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Sample records for disease-like pathological features

  1. Memantine Attenuates Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Pathology and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaochuan; Blanchard, Julie; Iqbal, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of protein phosphatase-2A is a key event in Alzheimer’s disease. An endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase-2A, inhibitor-1, I1PP2A, which inhibits the phosphatase activity by interacting with its catalytic subunit protein phosphatase-2Ac, is known to be upregulated in Alzheimer’s disease brain. In the present study, we overexpressed I1PP2A by intracerebroventricular injection with adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A in Wistar rats. The I1PP2A rats showed a decrease in brain protein phosphatase-2A activity, abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, neurodegeneration, an increase in the level of activated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, enhanced expression of intraneuronal amyloid-beta and spatial reference memory deficit; littermates treated identically but with vector only, i.e., adeno-associated virus vector-1-enhanced GFP, served as a control. Treatment with memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist which is an approved drug for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, rescued protein phosphatase-2A activity by decreasing its demethylation at Leu309 selectively and attenuated Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology and cognitive impairment in adeno-associated virus vector-1-I1PP2A rats. These findings provide new clues into the possible mechanism of the beneficial therapeutic effect of memantine in Alzheimer’s disease patients. PMID:26697860

  2. Neutrophils promote Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive decline via LFA-1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Zenaro, Elena; Pietronigro, Enrica; Della Bianca, Vittorina; Piacentino, Gennj; Marongiu, Laura; Budui, Simona; Turano, Ermanna; Rossi, Barbara; Angiari, Stefano; Dusi, Silvia; Montresor, Alessio; Carlucci, Tommaso; Nanì, Sara; Tosadori, Gabriele; Calciano, Lucia; Catalucci, Daniele; Berton, Giorgio; Bonetti, Bruno; Constantin, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and innate immune cells have been shown to contribute to disease pathogenesis. In two transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease (5xFAD and 3xTg-AD mice), neutrophils extravasated and were present in areas with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits, where they released neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and IL-17. Aβ42 peptide triggered the LFA-1 integrin high-affinity state and rapid neutrophil adhesion to integrin ligands. In vivo, LFA-1 integrin controlled neutrophil extravasation into the CNS and intraparenchymal motility. In transgenic Alzheimer's disease models, neutrophil depletion or inhibition of neutrophil trafficking via LFA-1 blockade reduced Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology and improved memory in mice already showing cognitive dysfunction. Temporary depletion of neutrophils for 1 month at early stages of disease led to sustained improvements in memory. Transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice lacking LFA-1 were protected from cognitive decline and had reduced gliosis. In humans with Alzheimer's disease, neutrophils adhered to and spread inside brain venules and were present in the parenchyma, along with NETs. Our results demonstrate that neutrophils contribute to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and cognitive impairment and suggest that the inhibition of neutrophil trafficking may be beneficial in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26214837

  3. Familial Prion Disease with Alzheimer Disease-Like Tau Pathology and Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nochlin, David; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Mastrianni, James A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Bird, Thomas D.; Leverenz, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the Alzheimer disease (AD)-like clinical and pathological features, including marked neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) pathology, of a familial prion disease due to a rare nonsense mutation of the prion gene (PRNP). Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments were available for the proband and her mother. After death, both underwent neuropathological evaluation. PRNP was sequenced after failure to find immunopositive Aβ deposits in the proband and the documentation of prion protein (PrP) immunopositive pathology. Results The proband presented at age 42 years with a 3-year history of progressive short-term memory impairment and depression. Neuropsychological testing found impaired memory performance, with relatively preserved attention and construction. She was diagnosed with AD and died at age 47 years. Neuropathologic evaluation revealed extensive limbic and neocortical NFT formation and neuritic plaques consistent with a Braak stage of VI. The NFTs were immunopositive, with multiple tau antibodies, and electron microscopy revealed paired helical filaments. However, the neuritic plaques were immunonegative for Aβ, whereas immunostaining for PrP was positive. The mother of the proband had a similar presentation, including depression, and had been diagnosed clinically and pathologically as AD. Reevaluation of her brain tissue confirmed similar tau and PrP immunostaining findings. Genetic analysis revealed that both the proband and her mother had a rare PRNP mutation (Q160X) that resulted in the production of truncated PrP. Interpretation We suggest that PRNP mutations that result in a truncation of PrP lead to a prolonged clinical course consistent with a clinical diagnosis of AD and severe AD-like NFTs. PMID:21416485

  4. Alzheimer's disease-like pathology has transient effects on the brain and blood metabolome.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaobei; Nasaruddin, Muhammad Bin; Elliott, Christopher T; McGuinness, Bernadette; Passmore, Anthony P; Kehoe, Patrick G; Hölscher, Christian; McClean, Paula L; Graham, Stewart F; Green, Brian D

    2016-02-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex involving multiple contributing factors. The extent to which AD pathology affects the metabolome is still not understood nor is it known how disturbances change as the disease progresses. For the first time, we have profiled longitudinally (6, 8, 10, 12, and 18 months) both the brain and plasma metabolome of APPswe/PS1deltaE9 double transgenic and wild-type mice. A total of 187 metabolites were quantified using a targeted metabolomic methodology. Multivariate statistical analysis produced models that distinguished APPswe/PS1deltaE9 from wild-type mice at 8, 10, and 12 months. Metabolic pathway analysis found perturbed polyamine metabolism in both brain and blood plasma. There were other disturbances in essential amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, and also in the neurotransmitter serotonin. Pronounced imbalances in phospholipid and acylcarnitine homeostasis were evident in 2 age groups. AD-like pathology, therefore, affects greatly on both the brain and blood metabolomes, although there appears to be a clear temporal sequence whereby changes to brain metabolites precede those in blood. PMID:26827653

  5. Impact of peripheral myeloid cells on amyloid-β pathology in Alzheimer's disease-like mice.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R; Drost, Natalia; Handrick, Susann; Mathur, Vidhu; Luo, Jian; Wegner, Anja; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Heppner, Frank L

    2015-10-19

    Although central nervous system-resident microglia are believed to be ineffective at phagocytosing and clearing amyloid-β (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), it has been suggested that peripheral myeloid cells constitute a heterogeneous cell population with greater Aβ-clearing capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the conditional ablation of resident microglia in CD11b-HSVTK (TK) mice is followed by a rapid repopulation of the brain by peripherally derived myeloid cells. We used this system to directly assess the ability of peripheral macrophages to reduce Aβ plaque pathology and therefore depleted and replaced the pool of resident microglia with peripherally derived myeloid cells in Aβ-carrying APPPS1 mice crossed to TK mice (APPPS1;TK). Despite a nearly complete exchange of resident microglia with peripheral myeloid cells, there was no significant change in Aβ burden or APP processing in APPPS1;TK mice. Importantly, however, newly recruited peripheral myeloid cells failed to cluster around Aβ deposits. Even additional anti-Aβ antibody treatment aimed at engaging myeloid cells with amyloid plaques neither directed peripherally derived myeloid cells to amyloid plaques nor altered Aβ burden. These data demonstrate that mere recruitment of peripheral myeloid cells to the brain is insufficient in substantially clearing Aβ burden and suggest that specific additional triggers appear to be required to exploit the full potential of myeloid cell-based therapies for AD. PMID:26458768

  6. Stress acts cumulatively to precipitate Alzheimer's disease-like tau pathology and cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, Ioannis; Catania, Caterina; Pinto, Lucilia G; Silva, Rui; Pollerberg, G Elizabeth; Takashima, Akihiko; Sousa, Nuno; Almeida, Osborne F X

    2011-05-25

    Stressful life experiences are likely etiological factors in sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Many AD patients hypersecrete glucocorticoids (GCs), and their GC levels correlate with the rate of cognitive impairment and extent of neuronal atrophy. Severity of cognitive deficits in AD correlates strongly with levels of hyperphosphorylated forms of the cytoskeletal protein TAU, an essential mediator of the actions of amyloid β (Aβ), another molecule with a key pathogenic role in AD. Our objective was to investigate the sequential interrelationships between these various pathogenic elements, in particular with respect to the mechanisms through which stress might precipitate cognitive decline. We thus examined whether stress, through the mediation of GCs, influences TAU hyperphosphorylation, a critical and early event in the cascade of processes leading to AD pathology. Results from healthy, wild-type, middle-aged rats show that chronic stress and GC induce abnormal hyperphosphorylation of TAU in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC), with contemporaneous impairments of hippocampus- and PFC-dependent behaviors. Exogenous GC potentiated the ability of centrally infused Aβ to induce hyperphosphorylation of TAU epitopes associated with AD and cytoplasmic accumulation of TAU, while previous exposure to stress aggravated the biochemical and behavioral effects of GC in Aβ-infused animals. Thus, lifetime stress/GC exposure may have a cumulative impact on the onset and progress of AD pathology, with TAU hyperphosphorylation serving to transduce the negative effects of stress and GC on cognition. PMID:21613497

  7. Amyloid accumulation is a late event in sporadic Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in nontransgenic rats

    PubMed Central

    Stefanova, Natalia A.; Muraleva, Natalia A.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Kiseleva, Elena; Maksimova, Kseniya Yi.; Kolosova, Nataliya G.

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis posits that deposition of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a key event in the initiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nonetheless, it now seems increasingly unlikely that amyloid toxicity is the cause of sporadic AD, which leads to cognitive decline. Here, using accelerated-senescence nontransgenic OXYS rats, we confirmed that aggregation of Aβ is a later event in AD-like pathology. We showed that an age-dependent increase in the levels of Aβ1–42 and extracellular Aβ deposits in the brain of OXYS rats occur later than do synaptic losses, neuronal cell death, mitochondrial structural abnormalities, and hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein. We identified the variants of the genes that are strongly associated with the risk of either late-onset or early-onset AD, including App, Apoe4, Bace1, Psen1, Psen2, and Picalm. We found that in OXYS rats nonsynonymous SNPs were located only in the genes Casp3 and Sorl1. Thus, we present proof that OXYS rats may be a model of sporadic AD. It is possible that multiple age-associated pathological processes may precede the toxic amyloid accumulation, which in turn triggers the final stage of the sporadic form of AD and becomes a hallmark event of the disease. PMID:25595891

  8. HIV-1 Tat Contributes to Alzheimer's Disease-like Pathology in PSAPP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Giunta, Brian; Hou, Houyan; Zhu, Yuyan; Rrapo, Elona; Tian, Jun; Takashi, Mori; Commins, Deborah; Singer, Elyse; He, Johnny; Fernandez, Francisco; Tan, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of HIV-associated cognitive impairment is rising. Amyloid-beta (A-beta) plaque deposition in the brain may be a contributing factor as epidemiological data suggests significant numbers of long-term HIV survivors are at elevated risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). HIV-1 Tat-induced A-beta deposition, tau phosphorylation, and subsequent neuronal death could be risk factors for subsequent AD and/or HIV-related cognitive impairment. To mimic this clinical condition, we generated mice with HIV-1 Tat-induced AD-like pathology. We first performed a short-term Doxycycline (dox) dosing (54, 108, and 216 mg/kg/day) study in transgenic mice whose astrocytes express HIV-1 Tat via activation of a GFAP/dox-inducible promoter. After one week, mouse brains were examined histologically and the expression of Bcl-xL, Bax, and phospho-tau was investigated by Western blotting. We next cross-bred these mice with the PSAPP mouse model of AD. To simulate chronic Tat secretion over periods longer than one week, we used an optimized dose of 54 mg/kg/day on a biweekly basis over three months; based on the initial dose ranging study in the Tat transgenic mice. This was followed by antisera detection of A-beta, and Western blot for phospho-tau, Bcl-xL, and Bax. Tat significantly induced neuron degeneration and tau phosphorylation in Tat transgenic mice, dox dependently (P<0.001) with the most robust effects at the 216 mg/kg/day dose. In the long term study, similar effects at the chronic 54 mg/kg/day dose were observed in PSAPP/Tat mice induced with dox. These mice also showed significantly more A-beta deposition (P < 0.05), neurodegeneration, neuronal apoptotic signaling, and phospho-tau than PSAPP mice (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HIV-1 Tat significantly promotes AD-like pathology in PSAPP/Tat mice. This model may provide a framework in which to identify new mechanisms involved in cognitive impairment in the HIV infected population, and possible treatments. Additional works

  9. Treadmill exercise prevents learning and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Dao, An T; Zagaar, Munder A; Levine, Amber T; Salim, Samina; Eriksen, Jason L; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by progressive memory loss. In contrast, accumulating evidence suggests a neuroprotective role of regular exercise in aging associated memory impairment. In this study, we investigated the ability of regular exercise to prevent impairments of short-term memory (STM) and early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in area CA1 of the hippocampus in a rat model of AD (i.c.v. infusion of 250 pmol/day Aβ1-42 peptides). We utilized behavioral assessment, in vivo electrophysiological recording, and immunoblotting in 4 groups of adult Wistar rats: control, treadmill exercise (Ex), β-amyloid-infused (Aβ), and amyloid-infused/treadmill exercised (Ex/Aβ). Our findings indicated that Aβ rats made significantly more errors in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) compared to all other groups and exhibited suppressed E-LTP in area CA1, which correlated with deleterious alterations in the levels of memory and E-LTP-related signaling molecules including calcineurin (PP2B), brain derivedneurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated CaMKII (p-CaMKII). Compared to controls, Ex and Ex/Aβ rats showed a similar behavioral performance and a normal E-LTP with no detrimental changes in the levels of PP2B, BDNF, and p- CaMKII. We conclude that treadmill exercise maybe able to prevent cognitive impairment associated with AD pathology. PMID:23627709

  10. Neural stem cell transplantation enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Gu, Guo-Jun; Shen, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Gang-Min; Wang, Pei-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, especially a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis, is an early and prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that the number of mitochondria is significantly reduced in susceptible hippocampal neurons from AD patients. Neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation in AD-like mice can compensate for the neuronal loss resulting from amyloid-beta protein deposition. The effects of NSC transplantation on mitochondrial biogenesis and cognitive function in AD-like mice, however, are poorly understood. In this study, we injected NSCs or vehicle into 12-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 transgenic mice, a mouse model of AD-like pathology. The effects of NSC transplantation on cognitive function, the amount of mitochondrial DNA, the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondria-related proteins, and mitochondrial morphology were investigated. Our results show that in NSC-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-NSC) mice, the cognitive function, number of mitochondria, and expression of mitochondria-related proteins, specifically the mitochondrial fission factors (dynamin-related protein 1 [Drp1] and fission 1 [Fis1]) and the mitochondrial fusion factor optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), were significantly increased compared with those in age-matched vehicle-injected APP/PS1 (Tg-Veh) mice, whereas the expression of mitochondrial fusion factors mitofusion 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2 was significantly decreased. These data indicate that NSC transplantation may enhance mitochondria biogenesis and further rescue cognitive deficits in AD-like mice. PMID:25582749

  11. Cotinine halts the advance of Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and associated depressive-like behavior in Tg6799 mice

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sagar; Grizzell, J. Alex; Holmes, Rosalee; Zeitlin, Ross; Solomon, Rosalynn; Sutton, Thomas L.; Rohani, Adeeb; Charry, Laura C.; Iarkov, Alexandre; Mori, Takashi; Echeverria Moran, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms for which there are currently no effective therapies. We have previously reported that cotinine, a natural product obtained from tobacco leaves, prevented memory loss and diminished amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque pathology in transgenic 6799 mice (Tg6799 mice) when treated prior to the development of the pathology. We have also shown that cotinine reduces depressive-like behavior in normal and chronically stressed C57BL/6 mice. Here, we extend our previous studies by investigating the effects of cotinine on the progression of AD-like pathology, depressive-like behavior, and the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects in Tg6799 mice when left untreated until after a more advanced stage of the disease's development. The results show that vehicle-treated Tg6799 mice displayed an accentuated loss of working memory and an abundant Aβ plaque pathology that were accompanied by higher levels of depressive-like behavior as compared to control littermates. By contrast, prolonged daily cotinine treatment to Tg6799 mice, withheld until after a mid-level progression of AD-like pathology, reduced Aβ levels/plaques and depressive-like behavior. Moreover, this treatment paradigm dramatically improved working memory as compared to control littermates. The beneficial effects of cotinine were accompanied by an increase in the expression of the active form of protein kinase B and the postsynaptic density protein 95 in the hippocampi and frontal cortices of Tg6799 mice. This suggests that cotinine halts the progression of AD-like pathology while reducing depressive-like behavior by stimulating signaling pathways supporting synaptic plasticity in Tg6799 mice. The potential use of cotinine to treat cognitive and non-cognitive symptoms of AD is discussed. PMID:25100990

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy

  13. Pathological features of polyneuropathy in three dogs.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Masaya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Ide, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Mizue; Inagaki, Takehiko; Tamura, Shinji; Saito, Miyoko; Chambers, James K; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Canine polyneuropathy is a neurological disorder characterized by a dysfunction of multiple peripheral nerves. The etiology of the disease is diverse; it may occur in cases of infectious, immune-mediated, or hereditary conditions or in association with endocrinopathy, neoplasm, or chemical intoxication. It is often difficult to determine the etiology through clinical symptoms. The aim of this study is to investigate pathological differences among three canine polyneuropathy cases with each presumably having a different etiology. Cases included a 13-month-old female border collie (Dog No.1), a 21-month-old male chihuahua (Dog No.2) and an 11-year-old male beagle (Dog No.3). Clinical examinations revealed hindlimb ataxia and sensory loss in Dog No.1, forelimb paralysis and vertebral pain in Dog No.2, and paddling-gait and hypothyroidism in Dog No.3. Histopathologically, axonal swelling and pale myelin were observed in Dog No.1. Giant axons mimicking giant axonal neuropathy were obvious in Dog No.2. Dog No.3 showed atrophic axons and severe interstitial edema. Distributions of peripheral nerve lesions coincided with respective clinical symptoms. According to their clinical and pathological features, Dogs No.1 and No.2 were suspected of hereditary polyneuropathy, while Dog No.3 seemed to have hypothyroidism-associated polyneuropathy. As each case demonstrated unique pathological features, different pathogeneses of peripheral nerve dysfunction were suggested. PMID:23123885

  14. Neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) slows down Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Rat, Dorothea; Schmitt, Ulrich; Tippmann, Frank; Dewachter, Ilse; Theunis, Clara; Wieczerzak, Ewa; Postina, Rolf; van Leuven, Fred; Fahrenholz, Falk; Kojro, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties and is a potent α-secretase activator. As PACAP peptides and their specific receptor PAC1 are localized in central nervous system areas affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD), this study aims to examine the role of the natural peptide PACAP as a valuable approach in AD therapy. We investigated the effect of PACAP in the brain of an AD transgenic mouse model. The long-term intranasal daily PACAP application stimulated the nonamyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and increased expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. In addition, it caused a strong reduction of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mRNA level. PACAP, by activation of the somatostatin-neprilysin cascade, also enhanced expression of the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin in the mouse brain. Furthermore, daily PAC1-receptor activation via PACAP resulted in an increased mRNA level of both the PAC1 receptor and its ligand PACAP. Our behavioral studies showed that long-term PACAP treatment of APP[V717I]-transgenic mice improved cognitive function in animals. Thus, nasal application of PACAP was effective, and our results indicate that PACAP could be of therapeutic value in treating AD.—Rat, D., Schmitt, U., Tippmann, F., Dewachter, I., Theunis, C., Wieczerzak, E, Postina, R., van Leuven, F., Fahrenholz, F., Kojro, E. Neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) slows down Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice. PMID:21593432

  15. Pathological features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Pomerance, Ariela; Teare, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The macroscopic features of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy are variable. The most easily recognized picture is of disproportionate and asymmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy with a small ventricular volume. Symmetrical ventricular hypertrophy also occurs and dilatation of the ventricular cavity may lead to a configuration more usually associated with congestive cardiomyopathy. Papillary muscle involvement leads to a bullet shape, often retained even when the ventricle dilates. Eighteen of the hearts showed a distinctive band of fibrous thickening below the aortic valve. This was a mirror image of the free edge of the anterior mitral cusp, had the microscopic features of an endocardial friction lesion, and was clearly the morphological expression of the systolic contact between cusp and septum seen on cineangiography. This band is characteristic of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy; it was more common in older patients and is of particular diagnostic value in cases with symmetrical hypertrophy, including those with dilated ventricular cavities. Sudden death was the commonest presentation in the younger cases but in several cases over 60 years at death hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy was an incidental necropsy finding. Images PMID:4472994

  16. Objective Pathological Voice Quality Assessment Based on HOS Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Yeoun; Jeong, Sangbae; Choi, Hong-Shik; Hahn, Minsoo

    This work proposes new features to improve the pathological voice quality classification performance. They are the means, the variances, and the perturbations of the higher-order statistics (HOS) such as the skewness and the kurtosis. The HOS-based features show meaningful differences among normal, grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3 voices classified in the GRBAS scale. The jitter, the shimmer, the harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR), and the variance of the short-time energy are utilized as the conventional features. The performances are measured by the classification and regression tree (CART) method. Specifically, the CART-based method by utilizing both the conventional features and the HOS-based ones shows its effectiveness in the pathological voice quality measurement, with the classification accuracy of 87.8%.

  17. Chronic Noise Exposure Acts Cumulatively to Exacerbate Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Amyloid-β Pathology and Neuroinflammation in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Bo; Li, Kang; Gai, Zhihui; She, Xiaojun; Zhang, Na; Xu, Chuanxiang; Chen, Xuewei; An, Gaihong; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    A putative etiological association exists between noise exposure and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is thought to be one of the primary initiating factors in AD. It has been further suggested that subsequent dysregulation of Aβ may play a mechanistic role in the AD-like pathophysiology associated with noise exposure. Here, we used ELISA, immunoblotting, cytokine arrays, and RT-PCR, to examine both hippocampal Aβ pathology and neuroinflammation in rats at different time points after noise exposure. We found that chronic noise exposure significantly accelerated the progressive overproduction of Aβ, which persisted for 7 to 14 days after the cessation of exposure. This effect was accompanied by up-regulated expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleavage enzymes, β- and γ-secretases. Cytokine analysis revealed that chronic noise exposure increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and the receptor for advanced glycation end products, while decreasing the expression of activin A and platelet-derived growth factor- AA. Furthermore, we found persistent elevations of glial fibrillary acidic protein and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 expression that closely corresponded to the noise-induced increases in Aβ and neuroinflammation. These studies suggest that lifelong environmental noise exposure may have cumulative effects on the onset and development of AD. PMID:26251361

  18. Memantine combined with environmental enrichment improves spatial memory and alleviates Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in senescence-accelerated prone-8 (SAMP8) mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jingde; Zhou, Mi; Wu, Xiaoqiang; Du, Mingyang; Wang, Xiaoshan

    2012-01-01

    Memantine is a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist approved for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD). Environmental enrichment (EE) has shown significant beneficial effects on functional improvement in AD. In this study, we sought to determine whether combining these two distinct therapies would yield greater benefit than either drug used alone. We investigated the effect of memantine combined with EE on spatial learning and memory and AD-like pathology in a widely used AD model, the senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8). The SAMP8 mice were randomly assigned to enriched housing (EH) or standard housing (SH), where either memantine (20 mg/kg) or saline was given by gastric lavage once daily continuously for eight weeks. Our results showed that, when provided separately, memantine and EE significantly improved spatial learning and memory by shortening escape latencies and increasing the frequency of entrance into the target quadrant. When combined, memantine and EE showed additive effect on learning and memory as evidenced by significant shorter escape latencies and higher frequency of target entrance than either drug alone. Consistent with the behavior results, pathological studies showed that both memantine and EE significantly reduced hippocampal CA1 neurofibrilliary tangles (NFTs) as well as amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) levels. Combining both therapies synergistically lessened NFTs and APP expression compared to either drug alone in SAMP8 mice, indicating that the combination of memantine with EE could offer a novel and efficient therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. PMID:23554783

  19. Intramuscular delivery of p75NTR ectodomain by an AAV vector attenuates cognitive deficits and Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Hua; Wang, Ye-Ran; Zhang, Tao; Jiao, Shu-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Hui; Zeng, Fan; Li, Jing; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    The neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR) is a receptor for amyloid-beta (Aβ) and mediates Aβ-induced neurodegenerative signals. The ectodomain of p75NTR (p75ECD) is a physiological protective factor against Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously demonstrated that the shedding of p75ECD from the cell surface is down-regulated in AD brains and restoration of the p75ECD level in the brain, through intracranial administration of p75ECD by adeno-associated virus vectors, attenuates AD-like pathologies in an AD mouse model. In this study, we further investigated the feasibility and efficacy of peripheral administration of AAV-p75ECD on brain amyloid burden and associated pathogenesis. We found that intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD increased the level of p75ECD in the blood, significantly improved the behavioral phenotype of amyloid precursor protein/PS1 transgenic mice, and reduced brain amyloid burden, attenuated Tau hyperphosphorylation, and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD was well tolerated. Our results indicate that peripheral delivery of p75ECD represents a safe and effective therapeutic strategy for AD. The ectodomain of p75NTR (p75ECD) is a physiological protective factor against amyloid-beta (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Intramuscular delivery of AAV-p75ECD increased the p75ECD levels in the blood, reduced brain amyloid burden through a 'peripheral sink' mechanism and alleviates AD-type pathologies. Peripheral delivery of p75ECD represents a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:26991827

  20. Selecting Disorder-Specific Features for Speech Pathology Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Visar; Sandoval, Steven; Utianski, Rene; Liss, Julie; Spanias, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The general aim of this work is to learn a unique statistical signature for the state of a particular speech pathology. We pose this as a speaker identification problem for dysarthric individuals. To that end, we propose a novel algorithm for feature selection that aims to minimize the effects of speaker-specific features (e.g., fundamental frequency) and maximize the effects of pathology-specific features (e.g., vocal tract distortions and speech rhythm). We derive a cost function for optimizing feature selection that simultaneously trades off between these two competing criteria. Furthermore, we develop an efficient algorithm that optimizes this cost function and test the algorithm on a set of 34 dysarthric and 13 healthy speakers. Results show that the proposed method yields a set of features related to the speech disorder and not an individual's speaking style. When compared to other feature-selection algorithms, the proposed approach results in an improvement in a disorder fingerprinting task by selecting features that are specific to the disorder. PMID:25005047

  1. Selecting Disorder-Specific Features for Speech Pathology Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Berisha, Visar; Sandoval, Steven; Utianski, Rene; Liss, Julie; Spanias, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The general aim of this work is to learn a unique statistical signature for the state of a particular speech pathology. We pose this as a speaker identification problem for dysarthric individuals. To that end, we propose a novel algorithm for feature selection that aims to minimize the effects of speaker-specific features (e.g., fundamental frequency) and maximize the effects of pathology-specific features (e.g., vocal tract distortions and speech rhythm). We derive a cost function for optimizing feature selection that simultaneously trades off between these two competing criteria. Furthermore, we develop an efficient algorithm that optimizes this cost function and test the algorithm on a set of 34 dysarthric and 13 healthy speakers. Results show that the proposed method yields a set of features related to the speech disorder and not an individual's speaking style. When compared to other feature-selection algorithms, the proposed approach results in an improvement in a disorder fingerprinting task by selecting features that are specific to the disorder. PMID:25005047

  2. Clinical and Pathologic Features of Secondary Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Amy S.; Aoki, Joseph; Levis, Mark; Cowan, Kathleen; Gocke, Christopher D.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Vuica-Ross, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a relatively common form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that has an excellent prognosis. In contrast, secondary acute myeloid leukemias, including therapy-related AML and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes, have a relatively poor prognosis. We identified 9 cases of APL at our institution in which there was a history of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chronic immunosuppression, or antecedent myelodysplastic syndrome. The clinical and pathologic findings in these cases of secondary APL were compared with the clinical and pathologic findings in cases of de novo APL. We found that secondary and de novo APL had abnormal promyelocytes with similar morphologic and immunophenotypic features, comparable cytogenetic findings, comparable rates of FMS-like tyrosine kinase mutations, and similar rates of recurrent disease and death. These data suggest that secondary APL is similar to de novo APL and, thus, should be considered distinct from other secondary acute myeloid neoplasms. PMID:22338051

  3. Retroperitoneal nodular fasciitis: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Meduri; Zuiani; Del Frate C; Bazzocchi

    1998-07-01

    A case of pelvic nodular fasciitis, with particular reference to its peculiar radiological and pathological features is described. Only a few cases of pelvic nodular fasciitis are reported in the English literature and at the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of retroperitoneal origin. This report discusses the role of MRI in the characterization of soft tissue masses. No specific MRI findings of nodular fasciitis were identified and MRI doesn't add any contribution to the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant lesions. As a consequence, the histopathological examination is necessary for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:10358366

  4. Pathologic features of pediatric head and neck melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tcheung, Win Janet; Nelson, Kelly; Aldabagh, Bishr; Puja, Puri

    2013-01-01

    Although malignant melanoma is rare in children, its incidence is steadily increasing, and it is potentially lethal. Few studies have examined head and neck melanoma in children, and even fewer have focused on the histopathologic features of melanoma within this anatomic region. To further the understanding of this entity, we examined pathology specimens from nine subjects age 18 years and younger with an original diagnosis of head or neck melanoma. The anatomic locations of these primary melanomas were the face and nose (n = 4), scalp and neck (n = 4), and ear (n = 1). The cases included seven superficial spreading melanomas, one unclassified (possible nodular) melanoma, and one melanoma in situ. No melanomas demonstrating desmoplastic or spindle cell morphologies were noted upon review. Breslow depth ranged from 0 to 2.9 mm (mean 1.3 mm, median 0.6 mm), with Clark level ranging from I to V. Pagetoid scatter was found in eight cases. Other notable features included regression (n = 5), ulceration (n = 1), and associated melanocytic nevus (n = 4). We did not observe any small cell variants; all nine cases had an epithelioid appearance. Nor was any melanoma-associated mortality observed at last follow-up (mean 60.4 mos, median 48 mos, range 2-174 mos). These histopathologic features were consistent with adult-type melanoma, which is in agreement with other histopathologic studies of melanoma in children. PMID:23627731

  5. Hyperphosphatemic Familial Tumoral Calcinosis: Odontostomatologic Management and Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Favia, Gianfranco; Lacaita, Maria Grazia; Limongelli, Luisa; Tempesta, Angela; Laforgia, Nicola; Cazzolla, Angela Pia; Maiorano, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 9 Final Diagnosis: Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Ortopantomography Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare disease Background: Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is to a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cutaneous and sub-cutaneous calcified masses, usually adjacent to large joints. The aim of the current study was to report on the clinico-pathological features of a patient with HFCT, with emphasis on alterations in the jawbones and teeth and the subsequent therapeutic interventions. Case Report: A 13-year-old male patient with HFTC diagnosis came to our attention for dental anomalies and maxillary and mandibular hypoplasia. OPT highlighted multiple impacted teeth, short and bulbous teeth, and pulp chamber and canal obliterations. Lateral cephalometric radiograms pointed out retrusion of both jaws, skeletal class II malocclusion, and deep-bite. He underwent orthopedic, orthodontic, conservative, and surgical treatments, allowing the correction of maxillo-facial and dental abnormalities and dysmorphisms without adverse effects. The surgical samples were sent for conventional and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) histopathological examination, which highlighted several metaplastic micro- and macro-calcifications in the soft tissues, and typical islands of homogenous, non-tubular, dentino-osteoid calcified structures in dentinal tissues. Conclusions: The management of maxillo-facial abnormalities in patients affected by HFTC is very difficult and, requires a combined therapeutic approach. To date, very few indications have been published in the literature. PMID:25537063

  6. Manipulations of the features of standard video lottery terminal (VLT) games: effects in pathological and non-pathological gamblers.

    PubMed

    Loba, P; Stewart, S H; Klein, R M; Blackburn, J R

    2001-01-01

    The present study was conducted to identify game parameters that would reduce the risk of abuse of video lottery terminals (VLTs) by pathological gamblers, while exerting minimal effects on the behavior of non-pathological gamblers. Three manipulations of standard VLT game features were explored. Participants were exposed to: a counter which displayed a running total of money spent; a VLT spinning reels game where participants could no longer "stop" the reels by touching the screen; and sensory feature manipulations. In control conditions, participants were exposed to standard settings for either a spinning reels or a video poker game. Dependent variables were self-ratings of reactions to each set of parameters. A set of 2(3) x 2 x 2 (game manipulation [experimental condition(s) vs. control condition] x game [spinning reels vs. video poker] x gambler status [pathological vs. non-pathological]) repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted on all dependent variables. The findings suggest that the sensory manipulations (i.e., fast speed/sound or slow speed/no sound manipulations) produced the most robust reaction differences. Before advocating harm reduction policies such as lowering sensory features of VLT games to reduce potential harm to pathological gamblers, it is important to replicate findings in a more naturalistic setting, such as a real bar. PMID:11842526

  7. A new feature constituting approach to detection of vocal fold pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, M.; Polat, Kemal; Yaacob, Sazali

    2014-08-01

    In the last two decades, non-invasive methods through acoustic analysis of voice signal have been proved to be excellent and reliable tool to diagnose vocal fold pathologies. This paper proposes a new feature vector based on the wavelet packet transform and singular value decomposition for the detection of vocal fold pathology. k-means clustering based feature weighting is proposed to increase the distinguishing performance of the proposed features. In this work, two databases Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) voice disorders database and MAPACI speech pathology database are used. Four different supervised classifiers such as k-nearest neighbour (k-NN), least-square support vector machine, probabilistic neural network and general regression neural network are employed for testing the proposed features. The experimental results uncover that the proposed features give very promising classification accuracy of 100% for both MEEI database and MAPACI speech pathology database.

  8. Clinical and pathological features of an autosomal recessive neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, T W; Riley, E; Hall, C D; Swift, M

    1980-06-01

    Two siblings are described, ages 49 and 45 years, having a distinct hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) with severe peroneal nerve involvement. The neuropathic symptoms began in childhood. Both patients have sensorineural deafness. The proband was found to have a cardiac conduction abnormality in the absence of known ischemic heart disease. Electrodiagnostic studies were consistent with a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The presence of parental consanguinity and absence of affected individuals in succeeding or preceding generations suggested that the sensorimotor neuropathy in this family is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The sural nerve of the proband had significant loss of myelinated fibers and demyelination but few regenerating myelinated fibers and no onion-bulbs. The pathological findings, while nonspecific, are not characteristic of the hypertrophic, neuronal or intermediate types of HMSN. PMID:6247456

  9. Clinical and pathological features of alcohol-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    Zahr, Natalie M; Kaufman, Kimberley L; Harper, Clive G

    2011-05-01

    One of the sequelae of chronic alcohol abuse is malnutrition. Importantly, a deficiency in thiamine (vitamin B(1)) can result in the acute, potentially reversible neurological disorder Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). When WE is recognized, thiamine treatment can elicit a rapid clinical recovery. If WE is left untreated, however, patients can develop Korsakoff syndrome (KS), a severe neurological disorder characterized by anterograde amnesia. Alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD) describes the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on human brain structure and function in the absence of more discrete and well-characterized neurological concomitants of alcoholism such as WE and KS. Through knowledge of both the well-described changes in brain structure and function that are evident in alcohol-related disorders such as WE and KS and the clinical outcomes associated with these changes, researchers have begun to gain a better understanding of ARBD. This Review examines ARBD from the perspective of WE and KS, exploring the clinical presentations, postmortem brain pathology, in vivo MRI findings and potential molecular mechanisms associated with these conditions. An awareness of the consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on human behavior and brain structure can enable clinicians to improve detection and treatment of ARBD. PMID:21487421

  10. Compulsive features in behavioral addictions: the case of pathological gambling

    PubMed Central

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Mudry, Tanya; Zohar, Joseph; Tavares, Hermano; Potenza, Marc N.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To describe, in the context of DSM-V, how a focus on addiction and compulsion is emerging in the consideration of pathological gambling (PG). Methods A systematic literature review of evidence for the proposed re-classification of PG as an addiction. Results Findings include: 1. Phenomenological models of addiction highlighting a motivational shift from impulsivity to compulsivity associated with a protracted withdrawal syndrome and blurring of the ego-syntonic/ego-dystonic dichotomy; 2. Common neurotransmitter (dopamine, serotonin) contributions to PG and substance use disorders (SUDs); 3. Neuroimaging support for shared neurocircuitries between “behavioral” and substance addictions and differences between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), impulse control disorders (ICDs) and SUDs; 4. Genetic findings more closely related to endophenotypic constructs like compulsivity and impulsivity than to psychiatric disorders; 5. Psychological measures such as harm avoidance identifying a closer association between SUDs and PG than with OCD; 6. Community and pharmaco-therapeutic trials data supporting a closer association between SUDs and PG than with OCD. Adapted behavioral therapies, such as exposure therapy appear applicable to OCD, PG, or SUDs, suggesting some commonalities across disorders. Conclusions PG shares more similarities with SUDs than with OCD. Similar to the investigation of impulsivity, studies of compulsivity hold promising insights concerning the course, differential diagnosis and treatment of PG, SUDs, and OCD. PMID:21985690

  11. Pathologic Features of Colorectal Inflammatory Polyps in Miniature Dachshunds.

    PubMed

    Uchida, E; Chambers, J K; Nakashima, K; Saito, T; Ohno, K; Tsujimoto, H; Nakayama, H; Uchida, K

    2016-07-01

    The histopathologic characteristics of colorectal inflammatory polyps that formed in Miniature Dachshunds were compared with those of other colorectal proliferative lesions, including adenomas and adenocarcinomas. Fifty-three colorectal polypoid lesions were histopathologically classified into inflammatory polyps (26 cases), adenoma (18 cases), and adenocarcinoma (9 cases). All 26 dogs that were diagnosed with inflammatory polyps were Miniature Dachshunds, indicating that colorectal inflammatory polyps exhibit a marked predilection for this breed. The inflammatory polyps had complex histopathologic features and were classified into 3 stages based on their epithelial composition. In early stage (stage 1), the polyps tended to exhibit a thickened mucosa containing hyperplastic goblet cells, dilated crypts filled with a large amount of mucus, and mild lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration. In later stages (stages 2 and 3), more severe neutrophil infiltration, interstitial mucus accumulation, granulation tissue, and occasional osteoid tissue were seen. Also, a few small foci of dysplastic epithelial cells were detected. The hyperplastic goblet cells, which were a major component of the epithelium of the inflammatory polyps, were positive for cytokeratin 20 (CK20), while the dysplastic epithelial cells found in inflammatory polyps (stage 3) and the tumor cells of the adenomas and adenocarcinomas were negative for CK20. These CK20-negative epithelial cells exhibited cytoplasmic and nuclear immunoreactivity for beta-catenin. In addition, the epithelial cells in the inflammatory polyps demonstrated significantly higher cyclooxygenase 2 and fibroblast growth factor 2 expression than did those of the adenomas and adenocarcinomas, suggesting that the arachidonate cascade is involved in the development of colorectal inflammatory polyps in miniature dachshunds. PMID:26792840

  12. Representation of fluctuation features in pathological knee joint vibroarthrographic signals using kernel density modeling method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanshan; Cai, Suxian; Zheng, Fang; Wu, Yunfeng; Liu, Kaizhi; Wu, Meihong; Zou, Quan; Chen, Jian

    2014-10-01

    This article applies advanced signal processing and computational methods to study the subtle fluctuations in knee joint vibroarthrographic (VAG) signals. Two new features are extracted to characterize the fluctuations of VAG signals. The fractal scaling index parameter is computed using the detrended fluctuation analysis algorithm to describe the fluctuations associated with intrinsic correlations in the VAG signal. The averaged envelope amplitude feature measures the difference between the upper and lower envelopes averaged over an entire VAG signal. Statistical analysis with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test indicates that both of the fractal scaling index (p=0.0001) and averaged envelope amplitude (p=0.0001) features are significantly different between the normal and pathological signal groups. The bivariate Gaussian kernels are utilized for modeling the densities of normal and pathological signals in the two-dimensional feature space. Based on the feature densities estimated, the Bayesian decision rule makes better signal classifications than the least-squares support vector machine, with the overall classification accuracy of 88% and the area of 0.957 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Such VAG signal classification results are better than those reported in the state-of-the-art literature. The fluctuation features of VAG signals developed in the present study can provide useful information on the pathological conditions of degenerative knee joints. Classification results demonstrate the effectiveness of the kernel feature density modeling method for computer-aided VAG signal analysis. PMID:25096412

  13. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p < 0.0001), reddish (p = 0.0001), and smaller (p = 0.0095) lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm) and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p = 0.077, 0.0867, resp.). Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  14. Distinct Clinic-Pathological Features of Early Differentiated-Type Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Gastric cancer is discovered even after successful eradication of H. pylori. We investigated clinic pathological features of early gastric cancers after H. pylori eradication. Methods. 51 early gastric cancers (EGCs) from 44 patients diagnosed after successful H. pylori eradication were included as eradication group. The clinic-pathological features were compared with that of 131 EGCs from 120 patients who did not have a history of H. pylori eradication (control group). Results. Compared with control group, clinic-pathological features of eradication group were characterized as depressed (p < 0.0001), reddish (p = 0.0001), and smaller (p = 0.0095) lesions, which was also confirmed in the comparison of six metachronous lesions diagnosed after initial ESD and subsequent successful H. pylori eradication. Prevalence of both SM2 (submucosal invasion greater than 500 μm) and unexpected SM2 cases tended to be higher in eradication group (p = 0.077, 0.0867, resp.). Prevalence of inconclusive diagnosis of gastric cancer during pretreatment biopsy was also higher in the same group (26.0% versus 1.6%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Informative clinic pathological features of EGC after H. pylori eradication are depressed, reddish appearances, which should be treated as a caution because histological diagnosis of cancerous tissue is sometimes difficult by endoscopic biopsy. PMID:27212944

  15. A novel recombinant 6Aβ15-THc-C chimeric vaccine (rCV02) mitigates Alzheimer's disease-like pathology, cognitive decline and synaptic loss in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Liu, Si; Wang, Hai-Chao; Shi, Dan-Yang; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Pei-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs memory and cognition. Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) may be currently the most promising immunotherapeutic strategy for AD. In this study, a recombinant chimeric 6Aβ15-THc-C immunogen was formulated with alum adjuvant as a novel Aβ B-cell epitope candidate vaccine (rCV02) for AD. We examined its efficacy in preventing the cognitive deficit and synaptic impairment in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Using a toxin-derived carrier protein, the rCV02 vaccine elicited robust Aβ-specific antibodies that markedly reduced AD-like pathology and improved behavioral performance in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Along with the behavioral improvement in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice, rCV02 significantly decreased calpain activation concurrent with reduced soluble Aβ or oligomeric forms of Aβ, probably by preventing dynamin 1 and PSD-95 degradation. Our data support the hypothesis that reducing Aβ levels in rCV02-immunized AD mice increases the levels of presynaptic dynamin 1 and postsynaptic PSD-95 allowing functional recovery of cognition. In conclusion, this novel and highly immunogenic rCV02 shows promise as a new candidate prophylactic vaccine for AD and may be useful for generating rapid and strong Aβ-specific antibodies in AD patients with pre-existing memory Th cells generated after immunization with conventional tetanus toxoid vaccine. PMID:27255752

  16. A novel recombinant 6Aβ15-THc-C chimeric vaccine (rCV02) mitigates Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology, cognitive decline and synaptic loss in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Liu, Si; Wang, Hai-Chao; Shi, Dan-Yang; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Huang, Pei-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs memory and cognition. Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) may be currently the most promising immunotherapeutic strategy for AD. In this study, a recombinant chimeric 6Aβ15-THc-C immunogen was formulated with alum adjuvant as a novel Aβ B-cell epitope candidate vaccine (rCV02) for AD. We examined its efficacy in preventing the cognitive deficit and synaptic impairment in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Using a toxin-derived carrier protein, the rCV02 vaccine elicited robust Aβ-specific antibodies that markedly reduced AD-like pathology and improved behavioral performance in 3 × Tg-AD mice. Along with the behavioral improvement in aged 3 × Tg-AD mice, rCV02 significantly decreased calpain activation concurrent with reduced soluble Aβ or oligomeric forms of Aβ, probably by preventing dynamin 1 and PSD-95 degradation. Our data support the hypothesis that reducing Aβ levels in rCV02-immunized AD mice increases the levels of presynaptic dynamin 1 and postsynaptic PSD-95 allowing functional recovery of cognition. In conclusion, this novel and highly immunogenic rCV02 shows promise as a new candidate prophylactic vaccine for AD and may be useful for generating rapid and strong Aβ-specific antibodies in AD patients with pre-existing memory Th cells generated after immunization with conventional tetanus toxoid vaccine. PMID:27255752

  17. Preventing Eating Disorder Pathology: Common and Unique Features of Successful Eating Disorders Prevention Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ciao, Anna C.; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the field of eating disorders has made remarkable strides in identifying, evaluating, and disseminating successful prevention programs. The current review identifies and discusses nine distinct eating disorders prevention programs that reduce existing eating disorder pathology or prevent the onset of future pathology. Each program was evaluated in one or more controlled trial with a follow-up period of at least six months. We review the evidence base for these nine successful programs and discuss their common and unique features. Based on authors’ descriptions of their programs in published trials, we found that all programs were theory-driven, targeted one or more eating disorder risk factor (e.g., body dissatisfaction), were delivered across multiple group sessions, and included at least some interactive content. Most programs included content related to healthy eating/nutrition, media literacy/sociocultural pressures, and body acceptance/body satisfaction. Notably, there was wide variation in some participant features (e.g., participant age, sex, risk status) and intervention features (e.g., setting and format, length and dose, providers), suggesting that a variety of programs are beneficial in impacting eating disorder pathology. Implications and directions for future research are discussed, including an increased focus on universal and indicated prevention programs, expanding programs to a wider age range and a broader spectrum of weight-related problems, and rigorous evaluation of programs through efficacy, effectiveness, and implementation research. PMID:24821099

  18. Preventing eating disorder pathology: common and unique features of successful eating disorders prevention programs.

    PubMed

    Ciao, Anna C; Loth, Katie; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-07-01

    Over the past two decades, the field of eating disorders has made remarkable strides in identifying, evaluating, and disseminating successful prevention programs. The current review identifies and discusses nine distinct eating disorders prevention programs that reduce existing eating disorder pathology or prevent the onset of future pathology. Each program was evaluated in one or more controlled trial with a follow-up period of at least six months. We review the evidence base for these nine successful programs and discuss their common and unique features. Based on authors' descriptions of their programs in published trials, we found that all programs were theory-driven, targeted one or more eating disorder risk factor (e.g., body dissatisfaction), were delivered across multiple group sessions, and included at least some interactive content. Most programs included content related to healthy eating/nutrition, media literacy/sociocultural pressures, and body acceptance/body satisfaction. Notably, there was wide variation in some participant features (e.g., participant age, sex, risk status) and intervention features (e.g., setting and format, length and dose, providers), suggesting that a variety of programs are beneficial in impacting eating disorder pathology. Implications and directions for future research are discussed, including an increased focus on universal and indicated prevention programs, expanding programs to a wider age range and a broader spectrum of weight-related problems, and rigorous evaluation of programs through efficacy, effectiveness, and implementation research. PMID:24821099

  19. Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE): clinical-pathological features, differential pathological diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Serena; Bellevicine, Claudio; Arpaia, Debora; Peirce, Carmela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Vigliar, Elena; Troncone, Giancarlo; Biondi, Bernadette

    2016-03-01

    Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation (SETTLE) is a very rare tumor of the thyroid gland. An algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of SETTLE has yet to be established. The aim of this study was to identify all case reports of SETTLE and to compare the clinical-pathological features and therapy of the cases identified. We performed a PubMed search for case reports of SETTLE in English published up to November 2014 in which "SETTLE" and "Spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation" were keywords. We identified 35 articles for a total of 42 cases. We found that SETTLE usually occurs in children and adolescents as an asymptomatic neck mass. Thyroid function tests and tumor markers are invariably within normal range in all patients, and fine needle aspiration biopsy is rarely diagnostic for SETTLE. All 42 patients had undergone thyroidectomy. After surgical resection, chemotherapy (adjuvant or first/second-line treatment) and/or radiotherapy were administered to control tumor growth in cases with metastatic involvement. Although SETTLE presents a low-grade malignancy, it can metastasize to lymph nodes, the mediastinum, lung, vertebrae, and kidney even many years after the initial diagnosis. SETTLE may have a good prognosis if appropriately treated at initial presentation and if patients undergo long-term monitoring with regular clinical and morphological evaluations. PMID:26289127

  20. An autopsy study of combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema: correlations among clinical, radiological, and pathological features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical evaluation to differentiate the characteristic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema is often difficult in patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE), but diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis is important for evaluating treatment options and the risk of acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia of such patients. As far as we know, it is the first report describing a correlation among clinical, radiological, and whole-lung pathological features in an autopsy cases of CPFE patients. Methods Experts retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts and examined chest computed tomography (CT) images and pathological findings of an autopsy series of 22 CPFE patients, and compared these with findings from 8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients and 17 emphysema-alone patients. Results All patients had a history of heavy smoking. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) was significantly lower in the emphysema-alone group than the CPFE and IPF-alone groups. The percent predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO%) was significantly lower in the CPFE group than the IPF- and emphysema-alone groups. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern was observed radiologically in 15 (68.2%) CPFE and 8 (100%) IPF-alone patients and was pathologically observed in all patients from both groups. Pathologically thick-cystic lesions involving one or more acini with dense wall fibrosis and occasional fibroblastic foci surrounded by honeycombing and normal alveoli were confirmed by post-mortem observation as thick-walled cystic lesions (TWCLs). Emphysematous destruction and enlargement of membranous and respiratory bronchioles with fibrosis were observed in the TWCLs. The cystic lesions were always larger than the cysts of honeycombing. The prevalence of both radiological and pathological TWCLs was 72.7% among CPFE patients, but no such lesions were observed in patients with IPF or emphysema

  1. A Joint Time-Frequency and Matrix Decomposition Feature Extraction Methodology for Pathological Voice Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoraani, Behnaz; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2009-12-01

    The number of people affected by speech problems is increasing as the modern world places increasing demands on the human voice via mobile telephones, voice recognition software, and interpersonal verbal communications. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatic pattern classification of pathological voices. The main contribution of this paper is extraction of meaningful and unique features using Adaptive time-frequency distribution (TFD) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). We construct Adaptive TFD as an effective signal analysis domain to dynamically track the nonstationarity in the speech and utilize NMF as a matrix decomposition (MD) technique to quantify the constructed TFD. The proposed method extracts meaningful and unique features from the joint TFD of the speech, and automatically identifies and measures the abnormality of the signal. Depending on the abnormality measure of each signal, we classify the signal into normal or pathological. The proposed method is applied on the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI) voice disorders database which consists of 161 pathological and 51 normal speakers, and an overall classification accuracy of 98.6% was achieved.

  2. Pathological features of localized prostate cancer in China: a contemporary analysis of radical prostatectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Yang, Xiao-Qun; Han, Cheng-Tao; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Shi, Guo-Hai; Wang, Chao-Fu; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-01-01

    There has been a rapid increase in the incidence of prostate cancer in China, especially in areas with boosted economic development. In this study, we analyzed the pathological features of a contemporary series of radical prostatectomy cases. A total of 230 consecutive, whole-mounted radical prostatectomy specimens collected from 2012 to 2014 were reviewed. The median age of the patients was 68 years, and 64.3% of patients presented with prostate specific antigen alone. Pathological examination indicated that a high proportion (77.4%) of patients had intermediate- or high-risk disease according to the Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment Post-Surgical score. After surgery, only 28 patients met the criteria for active surveillance (organ-confined Gleason ≥6 disease). The Prostate Cancer Research International Active Surveillance criteria achieved a sensitivity of 57.1% and a specificity of 98.0% for identifying candidates. The probability of Gleason score upgrading was 24.8% in the entire group and 59.0% in biopsy-confirmed Gleason ≥6 disease. The predominant tumor was located in the transition zone in 14.8% of cases, while only three patients (1.3%) had a predominant tumor located in the anterior region. Patients with transition zone-predominant tumor were likely to have been referred with urinary symptoms and high prostate specific antigen levels. The results of this study highlight the contemporary pathological features of localized prostate cancer in urban China. There was an increased trend towards asymptomatic cases, though most patients had intermediate- or high-risk disease and were suitable for definitive treatment. The low prevalence of dominant cancer in the anterior region may reflect race-based pathological differences. PMID:25799190

  3. MRI features of Binswanger’s disease predict prognosis and associated pathology

    PubMed Central

    Akiguchi, Ichiro; Budka, Herbert; Shirakashi, Yoshitomo; Woehrer, Adelheid; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Shiino, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Yasumasa; Kawamoto, Yasuhiro; Krampla, Wolfgang; Jungwirth, Susanne; Fischer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the prevalence of MRI features of Binswanger’s disease (BD), specifically MRI with diffuse white matter lesions and scattered multiple lacunes (BD-MRI), and to describe neurological features and pathological outcomes of a community-based cohort study. Methods Of 697 participants (all 75 years old), 503 completed neurological examinations at baseline and were followed-up every 30 months thereafter with MRIs, the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale-Motor Section (UPDRSM). Data from participants with BD-MRI were compared with those from participants with predominant white matter lesions (WML-MRI), scattered multiple lacunes (ML-MRI), or normal MRIs. Results Fourteen BD-MRI patients (2.8%) were detected at baseline. The mean MMSE scores in the BD-MRI, WML-MRI, ML-MRI, and normal MRIs groups were 26.4, 28.2, 28.4, and 28.5, respectively, and the mean UPDRSM scores were 9.1, 1.3, 3.1, and 1.7, respectively. At the 30-month follow-up, mortality rates in the normal MRIs, WML-MRI and ML-MRI were 4%, 9.1%, and 22.2%, respectively, and follow-up MRIs were available for 80%, 82%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. In the BD-MRI, however, five patients were deceased, and only five follow-up individual MRIs were available (33.3%). Autopsies were performed on six of eight BD-MRI brains, and these brains fulfilled the pathological criteria for BD independent of Alzheimer disease pathology. All these six individuals also showed systemic atherosclerosis and renal arterio-arteriolosclerosis. Interpretation The BD-MRI participants had poor prognoses and showed pure BD pathology with advanced systemic vascular disease. BD-MRI appears to be a predictor of vascular neurocognitive impairment. PMID:25493272

  4. Interobserver Agreement on Pathologic Features of Liver Biopsy Tissue in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Lee, Kyoungbun; Yu, Eunsil; Kang, Yun Kyung; Cho, Mee-Yon; Kim, Joon Mee; Moon, Woo Sung; Jeong, Jin Sook; Park, Cheol Keun; Park, Jae-Bok; Kang, Dae Young; Sohn, Jin Hee; Jin, So-Young

    2016-01-01

    Background: The histomorphologic criteria for the pathological features of liver tissue from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain subjective, causing confusion among pathologists and clinicians. In this report, we studied interobserver agreement of NAFLD pathologic features and analyzed causes of disagreement. Methods: Thirty-one cases of clinicopathologically diagnosed NAFLD from 10 hospitals were selected. One hematoxylin and eosin and one Masson’s trichrome-stained virtual slide from each case were blindly reviewed with regard to 12 histological parameters by 13 pathologists in a gastrointestinal study group of the Korean Society of Pathologists. After the first review, we analyzed the causes of disagreement and defined detailed morphological criteria. The glass slides from each case were reviewed a second time after a consensus meeting. The degree of interobserver agreement was determined by multi-rater kappa statistics. Results: Kappa values of the first review ranged from 0.0091–0.7618. Acidophilic bodies (k = 0.7618) and portal inflammation (k = 0.5914) showed high levels of agreement, whereas microgranuloma (k = 0.0984) and microvesicular fatty change (k = 0.0091) showed low levels of agreement. After the second review, the kappa values of the four major pathological features increased from 0.3830 to 0.5638 for steatosis grade, from 0.1398 to 0.2815 for lobular inflammation, from 0.1923 to 0.3362 for ballooning degeneration, and from 0.3303 to 0.4664 for fibrosis. Conclusions: More detailed histomorphological criteria must be defined for correct diagnosis and high interobserver agreement of NAFLD. PMID:27086596

  5. Pathology Features in Bethesda Guidelines Predict Colorectal Cancer Microsatellite Instability: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Mark A.; Hayashi, Shinichi; O’shea, Anne-Marie; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Smyrk, Tom C.; Shimizu, David; Waring, Paul M.; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R.; Pollett, Aaron F.; Redston, Mark; Barker, Melissa A.; Baron, John A.; Casey, Graham R.; Dowty, James G.; Giles, Graham G.; Limburg, Paul; Newcomb, Polly; Young, Joanne P.; Walsh, Michael D.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Lemarchand, Loïc; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Potter, John D.; Hopper, John L.; Jass, Jeremy R.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The revised Bethesda guidelines for Lynch syndrome recommend microsatellite instability (MSI) testing all colorectal cancers in patients diagnosed before age 50 years and colorectal cancers diagnosed in patients between ages 50 and 59 years with particular pathology features. Our aim was to identify pathology and other features that independently predict high MSI (MSI-H). Methods Archival tissue from 1098 population-based colorectal cancers diagnosed before age 60 years was tested for MSI. Pathology features, site, and age at diagnosis were obtained. Multiple logistic regression was performed to determine the predictive value of each feature, as measured by an odds ratio (OR), from which a scoring system (MsPath) was developed to estimate the probability a colorectal cancer is MSI-H. Results Fifteen percent of tumors (162) were MSI-H. Independent predictors were tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (OR, 9.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9 –14.1), proximal subsite (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.1–7.3), mucinous histology (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7– 4.8), poor differentiation (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2–3.1), Crohn’s-like reaction (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2–2.9), and diagnosis before age 50 years (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3–2.9). MsPath score ≥ 1.0 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 55% for MSI-H. Conclusions The probability an individual colorectal cancer is MSI-H is predicted well by the MsPath score. There is little value in testing for DNA mismatch repair loss in tumors, or for germline mismatch repair mutations, for colorectal cancers diagnosed in patients before age 60 years with an MSPath score <1 (approximately 50%). Pathology can identify almost all MSI-H colorectal cancers diagnosed before age 60 years. PMID:17631130

  6. Pathological features of FTLD-FUS in a Japanese population: analyses of nine cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Zen; Kawakami, Ito; Arai, Tetsuaki; Yokota, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Kondo, Hiromi; Shimomura, Yoko; Haga, Chie; Aoki, Naoya; Hasegawa, Masato; Hosokawa, Masato; Oshima, Kenichi; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Ishizu, Hideki; Terada, Seishi; Onaya, Mitsumoto; Ikeda, Manabu; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Nakano, Imaharu; Murayama, Shigeo; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-12-15

    We investigated the pathological features of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with fused in sarcoma protein (FUS) accumulation (FTLD-FUS) in the Japanese population. Only one out of nine FTLD-FUS cases showed pathology that corresponds to atypical FTLD with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (aFTLD-U). Five were basophilic inclusion body disease (BIBD) and two were neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease. The last case was unclassifiable and was associated with dystrophic neurites (DNs) as the predominant FUS pathology. The results of this study indicate an ethnic difference from western countries. In Japan, BIBD is the most common subtype of FTLD-FUS and aFTLD-U is rare, a finding which contrasts with aFTLD-U being the most common form in western countries. Immunohistochemical analyses of these FTLD-FUS cases reveal that FUS abnormally accumulated in neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) and DNs has an immunohistochemical profile distinct from that of normal, nuclear FUS. NCIs and DNs are more readily stained than the nuclei by antibodies to the middle portion of FUS. Antibodies to the carboxyl terminal portion, on the other hand, stain the nuclei more readily than NCIs and DNs. Such an immunohistochemical profile of NCIs and DNs was similar to that of cytoplasmic granular FUS staining which we previously reported to be associated with dendrites and synapses. Redistribution of FUS from the nucleus to the cytoplasm could be associated with the formation of abnormal FUS aggregates in FTLD-FUS. PMID:24050818

  7. Early Controversies over Athetosis: I. Clinical Features, Differentiation from other Movement Disorders, Associated Conditions, and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lanska, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the description of athetosis in 1871 by American neurologist William Alexander Hammond (1828–1900) the disorder has been a source of controversy, as were many aspects of Hammond’s career. Methods Primary sources have been used to review controversies in the 50-year period since the initial description of athetosis, in particular those concerning clinical features, differentiation from other movement disorders, associated conditions, and pathology. Controversies concerning treatment will be addressed in a subsequent article. Results Hammond struggled to establish athetosis as a distinct clinical–pathological entity, and had successfully predicted the striatal pathology in his initial case (albeit somewhat serendipitously). Athetosis was, nevertheless, considered by many neurologists to be a form of post-hemiplegic chorea or part of a continuum between chorea and dystonia. European neurologists, and particularly the French, initially ignored or discounted the concept. Additional controversies arose over whether the movements persisted during sleep, whether athetosis was, or could be, associated with imbecility or insanity, and how it should be treated. Discussion Some controversies concerning athetosis served to identify areas where knowledge was insufficient to make accurate statements, despite prior self-assured or even dogmatic statements to the contrary. Other controversies illustrated established prejudices, even if these biases were often only apparent with the greater detachment of hindsight. PMID:23450262

  8. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Overview of Clinicopathologic Features and Insights into the Molecular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Stefano; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) of the pancreas are rare pancreatic neoplasms accounting for about 1–2% of pancreatic tumors in adults and about 15% in pediatric subjects. They show different clinical symptoms at presentation, different morphological features, different outcomes, and different molecular alterations. This heterogeneous clinicopathological spectrum may give rise to difficulties in the clinical and pathological diagnosis with consequential therapeutic and prognostic implications. The molecular mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of ACCs are still not completely understood, although in recent years, several attempts have been made to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in ACC biology. In this paper, we will review the main clinicopathological and molecular features of pancreatic ACCs of both adult and pediatric subjects to give the reader a comprehensive overview of this rare tumor type. PMID:26137463

  9. Clinical, Pathological, and Molecular Features of Lung Adenocarcinomas with AXL Expression.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsuaki; Suda, Kenichi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is a member of the Tyro3-Axl-Mer receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily. AXL affects several cellular functions, including growth and migration. AXL aberration is reportedly a marker for poor prognosis and treatment resistance in various cancers. In this study, we analyzed clinical, pathological, and molecular features of AXL expression in lung adenocarcinomas (LADs). We examined 161 LAD specimens from patients who underwent pulmonary resections. When AXL protein expression was quantified (0, 1+, 2+, 3+) according to immunohistochemical staining intensity, results were 0: 35%; 1+: 20%; 2+: 37%; and 3+: 7% for the 161 samples. AXL expression status did not correlate with clinical features, including smoking status and pathological stage. However, patients whose specimens showed strong AXL expression (3+) had markedly poorer prognoses than other groups (P = 0.0033). Strong AXL expression was also significantly associated with downregulation of E-cadherin (P = 0.025) and CD44 (P = 0.0010). In addition, 9 of 12 specimens with strong AXL expression had driver gene mutations (6 with EGFR, 2 with KRAS, 1 with ALK). In conclusion, we found that strong AXL expression in surgically resected LADs was a predictor of poor prognosis. LADs with strong AXL expression were characterized by mesenchymal status, higher expression of stem-cell-like markers, and frequent driver gene mutations. PMID:27100677

  10. Clinical, Pathological, and Molecular Features of Lung Adenocarcinomas with AXL Expression

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Kenichi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is a member of the Tyro3-Axl-Mer receptor tyrosine kinase subfamily. AXL affects several cellular functions, including growth and migration. AXL aberration is reportedly a marker for poor prognosis and treatment resistance in various cancers. In this study, we analyzed clinical, pathological, and molecular features of AXL expression in lung adenocarcinomas (LADs). We examined 161 LAD specimens from patients who underwent pulmonary resections. When AXL protein expression was quantified (0, 1+, 2+, 3+) according to immunohistochemical staining intensity, results were 0: 35%; 1+: 20%; 2+: 37%; and 3+: 7% for the 161 samples. AXL expression status did not correlate with clinical features, including smoking status and pathological stage. However, patients whose specimens showed strong AXL expression (3+) had markedly poorer prognoses than other groups (P = 0.0033). Strong AXL expression was also significantly associated with downregulation of E-cadherin (P = 0.025) and CD44 (P = 0.0010). In addition, 9 of 12 specimens with strong AXL expression had driver gene mutations (6 with EGFR, 2 with KRAS, 1 with ALK). In conclusion, we found that strong AXL expression in surgically resected LADs was a predictor of poor prognosis. LADs with strong AXL expression were characterized by mesenchymal status, higher expression of stem-cell-like markers, and frequent driver gene mutations. PMID:27100677

  11. Using multiparametric data with missing features for learning patterns of pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura; Parker, William A.; Bloy, Luke; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Verma, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method for learning multimodal classifiers from datasets in which not all subjects have data from all modalities. Usually, subjects with a severe form of pathology are the ones failing to satisfactorily complete the study, especially when it consists of multiple imaging modalities. A classifier capable of handling subjects with unequal numbers of modalities prevents discarding any subjects, as is traditionally done, thereby broadening the scope of the classifier to more severe pathology. It also allows design of the classifier to include as much of the available information as possible and facilitates testing of subjects with missing modalities over the constructed classifier. The presented method employs an ensemble based approach where several subsets of complete data are formed and trained using individual classifiers. The output from these classifiers is fused using a weighted aggregation step giving an optimal probabilistic score for each subject. The method is applied to a spatio-temporal dataset for autism spectrum disorders (ASD)(96 patients with ASD and 42 typically developing controls) that consists of functional features from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and structural connectivity features from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A clear distinction between ASD and controls is obtained with an average 5-fold accuracy of 83.3% and testing accuracy of 88.4%. The fusion classifier performance is superior to the classification achieved using single modalities as well as multimodal classifier using only complete data (78.3%). The presented multimodal classifier framework is applicable to all modality combinations. PMID:23286164

  12. Stratification of Digestive Cancers with Different Pathological Features and Survival Outcomes by MicroRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Senwei; Wu, William K. K.; Li, Xiangchun; Wong, Sunny H.; Wong, Nathalie; Chan, Matthew T. V.; Sung, Joseph J. Y.; Yu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are aberrantly expressed in virtually all cancer types, including digestive cancers. Herein, we aggregated and systematically analyzed miRNA expression profiles of 1765 tumor samples, including esophageal, gastric, liver, pancreatic, colon and rectal cancers, obtained through small RNA sequencing by The Cancer Genome Atlas. We found that digestive cancers of different tissue origins could be differentiated according to their miRNA expression profiles. In particular, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and esophageal adenocarcinoma exhibited distinct miRNA expression patterns. Thirteen (e.g. miR-135b, miR-182) and sixteen (e.g. miR-139, miR-133a-1, miR-490) miRNAs were commonly upregulated and downregulated in more than four cancer types, respectively. Pertinent to pathological features, low miR-181d expression was associated with microsatellite instability in colon and gastric cancers whereas low miR-106a expression was associated with hepatitis B virus infection in hepatocellular carcinoma. Progression in colon cancer could also be predicted by low let-7f-2 and high miR-106a expression. Molecular subtypes with distinct prognostic outcomes independent of tumor-node-metastasis staging were identified in hepatocellular carcinoma and colon cancer. In total, 4 novel and 6 reported associations between specific miRNAs and patients’ survival were identified. Collectively, novel miRNA markers were identified to stratify digestive cancers with different pathological features and survival outcomes. PMID:27080237

  13. Imaging features of primary anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Koch, M.R.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Krajewski, K.M.; Raut, C.P.; Hornick, J.L.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the imaging features of anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with clinical and histopathologic correlation. Materials and methods: In this Institutional Review Board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective study, 16 patients (12 men; mean age 66 years (30–89 years)) with pathologically proven anorectal GISTs seen at our institution from January 2001 to July 2011 were identified. Electronic medical records were reviewed to obtain clinical data. Pretreatment imaging studies (computed tomography (CT) in 16 patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 9 patients and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in 8 patients) were evaluated by 2 radiologists until consensus. The location, size and imaging features of the primary tumor and metastases at presentation, if any, were recorded, and correlated with clinical data and pathologic features (histologic type, presence of necrosis, mitotic activity, risk category, immunohistochemical profile). Results: The mean tumor size was 6.9 × 6.0 cm. Of the 16 tumors, 11 (68.7%) were infralevator, 4 (25%) supra and infralevator and 1 (6.3%) supralevator; 9 (56.2%) were exophytic, 6 (37.5%) both exophytic and intraluminal, and 1 (6.3%) was intraluminal. The tumors were iso- to minimally hypoattenuating to muscle on CT, iso- to minimally hypointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed variable enhancement. Necrosis was seen in 4 (25%), and hemorrhage and calcification in 2 (12.5%) patients each. The tumors were FDG avid with a mean maximum standardized uptake value of 11 (8.4–16.8). All tumors were positive for KIT and CD34. Distant metastasis to liver was seen in 1 patient (6.3%) at presentation. Conclusion: Anorectal GISTs are well-circumscribed, non-circumferential, predominantly infralevator, intramural or exophytic, FDG-avid, hypoattenuating masses, and present without

  14. The Research of Feature Extraction Method of Liver Pathological Image Based on Multispatial Mapping and Statistical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiling; Xia, Bingbing; Yi, Dehui

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new feature extraction method of liver pathological image based on multispatial mapping and statistical properties. For liver pathological images of Hematein Eosin staining, the image of R and B channels can reflect the sensitivity of liver pathological images better, while the entropy space and Local Binary Pattern (LBP) space can reflect the texture features of the image better. To obtain the more comprehensive information, we map liver pathological images to the entropy space, LBP space, R space, and B space. The traditional Higher Order Local Autocorrelation Coefficients (HLAC) cannot reflect the overall information of the image, so we propose an average correction HLAC feature. We calculate the statistical properties and the average gray value of pathological images and then update the current pixel value as the absolute value of the difference between the current pixel gray value and the average gray value, which can be more sensitive to the gray value changes of pathological images. Lastly the HLAC template is used to calculate the features of the updated image. The experiment results show that the improved features of the multispatial mapping have the better classification performance for the liver cancer. PMID:27022407

  15. Predicting non-small cell lung cancer prognosis by fully automated microscopic pathology image features.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Zhang, Ce; Berry, Gerald J; Altman, Russ B; Ré, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel L; Snyder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent cancer worldwide, and histopathological assessment is indispensable for its diagnosis. However, human evaluation of pathology slides cannot accurately predict patients' prognoses. In this study, we obtain 2,186 haematoxylin and eosin stained histopathology whole-slide images of lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and 294 additional images from Stanford Tissue Microarray (TMA) Database. We extract 9,879 quantitative image features and use regularized machine-learning methods to select the top features and to distinguish shorter-term survivors from longer-term survivors with stage I adenocarcinoma (P<0.003) or squamous cell carcinoma (P=0.023) in the TCGA data set. We validate the survival prediction framework with the TMA cohort (P<0.036 for both tumour types). Our results suggest that automatically derived image features can predict the prognosis of lung cancer patients and thereby contribute to precision oncology. Our methods are extensible to histopathology images of other organs. PMID:27527408

  16. Predicting non-small cell lung cancer prognosis by fully automated microscopic pathology image features

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Zhang, Ce; Berry, Gerald J.; Altman, Russ B.; Ré, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel L.; Snyder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent cancer worldwide, and histopathological assessment is indispensable for its diagnosis. However, human evaluation of pathology slides cannot accurately predict patients' prognoses. In this study, we obtain 2,186 haematoxylin and eosin stained histopathology whole-slide images of lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), and 294 additional images from Stanford Tissue Microarray (TMA) Database. We extract 9,879 quantitative image features and use regularized machine-learning methods to select the top features and to distinguish shorter-term survivors from longer-term survivors with stage I adenocarcinoma (P<0.003) or squamous cell carcinoma (P=0.023) in the TCGA data set. We validate the survival prediction framework with the TMA cohort (P<0.036 for both tumour types). Our results suggest that automatically derived image features can predict the prognosis of lung cancer patients and thereby contribute to precision oncology. Our methods are extensible to histopathology images of other organs. PMID:27527408

  17. Hepatolithiasis and the syndrome of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis: clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Wilson Man-shan; Chan, Yiu-kay; Wong, Chi-tat; Lo, Yan-fai; Yeung, Yat-wah; Lee, Yat-wing

    2011-02-01

    Primary hepatothiasis (HL) and recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) are two terms describing the different aspects of the same disease, with HL emphasizing the pathologic changes and RPC emphasizing the clinical presentation and suppurative inflammation. It is predominantly a disease of the Far East. In the 1960s, it was the third most common cause of emergency abdominal surgery at a university hospital in Hong Kong. Thereafter, its incidence has decreased considerably, possibly due to improved standards of living and Westernized diet. Clinically, patients may present acutely with recurrent bacterial cholangitis and its possible complications, such as liver abscess and septicemic shock, or with chronic complications, such as cholangiocarcinoma. Pathologically, it is characterized by pigmented calcium bilirubinate stones within dilated intrahepatic bile ducts featuring chronic inflammation, mural fibrosis, and proliferation of peribiliary glands, without extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Episodes of suppurative inflammation cumulate in sclerosing cholangitis of peripheral ducts and parenchymal fibrosis resulting from collapse and scarring. Mass-forming inflammatory pseudotumor and neoplasms like intraductal papillary neoplasms and cholangiocarcinoma are increasingly recognized complications. Modern imaging techniques allow definitive diagnosis, accurate assessment for treatment planning, and detection of complications. A multidisciplinary team approach (interventional endoscopist, interventional radiologist, hepatobiliary surgeon, and intensivists) is important for optimal patient outcome. PMID:21344349

  18. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharoar, M G; Shi, Q; Ge, Y; He, W; Hu, X; Perry, G; Zhu, X; Yan, R

    2016-09-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer's brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains. PMID:26619807

  19. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharoar, Md. Golam; Shi, Qi; Ge, Yingying; He, Wanxia; Hu, Xiangyou; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Yan, Riqiang

    2015-01-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer’s brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from AD brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains PMID:26619807

  20. BRAF V600 mutations and pathological features in Japanese melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryota; Tsutsumida, Arata; Namikawa, Kenjiro; Eguchi, Hironobu; Omata, Wataru; Oashi, Kohei; Ogawa, Toru; Hayashi, Amiko; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a risk factor for BRAF V600 mutations frequently found in melanomas that cause constitutive BRAF activation. Primary sites of melanoma and the frequency of BRAF mutations might differ between races. Melanoma is rare in Japan (1500–2000 cases/year compared with 132 000/year worldwide) and the frequency and distribution of BRAF V600 mutations are unknown. We aimed to investigate the frequency of BRAF V600 mutations in a cohort of Japanese patients with melanoma and determine the relationship between mutations and clinical/pathologic features. DNA was extracted from 80 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumours from individuals diagnosed with melanoma. BRAF V600 mutations were detected using the Cobas 4800 System with z480 Analyzer and Cobas 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test reagents. BRAF V600 mutations were detected in 41.8% of tested tumours, with an invalid rate of 1.3%. The mutation rate was more than 60% in patients aged less than 60 years and more than 36% in patients with stage III/IV disease. No sex difference in the mutation rate was observed. BRAF V600 mutations were detected in 18.8% of acral lentiginous melanomas (ALMs), 64.7% of superficial spreading melanomas, 50.0% of lentigo maligna melanomas and 20.0% of nodular melanomas. Although the mutation rate was low in ALMs, 36.4% were mutation positive at stage III/IV compared with 9.5% at stage I/II. This study confirmed associations among BRAF V600 mutations, pathological features and subtypes of melanoma. BRAF V600 mutations were more frequent in late-stage ALMs than in early-stage ALMs. Superficial spreading melanomas had similar mutation rates at all stages. These insights suggest improved treatment predictions for stage III/IV melanoma patients. PMID:25051202

  1. BRAF V600 mutations and pathological features in Japanese melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Naoya; Tanaka, Ryota; Tsutsumida, Arata; Namikawa, Kenjiro; Eguchi, Hironobu; Omata, Wataru; Oashi, Kohei; Ogawa, Toru; Hayashi, Amiko; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-02-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a risk factor for BRAF V600 mutations frequently found in melanomas that cause constitutive BRAF activation. Primary sites of melanoma and the frequency of BRAF mutations might differ between races. Melanoma is rare in Japan (1500-2000 cases/year compared with 132 000/year worldwide) and the frequency and distribution of BRAF V600 mutations are unknown. We aimed to investigate the frequency of BRAF V600 mutations in a cohort of Japanese patients with melanoma and determine the relationship between mutations and clinical/pathologic features. DNA was extracted from 80 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumours from individuals diagnosed with melanoma. BRAF V600 mutations were detected using the Cobas 4800 System with z480 Analyzer and Cobas 4800 BRAF V600 Mutation Test reagents. BRAF V600 mutations were detected in 41.8% of tested tumours, with an invalid rate of 1.3%. The mutation rate was more than 60% in patients aged less than 60 years and more than 36% in patients with stage III/IV disease. No sex difference in the mutation rate was observed. BRAF V600 mutations were detected in 18.8% of acral lentiginous melanomas (ALMs), 64.7% of superficial spreading melanomas, 50.0% of lentigo maligna melanomas and 20.0% of nodular melanomas. Although the mutation rate was low in ALMs, 36.4% were mutation positive at stage III/IV compared with 9.5% at stage I/II. This study confirmed associations among BRAF V600 mutations, pathological features and subtypes of melanoma. BRAF V600 mutations were more frequent in late-stage ALMs than in early-stage ALMs. Superficial spreading melanomas had similar mutation rates at all stages. These insights suggest improved treatment predictions for stage III/IV melanoma patients. PMID:25051202

  2. Correlation of CT scanning and pathologic features of ophthalmic Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Trokel, S L; Jakobiec, F A

    1981-06-01

    Correlating the CT scan features of patients with orbital Graves' disease with histopathologic observations allows one to focus more specifically on the distinguishing features of this disease with future research implications. Both CT scanning and pathologic studies have shown clearly that the extraocular muscles are the primary focus of the disease. Swelling of the extraocular muscles generally occurs within their bellys with sparing of the tendons. This contrast with idiopathic inflammation of the muscles or myositis, which tends to involve the tendon as well. All of the associated findings in orbital Graves' disease probably flow from the enlarged volume of the extraocular muscles: proptosis, bowing of the medial lamina papyracea to accommodate the swollen belly of the medial rectus muscle, venous engorgement from stasis induced by direct compression of the orbital venous drainage, conjunctival and lid swelling, and lacrimal gland enlargement. Both radiographic and pathologic changes in the orbital fat are secondary and comparatively insignificant. While there appears to be no selective inflammation of the optic nerve meninges or the perineural connective tissues, enlargement of the extraocular muscle bellys where they converge at the crowded orbital apex brings about compression of the optic nerve, impairs its function, and causes visual decrease. Lymphocytic and plasmacytic infiltration along with edema within the endomysium of the extraocular muscles leads to the activation of fibroblasts with the production of acid mucopolysaccharides and progressive fibrosis. It is not known what attracts the lymphocytes to the extraocular muscles, why certain extraocular muscles are affected preferentially, why the disease may be asymmetrically unilateral, and whether a defect in T cell or B cell functions (or both) is immunologically at fault. PMID:6894976

  3. Carpet Lesions Detected at CT Colonography: Clinical, Imaging, and Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vu P.; Weiss, Jennifer M.; Kennedy, Gregory D.; Kim, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe carpet lesions (laterally spreading tumors ≥ 3 cm) detected at computed tomographic (CT) colonography, including their clinical, imaging, and pathologic features. Materials and Methods The imaging reports for 9152 consecutive adults undergoing initial CT colonography at a tertiary center were reviewed in this HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board–approved retrospective study to identify all potential carpet lesions detected at CT colonography. Carpet lesions were defined as morphologically flat, laterally spreading tumors 3 cm or larger. For those patients with neoplastic carpet lesions, CT colonography studies were analyzed to determine maximal lesion width and height, oral contrast material coating, segmental location, and computer-aided detection (CAD) findings. Demographic data and details of clinical treatment in these patients were reviewed. Results Eighteen carpet lesions in 18 patients (0.2%; mean age, 67.1 years; eight men, 10 women) were identified and were subsequently confirmed at colonoscopy and pathologic examination among 20 potential flat masses (≥3 cm) prospectively identified at CT colonography (there were two nonneoplastic rectal false-positive findings). No additional neoplastic carpet lesions were found in the cohort undergoing colonoscopy after CT colonography and/or surgery (there were no false-negatives). Mean lesion width was 46.5 mm (range, 30–80 mm); mean lesion height was 7.9 mm (range, 4–14 mm). Surface retention of oral contrast material was noted in all 18 cases. All but two lesions were located in the distal rectosigmoid or proximal right colon. At CAD, 17 (94.4%) lesions were detected (mean, 6.2 CAD marks per lesion). Sixteen lesions (88.9%) demonstrated advanced histologic features, including a villous component (n = 11), high-grade dysplasia (n = 4), and invasive cancer (n = 5). Sixteen patients (88.9%) required surgical treatment for complete excision. Conclusion CT colonography can effectively

  4. The Hybrid Feature Selection Algorithm Based on Maximum Minimum Backward Selection Search Strategy for Liver Tissue Pathological Image Classification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel feature selection algorithm for liver tissue pathological image classification. To improve the efficiency of feature selection, the same feature values of positive and negative samples are removed in rough selection. To obtain the optimal feature subset, a new heuristic search algorithm, which is called Maximum Minimum Backward Selection (MMBS), is proposed in precise selection. MMBS search strategy has the following advantages. (1) For the deficiency of Discernibility of Feature Subsets (DFS) evaluation criteria, which makes the class of small samples invalid for unbalanced samples, the Weighted Discernibility of Feature Subsets (WDFS) evaluation criteria are proposed as the evaluation strategy of MMBS, which is also available for unbalanced samples. (2) For the deficiency of Sequential Forward Selection (SFS) and Sequential Backward Selection (SBS), which can only add or only delete feature, MMBS decides whether to add the feature to feature subset according to WDFS criteria for each feature firstly; then it decides whether to remove the feature from feature subset according to SBS algorithm. In this way, the better feature subset can be obtained. The experiment results show that the proposed hybrid feature selection algorithm has good classification performance for liver tissue pathological image. PMID:27563344

  5. Does the choice of display system influence perception and visibility of clinically relevant features in digital pathology images?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpe, Tom; Rostang, Johan; Avanaki, Ali; Espig, Kathryn; Xthona, Albert; Cocuranu, Ioan; Parwani, Anil V.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2014-03-01

    Digital pathology systems typically consist of a slide scanner, processing software, visualization software, and finally a workstation with display for visualization of the digital slide images. This paper studies whether digital pathology images can look different when presenting them on different display systems, and whether these visual differences can result in different perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. By analyzing a set of four digital pathology images of different subspecialties on three different display systems, it was concluded that pathology images look different when visualized on different display systems. The importance of these visual differences is elucidated when they are located in areas of the digital slide that contain clinically relevant features. Based on a calculation of dE2000 differences between background and clinically relevant features, it was clear that perceived contrast of clinically relevant features is influenced by the choice of display system. Furthermore, it seems that the specific calibration target chosen for the display system has an important effect on the perceived contrast of clinically relevant features. Preliminary results suggest that calibrating to DICOM GSDF calibration performed slightly worse than sRGB, while a new experimental calibration target CSDF performed better than both DICOM GSDF and sRGB. This result is promising as it suggests that further research work could lead to better definition of an optimized calibration target for digital pathology images resulting in a positive effect on clinical performance.

  6. The comparison of pathology in ferrets infected by H9N2 avian influenza viruses with different genomic features.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rongbao; Bai, Tian; Li, Xiaodan; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Yiwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Ye; Bo, Hong; Zou, Shumei; Shu, Yuelong

    2016-01-15

    H9N2 avian influenza virus circulates widely in poultry and has been responsible for sporadic human infections in several regions. Few studies have been conducted on the pathogenicity of H9N2 AIV isolates that have different genomic features. We compared the pathology induced by a novel reassortant H9N2 virus and two currently circulating H9N2 viruses that have different genomic features in ferrets. The results showed that the three viruses can induce infections with various amounts of viral shedding in ferrets. The novel H9N2 induced respiratory infection, but no pathological lesions were observed in lung tissues. The other two viruses induced mild to intermediate pathological lesions in lung tissues, although the clinical signs presented mildly in ferrets. The pathological lesions presented a diversity consistent with viral replication in ferrets. PMID:26638019

  7. Cognition, Language, and Clinical Pathological Features of Non-Alzheimer’s Dementias: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Jamie; Rodriguez, Amy; Lamy, Martine; Neils-Strunjas, Jean

    2010-01-01

    There are many distinct forms of dementia whose pharmacological and behavioral management differ. Differential diagnosis among the dementia variants currently relies upon a weighted combination of genetic and protein biomarkers, neuroanatomical integrity, and behavior. Diagnostic specificity is complicated by a high degree of overlap in the initial presenting symptoms across dementia subtypes. For this reason, reliable markers are of considerable diagnostic value. Communication disorders have proven to be among the strongest predictors for discriminating among dementia subtypes. As such, Speech-Language Pathologists may be poised to make an increasingly visible contribution to dementia diagnosis and its ongoing management. The value and durability of this potential contribution, however, demands an improved discipline-wide knowledge base about the unique features associated with different dementia variants. To this end we provide an overview of cognition, language, and clinical pathological features of four of the most common non-Alzheimer’s dementias: Frontotemporal Dementia, Vascular Dementia, Lewy Body Disease Dementia, and Parkinson’s Disease Dementia. PMID:20493496

  8. Pathologic features of renal biopsies based on H & E, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zahir, S Taghipour; Hosseini, E

    2014-01-01

    Kidneys are complex organs with multiple vital functions. They are an essential part of the urinary system and also are necessary for regulation of body homeostasis like electrolytes, acid base balance and blood pressure. Diagnosis of renal injuries is based on clinical and histopathologic features. In a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital, Yazd, Iran, pathology reports of all renal biopsies, by light microscopic examination, immunofluorecence and electron microscopy (EM) were perused. Data were registered in a questionnaire with questions on patients' demographic information such as age, sex and also questions on clinical signs and symptoms and pathologic findings such as H & E, Immunofluorescence (IF) and electron microscopy. All data were analyzed by SPSS-15 software with descriptive analysis. A total of 80 patients were included in this study, 42 men (52.5%) and 38 women (47.5%), aged 19-73 years (mean: 40.59 ± 16.36). Based on H & E, IF and electron microscopic findings, it seems that in 26.4% of cases the IFM was necessary and in 67.6% was helpful and in 6% was unnecessary for diagnosis. Between 42 patients, EM was necessary in 12% of patients, while in 71.5% was helpful and in 16.5% was unnecessary. Based on IFM the most common renal disease was FSGS (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis) with mean age of 41.3 years. IFM was necessary in RPGN, chronic glomerulonephritis, mesangial hypercellularity, minimal change disease, IgA nephropathy, and was helpful in FSGS, MPGN, tubulointerstitial nephritis, diffuse sclerosing glomerulonephritis and membranous glomerulopathy but was unnecessary in lupus nephritis. EM was necessary in mesangial hypercellularity, chronic glomerulonephritis and diffuse sclerosing glomerulopathy and was helpful in FSGS, MPGN, lupus nephritis and membranous glomerulopathy while it was unnecessary in minimal change disease and IgA nephropathy. PMID:25726629

  9. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The indications for adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) are poorly defined. We performed a retrospective comparison of our institution's experience treating prostate cancer with RP vs. RP followed by adjuvant EBRT. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 1998, 617 patients with clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer underwent RP. Patients who underwent preoperative androgen deprivation and those with positive lymph nodes were excluded. Of the 617 patients, 34 (5.5%) with an undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level underwent adjuvant prostatic fossa RT at a median of 0.25 year (range, 0.1-0.6) postoperatively because of poor pathologic features. The median total dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 50.4-66.6 Gy) in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. These 34 RP+RT patients were compared with the remaining 583 RP patients. Biochemical failure was defined as any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.1 ng/mL and any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.3 ng/mL (at least 30 days after surgery). Administration of androgen deprivation was also scored as biochemical failure when applying either definition. The median clinical follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.1-11.2 years) for RP and 8.4 years (range, 0.3-13.8 years) for RP+RT. Results: Radical prostatectomy + radiation therapy patients had a greater pathologic Gleason score (mean, 7.3 vs. 6.5; p < 0.01) and pathologic T stage (median, T3a vs. T2c; p < 0.01). Age (median, 65.7 years) and pretreatment PSA level (median, 7.9 ng/mL) were similar between the treatment groups. Extracapsular extension was present in 72% of RP+RT patients vs. 27% of RP patients (p < 0.01). The RP+RT patients were more likely to have seminal vesicle invasion (29% vs. 9%, p < 0.01) and positive margins (73% vs. 36%, p < 0.01). Despite these poor pathologic features, the 5-year biochemical control (BC) rate (PSA < 0.1 ng/mL) was 57% for RP+RT and 47% for RP (p = 0.28). For patients with extracapsular extension, the

  10. The behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer's disease: clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Perry, David C; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Scheltens, Nienke M E; Vogel, Jacob W; Kramer, Joel H; van der Vlies, Annelies E; La Joie, Renaud; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Grinberg, Lea T; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; Huang, Eric J; van Berckel, Bart N M; Miller, Bruce L; Barkhof, Frederik; Jagust, William J; Scheltens, Philip; Seeley, William W; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-09-01

    A 'frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease' has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer's disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological characteristics are not well understood. In this retrospective study, we included 55 patients with Alzheimer's disease with a behavioural-predominant presentation (behavioural Alzheimer's disease) and a neuropathological diagnosis of high-likelihood Alzheimer's disease (n = 17) and/or biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's disease pathology (n = 44). In addition, we included 29 patients with autopsy/biomarker-defined Alzheimer's disease with a dysexecutive-predominant syndrome (dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease). We performed structured chart reviews to ascertain clinical features. First symptoms were more often cognitive (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 53%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 83%) than behavioural (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 25%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 3%). Apathy was the most common behavioural feature, while hyperorality and perseverative/compulsive behaviours were less prevalent. Fifty-two per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease met diagnostic criteria for possible behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia. Overlap between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease was modest (9/75 patients). Sixty per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease and 40% of those with the dysexecutive syndrome carried at least one APOE ε4 allele. We also compared neuropsychological test performance and brain atrophy (applying voxel-based morphometry) with matched autopsy/biomarker-defined typical (amnestic-predominant) Alzheimer's disease (typical Alzheimer's disease, n = 58), autopsy-confirmed/Alzheimer's disease biomarker-negative behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 59

  11. Identifying features of 'pathological demand avoidance' using the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO).

    PubMed

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Gould, Judith; Christie, Phil; Gillberg, Christopher; Viding, Essi; Happé, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    The term 'pathological demand avoidance' (PDA) was coined by Elizabeth Newson to describe children within the autism spectrum who exhibit obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests (Newson et al., Arch Dis Child 88:595-600, 2003). Clinical accounts describe avoidance strategies including apparently strategic use of distraction or socially shocking behaviour, and obsessive need for control, reflected in domineering behaviour to peers and adults. Educational and management approaches effective for PDA reportedly differ from those for 'typical' autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and include novelty, humour and flexibility. Identification of PDA in individuals with ASD may have important implications for management (Eaton and Banting, J Learn Disabil Offending Behav 3:150-157, 2012). Despite increasing interest, no clinician-rated instrument for PDA has been developed. Here, items relevant to PDA were identified from the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorder (DISCO) (Wing et al., J Child Psychol Psychiatry 43:307-325, 2002). The most PDA-specific subset of relevant DISCO items was selected, based on low endorsement in general across a sample of 153 individuals assessed for possible ASD using the DISCO. Having selected 11 DISCO PDA items for the measure, a subset of individuals with a high number of these features was identified (N = 27). Consistent with Newson's descriptions, this high scoring group was characterised by lack of co-operation, use of apparently manipulative behaviour, socially shocking behaviour, difficulties with other people, anxiety and sudden behavioural changes from loving to aggression. All but one case met criteria for an ASD. This study brings the field a step closer to a clinician-rated measure of PDA features and highlights the need for further elucidation of the PDA phenotype. PMID:26224583

  12. Cavernous Sinus: A Comprehensive Review of its Anatomy, Pathologic Conditions, and Imaging Features.

    PubMed

    Bakan, A A; Alkan, A; Kurtcan, S; Aralaşmak, A; Tokdemir, S; Mehdi, E; Özdemir, H

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy of the cavernous sinus (CS), illustrate numerous lesions that can affect the CS, and emphasize the imaging characteristics for each lesion to further refine the differential diagnoses. The CS, notwithstanding its small size, contains a complicated and crucial network that consists of the carotid artery, the venous plexus, and cranial nerves. The wide-ranging types of pathologies that can involve the CS can be roughly classified as tumoral, congenital, infectious/inflammatory/granulomatous, and vascular. Conditions that affect the CS usually lead to symptoms that are similar to each other; thus, for diagnosis, imaging procedures are required. Radiological evaluations are also required to detect pre- and postoperative CS invasion. Magnetic resonance imaging, which can be supplemented with thin-section contrast-enhanced sequences, is the preferred imaging technique for evaluating the CS. For correct diagnosis of CS lesions and accurate evaluations of CS invasions, it is essential to carefully analyze the anatomical structures within the CS and to acquire precise knowledge about the imaging features of CS lesions, which may frequently overlap. PMID:25410584

  13. C9orf72 BAC Transgenic Mice Display Typical Pathologic Features of ALS/FTD.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Jacqueline G; Bogdanik, Laurent; Muhammad, A K M G; Gendron, Tania F; Kim, Kevin J; Austin, Andrew; Cady, Janet; Liu, Elaine Y; Zarrow, Jonah; Grant, Sharday; Ho, Ritchie; Bell, Shaughn; Carmona, Sharon; Simpkinson, Megan; Lall, Deepti; Wu, Kathryn; Daughrity, Lillian; Dickson, Dennis W; Harms, Matthew B; Petrucelli, Leonard; Lee, Edward B; Lutz, Cathleen M; Baloh, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Noncoding expansions of a hexanucleotide repeat (GGGGCC) in the C9orf72 gene are the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Here we report transgenic mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) containing the full human C9orf72 gene with either a normal allele (15 repeats) or disease-associated expansion (∼100-1,000 repeats; C9-BACexp). C9-BACexp mice displayed pathologic features seen in C9orf72 expansion patients, including widespread RNA foci and repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translated dipeptides, which were suppressed by antisense oligonucleotides targeting human C9orf72. Nucleolin distribution was altered, supporting that either C9orf72 transcripts or RAN dipeptides promote nucleolar dysfunction. Despite early and widespread production of RNA foci and RAN dipeptides in C9-BACexp mice, behavioral abnormalities and neurodegeneration were not observed even at advanced ages, supporting the hypothesis that RNA foci and RAN dipeptides occur presymptomatically and are not sufficient to drive neurodegeneration in mice at levels seen in patients. PMID:26637796

  14. Computed tomography appearance of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the abdomen: CT features and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Xu, Junlong; Wang, Jiaxin; Fan, Hongguang; Ang, Xuan; Liu, Wenming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT findings of abdominal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) and the relationship with morphological character. Materials and Methods: CT examinations and pathological findings of ten intra-abdominal IMTs were retrospectively analyzed. The histopathological characteristics of the IMTs were confirmed by two pathologists and two radiologists evaluated CT findings of the lesion, with emphasis on the imaging features compared with the corresponding histopathology. Results: The most common imaging characteristics were presence of heterogeneity, all tumors showed varying degrees of contrast enhancement. Two major different CT patterns were individualized. In type one, the tumor had a distinct boundary without a lobular appearance and displayed hypo-enhanced enhancement after administration of contrast in correlated with the mainly histopathologic findings of spindle cells myxoid and hypocellular fibrous (6/10; 60%). In type two, the lesions exhibited indistinct boundaries or complete capsule, ill-defined growth patterns or low intralesional attenuation with marked heterogeneous or circumferential enhancement, which correlated well with the presence of abundance of micromodule and inflammatory cell infiltration (4/10; 40%). Conclusions: Two major different contrast enhancement CT patterns were individualized can help to determine the relationships with histopathologic findings, while cannot be reliably differentiated from other solid lesions based solely on the CT appearance, combined with diagnostic biopsy may facilitate to achieve a correct diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26629216

  15. [An autopsy case of senile dementia with pathological features of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kenichi; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Iritani, Shuji; Niizato, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Ikeda, Kenji; Arai, Heii

    2004-07-01

    We report an autopsy case of Parkinson's disease mimicking senile dementia of the Alzheimer type. A Japanese man developed memory disturbance and visual hallucination at age 70. Although he died from pneumonia at age of 74, he had no neurological signs throughout the clinical course. The weight of his brain was 1,420 g. Macroscopic examination of the brain revealed prominent depigmentation of the substantia nigra and locus ceruleus. Histological examination disclosed neuronal loss with astrocytosis and the appearance of the Lewy bodies in the nucleus basalis of Meynert, substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, and dorsal vagal nucleus. There were widespread senile plaques in the brain, including the precentral gyrus, which was compatible with Braak stage C. A small number of neurofibrillary changes were present in the limbic areas, consistent with Braak stage III. This case is consistent with brain stem dominance with the pathological diagnosis of the Consortium on Dementia with Lewy Bodies International Workshop. That is, it is compatible with Parkinson's disease. We postulate that the clinical features of Parkinson's disease are more widespread than previously considered. PMID:15379289

  16. Emerinopathy and Laminopathy Clinical, pathological and molecular features of muscular dystrophy with nuclear envelopathy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Astejada, MN; Goto, K; Nagano, A; Ura, S; Noguchi, S; Nonaka, I; Nishino, I; Hayashi, YK

    2007-01-01

    Summary Mutations in the genes for nuclear envelope proteins of emerin (EMD) and lamin A/C (LMNA) are known to cause Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). We compared clinical features of the muscular dystrophy patients associated with mutations in EMD (emerinopathy) and LMNA (laminopathy) in our series. The incidence of laminopathy was slightly higher than that of emerinopathy. The age at onset of the disease in emerinopathy was variable and significantly older than in laminopathy. The initial symptom of emerinopathy was also variable, whereas nearly all laminopathy patients presented initially with muscle weakness. Calf hypertrophy was often seen in laminopathy, underscoring the importance of mutation screening for LMNA in childhood muscular dystrophy with calf hypertrophy. The clinical spectrum of emerinopathy is actually wider than previously known including EDMD, LGMD, conduction defects with minimal muscle/joint involvement, and their intermittent forms. Pathologically, no marked difference was observed between emerinopathy and laminopathy. Increased number and variation in size of myonuclei were detected. More precise observations using electron microscopy is warranted to characterize the detailed nuclear changes in nuclear envelopathy. PMID:18646565

  17. A retrospective cohort study identifying the principal pathological features useful in the diagnosis of inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Stefen; Squier, Waney; Sewry, Caroline; Hanna, Michael; Hilton-Jones, David; Holton, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current pathological diagnostic criteria for sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) lack sensitivity. Using immunohistochemical techniques abnormal protein aggregates have been identified in IBM, including some associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Our objective was to investigate the diagnostic utility of a number of markers of protein aggregates together with mitochondrial and inflammatory changes in IBM. Design Retrospective cohort study. The sensitivity of pathological features was evaluated in cases of Griggs definite IBM. The diagnostic potential of the most reliable features was then assessed in clinically typical IBM with rimmed vacuoles (n=15), clinically typical IBM without rimmed vacuoles (n=9) and IBM mimics—protein accumulation myopathies containing rimmed vacuoles (n=7) and steroid-responsive inflammatory myopathies (n=11). Setting Specialist muscle services at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London. Results Individual pathological features, in isolation, lacked sensitivity and specificity. However, the morphology and distribution of p62 aggregates in IBM were characteristic and in a myopathy with rimmed vacuoles, the combination of characteristic p62 aggregates and increased sarcolemmal and internal major histocompatibility complex class I expression or endomysial T cells were diagnostic for IBM with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 100%. In an inflammatory myopathy lacking rimmed vacuoles, the presence of mitochondrial changes was 100% sensitive and 73% specific for IBM; characteristic p62 aggregates were specific (91%), but lacked sensitivity (44%). Conclusions We propose an easily applied diagnostic algorithm for the pathological diagnosis of IBM. Additionally our findings support the hypothesis that many of the pathological features considered typical of IBM develop later in the disease, explaining their poor sensitivity at disease presentation and

  18. An improved high order texture features extraction method with application to pathological diagnosis of colon lesions for CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bowen; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing; Wang, Huafeng; Han, Fangfang; Zhu, Wei; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Differentiation of colon lesions according to underlying pathology, e.g., neoplastic and non-neoplastic, is of fundamental importance for patient management. Image intensity based textural features have been recognized as a useful biomarker for the differentiation task. In this paper, we introduce high order texture features, beyond the intensity, such as gradient and curvature, for that task. Based on the Haralick texture analysis method, we introduce a virtual pathological method to explore the utility of texture features from high order differentiations, i.e., gradient and curvature, of the image intensity distribution. The texture features were validated on database consisting of 148 colon lesions, of which 35 are non-neoplastic lesions, using the random forest classifier and the merit of area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristics. The results show that after applying the high order features, the AUC was improved from 0.8069 to 0.8544 in differentiating non-neoplastic lesion from neoplastic ones, e.g., hyperplastic polyps from tubular adenomas, tubulovillous adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The experimental results demonstrated that texture features from the higher order images can significantly improve the classification accuracy in pathological differentiation of colorectal lesions. The gain in differentiation capability shall increase the potential of computed tomography (CT) colonography for colorectal cancer screening by not only detecting polyps but also classifying them from optimal polyp management for the best outcome in personalized medicine.

  19. [Multiple ovarian fibromas in a patient with Gorlin syndrome: US and MR imaging features with pathological correlation].

    PubMed

    Berment, H; Genevois, A; Dacher, J N; Sabourin, J C

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of multiple ovarian fibromas in a 23 year old woman with Gorlin syndrome. We describe the US and MR imaging features with pathological correlation. The fibrous component of the tumors were hypoechoic and attenuating on US with corresponding T2W hypointensity whereas myxoid components were hypoechoic with increased through transmission on US with corresponding T2W hyperintensity. PMID:20814383

  20. [CLINICAL FEATURES AND OPTIMIZATION OF THE TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH COMBINATION GASTRODUODENAL PATHOLOGY AND PRIMARY HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Marushco, Y V; Zlobynets, A S

    2015-01-01

    The paper present dynamic of clinical picture, daily blood pressure monitoring results and subjective assessment of functional status in children with combination of chronic gastroduodenal pathology and primary hypertension when L-carnitine used with the standard treatment regimen. PMID:26118045

  1. [FEATURES MICROECOLOGY GENITAL TRACT IN WOMEN OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE WITH BENIGN CERVICAL PATHOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Koblosh, N D

    2015-01-01

    In the article we may see the results of microbiological investigation of secretion from genital tracts in women with the benign pathology of uterus cervix. The outcomes specify the disorders of microecology of genital tracts in these women following the proliferation of conditionally pathogenic flora, the increase of viral infection and the increase in the frequency of diagnostic of sexually transmitted infections. PMID:27491159

  2. Correlation mapping: rapid method for identification of histological features and pathological classification in mid infrared spectroscopic images of lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, Martin; Rogers, Keith; Stone, Nicholas

    2010-03-01

    In this work, a novel technique for rapid image analysis of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) data obtained from human lymph nodes is explored. It uses the mathematical principle of orthogonality as a method to quickly and efficiently obtain tissue and pathology information from a spectral image cube. It requires less computational power and time compared to most forms of cluster analysis. The values obtained from different tissue and pathology types allows for discrimination of noncancerous from cancerous lymph nodes. It involves the calculation of the dot product between reference spectra and individual spectra from across the tissue image. These provide a measure of the correlation between individual spectra and the reference spectra, and each spectrum or pixel in the image is given a color representing the reference most closely correlating with it. The correlation maps are validated with the tissue and pathology features identified by an expert pathologist from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections. Although this novel technique requires further study to properly test and validate this tool, with inclusion of more lymph node hyperspectral datasets (containing a greater variety of tissue states), it demonstrates significant clinical potential for pathology diagnosis.

  3. Pathological and immunological features of canine necrotising meningoencephalitis and granulomatous meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuyuki; Park, Eunsil; Tsuboi, Masaya; Chambers, James K; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Necrotising meningoencephalitis (NME) and granulomatous meningoencephalitis (GME) are idiopathic inflammatory diseases of the canine central nervous system (CNS). Typical NME occurs predominantly in small breeds of dogs, such as Pug, Maltese and Yorkshire terriers. Although there is no specific breed predisposition to GME, toy and terrier breeds appear to be overrepresented. Recent molecular investigations have identified genetic risk factors for NME in Pug, Maltese and other toy breed dogs; however, details of the pathogenesis of this disease remain to be clarified. NME is characterised pathologically by necrotic lesions with mononuclear cell infiltration in the meninges and perivascular spaces. On the basis of the distribution pattern of major necrotic foci, NME can be divided into cortex dominant and white matter dominant types; the latter is designated necrotising leucoencephalitis (NLE). Lesions in GME are characterised by the accumulation of lymphocytes and macrophages with epithelioid morphology, forming granulomas around blood vessels. Some common genetic factors and/or some additional triggers, such as infection or vaccination, may play a role in the pathogenesis of NME, NLE and GME; however, the host immune responses may define the pathological phenotypes. Different cytokine and chemokine responses are seen in NME, NLE and GME, whilst autoantibodies against astrocytes are detected predominantly in NME. This review focuses on the pathological and immunological characteristics of these canine idiopathic inflammatory CNS disorders. PMID:27240919

  4. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the

  5. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the performance

  6. Clinical and Pathological Features of Generalized Granuloma Annulare with Their Correlation: A Retrospective Multicenter Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Mi Kyeong; Seo, Young Joon; Kim, Myung Hwa; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Moon Bum; Lee, Won Soo; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Kim, You Chan; Lee, Seok Jong; Choi, Gwang Seong; Won, Young Ho; Ihm, Chull Wan

    2009-01-01

    Background Generalized granuloma annulare (GGA) is a benign skin disorder of an unknown etiology. Though some cases of GGA have been reported, few systemic reviews of the clinical and pathological features of GGA have been performed. Objective The purpose of this study is to analyze and correlate the clinical and pathological characteristics of GGA in Korean patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective study that included 54 biopsy specimens of Korean GGA patients, and the clinical and pathological features of GGA were reviewed and analyzed for their correlation. Results The cutaneous lesions could be divided into the annular (24, 44%) and nonannular types (30, 56%), and the lesions were more common in males than in females (29 males and 25 females). The incidence of GGA showed a bimodal age distribution. The number of patients who presented within the first decade was 24 cases (44%), and 24 cases (44%) were over the fifth decade. Eight patients (15%) had systemic diseases. Especially, diabetes mellitus (DM) occurred only in the adult GGA patients over forty years old. The pathological findings showed dermal granulomatous lesions that consisted of either a palisading pattern (28, 52%) or an interstitial pattern (26, 48%). Conclusion In contrast to the previously reported studies, the age of GGA onset showed a bimodal distribution, and GGA was observed more often in males. The prevalence of DM in the GGA affected individuals was higher than that found in the general Korean population. Therefore, it is recommended to perform a work-up for DM in the GGA affected patients who are over forty years old. PMID:20523767

  7. Length-adaptive graph search for automatic segmentation of pathological features in optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brenton; Cunefare, David; Grewal, Dilraj S.; Mahmoud, Tamer H.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a metric in graph search and demonstrate its application for segmenting retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of macular pathology. Our proposed "adjusted mean arc length" (AMAL) metric is an adaptation of the lowest mean arc length search technique for automated OCT segmentation. We compare this method to Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which we utilized previously in our popular graph theory and dynamic programming segmentation technique. As an illustrative example, we show that AMAL-based length-adaptive segmentation outperforms the shortest path in delineating the retina/vitreous boundary of patients with full-thickness macular holes when compared with expert manual grading.

  8. Clinical and pathologic features of West Nile virus infection in native North American owls (Family strigidae).

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, S D; Patterson, J S; Kiupel, M; Simmons, H A; Grimes, S D; Sarver, C F; Fulton, R M; Steficek, B A; Cooley, T M; Massey, J P; Sikarskie, J G

    2003-01-01

    Since the initial report of West Nile virus in the northeastern United States in 1999, the virus has spread rapidly westward and southward across the country. In the summer of 2002, several midwestern states reported increased cases of neurologic disease and mortality associated with West Nile virus infection in various native North American owl species. This report summarizes the clinical and pathologic findings for 13 captive and free-ranging owls. Affected species were all in the family Strigidae and included seven snowy owls (Nyctea scandiaca), four great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus), a barred owl (Strix varia), and a short-eared owl (Asio flammeus). Neurologic signs identified included head tilt, uncoordinated flight, paralysis, tremors, and seizures. Owls that died were screened for flaviviral proteins by immunohistochemical staining of formalin-fixed tissues, followed by specific polymerase chain reaction assay to confirm West Nile virus with fresh tissues when available. Microscopic lesions were widespread, involving brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, and were typically nonsuppurative with infiltration by predominantly lymphocytes and plasma cells. Lesions in owls were much more severe than those previously reported in corvids such as crows, which are considered highly susceptible to infection and are routinely used as sentinel species for monitoring for the presence and spread of West Nile virus. This report is the first detailed description of the pathology of West Nile virus infection in Strigiformes and indicates that this bird family is susceptible to natural infection with West Nile virus. PMID:14562887

  9. Major diagnostic and pathological features of iniencephaly based on twenty-four cases.

    PubMed

    Joó, József Gábor; Beke, Artúr; Papp, Csaba; Szigeti, Zsanett; Csaba, Akos; Papp, Zoltán

    2008-01-01

    Iniencephaly is quite a rare malformation the etiology of which is still not fully understood. In the majority of cases it is a grave and lethal condition. It is often complicated by other abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (spina bifida, anencephaly), but malformations involving other organs and systems may also be observed. Based on 24 cases the authors have surveyed the diagnostics of iniencephaly with special regard to the disorders affecting the central and non-central nervous systems. In addition, they have compared the results of prenatal diagnostics and pathological investigations. In the sample, maternal age ranged between 17 and 42 (median 24) years. Positive obstetrical-gynecological and genetic findings in the patients' history have been reported in 4 and 2 cases, respectively. In these cases, the maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) values ranged between 0.7 and 3.9 (median 2.0) MoM, while the amniotic fluid AFP values were between 0.9 and 2.7 (median 1.4) MoM. Spina bifida (50%) and anencephaly (42%) were the most commonly occurring complications affecting the central nervous system. Among the non-central nervous system disorders, malformations of the abdominal (omphalocele) and thoracic walls (diaphragmatic hernia) were found most frequently and the tendency to develop associated polyhydramnios was also very high (75%). Pathological investigations revealed developmental disorders such as cleft lip and palate, ventricular septal defect and facial dysmorphism, which are difficult to detect using ultrasonography. PMID:18504373

  10. Pathological features in marine birds affected by the prestige's oil spill in the north of Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, A; Espí, A; Márquez, I; Pérez, V; Ferreras, M C; Marín, J F García; Prieto, J M

    2005-04-01

    A total of 2,465 seabirds, mainly common murres (Uria aalge), razorbills (Alca torda), and puffins (Fratercula arctica) that beached in the northwestern part of Spain after the "Prestige" oil spill on 19 November 2002 were examined by pathological methods. Birds were divided into three groups: dead birds with the body covered (group 1) or uncovered (group 2) by oil and birds recovered alive but which died after being treated at a rescue center (group 3). The main gross lesions were severe dehydration and emaciation. Microscopically, hemosiderin deposits, related to cachexia and/or hemolytic anemia, were observed in those birds harboring oil in the intestine. Severe aspergillosis and ulcers in the ventriculus were found only in group 3 birds, probably because of stress associated with attempted rehabilitation at the rescue center. The mild character of the pathological changes suggests that petroleum oil toxicosis causes multiple sublethal changes that have an effect on the ability of the birds to survive at sea, especially weak and young, inexperienced animals. Dehydration and exhaustion seem to be the most likely cause of death. PMID:16107672

  11. Epidemiological, clinical and pathological features of primary cardiac hemangiosarcoma in dogs: a review of 51 cases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Hoshi, Katsuichiro; Hirakawa, Atsushi; Chimura, Syuuichi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Machida, Noboru

    2013-11-01

    In the study presented here, we aimed to describe the epidemiological, clinical and pathological findings of 51 canine cases with histologically-verified diagnoses of primary cardiac hemangiosarcoma (HSA). The medical data for each dog, including signalment, presenting complaints, physical examination findings, results of various diagnostic testing performed and method of treatment, were checked. In addition, all 51 cases were re-examined pathologically. The tumor occurred most frequently in older Golden Retrievers, followed by Maltese dogs and Miniature Dachshunds. Mass lesions of HSA were found more commonly in the right auricle (RAu) (25/51) and right atrium (RA) (21/51), and the RA masses were significantly (P<0.001) larger than the RAu masses. The echocardiographic detection rate of masses in the RAu group (60%; 15/25) was significantly lower than that in the RA group (95%; 20/21). Survival time was significantly (P<0.05) longer for 5 dogs that received adjuvant chemotherapy after tumor resection than for 12 dogs that did not. In this series, the Maltese (9/51) and Miniature Dachshund (7/51), as well as the Golden Retriever, were represented more frequently than other breeds. The lower echocardiographic detection rate of RAu masses compared with RA masses may be related to tumor size and/or location. The significantly longer survival time for dogs receiving adjuvant chemotherapy indicates that postoperative chemotherapy could be useful for dogs with cardiac HSA. PMID:23811814

  12. Root of the small-bowel mesentery: correlative anatomy and CT features of pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Okino, Y; Kiyosue, H; Mori, H; Komatsu, E; Matsumoto, S; Yamada, Y; Suzuki, K; Tomonari, K

    2001-01-01

    The root of the small-bowel mesentery (SBM) is an important peritoneal fold that is contiguous to other peritoneal ligaments and mesocolons. Several pathologic conditions can occur in the SBM itself, and diseases that spread through the connections from adjacent organs frequently involve it. The root of the SBM is contiguous to the hepatoduodenal ligament around the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and contiguous to the right side of the transverse mesocolon around the gastrocolic trunk. The inferior mesenteric vein, which is a landmark of the descending mesocolon, runs along the left side of the root of the SBM. Malignant neoplasms can spread to the SBM by means of direct extension, extension along the neural plexus, extension along neighboring ligaments, or extension along lymphatic vessels. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis and perforation of a jejunal diverticulum can also spread to the SBM. Anomalies that can occur in the SBM include rotation anomalies and internal hernia. Vascular lesions of the SBM include thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), acute SMV thrombosis, SMA dissection, arterioportal fistula, and portal venous gas. Other pathologic conditions that can occur in the SBM are edema or congestion, mesenteric tear, mesenteric panniculitis, and tumors or tumorlike lesions. PMID:11706218

  13. The radiological features of phylloides tumour of the breast with clinico-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Page, J E; Williams, J E

    1991-07-01

    The mammograms of 13 patients with phylloides tumour of the breast are reviewed and the results correlated with clinical and histological features. Three patients had recurrent tumours. There is a strong association between phylloides tumour and fibroadenoma. Many of the tumours are radiologically indistinguishable from fibroadenomata and it is not possible to predict tumour behaviour on the basis of clinical and radiological features alone. PMID:1651822

  14. Clinical and Anatomical Features as well as Pathological Conditions of Surgically Treated Adult Patients with Occipitalization of the Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takachika; Fueki, Keisuke; Ino, Masatake; Toda, Naofumi; Tanouchi, Tetsu; Manabe, Nodoka

    2016-01-01

    Background This paper intends to clarify clinical and anatomical features as well as pathological conditions of surgically treated adult patients with occipitalization of the atlas. Methods The authors reviewed 12 consecutive adult patients with occipitalization of the atlas who underwent surgery for myleopathy in our hospital. Mainly using preoperative computed tomography and three-dimensional computed tomography angiography, we investigated their anomalies of the osseous structures and vertebral artery at the cervical spine including the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). We also developed a new classification system for occipitalization of the atlas. Results Atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) was detected in 9 patients (75%). The condition of AAS was irreducible in 7 patients. Among these 7 patients, deformity at the lateral atlantoaxial joints was detected in 2 patients. C2-3 fusion was detected in 6 patients (67%) among 9 patients with AAS. Anomalies of the VA were detected in 11 patients (92%). Occipitalization of the atlas was classified into three types according to their pathological conditions. In type 1 (2 patients) the medial atlantoaxial joint is semi-dislocated and the lateral atlantoaxial joints are severely deformed. Type 2 (7 patients) exhibits AAS but the lateral atlantoaxial joints are not deformed. Type 3 (3 patients) is not associated with AAS and therefore does not exhibit osseous stenosis at the CVJ. In type 3 the myelopathy was caused by another coexisting condition. Conclusions Occipitalization of the atlas is classified into three types. The main pathological condition in both types 1 and 2 is AAS. Reduction of AAS is essential in both; however, reduction of AAS in type 1 is more technically demanding than in type 2. The pathological conditions of type 3 are completely different from those of the others, so an accurate diagnosis must be made. The new classification system is a useful guide for surgeons when planning surgical strategies. PMID

  15. Tau Protein Mediates APP Intracellular Domain (AICD)-Induced Alzheimer’s-Like Pathological Features in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Hana N.; Pimplikar, Sanjay W.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is cleaved by gamma-secretase to simultaneously generate amyloid beta (Aβ) and APP Intracellular Domain (AICD) peptides. Aβ plays a pivotal role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis but recent studies suggest that amyloid-independent mechanisms also contribute to the disease. We previously showed that AICD transgenic mice (AICD-Tg) exhibit AD-like features such as tau pathology, aberrant neuronal activity, memory deficits and neurodegeneration in an age-dependent manner. Since AD is a tauopathy and tau has been shown to mediate Aβ–induced toxicity, we examined the role of tau in AICD-induced pathological features. We report that ablating endogenous tau protects AICD-Tg mice from deficits in adult neurogenesis, seizure severity, short-term memory deficits and neurodegeneration. Deletion of tau restored abnormal phosphorylation of NMDA receptors, which is likely to underlie hyperexcitability and associated excitotoxicity in AICD-Tg mice. Conversely, overexpression of wild-type human tau aggravated receptor phosphorylation, impaired adult neurogenesis, memory deficits and neurodegeneration. Our findings show that tau is essential for mediating the deleterious effects of AICD. Since tau also mediates Aβ-induced toxic effects, our findings suggest that tau is a common downstream factor in both amyloid-dependent and–independent pathogenic mechanisms and therefore could be a more effective drug target for therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:27459671

  16. Primary hepatic cancers with multiple pathologic features in a patient with hepatitis C: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Go; Shinoda, Masahiro; Tanabe, Minoru; Masugi, Yohei; Ueno, Akihisa; Takano, Kiminori; Kitago, Minoru; Itano, Osamu; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Oda, Masaya; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Sakamaoto, Michiie; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of multiple primary hepatic cancers exhibiting different pathologic features coexisting in a patient with chronic hepatitis C. Computed tomography showed 2 tumors in segment 8, 20 mm (S8-A) and 5 mm (S8-B) in diameter, and a 10-mm tumor in segment 6 (S6). Based on the images, the S8-A lesion was diagnosed as cholangiocellular carcinoma or combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma (combined HCC-CC). The other 2 tumors were diagnosed as HCC. The patient underwent partial resections of segments 6 and 8. We found 2 more tumors (S8-C was 6 mm in diameter and S8-D was 4 mm) in the resected segment 8 specimen. Histopathologic examination revealed that the S8-A and S8-C tumors were combined HCC-CC, the S8-B and S6 lesions were scirrhous HCC, and the S8-D tumor was an early HCC. This is a very rare case in which different hepatic cancers with multiple pathologic features coexisted. PMID:23101996

  17. Epidemiologic Profile, Sexual History, Pathologic Features, and Human Papillomavirus Status of 103 Patients with Penile Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chaux, Alcides; Netto, George J.; Rodríguez, Ingrid M.; Barreto, José E.; Oertell, Judith; Ocampos, Sandra; Boggino, Hugo; Codas, Ricardo; Bosch, F. Xavier; de Sanjose, Silvia; Muñoz, Nubia; Hildesheim, Allan; Cubilla, Antonio L.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The incidence of penile cancer is four times higher in Paraguay than in the United States or Europe. There are no adequate scientific explanations for this geographical variation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the interplay among risk factors, morphology of the primary tumor, and HPV status. METHODS Information on socioeconomic status, education level, habits, and sexual history was obtained in 103 Paraguayan patients with penile cancer. All patients were then treated by surgery and specimens were evaluated histopathologically. RESULTS Patients usually dwelled in rural/suburban areas (82%), lived in poverty (75%), had a low education level (91%), and were heavy smokers (76%). Phimosis (57%), moderate/poor hygienic habits (90%), and history of sexually-transmitted diseases (74%) were frequently found. Patients with >10 lifetime female partners had an odds ratio of 3.8 (95% CI 1.1, 12.6; P-trend = .03) for presenting HPV positive tumors when compared to patients with <6 partners. However, this trend was not significant when the number of sexual partners was adjusted for age of first coitus and antecedents of sexually-transmitted diseases. HPV-related tumors (found in 36% of the samples) were characterized by a warty and/or basaloid morphology and high histological grade in most cases. CONCLUSIONS In our series, patients with penile cancer presented a distinctive epidemiological and pathological profile. These data might help explaining the geographical differences in incidence and aid in the design of strategies for cancer control in Paraguay. PMID:22116602

  18. Pathological features in dead on arrival broilers with special reference to heart disorders.

    PubMed

    Nijdam, E; Zailan, A R M; van Eck, J H H; Decuypere, E; Stegeman, J A

    2006-07-01

    A gross postmortem investigation was done on 302 broilers that died between catching and slaughter to establish predisposing factors for dying in this period. Special attention was paid to heart disorders, which were established by determining the ratio of the right ventricle mass to the total ventricle mass (RV:TV) and to postmortem changes in hearts and lungs of broilers that were dead on arrival (DOA). Macroscopic pathologic lesions were found in 89.4% of DOA broilers. Signs of infectious diseases appeared to be most frequent (64.9%), followed by heart and circulation disorders (42.4%), and trauma (29.5%). The RV:TV was significantly higher for DOA broilers in comparison with slaughtered broilers. The prevalence of hearts with an abnormal RV:TV in DOA broilers was 34.4 vs. 4.1% in slaughtered broilers. The DOA broilers with an abnormal heart ratio more frequently showed ascites and hydropericardium. Postmortem changes in lungs depend on the position of the carcass the first several hours after death. Broilers, which remain in dorsal recumbency for several hours after death, develop engorged lungs. A good health status as well as more attention for the catching and crating process is crucial in decreasing the percentage of DOA broilers. Prevention of an increased heart ratio and of ascites will improve the livability in the broiler house and also decrease the DOA rate enormously. PMID:16830873

  19. Columnar cell lesions of the canine mammary gland: pathological features and immunophenotypic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that columnar cell lesions indicate an alteration of the human mammary gland involved in the development of breast cancer. They have not previously been described in canine mammary gland. The aim of this paper is describe the morphologic spectrum of columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland specimens and their association with other breast lesions. Methods A total of 126 lesions were subjected to a comprehensive morphological review based upon the human breast classification system for columnar cell lesions. The presence of preinvasive (epithelial hyperplasia and in situ carcinoma) and invasive lesions was determined and immunophenotypic analysis (estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), high molecular weight cytokeratin (34βE-12), E-cadherin, Ki-67, HER-2 and P53) was perfomed. Results Columnar cell lesions were identified in 67 (53.1%) of the 126 canine mammary glands with intraepithelial alterations. They were observed in the terminal duct lobular units and characterized at dilated acini may be lined by several layers of columnar epithelial cells with elongated nuclei. Of the columnar cell lesions identified, 41 (61.2%) were without and 26 (38.8%) with atypia. Association with ductal hyperplasia was observed in 45/67 (67.1%). Sixty (89.5%) of the columnar cell lesions coexisted with neoplastic lesions (20 in situ carcinomas, 19 invasive carcinomas and 21 benign tumors). The columnar cells were ER, PgR and E-cadherin positive but negative for cytokeratin 34βE-12, HER-2 and P53. The proliferation rate as measured by Ki-67 appeared higher in the lesions analyzed than in normal TDLUs. Conclusions Columnar cell lesions in canine mammary gland are pathologically and immunophenotypically similar to those in human breast. This may suggest that dogs are a suitable model for the comparative study of noninvasive breast lesions. PMID:20178635

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Huntington disease-like syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... are responsible for HDL4 (also known as spinocerebellar ataxia type 17). The genetic cause of HDL3 is ... syndrome: GeneReview: Huntington Disease-Like 2 GeneReview: Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 17 Genetic Testing Registry: Huntington disease-like ...

  1. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer's disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may be

  2. A note on the stability and discriminability of graph-based features for classification problems in digital pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Xu, Jun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear architecture or the spatial arrangement of individual cancer nuclei on histopathology images has been shown to be associated with different grades and differential risk for a number of solid tumors such as breast, prostate, and oropharyngeal. Graph-based representations of individual nuclei (nuclei representing the graph nodes) allows for mining of quantitative metrics to describe tumor morphology. These graph features can be broadly categorized into global and local depending on the type of graph construction method. While a number of local graph (e.g. Cell Cluster Graphs) and global graph (e.g. Voronoi, Delaunay Triangulation, Minimum Spanning Tree) features have been shown to associated with cancer grade, risk, and outcome for different cancer types, the sensitivity of the preceding segmentation algorithms in identifying individual nuclei can have a significant bearing on the discriminability of the resultant features. This therefore begs the question as to which features while being discriminative of cancer grade and aggressiveness are also the most resilient to the segmentation errors. These properties are particularly desirable in the context of digital pathology images, where the method of slide preparation, staining, and type of nuclear segmentation algorithm employed can all dramatically affect the quality of the nuclear graphs and corresponding features. In this paper we evaluated the trade off between discriminability and stability of both global and local graph-based features in conjunction with a few different segmentation algorithms and in the context of two different histopathology image datasets of breast cancer from whole-slide images (WSI) and tissue microarrays (TMA). Specifically in this paper we investigate a few different performance measures including stability, discriminability and stability vs discriminability trade off, all of which are based on p-values from the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance for local and global

  3. Pathology accessioning and retrieval system with encoding by computer (PARSEC). A microcomputer-based system for anatomic pathology featuring automated SNOP coding and multiple administrative functions.

    PubMed

    Foulis, P R; Norbut, A M; Mendelow, H; Kessler, G F

    1980-06-01

    A pathology accessioning and retrieval system with encoding by computer (PARSEC) has been developed, employing a relatively inexpensive microcomputer. PARSEC performs a variety of administrative functions for anatomic pathology, including accessioning of surgical specimens, storage of patient demographic information, editing, retrieval, and archiving of patient data, as well as CAP (college of American Pathologists) workload units, billing, and inventory functions for histopathology. In addition, appropriate gross and microscopic descriptions and pathologic diagnoses can be entered into the system by a text editor. Automatic assignment of SNOP (Systematized Nomenclature of Pathology) codes, is accomplished via an online SNOP lexicon, allowing the ultimate generation of completed surgical pathology reports. The data base management system employed makes optimum use of disk storage space, while permitting rapid data retrieval. Data file maintenance is automatically accomplished by the system, requiring no user intervention. PMID:7395803

  4. RET/PTC Translocations and Clinico-Pathological Features in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Romei, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent endocrine cancer accounting for 5–10% of thyroid nodules. Papillary histotype (PTC) is the most prevalent form accounting for 80% of all thyroid carcinoma. Although much is known about its epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical, and biological behavior, the only documented risk factor for PTC is the ionizing radiation exposure. Rearrangements of the Rearranged during Transfection (RET) proto-oncogene are found in PTC and have been shown to play a pathogenic role. The first RET rearrangement, named RET/PTC, was discovered in 1987. This rearrangement constitutively activates the transcription of the RET tyrosine-kinase domain in follicular cell, thus triggering the signaling along the MAPK pathway and an uncontrolled proliferation. Up to now, 13 different types of RET/PTC rearrangements have been reported but the two most common are RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3. Ionizing radiations are responsible for the generation of RET/PTC rearrangements, as supported by in vitro studies and by the evidence that RET/PTC, and particularly RET/PTC3, are highly prevalent in radiation induced PTC. However, many thyroid tumors without any history of radiation exposure harbor similar RET rearrangements. The overall prevalence of RET/PTC rearrangements varies from 20 to 70% of PTCs and they are more frequent in childhood than in adulthood thyroid cancer. Controversial data have been reported on the relationship between RET/PTC rearrangements and the PTC prognosis. RET/PTC3 is usually associated with a more aggressive phenotype and in particular with a greater tumor size, the solid variant, and a more advanced stage at diagnosis which are all poor prognostic factors. In contrast, RET/PTC1 rearrangement does not correlate with any clinical–pathological characteristics of PTC. Moreover, the RET protein and mRNA expression level did not show any correlation with the outcome of patients with PTC and no correlation between RET/PTC rearrangements and the

  5. Pathological and immunohistochemical features of subdural histiocytic sarcomas in 15 dogs.

    PubMed

    Ide, Tetsuya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Subdural histiocytic sarcomas from 15 dogs (mean age 7.8 years) were histopathologically examined. Among the 15 dogs, there was a marked breed predominance (toward Pembroke Welsh Corgi dogs, 47%), but no gender predilection. Focal solitary subdural masses were detected in the cerebrum (12 cases) and spinal cord (1 case), whereas diffuse infiltrative lesions were observed in the cerebral leptomeninges in 2 cases. All neoplastic lesions had common histological features characterized by the proliferation of pleomorphic histiocytic cells combined with various inflammatory reactions. Multinucleated giant cells, phagocytosis, and atypical mitotic figures in the neoplastic cells were commonly observed. Most of the pleomorphic neoplastic cells in the present cases were immunopositive for monocytic, histiocytic, or both markers, such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1), cluster of differentiation (CD)163, and CD204, except for the neoplastic cells in 2 focal and 2 diffuse histiocytic sarcomas. The findings suggest that differences in cell origin, molecular expression, or both patterns are responsible for the distribution patterns of canine subdural histiocytic sarcomas. PMID:21217043

  6. Clinical & pathological features of acute toxicity due to Cassia occidentalis in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, V M; John, T J; Kumar, Amod

    2009-07-01

    Cassia occidentalis is an annual shrub found in many countries including India. Although bovines and ovines do not eat it, parts of the plant are used in some traditional herbal medicines. Several animal studies have documented that fresh or dried beans are toxic. Ingestion of large amounts by grazing animals has caused serious illness and death. The toxic effects in large animals, rodents and chicken are on skeletal muscles, liver, kidney and heart. The predominant systems involved depend upon the animal species and the dose of the beans consumed. Brain functions are often affected. Gross lesions at necropsy consist of necrosis of skeletal muscle fibres and hepatic centrilobular necrosis; renal tubular necrosis is less frequent. Muscle and liver cell necrosis is reflected in biochemical abnormalities. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) is 1 g/kg for mice and rats. Toxicity is attributed to various anthraquinones and their derivatives and alkaloids, but the specific toxins have not been identified. Data on human toxicity are extremely scarce. This review summarizes information available on Cassia toxicity in animals and compares it with toxic features reported in children. The clinical spectrum and histopathology of C. occidentalis poisoning in children resemble those of animal toxicity, affecting mainly hepatic, skeletal muscle and brain tissues. The case-fatality rate in acute severe poisoning is 75-80 per cent in children. PMID:19700797

  7. Adaptive multiple feature method (AMFM) for early detecton of parenchymal pathology in a smoking population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppaluri, Renuka; McLennan, Geoffrey; Enright, Paul; Standen, James; Boyer-Pfersdorf, Pamela; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1998-07-01

    Application of the Adaptive Multiple Feature Method (AMFM) to identify early changes in a smoking population is discussed. This method was specifically applied to determine if differences in CT images of smokers (with normal lung function) and non-smokers (with normal lung function) could be found through computerized texture analysis. Results demonstrated that these groups could be differentiated with over 80.0% accuracy. Further, differences on CT images between normal appearing lung from non-smokers (with normal lung function) and normal appearing lung from smokers (with abnormal lung function) were also investigated. These groups were differentiated with over 89.5% accuracy. In analyzing the whole lung region by region, the AMFM characterized 38.6% of a smoker lung (with normal lung function) as mild emphysema. We can conclude that the AMFM detects parenchymal patterns in the lungs of smokers which are different from normal patterns occurring in healthy non-smokers. These patterns could perhaps indicate early smoking-related changes.

  8. The thyroid: review of imaging features and biopsy techniques with radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Nachiappan, Arun C; Metwalli, Zeyad A; Hailey, Brian S; Patel, Rishi A; Ostrowski, Mary L; Wynne, David M

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of the thyroid gland is essential for appropriate identification and diagnosis of thyroid lesions. Thyroid nodules are often detected incidentally at computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography; however, ultrasonography (US) is the most commonly used imaging modality for characterization of these nodules. US characteristics that increase the likelihood of malignancy in a thyroid nodule include microcalcifications, solid composition, and central vascularity. Nuclear scintigraphy is commonly used for evaluation of physiologic thyroid function and for identification of metabolically active and inactive nodules. When fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of a lesion is indicated based on clinical and radiologic features, appropriate US-guided biopsy technique and careful cytologic analysis are crucial for making the diagnosis. FNAB and core biopsy are the two percutaneous techniques used to obtain a specimen, with the latter technique being indicated following nondiagnostic or indeterminate FNAB. Specimen adequacy and diagnostic accuracy vary due to several factors, including location of aspiration and biopsy technique used. The radiologist must have a basic knowledge of thyroid disease, be familiar with specimen processing, and recognize the cytologic and radiologic appearances of thyroid lesions, all of which will facilitate the management of these lesions. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24617678

  9. Nanotheranostics of Circulating Tumor Cells, Infections and Other Pathological Features In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zaharoff, David A.; Griffin, Robert J.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Many life-threatening diseases are disseminated through biological fluids, such as blood, lymph and cerebrospinal fluid. The migration of tumor cells through the vascular circulation is a mandatory step in metastasis, which is responsible for ∼90% of cancer-associated mortality. Circulating pathogenic bacteria, viruses, or blood clots lead to other serious conditions including bacteremia, sepsis, viremia and infarction. Therefore, technologies capable of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating bacterial cells (CBCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), cancer biomarkers such as microparticles and exosomes, which contain important microRNA signatures, and other abnormal features in biological fluids may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cancers, infections and adverse cardiovascular events. Unfortunately, even in a disease setting, circulating abnormal cells are rare events that are easily obscured by the overwhelming background material in whole blood. Existing detection methods mostly rely on ex vivo analyses of limited volumes (a few mL) of whole blood. These small volumes limit the probability of detecting CTCs, CECs, CBCs and other rare phenomena. In vivo detection platforms capable of continuously monitoring the entire circulation may substantially increase the probability of detecting circulating abnormal cells and, in particular, increase the opportunity to identify exceedingly rare and potentially dangerous subsets of these cells, such as circulating cancer stem cells (CCSCs). In addition, in vivo detection technologies capable of destroying and/or capturing circulating abnormal cells may inhibit disease progression. This article reviews novel therapeutic and diagnostic (theranostic) platforms integrating in vivo realtime early diagnosis of CTCs, CECs, CBCs and other abnormal objects in circulation. This critical review particularly focuses on nanotechnology-based theranostic (nanotheranostic) approaches, especially in

  10. Usual interstitial pneumonia end-stage features from explants with radiologic and pathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Rabeyrin, Maud; Thivolet, Françoise; Ferretti, Gilbert R; Chalabreysse, Lara; Jankowski, Adrien; Cottin, Vincent; Pison, Christophe; Cordier, Jean-François; Lantuejoul, Sylvie

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most frequent and severe idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, with typical high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features and histologic pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP); its main differential diagnosis is fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (F-NSIP). Usual interstitial pneumonia was mainly described from lung biopsies, and little is known on explants. Twenty-two UIP/IPF explants were analyzed histologically and compared with previous open lung biopsies (OLBs; n = 11) and HRCT (n = 19), when available. Temporospatial heterogeneity and subpleural and paraseptal fibrosis were similarly found in UIP/IPF explants and OLB (91%-95%). Fibroblastic foci were found in 82% of OLBs and 100% of explants, with a higher mean score in explants (P = .023). Honeycombing was present in 64% of OLBs and 95% of explants, with a higher mean score in explants (P = .005). Almost 60% of UIP/IPF explants showed NSIP areas and 41% peribronchiolar fibrosis; inflammation, bronchiolar metaplasia, and vascular changes were more frequent in UIP/IPF explants; and Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia (DIP)-like areas were not common (18%-27%). Numerous large airspace enlargements with fibrosis were frequent in UIP/IPF explants (59%). On HRCT, honeycombing was observed in 95% of the cases and ground-glass opacities in 53%, correlating with NSIP areas or acute exacerbation at histology. Six patients had combined IPF and emphysema. Lesions were more severe in UIP/IPF explants, reflecting the worsening of the disease. Usual interstitial pneumonia/IPF explants more frequently presented with confounding lesions such as NSIP areas, peribronchiolar fibrosis, and airspace enlargements with fibrosis sometimes associated with emphysema. PMID:26025258

  11. Effects of clinical, laboratuary and pathological features on successful sperm retrieval in non-obstructive azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Güneri, Çağrı; Alkibay, Turgut; Tunç, Lütfi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aims to evaluate the correlation of testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and histopathology with various features of non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) cases who consulted to our university-based infertility clinic, and the probability of prompting couples about TESE success and to investigate the cost reduction chance through cost-beneficial aspects. Material and methods One hundred and twenty-five patients were enrolled in this study. Age, unprotected intercourse period, age of puberty, and concomittant diseases were noted. Testicular volumes were measured. The correlations between genetic test results and serum levels of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH), free testosterone, prolactine were investigated. Results The incidence of NOA among infertile men was found to be 15.1%. Median age of the cases was 33.1 years. Decrease in TESE success rate was seen in the group aged >30, and those who practiced unprotected intercourse for more than 10 years. TESE success rate was 40 percent. The required negative correlation between FSH levels, and testicular volume was not observed when the patient had additional diseases and/or genitourinary surgery. FSH and LH levels were significantly different between TESE- positive and negative groups (p=0.006, and p=0.001 respectively). Success rate in bilateral TESE group was 14.2%, and 96% of TESE- negative patients had bilateral TESE. Fifteen of 118 patients had Y chromosome microdeletions. These results were similar in both TESE- positive and negative group. Conclusion None of the parameters investigated herein predicted succesful TESE outcomes. However, in cases with increased FSH and AZFa/AZFb deletion before application of bilateral TESE, in cases of increased FSH and AZFa/AZFb deletion, detailed information should be given to these patients about low success rates and risk of disease inheritance which may reduce procedural costs. Knowing groups with poor prognosis, may help

  12. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer’s disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may

  13. Clinical and pathological features of familial frontotemporal dementia caused by C9ORF72 mutation on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Feldman, Howard H; Sengdy, Pheth; Bouchard-Kerr, Phoenix; Dwosh, Emily; Butler, Rachel; Leung, Bonnie; Fok, Alice; Rutherford, Nicola J; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the FTD/ALS gene defect on chromosome 9p as an expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72). In the present study, we provide detailed analysis of the clinical features and neuropathology for 16 unrelated families with frontotemporal dementia caused by the C9ORF72 mutation. All had an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Eight families had a combination of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis while the other eight had a pure frontotemporal dementia phenotype. Clinical information was available for 30 affected members of the 16 families. There was wide variation in age of onset (mean = 54.3, range = 34-74 years) and disease duration (mean = 5.3, range = 1-16 years). Early diagnoses included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (n = 5), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 9) and progressive non-fluent aphasia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 1). Heterogeneity in clinical presentation was also common within families. However, there was a tendency for the phenotypes to converge with disease progression; seven subjects had final clinical diagnoses of both frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and all of those with an initial progressive non-fluent aphasia diagnosis subsequently developed significant behavioural abnormalities. Twenty-one affected family members came to autopsy and all were found to have transactive response DNA binding protein with M(r) 43 kD (TDP-43) pathology in a wide neuroanatomical distribution. All had involvement of the extramotor

  14. Clinical and pathological features of familial frontotemporal dementia caused by C9ORF72 mutation on chromosome 9p

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Feldman, Howard H.; Sengdy, Pheth; Bouchard-Kerr, Phoenix; Dwosh, Emily; Butler, Rachel; Leung, Bonnie; Fok, Alice; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the FTD/ALS gene defect on chromosome 9p as an expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72). In the present study, we provide detailed analysis of the clinical features and neuropathology for 16 unrelated families with frontotemporal dementia caused by the C9ORF72 mutation. All had an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Eight families had a combination of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis while the other eight had a pure frontotemporal dementia phenotype. Clinical information was available for 30 affected members of the 16 families. There was wide variation in age of onset (mean = 54.3, range = 34–74 years) and disease duration (mean = 5.3, range = 1–16 years). Early diagnoses included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (n = 5), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 9) and progressive non-fluent aphasia–amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 1). Heterogeneity in clinical presentation was also common within families. However, there was a tendency for the phenotypes to converge with disease progression; seven subjects had final clinical diagnoses of both frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and all of those with an initial progressive non-fluent aphasia diagnosis subsequently developed significant behavioural abnormalities. Twenty-one affected family members came to autopsy and all were found to have transactive response DNA binding protein with Mr 43 kD (TDP-43) pathology in a wide neuroanatomical distribution. All

  15. Optimal selection of wavelet-packet-based features using genetic algorithm in pathological assessment of patients' speech signal with unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Almasganj, Farshad

    2007-04-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) is one of the most severe types of neurogenic laryngeal disorder in which the patients, due to their vocal cords malfunction, are confronted by some serious problems. As the effect of such pathologies would be significantly evident in the reduced quality and feature variation of dysphonic voices, this study is designed to scrutinize the piecewise variation of some specific types of these features, known as energy and entropy, all over the frequency range of pathological speech signals. In order to do so, the wavelet-packet coefficients, in five consecutive levels of decomposition, are used to extract the energy and entropy measures at different spectral sub-bands. As the decomposition procedure leads to a set of high-dimensional feature vectors, genetic algorithm is invoked to search for a group of optimal sub-band indexes for which the extracted features result in the highest recognition rate for pathological and normal subjects' classification. The results of our simulations, using support vector machine classifier, show that the highest recognition rate, for both optimized energy and entropy measures, is achieved at the fifth level of wavelet-packet decomposition. It is also found that entropy feature, with the highest recognition rate of 100% vs. 93.62% for energy, is more prominent in discriminating patients with UVFP from normal subjects. Therefore, entropy feature, in comparison with energy, demonstrates a more efficient description of such pathological voices and provides us a valuable tool for clinical diagnosis of unilateral laryngeal paralysis. PMID:17034780

  16. Targeted disruption of the Hexa gene results in mice with biochemical and pathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease

    SciTech Connect

    Proia, R.L.; Yamanaka, S.; Johnson, M.D.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease, the prototype of the G{sub M2} gangliosidoses, is a catastrophic neurodegenerative disorder of infancy. The disease is caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in an absence of the lysosomal enzyme, {beta}-hexosaminidase A. As consequence of the enzyme deficiency, G{sub M2} ganglioside accumulates progressively, beginning early in fetal life, to excessive amounts in the central nervous system (CNS). Rapid mental and motor deterioration starting in the first year of life leads to death by 2 to 4 years of age. Through the targeted disruption of the Hexa gene in embryonic stem cells, we have produced mice with biochemical and neuropathologic features of Tay-Sachs disease. The mutant mice exhibited less than 1% of normal {beta}-hexosaminidase A activity and accumulated G{sub M2} ganglioside in their CNS in an age-dependent manner. The accumulated ganglioside was stored in neurons as membranous cytoplasmic bodies characteristically found in the neurons of Tay-Sachs disease patients. At three to five months of age the mutant mice showed no apparent defects in motor or memory function. These {beta}-hexosaminidase A deficient mice should be useful for devising strategies to introduce functional enzymes and genes into the CNS. This model may also be valuable for studying the biochemical and pathologic changes occurring during the course of the disease.

  17. Spatial-Temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Features for Predicting Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Shan; Kligerman, Seth; Chen, Wengen; Lu, Minh; Kim, Grace; Feigenberg, Steven; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To extract and study comprehensive spatial-temporal {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) features for the prediction of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were treated with trimodal therapy (CRT plus surgery) and underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT scans both before (pre-CRT) and after (post-CRT) CRT. The 2 scans were rigidly registered. A tumor volume was semiautomatically delineated using a threshold standardized uptake value (SUV) of ≥2.5, followed by manual editing. Comprehensive features were extracted to characterize SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns (texture), tumor geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT. The usefulness of each feature in predicting pathologic tumor response to CRT was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value. Results: The best traditional response measure was decline in maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}; AUC, 0.76). Two new intensity features, decline in mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and skewness, and 3 texture features (inertia, correlation, and cluster prominence) were found to be significant predictors with AUC values ≥0.76. According to these features, a tumor was more likely to be a responder when the SUV{sub mean} decline was larger, when there were relatively fewer voxels with higher SUV values pre-CRT, or when [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake post-CRT was relatively homogeneous. All of the most accurate predictive features were extracted from the entire tumor rather than from the most active part of the tumor. For SUV intensity features and tumor size features, changes were more predictive than pre- or post-CRT assessment alone. Conclusion: Spatial-temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET features were found to be useful predictors of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant CRT in esophageal cancer.

  18. Predicting Pathological Features at Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer Eligible for Active Surveillance by Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Cobelli, Ottavio; Terracciano, Daniela; Tagliabue, Elena; Raimondi, Sara; Bottero, Danilo; Cioffi, Antonio; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara; Petralia, Giuseppe; Cordima, Giovanni; Almeida, Gilberto Laurino; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Matei, Deliu Victor; Renne, Giuseppe; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Ferro, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS) score in predicting pathologic features in a cohort of patients eligible for active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy. Methods A total of 223 patients who fulfilled the criteria for “Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance”, were included. Mp–1.5 Tesla MRI examination staging with endorectal coil was performed at least 6–8 weeks after TRUS-guided biopsy. In all patients, the likelihood of the presence of cancer was assigned using PIRADS score between 1 and 5. Outcomes of interest were: Gleason score upgrading, extra capsular extension (ECE), unfavorable prognosis (occurrence of both upgrading and ECE), large tumor volume (≥0.5ml), and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves and Decision Curve Analyses (DCA) were performed for models with and without inclusion of PIRADS score. Results Multivariate analysis demonstrated the association of PIRADS score with upgrading (P<0.0001), ECE (P<0.0001), unfavorable prognosis (P<0.0001), and large tumor volume (P = 0.002). ROC curves and DCA showed that models including PIRADS score resulted in greater net benefit for almost all the outcomes of interest, with the only exception of SVI. Conclusions mpMRI and PIRADS scoring are feasible tools in clinical setting and could be used as decision-support systems for a more accurate selection of patients eligible for AS. PMID:26444548

  19. Chromosome region maintenance 1 expression and its association with clinical pathological features in primary carcinoma of the liver

    PubMed Central

    XIE, QIAO-LING; LIU, YUE; ZHU, YING

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Recurrence and metastasis are the major factors affecting the prognosis; thus, investigation of the underlying molecular mechanisms of invasion and metastasis, and detection of novel drug target may improve the mortality rate of liver cancer patients. Chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) recognizes specific leucine-rich nuclear export signal sequences, and its overexpression is associated with tumor-suppressor gene inactivation, proliferation, invasion and resistance to chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of CRM1 expression with the clinical and pathological features of primary liver cancer. In total, 152 cases diagnosed with liver cancer were included. CRM1 expression was detected in cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues by immunohistochemical assay. No statistically significant difference was found between the CRM1 expression levels in tumor and adjacent normal tissues (P=0.106). However, CRM1 expression in adjacent normal tissues was higher compared with that in tumor tissues in the negative hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg; P=0.029) and low differentiation (P=0.004) groups. In tumor tissues, CRM1 expression was significantly correlated with differentiation (P=0.045), whereas in adjacent normal tissues, CRM1 expression was significantly correlated with the tumor diameter (P=0.004). Therefore, it can be concluded that CRM1 is highly expressed in both tumor and adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, CRM1 expression is associated with the tumor differentiation degree and diameter. Lower differentiation and larger tumor diameter resulted in higher CRM1 expression in adjacent normal tissues, and higher tendency for invasion and metastasis. In addition, the risk of invasion and metastasis remains in chronic hepatitis B patients with negative HBeAg. PMID:27347018

  20. Anomalous expression of P-cadherin in breast carcinoma. Correlation with E-cadherin expression and pathological features.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, J.; Benito, N.; Pizarro, A.; Suárez, A.; Espada, J.; Cano, A.; Gamallo, C.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies on the cell-cell adhesion molecules P- and E-cadherin have shown that P-cadherin is not expressed in breast cancer. In contrast, the expression of E-cadherin is a normal event in these tumors, but a reduction in the levels of this molecule in neoplastic cells is associated with the histological type, high histological grade, greater tumor size, and metastasis. The expression pattern of P- and E-cadherin were immunohistochemically studied in tissue sections from normal breast tissue, benign breast lesions, and 57 infiltrating breast carcinomas. Cadherin expression was analyzed in parallel with pathological features and the immunohistochemical expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast carcinomas. P-cadherin was detected in the myoepithelial cells and E-cadherin in luminal epithelial cells from normal breast and benign breast lesions. P-cadherin expression was detected in 9 of 45 cases (20%) of infiltrating ductal carcinomas of no special type; none of the special histological types that were analyzed (7 infiltrating lobular carcinomas, 3 colloid carcinomas, and 2 infiltrating papillary carcinomas) expressed P-cadherin. In infiltrating ductal carcinomas, P-cadherin expression correlated significantly with a reduction in E-cadherin expression, histological grade (all cases were grade III tumors), and hormone receptor content (8 of 9 cases were estrogen and progesterone receptor negative). Although E-cadherin was not found in the 7 infiltrating lobular carcinomas, it was present in the remaining histological types and was preserved in 15 infiltrating ductal and 3 colloid and 2 papillary carcinomas and was reduced in 30 infiltrating ductal carcinomas. In addition, a reduction in E-cadherin expression was significantly associated with high histological grade and a lack of steroid hormone receptors in infiltrating ductal carcinomas. No apparent relationship was found between P- and E-cadherin expression and tumor size and axillary lymph

  1. The use of pathologic features in selecting the extent of surgical resection necessary for breast cancer patients treated by primary radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Harris, J R; Connolly, J L; Schnitt, S J; Cady, B; Love, S; Osteen, R T; Patterson, W B; Shirley, R; Hellman, S; Cohen, R B

    1985-02-01

    The extent of the surgical resection necessary for breast cancer patients treated by primary radiation therapy is unknown. A simple gross excision of the tumor provides the best cosmetic result, but a wide local resection may be important to prevent local recurrence in some patients. In order to identify patients who are not adequately treated by gross excision of the tumor and radiation therapy, we performed a retrospective clinical-pathologic review of 221 treated women with infiltrating duct carcinoma. There were 53 cases in which the excision specimen showed a constellation of three pathologic features: prominent intraductal carcinoma in the tumor, intraductal carcinoma in the grossly-normal adjacent tissue, and poorly-differentiated nuclei. These cases had a 37% risk of a local recurrence at 6 years compared to eight per cent for all other cases (p less than 0.0001). In cases with all three features, the use of a supplemental dose of radiation to the primary site did not significantly reduce the risk of a local recurrence. Local recurrence at 6 years was 34% in cases with all three features, who received supplemental local radiation, compared to 49% in cases not receiving a supplemental dose (p = 0.28). Survival was also worse for patients with all three features compared to other cases (69% vs. 90% at 6 years, p = 0.002). These results indicate that patients with all three pathologic features have a high risk of local recurrence following gross excision of the tumor and radiation therapy. If primary radiation therapy is selected for these patients, they should first undergo a re-excision of the tumor site in order to be certain that areas of extensive intraductal carcinoma have been adequately resected. Patients whose tumors do not show all three features are adequately treated by gross excision of the tumor prior to radiation therapy. PMID:2982337

  2. Ultrasonographic features of the persistence of superior left vena cava and pathological cardiac associations in fetus. Case series.

    PubMed

    Mărginean, Claudiu; Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Meliț, Lorena Elena; Mărginean, Maria Oana; Gozar, Liliana

    2016-06-01

    The persistence of superior left vena cava (PLSVC) is a pathological condition in fetus with risk of association with abnormalities like heterotaxy, cardiac abnormalities - atrioventricular septum defect, and conotruncal anomalies. In this paper we report 23 cases of fetuses with PLSVCs, reviewing their diagnosis, co-morbidities, and evolution in the newborns. PMID:27239657

  3. Choroid plexus implants rescue Alzheimer's disease-like pathologies by modulating amyloid-β degradation.

    PubMed

    Bolos, Marta; Antequera, Desireé; Aldudo, Jesús; Kristen, Henrike; Bullido, María Jesús; Carro, Eva

    2014-08-01

    The choroid plexuses (CP) release numerous biologically active enzymes and neurotrophic factors, and contain a subpopulation of neural progenitor cells providing the capacity to proliferate and differentiate into other types of cells. These characteristics make CP epithelial cells (CPECs) excellent candidates for cell therapy aiming at restoring brain tissue in neurodegenerative illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, using in vitro approaches, we demonstrated that CP were able to diminish amyloid-β (Aβ) levels in cell cultures, reducing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. For in vivo studies, CPECs were transplanted into the brain of the APP/PS1 murine model of AD that exhibits advanced Aβ accumulation and memory impairment. Brain examination after cell implantation revealed a significant reduction in brain Aβ deposits, hyperphosphorylation of tau, and astrocytic reactivity. Remarkably, the transplantation of CPECs was accompanied by a total behavioral recovery in APP/PS1 mice, improving spatial and non-spatial memory. These findings reinforce the neuroprotective potential of CPECs and the use of cell therapies as useful tools in AD. PMID:24343520

  4. IL-33 ameliorates Alzheimer's disease-like pathology and cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Fu, Amy K Y; Hung, Kwok-Wang; Yuen, Michael Y F; Zhou, Xiaopu; Mak, Deejay S Y; Chan, Ivy C W; Cheung, Tom H; Zhang, Baorong; Fu, Wing-Yu; Liew, Foo Y; Ip, Nancy Y

    2016-05-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating condition with no known effective treatment. AD is characterized by memory loss as well as impaired locomotor ability, reasoning, and judgment. Emerging evidence suggests that the innate immune response plays a major role in the pathogenesis of AD. In AD, the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain perturbs physiological functions of the brain, including synaptic and neuronal dysfunction, microglial activation, and neuronal loss. Serum levels of soluble ST2 (sST2), a decoy receptor for interleukin (IL)-33, increase in patients with mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that impaired IL-33/ST2 signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. Therefore, we investigated the potential therapeutic role of IL-33 in AD, using transgenic mouse models. Here we report that IL-33 administration reverses synaptic plasticity impairment and memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice. IL-33 administration reduces soluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque deposition by promoting the recruitment and Aβ phagocytic activity of microglia; this is mediated by ST2/p38 signaling activation. Furthermore, IL-33 injection modulates the innate immune response by polarizing microglia/macrophages toward an antiinflammatory phenotype and reducing the expression of proinflammatory genes, including IL-1β, IL-6, and NLRP3, in the cortices of APP/PS1 mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate a potential therapeutic role for IL-33 in AD. PMID:27091974

  5. IL-33 ameliorates Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Amy K. Y.; Hung, Kwok-Wang; Yuen, Michael Y. F.; Zhou, Xiaopu; Mak, Deejay S. Y.; Chan, Ivy C. W.; Cheung, Tom H.; Zhang, Baorong; Fu, Wing-Yu; Liew, Foo Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating condition with no known effective treatment. AD is characterized by memory loss as well as impaired locomotor ability, reasoning, and judgment. Emerging evidence suggests that the innate immune response plays a major role in the pathogenesis of AD. In AD, the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain perturbs physiological functions of the brain, including synaptic and neuronal dysfunction, microglial activation, and neuronal loss. Serum levels of soluble ST2 (sST2), a decoy receptor for interleukin (IL)-33, increase in patients with mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that impaired IL-33/ST2 signaling may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. Therefore, we investigated the potential therapeutic role of IL-33 in AD, using transgenic mouse models. Here we report that IL-33 administration reverses synaptic plasticity impairment and memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice. IL-33 administration reduces soluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque deposition by promoting the recruitment and Aβ phagocytic activity of microglia; this is mediated by ST2/p38 signaling activation. Furthermore, IL-33 injection modulates the innate immune response by polarizing microglia/macrophages toward an antiinflammatory phenotype and reducing the expression of proinflammatory genes, including IL-1β, IL-6, and NLRP3, in the cortices of APP/PS1 mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate a potential therapeutic role for IL-33 in AD. PMID:27091974

  6. Clinical-Pathologic Features and Long-Term Outcomes of Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast Compared With Invasive Ductal Carcinoma Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gene-Fu F.; Yang Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Moran, Meena S.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our institutional experience of treating tubular carcinoma of the breast (TC) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) with conservative surgery and radiation therapy, to compare clinical-pathologic features and long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A review of our institution's tumor registry from 1975 to 2007, followed by a central pathology review of available slides, yielded 71 cases of Stage I/II TC and 2,238 cases of Stage I/II IDC treated with breast conservation therapy. Clinical-pathologic features and outcomes were analyzed by subtype to detect significant differences. Results: The median follow-up was 7 years. The TC cohort presented more frequently with pT1 disease (97% vs. 80%, p = 0.0007), pN0 disease (95% vs. 74%, p = 0.0004), hormone-receptor positivity (ER+, 89% vs. 62%, p = 0.0001; PR+, 81% vs. 52%, p = 0.0001), and HER-2 negativity (89% vs. 71%, p = 0.04). Clinical outcomes also favored the TC cohort, with lower rates of breast cancer-related death (1% vs. 10%; p = 0.0109) and distant metastasis (1% vs. 13%; p = 0.0028) and higher rates of 10-year overall (90% vs. 80%; p = 0.033), cause-specific (99% vs. 86%; p = 0.011), and disease-free (99% vs. 82%; p = 0.003) survival. There was a nonsignificant trend toward improved breast cancer relapse-free survival for the TC cohort (95% vs. 87%; p = 0.062) but no difference in nodal relapse-free survival or contralateral breast cancer relapse-free survival (all p values >0.05) between the cohorts. Conclusion: Our institutional experience suggests that TC, when compared with IDC, is associated with more favorable clinical-pathologic features and comparable, if not superior, outcomes after breast conservation therapy, suggesting the appropriateness of a conservative approach to this rare subtype.

  7. [Formation and structural features of morbidity in miners with professional pathology of the peripheral nervous system and the musculoskeletal system].

    PubMed

    Shpagina, L N

    2014-01-01

    There were studied polypathy rates, their relationship with the professional pathology in Kuzbass miners. There was performed the analysis of an array of more than 2000 patients with occupational pathology and also 1800 records from for the coal miners hospitals for patients with no signs of occupational diseases. The rise in morbidity rate of polypathies was turned out to be associated with a very low proportion (less than 20%) of patients' preventive visits. It is advisable to introduce the financial incentives for doctors share for the rise of the number of healthy individuals in the enterprise, for detection rate of chronic general and occupational diseases at the early stages of the disease and for reducing of incidence of polypathies. PMID:25306698

  8. TU-C-12A-09: Modeling Pathologic Response of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer to Chemo-Radiotherapy Using Quantitative PET/CT Features, Clinical Parameters and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Chen, W; Kligerman, S; D’Souza, W; Suntharalingam, M; Lu, W; Tan, S; Kim, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop predictive models using quantitative PET/CT features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: This study included 20 patients who underwent tri-modality therapy (CRT + surgery) and had {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before initiation of CRT and 4-6 weeks after completion of CRT but prior to surgery. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (SUVmax, tumor diameter, etc.); (2) clinical parameters (TNM stage, histology, etc.) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, using cross-validations to avoid model over-fitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed via area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated via confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). Using spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications), significantly better than using conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone. For groups with a large number of tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher accuracy than the LR model. Conclusion: The SVM model using all features

  9. Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy Using Spatial-Temporal {sup 18}F-FDG PET Features, Clinical Parameters, and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Tan, Shan; Chen, Wengen; Kligerman, Seth; Kim, Grace; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct predictive models using comprehensive tumor features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This study included 20 patients who underwent trimodality therapy (CRT + surgery) and underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) both before and after CRT. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (eg, standardized uptake value [SUV]{sub max}, tumor diameter); (2) clinical parameters (eg, TNM stage, histology) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, cross-validations being used to avoid model overfitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated by confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). With the use of spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications)—results that were significantly better than when conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone were used. For groups with many tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher

  10. A new approach to the pathology, clinical features and treatment of stress tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Perugia, L; Ippolitio, E; Postacchini, F

    1976-04-01

    On the basis of clinical, anatomical, surgical, histological and pathological investigations, the authors propose a classification of the tendinopathies of the Achilles tendon associated with stress. These are particularly common in the field of sport. Three syndromes are identified: a) pure peritendinitis; b) peritendinitis associated with tendinosis; c) pure tendinosis. The symptoms and possible complications are described and the problem of treatment is discussed. In pure peritendinitis tenolysis is recommended, but in peritendinitis associated with tendinosis it should be combined with extensive scarification of the tendon in order to promote revitalisation. PMID:977317

  11. Levels and actions of neuroactive steroids in the nervous system under physiological and pathological conditions: Sex-specific features.

    PubMed

    Melcangi, Roberto C; Giatti, Silvia; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2016-08-01

    Neuroactive steroids regulate the physiology of the central and peripheral nervous system, exert neuroprotective actions and represent interesting tools for therapeutic strategies against neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Sex differences in their levels are detected not only under physiological conditions but are also modified in a sex-dependent way in different pathological alterations such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetic encephalopathy, psychiatric disorders and peripheral neuropathy. Interestingly, many of these disorders show sex differences in their incidence, symptomatology and/or neurodegenerative outcome. The neuroprotective actions of neuroactive steroids, together with the sex specific regulation of its levels might provide the basis to design sex-specific neuroprotective therapies. Indeed, some experiments here discussed suggest the viability of this approach. PMID:26657814

  12. The neuropsychiatric manifestations of Huntington's disease-like 2.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christopher A; Licht, Eliot A; Mendez, Mario F

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease-like 2 (HDL2) is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder that resembles HD but results from a distinct mutation. The authors present a patient with HDL2, hospitalized for psychiatric management, and they review the neuropsychiatric manifestations of this disorder. Depression, irritability/aggression, and frontal lobe personality changes are common presentations of HDL2 and are comparable to classic HD. Patients with HDL2 may differ from those with HD in having a lower incidence of obsessive-compulsive acts, known suicides, antisocial acts, and changes in sexuality. Clinicians should be aware of the psychiatric presentations of this disorder, when to obtain genetic testing, and how to manage problematic behaviors. PMID:23224457

  13. Chronic unremitting headache associated with Lyme disease-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kowacs, Pedro André; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Pinto, Maria Cristina Araujo; Yoshinari, Natalino Hagime

    2013-07-01

    The Brazilian Lyme-disease-like illness (BLDLI) or Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome is a unique zoonosis found in Brazil. It reproduces all the clinical symptoms of Lyme disease except for the high frequencies of relapse and the presence of autoimmune manifestations. Two cases of borreliosis manifesting with unremitting headache, which is a symptom associated with late-stage BLDLI, were presented. Clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of the BLDLI and its associated headaches were showed and discussed in this article. BLDLI diagnosis requires additional attention by physicians, since the disease has a tendency to progress to the late, recurrent stage or the chronic form, and the associated headache can be confused with chronic primary headache or with analgesic-overuse one. Special attention should be paid to patients with headaches who have traveled to endemic areas. PMID:23857618

  14. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Beta Predicts Oncologic Outcome of pT3 Upper Urinary Tract Urothelial Carcinoma Better Than Aggressive Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao Lun; Sung, Ming Tse; Tsai, Eing Mei; Lin, Chang Shen; Lee, Nai Lun; Chung, Yueh-Hua; Chiang, Po Hui

    2016-01-01

    Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UT-UC) is rare and treatment options or prognostic markers are limited. There is increasing evidence indicating that urothelial carcinoma may be an endocrine-related cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic effect of estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) on the outcome of UT-UC. From 2005 to 2012, this study included 105 patients with pT3 UT-UC. Perioperative factors, pathological features, and ERβ immunostaining were reviewed and prognostic effects were examined by multivariate analysis. This study divided patients into either the ERβ-high (n = 52) or ERβ-low (n = 53) group and analyzed their oncologic outcomes. All pathological features except infiltrating tumor architecture (significantly higher incidence in ERβ-low group, p = 0.004) are symmetric in both groups. Low ERβ expression was significantly correlated with local recurrence and distant metastasis in univariate analysis (p = 0.035 and 0.004, respectively) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.05 and 0.008, respectively). Cell line study also proved that knock down of ERβ cause less UTUC proliferation and migration. In addition, ERβ agonist also enhanced the cytotoxic and migration inhibition effect of cisplatin and ERβ antagonist cause the UTUC cell more resistant to cisplatin. This result may help identify patients in need of adjuvant therapy or develop potential targeted therapy. PMID:27052470

  15. Significant differences in demographic, clinical, and pathological features in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption among 1,633 head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Moyses, Raquel Ajub; López, Rossana Verónica Mendoza; Cury, Patrícia Maluf; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; de Gois Filho, José Francisco; Figueiredo, David Livingstone Alves; Head; GENCAPO, Neck Genome Project; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Michaluart, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: As a lifestyle-related disease, social and cultural disparities may influence the features of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in different geographic regions. We describe demographic, clinical, and pathological aspects of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck according to the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of patients in a Brazilian cohort. METHODS: We prospectively analyzed the smoking and alcohol consumption habits of 1,633 patients enrolled in five São Paulo hospitals that participated in the Brazilian Head and Neck Genome Project – Gencapo. RESULTS: The patients who smoked and drank were younger, and those who smoked were leaner than the other patients, regardless of alcohol consumption. The non-smokers/non-drinkers were typically elderly white females who had more differentiated oral cavity cancers and fewer first-degree relatives who smoked. The patients who drank presented significantly more frequent nodal metastasis, and those who smoked presented less-differentiated tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck demonstrated demographic, clinical, and pathological features that were markedly different according to their smoking and drinking habits. A subset of elderly females who had oral cavity cancer and had never smoked or consumed alcohol was notable. Alcohol consumption seemed to be related to nodal metastasis, whereas smoking correlated with the degree of differentiation. PMID:23778492

  16. Denosumab-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw affects osteoclast formation and differentiation: Pathological features of two cases

    PubMed Central

    MATSUSHITA, YUKI; HAYASHIDA, SAKI; MORISHITA, KOTA; SAKAMOTO, HIROSHI; NARUSE, TOMOFUMI; SAKAMOTO, YUKI; YAMADA, SHIN-ICHI; YANAMOTO, SOUICHI; FUJITA, SHUICHI; IKEDA, TOHRU; UMEDA, MASAHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is caused by antiresorptive (bisphosphonates and denosumab) and antiangiogenic agents, with the first report of denosumab-related ONJ emerging in 2010. To date, although certain case reports on denosumab-related ONJ have been published, those of ONJ caused by a single application of the drug are scarce. In addition, only one report described the histopathological features of this condition, although not completely; only the sequestrum resected by conservative surgery was evaluated. Although conservative treatment is recommended, the effectiveness of extensive surgery in the early stages of bisphosphonate-related ONJ has been described in recent years. Here we report the clinical and histopathological features of denosumab-related ONJ caused by single application of the drug, which was treated by extensive surgery in two patients. Histopathological analysis revealed a decreased number of osteoclasts in viable bone around the sequestrum, and these appeared morphologically immature, as indicated by the presence of very few nuclei. These findings are different from those for bisphosphonate-related ONJ and may assist in elucidating the mechanism underlying denosumab-related ONJ. Furthermore, extensive surgery may be effective for the management of this condition. PMID:26893859

  17. Mouse Models of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Review of Analytical Approaches, Pathologic Features, and Common Measurements.

    PubMed

    Aeffner, Famke; Bolon, Brad; Davis, Ian C

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe pulmonary reaction requiring hospitalization, which is incited by many causes, including bacterial and viral pneumonia as well as near drowning, aspiration of gastric contents, pancreatitis, intravenous drug use, and abdominal trauma. In humans, ARDS is very well defined by a list of clinical parameters. However, until recently no consensus was available regarding the criteria of ARDS that should be evident in an experimental animal model. This lack was rectified by a 2011 workshop report by the American Thoracic Society, which defined the main features proposed to delineate the presence of ARDS in laboratory animals. These should include histological changes in parenchymal tissue, altered integrity of the alveolar capillary barrier, inflammation, and abnormal pulmonary function. Murine ARDS models typically are defined by such features as pulmonary edema and leukocyte infiltration in cytological preparations of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or lung sections. Common pathophysiological indicators of ARDS in mice include impaired pulmonary gas exchange and histological evidence of inflammatory infiltrates into the lung. Thus, morphological endpoints remain a vital component of data sets assembled from animal ARDS models. PMID:26296628

  18. Clinical and pathological features of kidney transplant patients with concurrent polyomavirus nephropathy and rejection-associated endarteritis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Stephanie M; Chon, W James; Kim, Lisa; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinicopathologic features of concurrent polyomavirus nephropathy (PVN) and endarteritis due to rejection in renal allografts. METHODS: We searched our electronic records database for cases with transplant kidney biopsies demonstrating features of both PVN and acute rejection (AR). PVN was defined by the presence of typical viral cytopathic effect on routine sections and positive polyomavirus SV40 large-T antigen immunohistochemistry. AR was identified by endarteritis (v1 by Banff criteria). All cases were subjected to chart review in order to determine clinical presentation, treatment course and outcomes. Outcomes were recorded with a length of follow-up of at least one year or time to nephrectomy. RESULTS: Of 94 renal allograft recipients who developed PVN over an 11-year period at our institution, we identified 7 (7.4%) with viral cytopathic changes, SV40 large T antigen staining, and endarteritis in the same biopsy specimen, indicative of concurrent PVN and AR. Four arose after reduction of immunosuppression (IS) (for treatment of PVN in 3 and tuberculosis in 1), and 3 patients had no decrease of IS before developing simultaneous concurrent disease. Treatment consisted of reduced oral IS and leflunomide for PVN, and anti-rejection therapy. Three of 4 patients who developed endarteritis in the setting of reduced IS lost their grafts to rejection. All 3 patients with simultaneous PVN and endarteritis cleared viremia and were stable at 1 year of follow up. Patients with endarteritis and PVN arising in a background of reduced IS had more severe rejection and poorer outcome. CONCLUSION: Concurrent PVN and endarteritis may be more frequent than is currently appreciated and may occur with or without prior reduction of IS. PMID:26722657

  19. Isolation Housing Exacerbates Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Pathophysiology in Aged APP/PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huang; Wang, Linmei; Cao, Min; Marshall, Charles; Gao, Junying; Xiao, Na; Hu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by gradual declines in social, cognitive, and emotional functions, leading to a loss of expected social behavior. Social isolation has been shown to have adverse effects on individual development and growth as well as health and aging. Previous experiments have shown that social isolation causes an early onset of Alzheimer’s disease-like phenotypes in young APP695/PS1-dE9 transgenic mice. However, the interactions between social isolation and Alzheimer’s disease still remain unknown. Methods: Seventeen-month-old male APP695/PS1-dE9 transgenic mice were either singly housed or continued group housing for 3 months. Then, Alzheimer’s disease-like pathophysiological changes were evaluated by using behavioral, biochemical, and pathological analyses. Results: Isolation housing further promoted cognitive dysfunction and Aβ plaque accumulation in the hippocampus of aged APP695/PS1-dE9 transgenic mice, associated with increased γ-secretase and decreased neprilysin expression. Furthermore, exacerbated hippocampal atrophy, synapse and myelin associated protein loss, and glial neuroinflammatory reactions were observed in the hippocampus of isolated aged APP695/PS1-dE9 transgenic mice. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that social isolation exacerbates Alzheimer’s disease-like pathophysiology in aged APP695/PS1-dE9 transgenic mice, highlighting the potential role of group life for delaying or counteracting the Alzheimer’s disease process. PMID:25568286

  20. Primary and Secondary T-cell Lymphomas of the Breast: Clinico-pathologic Features of 11 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Breast involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphomas is rare, and exceptional for T-cell lymphomas; we studied the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features of 11 patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas involving the breast. Four cases fulfilled the definition criteria for primary breast lymphomas, 3 females and 1 male, with a median age of 51 years. One primary breast lymphomas was T-cell lymphoma unspecified, other was subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and 2 cases were anaplastic large cell lymphomas. One of the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases was found surrounding a silicone breast implant and presented as clinically as mastitis; whereas the other case occurred in a man. T-cell lymphoma secondarily involved the breast in 7 patients, all women and 1 bilateral, with a median age of 29 years. These secondary breast lymphomas occurred as part of widespread nodal or leukemic disease. Three patients had adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, including the patient with bilateral lesions, 3 others had precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia, and the other presented with a peripheral-T-cell lymphoma nonotherwise specified type. Breast T-cell lymphomas are very infrequent and are morphologically and clinically heterogeneous. PMID:19318917

  1. Middle ear meningiomas: a case series reviewing the clinical presentation, radiologic features, and contemporary management of a rare temporal bone pathology.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kristin L; Carlson, Matthew L; Pelosi, Stanley; Haynes, David S

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial intracranial neoplasm and frequently develop in the parasagittal region. Rarely, meningiomas may involve the middle ear and mastoid, resulting from contiguous spread of adjacent intracranial tumor, or less commonly as an isolated primary tumor of the middle ear. Patients with primary middle ear meningiomas (MEMs) often present with non-specific otologic complaints including hearing loss, otorrhea and otalgia thereby mimicking common chronic otitis media, while secondary lesions more frequently manifest sensorineural hearing loss, cranial neuropathy and other neurologic symptoms from the associated intracranial component. The radiological appearance of MEMs often overlaps with other tumors of the temporal bone. Therefore, a correct diagnosis cannot always be made prior to surgical biopsy. While gross total resection with preservation of existing neurological function is possible with smaller lesions, complete tumor removal may be extremely morbid with more extensive or adherent MEMs. In such cases, aggressive subtotal resection with close radiologic follow-up should be considered. Given the rarity of the studied condition, the literature addressing MEMs is sparse. The current study reviews ten additional cases of MEMs, highlighting the clinicopathologic and radiological features that distinguish meningiomas from other middle ear and mastoid pathology. PMID:24650749

  2. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome-associated renal cancer: recognition of the syndrome by pathologic features and the utility of detecting aberrant succination by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Brannon, A Rose; Toubaji, Antoun; Dudas, Maria E; Won, Helen H; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Fine, Samson W; Gopalan, Anuradha; Frizzell, Norma; Voss, Martin H; Russo, Paul; Berger, Michael F; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E

    2014-05-01

    cytoplasmic staining without nuclear labeling, unlike the pattern seen with confirmed HLRCC tumors. Sequencing revealed no germline or somatic FH alterations in 14 tumors that either exhibited only cytoplasmic 2SC staining (n=5) or were negative for 2SC (n=9), despite their HLRCC-like morphologic features. Our results emphasize the pivotal role of pathologic examination in the diagnosis of HLRCC patients and indicate immunohistochemical detection of 2SC as a useful ancillary tool in the differentiation of HLRCC renal tumors from other high-grade renal cell carcinomas. PMID:24441663

  3. Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome-associated Renal Cancer: Recognition of the Syndrome by Pathologic Features and the Utility of Detecting Aberrant Succination by Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Brannon, A. Rose; Toubaji, Antoun; Dudas, Maria E.; Won, Helen H.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A.; Fine, Samson W.; Gopalan, Anuradha; Frizzell, Norma; Voss, Martin H.; Russo, Paul; Berger, Michael F.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.

    2014-01-01

    staining without nuclear labeling, unlike the pattern seen with confirmed HLRCC tumors. Sequencing revealed no germline or somatic FH alterations in 14 tumors that either exhibited only cytoplasmic 2SC staining (n=5) or were negative for 2SC (n=9), despite their HLRCC-like morphologic features. Our results emphasize the pivotal role of pathologic examination in the diagnosis of HLRCC patients, and indicate immunohistochemical detection of 2SC as a useful ancillary tool in the differentiation of HLRCC renal tumors from other high-grade renal cell carcinomas. PMID:24441663

  4. Clinical and pathological features of toxoplasmosis in free-ranging common wombats (Vombatus ursinus) with multilocus genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii type II-like strains.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Šlapeta, Jan; Knowles, Graeme; Obendorf, David; Peck, Sarah; Phalen, David N

    2015-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a cosmopolitan zoonotic protozoan parasite with the capacity to infect virtually any warm blooded vertebrate species. Australian native marsupials are thought to be highly susceptible to toxoplasmosis; however, most reports are in captive animals and little is known about T. gondii associated disease in free-ranging marsupials, including wombats (Vombatus ursinus). This study describes the clinical and pathological features of eight cases of toxoplasmosis in free-ranging common wombats in Tasmania and New South Wales (NSW) from 1992 to 2013, including a morbidity and mortality event investigated in the Southern Highlands NSW in the autumn of 2010. The diagnosis of T. gondii infection was confirmed using either immunohistochemistry, molecular diagnostics or both. Utilizing the combination of direct DNA sequencing of B1, SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico DNA markers and virtual RFLP to genetically characterize two of the T. gondii strains, we found a nonarchetypal type II-like strain (ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #1) and an atypical type II-like strain (ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #3) to be the causal agents of toxoplasmosis in wombats from the 2010 morbidity and mortality event. This study suggests that T. gondii may act as a significant disease threat to free-ranging common wombats. Our findings indicate neurologic signs are a very common clinical presentation in common wombats with toxoplasmosis and T. gondii infection should be considered as a likely differential diagnosis for any common wombat exhibiting signs of blindness, head tilt, circling and changes in mentation. PMID:25463314

  5. Prevalence and Role of a Low-Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly in Patients With Peroneal Tendon Pathologic Features: A Potential Source of Tendon Subluxation.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Roya; Squire, Chad; Wassell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A peroneus brevis low-lying muscle belly (LLMB) is a rare anomaly. A few published studies have supported the presence of this anomaly as an etiology for a peroneal tendon tear. However, the association between a peroneus brevis LLMB and tendon subluxation has not been well explored. In the present retrospective study, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings of 50 consecutive patients undergoing primary peroneal tendon surgery during a 5-year period were assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI compared with the intraoperative findings for identifying peroneal tendon disease were investigated. The presence of associated peroneal tendon pathologic features in patients with and without a peroneus brevis LLMB was also compared. The sensitivity of MRI was high for identifying peroneal tenosynovitis (81.58%) and tear (85.71%). Although the sensitivity of MRI for detecting a peroneus brevis LLMB (3.23%) and tendon subluxation (10.00%) was low, MRI had high specificity at 94.74% and 100%, respectively. Intraoperatively, a peroneus brevis LLMB was seen in 62.00% of the patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and was associated with 64.52% of the patients with tenosynovitis, 29.03% of those with tendon subluxation, and 80.65% of those with a peroneus brevis tendon tear. Although the presence of a peroneus brevis LLMB did not show any statistically significant association with peroneus brevis tendon subluxation, of the 10 patients with intraoperatively observed tendon subluxation, 9 had a concomitant peroneus brevis LLMB. More studies with larger patient populations are needed to better investigate the role of a peroneus brevis LLMB as a mass-occupying lesion resulting in peroneal tendon subluxation. PMID:25998478

  6. A novel NREM and REM parasomnia with sleep breathing disorder associated with antibodies against IgLON5: a case series, pathological features, and characterization of the antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, Lidia; Gaig, Carles; Gelpi, Ellen; Bataller, Luis; Lewerenz, Jan; Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Contreras, Angeles; Giometto, Bruno; Compta, Yaroslau; Embid, Cristina; Vilaseca, Isabel; Iranzo, Alex; Santamaría, Joan; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    ) against IgLON5, member of a family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules. Only 1/285 controls (with progressive supranuclear palsy) had IgLON5 antibodies. Neuropathology showed neuronal loss and extensive deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau mainly involving the tegmentum of the brainstem and hypothalamus. Interpretation IgLON5-antibodies identify a unique NREM and REM parasomnia with sleep breathing dysfunction and pathological features suggesting a tauopathy. Funding Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias. Centros de Investigación Biomédica en Red de enfermedades neurodegenerativas (CIBERNED) and Respiratorias (CIBERES), Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Fundació la Marató TV3 and the National Institutes of Health. PMID:24703753

  7. Computational Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  8. Pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Hollander, E; Buchalter, A J; DeCaria, C M

    2000-09-01

    With increasing access to gambling facilities through casinos, the Internet, and other venues, PG is a rapidly emerging mental health concern. This impulse-control disorder tends to be comorbid with a wide range of other disorders and is reportedly associated with a high rate of suicide. For most gamblers, gambling is a form of entertainment, but for many individuals, the activity leads to far-reaching disruption of family and work. The personal and societal financial ramifications are severe, and many individuals with PG end up in the criminal justice system. An understanding of the neurobiology of PG is beginning to surface. 5-HT is linked to behavioral initiation and disinhibition, which are important in the onset of the gambling cycle and the difficulty in ceasing the behavior. Norepinephrine is associated with the arousal and risk taking in patients with PG. Dopamine is linked to positive and negative reward, the addictive component of this disorder. Effective treatment strategies for pathological gamblers are emerging. Potentially useful pharmacologic agents include SRIs (clomipramine and fluvoxamine), mood stabilizers for pathological gamblers with comorbid bipolar disorders (lithium), and naltrexone. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies offer promising results in the treatment of patients with this disorder. To devise prevention and early-intervention programs, research is needed to identify specific features of the individuals at risk for gambling problems. Education targeting vulnerable youth that show early signs of gambling behavior may be worthwhile and should be investigated further. Funding is necessary to support these endeavors, so perhaps a portion of tax revenues generated from the gambling industry should go toward specialized treatment facilities, educational efforts, and research into the neurobiology and treatment of PG. PMID:10986732

  9. Musculoskeletal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Peat, Frances J; Kawcak, Christopher E

    2015-08-01

    The current understanding of pathology as it relates to common diseases of the equine musculoskeletal system is reviewed. Conditions are organized under the fundamental categories of developmental, exercise-induced, infectious, and miscellaneous pathology. The overview of developmental pathology incorporates the new classification system of juvenile osteochondral conditions. Discussion of exercise-induced pathology emphasizes increased understanding of the contribution of cumulative microdamage caused by repetitive cyclic loading. Miscellaneous musculoskeletal pathology focuses on laminitis, which current knowledge indicates should be regarded as a clinical syndrome with a variety of possible distinct mechanisms of structural failure that are outlined in this overview. PMID:26037607

  10. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2016-03-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. PMID:26851666

  11. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. PMID:26065794

  12. Clinical and pathologic features of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome due to an IFIH1 mutation: A pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Marguet, Florent; Laquerrière, Annie; Goldenberg, Alice; Guerrot, Anne-Marie; Quenez, Olivier; Flahaut, Philippe; Vanhulle, Catherine; Dumant-Forest, Clémentine; Charbonnier, Françoise; Vezain, Myriam; Bekri, Soumeya; Tournier, Isabelle; Frébourg, Thierry; Nicolas, Gaël

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a young patient with calcifying encephalopathy, born to asymptomatic parents. An extensive hypothesis-driven etiological assessment was performed and failed to detect the precise etiology during many years. We therefore decided to perform whole exome sequencing of the child-unaffected parents trio. A de novo pathogenic variant in the IFIH1 gene which has recently been shown to cause autosomal dominant forms of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome was identified. This child presented with a severe form with neonatal thrombocytopenia and hepatomegaly, the latter having been detected during late gestation. Although first milestones were uneventful, he progressively lost motor skills from the age of 12 months and developed severe spastic paraplegia. Brain imaging revealed white matter abnormalities and extensive calcifications. He also presented atypical skin lesions, different from chilblains. His medical history was marked by two episodes of acute pancreatitis. We provide herein the results of pathological examination including detailed description of the neuropathological hallmarks. To our knowledge, this the first detailed clinico-pathological description of a patient with an IFIH1 pathogenic variant. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833990

  13. Therapeutic Approach of a High Functioning Individual With Traumatic Brain Injury and Subsequent Emotional Volatility With Features of Pathological Laughter and Crying With Dextromethorphan/Quinidine.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Baran, Dynela; Johnson, Thomas M; Wagner, Joyce; Shen, Joann; Geers, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    Pathological laughing and crying, or pseudobulbar affect (PBA), has been described in patients with neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and traumatic brain injury (TBI) since the 19th century (Schiffer 2005). The syndrome is characterized by inappropriate episodes of laughing or crying after minor stimuli. It was first coined a disinhibition of cortical control by Kinnier Wilson in 1924. It was observed in brain disease and seen with mild TBI. It can impair social and occupational function and is largely underrecognized in clinical settings. PBA is usually treated with antidepressants and dopaminergic agents. In this case we treated a military recruit with TBI with Nuedexta-a dextromethorphan/Quinidine derivative with a subsequent decrease in his episodes. PMID:27015166

  14. The relationship between the preoperative plasma level of HIF-1α and clinic pathological features, prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiabei; Hu, Ying; Hu, Mingming; Zhang, Siyi; Li, Baolan

    2016-01-01

    Studies have found that hypoxia is the most common feature in all of solid tumor progression, thus it has become a central issue in tumor physiology and cancer treatment. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) could make the tumor produce adaptive biological response to hypoxia and become more aggressive. In this paper, we used enzyme linked immune sorbent assay to detect the plasma level of HIF-1α in patients with NSCLC and healthy volunteers. The results indicated that the 5-year survival rate of patients with squamous cell carcinomas is negatively correlated with the plasma level of HIF-1α and the 5-year survival rate of patients with low level of HIF-1α is higher than those with high level of HIF-1α. The plasma level of HIF-1α in patients with NSCLC is significantly higher than healthy volunteers. There is no significant correlation between the plasma level of HIF-1α and clinical features of NSCLC patients. In a word, there is no connection between the plasma level of HIF-1α and the clinical features of NSCLC patients as well as their prognosis. In stratified analysis, the plasma level of HIF-1α in patients with squamous cell carcinoma is associated with regional lymph node status. PMID:26853843

  15. Pathologic and Molecular Features Correlate With Long-Term Outcome After Adjuvant Therapy of Resected Primary GI Stromal Tumor: The ACOSOG Z9001 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Corless, Christopher L.; Ballman, Karla V.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Kolesnikova, Violetta; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Blackstein, Martin E.; Blanke, Charles D.; Demetri, George D.; Heinrich, Michael C.; von Mehren, Margaret; Patel, Shreyaskumar; McCarter, Martin D.; Owzar, Kouros; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ACOSOG (American College of Surgeons Oncology Group) Z9001 (Alliance) study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, demonstrated that 1 year of adjuvant imatinib prolonged recurrence-free survival (RFS) after resection of primary GI stromal tumor (GIST). We sought to determine the pathologic and molecular factors associated with patient outcome. Patients and Methods There were 328 patients assigned to the placebo arm and 317 to the imatinib arm. Median patient follow-up was 74 months. There were 645 tumor specimens available for mitotic rate or mutation analysis. Results RFS remained superior in the imatinib arm (hazard ratio, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.75; Cox model–adjusted P < .001). On multivariable analysis of patients in the placebo arm, large tumor size, small bowel location, and high mitotic rate were associated with lower RFS, whereas tumor genotype was not significantly associated with RFS. Multivariable analysis of patients in the imatinib arm yielded similar findings. When comparing the two arms, imatinib therapy was associated with higher RFS in patients with a KIT exon 11 deletion of any type, but not a KIT exon 11 insertion or point mutation, KIT exon 9 mutation, PDGFRA mutation, or wild-type tumor, although some of these patient groups were small. Adjuvant imatinib did not seem to alter overall survival. Conclusion Our findings show that tumor size, location, and mitotic rate, but not tumor genotype, are associated with the natural history of GIST. Patients with KIT exon 11 deletions assigned to 1 year of adjuvant imatinib had a longer RFS. PMID:24638003

  16. The expression of Epstein-Barr virus latent proteins is related to the pathological features of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Delecluse, H. J.; Kremmer, E.; Rouault, J. P.; Cour, C.; Bornkamm, G.; Berger, F.

    1995-01-01

    Transplant recipients are at increased risk for the development of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs harbor genomes of the Epstein-Barr virus, a herpesvirus that immortalizes B cells in vitro. At least five viral proteins are required for immortalization. Two of them are particularly important. Latent membrane protein (LMP) has transforming activity in fibroblasts, and Epstein-Barr antigen (EBNA)2 transactivates the expression of numerous cellular and viral genes. To determine whether the expression of EBNA2 and LMP is related to the histological and clinical presentation of PTLD, we tested their expression in 14 Epstein-Barr virus-positive cases. Using monoclonal antibodies to EBNA2 and LMP on paraffin sections, we found an expression of both proteins in 2 of 3 polymorphic PTLD and in 7 of 8 cases of monomorphic, large cell PTLD, without plasmacytic differentiation. One polymorphic and one large cell PTLD expressed LMP only. LMP and EBNA2 were found particularly in immunoblasts. The number of positive cells was extremely variable in the different cases as well as within the same biopsy. Three cases of PTLD had morphological and phenotypical features of plasmacytomas and did not stain for EBNA2 or LMP. This suggests that the expression of EBNA2 and LMP is related to the differentiation stage of the infected cells and that other viral or cellular proteins may contribute to tumor growth. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7747805

  17. Clinical and pathological features of Burkitt lymphoma showing expression of BCL2--an analysis including gene expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Masqué-Soler, Neus; Szczepanowski, Monika; Kohler, Christian W; Aukema, Sietse M; Nagel, Inga; Richter, Julia; Siebert, Reiner; Spang, Rainer; Burkhardt, Birgit; Klapper, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    The differential diagnosis between Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be challenging. BL has been reported to express less BCL2 than DLBCL, but this issue has not been analysed systematically. BL expressing BCL2 can be considered to be MYC/BCL2 co-expressors, a feature that is associated with poorer outcome in DLBCL but that has not been correlated with outcome in BL so far. We analysed the expression of BCL2 in 150 cases of conventionally diagnosed BL using two different BCL2 antibodies. BCL2 expression was detected in 23% of the cases, though the expression varied in intensity and number of positive cells. We did not detect any relevant differences in clinical presentation and outcome between BCL2-positive and BCL2-negative BL in a subgroup of 43 cases for which detailed clinical data were available. An independent cohort of 17 BL with expression of BCL2 were analysed molecularly, with 13 of 17 cases classified as molecularly defined BL (Burkitt Lymphoma) using gene expression profiling on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. The four lymphomas diagnosed molecularly as intermediates did not differ in clinical presentation and outcome from molecularly defined BL. PMID:26218299

  18. Clinico-pathological features and somatic gene alterations in refractory ceramic fibre-induced murine mesothelioma reveal mineral fibre-induced mesothelioma identities

    PubMed Central

    Andujar, Pascal; Lecomte, Céline; Renier, Annie; Fleury-Feith, Jocelyne; Kheuang, Laurence; Daubriac, Julien; Janin, Anne; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2007-01-01

    Although human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) is mainly caused by asbestos exposure, refractory ceramic fibres (RCFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of their biological effects in rodents’ lung and pleura and in cultured cells. Hence, further investigations are needed to clarify the mechanism of fibre-induced carcinogenicity and to prevent use of harmful particles. In a previous study, mesotheliomas were found in hemizygous Nf2 (Nf2+/−) mice exposed to asbestos fibres, and showed similar alterations in genes at the Ink4 locus and in Trp53 as described in HMM. Here we found that Nf2+/− mice developed mesotheliomas after intra-peritoneal inoculation of a RCF sample (RCF1). Clinical features in exposed mice were similar to those observed in HMM, showing association between ascite and mesothelioma. Early passages of 12 mesothelioma cell cultures from ascites developed in RCF1-exposed Nf2+/− mice demonstrated frequent inactivation by deletion of genes at the Ink4 locus, and low rate of Trp53 point and insertion mutations. Nf2 gene was inactivated in all cultures. In most cases, co-inactivation of genes at the Ink4 locus and Nf2 was found and, at a lower rate, of Trp53 and Nf2. These results are the first to identify mutations in RCF-induced mesothelioma. They suggest that nf2 mutation is complementary of p15Ink4b, p16Ink4a and p19Arf or p53 mutations and show similar profile of gene alterations resulting from exposure to ceramic or asbestos fibres in Nf2+/− mice, also consistent with the one found in HMM. These somatic genetic changes define different pathways of mesothelial cell transformation. PMID:17272307

  19. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  20. Prediction of Low versus High Recurrence Scores in Estrogen Receptor-Positive, Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer on the Basis of Radiologic-Pathologic Features: Comparison with Oncotype DX Test Recurrence Scores.

    PubMed

    Dialani, Vandana; Gaur, Shantanu; Mehta, Tejas S; Venkataraman, Shambhavi; Fein-Zachary, Valerie; Phillips, Jordana; Brook, Alexander; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To review mammographic, ultrasonographic (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and pathologic characteristics of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, lymph node-negative invasive breast cancer and to determine the relationship of these characteristics to Oncotype DX (Genomic Health, Redwood City, Calif) test recurrence scores (ODRS) for breast cancer recurrence. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved retrospective study was performed in a single large academic medical center. The study population included patients with ER-positive, lymph node-negative invasive breast cancer who underwent genomic testing from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013. Imaging features of the tumor were classified according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon by breast imagers who were blinded to the ODRS. Mammography was performed in 86% of patients, US was performed in 84%, and MR imaging was performed in 33%, including morphologic and kinetic evaluation. Images from each imaging modality were evaluated. Each imaging finding, progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, and tumor grade were then individually correlated with ODRS. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences for each imaging feature. Regression analysis was used to calculate prediction of recurrence on the basis of imaging features combined with histopathologic features. Results The 319 patients had a mean age ± standard deviation of 55 years ± 8.7 (range, 31-82 years). Imaging features with a positive correlation with ODRS included a well-circumscribed oval mass (P = .024) at mammography, vascularity (P = .047) and posterior enhancement (P = .004) at US, and lobulated mass (P = .002) at MR imaging. Recurrence scores were predicted by using these features in combination with PR and HER2 status and tumor grade by using the threshold of more than 30 as a high recurrence score. With a regression tree, there

  1. Pyrosequencing revealed shifts of prokaryotic communities between healthy and disease-like tissues of the Red Sea sponge Crella cyathophora

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhao-Ming; Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren-Mao; Lee, On On; Wong, Yue Him; Batang, Zenon B.; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Sponge diseases have been widely reported, yet the causal factors and major pathogenic microbes remain elusive. In this study, two individuals of the sponge Crella cyathophora in total that showed similar disease-like characteristics were collected from two different locations along the Red Sea coast separated by more than 30 kilometers. The disease-like parts of the two individuals were both covered by green surfaces, and the body size was much smaller compared with adjacent healthy regions. Here, using high-throughput pyrosequencing technology, we investigated the prokaryotic communities in healthy and disease-like sponge tissues as well as adjacent seawater. Microbes in healthy tissues belonged mainly to the Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and were much more diverse at the phylum level than reported previously. Interestingly, the disease-like tissues from the two sponge individuals underwent shifts of prokaryotic communities and were both enriched with a novel clade affiliated with the phylum Verrucomicrobia, implying its intimate connection with the disease-like Red Sea sponge C. cyathophora. Enrichment of the phylum Verrucomicrobia was also considered to be correlated with the presence of algae assemblages forming the green surface of the disease-like sponge tissues. This finding represents an interesting case of sponge disease and is valuable for further study. PMID:26082867

  2. Punctate follicular porokeratosis: clinical and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Ritika; Wile, Anna; King, Joy; Ward, Kimberley H M; Brodell, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Porokeratosis is a disorder of keratinization characterized by an abnormal cornoid lamella surrounding an annular, scaly plaque with an atrophic center. A histologic variant of this condition has been proposed, termed follicular porokeratosis, in cases where follicular involvement was contiguous with an annular cornoid lamella. There has been only 1 report of punctate follicular porokeratosis, in which cornoid lamellae originated exclusively from hair follicles with no associated annular plaque. The authors present the second case of punctate follicular porokeratosis, further supporting the contention that this entity is a unique form of porokeratosis rather than a histologic variant. A 56-year-old African American female presented to the dermatology clinic with a 3-month history of keratotic lesions localized on the right posterior shoulder. Examination revealed an area of perifollicular keratotic papules, each surrounded by an erythematous rim. Histopathology revealed a cornoid lamella originating within a hair follicle, with the parakeratotic column protruding through the follicular orifice. The static nature of the condition along with exclusive involvement of hair follicles supports the notion of punctate follicular porokeratosis as a distinct clinical entity. The diagnosis of this condition relies heavily on proper histopathologic sampling revealing punctate follicular cornoid lamellae. PMID:26485244

  3. Chronic exposure to low benzo[a]pyrene level causes neurodegenerative disease-like syndromes in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gao, Dongxu; Wu, Meifang; Wang, Chonggang; Wang, Yuanchuan; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2015-10-01

    Previous epidemiological and animal studies report that exposure to environmental pollutant exposure links to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a neurotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, has been increasingly released into the environment during recent decades. So far, the role of BaP on the development of neurodegenerative diseases remaind unclear. This study aimed to determine whether chronic exposure to low dose BaP would cause neurodegenerative disease-like syndromes in zebrafish (Danio rerio). We exposed zebrafish, from early embryogenesis to adults, to environmentally relevant concentrations of BaP for 230 days. Our results indicated that BaP decreased the brain weight to body weight ratio, locomotor activity and cognitive ability; induced the loss of dopaminergic neurons; and resulted in neurodegeneration. In addition, obvious cell apoptosis in the brain was found. Furthermore, the neurotransmitter levels of dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, the mRNA levels of the genes encoding dopamine transporter, Parkinson protein 7, phosphatase and tensin-induced putative kinase 1, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine kinase 2, amyloid precursor protein b, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 were significantly down-regulated by BaP exposure. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to low dose BaP could cause the behavioral, neuropathological, neurochemical, and genetic features of neurodegenerative diseases. This study provides clues that BaP may constitute an important environmental risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases in humans. PMID:26349946

  4. Benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminide induces a storage disease-like phenotype by perturbing the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Fausto; Real, Francisco X

    2003-04-01

    The sugar analog O-benzyl-N-acetyl-alpha-d-galactosaminide (BG) is an inhibitor of glycan chain elongation and inhibits alpha2,3-sialylation in mucus-secreting HT-29 cells. Long-term exposure of these cells to BG is associated with the accumulation of apical glycoproteins in cytoplasmic vesicles. The mechanisms involved therein and the nature of the vesicles have not been elucidated. In these cells, a massive amount of BG metabolites is synthesized. Because sialic acid is mainly distributed apically in epithelial cells, it has been proposed that the BG-induced undersialylation of apical membrane glycoproteins is responsible for their intracellular accumulation due to a defect in anterograde traffic and that sialic acid may constitute an apical targeting signal. In this work, we demonstrate that the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins does not result mainly from defects in anterograde traffic. By contrast, in BG-treated cells, endocytosed membrane proteins were retained intracellularly for longer periods of time than in control cells and colocalized with accumulated MUC1 and beta(1) integrin in Rab7/lysobisphosphatidic acid(+) vesicles displaying features of late endosomes. The phenotype of BG-treated cells is reminiscent of that observed in lysosomal storage disorders. Sucrose induced a BG-like, lysosomal storage disease-like phenotype without affecting sialylation, indicating that undersialylation is not a requisite for the intracellular accumulation of membrane glycoproteins. Our findings strongly support the notion that the effects observed in BG-treated cells result from the accumulation of BG-derived metabolites and from defects in the endosomal pathway. We propose that abnormal subcellular distribution of membrane glycoproteins involved in cellular communication and/or signaling may also take place in lysosomal storage disorders and may contribute to their pathogenesis. PMID:12538583

  5. Pathological impact of SMN2 mis-splicing in adult SMA mice

    PubMed Central

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Ling, Karen K Y; Hua, Yimin; Wilkinson, John Erby; Nomakuchi, Tomoki; Rigo, Frank; Hung, Gene; Xu, David; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z; Ko, Chien-Ping; Bennett, C Frank; Krainer, Adrian R

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SMN1 cause spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. The related SMN2 gene expresses suboptimal levels of functional SMN protein, due to a splicing defect. Many SMA patients reach adulthood, and there is also adult-onset (type IV) SMA. There is currently no animal model for adult-onset SMA, and the tissue-specific pathogenesis of post-developmental SMN deficiency remains elusive. Here, we use an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to exacerbate SMN2 mis-splicing. Intracerebroventricular ASO injection in adult SMN2-transgenic mice phenocopies key aspects of adult-onset SMA, including delayed-onset motor dysfunction and relevant histopathological features. SMN2 mis-splicing increases during late-stage disease, likely accelerating disease progression. Systemic ASO injection in adult mice causes peripheral SMN2 mis-splicing and affects prognosis, eliciting marked liver and heart pathologies, with decreased IGF1 levels. ASO dose–response and time-course studies suggest that only moderate SMN levels are required in the adult central nervous system, and treatment with a splicing-correcting ASO shows a broad therapeutic time window. We describe distinctive pathological features of adult-onset and early-onset SMA. PMID:24014320

  6. Microscopic Disease Extension in Three Dimensions for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Development of a Prediction Model Using Pathology-Validated Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography Features

    SciTech Connect

    Loon, Judith van; Siedschlag, Christian; Stroom, Joep; Blauwgeers, Hans; Suylen, Robert-Jan van; Knegjens, Joost; Rossi, Maddalena; Baardwijk, Angela van; Boersma, Liesbeth; Klomp, Houke; Vogel, Wouter; Burgers, Sjaak; Gilhuijs, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: One major uncertainty in radiotherapy planning of non-small-cell lung cancer concerns the definition of the clinical target volume (CTV), meant to cover potential microscopic disease extension (MDE) around the macroscopically visible tumor. The primary aim of this study was to establish pretreatment risk factors for the presence of MDE. The secondary aim was to establish the impact of these factors on the accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) to assess the total tumor-bearing region at pathologic examination (CTV{sub path}). Methods and Materials: 34 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer who underwent CT and PET before lobectomy were included. Specimens were examined microscopically for MDE. The gross tumor volume (GTV) on CT and PET (GTV{sub CT} and GTV{sub PET}, respectively) was compared with the GTV and the CTV at pathologic examination, tissue deformations being taken into account. Using multivariate logistic regression, image-based risk factors for the presence of MDE were identified, and a prediction model was developed based on these factors. Results: MDE was found in 17 of 34 patients (50%). The MDE did not exceed 26 mm in 90% of patients. In multivariate analysis, two parameters (mean CT tumor density and GTV{sub CT}) were significantly associated with MDE. The area under the curve of the two-parameter prediction model was 0.86. Thirteen tumors (38%, 95% CI: 24-55%) were identified as low risk for MDE, being potential candidates for reduced-intensity therapy around the GTV. In the low-risk group, the effective diameter of the GTV{sub CT/PET} accurately represented the CTV{sub path}. In the high-risk group, GTV{sub CT/PET} underestimated the CTV{sub path} with, on average, 19.2 and 26.7 mm, respectively. Conclusions: CT features have potential to predict the presence of MDE. Tumors identified as low risk of MDE show lower rates of disease around the GTV than do high-risk tumors. Both CT and PET accurately

  7. Masochism and pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    That all pathological gamblers have an "unconscious wish to lose," an idea first expressed by Freud and Bergler, is neither true nor useful; wrong as well, however, are the reasons for neglecting masochism in relation to gambling. There is a small but clinically significant subgroup of pathological gamblers who are masochistic. I present clinical vignettes and a more extended treatment account to illustrate its importance. Masochism has been a confusing concept. As used here it refers to the deliberate seeking of pain, loss, suffering, or humiliation. There may be pleasure in pain, or an obligatory combining of pleasure and pain. A sense of power and control may be achieved through suffering. The case material illustrates clinically useful types (sexual masochism, masochistic personality disorder, moral masochism, relational masochism) as well as some common masochistic dynamics encountered in the treatment of pathological gamblers. These masochistic patterns are often identifiable during the initial evaluation. Distinguishing features may include a reversal of normal attitudes about winning and losing, the absence of an early winning phase, sometimes a memorable early loss. Gamblers may sabotage opportunities for success or create unnecessary obstacles for themselves. Losing may be more comfortable than winning or may be overtly sexualized. PMID:25734872

  8. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  9. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  10. Widespread cytoskeletal pathology characterizes corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Feany, M. B.; Dickson, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) is a rare, progressive neurological disorder characterized by widespread neuronal and glial pathology. Using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that the nonamyloid cortical plaques of CBD are actually collections of abnormal tau in the distal processes of astrocytes. These glial cells express both vimentin and CD44, markers of astrocyte activation. Glial pathology also includes tau-positive cytoplasmic inclusions, here localized to Leu 7-expressing oligodendrocytes. In addition, a wide array of neuronal pathology is defined with tau-positive inclusions in multiple domains of a variety of cortical neurons. CBD thus exhibits widespread glial and neuronal cytoskeletal pathology, including a novel structure, the astrocytic plaque. CBD is a disease of generalized cytoskeletal disruption affecting several cell types and multiple domains of these cells. The further definition of CBD pathology refines the diagnosis and pathophysiological understanding of this unique disease and has important implications for other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, characterized by abnormal tau deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7778678

  11. Nanotechnology: Toxicologic Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Hubbs, Ann F.; Sargent, Linda M.; Porter, Dale W.; Sager, Tina M.; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David G.; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Reynolds, Steven H.; Battelli, Lori A.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L.; Mercer, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies. PMID:23389777

  12. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology and Oral Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for dental school pathology courses describe the interrelationships of general, systemic, and oral pathology; primary educational goals; prerequisites; a core curriculum outline and behavioral objectives for each type of pathology. Notes on sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards are included. (MSE)

  13. Junctophilin 3 (JPH3) expansion mutations causing Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2) are common in South African patients with African ancestry and a Huntington disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Krause, Amanda; Mitchell, Claire; Essop, Fahmida; Tager, Susan; Temlett, James; Stevanin, Giovanni; Ross, Christopher; Rudnicki, Dobrila; Margolis, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by abnormal movements, cognitive decline, and psychiatric symptoms, caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene on chromosome 4p. A CAG/CTG repeat expansion in the junctophilin-3 (JPH3) gene on chromosome 16q24.2 causes a Huntington disease-like phenotype (HDL2). All patients to date with HDL2 have some African ancestry. The present study aimed to characterize the genetic basis of the Huntington disease phenotype in South Africans and to investigate the possible origin of the JPH3 mutation. In a sample of unrelated South African individuals referred for diagnostic HD testing, 62% (106/171) of white patients compared to only 36% (47/130) of black patients had an expansion in HTT. However, 15% (20/130) of black South African patients and no white patients (0/171) had an expansion in JPH3, confirming the diagnosis of Huntington disease like 2 (HDL2). Individuals with HDL2 share many clinical features with individuals with HD and are clinically indistinguishable in many cases, although the average age of onset and diagnosis in HDL2 is 5 years later than HD and individual clinical features may be more prominent. HDL2 mutations contribute significantly to the HD phenotype in South Africans with African ancestry. JPH3 haplotype studies in 31 families, mainly from South Africa and North America, provide evidence for a founder mutation and support a common African origin for all HDL2 patients. Molecular testing in individuals with an HD phenotype and African ancestry should include testing routinely for JPH3 mutations. PMID:26079385

  14. Myelin-associated glycoprotein gene mutation causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like disorder.

    PubMed

    Lossos, Alexander; Elazar, Nimrod; Lerer, Israela; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Fellig, Yakov; Glick, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Bat-El; Azulay, Haim; Dotan, Shlomo; Goldberg, Sharon; Gomori, John M; Ponger, Penina; Newman, J P; Marreed, Hodaifah; Steck, Andreas J; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Mor, Nofar; Harel, Michal; Geiger, Tamar; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Meiner, Vardiella; Peles, Elior

    2015-09-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations or rearrangements in PLP1. It presents in infancy with nystagmus, jerky head movements, hypotonia and developmental delay evolving into spastic tetraplegia with optic atrophy and variable movement disorders. A clinically similar phenotype caused by recessive mutations in GJC2 is known as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. Both genes encode proteins associated with myelin. We describe three siblings of a consanguineous family manifesting the typical infantile-onset Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like phenotype slowly evolving into a form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation, dysarthria, optic atrophy and peripheral neuropathy in adulthood. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were consistent with a demyelinating leukodystrophy. Using genetic linkage and exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense c.399C>G; p.S133R mutation in MAG. This gene, previously associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia, encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein, which is involved in myelin maintenance and glia-axon interaction. This mutation is predicted to destabilize the protein and affect its tertiary structure. Examination of the sural nerve biopsy sample obtained in childhood in the oldest sibling revealed complete absence of myelin-associated glycoprotein accompanied by ill-formed onion-bulb structures and a relatively thin myelin sheath of the affected axons. Immunofluorescence, cell surface labelling, biochemical analysis and mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies in a variety of cell types demonstrated a devastating effect of the mutation on post-translational processing, steady state expression and subcellular localization of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the p.S133R mutant was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and was subjected to endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation by the

  15. Gene Expression Studies on Human Trisomy 21 iPSCs and Neurons: Towards Mechanisms Underlying Down's Syndrome and Early Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Weick, Jason P; Kang, Huining; Bonadurer, George F; Bhattacharyya, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not well understood and there is no cure. Our ability to understand the early events in the course of AD is severely limited by the difficulty of identifying individuals who are in the early, preclinical stage of this disease. Most individuals with Down's syndrome (DS, trisomy 21) will predictably develop AD and that they will do so at a young age makes them an ideal population in which to study the early stages of AD. Several recent studies have exploited induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from individuals with familial AD, spontaneous AD and DS to attempt to identify early events and discover novel biomarkers of disease progression in AD. Here, we summarize the progress and limitations of these iPSC studies with a focus on iPSC-derived neurons. Further, we outline the methodology and results for comparing gene expression between AD and DS iPSC-derived neurons. We highlight differences and commonalities in these data that may implicate underlying genes and pathways that are causative for AD. PMID:26235072

  16. Loss of Polo ameliorates APP-induced Alzheimer’s disease-like symptoms in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fei; Zhao, Yu; Huang, Xirui; Chen, Changyan; Sun, Lili; Zhuang, Luming; Xue, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Despite extensive studies, little is known about the regulation of APP’s functions in vivo. Here we report that expression of human APP in Drosophila, in the same temporal-spatial pattern as its homolog APPL, induced morphological defects in wings and larval NMJ, larva and adult locomotion dysfunctions, male choice disorder and lifespan shortening. To identify additional genes that modulate APP functions, we performed a genetic screen and found that loss of Polo, a key regulator of cell cycle, partially suppressed APP-induced morphological and behavioral defects in larval and adult stages. Finally, we showed that eye-specific expression of APP induced retina degeneration and cell cycle re-entry, both phenotypes were mildly ameliorated by loss of Polo. These results suggest Polo is an important in vivo regulator of the pathological functions of APP, and provide insight into the role of cell cycle re-entry in AD pathogenesis. PMID:26597721

  17. Dysbiotic gut microbiota causes transmissible Crohn's disease-like ileitis independent of failure in antimicrobial defence

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Thomas; Calasan, Jelena; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Haange, Sven Bastiaan; Jehmlich, Nico; Basic, Marijana; Dupont, Aline; Hornef, Mathias; von Bergen, Martin; Bleich, André; Haller, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota is associated with Crohn's disease (CD). Functional evidence for a causal role of bacteria in the development of chronic small intestinal inflammation is lacking. Similar to human pathology, TNFdeltaARE mice develop a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-driven CD-like transmural inflammation with predominant ileal involvement. Design Heterozygous TNFdeltaARE mice and wildtype (WT) littermates were housed under conventional (CONV), specific pathogen-free (SPF) and germ-free (GF) conditions. Microbial communities were analysed by high-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Metaproteomes were measured using LC-MS. Temporal and spatial resolution of disease development was followed after antibiotic treatment and transfer of microbial communities into GF mice. Granulocyte infiltration and Paneth cell function was assessed by immunofluorescence and gene expression analysis. Results GF-TNFdeltaARE mice were free of inflammation in the gut and antibiotic treatment of CONV-TNFdeltaARE mice attenuated ileitis but not colitis, demonstrating that disease severity and location are microbiota-dependent. SPF-TNFdeltaARE mice developed distinct ileitis-phenotypes associated with gradual loss of antimicrobial defence. 16S analysis and metaproteomics revealed specific compositional and functional alterations of bacterial communities in inflamed mice. Transplantation of disease-associated but not healthy microbiota transmitted CD-like ileitis to GF-TNFdeltaARE recipients and triggered loss of lysozyme and cryptdin-2 expression. Monoassociation of GF-TNFdeltaARE mice with the human CD-related Escherichia coli LF82 did not induce ileitis. Conclusions We provide clear experimental evidence for the causal role of gut bacterial dysbiosis in the development of chronic ileal inflammation with subsequent failure of Paneth cell function. PMID:25887379

  18. Structures of three polycystic kidney disease-like domains from Clostridium histolyticum collagenases ColG and ColH.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Ryan; Janowska, Katarzyna; Taylor, Kelly; Jordan, Brad; Gann, Steve; Janowski, Tomasz; Latimer, Ethan C; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium histolyticum collagenases ColG and ColH are segmental enzymes that are thought to be activated by Ca(2+)-triggered domain reorientation to cause extensive tissue destruction. The collagenases consist of a collagenase module (s1), a variable number of polycystic kidney disease-like (PKD-like) domains (s2a and s2b in ColH and s2 in ColG) and a variable number of collagen-binding domains (s3 in ColH and s3a and s3b in ColG). The X-ray crystal structures of Ca(2+)-bound holo s2b (1.4 Å resolution, R = 15.0%, Rfree = 19.1%) and holo s2a (1.9 Å resolution, R = 16.3%, Rfree = 20.7%), as well as of Ca(2+)-free apo s2a (1.8 Å resolution, R = 20.7%, Rfree = 27.2%) and two new forms of N-terminally truncated apo s2 (1.4 Å resolution, R = 16.9%, Rfree = 21.2%; 1.6 Å resolution, R = 16.2%, Rfree = 19.2%), are reported. The structurally similar PKD-like domains resemble the V-set Ig fold. In addition to a conserved β-bulge, the PKD-like domains feature a second bulge that also changes the allegiance of the subsequent β-strand. This β-bulge and the genesis of a Ca(2+) pocket in the archaeal PKD-like domain suggest a close kinship between bacterial and archaeal PKD-like domains. Different surface properties and indications of different dynamics suggest unique roles for the PKD-like domains in ColG and in ColH. Surface aromatic residues found on ColH s2a-s2b, but not on ColG s2, may provide the weak interaction in the biphasic collagen-binding mode previously found in s2b-s3. B-factor analyses suggest that in the presence of Ca(2+) the midsection of s2 becomes more flexible but the midsections of s2a and s2b stay rigid. The different surface properties and dynamics of the domains suggest that the PKD-like domains of M9B bacterial collagenase can be grouped into either a ColG subset or a ColH subset. The conserved properties of PKD-like domains in ColG and in ColH include Ca(2+) binding. Conserved residues not only interact with Ca(2+), but also

  19. Explaining pathological changes in axonal excitability through dynamical analysis of conductance-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggan, Jay S.; Ocker, Gabriel K.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Prescott, Steven A.

    2011-10-01

    Neurons rely on action potentials, or spikes, to relay information. Pathological changes in spike generation likely contribute to certain enigmatic features of neurological disease, like paroxysmal attacks of pain and muscle spasm. Paroxysmal symptoms are characterized by abrupt onset and short duration, and are associated with abnormal spiking although the exact pathophysiology remains unclear. To help decipher the biophysical basis for 'paroxysmal' spiking, we replicated afterdischarge (i.e. continued spiking after a brief stimulus) in a minimal conductance-based axon model. We then applied nonlinear dynamical analysis to explain the dynamical basis for initiation and termination of afterdischarge. A perturbation could abruptly switch the system between two (quasi-)stable attractor states: rest and repetitive spiking. This bistability was a consequence of slow positive feedback mediated by persistent inward current. Initiation of afterdischarge was explained by activation of the persistent inward current forcing the system to cross a saddle point that separates the basins of attraction associated with each attractor. Termination of afterdischarge was explained by the attractor associated with repetitive spiking being destroyed. This occurred when ultra-slow negative feedback, such as intracellular sodium accumulation, caused the saddle point and stable limit cycle to collide; in that regard, the active attractor is not truly stable when the slowest dynamics are taken into account. The model also explains other features of paroxysmal symptoms, including temporal summation and refractoriness.

  20. The etiology of Ebola virus disease-like illnesses in Ebola virusnegative patients from Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Gang; Chen, Wei-Wei; Li, Lei; Ji, Dong; Ji, Ying-Jie; Li, Chen; Gao, Xu-Dong; Wang, Li-Fu; Zhao, Min; Duan, Xue-Zhang; Duan, Hui-Juan

    2016-05-10

    During the 2014 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak, less than half of EVD-suspected cases were laboratory tested as Ebola virus (EBOV)-negative, but disease identity remained unknown. In this study we investigated the etiology of EVD-like illnesses in EBOV-negative cases. From November 13, 2014 to March 16, 2015, EVD-suspected patients were admitted to Jui Government Hospital and assessed for EBOV infection by real-time PCR. Of 278 EBOV negative patients, 223 (80.21%), 142 (51.08%), 123 (44.24%), 114 (41.01%), 59 (21.22%), 35 (12.59%), and 12 (4.32%) reported fever, headache, joint pain, fatigue, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, hemorrhage, respectively. Furthermore, 121 (43.52%), 44 (15.83%), 36 (12.95%), 33 (11.87%), 23 (8.27%), 10 (3.60%) patients were diagnosed as infection with malaria, HIV, Lassa fever, tuberculosis, yellow fever, and pneumonia, respectively. No significant differences in clinical features and symptoms were found between non-EVD and EVD patients. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to explore the etiology of EVD-like illnesses in uninfected patients in Sierra Leone, highlighting the importance of accurate diagnosis to EVD confirmation. PMID:27058894

  1. hMTH1 expression protects mitochondria from Huntington's disease-like impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Ilenia; Russo, Maria Teresa; De Nuccio, Chiara; De Luca, Gabriele; Degan, Paolo; Bernardo, Antonietta; Visentin, Sergio; Minghetti, Luisa; Bignami, Margherita

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin (Htt) gene. The expression of hMTH1, the human hydrolase that degrades oxidized purine nucleoside triphosphates, grants protection in a chemical HD mouse model in which HD-like features are induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). To further examine the relationship between oxidized dNTPs and HD-like neurodegeneration, we studied the effects of hMTH1 expression in a genetic cellular model for HD, such as striatal cells expressing mutant htt (HdhQ111). hMTH1 expression protected these cells from 3-NP and H2O2-induced killing, by counteracting the mutant htt-dependent increased vulnerability and accumulation of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA 8-hydroxyguanine levels. hMTH1 expression reverted the decreased mitochondrial membrane potential characteristic of HdhQ111 cells and delayed the increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species associated with 3-NP treatment. Further indications of hMTH1-mediated mitochondrial protection are the partial reversion of 3-NP-induced alterations in mitochondrial morphology and the modulation of DRP1 and MFN1 proteins, which control fusion/fission rates of mitochondria. Finally, in line with the in vitro findings, upon 3-NP in vivo treatment, 8-hydroxyguanine levels in mitochondrial DNA from heart, muscle and brain are significantly lower in transgenic hMTH1-expressing mice than in wild-type animals. PMID:22974734

  2. Handheld computing in pathology

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; Satyanarayanan, Mahadev; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Handheld computing has had many applications in medicine, but relatively few in pathology. Most reported uses of handhelds in pathology have been limited to experimental endeavors in telemedicine or education. With recent advances in handheld hardware and software, along with concurrent advances in whole-slide imaging (WSI), new opportunities and challenges have presented themselves. This review addresses the current state of handheld hardware and software, provides a history of handheld devices in medicine focusing on pathology, and presents future use cases for such handhelds in pathology. PMID:22616027

  3. Radiographic pathology for technologists

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J.D.; Kowalczyk, N.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the fundamentals of disease mechanisms and relates this to the practice of radiologic science. Each chapter begins with a discussion of normal anatomy and physiology, then covers pathology and demonstrates how the pathology appears on film. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound are also discussed. Clinical case studies are included.

  4. Opportunities in Speech Pathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Parley W.

    The importance of speech is discussed and speech pathology is described. Types of communication disorders considered are articulation disorders, aphasia, facial deformity, hearing loss, stuttering, delayed speech, voice disorders, and cerebral palsy; examples of five disorders are given. Speech pathology is investigated from these aspects: the…

  5. Mixed tau, TDP-43 and p62 pathology in FTLD associated with a C9ORF72 repeat expansion and p.Ala239Thr MAPT (tau) variant.

    PubMed

    King, Andrew; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Troakes, Claire; Smith, Bradley N; Maekawa, Satomi; Iovino, Mariangela; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Shaw, Christopher E

    2013-02-01

    A massive intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 has recently been identified as the most common cause of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We have previously demonstrated that C9ORF72 mutant cases have a specific pathological profile with abundant p62-positive, TDP-43-negative cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions within cerebellar granular cells of the cerebellum and pyramidal cells of the hippocampus in addition to classical TDP-43 pathology. Here, we report mixed tau and TDP-43 pathology in a woman with behavioural variant FTLD who had the C9ORF72 mutation, and the p.Ala239Thr variant in MAPT (microtubule associated protein tau) gene not previously associated with tau pathology. Two of her brothers, who carried the C9ORF72 mutation, but not the MAPT variant, developed classical ALS without symptomatic cognitive changes. The dominant neuropathology in this woman with FTLD was a tauopathy with Pick's disease-like features. TDP-43 labelling was mainly confined to Pick bodies, but p62-positive, TDP-43-negative inclusions, characteristic of C9ORF72 mutations, were present in the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mixed pathology to this degree is unusual. One might speculate that the presence of the C9ORF72 mutation might influence tau deposition in what was previously thought to be a "benign" variant in MAPT in addition to the aggregation of TDP-43 and other as yet unidentified proteins decorated with ubiquitin and p62. PMID:23053136

  6. Voice data mining for laryngeal pathology assessment.

    PubMed

    Hemmerling, Daria; Skalski, Andrzej; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of different methods of speech signal analysis in the detection of voice pathologies. Firstly, an initial vector was created consisting of 28 parameters extracted from time, frequency and cepstral domain describing the human voice signal based on the analysis of sustained vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/ all at high, low and normal pitch. Afterwards we used a linear feature extraction technique (principal component analysis), which enabled a reduction in the number of parameters and choose the most effective acoustic features describing the speech signal. We have also performed non-linear data transformation which was calculated using kernel principal components. The results of the presented methods for normal and pathological cases will be revealed and discussed in this paper. The initial and extracted feature vectors were classified using the k-means clustering and the random forest classifier. We found that reasonably good classification accuracies could be achieved by selecting appropriate features. We obtained accuracies of up to 100% for classification of healthy versus pathology voice using random forest classification for female and male recordings. These results may assist in the feature development of automated detection systems for diagnosis of patients with symptoms of pathological voice. PMID:26471193

  7. Clinical governance and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Crook, M

    2002-01-01

    This article looks at clinical governance and pathology. Clinical governance should be an important tool in seeking quality improvement within the Natinal Health Service. But how as pathologists should we go about it? PMID:11896066

  8. Gastrointestinal Lymphoma: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Somwaru, Alexander S; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Levine, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Extranodal lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms that can affect every abdominal organ, with distinctive pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features. The radiologic findings are closely related to the underlying pathophysiology, and an understanding of these characteristic features should facilitate recognition of extranodal lymphoma and its various subtypes. Within the abdomen, lymphoma is found most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach. This article presents the findings in gastrointestinal tract lymphoma. PMID:27265607

  9. The Pathology of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Lindsay; Hart, John

    2016-08-01

    The term "alcoholic liver disease" encompasses a spectrum of pathologic conditions ranging from isolated steatosis to established cirrhosis. Within this spectrum, varying degrees of inflammation, hepatocellular ballooning degeneration, hepatocyte necrosis, cholestasis, and fibrosis may be encountered. This article reviews the characteristic histologic features of the many forms of alcoholic liver disease. Histologic scoring systems are described, and diseases with overlapping morphologic features and comorbid conditions are also discussed. PMID:27373610

  10. Colorectal carcinoma: Pathologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew; Ravula, Sreelakshmi; Tatishchev, Sergei F.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in the United States. Pathologic examination of biopsy, polypectomy and resection specimens is crucial to appropriate patient managemnt, prognosis assessment and family counseling. Molecular testing plays an increasingly important role in the era of personalized medicine. This review article focuses on the histopathology and molecular pathology of colorectal carcinoma and its precursor lesions, with an emphasis on their clinical relevance. PMID:22943008

  11. Clinical and pathological correlations in endometrial pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bohîlțea, RE; Sajin, M; Furtunescu, F; Bohîlțea, LC; Mihart, A; Baros, A; Anca, AF

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rate of endometrial cancer has been registering an increasing trend both in Romania and in the whole world. The paper’s aim is to analyze the diagnostic approach of endometrial pathology in the University Emergency Hospital Bucharest, on a four years period. The medium age of the patients was of 50.51 ± 10.924 years, and the median age was of 48 years. The youngest patient suffering from endometrial cancer was of 30 years. Dilation and uterine curettage represent the main method used in the performance of endometrial biopsy, based on which the certitude etiologic histopathologic diagnosis was established in 68.4% of the patients with endometrial pathology. Hyperplasias represented half of the pathology (54.9%), most of them being without atypias. Endometrial carcinoma was identified in 19% of the patients. The diagnosis of the disease in IA stage represents 5.5% of the total endometrial cases and the diagnosis of the disease in the stage of its limitation to the uterus (stage IA, IB and IC) was of 64.2%. The endometrioid adenocarcinoma represents the most encountered histopathological form and the degree of tumor differentiation established for 68,15% of the cases was predominantly 1 and 2 (88%). The main symptom, which determines the patients’ decision to go to the physician, is the abnormal uterine bleeding. 66% of the cases of endometrial cancer in the stage of the disease limited to the uterus are diagnosed in Romania based on the abnormal uterine bleeding. However, 34% of the cases are diagnosed in advanced stages, presenting a significantly low life expectancy. PMID:26664489

  12. Pathological Gambling and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Justin D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) has been considered as a behavioral addiction having similarities with substance use disorders (SUDs). Shared features exist in diagnostic, clinical, physiological, and behavioral domains. Current conceptualizations of addiction, as well as experimental studies of PG and SUDs, are reviewed in order to provide a perspective on the areas of convergence between addictive behaviors in PG and SUDs. PMID:20575651

  13. Exploring the Role of Microorganisms in the Disease-Like Syndrome Affecting the Sponge Ianthella basta▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Luter, Heidi M.; Whalan, Steve; Webster, Nicole S.

    2010-01-01

    A disease-like syndrome is currently affecting a large percentage of the Ianthella basta populations from the Great Barrier Reef and central Torres Strait. Symptoms of the syndrome include discolored, necrotic spots leading to tissue degradation, exposure of the skeletal fibers, and disruption of the choanocyte chambers. To ascertain the role of microbes in the disease process, a comprehensive comparison of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other eukaryotes was performed in healthy and diseased sponges using multiple techniques. A low diversity of microbes was observed in both healthy and diseased sponge communities, with all sponges dominated by an Alphaproteobacteria, a Gammaproteobacteria, and a group I crenarchaeota. Bacterial cultivation, community analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (Bacteria and Eukarya), sequencing of 16S rRNA clone libraries (Bacteria and Archaea), and direct visual assessment by electron microscopy failed to reveal any putative pathogens. In addition, infection assays could not establish the syndrome in healthy sponges even after direct physical contact with affected tissue. These results suggest that microbes are not responsible for the formation of brown spot lesions and necrosis in I. basta. PMID:20622129

  14. Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Tau Neuropathology Leads to Memory Deficits and Loss of Functional Synapses in a Novel Mutated Tau Transgenic Mouse without Any Motor Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Schindowski, Katharina; Bretteville, Alexis; Leroy, Karelle; Bégard, Séverine; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Hamdane, Malika; Buée, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Tau transgenic mice are valuable models to investigate the role of tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. However, motor dysfunction and dystonic posture interfering with behavioral testing are the most common undesirable effects of tau transgenic mice. Therefore, we have generated a novel mouse model (THY-Tau22) that expresses human 4-repeat tau mutated at sites G272V and P301S under a Thy1.2-promotor, displaying tau pathology in the absence of any motor dysfunction. THY-Tau22 shows hyperphosphorylation of tau on several Alzheimer’s disease-relevant tau epitopes (AT8, AT100, AT180, AT270, 12E8, tau-pSer396, and AP422), neurofibrillary tangle-like inclusions (Gallyas and MC1-positive) with rare ghost tangles and PHF-like filaments, as well as mild astrogliosis. These mice also display deficits in hippocampal synaptic transmission and impaired behavior characterized by increased anxiety, delayed learning from 3 months, and reduced spatial memory at 10 months. There are no signs of motor deficits or changes in motor activity at any age investigated. This mouse model therefore displays the main features of tau pathology and several of the pathophysiological disturbances observed during neurofibrillary degeneration. This model will serve as an experimental tool in future studies to investigate mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits during pathogenic tau aggregation. PMID:16877359

  15. Pathological conditions re-shape physiological Tregs into pathological Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William Y.; Shao, Ying; Lopez-Pastrana, Jahaira; Mai, Jietang; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2015-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4 T cells that play an essential role in maintaining peripheral immune tolerance, controlling acute and chronic inflammation, allergy, autoimmune diseases, and anti-cancer immune responses. Over the past 20 years, significant progress has been made since Tregs were first characterized in 1995. Many concepts and principles regarding Tregs generation, phenotypic features, subsets (tTregs, pTregs, iTregs, and iTreg35), tissue specificity (central Tregs, effector Tregs, and tissue resident Tregs), homeostasis (highly dynamic and apoptotic), regulation of Tregs by receptors for PAMPs and DAMPs, Treg plasticity (re-differentiation to other CD4 T helper cell subsets, Th1, Th2, Tfh and Th17), and epigenetic regulation of Tregs phenotypes and functions have been innovated. In this concise review, we want to briefly analyze these eight new progresses in the study of Tregs. We have also proposed for the first time a novel concept that “physiological Tregs” have been re-shaped into “pathological Tregs” in various pathological environments. Continuing of the improvement in our understanding on this important cellular component about the immune tolerance and immune suppression, would lead to the future development of novel therapeutics approaches for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, allergy, allogeneic transplantation-related immunity, sepsis, autoimmune diseases, and cancers. PMID:26623425

  16. Molecular systems evaluation of oligomerogenic APPE693Q and fibrillogenic APPKM670/671NL/PSEN1Δexon9 mouse models identifies shared molecular features with human Alzheimer’s brain molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Readhead, Ben; Haure-Mirande, Jean-Vianney; Zhang, Bin; Haroutunian, Vahram; Gandy, Sam; Schadt, Eric E.; Dudley, Joel T.; Ehrlich, Michelle E.

    2016-01-01

    matrix regulation and neurogenesis, as well as strong overlap with AD associated co-expression network structures. The strong overlap in molecular systems features supports the relevance of these findings from the AD mouse models to human AD. PMID:26552589

  17. Molecular systems evaluation of oligomerogenic APP(E693Q) and fibrillogenic APP(KM670/671NL)/PSEN1(Δexon9) mouse models identifies shared features with human Alzheimer's brain molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Readhead, B; Haure-Mirande, J-V; Zhang, B; Haroutunian, V; Gandy, S; Schadt, E E; Dudley, J T; Ehrlich, M E

    2016-08-01

    , including ECM regulation and neurogenesis, as well as strong overlap with AD-associated co-expression network structures. The strong overlap in molecular systems features supports the relevance of these findings from the AD mouse models to human AD. PMID:26552589

  18. Complexity and forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard Martin

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that nonlinearity and complexity are the norm in human physiological systems, the relevance of which is informing an enhanced understanding of basic pathological processes such as inflammation, the host response to severe trauma, and critical illness. This article will explore how an understanding of nonlinear systems and complexity might inform the study of the pathophysiology of deaths of medicolegal interest, and how 'complexity thinking' might usefully be incorporated into modern forensic medicine and forensic pathology research, education and practice. PMID:26372537

  19. Complications of Pathologic Myopia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Shin, Joo Young; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Pathologic myopia (PM) is one of the leading causes of visual impairment worldwide. The pathophysiology of PM is not fully understood, but the axial elongation of the eye followed by chorioretinal thinning is suggested as a key mechanism. Pathologic myopia may lead to many complications such as chorioretinal atrophy, foveoschisis, choroidal neovascularization, rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, cataract, and glaucoma. Some complications affect visual acuity significantly, showing poor visual prognosis. This article aims to review the types, pathophysiology, treatment, and visual outcome of the complications of PM. PMID:26649982

  20. Molecular Pathology Informatics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somak

    2015-06-01

    Molecular informatics (MI) is an evolving discipline that will support the dynamic landscape of molecular pathology and personalized medicine. MI provides a fertile ground for development of clinical solutions to bridge the gap between clinical informatics and bioinformatics. Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical arena has triggered major endeavors in MI that are expected to bring a paradigm shift in the practice of pathology. This brief review presents a broad overview of various aspects of MI, particularly in the context of NGS based testing. PMID:26065793

  1. Training pathologists in mouse pathology.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Ward, J M; HogenEsch, H; Nikitin, A Yu; Treuting, P M; Macauley, J B; Schofield, P N

    2012-03-01

    Expertise in the pathology of mice has expanded from traditional regulatory and drug safety screening (toxicologic pathology) primarily performed by veterinary pathologists to the highly specialized area of mouse research pathobiology performed by veterinary and medical pathologists encompassing phenotyping of mutant mice and analysis of research experiments exploiting inbred mouse strains and genetically engineered lines. With increasing use of genetically modified mice in research, mouse pathobiology and, by extension, expert mouse research-oriented pathologists have become integral to the success of basic and translational biomedical research. Training for today's research-oriented mouse pathologist must go beyond knowledge of anatomic features of mice and strain-specific background diseases to the specialized genetic nomenclature, husbandry, and genetics, including the methodology of genetic engineering and complex trait analysis. While training can be accomplished through apprenticeships in formal programs, these are often heavily service related and do not provide the necessary comprehensive training. Specialty courses and short-term mentoring with expert specialists are opportunities that, when combined with active practice and publication, will lead to acquisition of the skills required for cutting-edge mouse-based experimental science. PMID:20817889

  2. [Cartilage tumors : Pathology and radiomorphology].

    PubMed

    Uhl, M; Herget, G; Kurz, P

    2016-06-01

    Primary cartilage-forming tumors of the bone are frequent entities in the daily work of skeletal radiologists. This article describes the correlation of pathology and radiology in cartilage-forming skeletal tumors, in particular, enchondroma, osteochondroma, periosteal chondromas, chondroblastoma and various forms of chondrosarcoma. After reading, the radiologist should be able to deduce the different patterns of cartilage tumors on radiographs, CT, and MRI from the pathological aspects. Differentiation of enchondroma and chondrosarcoma is a frequent diagnostic challenge. Some imaging parameters, e. g., deep cortical scalloping (more than two thirds of the cortical thickness), cortical destruction, or a soft-tissue mass, are features of a sarcoma. Osteochondromas are bony protrusions with a continuous extension of bone marrow from the parent bone, the host cortical bone runs continuously from the osseous surface of the tumor into the shaft of the osteochondroma and the osteochondroma has a cartilage cap. Chondromyxoid fibromas are well-defined lytic and eccentric lesions of the metaphysis of the long bones, with nonspecific MRI findings. Chondroblastomas have a strong predilection for the epiphysis of long tubular bones and develop an intense perifocal bone marrow edema. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas are bimorphic lesions with a low-grade chondrogenic component and a high-grade noncartilaginous component. Most chondrogenic tumors have a predilection with regard to site and age at manifestation. PMID:27233920

  3. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  4. Pathological fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  5. Is Psychometrics Pathological Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michell, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Pathology of science occurs when the normal processes of scientific investigation break down and a hypothesis is accepted as true within the mainstream of a discipline without a serious attempt being made to test it and without any recognition that this is happening. It is argued that this has happened in psychometrics: The hypothesis upon which…

  6. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations. PMID:27265600

  7. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  8. Personality Pathology and Interpersonal Problem Stability

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Scott, Lori N.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) are often described as stable, which ignores the important dynamic processes and shifts that are observed clinically in individuals with PD. The current study examined patterns of variability in problematic interpersonal functioning, a core feature of personality pathology. Participants (N=150) were assessed for personality pathology at baseline and also completed the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems–Circumplex Scales at baseline and every three months over the course of a year. Baseline PD was used to predict individual means and variability parameters in generalized interpersonal distress, agentic problems, and communal problems across repeated assessments. Disorders associated with disinhibition predicted variability in generalized distress and agentic problems, whereas only antagonism related disorders predicted variability in communal problems. These associations reveal dynamic processes involved in multiple dimensions of personality pathology and suggest that future research on instability is needed that expands beyond the historical focus on borderline PD. PMID:25562539

  9. Epitope and isotype specificities of antibodies to -amyloid peptide for protection against Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Frédérique; Barbour, Robin; Cannon, Catherine; Carretto, Robert; Fox, Michael; Games, Dora; Guido, Teresa; Hoenow, Kathleen; Hu, Kang; Johnson-Wood, Kelly; Khan, Karen; Kholodenko, Dora; Lee, Celeste; Lee, Mike; Motter, Ruth; Nguyen, Minh; Reed, Amanda; Schenk, Dale; Tang, Pearl; Vasquez, Nicki; Seubert, Peter; Yednock, Ted

    2003-02-01

    Transgenic PDAPP mice, which express a disease-linked isoform of the human amyloid precursor protein, exhibit CNS pathology that is similar to Alzheimer's disease. In an age-dependent fashion, the mice develop plaques containing -amyloid peptide (A) and exhibit neuronal dystrophy and synaptic loss. It has been shown in previous studies that pathology can be prevented and even reversed by immunization of the mice with the A peptide. Similar protection could be achieved by passive administration of some but not all monoclonal antibodies against A. In the current studies we sought to define the optimal antibody response for reducing neuropathology. Immune sera with reactivity against different A epitopes and monoclonal antibodies with different isotypes were examined for efficacy both ex vivo and in vivo. The studies showed that: (i) of the purified or elicited antibodies tested, only antibodies against the N-terminal regions of A were able to invoke plaque clearance; (ii) plaque binding correlated with a clearance response and neuronal protection, whereas the ability of antibodies to capture soluble A was not necessarily correlated with efficacy; (iii) the isotype of the antibody dramatically influenced the degree of plaque clearance and neuronal protection; (iv) high affinity of the antibody for Fc receptors on microglial cells seemed more important than high affinity for Aβ itself; and (v) complement activation was not required for plaque clearance. These results indicate that antibody Fc-mediated plaque clearance is a highly efficient and effective process for protection against neuropathology in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

  11. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology. PMID:12605090

  12. Reducing C-terminal-truncated alpha-synuclein by immunotherapy attenuates neurodegeneration and propagation in Parkinson's disease-like models.

    PubMed

    Games, Dora; Valera, Elvira; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Ubhi, Kiren; Nuber, Silke; Sacayon, Patricia; Zago, Wagner; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; Schenk, Dale; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are common neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population, characterized by progressive and abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). Recent studies have shown that C-terminus (CT) truncation and propagation of α-syn play a role in the pathogenesis of PD/DLB. Therefore, we explored the effect of passive immunization against the CT of α-syn in the mThy1-α-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model, which resembles the striato-nigral and motor deficits of PD. Mice were immunized with the new monoclonal antibodies 1H7, 5C1, or 5D12, all directed against the CT of α-syn. CT α-syn antibodies attenuated synaptic and axonal pathology, reduced the accumulation of CT-truncated α-syn (CT-α-syn) in axons, rescued the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase fibers in striatum, and improved motor and memory deficits. Among them, 1H7 and 5C1 were most effective at decreasing levels of CT-α-syn and higher-molecular-weight aggregates. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that preincubation of recombinant α-syn with 1H7 and 5C1 prevented CT cleavage of α-syn. In a cell-based system, CT antibodies reduced cell-to-cell propagation of full-length α-syn, but not of the CT-α-syn that lacked the 118-126 aa recognition site needed for antibody binding. Furthermore, the results obtained after lentiviral expression of α-syn suggest that antibodies might be blocking the extracellular truncation of α-syn by calpain-1. Together, these results demonstrate that antibodies against the CT of α-syn reduce levels of CT-truncated fragments of the protein and its propagation, thus ameliorating PD-like pathology and improving behavioral and motor functions in a mouse model of this disease. PMID:25009275

  13. Reducing C-Terminal-Truncated Alpha-Synuclein by Immunotherapy Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Propagation in Parkinson's Disease-Like Models

    PubMed Central

    Games, Dora; Valera, Elvira; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Ubhi, Kiren; Nuber, Silke; Sacayon, Patricia; Zago, Wagner; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; Schenk, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are common neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population, characterized by progressive and abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). Recent studies have shown that C-terminus (CT) truncation and propagation of α-syn play a role in the pathogenesis of PD/DLB. Therefore, we explored the effect of passive immunization against the CT of α-syn in the mThy1-α-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model, which resembles the striato-nigral and motor deficits of PD. Mice were immunized with the new monoclonal antibodies 1H7, 5C1, or 5D12, all directed against the CT of α-syn. CT α-syn antibodies attenuated synaptic and axonal pathology, reduced the accumulation of CT-truncated α-syn (CT-α-syn) in axons, rescued the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase fibers in striatum, and improved motor and memory deficits. Among them, 1H7 and 5C1 were most effective at decreasing levels of CT-α-syn and higher-molecular-weight aggregates. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that preincubation of recombinant α-syn with 1H7 and 5C1 prevented CT cleavage of α-syn. In a cell-based system, CT antibodies reduced cell-to-cell propagation of full-length α-syn, but not of the CT-α-syn that lacked the 118–126 aa recognition site needed for antibody binding. Furthermore, the results obtained after lentiviral expression of α-syn suggest that antibodies might be blocking the extracellular truncation of α-syn by calpain-1. Together, these results demonstrate that antibodies against the CT of α-syn reduce levels of CT-truncated fragments of the protein and its propagation, thus ameliorating PD-like pathology and improving behavioral and motor functions in a mouse model of this disease. PMID:25009275

  14. In situ follicular lymphoma: pathologic characteristics and diagnostic features.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Santoro, Armando

    2012-03-01

    The diagnosis of in situ follicular lymphoma (FL) is feasible when immunohistochemical characterization is carried out and genetic abnormalities are assessed. We usually use a selected diagnostic panel of antibodies (CD10, CD20, CD23, BCL2, BCL6, and Ki67) in lymph nodes with follicular hyperplasia only when we analyze an unexplained lymphadenopathy. Molecular studies, for example, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for t(14;18), are restricted to doubtful cases in which immunohistochemistry data are ambiguous. Immunohistochemically, the involved follicles show strongly positive staining for BCL2 and CD10. The BCL2+ cells are confined only to germinal centers and are not seen in the interfollicular region or elsewhere in the lymph node. The BCL2 staining in the abnormal follicles is notable for its high-level and uniform intensity. In situ FL may be associated with overt FL or with lymphomas other than FL or with other malignancies. The crucial point relies on distinguishing in situ FL arising in asymptomatic patients from cases with presence of lymphoma at the same or other sites. Other open questions remain on the frequency with which in situ FLs occur and the frequency of concomitant systemic disease. PMID:21560142

  15. Acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis: definition, pathologic features, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chong Jai; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Chaiyasit, Noppadol; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yeon Mee

    2015-10-01

    Acute inflammatory lesions of the placenta consist of diffuse infiltration of neutrophils at different sites in the organ. These lesions include acute chorioamnionitis, funisitis, and chorionic vasculitis and represent a host response (maternal or fetal) to a chemotactic gradient in the amniotic cavity. While acute chorioamnionitis is evidence of a maternal host response, funisitis and chorionic vasculitis represent fetal inflammatory responses. Intraamniotic infection generally has been considered to be the cause of acute chorioamnionitis and funisitis; however, recent evidence indicates that "sterile" intraamniotic inflammation, which occurs in the absence of demonstrable microorganisms induced by "danger signals," is frequently associated with these lesions. In the context of intraamniotic infection, chemokines (such as interleukin-8 and granulocyte chemotactic protein) establish a gradient that favors the migration of neutrophils from the maternal or fetal circulation into the chorioamniotic membranes or umbilical cord, respectively. Danger signals that are released during the course of cellular stress or cell death can also induce the release of neutrophil chemokines. The prevalence of chorioamnionitis is a function of gestational age at birth, and present in 3-5% of term placentas and in 94% of placentas delivered at 21-24 weeks of gestation. The frequency is higher in patients with spontaneous labor, preterm labor, clinical chorioamnionitis (preterm or term), or ruptured membranes. Funisitis and chorionic vasculitis are the hallmarks of the fetal inflammatory response syndrome, a condition characterized by an elevation in the fetal plasma concentration of interleukin-6, and associated with the impending onset of preterm labor, a higher rate of neonatal morbidity (after adjustment for gestational age), and multiorgan fetal involvement. This syndrome is the counterpart of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in adults: a risk factor for short- and long-term complications (ie, sterile inflammation in fetuses, neonatal sepsis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, and cerebral palsy). This article reviews the definition, pathogenesis, grading and staging, and clinical significance of the most common lesions in placental disease. Illustrations of the lesions and diagrams of the mechanisms of disease are provided. PMID:26428501

  16. Otic artery: a review of normal and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Vasović, Ljiljana; Arsić, Stojanka; Vlajković, Slobodan; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Andjelković, Zlatibor

    2010-05-01

    Three primitive arteries - the trigeminal, otic and hypoglossal take the names according to their close relation with the V, VIII and XII cranial nerves, while at the cervical level, the first segmental artery is named the primitive proatlantal intersegmental artery. When the human embryo is 4 mm long, these arteries serve as transitory anastomoses between primitive internal carotid arteries and bilateral longitudinal neural arterial plexus, which is the precursor of future basilar artery. Normal and/or abnormal morphofunctional aspects of the prenatal and postnatal forms of the otic artery are described according to the personal and literature data. Many (ab) normal arteries are also noted in differential diagnosis of the otic artery. Postnatally, individual incidence rates of the carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses have been found to be inversely related to their order of disappearance. The persistent trigeminal artery has a reported incidence from 0.06-0.6%, whereas the persistent primitive otic artery has been convincingly documented only in minor rates. Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses between the anterior and posterior cranial circulation are important to recognize during angiography for endovascular and surgical planning. Most frequently, the otic artery was an incidental finding. PMID:20424561

  17. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... With the National Cancer Institute for Inaugural Global Pathology Conference March 2016 OneLab Memo ASCP Action Alert - ... 2016 Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  18. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Science Letter to Council of Deans: State of Pathology Training in Medical School Help Chart the Future ... Need Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  19. From telepathology to virtual pathology institution: the new world of digital pathology.

    PubMed

    Kayser, K; Kayser, G; Radziszowski, D; Oehmann, A

    Telepathology has left its childhood. Its technical development is mature, and its use for primary (frozen section) and secondary (expert consultation) diagnosis has been expanded to a great amount. This is in contrast to a virtual pathology laboratory, which is still under technical constraints. Similar to telepathology, which can also be used for e-learning and e-training in pathology, as exemplarily is demonstrated on Digital Lung Pathology (Klaus.Kayser@charite.de) at least two kinds of virtual pathology laboratories will be implemented in the near future: a) those with distributed pathologists and distributed (> or = 1) laboratories associated to individual biopsy stations/surgical theatres, and b) distributed pathologists (usually situated in one institution) and a centralized laboratory, which digitizes complete histological slides. Both scenarios are under intensive technical investigations. The features of virtual pathology comprise a virtual pathology institution (mode a) that accepts a complete case with the patient's history, clinical findings, and (pre-selected) images for first diagnosis. The diagnostic responsibility is that of a conventional institution. The Internet serves as platform for information transfer, and an open server such as the iPATH (http://telepath.patho.unibas.ch) for coordination and performance of the diagnostic procedure. The size and number of transferred images have to be limited, and usual different magnifications have to be used. The sender needs to possess experiences in image sampling techniques, which present with the most significant information. A group of pathologists is "on duty", or selects one member for a predefined duty period. The diagnostic statement of the pathologist(s) on duty is retransmitted to the sender with full responsibility. The first experiences of a virtual pathology institution group working with the iPATH server working with a small hospital of the Salomon islands are promising. A centralized

  20. Molecular pathology in real time.

    PubMed

    Ryška, Aleš

    2016-03-01

    With the development of sophisticated individualized therapeutic approaches, the role of pathology in classification of tumors is enormously increasing. The solely morphological characterization of neoplastic process is no more sufficient for qualified decision on optimal therapeutic approach. Thus, morphologic diagnosis must be supplemented by molecular analysis of the lesion with emphasis on the detection of status of certain markers used as predictive factors for targeted therapy. Both intrinsic and acquired types of intratumor heterogeneity have an impact at various moments of cancer diagnostics and therapy. The primary heterogeneity of neoplastic tissue represents a significant problem in patients, where only limited biopsy samples from the primary tumor are available for diagnosis, such as core needle biopsy specimens in breast cancer, transthoracic or endobronchial biopsies in lung cancer, or endoscopic biopsies in gastric cancer. Detection of predictive markers may be influenced by this heterogeneity, and the marker detection may be falsely negative or (less probably) falsely positive. In addition, as these markers are often detected in the tissue samples from primary tumor, the differences between molecular features of the primary lesion and its metastases may be responsible for failure of systemic therapy in patients with discordant phenotype between primary and metastatic disease. The fact of tumor heterogeneity must be taken into consideration already in establishing pathological diagnosis. One has to be aware that limited biopsy specimen must not always be fully representative of the entire tumor volume. To overcome these limitations, there does not exist one single simple solution. Examination of more tissue (preference of surgical resection specimens over biopsies, whenever possible), use of ultra-sensitive methods able to identify the minute subclones as a source of possible resistance to treatment, and detection of secondary molecular events from

  1. Pathologic and physiologic phimosis

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Thomas B.; Pike, John G.; Leonard, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the differences between physiologic and pathologic phimosis, review proper foreskin care, and discuss when it is appropriate to seek consultation regarding a phimotic foreskin. SOURCES OF INFORMATION This paper is based on selected findings from a MEDLINE search for literature on phimosis and circumcision referrals and on our experience at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Urology Clinic. MeSH headings used in our MEDLINE search included “phimosis,” “referral and consultation,” and “circumcision.” Most of the available articles about phimosis and foreskin referrals were retrospective reviews and cohort studies (levels II and III evidence). MAIN MESSAGE Phimosis is defined as the inability to retract the foreskin. Differentiating between physiologic and pathologic phimosis is important, as the former is managed conservatively and the latter requires surgical intervention. Great anxiety exists among patients and parentsregarding non-retractile foreskins. Most phimosis referrals seen in pediatric urology clinics are normal physiologically phimotic foreskins. Referrals of patients with physiologic phimosis to urology clinics can create anxiety about the need for surgery among patients and parents, while unnecessarily expanding the waiting list for specialty assessment. Uncircumcised penises require no special care. With normal washing, using soap and water, and gentle retraction during urination and bathing, most foreskins will become retractile over time. CONCLUSION Physiologic phimosis is often seen by family physicians. These patients and their parents require reassurance of normalcy and reinforcement of proper preputial hygiene. Consultation should be sought when evidence of pathologic phimosis is present, as this requires surgical management. PMID:17872680

  2. Pathology of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Elder, David E

    2015-04-01

    The pathology of melanoma is discussed in relation to surgical diagnosis and management. Pitfalls that may result in problems of clinicopathologic communication are emphasized. A compelling vision for the future is that all tumors will be characterized by their driving oncogenes, suppressor genes, and other genomic factors. The success of targeted therapy directed against individual oncogenes, despite its limitations, suggests that a repertoire of targeted agents will be developed that can be used against a variety of different tumors, depending on the results of genetic testing. Nevertheless, histopathologic diagnosis and surgical therapy will remain mainstays of management for melanoma. PMID:25769708

  3. Marketing the pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, E N

    1995-07-01

    Effective marketing of the pathology practice is essential in the face of an increasingly competitive market. Successful marketing begins with a market-driven planning process. As opposed to the traditional planning process used in health care organizations, a market-driven approach is externally driven. Implementing a market-driven plan also requires recognition of the definition of the service. Each market to which pathologists direct their service defines the service differently. Recognition of these different service definitions and creation of a product to meet these needs could lead to competitive advantages in the marketplace. PMID:7625911

  4. Doubly Phosphorylated Peptide Vaccines to Protect Transgenic P301S Mice against Alzheimer’s Disease Like Tau Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Monique; Mewes, Agneta; Fritsch, Manuela; Krügel, Ute; Hoffmann, Ralf; Singer, David

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques are potential targets for active and passive immunotherapies. In this study we used the transgenic mouse model P301S for active immunizations with peptide vaccines composed of a double phosphorylated tau neoepitope (pSer202/pThr205, pThr212/pSer214, pThr231/pSer235) and an immunomodulatory T cell epitope from the tetanus toxin or tuberculosis antigen Ag85B. Importantly, the designed vaccine combining Alzheimer’s disease (AD) specific B cell epitopes with foreign (bacterial) T cell epitopes induced fast immune responses with high IgG1 titers after prophylactic immunization that subsequently decreased over the observation period. The effectiveness of the immunization was surveyed by evaluating the animal behavior, as well as the pathology in the brain by biochemical and histochemical techniques. Immunized mice clearly lived longer with reduced paralysis than placebo-treated mice. Additionally, they performed significantly better in rotarod and beam walk tests at the age of 20 weeks, indicating that the disease development was slowed down. Forty-eight weeks old vaccinated mice passed the beam walk test significantly better than control animals, which together with the increased survival rates undoubtedly prove the treatment effect. In conclusion, the data provide strong evidence that active immune therapies can reduce toxic effects of deposits formed in AD. PMID:26344748

  5. Exosomes in liver pathology.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisaku; Meng, Fanyin; Glaser, Shannon; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-07-01

    Exosomes are small (∼100nm) membrane-bound extracellular vesicles released by various types of cells into biological fluids. They contain proteins, mRNAs and miRNAs as cargo. Different cell types can take up exosomes by endocytosis and the cargo contained within them can be transferred horizontally to these recipient cells. Exosomal proteins and miRNAs can be functional and regulate physiological cell events modifying the microenvironment in target cells, a key event of liver pathology. Exosome-mediated cell-cell communication can alter tumor growth, cell migration, antiviral infection and hepatocyte regeneration, indicating that exosomes have great potential for development as diagnostic or therapeutic tools. Analyses of circulating total or exosomal miRNAs have identified a large number of candidate miRNAs that are regulated in liver diseases, and the diagnostic testing using single or multiple miRNAs shows good sensitivity and specificity. Some candidate miRNAs have been identified to play an important role in various liver disorders. This review summarizes recent findings on the role of extracellular vesicles in liver diseases and their diagnostic and therapeutic potential, mainly focusing on exosomes but also includes microvesicles in liver pathology. PMID:26988731

  6. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory. PMID:23634908

  7. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    PubMed

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  8. Skeletal muscle pathology in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Daniel; Piotrowska, Izabela; Marcinkowski, Jerzy T.; Mielcarek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine stretch within the huntingtin protein (HTT). The neurological symptoms, that involve motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances, are caused by neurodegeneration that is particularly widespread in the basal ganglia and cereberal cortex. HTT is ubiquitously expressed and in recent years it has become apparent that HD patients experience a wide array of peripheral organ dysfunction including severe metabolic phenotype, weight loss, HD-related cardiomyopathy and skeletal muscle wasting. Although skeletal muscles pathology became a hallmark of HD, the mechanisms underlying muscular atrophy in this disorder are unknown. Skeletal muscles account for approximately 40% of body mass and are highly adaptive to physiological and pathological conditions that may result in muscle hypertrophy (due to increased mechanical load) or atrophy (inactivity, chronic disease states). The atrophy is caused by degeneration of myofibers and their replacement by fibrotic tissue is the major pathological feature in many genetic muscle disorders. Under normal physiological conditions the muscle function is orchestrated by a network of intrinsic hypertrophic and atrophic signals linked to the functional properties of the motor units that are likely to be imbalanced in HD. In this article, we highlight the emerging field of research with particular focus on the recent studies of the skeletal muscle pathology and the identification of new disease-modifying treatments. PMID:25339908

  9. [Cystic renal pathology].

    PubMed

    Rosi, P; Cesaroni, M; Bracarda, S; Rociola, W; Virgili, G

    1993-08-01

    Ultrasonography has a great interest in diagnosis of cystic kidney disorders for typical eco-pattern of this pathology. In this work we show the eco-pattern of the most common cystic kidney disorders. Particularly we examine simple cysts (typical, atypical, complicated), multicystic kidney dysplasia, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (infantile) autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (adult age). The so-called neoplastic cysts (multiloculated cysts, multiloculated cysts nephroma, cystic nephroblastoma), medullar cysts (medullary sponge kidney, medullary cystic disease), parapyelic cysts, acquired cystic kidney disease in renal failure patients, parasitic cysts, epidermoid cysts. About this disorders we present the more typical and expressive ultrasonographic appearance and we define the role and the opportunity of diagnostic setting by echography, moreover ultrasonography allows us to make a differential diagnosis between cystic kidney disorders and other kidney disease. PMID:8353538

  10. [Pathology of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease].

    PubMed

    Oka, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although genetic testing is available, nerve biopsy is useful in selected patients for the diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). These are sporadic cases of hereditary neuropathy, or familial cases in which genetic testing is negative. CMT is caused by mutations of various genes. The pathological features of CMT have mostly been investigated using nerve biopsy, which may shed light on the presumed functions of mutated gene products. PMP22 duplication in CMT1A induces numerous large onion bulb lesions (OB). Compared to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, the differential features of CMT1A are patchy distribution of OB and non-inflammatory lesions. CMT1B also manifests as OB, but presents abnormal compaction of myelin sheaths caused by uncompacted myelin or excessive myelin folding. CMT2 includes axonal neuropathies and many causative genes have been found. CMT2A (MFN2 mutation) shows abnormal mitochondria with a spherical morphology instead of tubular in the longitudinal direction. CMT4 consists of autosomal recessive forms with demyelinating pathology. Most subtypes have mutations of genes relating to myelin maintenance, and pathologically, they show abnormal folding of the myelin structure. PMID:26764296

  11. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  12. Intrapelvic chronic expanding hematoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Jun; Akaki, Shiro; Yonezawa, Masaru; Horiguchi, Ikuyo; Nakamura, Satoko; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma is rare and occasionally misdiagnosed as malignant neoplasm. We describe a case in the female pelvis and correlate findings from pathology and magnetic resonance imaging. On diffusion-weighted images (DWI), our patient's hematoma showed 2 different signal intensities, which corresponded to pathological features of fresh and altered blood components. DWI can distinguish between such pathological features of a chronic expanding hematoma. PMID:20585198

  13. Differential diagnosis of cerebral hemispheric pathology: multimodal approach.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T; Smoker, W R K; Lee, H K; Sato, Y

    2011-06-01

    This article gives a comprehensive review and illustrations of the imaging features of various pathological conditions and clinical syndromes associated with cerebral hemispheric involvement. The various conditions are described and defined to provide a basis for the differential diagnostics. The hypotheses relating to the pathology of the various syndromes are discussed with special emphasis on excitotoxic mechanisms for explaining the subsequent cerebral hemiatrophy. PMID:21528369

  14. Physiotherapy assessment of patients with rotator cuff pathology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pathology of the rotator cuff and sub-acromial bursa are considered to be the main cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. In the absence of trauma, conservative care, including physiotherapy is the primary treatment. This paper aims to present the key features of a physiotherapy assessment, excluding diagnostic tests for rotator cuff pathology. It describes and explores how assessment can be used to direct management options and develop a treatment plan.

  15. Public hospital pathology--at what cost?

    PubMed

    White, G H; Pascoe, P J

    1994-01-01

    Public hospital laboratories have in the past fended off financial scrutiny and accountability on the grounds of their complexity and lack of compelling need. However, the cost of providing diagnostic laboratory services has now come under intense scrutiny because of budget reductions and options for private sector competition. Costing of pathology services is not difficult, but their organisation and outputs do have unique features that need to be understood and defined to ensure that the costing model used provides robust data that accurately reflects how resources are consumed. The cost data generated for diagnostic services can then be compared to the various benchmarks widely used for activity-based funding, such as the Commonwealth Medical Benefits Schedule and the pathology component of the AN-DRG Service Weights System, while the requirement and funding for other activities can be rationally determined. PMID:10140592

  16. Recommendations for pathology peer review.

    PubMed

    Morton, Daniel; Sellers, Rani S; Barale-Thomas, Erio; Bolon, Brad; George, Catherine; Hardisty, Jerry F; Irizarry, Armando; McKay, Jennifer S; Odin, Marielle; Teranishi, Munehiro

    2010-12-01

    Pathology peer review verifies and improves the accuracy and quality of pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Pathology peer review is recommended when important risk assessment or business decisions are based on nonclinical studies. For pathology peer review conducted before study completion, the peer-review pathologist reviews sufficient slides and pathology data to assist the study pathologist in refining pathology diagnoses and interpretations. Materials to be reviewed are selected by the peer-review pathologist. Consultations with additional experts or a formal (documented) pathology working group may be used to resolve discrepancies. The study pathologist is solely responsible for the content of the final pathology data and report, makes changes resulting from peer-review discussions, initiates the audit trail for microscopic observations after all changes resulting from peer-review have been made, and signs the final pathologist's report. The peer-review pathologist creates a signed peer-review memo describing the peer-review process and confirming that the study pathologist's report accurately and appropriately reflects the pathology data. The study pathologist also may sign a statement of consensus. It is not necessary to archive working notes created during the peer-review process. PMID:20924082

  17. N-butylidenephthalide attenuates Alzheimer's disease-like cytopathy in Down syndrome induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Mei; Lu, Huai-En; Lai, Syu-Ming; Lai, Ping-Shan; Shen, Po-Wen; Chen, Pei-Ying; Shen, Ching-I; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) patients with early-onset dementia share similar neurodegenerative features with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To recapitulate the AD cell model, DS induced pluripotent stem cells (DS-iPSCs), reprogrammed from mesenchymal stem cells in amniotic fluid, were directed toward a neuronal lineage. Neuroepithelial precursor cells with high purity and forebrain characteristics were robustly generated on day 10 (D10) of differentiation. Accumulated amyloid deposits, Tau protein hyperphosphorylation and Tau intracellular redistribution emerged rapidly in DS neurons within 45 days but not in normal embryonic stem cell-derived neurons. N-butylidenephthalide (Bdph), a major phthalide ingredient of Angelica sinensis, was emulsified by pluronic F127 to reduce its cellular toxicity and promote canonical Wnt signaling. Interestingly, we found that F127-Bdph showed significant therapeutic effects in reducing secreted Aβ40 deposits, the total Tau level and the hyperphosphorylated status of Tau in DS neurons. Taken together, DS-iPSC derived neural cells can serve as an ideal cellular model of DS and AD and have potential for high-throughput screening of candidate drugs. We also suggest that Bdph may benefit DS or AD treatment by scavenging Aβ aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles. PMID:25735452

  18. The SAMP1/YitFc Mouse Strain: A Spontaneous Model of Crohn’s Disease-Like Ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Theresa T.; Pastorelli, Luca; Bamias, Giorgos; Garg, Rekha R.; Reuter, Brian K.; Mercado, Joseph R.; Chieppa, Marcello; Arseneau, Kristen O; Ley, Klaus; Cominelli, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The SAMP1/YitFc mouse strain represents a model of Crohn’s disease (CD)-like ileitis that is ideal for investigating the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation. Differently from the vast majority of animal models of colitis, the ileal-specific phenotype characteristic of SAMP1/YitFc mice occurs spontaneously, without genetic, chemical or immunological manipulation. In addition, SAMP1/YitFc mice possess remarkable similarities to the human condition in regard to disease location, histologic features, incidence of extra-intestinal manifestations, and response to conventional therapies. SAMP1/YitFc mice also display a well-defined time course of a pre-disease state, and phases of acute and chronic ileitis. As such, the SAMP1/YitFc model is particularly suitable for elucidating pathways that precede the clinical phenotype that may lead to preventive, and therefore more efficacious, intervention with the natural course of disease, or alternatively, for the development of therapeutic strategies directed against chronic, established ileitis. In the following review, we summarize important contributions made by our group and others that uncover potential mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CD using this unique murine model of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:21557393

  19. N-butylidenephthalide Attenuates Alzheimer's Disease-Like Cytopathy in Down Syndrome Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Mei; Lu, Huai-En; Lai, Syu-Ming; Lai, Ping-Shan; Shen, Po-Wen; Chen, Pei-Ying; Shen, Ching-I; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Hong-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) patients with early-onset dementia share similar neurodegenerative features with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To recapitulate the AD cell model, DS induced pluripotent stem cells (DS-iPSCs), reprogrammed from mesenchymal stem cells in amniotic fluid, were directed toward a neuronal lineage. Neuroepithelial precursor cells with high purity and forebrain characteristics were robustly generated on day 10 (D10) of differentiation. Accumulated amyloid deposits, Tau protein hyperphosphorylation and Tau intracellular redistribution emerged rapidly in DS neurons within 45 days but not in normal embryonic stem cell-derived neurons. N-butylidenephthalide (Bdph), a major phthalide ingredient of Angelica sinensis, was emulsified by pluronic F127 to reduce its cellular toxicity and promote canonical Wnt signaling. Interestingly, we found that F127-Bdph showed significant therapeutic effects in reducing secreted Aβ40 deposits, the total Tau level and the hyperphosphorylated status of Tau in DS neurons. Taken together, DS-iPSC derived neural cells can serve as an ideal cellular model of DS and AD and have potential for high-throughput screening of candidate drugs. We also suggest that Bdph may benefit DS or AD treatment by scavenging Aβ aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles. PMID:25735452

  20. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    PubMed

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness. PMID:1654715

  1. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies. PMID:26210152

  2. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  3. Ultra-trace graphene oxide in a water environment triggers Parkinson's disease-like symptoms and metabolic disturbance in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chaoxiu; Hu, Xiangang; Li, Xueyan; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, the safety of nanomaterials has attracted attention due to their rapid development. The relevant health threat of these materials remains largely unknown, particularly at environmentally or biologically relevant ultra-trace concentrations. To address this, we first found that graphene oxide (GO, a carbon nanomaterial that receives extensive attention across various disciplines) at concentrations of 0.01 μg/L-1 μg/L induced Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in zebrafish larvae. In this model, zebrafish showed a loss of more than 90% of dopamine neurons, a 69-522% increase in Lewy bodies (α-synuclein and ubiquitin) and significantly disturbed locomotive activity. Moreover, it was also shown that GO was able to translocate from the water environment to the brain and localize to the nucleus of the diencephalon, thereby inducing structural and morphological damage in the mitochondria. Cell apoptosis and senescence were triggered via oxidative stress, as shown by the upregulation of caspase 8 and β-galactosidase. Using metabolomics, we found that the upregulation of amino acid and some fatty acids (e.g. dodecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, octadecenoic acid, nonanoic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosanoic acid, propanoic acid and benzenedicarboxylic acid) metabolism and the downregulation of some other fatty acids (e.g. butanoic acid, phthalic acid and docosenoic acid) are linked to these Parkinson's disease-like symptoms. These findings broaden our understanding of nanomaterial safety at ultra-trace concentrations. PMID:27085073

  4. Speech Pathology Assistant. Trainee Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Hearing and Speech Action, Silver Spring, MD.

    Part of an instructional set which includes an instructor's guide, this trainee manual is designed to provide speech pathology students with some basic and essential knowledge about the communication process. The manual contains nine modules: (1) speech pathology assistant, (2) the bases of speech (structure and function of the speech mechanism,…

  5. The Pathology of Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitch, Jay H

    2016-05-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare and severe liver disease that usually develops in 8 weeks or less in individuals without preexisting liver disease. Its chief causes worldwide are hepatitis virus infections (hepatitis A, B, and E) and drug hepatotoxicity (particularly intentional or unintentional acetaminophen toxicity). Massive hepatic necrosis is often seen in liver specimens in ALF and features marked loss of hepatocytes, variable degrees of inflammation, and a stereotypic proliferation of bile ductular structures (neocholangioles) derived from activated periportal hepatic progenitor cells. This paper reviews the liver pathology in ALF, including forms of zonal necrosis and their etiologies. PMID:27058243

  6. Pathology of congenital syphilis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Froberg, M K; Fitzgerald, T J; Hamilton, T R; Hamilton, B; Zarabi, M

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a model for congenital syphilis in the rabbit. This report provides additional information on newborn tissue pathology in animals that were infected in utero. A total of 35 pregnancies were evaluated, each containing 6 to 12 newborns. In the infected group, the mortality was approximately 50%; of the live newborns, half appeared normal and half were hyperreflexic, weak, and runty. Gross pathology in the sickly newborns was quite prevalent and involved enlarged spleens with isolated spots of necrosis; enlarged livers that were overtly congested and hemorrhagic and had numerous granular, white spots; and brains with hemorrhage in the occipital area. Histopathology was apparent in different tissues. Lymphocytes, plasma cells, and vacuolated macrophages were prominent in livers, spleens, brains, and bones. A few actively motile treponemes were visualized by dark-field microscopy within extracts of spleen and within cerebrospinal fluid. Low numbers of treponemes were also demonstrated in sections of brain and liver by using the Warthin-Starry silver stain technique. Blood hematocrits were decreased, and extramedullary hematopoiesis was prominent within spleens and livers; this is consistent with anemia. This rabbit model exhibits many of the same pathologic features commonly found in human congenital syphilis. Images PMID:8406873

  7. Pathologic Outcomes following Urethral Diverticulectomy in Women

    PubMed Central

    Laudano, Melissa A.; Jamzadeh, Asha E.; Lee, Richard K.; Robinson, Brian D.; Tyagi, Renuka; Kaplan, Steven A.; Te, Alexis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Although most urethral diverticula in women are benign, there is a subset of patients who develop malignant changes. Limited studies report the pathologic findings associated with this relatively rare entity. We describe the clinicopathologic findings of women who underwent urethral diverticulectomy. Methods. A consecutive series of 29 women who underwent surgical resection of a urethral diverticulum were identified between 1992 and 2013. Clinical and radiographic data was collected by retrospective review of patient medical records. All pathological slides were rereviewed by a single urologic pathologist. Results. Of the 14 women with clinical data, 9 (64%) presented with urgency, 7 (50%) with urinary frequency, 3 (21%) with urinary incontinence, and 3 (21%) with dysuria. Mean diverticular size was 2.3 (±1.4) cm. Although one patient (3%) had invasive adenocarcinoma on final pathology, the remaining 28 cases (97%) demonstrated benign features. The most common findings were inflammation (55%) and nephrogenic adenoma (21%). Conclusions. Although most urethral diverticula in women are benign, there is a subset of patients who develop malignancy in association with the diverticulum. In this series, 97% of cases had a benign histology. These findings are important when counseling patients regarding treatment options. PMID:24860605

  8. Pathology of Mouse Models of Accelerated Aging.

    PubMed

    Harkema, L; Youssef, S A; de Bruin, A

    2016-03-01

    Progeroid mouse models display phenotypes in multiple organ systems that suggest premature aging and resemble features of natural aging of both mice and humans. The prospect of a significant increase in the global elderly population within the next decades has led to the emergence of "geroscience," which aims at elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in aging. Progeroid mouse models are frequently used in geroscience as they provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the highly complex process of natural aging. This review provides an overview of the most commonly reported nonneoplastic macroscopic and microscopic pathologic findings in progeroid mouse models (eg, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease, intervertebral disc degeneration, kyphosis, sarcopenia, cutaneous atrophy, wound healing, hair loss, alopecia, lymphoid atrophy, cataract, corneal endothelial dystrophy, retinal degenerative diseases, and vascular remodeling). Furthermore, several shortcomings in pathologic analysis and descriptions of these models are discussed. Progeroid mouse models are valuable models for aging, but thorough knowledge of both the mouse strain background and the progeria-related phenotype is required to guide interpretation and translation of the pathology data. PMID:26864891

  9. New Trends of Emerging Technologies in Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Gloria; Fernández-Carrobles, M Milagro; Deniz, Oscar; García-Rojo, Marcial

    2016-01-01

    The future paradigm of pathology will be digital. Instead of conventional microscopy, a pathologist will perform a diagnosis through interacting with images on computer screens and performing quantitative analysis. The fourth generation of virtual slide telepathology systems, so-called virtual microscopy and whole-slide imaging (WSI), has allowed for the storage and fast dissemination of image data in pathology and other biomedical areas. These novel digital imaging modalities encompass high-resolution scanning of tissue slides and derived technologies, including automatic digitization and computational processing of whole microscopic slides. Moreover, automated image analysis with WSI can extract specific diagnostic features of diseases and quantify individual components of these features to support diagnoses and provide informative clinical measures of disease. Therefore, the challenge is to apply information technology and image analysis methods to exploit the new and emerging digital pathology technologies effectively in order to process and model all the data and information contained in WSI. The final objective is to support the complex workflow from specimen receipt to anatomic pathology report transmission, that is, to improve diagnosis both in terms of pathologists' efficiency and with new information. This article reviews the main concerns about and novel methods of digital pathology discussed at the latest workshop in the field carried out within the European project AIDPATH (Academia and Industry Collaboration for Digital Pathology). PMID:27100343

  10. Translational pathology of neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Grizzle, William E; Srivastava, Sudhir; Manne, Upender

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing use of individualized medical care (personalized medicine) in treating and managing patients with cancer, the utilization of biomarkers in selecting and tailoring such medical approaches also is increasing and becoming more important. Specifically, many therapies are effective against only a subgroup of a specific type of tumors and exposing patients with different non-responsive subgroups of the same tumor to ineffective therapies, not only exposes these patients needlessly to acute and chronic side effects of the therapy, but also adds to the costs of medical care. For example, the Oncotype Dx test for estrogen receptor positive tumors that are node negative has been used to identify low risk tumors for which surgery alone is an adequate therapy. Biomarkers may be used to aid in multiple aspects of medical care related to cancer, including early detection, diagnosis, risk assessment, as well as in predicting the aggressiveness of cancers (i.e., prognosis) and predicting the therapeutic efficacy of treatments (i.e., prediction). Biomarkers may be also used as surrogate endpoints to aid in evaluating therapies and preventive approaches. Types of biomarkers vary greatly and include histopathologic appearance, stage of the lesion, quantitative morphologic features, size of the lesion, metastatic pattern and extent of metastasis, as well as imaging and molecular features. The types of measurements of biomarkers also vary; for example, molecular features can be measured at the DNA, mRNA or protein levels as well as at regulatory levels (e.g., microRNA). The usefulness of each biomarker is limited by its sensitivity and specificity in fulfilling its role (e.g., in early detection) and the requirements of sensitivity and specificity to accomplish specific tasks are affected by multiple variables. For example, both very high specificity and sensitivity of a test are required to screen a population with a low prevalence of a specific tumor. The goal of