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Sample records for diseases radiologic-pathologic correlation

  1. White Matter Diseases with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Shih, Robert Y; Jones, Robert V; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Oleaga, Laura; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2016-01-01

    White matter diseases include a wide spectrum of disorders that have in common impairment of normal myelination, either by secondary destruction of previously myelinated structures (demyelinating processes) or by primary abnormalities of myelin formation (dysmyelinating processes). The pathogenesis of many white matter diseases remains poorly understood. Demyelinating disorders are the object of this review and will be further divided into autoimmune, infectious, vascular, and toxic-metabolic processes. Autoimmune processes include multiple sclerosis and related diseases: tumefactive demyelinating lesions, Balo concentric sclerosis, Marburg and Schilder variants, neuromyelitis optica (Devic disease), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy (Hurst disease). Infectious processes include Lyme disease (neuroborreliosis), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy. Vascular processes include different types of small-vessel disease: arteriolosclerosis, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), primary angiitis of the central nervous system, Susac syndrome, and neurolupus. Toxic-metabolic processes include osmotic myelinolysis, methotrexate leukoencephalopathy, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The imaging spectrum can vary widely from small multifocal white matter lesions to confluent or extensive white matter involvement. Understanding the pathologic substrate is fundamental for understanding the radiologic manifestations, and a systematic approach to the radiologic findings, in correlation with clinical and laboratory data, is crucial for narrowing the differential diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618323

  2. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ros, P R; Buck, J L; Goodman, Z D; Ros, A M; Olmsted, W W

    1988-06-01

    Seventeen proved cases of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICAC) were reviewed to establish a radiologic-pathologic correlation. The most common appearance of ICAC at computed tomography (CT) is that of a single, homogeneous low-attenuation mass. Multiple low-attenuation lesions were present in four cases. Calcification was depicted by CT in three cases. At angiography, ICAC has a variable appearance with avascular, hypovascular, and hypervascular patterns possible. Portal obstruction was seen in only one case. The most common appearance of ICAC at sonography is that of a homogeneously hyperechoic mass, either single or multiple. In only one case was ICAC hypoechoic. Plain abdominal radiography demonstrated calcification in three patients and evidence of Thorotrast (thorium dioxide) deposition in one. Upper gastrointestinal series demonstrated abnormal gastric folds in two cases, corresponding to gastric invasion by ICAC. There were no characteristic radiographic findings, but the following features may be helpful in differentiating ICAC from other primary intrahepatic tumors, particularly typical hepatocellular carcinoma: a homogeneously echogenic or high-attenuation appearance on images that reflects the uniform nature observed at pathologic examination, the presence of calcification, and the uncommon invasion of portal or hepatic veins. Conversely, the presence of satellite lesions may blur the the distinction between ICAC and metastatic liver disease. PMID:2834769

  3. Castleman Disease of the Thorax: Clinical, Radiologic, and Pathologic Correlation: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, Seth J; Auerbach, Aaron; Franks, Teri J; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Castleman disease is a complex lymphoproliferative disease pathologically divided into two subtypes, the hyaline vascular variant (HVV) and the plasma cell variant (PCV). The HVV is the most common, is thought to represent a benign neoplasm of lymph node stromal cells, and is treated with surgical resection. It is most commonly found in the mediastinum, where it classically appears as a unicentric, avidly enhancing mass at computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging. This appearance can mimic other avidly enhancing mediastinal masses, and location, clinical history, laboratory data, and nuclear medicine single photon emission CT (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies can help narrow the differential diagnosis. Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), which in the majority of cases is composed of the PCV, is an aggressive lymphoproliferative disorder associated with human herpesvirus infection, interleukin 6 dysregulation, and other systemic disorders. While it can be difficult to differentiate MCD from lymphoma, the presence of avidly enhancing lymph nodes can suggest the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical, immunologic, and pathologic findings associated with both unicentric Castleman disease and MCD and discuss how the imaging findings correlate with the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:27618318

  4. Pulmonary Alveolar Microlithiasis: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Delic, Joseph A; Fuhrman, Carl R; Trejo Bittar, Humberto E

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:27618319

  5. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor of the Kidney: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Walton, William J; Flores, Raina R

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:27618327

  6. Immunoglobulin G4 -related Sclerosing Mastitis: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Zalaquett, Eugenio; Razmilic, Dravna; Oddo, David

    2016-01-01

    Editor's Note.-RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:27399235

  7. Benign Multicystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma: AIRP Best Cases in Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ruri; Tong, Angela; Kurtis, Boaz; Gilet, Anthony G

    2016-01-01

    RadioGraphics continues to publish radiologic-pathologic case material selected from the American Institute for Radiologic Pathology (AIRP) "best case" presentations. The AIRP conducts a 4-week Radiologic Pathology Correlation Course, which is offered five times per year. On the penultimate day of the course, the best case presentation is held at the American Film Institute Silver Theater and Cultural Center in Silver Spring, Md. The AIRP faculty identifies the best cases, from each organ system, brought by the resident attendees. One or more of the best cases from each of the five courses are then solicited for publication in RadioGraphics. These cases emphasize the importance of radiologic-pathologic correlation in the imaging evaluation and diagnosis of diseases encountered at the institute and its predecessor, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP). PMID:26963453

  8. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty: radiological-pathological correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Saffitz, J.E.; Totty, W.G.; McClennan, B.L.; Gilula, L.A.

    1981-12-01

    Radiological and pathological assessment of the degree and extent of arterial injury caused by balloon angioplasty was performed in 20 renal arteries obtained at autopsy. Intact arteries were studied angiographically before and after dilatation and then examined histologically. Both normal and diseased arteries were subjected to varying degrees of dilatation. Damage ranged from minimal inimal disruption to major tears of the muscular media. Equivalent dilatory force created greater damage in the distal (muscular) than in the proximal (elastic) portion of the renal artery. There was no evidence of plaque remodling or compression.

  9. Eumycetoma Osteomyelitis of the Calcaneus in a Child: A Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation following Total Calcanectomy

    PubMed Central

    EL-Sobky, Tamer Ahmed; Haleem, John Fathy; Samir, Shady

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are unusual causes of pedal osteomyelitis in children and adolescents. Eumycetoma is a chronic cutaneous and subcutaneous infection caused by various genera of fungi. A provisional diagnosis of foot mycetoma is made after clinical assessment. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is an essential supplement for the accurate diagnosis of osteoarticular infections. This paper aims to sensitize orthopedic surgeons, radiologists, and pathologists to the importance of correlative imaging findings in relation to surgical and microscopic pathology in osteoarticular infections, specifically eumycetoma osteomyelitis of the foot. From our review of the published data, the present case is the first report of radiologic-pathologic correlation in eumycetoma osteomyelitis of the calcaneus. This paper describes a case of eumycetoma osteomyelitis of the calcaneus in a child in which diagnostic X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were correlated with the surgical and microscopic pathologic features, for establishing an appropriate diagnosis and treatment. We conclude that there is a significant agreement between radiologic and pathologic evaluation for assessment of eumycetoma osteomyelitis of the calcaneus. Radiologic-pathologic correlation amplified our interpretation of imaging information available on plain radiographs and MRI and augmented diagnostic confidence. Similarly, anatomic-histopathological correlations consolidated diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26483983

  10. Application of whole-mount section of lung specimen in study of radiologic-pathologic correlations.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Soimakallio, S

    1996-08-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of the whole-mount section of the inflated-fixed lung specimen in the study of radiologic-pathologic correlations. Altogether, 24 resected fresh lobe specimens with 1.5- to 3.0-cm solitary pulmonary carcinomas or tuberculomas were inflated with air, intrabronchially fixed by infusing Heitzman's solution, and finally cut into 10- to 15-micron-thick whole-mount sections for the histopathological examination. All 24 inflated-fixed lobes were satisfactorily soft as sponge, sufficiently springy, and kept their original shape. All whole-mount sections clearly presented the complete morphological features of the whole lobes, and could be directly observed by the naked eye and examined under microscopy. The use of the whole-mount section of the lung specimen may facilitate precisely and effectively the studies of the radiologic-pathologic correlations. PMID:8872075

  11. Do you really know precise radiologic-pathologic correlation of usual interstitial pneumonia?

    PubMed

    Johkoh, Takeshi; Sumikawa, Hiromotsu; Fukuoka, Junya; Tanaka, Tomonori; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Takahashi, Masashi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Kondo, Yasuhiro; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Although usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is the most common chronic interstitial pneumonia, understanding of pathologic backgrounds of CT findings has still not been enough. Since honeycombing on either scanning microgram or CT is essential for diagnosis of UIP in 2010 ATS-ERS-JRS-ALAT guide line, the role of radiologists has become much more important. We will summarize common and uncommon CT findings with radiologic-pathological correlation. PMID:23806534

  12. Solid tumors of the peritoneum, omentum, and mesentery in children: radiologic-pathologic correlation: from the radiologic pathology archives.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Biko, David M; Arzamendi, Aaron M; Meldrum, Jaren T; Stocker, J Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Intraperitoneal solid tumors are far less common in children than in adults, and the histologic spectrum of neoplasms of the peritoneum and its specialized folds in young patients differs from that in older patients. Localized masses may be caused by inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, Castleman disease, mesenteric fibromatosis, or other mesenchymal masses. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a mesenchymal tumor of borderline biologic potential that appears as a solitary circumscribed mass, possibly with central calcification. Castleman disease is an idiopathic lymphoproliferative disorder that appears as a circumscribed, intensely enhancing mass in the mesentery. Mesenteric fibromatosis, or intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign tumor of mesenchymal origin associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Mesenteric fibromatosis appears as a mildly enhancing, circumscribed solitary mass without metastases. Diffuse peritoneal disease may be due to desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or rhabdomyosarcoma. DSRCT is a rare member of the small round blue cell tumor family that causes diffuse peritoneal masses without a visible primary tumor. A dominant mass is typically found in the retrovesical space. Burkitt lymphoma is a pediatric tumor that manifests with extensive disease because of its short doubling time. The bowel and adjacent mesentery are commonly involved. Rhabdomyosarcoma may arise as a primary tumor of the omentum or may spread from a primary tumor in the bladder, prostate, or scrotum. Knowledge of this spectrum of disease allows the radiologist to provide an appropriate differential diagnosis and suggest proper patient management. PMID:25763737

  13. Infantile hemangioendothelioma of the liver: a radiologic-pathologic-clinical correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Dachman, A.H.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Friedman, A.C.; Hartman, D.S.

    1983-06-01

    Infantile hemangioendothelioma is the most common symptomatic vascular liver tumor of infancy. It is considered a benign tumor; however, aggressive behavior is occasionally seen microscopically, and rarely distant metastases have been reported. The exact incidence of infantile hemangioendothelioma is difficult to determine because often it has been either misdiagnosed or mislabeled as cavernous hemangioma in the literature. Cavernous hemangioma is the most common primary liver tumor in older age groups but is rarely found in infants as a clinically significant tumor. Levick and Rubie were the first to recognize an association between hemangioendothelioma of the liver and congestive heart failure, and there were subsequent reports substantiating this association. However, it is our impression and the finding of others that congestive heart failure is distinctly less common than abdominal mass or hepatomegaly as the presenting sign in infantile hemangioendothelioma. Congestive heart failure is rarely a feature of cavernous hemangioma. Because of the errors in terminology and questions regarding clinical presentation, a radiologic-pathologic-clinical correlation study of infantile hemangioendothelioma and review of the literature was undertaken.

  14. Radiologic-pathologic Correlation-An Advanced Fourth-year Elective: How We Do It.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Matthew; Silverman, Jan; Spruill, Laura; Hill, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, the radiology elective has been designed to teach medical students the fundamentals of radiologic interpretation. When questioned, many students state that they want to take a radiology elective so they can "interpret images." For the students on radiology, rotation/elective education was often passive, consisting of didactic conferences and observational shadowing of radiologists as they interpreted images. Students had only a superficial appreciation of how radiologists interacted with clinical services, multidisciplinary teams, and pathology. There was very little emphasis on imaging appropriateness or the most efficient and effective imaging for various clinical problems. With the expansion of numerous imaging modalities and the emphasis on patient-centered care, including imaging safety and dose reduction, it is important to change the focus of radiology education from interpretation to the optimal integration of imaging into clinical medicine. Radiology-pathology (rad path) electives were created at Allegheny General Hospital and the Medical University of South Carolina as a new option to provide a high-quality advanced elective for fourth-year medical students. These electives enable students to correlate radiologic images with gross and microscopic pathology specimens, thus increasing their knowledge and understanding of both. The rad path elective combines aspects of surgery, radiology, and pathology and requires students to be active learners. The implementation of this elective is an exciting work in progress that has been evolving over the past 2 and 4 years at Medical University of South Carolina and Allegheny General Hospital, respectively. We will discuss the historical basis for the elective, the advantages and challenges of having such an integrated course, and some different strategies for creating a rad path elective. PMID:27311804

  15. Application of Clinico-Radiologic-Pathologic Diagnosis of Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases in Children in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dan; Chen, Zhimin; Chen, Huizhong; Huang, Rongyan; Zhao, Shunying; Liu, Xiuyun; Zhou, Chunju; Peng, Yun; Yuan, Xinyu; Zou, Jizhen; Zhang, Hailing; Zhao, Deyu; Liu, Enmei; Zheng, Yuejie; Zhong, Lili; Lu, Min; Lu, Jirong; Nong, Guangmin

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases in children (chDPLD) or interstitial lung diseases in children (chILD) represent a heterogeneous group of respiratory disorders that are mostly chronic and associated with high morbidity and mortality. However, the incidence of chDPLD is so low that most pediatricians lack sufficient knowledge of chDPLD, especially in China. Based on the clinico- radiologic- pathologic (CRP) diagnosis, we tried to describe (1) the characteristics of chDPLD and (2) the ratio of each constituent of chDPLD in China. Data were evaluated, including clinical, radiographic, and pathologic results from lung biopsies. We collected 25 cases of chDPLD, 18 boys and 7 girls with a median age of 6.0 years, from 16 hospitals in China. The most common manifestations included cough (n = 24), dyspnea (n = 21), and fever (n = 4). There were three cases of exposure-related interstitial lung disease (ILD), three cases of systemic disease-associated ILD, nineteen cases of alveolar structure disorder-associated ILD, and no cases of ILD specific to infancy. Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (n = 9) was the two largest groups. Conclusion: Non-specific interstitial pneumonia is the main categories of chDPLD in China. Lung biopsy is always a crucial step in the final diagnosis. However, clinical and imaging studies should be carefully evaluated for their value in indicating a specific chDPLD. PMID:25569558

  16. Bacterial, Fungal, and Parasitic Infections of the Central Nervous System: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation and Historical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shih, Robert Y; Koeller, Kelly K

    2015-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in prevention and treatment, infectious diseases affecting the central nervous system remain an important source of morbidity and mortality, particularly in less-developed countries and in immunocompromised persons. Bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens are derived from living organisms and affect the brain, spinal cord, or meninges. Infections due to these pathogens are associated with a variety of neuroimaging patterns that can be appreciated at magnetic resonance imaging in most cases. Bacterial infections, most often due to Streptococcus, Haemophilus, and Neisseria species, cause significant meningitis, whereas the less common cerebritis and subsequent abscess formation have well-documented progression, with increasingly prominent altered signal intensity and corresponding contrast enhancement. Atypical bacterial infections are characterized by the development of a granulomatous response, classically seen in tuberculosis, in which the tuberculoma is the most common parenchymal form of the disease; spirochetal and rickettsial diseases are less common. Fungal infections predominate in immunocompromised hosts and are caused by yeasts, molds, and dimorphic fungi. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal infection, whereas candidiasis is the most common nosocomial infection. Mucormycosis and aspergillosis are characterized by angioinvasiveness and are associated with high morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In terms of potential exposure in the worldwide population, parasitic infections, including neurocysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, echinococcosis, malaria, and schistosomiasis, are the greatest threat. Rare amebic infections are noteworthy for their extreme virulence and high mortality. The objective of this article is to highlight the characteristic neuroimaging manifestations of bacterial, fungal, and parasitic diseases, with emphasis on radiologic-pathologic correlation and historical perspectives

  17. CT and MR imaging of the mitral valve: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael F; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Suri, Rakesh M; Burkhart, Harold M; Foley, Thomas A; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Anavekar, Nandan S; Young, Phillip M; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are increasingly important adjuncts to echocardiography for the evaluation of mitral valve disease. The mitral valve may be involved in various acquired or congenital conditions with resultant regurgitation or stenosis, and many of these conditions can be identified with CT or MR imaging. In addition, CT is useful for detecting and monitoring postoperative complications after mitral valve repair or replacement. As the use of CT and MR imaging increases, awareness of the CT and MR imaging appearances of the normal mitral valve and the various disease processes that affect it may foster recognition of unsuspected mitral disease in patients undergoing imaging for other purposes. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.306105518/-/DC1. PMID:21071378

  18. CT and MR imaging of the aortic valve: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Christopher J; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Araoz, Philip A

    2012-01-01

    Valvular disease is estimated to account for as many as 20% of cardiac surgical procedures performed in the United States. It may be congenital in origin or secondary to another disease process. One congenital anomaly, bicuspid aortic valve, is associated with increased incidence of stenosis, regurgitation, endocarditis, and aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta. A bicuspid valve has two cusps instead of the normal three; resultant fusion or poor excursion of the valve leaflets may lead to aortic stenosis, the presence of which is signaled by dephasing jets on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Surgery is generally recommended for patients with severe stenosis who are symptomatic or who have significant ventricular dysfunction; transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging therapeutic option for patients who are not eligible for surgical treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is an essential component of preoperative planning for TAVI; it is used to determine the aortic root dimensions, severity of peripheral vascular disease, and status of the coronary arteries. Aortic regurgitation, which is caused by incompetent closure of the aortic valve, likewise leads to the appearance of jets on MR images. The severity of regurgitation is graded on the basis of valvular morphologic parameters; qualitative assessment of dephasing jets at Doppler ultrasonography; or measurements of the regurgitant fraction, volume, and orifice area. Mild regurgitation is managed conservatively, whereas severe or symptomatic regurgitation usually leads to valve replacement surgery, especially in the presence of substantial left ventricular enlargement or dysfunction. Bacterial endocarditis, although less common than aortic stenosis and regurgitation, is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Electrocardiographically gated CT reliably demonstrates infectious vegetations and benign excrescences of 1 cm or more on the valve surface, allowing the assessment of any embolic

  19. Computed tomography of the anterior mediastinum in myasthemia gravis: a radiologic-pathologic correlative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fon, G.T.; Bein, M.E.; Mancuso, A.A.; Keesey, J.C.; Lupetin, A.R.; Wong, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans of the mediastinum were correlated with pathologic findings of the thymus following thymectomy in 57 patients with myasthenia gravis. Based on the patient's age and the overall morphology of the anterior mediastinum, CT scans were assigned one of four grades in an attempt to predict thymus pathologic findings. Using this grading, 14 of 16 cases of thymoma were suspected or definitely diagnosed. One of the two cases not diagnosed on CT was a microscopic tumor. There were no false-positive diagnoses in 11 cases graded as definitely thymoma. We conclude that thymoma can be sensitively diagnosed in patients older than 40 years of age. However, thymoma cannot be predicted with a high level of confidence in patients younger than 40 because of the difficulty in differentiating normal thymus or hyperplasia from thymoma. Recommendations for the use of CT in the preoperative evaluation of myasthenic patients are presented.

  20. Irreversible Electroporation of Hepatic and Pancreatic Malignancies: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Beicos, Aldo; Venkat, Shree; Songrug, Tanakorn; Poveda, Julio; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica; Poozhikunnath Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-09-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel therapy that has shown to be a feasible and promising alternative to conventional ablative techniques when treating tumors near vital structures or blood vessels. The clinical efficacy of IRE has been evaluated using established imaging criteria. This study evaluates the histologic and imaging response of hepatic and pancreatic malignancies that were surgically resected after IRE. In total, 12 lesions ablated with IRE were included, including 3 pancreatic carcinomas, 5 primary tumors of the liver, and 4 metastatic tumors of the liver. The rate of complete response to IRE was 25% based on the histologic evaluation of the resected tumors. Although treatment-related vessel wall changes were noted in several cases in histologic findings, there was no evidence of vascular luminal narrowing or obliteration in any of the specimens. The imaging response to IRE before surgical resection usually resulted in underestimation of disease burden when compared with the histologic response seen on the resected specimens. PMID:26365548

  1. The thyroid: review of imaging features and biopsy techniques with radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Nachiappan, Arun C; Metwalli, Zeyad A; Hailey, Brian S; Patel, Rishi A; Ostrowski, Mary L; Wynne, David M

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of the thyroid gland is essential for appropriate identification and diagnosis of thyroid lesions. Thyroid nodules are often detected incidentally at computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography; however, ultrasonography (US) is the most commonly used imaging modality for characterization of these nodules. US characteristics that increase the likelihood of malignancy in a thyroid nodule include microcalcifications, solid composition, and central vascularity. Nuclear scintigraphy is commonly used for evaluation of physiologic thyroid function and for identification of metabolically active and inactive nodules. When fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of a lesion is indicated based on clinical and radiologic features, appropriate US-guided biopsy technique and careful cytologic analysis are crucial for making the diagnosis. FNAB and core biopsy are the two percutaneous techniques used to obtain a specimen, with the latter technique being indicated following nondiagnostic or indeterminate FNAB. Specimen adequacy and diagnostic accuracy vary due to several factors, including location of aspiration and biopsy technique used. The radiologist must have a basic knowledge of thyroid disease, be familiar with specimen processing, and recognize the cytologic and radiologic appearances of thyroid lesions, all of which will facilitate the management of these lesions. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24617678

  2. Malignant Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor of the Leg: A Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Richman, Danielle M; Bresler, Scott C; Rosenthal, Michael H; Howard, Stephanie Anne Holler

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a rare clinical entity that can arise as a recurrent lesion or can co-exist with a benign TGCT lesion. Malignant TGCT most commonly arises in the lower extremity and tends to be clinically aggressive, with most patients developing recurrent lesions or dying. Much of the literature describes the histopathologic features and classifies this broad group of tumors, with little description of the imaging characteristics of this disease. We present the multimodality appearance of a case of malignant diffuse-type TGCT that recurred 2 months after resection with subsequent rapid clinical progression. PMID:25861547

  3. Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor of the leg: a radiologic-pathologic correlation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Richman, Danielle M; Bresler, Scott C; Rosenthal, Michael H; Howard, Stephanie Anne Holler

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) is a rare clinical entity that can arise as a recurrent lesion or can co-exist with a benign TGCT lesion. Malignant TGCT most commonly arises in the lower extremity and tends to be clinically aggressive, with most patients developing recurrent lesions or dying. Much of the literature describes the histopathologic features and classifies this broad group of tumors, with little description of the imaging characteristics of this disease. We present the multimodality appearance of a case of malignant diffuse-type TGCT that recurred 2 months after resection with subsequent rapid clinical progression. PMID:25861547

  4. Occurrence of extensive spherical amyloid deposits in a prolactin-secreting pituitary macroadenoma: a radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Levine, Steven N; Ishaq, Shmaila; Nanda, Anil; Wilson, Jon D; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2013-08-01

    Pituitary adenomas are the most common tumors of the sellar region, but the occurrence of spherical amyloid deposits in a pituitary adenoma is rare. We describe the clinical features, radiologic characteristics, and pathologic findings of 45-year-old man who presented with galactorrhea, hypogonadism, and hyperprolactinemia who had a pituitary adenoma with extensive spherical amyloid deposits. Approximately 30 cases have been reported, almost exclusively in patients with prolactinomas. Treatment with dopaminergic agonists will result in the expected reduction in prolactin levels; however, in most cases, macroadenomas with spherical amyloid deposits fail to decrease in size. The source of the amyloid deposits in prolactinomas is not clearly defined but may be due to abnormal processing of prolactin or its prohormone. These adenomas with spherical amyloid have a characteristic appearance on magnetic resonance imaging with low or heterogeneous intensity on T1 and low intensity on T2-weighted images. Following infusion of gadolinium, there is enhancement of the periphery but not most of the tumor mass. These magnetic resonance imaging characteristics are different than those of typical pituitary adenomas. These differences should alert clinicians to the possibility of extensive spherical amyloid deposits in a prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma, which may have important clinical implications. In this report, we correlate the radiologic finds with the pathology and compared them with other sellar and parasellar lesions. PMID:23602507

  5. Primary mixed malignant tumor of bone in an 18-year-old male: Report of a case with radiologic-pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Courtier, Jesse; Robbins, Elizabeth; Soares, Bruno; Horvai, Andrew; Mackenzie, John D.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of primary malignant mixed tumor (MMT) of bone in an 18-year-old boy with X-ray, CT, MR, scintigraphic, FDG PET, and pathologic correlation. Primary MMT of bone is a highly aggressive tumor and presents both a diagnostic and clinical treatment challenge. This tumor is extremely rare and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the diagnostic imaging findings for primary MMT arising from bone in a patient of this age group. PMID:26909264

  6. Gastrointestinal Lymphoma: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Somwaru, Alexander S; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Levine, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Extranodal lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms that can affect every abdominal organ, with distinctive pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features. The radiologic findings are closely related to the underlying pathophysiology, and an understanding of these characteristic features should facilitate recognition of extranodal lymphoma and its various subtypes. Within the abdomen, lymphoma is found most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach. This article presents the findings in gastrointestinal tract lymphoma. PMID:27265607

  7. Multilocular cystic renal tumor in children: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Agrons, G A; Wagner, B J; Davidson, A J; Suarez, E S

    1995-05-01

    Multilocular cystic renal tumor is a term that encompasses two histologically distinct but grossly indistinguishable lesions: cystic nephroma and cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma (CPDN). Cystic nephroma is a segmental, purely cystic mass characterized by multiple septations composed entirely of differentiated tissues, without blastemal elements. CPDN is also a multiloculated lesion without nodular solid components, but its septa contain embryonal cells. Multilocular cystic tumors primarily affect boys during early childhood, with a substantial number of the lesions containing blastema (CPDN), and adult women, with lesions that more commonly lack septal blastema (cystic) nephroma). As a rule, nephrectomy is curative and the clinical course benign, but CPDN may recur locally. Although cystic nephroma and CPDN cannot be distinguished radiologically, failure to do so has no practical impact on management, since all of these tumors are surgically removed. However, the differential diagnosis includes other pediatric cystic renal masses that may require different treatment stratagems: Wilms tumor with cyst formation due to hemorrhage and necrosis, cystic clear cell sarcoma, cystic mesoblastic nephroma, cystic renal cell carcinoma, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and segmental multicystic dysplasia in a duplicated renal collecting system. PMID:7624570

  8. Nonepithelial Neoplasms of the Pancreas: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation, Part 1--Benign Tumors: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Srivastava, Amogh; Paal, Edina E; Gould, Charles F; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2016-01-01

    Solid and cystic pancreatic neoplasms are being recognized more frequently with increasing utilization and spatial resolution of modern imaging techniques. In addition to the more common primary pancreatic solid (ductal adenocarcinoma) and cystic neoplasms of epithelial origin, nonepithelial neoplasms of the pancreas may appear as well-defined solid or cystic neoplasms. Most of these lesions have characteristic imaging features, such as a well-defined border, which allows differentiation from ductal adenocarcinoma. Solid masses include neurofibroma, ganglioneuroma, leiomyoma, lipoma, and perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa). Schwannomas and desmoid tumors can be solid or cystic. Cystic tumors include mature cystic teratoma and lymphangioma. Lipoma, PEComa, and mature cystic teratoma can contain fat, and ganglioneuroma and mature cystic teratoma may contain calcification. Although these unusual benign neoplasms are rare, the radiologist should at least consider them in the differential diagnosis of well-defined lesions of the pancreas. The goal of this comprehensive review is to improve understanding of these rare primary pancreatic mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26761535

  9. Ileostomy obstruction by ingested apricot stone with clinical-radiological-pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    George, A J; Fallaize, R C; Bennett, J; Shabbir, J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with stomas often present with bowel obstruction, often secondary to adhesions. This case describes the presentation, investigation and management of a 62-year-old woman with an end ileostomy, who presented to hospital with acute abdominal pain and subacute bowel obstruction. Further questioning revealed the recent ingestion of an apricot stone and this was identified by multimodality imaging as the cause of the luminal obstruction in the distal ileum, just proximal to the stoma. After a failed period of conservative management, examination under anaesthesia was performed and digital extraction attempted, but this was unsuccessful. Rather than surgical stoma revision, endoscopic removal was achieved. The patient improved and was discharged the following day. However, her small bowel obstruction relapsed within 48 h. She was readmitted and underwent stoma revision with no further problems. PMID:26374775

  10. Postmortem computed tomography in victims of military air mishaps: radiological-pathological correlation of CT findings.

    PubMed

    Levy, Gad; Goldstein, Liav; Blachar, Arye; Apter, Sara; Barenboim, Erez; Bar-Dayan, Yaron; Shamis, Ari; Atar, Eli

    2007-10-01

    A thorough medical inquiry is included in every aviation mishap investigation. While the gold standard of this investigation is a forensic pathology examination, numerous reports stress the important role of computed tomography in the postmortem evaluation of trauma victims. To characterize the findings identified by postmortem CT and compare its performance to conventional autopsy in victims of military aviation mishaps, we analyzed seven postmortem CT examinations. Musculoskeletal injuries accounted for 57.8% of the traumatic findings identified by postmortem CT. The most frequent findings were fractures of the rib (47%), skull (9.6%) and facial bones (8.6%). Abnormally located air accounted for 24% of findings, for which CT was superior (3.5% detected by autopsy, 100% by postmortem CT, P < 0.001). The performance of autopsy in detecting injuries was superior (autopsy detected 85.8% of all injuries, postmortem CT detected 53.9%, P < 0.001), especially in the detection of superficial lesions (100% detected by autopsy, 10.5% by postmortem CT, P < 0.001) and solid organ injuries (100% by autopsy, 18.5% by postmortem CT, P < 0.001). Performance in the detection of musculoskeletal injuries was similar (91.3% for autopsy, 90.3% for postmortem CT, P = not significant). Postmortem CT and autopsy have distinct performance profiles, and although the first cannot replace the latter it is a useful complementary examination. PMID:17987755

  11. Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation: Metastatic Pulmonary Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma of Bone Primary

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine U; Zreik, Riyam T; Boland, Jennifer M; White, Mariah L

    2015-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma is a rare vascular malignancy often characterized by a clinically indolent course and delayed diagnosis. The authors present the radiologic and pathologic features of a case of pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma which was initially thought to be calcified granulomas. PMID:26430543

  12. Giant Pindborg Tumor (Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor): An Unusual Case Report with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Satya Ranjan; Lenka, Sthitaprajna; Sahoo, Sujit Ranjan; Mishra, Sobhan

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors develop in the jaws from odontogenic tissues such as enamel organ, Hertwig epithelial root sheath, dental lamina, and so on. A variety of tumors unique to the maxilla and mandible are therefore seen. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) is a rare, aggressive, benign odontogenic tumor of epithelial origin accounting for only about 1% of all odontogenic tumors. It is eponymously called “Pindborg tumor”, as it was first described by Pindborg in 1955. The origin of this locally invasive tumor remains unknown. It is thought to arise from stratum intermedium. It commonly affects the posterior mandible manifesting as a slow-growing asymptomatic swelling often associated with an impacted tooth. We report a case of CEOT, for which, owing to its huge size we have proposed the term “giant” Pindborg tumor (CEOT). This is probably the largest case of this tumor reported so far in the English literature. The present case also has the classic yet rare “driven snow” appearance of the tumor on radiographs. PMID:24516774

  13. From the archives of the AFIP: lesions of the pineal region: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alice Boyd; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2010-11-01

    Lesions of the pineal region include a diverse group of entities. The most common neoplastic lesions are the germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors may be hormonally active, and evaluation of serum or cerebrospinal fluid levels of oncoproteins assists in making the diagnosis. Neoplasms arising from the pineal parenchyma include the low-grade pineocytoma, pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, and the highly malignant pineoblastoma. Germ cell tumors and pineal parenchymal neoplasms do not have pathognomonic imaging findings, but imaging in combination with laboratory evaluation helps narrow the differential diagnosis. Neoplasms may also arise from the variety of cell types residing in the proximity of the pineal gland. These include lipomas, meningiomas, and astrocytomas. Congenital lesions such as epidermoid and dermoid cysts and lipomas can also occur. Knowledge of the variety of lesions that occur in the pineal region, their imaging appearances, and their clinical features assists in narrowing the radiologic differential diagnosis and optimizing patient treatment. PMID:21057132

  14. Fascial relationship of the thymus: radiologic-pathologic correlation in neonatal pneumomediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Quattromani, F.L.; Foley, L.C.; Bowen, A.D.; Weisman, L.; Hernandez, J.

    1981-12-01

    The radiographic appearance of retrothymic pneumomediastinum is quite specific. The findings include elevation of the thymus away from other mediastinal structures with increased lucency beneath it, visualization of a radiodense line extending from the inferior pole of the thymus to the midportion of the heart, and tenting of the pericardium at the point of attachment of this line. This constellation of findings will aid in the differential diagnosis of medial anterior pneumothorax, pneumopericardium, and intrapulmonary cyst in the infant with air block. The paper details the mediastinal anatomy with special emphasis on a previously undescribed layer of connective tissue that accounts for this specific radiographic appearance.

  15. Tomosynthesis-detected Architectural Distortion: Management Algorithm with Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Durand, Melissa A; Wang, Steven; Hooley, Regina J; Raghu, Madhavi; Philpotts, Liane E

    2016-01-01

    As use of digital breast tomosynthesis becomes increasingly widespread, new management challenges are inevitable because tomosynthesis may reveal suspicious lesions not visible at conventional two-dimensional (2D) full-field digital mammography. Architectural distortion is a mammographic finding associated with a high positive predictive value for malignancy. It is detected more frequently at tomosynthesis than at 2D digital mammography and may even be occult at conventional 2D imaging. Few studies have focused on tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortions to date, and optimal management of these distortions has yet to be well defined. Since implementing tomosynthesis at our institution in 2011, we have learned some practical ways to assess architectural distortion. Because distortions may be subtle, tomosynthesis localization tools plus improved visualization of adjacent landmarks are crucial elements in guiding mammographic identification of elusive distortions. These same tools can guide more focused ultrasonography (US) of the breast, which facilitates detection and permits US-guided tissue sampling. Some distortions may be sonographically occult, in which case magnetic resonance imaging may be a reasonable option, both to increase diagnostic confidence and to provide a means for image-guided biopsy. As an alternative, tomosynthesis-guided biopsy, conventional stereotactic biopsy (when possible), or tomosynthesis-guided needle localization may be used to achieve tissue diagnosis. Practical uses for tomosynthesis in evaluation of architectural distortion are highlighted, potential complications are identified, and a working algorithm for management of tomosynthesis-detected architectural distortion is proposed. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:26963448

  16. Review of ovarian tumors in children and adolescents: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Seo In; Lim, Hyo Soon; Choi, Yoo Duk; Lee, Kyoung Hwa; Kang, Woo Dae; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2014-01-01

    The incidence, histologic distribution, and clinical manifestations of ovarian tumors in the pediatric population are distinct from those in adults. Although ovarian neoplasms in childhood and adolescence are rare, the diagnosis should be considered in young girls with abdominal pain and a palpable mass. Differential diagnosis in children and adolescents with ovarian tumors should be conducted on the basis of unique clinical manifestations, elevated serum tumor marker levels, and distinctive imaging findings. Although the clinical manifestations are nonspecific and may overlap, they may assist in diagnosis of some types of ovarian tumors. Children who present with a palpable mass or symptoms of precocious puberty have a high likelihood of malignancy. Many ovarian tumors are associated with abnormal hormonal activity and/or abnormal sexual development. Elevated levels of serum tumor markers, including α-fetoprotein, the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin, and CA-125, raise concern for ovarian malignancies. However, negative tumor markers do not exclude the possibility of malignancy. Identification of imaging features at ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can help differentiate benign from malignant ovarian tumors and, in turn, plays a crucial role in determining treatment options. At imaging, malignant ovarian tumors usually appear predominantly solid or heterogeneous and are larger than benign tumors. Because surgery is the primary treatment for ovarian tumors, ovarian salvage with fertility preservation and use of a minimally invasive surgical technique are important in children and adolescents. PMID:25384300

  17. Periosteum: characteristic imaging findings with emphasis on radiologic-pathologic comparisons.

    PubMed

    Bisseret, Damien; Kaci, Rachid; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Alison, Marianne; Parlier-Cuau, Caroline; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Bousson, Valérie

    2015-03-01

    The periosteum covers most bone structures. It has an outer fibrous layer and an inner cambial layer that exhibits osteogenic activity. The periosteum is a dynamic structure that plays a major role in bone modeling and remodeling under normal conditions. In several disorders such as infections, benign and malignant tumors, and systemic diseases, the osteogenic potential of the periosteum is stimulated and new bone is produced. The newly formed bone added onto the surface of the cortex adopts various configurations depending on the modalities and pace of bone production. Our aim here is to describe the anatomy, histology, and physiology of the periosteum and to review the various patterns of periosteal reaction with emphasis on relations between radiological and histopathological findings. A careful evaluation of the periosteal reaction and appearance of the underlying cortex, in combination with the MRI, clinical, and laboratory data, provides valuable information on lesion duration and aggressiveness, thereby assisting in the etiological diagnosis and optimizing patient management. A solid reaction strongly suggests a benign and slow-growing process that gives the bone enough time to wall off the lesion. Single lamellar reactions occur in acute and usually benign diseases. Multilamellar reactions are associated with intermediate aggressiveness and a growth rate close to the limit of the walling-off capabilities of the bone. Spiculated, interrupted, and complex combined reactions carry the worst prognosis, as they occur in the most aggressive and fast-growing diseases: the periosteum attempts to create new bone but is overwhelmed and may be breached. PMID:25269751

  18. From the radiologic pathology archives: gastrointestinal lymphoma: radiologic and pathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rachel B; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Rodríguez, Pablo; Manning, Maria A; Levine, Marc S

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma encompasses a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that have a common lymphoid origin but variable pathologic and imaging features. Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (ENMZL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are the most common. ENMZL usually occurs in the stomach, where it is associated with chronic infection by Helicobacter pylori, and is typically a superficial spreading lesion that causes mucosal nodularity or ulceration and mild wall thickening. DLBCL may arise de novo or from transformation of ENMZL or other low-grade lymphomas. This form of lymphoma produces extensive wall thickening or a bulky mass, but obstruction is uncommon. Mantle cell lymphoma is the classic cause of lymphomatous polyposis, but multiple polyps or nodules can also be seen with ENMZL and follicular lymphoma. Burkitt lymphoma is usually characterized by an ileocecal mass or wall thickening in the terminal ileum in young children, often in the setting of widespread disease. Primary GI Hodgkin lymphoma, which is rare, may be manifested by a variety of findings, though stenosis is more common than with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is frequently associated with celiac disease and is characterized by wall thickening, ulceration, and even perforation of the jejunum. Accurate radiologic diagnosis of GI lymphoma requires a multifactorial approach based on the clinical findings, site of involvement, imaging findings, and associated complications. PMID:25384294

  19. The Differential Imaging Features of Fat-Containing Tumors in the Peritoneal Cavity and Retroperitoneum: the Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Na-young; Chung, Jae-Joon; Chung, Yong-Eun; Choi, Jin-Young; Park, Young-Nyun

    2010-01-01

    There are a variety of fat-containing lesions that can arise in the intraperitoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space. Some of these fat-containing lesions, such as liposarcoma and retroperitoneal teratoma, have to be resected, although resection can be deferred for others, such as adrenal adenoma, myelolipoma, angiomyolipoma, ovarian teratoma, and lipoma, until the lesions become large or symptomatic. The third group tumors (i.e., mesenteric panniculitis and pseudolipoma of Glisson's capsule) require medical treatment or no treatment at all. Identifying factors such as whether the fat is macroscopic or microscopic within the lesion, the origin of the lesions, and the presence of combined calcification is important for narrowing the differential diagnosis. The development and wide-spread use of modern imaging modalities make identification of these factors easier so narrowing the differential diagnosis is possible. At the same time, lesions that do not require immediate treatment are being incidentally found at an increasing rate with these same imaging techniques. Thus, the questions about the treatment methods have become increasingly important. Classifying lesions in terms of the necessity of performing surgical treatment can provide important information to clinicians, and this is the one of a radiologist's key responsibilities. PMID:20461188

  20. Cognitive Correlates of Metamemory in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Danielle; Farrell, Meagan; Huey, Edward; Metcalfe, Janet; Cines, Sarah; Karlawish, Jason; Sullo, Elisabeth; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Metamemory, or knowledge of one's memory abilities, is often impaired in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), although the basis of this metacognitive deficit has not been fully articulated. Behavioral and imaging studies have produced conflicting evidence regarding the extent to which specific cognitive domains (i.e., executive functioning (EF), memory) and brain regions contribute to memory awareness. The primary aim of this study was to disentangle the cognitive correlates of metamemory in AD by examining the relatedness of objective metamemory performance to cognitive tasks grouped by domain (EF or memory) as well as by preferential hemispheric reliance defined by task modality (verbal or nonverbal). Method 89 participants with mild AD recruited at Columbia University Medical Center and the University of Pennsylvania underwent objective metamemory and cognitive testing. Partial correlations were used to assess the relationship between metamemory and four cognitive variables, adjusted for recruitment site. Results The significant correlates of metamemory included nonverbal fluency (r = .27 p = .02) and nonverbal memory (r = .24, p = .04). Conclusions Our findings suggest that objectively measured metamemory in a large sample of individuals with mild AD is selectively related to a set of inter-domain nonverbal tasks. The association between metamemory and the nonverbal tasks may implicate a shared reliance on a right-sided cognitive network that spans frontal and temporal regions. PMID:24819066

  1. Putaminal Diffusivity Correlates With Disease Progression in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ling-Ling; Ng, Kia-Min; Yeoh, Chooi-Sum; Rumpel, H.; Li, Hui-Hua; Tan, Eng-King

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an increasingly used noninvasive imaging tool. However its long-term clinical utility is unclear. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease. We prospectively examined a cohort of 46 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain at baseline and 6 years later on a 1.5 Tesla scanner using a standardized protocol. DTI parameters of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotrophy (FA) were extracted using regions-of-interest (ROIs) analysis from various brain regions. Compared to the baseline scan, MD increased in all brain regions (P < 0.0001). FA increased in the substantia nigra and posterior putamen, but decreased in the frontal white matter (P < 0.0001). Linear regression analysis demonstrated that the MD in the anterior putamen increased 11.6 units (95% CI = [4.71, 18.43]) (P = 0.0003) for every unit increase of United PD Rating Scale (UPDRS). Our 6-year prospective longitudinal study demonstrated increased diffusivity in all brain regions and that in the anterior putamen correlated with disease progression. Serial diffusion data may be useful as an additional objective in vivo biomarker for motor progression in PD. PMID:26871779

  2. Correlations between Psoriasis and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Skroza, Nevena; Proietti, Ilaria; La Viola, Giorgio; Bernardini, Nicoletta; Nicolucci, Francesca; Tolino, Ersilia; Zuber, Sara; Soccodato, Valentina; Potenza, Concetta

    2013-01-01

    For a long time the relationship between inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and psoriasis has been investigated by epidemiological studies. It is only starting from the 1990s that genetic and immunological aspects have been focused on. Psoriasis and IBD are strictly related inflammatory diseases. Skin and bowel represent, at the same time, barrier and connection between the inner and the outer sides of the body. The most important genetic correlations involve the chromosomal loci 6p22, 16q, 1p31, and 5q33 which map several genes involved in innate and adaptive immunity. The genetic background represents the substrate to the common immune processes involved in psoriasis and IBD. In the past, psoriasis and IBD were considered Th1-related disorders. Nowadays the role of new T cells populations has been highlighted. A key role is played by Th17 and T-regs cells as by the balance between these two cells types. New cytokines and T cells populations, as IL-17A, IL-22, and Th22 cells, could play an important pathogenetic role in psoriasis and IBD. The therapeutic overlaps further support the hypothesis of a common pathogenesis. PMID:23971052

  3. Neural correlates underlying micrographia in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Zhang, Jiarong; Hallett, Mark; Feng, Tao; Hou, Yanan; Chan, Piu

    2016-01-01

    Micrographia is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease, which manifests as either a consistent or progressive reduction in the size of handwriting or both. Neural correlates underlying micrographia remain unclear. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate micrographia-related neural activity and connectivity modulations. In addition, the effect of attention and dopaminergic administration on micrographia was examined. We found that consistent micrographia was associated with decreased activity and connectivity in the basal ganglia motor circuit; while progressive micrographia was related to the dysfunction of basal ganglia motor circuit together with disconnections between the rostral supplementary motor area, rostral cingulate motor area and cerebellum. Attention significantly improved both consistent and progressive micrographia, accompanied by recruitment of anterior putamen and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Levodopa improved consistent micrographia accompanied by increased activity and connectivity in the basal ganglia motor circuit, but had no effect on progressive micrographia. Our findings suggest that consistent micrographia is related to dysfunction of the basal ganglia motor circuit; while dysfunction of the basal ganglia motor circuit and disconnection between the rostral supplementary motor area, rostral cingulate motor area and cerebellum likely contributes to progressive micrographia. Attention improves both types of micrographia by recruiting additional brain networks. Levodopa improves consistent micrographia by restoring the function of the basal ganglia motor circuit, but does not improve progressive micrographia, probably because of failure to repair the disconnected networks. PMID:26525918

  4. [Magnetic resonance imaging with 21.1 T and pathological correlations--diffuse Lewy body disease].

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Murray, Melissa E; Foroutan, Parastou; Schweitzer, Katherine J; Dickson, Dennis W; Grant, Samuel C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2011-08-01

    We investigated fixed basal ganglia specimens, including globus pallidus and putamen, with 21.1-Tesla MRI allowing us to achieve a microscopic level resolution from a patient with pathologically confirmed dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and a neurologically normal control case. We acquired T2 and T2 * weighted images that demonstrated diffuse and patchy lower intensities in the basal ganglia compared to control. There are several paramagnetic substances in brain tissue that could potentially reduce both T2 and T2 * relaxation times, including ferritin, iron (Fe3+), manganese, copper and others. Because iron is most abundant, low intensities on T2 and T2 * weighted images most likely reflect iron deposition. Iron, especially Fe3+, deposition was visible in the pathological specimens stained with Prussian blue after images were obtained. Although radiological-pathological comparisons are not straightforward with respect to either the MRI signal or relaxation quantification, there appears to be a correlation between the relative increase in iron as assessed by Prussian blue staining and the decrease in T2 * value between the DLB and control specimens. As such, this exceptionally high field MRI technique may provide details about the role that iron deposition plays either directly or indirectly as a biomarker in neurodegenerative processes. PMID:21878728

  5. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm of the Liver Masquerading as an Echinococcal Cyst: Radiologic-pathologic Differential of Complex Cystic Liver Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Daniel; Jiang, Kun; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Although simple liver cysts are common, complex cystic liver lesions are infrequent and represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The differential diagnosis of complex cystic liver lesions can be grouped into neoplastic, infectious or inflammatory, and miscellaneous pathologic entities. Clinicians should remember to consider mucinous cystic neoplasm and echinococcal cysts in the differential, which are uncommon etiologies for liver lesions but may expose unique challenges. We present a case of a 49-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of a new complex cystic liver lesion. The following brief review describes how radiologic imaging and pathologic testing can help distinguish between the broad spectrum of diseases that may produce cystic liver lesions. PMID:27195178

  6. Innovations in macroscopic evaluation of pancreatic specimens and radiologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Papaparaskeva, Kleo; Agalianos, Christos; Dervenis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a novel dissection technique of surgical specimens in different cases of pancreatic tumors and provide a radiologic pathologic correlation. In our hospital, that is a referral center for pancreatic diseases, the macroscopic evaluation of the pancreatectomy specimens is performed by the pathologists using the axial slicing technique (instead of the traditional procedure with longitudinal opening of the main pancreatic and/or common bile duct and slicing along the plane defined by both ducts). The specimen is sliced in an axial plane that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the descending duodenum. The procedure results in a large number of thin slices (3–4 mm). This plane is identical to that of CT or MRI and correlation between pathology and imaging is straightforward. We studied 70 cases of suspected different solid and cystic pancreatic tumors and we correlated the tumor size and location, the structure—consistency (areas of necrosis—hemorrhage—fibrosis—inflammation), the degree of vessels’ infiltration, the size of pancreatic and common bile duct and the distance from resection margins. Missed findings by imaging or pitfalls were recorded and we tried to explain all discrepancies between radiology evaluation and the histopathological findings. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is extremely important, adding crucial information on imaging limitations and enabling quality assessment of surgical specimens. The deep knowledge of different pancreatic tumors’ consistency and way of extension helps to improve radiologists’ diagnostic accuracy and minimize the radiological-surgical mismatching, preventing patients from unnecessary surgery. PMID:27069980

  7. An atlas of genetic correlations across human diseases and traits.

    PubMed

    Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Finucane, Hilary K; Anttila, Verneri; Gusev, Alexander; Day, Felix R; Loh, Po-Ru; Duncan, Laramie; Perry, John R B; Patterson, Nick; Robinson, Elise B; Daly, Mark J; Price, Alkes L; Neale, Benjamin M

    2015-11-01

    Identifying genetic correlations between complex traits and diseases can provide useful etiological insights and help prioritize likely causal relationships. The major challenges preventing estimation of genetic correlation from genome-wide association study (GWAS) data with current methods are the lack of availability of individual-level genotype data and widespread sample overlap among meta-analyses. We circumvent these difficulties by introducing a technique-cross-trait LD Score regression-for estimating genetic correlation that requires only GWAS summary statistics and is not biased by sample overlap. We use this method to estimate 276 genetic correlations among 24 traits. The results include genetic correlations between anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia, anorexia and obesity, and educational attainment and several diseases. These results highlight the power of genome-wide analyses, as there currently are no significantly associated SNPs for anorexia nervosa and only three for educational attainment. PMID:26414676

  8. An Atlas of Genetic Correlations across Human Diseases and Traits

    PubMed Central

    Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Finucane, Hilary K; Anttila, Verneri; Gusev, Alexander; Day, Felix R.; Loh, Po-Ru; Duncan, Laramie; Perry, John R.B.; Patterson, Nick; Robinson, Elise B.; Daly, Mark J.; Price, Alkes L.; Neale, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying genetic correlations between complex traits and diseases can provide useful etiological insights and help prioritize likely causal relationships. The major challenges preventing estimation of genetic correlation from genome-wide association study (GWAS) data with current methods are the lack of availability of individual genotype data and widespread sample overlap among meta-analyses. We circumvent these difficulties by introducing a technique – cross-trait LD Score regression – for estimating genetic correlation that requires only GWAS summary statistics and is not biased by sample overlap. We use this method to estimate 276 genetic correlations among 24 traits. The results include genetic correlations between anorexia nervosa and schizophrenia, anorexia and obesity and associations between educational attainment and several diseases. These results highlight the power of genome-wide analyses, since there currently are no significantly associated SNPs for anorexia nervosa and only three for educational attainment. PMID:26414676

  9. Combined Undifferentiated and Neuroendocrine Carcinomas of the Gallbladder Appearing as Two Separate Lesions: A Case Report with Radiological-Pathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Won; Baek, Seung Yon; Sung, Sun Hee

    2015-01-01

    We report herein a rare case of incidentally detected combined undifferentiated and neuroendocrine carcinomas of the gallbladder. An incidental gallbladder malignancy was revealed on abdominal ultrasound and multi-detector computed tomography in a 54-year-old man. A short distance from the main polypoid hypoechoic mass at the fundus of the gallbladder, focal wall thickening was noted with prominently increased power Doppler flow. Extended cholecystectomy was performed, and histology confirmed the main polypoid mass as undifferentiated carcinoma and the separate nodule as neuroendocrine carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report presenting two separate lesions of combined gallbladder carcinomas by radiological features. PMID:26622929

  10. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential. PMID:26957336

  11. Intellectual impairment in Parkinson's disease: clinical, pathologic, and biochemical correlates.

    PubMed

    Cummings, J L

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of overt dementia in 27 studies representing 4,336 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients was 39.9%. The studies reporting the highest incidence of intellectual impairment (69.9%) used psychologic assessment techniques, whereas studies identifying the lowest prevalence of dementia (30.2%) depended on nonstandardized clinical examinations. Neuropsychologic investigations reveal that PD patients manifest impairment in memory, visuospatial skills, and set aptitude. Language function is largely spared. Intellectual deterioration in PD correlates with age, akinesia, duration, and treatment status. Neuropathologic and neurochemical observations demonstrate that PD is a heterogeneous disorder: the classic subcortical pathology with dopamine deficiency may be complicated by atrophy of nucleus basalis and superimposed cortical cholinergic deficits, and a few patients have the histopathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Mild intellectual loss occurs with the classic pathology, and the more severe dementia syndromes have cholinergic alterations or Alzheimer's disease. Thus, PD includes several syndromes of intellectual impairment with variable pathologic and neurochemical correlates. PMID:2908099

  12. Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Antenatal Diagnosis and Histopathological Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Rajanna, Dayananda Kumar; Reddy, Anjani; Srinivas, Naren Satya; Aneja, Ankur

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is one of the most common inheritable disease manifesting in infancy and childhood with a frequency of 1:6,000 to 1:55,000 births. The patient in her second trimester presented with a history of amenorrhea. Ultrasound examination revealed bilateral, enlarged, hyperechogenic kidneys, placentomegaly, and severe oligohydramnios. The pregnancy was terminated. An autopsy was performed on the fetus. Both the kidneys were found to be enlarged and the cut surface showed numerous cysts. The liver sections showed changes due to fibrosis. The final diagnosis of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease was made based on these findings. In this article, we correlate the ante-natal ultrasound and histopathological findings in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23814685

  13. Dopaminergic correlates of metabolic network activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holtbernd, Florian; Ma, Yilong; Peng, Shichun; Schwartz, Frank; Timmermann, Lars; Kracht, Lutz; Fink, Gereon R; Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David; Eggers, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with distinct metabolic covariance patterns that relate to the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disorder. It is not known, however, how the expression of these patterns relates to measurements of nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity from the same individuals. To explore these associations, we studied 106 PD subjects who underwent cerebral PET with both (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and (18) F-fluoro-L-dopa (FDOPA). Expression values for the PD motor- and cognition-related metabolic patterns (PDRP and PDCP, respectively) were computed for each subject; these measures were correlated with FDOPA uptake on a voxel-by-voxel basis. To explore the relationship between dopaminergic function and local metabolic activity, caudate and putamen FDOPA PET signal was correlated voxel-wise with FDG uptake over the entire brain. PDRP expression correlated with FDOPA uptake in caudate and putamen (P < 0.001), while PDCP expression correlated with uptake in the anterior striatum (P < 0.001). While statistically significant, the correlations were only of modest size, accounting for less than 20% of the overall variation in these measures. After controlling for PDCP expression, PDRP correlations were significant only in the posterior putamen. Of note, voxel-wise correlations between caudate/putamen FDOPA uptake and whole-brain FDG uptake were significant almost exclusively in PDRP regions. Overall, the data indicate that PDRP and PDCP expression correlates significantly with PET indices of presynaptic dopaminergic functioning obtained in the same individuals. Even so, the modest size of these correlations suggests that in PD patients, individual differences in network activity cannot be explained solely by nigrostriatal dopamine loss. PMID:26037537

  14. Correlates of sleep quality in persons with HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Nokes, K M; Kendrew, J

    2001-01-01

    This study used the Symptom Experience dimension of the revised UCSF Symptom Management Conceptual model to examine correlates of sleep quality in HIV-infected persons. According to this model, person, health/illness, and environment categories influence perception of a symptom. The average person in the sample (N = 58) reported being HIV-infected for 8.5 years and was 46 years old, not working, and a person of color. Depending on the level of data, either chi square or Pearson correlations were computed between the person, health/illness, and environment categories and the dependent variable, sleep quality, as measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Person variables significantly related to sleep quality were employment status, trait anxiety, and general well-being. Health/illness variables significantly related to sleep quality were length of time living with HIV disease and five health status measures (depressive symptoms, state anxiety, symptom severity, daytime sleepiness, and functional status). The environmental variables associated with sleep quality were sleeping alone, having a separate bedroom, and sleeping in a noisy room. Correlates of better sleep quality are positive general well-being, less anxious personality trait and emotional state, less daytime sleepiness, less depressive symptoms, and less symptom severity. Correlates of worse sleep quality are impaired functional status and longer duration of living with HIV disease. PMID:11211669

  15. Clinical correlates of raphe serotonergic dysfunction in early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Qamhawi, Zahi; Towey, David; Shah, Bina; Pagano, Gennaro; Seibyl, John; Marek, Kenneth; Borghammer, Per; Brooks, David James; Pavese, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Post-mortem and neuroimaging studies suggest that the serotonergic system, which originates from the brainstem raphe nuclei, is disrupted in Parkinson's disease. This could contribute to the occurrence of non-motor symptoms and tremor, which are only partially explained by dopamine loss. However, the level of involvement of the serotonergic raphe nuclei in early Parkinson's disease is still debated. (123)I-FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography is a marker of dopamine and serotonin transporter availability. While (123)I-FP-CIT binds primarily to dopamine transporters in the striatum, its binding in the brainstem raphe nuclei reflects serotonin transporter availability. We interrogated baseline single photon emission computed tomography scans of subjects recruited by the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative to determine: (i) the integrity of the brainstem raphe nuclei in early Parkinson's disease; and (ii) whether raphe serotonin transporter levels correlate with severity of tremor and symptoms of fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance. Three hundred and forty-five patients with early drug-naïve Parkinson's disease, 185 healthy controls, and 56 subjects with possible Parkinson's disease without evidence of dopaminergic deficit were included. In the Parkinson's disease cohort, 37 patients had a tremulous, 106 patients had a pure akinetic-rigid, and 202 had a mixed phenotype. Patients with Parkinson's disease had significantly lower serotonin transporter availability in the brainstem raphe nuclei compared to controls (P < 0.01) and subjects without evidence of dopaminergic deficit (P < 0.05). However, only 13% of patients with Parkinson's disease individually had reduced signals. Raphe serotonin transporter availability over the entire Parkinson's disease cohort were associated with rest tremor amplitude (β = -0.106, P < 0.05), rest tremor constancy (β = -0.109, P < 0.05), and index of rest tremor severity (β = -0.104, P < 0.05). The tremulous

  16. Metabolic correlates of subthalamic nucleus activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tanya P; Carbon, Maren; Tang, Chengke; Mogilner, Alon Y; Sterio, Djordje; Beric, Aleksandar; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2008-05-01

    Overactivity of subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons is a consistent feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) and is a target of therapy for this disorder. However, the relationship of STN firing rate to regional brain function is not known. We scanned 17 PD patients with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET to measure resting glucose metabolism before the implantation of STN deep brain stimulation electrodes. Spontaneous STN firing rates were recorded during surgery and correlated with preoperative regional glucose metabolism on a voxel-by-voxel basis. We also examined the relationship between firing rate and the activity of metabolic brain networks associated with the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disease. Mean firing rates were 47.2 +/- 6.1 and 48.7 +/- 8.5 Hz for the left and right hemispheres, respectively. These measures correlated (P < 0.007) with glucose metabolism in the putamen and globus pallidus, which receive projections from this structure. Significant correlations (P < 0.0005) were also evident in the primary motor (BA4) and dorsolateral prefrontal (BA46/10) cortical areas. The activity of both the motor (P < 0.0001) and the cognitive (P < 0.006) PD-related metabolic networks was elevated in these patients. STN firing rates correlated with the activity of the former (P < 0.007) but not the latter network (P = 0.39). The findings suggest that the functional pathways associated with motor disability in PD are linked to the STN firing rate. These pathways are likely to mediate the clinical benefit that is seen following targeted STN interventions for this disease. PMID:18400841

  17. Metabolic correlates of pallidal neuronal activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Eidelberg, D; Moeller, J R; Kazumata, K; Antonini, A; Sterio, D; Dhawan, V; Spetsieris, P; Alterman, R; Kelly, P J; Dogali, M; Fazzini, E; Beric, A

    1997-08-01

    We have used [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and PET to identify specific metabolic covariance patterns associated with Parkinson's disease and related disorders previously. Nonetheless, the physiological correlates of these abnormal patterns are unknown. In this study we used PET to measure resting state glucose metabolism in 42 awake unmedicated Parkinson's disease patients prior to unilateral stereotaxic pallidotomy for relief of symptoms. Spontaneous single unit activity of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) was recorded intraoperatively in the same patients under identical conditions. The first 24 patients (Group A) were scanned on an intermediate resolution tomograph (full width at half maximum, 8 mm); the subsequent 18 patients (Group B) were scanned on a higher resolution tomograph (full width half maximum, 4.2 mm). We found significant positive correlations between GPi firing rates and thalamic glucose metabolism in both patient groups (Group A: r = 0.41, P < 0.05; Group B: r = 0.69, P < 0.005). In Group B, pixel-based analysis disclosed a significant focus of physiological-metabolic correlation involving the ventral thalamus and the GPi (statistical parametric map: P < 0.05, corrected). Regional covariance analysis demonstrated that internal pallidal neuronal activity correlated significantly (r = 0.65, P < 0.005) with the expression of a unique network characterized by covarying pallidothalamic and brainstem metabolic activity. Our findings suggest that the variability in pallidal neuronal firing rates in Parkinson's disease patients is associated with individual differences in the metabolic activity of efferent projection systems. PMID:9278625

  18. Correlations of clinical, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features in Hirayama disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Chang, Hong-Shiu; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Ro, Long-Sun; Chu, Chun-Che; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Lyu, Rong-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hirayama disease (HD) is characterized by development of asymmetric forearm muscle atrophy during adolescence with or without focal cervical spinal cord atrophy. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation of clinical symptoms, disease progression, and electrophysiological findings with cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The medical records, cervical spine MRIs, and electrophysiological findings of 44 HD patients were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Denervation changes in any single C5 to C7 root-innervated muscle (deltoid, biceps, triceps, or extensor digitorum communis) occurred more frequently in the 25 patients with cord atrophy than the 19 patients without cord atrophy (88% vs 53%, P = 0.02). Onset age, duration of disease progression, neurological examinations, nerve conduction study, and electromyographic findings from individual muscles were similar between patient groups. Compared with HD patients without cord atrophy, HD patients with cord atrophy experience a more severe denervation change in C5 to C7 root-innervated muscles. PMID:27428223

  19. Ocular signs correlate well with disease severity and genotype in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Pitz, Susanne; Kalkum, Gisela; Arash, Laila; Karabul, Nesrin; Sodi, Andrea; Larroque, Sylvain; Beck, Michael; Gal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Ocular signs in Fabry disease have generally been regarded to be primarily of diagnostic value. We explored whether ocular findings, alone or in particular in combination with the α-galactosidase A gene mutation, have predictive value for disease severity. Data from the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS), a large, global database sponsored by Shire, were selected for adult patients who had undergone ophthalmological examination. Three ocular signs were assessed: cornea verticillata, tortuous conjunctival and/or retinal vessels, and cataract. Fabry disease severity was measured using FOS Mainz Severity Score Index and modifications thereof. Ophthalmological data were available for 1203 (699 female, 504 male) adult patients with eye findings characteristic of Fabry disease in 55.1%. Cornea verticillata had a similar distribution in women (51.1%) and men (50.8%), whereas tortuous vessels and Fabry cataract were somewhat more frequent in men than in women. Patients with cornea verticillata, selected as the principal ocular sign for this study, had more severe disease (median score, 20.0) versus those without ocular signs (11.0; P<0.001). This finding could be confirmed by applying age adjusted severity scores. Moreover, the prevalence of cornea verticillata was significantly higher in patients with null (male, 76.9%; female, 64.5%) and missense (male, 79.2%; female, 67.4%) mutations versus mild missense (male, 17.1%; female, 23.1%) and the p.N215S (male, 15.0%; female, 15.6%) mutations (P<0.01). Our analyses show a correlation between the prevalence of ocular changes in Fabry disease and disease severity. Consequently, information on ocular findings and α-galactosidase A gene mutation may help assess the risk for more severe Fabry disease. These observed findings are of notable clinical importance, as Fabry disease is characterized by high clinical course variability and only weak genotype-phenotype correlation at the individual patient level. Further confirmatory studies

  20. Ocular Signs Correlate Well with Disease Severity and Genotype in Fabry Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pitz, Susanne; Kalkum, Gisela; Arash, Laila; Karabul, Nesrin; Sodi, Andrea; Larroque, Sylvain; Beck, Michael; Gal, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Ocular signs in Fabry disease have generally been regarded to be primarily of diagnostic value. We explored whether ocular findings, alone or in particular in combination with the α-galactosidase A gene mutation, have predictive value for disease severity. Data from the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS), a large, global database sponsored by Shire, were selected for adult patients who had undergone ophthalmological examination. Three ocular signs were assessed: cornea verticillata, tortuous conjunctival and/or retinal vessels, and cataract. Fabry disease severity was measured using FOS Mainz Severity Score Index and modifications thereof. Ophthalmological data were available for 1203 (699 female, 504 male) adult patients with eye findings characteristic of Fabry disease in 55.1%. Cornea verticillata had a similar distribution in women (51.1%) and men (50.8%), whereas tortuous vessels and Fabry cataract were somewhat more frequent in men than in women. Patients with cornea verticillata, selected as the principal ocular sign for this study, had more severe disease (median score, 20.0) versus those without ocular signs (11.0; P<0.001). This finding could be confirmed by applying age adjusted severity scores. Moreover, the prevalence of cornea verticillata was significantly higher in patients with null (male, 76.9%; female, 64.5%) and missense (male, 79.2%; female, 67.4%) mutations versus mild missense (male, 17.1%; female, 23.1%) and the p.N215S (male, 15.0%; female, 15.6%) mutations (P<0.01). Our analyses show a correlation between the prevalence of ocular changes in Fabry disease and disease severity. Consequently, information on ocular findings and α-galactosidase A gene mutation may help assess the risk for more severe Fabry disease. These observed findings are of notable clinical importance, as Fabry disease is characterized by high clinical course variability and only weak genotype-phenotype correlation at the individual patient level. Further confirmatory studies

  1. Pulse pressure correlates with leukoaraiosis in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ae Young; Jeong, Seong-Hae; Choi, Byung Hee; Sohn, Eun Hee; Chui, Helena

    2006-01-01

    The relation between pulse pressure (PP) and Alzheimer disease (AD) remains unclear. We performed this study to investigate the relation between PP and AD and the impact of PP to impair cognitive performance on this relationship. It is a cross-sectional study from the Neurology Memory Clinic of Chungnam National University Hospital and five senior welfare centers in the city of Taejon, Korea. A cohort of 75 patients with AD and 117 control subjects were enrolled for the study. PP was significantly higher whereas mean arterial pressure (MAP) was lower in patients with AD than those of control subjects. Elevated serum total cholesterol (TC) level was significantly associated with both PP and MAP in control subjects as well as patients with AD. We found a significant relationship between PP and cerebral white matter changes (WMCs) in AD. PP changes correlate with leukoaraiosis in AD. PMID:16139378

  2. Angiogenic growth factors correlate with disease severity in young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Berenice; Masoumi, Amirali; Elhassan, Elwaleed; McFann, Kim; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa; Maahs, David; Snell-Bergeon, Janet; Schrier, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Renal cysts, pain and hematuria are common presentations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children. Renal function, however, is typically preserved in these patients despite increased renal volume. Since angiogenesis has been implicated in promotion of renal cyst growth in ADPKD we measured the serum level of various angiogenic factors and early renal structural changes and cardiovascular parameters in 71 patients with ADPKD with a mean age of 16 years. Renal structure and left ventricular mass index were measured by magnetic resonance imaging or by echocardiogram. Renal function was assessed by creatinine clearance, and urinary protein excretion. Serum growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of skewed distributions, the various parameters are reported as log10. Serum Log10 vascular endothelial growth factor was positively correlated with renal and cardiac structure, but negatively correlated with creatinine clearance. Serum angiopoietin 1 levels significantly correlated with structural change in both the kidney and the heart and with urinary protein. Thus, the correlation between angiogenic growth factors with both renal and cardiac disease severity is compatible with a possible role for angiogenesis in the early progression of disease in ADPKD. PMID:20881939

  3. Biochemical correlates of neuropsychiatric illness in maple syrup urine disease

    PubMed Central

    Muelly, Emilie R.; Moore, Gregory J.; Bunce, Scott C.; Mack, Julie; Bigler, Don C.; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2013-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder of branched chain amino acid metabolism presenting with neonatal encephalopathy, episodic metabolic decompensation, and chronic amino acid imbalances. Dietary management enables survival and reduces risk of acute crises. Liver transplantation has emerged as an effective way to eliminate acute decompensation risk. Psychiatric illness is a reported MSUD complication, but has not been well characterized and remains poorly understood. We report the prevalence and characteristics of neuropsychiatric problems among 37 classical MSUD patients (ages 5–35 years, 26 on dietary therapy, 11 after liver transplantation) and explore their underlying mechanisms. Compared with 26 age-matched controls, MSUD patients were at higher risk for disorders of cognition, attention, and mood. Using quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we found lower brain glutamate, N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and creatine concentrations in MSUD patients, which correlated with specific neuropsychiatric outcomes. Asymptomatic neonatal course and stringent longitudinal biochemical control proved fundamental to optimizing long-term mental health. Neuropsychiatric morbidity and neurochemistry were similar among transplanted and nontransplanted MSUD patients. In conclusion, amino acid dysregulation results in aberrant neural networks with neurochemical deficiencies that persist after transplant and correlate with neuropsychiatric morbidities. These findings may provide insight into general mechanisms of psychiatric illness. PMID:23478409

  4. Questionnaire about psychology/disease correlation – II

    PubMed Central

    Dragoş, D; Ojog, DG; Tănăsescu, MD

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To further evaluate the adequacy of the items in our questionnaire aimed at unraveling the possible correlations between psychological features and internal disorders. This paper is dedicated to the items exploring the individual’s interaction with other people. Method. The items are divided into several subdomains. For each subdomain, we have calculated the correlations between the items of the respective subdomain (inner associations) and with the items in other subdomains (outer associations) by means of chi square test or Fisher exact test as dictated by statistical reasons. We examined the answers from our first 10192 respondents. Results and conclusions. Many inter-item correlations are the consequence of higher or lesser degrees of synonymy. Those within a given subdomain confirm the adequate allocation of items. Those bridging different subdomains may point either to incorrect assignments, or to semantic inclusion relations. Other results are not explicable by semantic similarity, and probably reveal psychological subtleties, such as: most individuals have a sense of undeservedness when badly treated by other people; those easily hurt by insults and humiliations have a propensity to timidity and/or emotivity; the subjects who shun conflicts are more prone to persistent thoughts, brooding people are more sensitive and more prone to conflicts, injustice-indignant people frequently get into conflict although they declare to be bothered by dissent etc. But at the heart of all the PFs in the Interaction-with-other-people domain there seems to be the sense of being undervalued, which should probably be the key issue to be addressed by any therapeutic interventions for diseases psychoemotionally determined by disturbed interpersonal relationships. Abbreviations: PF = psychological feature; Chisq = chi-square; OdRa = odds ratio; OdRaCL = odds ratio confidence limits; ErrProb = probability of error PMID:22514567

  5. Correlation between plasma renalase level and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Benhong; Hao, Jianjun; Sheng, Weiwei; Xiang, Yuancai; Zhang, Jiemei; Zhu, Hao; Tian, Jingcheng; Zhu, Xu; Feng, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between the plasma renalase level of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and the degree of coronary artery stenosis. Methods: A total of 180 patients who received coronary angiography in our hospitals from August 2013 to October 2013 were selected as the CAD group, of which 164 were finally diagnosed as CAD. Another 140 healthy subjects were selected as the control group. The plasma renalase levels of the two groups were detected by ELISA to analyze CA-induced changes and to clarify the correlations with the number of branches with coronary artery stenosis and Syntax scores. Results: The plasma renalase level of the CAD group was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05). The plasma renalase levels of the multi-branch and two-branch stenosis subgroups were significantly lower than that of the subgroup with normal coronary angiography outcomes (P<0.05), while the levels of the single-branch stenosis and normal subgroups were similar (P>0.05). Besides, the plasma renalase level of the low-risk subgroup was significantly higher than those of the medium-risk and high-risk subgroups (P<0.05), and the level of the medium-risk subgroup was significantly higher than that of the high-risk subgroup (P<0.05). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that renalase level was the risk factor of CAD (OR=1.12, 95%CI: 1.03-3.34). Conclusion: Plasma renalase level was correlated with CAD, the changes of which may reflect the degree of coronary artery stenosis. Therefore, plasma renalase level can be used to indicate the progression of CAD. PMID:25225499

  6. Angiogenic growth factors correlate with disease severity in young patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Reed, Berenice Y; Masoumi, Amirali; Elhassan, Elwaleed; McFann, Kim; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Schrier, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Renal cysts, pain, and hematuria are common presentations of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in children. Renal function, however, is typically preserved in these patients despite increased renal volume. Since angiogenesis has been implicated in promotion of renal cyst growth in ADPKD, we measured the serum level of various angiogenic factors and early renal structural changes and cardiovascular parameters in 71 patients with ADPKD, with a mean age of 16 years. Renal structure and left ventricular mass index were measured by magnetic resonance imaging or by echocardiogram. Renal function was assessed by creatinine clearance and urinary protein excretion. Serum growth factor levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of skewed distributions, the various parameters are reported as log(10). Serum log(10) vascular endothelial growth factor was positively correlated with renal and cardiac structure, but negatively with creatinine clearance. Serum angiopoietin 1 levels significantly correlated with structural change in both the kidney and the heart and with urinary protein. Thus, the correlation between angiogenic growth factors with both renal and cardiac disease severity is compatible with a possible role for angiogenesis in the early progression of disease in ADPKD. PMID:20881939

  7. Correlating Photoreceptor Mosaic Structure to Clinical Findings in Stargardt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razeen, Moataz M.; Cooper, Robert F.; Langlo, Christopher S.; Goldberg, Mara R.; Wilk, Melissa A.; Han, Dennis P.; Connor, Thomas B.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Collison, Frederick T.; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Stepien, Kimberly E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a method for correlating photoreceptor mosaic structure with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and microperimetry findings in patients with Stargardt disease. Methods A total of 14 patients with clinically diagnosed Stargardt disease were imaged using confocal and split-detection adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy. Cone photoreceptors were identified manually in a band along the temporal meridian. Resulting values were compared to a normative database (n = 9) to generate cone density deviation (CDD) maps. Manual measurement of outer nuclear layer plus Henle fiber layer (ONL+HFL) thickness was performed, in addition to determination of the presence of ellipsoid zone (EZ) and interdigitation zone (IZ) bands on OCT. These results, along with microperimetry data, were overlaid with the CDD maps. Results Wide variation in foveal structure and CDD maps was seen within this small group. Disruption of ONL+HFL and/or IZ band was seen in all patients, with EZ band preservation in regions with low cone density in 38% of locations analyzed. Normality of retinal lamellar structure on OCT corresponded with cone density and visual function at 50/78 locations analyzed. Outer retinal tubulations containing photoreceptor-like structures were observed in 3 patients. Conclusions The use of CDD color-coded maps enables direct comparison of cone mosaic local density with other measures of retinal structure and function. Larger normative datasets and improved tools for automation of image alignment are needed. Translational Relevance The approach described facilitates comparison of complex multimodal data sets from patients with inherited retinal degeneration, and can be expanded to incorporate other structural imaging or functional testing. PMID:26981328

  8. Human ZMPSTE24 disease mutations: residual proteolytic activity correlates with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Barrowman, Jemima; Wiley, Patricia A.; Hudon-Miller, Sarah E.; Hrycyna, Christine A.; Michaelis, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The zinc metalloprotease ZMPSTE24 plays a critical role in nuclear lamin biology by cleaving the prenylated and carboxylmethylated 15-amino acid tail from the C-terminus of prelamin A to yield mature lamin A. A defect in this proteolytic event, caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene (LMNA) that eliminates the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site, underlies the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS). Likewise, mutations in the ZMPSTE24 gene that result in decreased enzyme function cause a spectrum of diseases that share certain features of premature aging. Twenty human ZMPSTE24 alleles have been identified that are associated with three disease categories of increasing severity: mandibuloacral dysplasia type B (MAD-B), severe progeria (atypical ‘HGPS’) and restrictive dermopathy (RD). To determine whether a correlation exists between decreasing ZMPSTE24 protease activity and increasing disease severity, we expressed mutant alleles of ZMPSTE24 in yeast and optimized in vivo yeast mating assays to directly compare the activity of alleles associated with each disease category. We also measured the activity of yeast crude membranes containing the ZMPSTE24 mutant proteins in vitro. We determined that, in general, the residual activity of ZMPSTE24 patient alleles correlates with disease severity. Complete loss-of-function alleles are associated with RD, whereas retention of partial, measureable activity results in MAD-B or severe progeria. Importantly, our assays can discriminate small differences in activity among the mutants, confirming that the methods presented here will be useful for characterizing any new ZMPSTE24 mutations that are discovered. PMID:22718200

  9. Clinical and neuropathological correlates of depression in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Förstl, H; Burns, A; Luthert, P; Cairns, N; Lantos, P; Levy, R

    1992-11-01

    Depressive symptoms have been reported in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that a noradrenergic deficit originating from neuronal degeneration in brainstem nuclei may represent an organic correlate of these disturbances. We examined the neuropathological changes in the locus coeruleus (LC), substantia nigra (SN), basal nucleus of Meynert and cortex of 52 patients (12 male, 40 female, mean age 83.2 +/- 6.4 years) with pathologically verified AD. Fourteen patients (1 male, 13 female) showed signs of depression. The majority of these patients suffered from severe physical disability or sensory impairment and developed persistent delusions, but had less cognitive impairment. Neuronal counts in the LC were significantly lower than in the 38 patients without depression (36.9 +/- 14.0; 51.4 +/- 28.0 neuromelanin-pigmented cells per section per nucleus; F = 3.4, df = 1, 50, P = 0.04). Neuron counts were higher in the basal nucleus of Meynert in depressed AD patients and there were no differences of the neuron numbers in the SN. Depression (main effect; F = 4.5, P = 0.04) contributed significantly to the variance of neuronal counts in the LC, even when covarying for gender, age of onset, cognitive impairment and cortical Alzheimer pathology. The observed disproportionate loss of noradrenergic and cholinergic neurons in the LC and basal nucleus of Meynert may represent an important organic substrate of depression in AD. PMID:1488485

  10. Correlation between Marek’s disease virus pathotype and replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens. Pathotyping has become an increasingly important assay for monitoring shifts in virulence of field strains, however, it is time-consuming and expensive and alternatives are...

  11. Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease (CD) is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives were to estimate heritability of CD resistance in a line (ARS-Fp-R) selected 4 generations for improved bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance; estimate genetic correlations among CD resistance, BC...

  12. Clinical pathologic correlations of Lyme disease by stage.

    PubMed

    Duray, P H; Steere, A C

    1988-01-01

    Lyme disease is capable of producing a wide variety of clinical pathologic conditions and lesions having in common histologic features of collagen-vascular disease. The plasma cell is an omnipotent inflammatory responder in most tissues involved by Lyme disease, ranging from relatively acute to lesions that have gone on for years. Vascular thickening also seems to be prominent, and in the dermis is accompanied by scleroderma-like collagen expansion. The disease in some ways resembles the responses seen in lupus erythematosus such as mild cerebritis with lymphocytes and plasma cells in the leptomeninges. Lymphoplasmacytic panniculitis of Lyme disease resembles lupus profundus, both in the infiltrate and the plasma cell-blood vessel relationship. The onion skin thickened vessels of the synovia resemble the vessels of lupus spleens, while the scleradermoid thickening of the dermis and various skin lesions of stage III Lyme disease suggest a collagen-vascular disorder. Finally, the perivascular lymphoid infiltrate in clinical myositis does not differ from that seen in polymyositis or dermatomyositis. All of these histologic derangements suggest immunologic damage in response to persistence of the spirochete, however few in number. PMID:2847622

  13. Cerebral correlates of psychotic syndromes in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Psychosis has been recognized as a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases and a core feature of dementia that worsens most clinical courses. It includes hallucinations, delusions including paranoia, aggressive behaviour, apathy and other psychotic phenomena that occur in a wide range of degenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, synucleinopathies (Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies), Huntington’s disease, frontotemporal degenerations, motoneuron and prion diseases. Many of these psychiatric manifestations may be early expressions of cognitive impairment, but often there is a dissociation between psychotic/behavioural symptoms and the rather linear decline in cognitive function, suggesting independent pathophysiological mechanisms. Strictly neuropathological explanations are likely to be insufficient to explain them, and a large group of heterogeneous factors (environmental, neurochemical changes, genetic factors, etc.) may influence their pathogenesis. Clinico-pathological evaluation of behavioural and psychotic symptoms (PS) in the setting of neurodegenerative and dementing disorders presents a significant challenge for modern neurosciences. Recognition and understanding of these manifestations may lead to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic options that can serve to delay long-term progression of these devastating disorders and improve the patients’ quality of life. A better understanding of the pathophysiology and distinctive pathological features underlying the development of PS in neurodegenerative diseases may provide important insights into psychotic processes in general. PMID:21418522

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  15. Acute Marchiafava-Bignami disease: clinical and serial MRI correlation

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Chandan; Prakashini, Koteshwara; Polnaya, Ashwin

    2014-01-01

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a form of toxic demyelinating disease more often seen in chronic alcoholics. The disease process typically involves the corpus callosum and clinically often presents with altered sensorium, neurocognitive defects or seizures with acute cases often deteriorating to comatose state. The death rate is high. We report a rare case of MBD with complete clinical recovery. A 50-year-old male patient presented in an unconscious state and underwent MRI of the brain which showed significant lesions involving the corpus callosum. Following treatment with thiamine and supportive therapy, he improved clinically and a follow-up MRI revealed significant resolution of the earlier lesions. Diffusion-weighted MRI showed the changes more conspicuously as compared with conventional imaging. The clinical resolution corresponded well with the MRI pattern. The case highlights that diffusion-weighted MRI is an extremely useful tool in evaluation and prognostication of MBD. PMID:24850553

  16. Linguistic Correlates of Asymmetric Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick; Cappaert, Kevin; Durso, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Asymmetric motor severity is common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and provides a method for examining the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying cognitive and linguistic deficits associated with the disorder. In the present research, PD participants (N = 31) were assessed in terms of the asymmetry of their motor symptoms. Interviews with the…

  17. An Examination of the Demographic and Environmental Variables Correlated with Lyme Disease Emergence in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Seukep, Sara E; Kolivras, Korine N; Hong, Yili; Li, Jie; Prisley, Stephen P; Campbell, James B; Gaines, David N; Dymond, Randel L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the United States' most significant vector-borne illness. Virginia, on the southern edge of the disease's currently expanding range, has experienced an increase in Lyme disease both spatially and temporally, with steadily increasing rates over the past decade and disease spread from the northern to the southwestern part of the state. This study used a Geographic Information System and a spatial Poisson regression model to examine correlations between demographic and land cover variables, and human Lyme disease from 2006 to 2010 in Virginia. Analysis indicated that herbaceous land cover is positively correlated with Lyme disease incidence rates. Areas with greater interspersion between herbaceous and forested land were also positively correlated with incidence rates. In addition, income and age were positively correlated with incidence rates. Levels of development, interspersion of herbaceous and developed land, and population density were negatively correlated with incidence rates. Abundance of forest fragments less than 2 hectares in area was not significantly correlated. Our results support some findings of previous studies on ecological variables and Lyme disease in endemic areas, but other results have not been found in previous studies, highlighting the potential contribution of new variables as Lyme disease continues to emerge southward. PMID:26163019

  18. Volumetric MRI data correlate to disease severity in metachromatic leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Derks, Marloes GM; Pouwels, Petra J W; de Graaf, Pim; van Rappard, Diane F; Barkhof, Frederik; Steenweg, Marjan E; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder due to a deficiency in arylsulfatase A with progressive demyelination and neurological decline. This retrospective MRI study investigated the extent of cortical involvement at time of diagnosis, and clinical correlates to both conventional and regional volumetric measures of brain involvement. Methods 3D-T1-weighted MRI scans were used to determine cortical thickness and surface-based cerebral cortical gray matter (GM) and cerebral white matter (WM) volume (GMV and WMV), WM lesions, thalamus, and cerebellum. MRI-MLD severity scores were obtained from FLAIR images. Associations between clinical and imaging data were examined using correlation coefficients. Results Twenty patients with MLD (mean age 13.7 years, range 2–35) and 20 controls (mean age 13.9 years, range 2–40) were included. Compared with control subjects, late-infantile, and juvenile patients (n = 14) had significantly diminished cerebral cortical GMV and thalamus volume (P < 0.05), but did not differ in WMV and cortical thickness. Adult patients (n = 6) showed significantly reduced GMV, WMV and cortical thickness (all P < 0.05). Regional analysis showed statistically significant cortical thinning in the cingulate gyrus and most pronounced thinning with age in the frontal lobe of MLD patients. Intelligence quotient (IQ) correlated with MRI-MLD scores (r = −0.87, P < 0.001). Interpretation Significant cerebral cortical GMV loss is already present in early stages of MLD. IQ correlates with WM severity scores and lesion volume, but not with volumetric measures. In adult presentations, there is more pronounced global atrophy with GMV and WMV loss and accelerated cortical thinning, most prominently in the cingulate gyrus and frontal lobes. PMID:26401514

  19. Correlates of protection against rotavirus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Offit, P A

    2001-01-01

    Repeated infections with the 'mucosal' pathogen rotavirus are common in children. Subsequent rotavirus infections usually cause milder symptoms than first-time infections. Therefore, although natural rotavirus infection attenuates the severity of subsequent infections, it does not prevent reinfection or mild disease. On the other hand, natural infection with 'systemic' viruses such as measles, mumps, rubella, or varicella often confers life-long protection against mild disease associated with reinfection. The degree to which differences in the pathogenesis of systemic and mucosal pathogens determines differences in the capacity of natural infection to induce life-long protective immunity will be discussed. This paradigm will be used to explore the immunological effector functions associated with protection against rotavirus challenge. PMID:11444023

  20. Huntington disease in children: genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, A; Macias, R; Yescas, P; Ochoa, A; Davila, G; Alonso, E

    2000-08-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of adulthood; however, a subset of early-onset patients exists, representing 1% of all HD patients. We reviewed a population of 155 HD-families to determine the frequency, molecular and clinical characteristics of children with an onset before the age of 10 years. In each case, a neurological evaluation was performed as well as molecular detection of the expanded CAG triplet in the affected child and both parents. The family history was also reviewed and updated. Seven children (1.92%) had onset of symptoms before the age of 10, two of them were dead by the time of the study. Large CAG expansions with intergenerational instability were identified, and in one case the child's allele was almost three times larger than the allele of the asymptomatic transmitting father, a situation reported only once before. Clinically, they showed preponderance of rigidity, seizures, learning disabilities and a rapid course of the disease. We attempted to use UHDRS. However, consistent results could not be obtained, suggesting that the scale should be revised for use in juvenile cases. HD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases in children, even in the absence of a positive family history. PMID:11071143

  1. Cerebral correlates of psychotic symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mega, M.; Lee, L.; Dinov, I.; Mishkin, F.; Toga, A.; Cummings, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Psychotic symptoms are produced by distributed neuronal dysfunction. Abnormalities of reality testing and false inference implicate frontal lobe abnormalities.
OBJECTIVES—To identify the functional imaging profile of patients with Alzheimer's disease manifesting psychotic symptoms as measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).
METHODS—Twenty patients with Alzheimer's disease who had SPECT and clinical evaluations were divided into two equal groups with similar mini mental status examination (MMSE), age, sex, and the range of behaviours documented by the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI), except delusions and hallucinations. SPECT studies, registered to a probabilistic anatomical atlas, were normalised across the combined group mean intensity level, and subjected to a voxel by voxel subtraction of the non-psychotic minus psychotic groups. Subvolume thresholding (SVT) corrected random lobar noise to produce a three dimensional functional significance map.
RESULTS—The significance map showed lower regional perfusion in the right and left dorsolateral frontal, left anterior cingulate, and left ventral striatal regions along with the left pulvinar and dorsolateral parietal cortex, in the psychotic versus non-psychotic group.
CONCLUSION—Patients with Alzheimer's disease who manifest psychosis may have disproportionate dysfunction of frontal lobes and related subcortical and parietal structures.

 PMID:10896687

  2. [Refsum's disease. Epidemiologic, clinical and biological correlation. 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Petit, H; Leys, D; Skjeldal, O H; Caron, J C; Lambert, P; Lehembre, P; Hache, J C

    1986-01-01

    Nine patients with symptoms and signs of Refsum's disease are reported. In 6 a systemic accumulation of phytanic acid was demonstrated, together with low phytanic acid oxidase activity in skin fibroblasts in 5 of them. In 3, no disorder of phytanic acid metabolism was demonstrated. In 3, the diagnosis was made during the pre-clinical period. The disease seems more frequent in Northern France, which agrees with the hypothesis of a genetic mutation which would have taken place in Scandinavia some centuries ago and was subsequently spread by the Vikings. The effects of a dietary treatment on serum phytanic acid levels and clinical disorders are reported. The general condition of the patients improved remarkably but only partially. The diet is unpalatable and in some patients the level of serum phytanic acid increased, due to the mobilization of body fat. Patients with very high levels of phytanic acid might be initially treated by plasmapheresis. For the same reason, the diet should supply enough calories to keep body weight unchanged, and body weight loss whatever its cause should be avoided. PMID:2431446

  3. Linguistic Correlates of Asymmetric Motor Symptom Severity in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtgraves, Thomas; McNamara, Patrick; Cappaert, Kevin; Durso, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric motor severity is common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and provides a method for examining the neurobiologic mechanisms underlying cognitive and linguistic deficits associated with the disorder. In the present research, PD participants (N = 31) were assessed in terms of the asymmetry of their motor symptoms. Interviews with the participants were analyzed with the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) program. Three measures of linguistic complexity – the proportion of verbs, proportion of function words, and sentence length – were found to be affected by symptom asymmetry. Greater left-side motor severity (and hence greater right hemisphere dysfunction) was associated with the production of significantly fewer verbs, function words, and shorter sentences. Hence, the production of linguistic complexity in a natural language context was associated with relatively greater right hemisphere involvement. The potential neurobiological mechanisms underlying this effect are discussed. PMID:19751960

  4. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Perea, Anna E.; Pastula, Daniel M.; Mead, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:26488307

  5. The Correlation of Serum IL-12B Expression With Disease Activity in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Chung, Sook Hee; Moon, Chang Mo; Che, Xiumei; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Genetic variants in IL12B, encoding the p40 subunit common in interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-23, were identified as the susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study aimed to identify the correlation of serum IL-12B expression with disease activity in patients with IBD and evaluate the possibility of IL-12B as a biomarker for assessing inflammatory status in IBD. A total of 102 patients with IBD, including 38, 32, and 32 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and intestinal Behçet's disease (intestinal BD), respectively, were included. The clinical and laboratory data from the patients were collected at the time of serum IL-12B measurement. Serum IL-12B levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The median IL-12B levels in patients with CD, UC, and intestinal BD were significantly higher than those in controls (1.87, 2.74, and 2.73 pg/mL, respectively, vs. 1.42 pg/mL, all P <0.05). IL-12B concentrations were associated with disease activity in patients with UC and intestinal BD but not in those with CD. IL-12B levels were increased with increasing disease activity in patients with UC (P <0.001). Likewise, patients with active intestinal BD had higher IL-12B levels than those without active disease (P = 0.008). IL-12B levels were correlated with the endoscopic disease activity of UC (P = 0.002) and intestinal BD (P = 0.001) but not that of CD. Serum IL-12B levels were significantly correlated with clinical and endoscopic disease activity in patients with UC and intestinal BD, suggesting its potential use as a biomarker for assessing disease activity in these patients. PMID:27281077

  6. Examination of the Spatial Correlation of Statistics Information in the Ultrasonic Echo from Diseased Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2002-05-01

    To realize a quantitative diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, we have been analyzing the characteristics of echo amplitude in B-mode images. Realizing the distinction between liver diseases such as liver cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis is required in the field of medical ultrasonics. In this study, we examine the spatial correlation, with the coefficient of correlation between the frames and the amplitude characteristics of each frame, using the volumetric data of RF echo signals from normal and diseased liver. It is found that there is a relationship between the tissue structure of liver and the spatial correlation of echo information.

  7. Altered fractal dynamics of gait: reduced stride-interval correlations with aging and Huntington's disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Mitchell, S. L.; Firtion, R.; Peng, C. K.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in the duration of the gait cycle (the stride interval) display fractal dynamics and long-range correlations in healthy young adults. We hypothesized that these stride-interval correlations would be altered by changes in neurological function associated with aging and certain disease states. To test this hypothesis, we compared the stride-interval time series of 1) healthy elderly subjects and young controls and of 2) subjects with Huntington's disease and healthy controls. Using detrended fluctuation analysis we computed alpha, a measure of the degree to which one stride interval is correlated with previous and subsequent intervals over different time scales. The scaling exponent alpha was significantly lower in elderly subjects compared with young subjects (elderly: 0.68 +/- 0.14; young: 0.87 +/- 0.15; P < 0.003). The scaling exponent alpha was also smaller in the subjects with Huntington's disease compared with disease-free controls (Huntington's disease: 0.60 +/- 0.24; controls: 0.88 +/-0.17; P < 0.005). Moreover, alpha was linearly related to degree of functional impairment in subjects with Huntington's disease (r = 0.78, P < 0.0005). These findings demonstrate that strike-interval fluctuations are more random (i.e., less correlated) in elderly subjects and in subjects with Huntington's disease. Abnormal alterations in the fractal properties of gait dynamics are apparently associated with changes in central nervous system control.

  8. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J; Larovere, Laura E; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E; Schretlen, David J; Nyhan, William L; Puig, Juan G; O'Neill, Patrick J; Jinnah, H A

    2014-05-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype-phenotype correlations for other disorders. PMID:23975452

  9. Duration of recurrent ileitis after ileocolonic resection correlates with presurgical extent of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    D'Haens, G R; Gasparaitis, A E; Hanauer, S B

    1995-01-01

    Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum recurs in a predictable sequence proximal to the ileocolonic anastomosis after surgical resection. To confirm the suspicion that the duration of recurrent ileitis correlates with the extent of presurgical disease, this study investigated 23 consecutive patients with recurrent Crohn's disease symptoms who had undergone ileocaecal resections between 1982 and 1992 at our institution and had both preoperative and postoperative small bowel follow through studies available for comparison. All films were reviewed by a blinded gastrointestinal radiologist using uniform criteria. Symptomatic recurrence was reported at a mean (SEM) of 29 (25) months after resection. Presurgical length of inflammation averaged 26 (15) (8-57) cm and at recurrence 24 (14) (7-55) cm. The correlation coefficient (r) between pre and postsurgical extent of ileal disease was 0.70 (p < 0.0001). Seven patients had sequential small bowel series after 20 (10) (7-36) months without intervening surgery. The extent of measured inflammation between examinations correlated with r = 0.995 (p < 0.0001), showing the consistency of the measurement process. The close correlation between the duration of postoperative recurrence with the extent of presurgical disease is another example of individual patterns of recurrent Crohn's disease and is an additional factor to be considered when contemplating surgical resections. Images Figure 2 PMID:7797122

  10. A correlation study between ankle brachial pressure index and the severity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Benyakorn, Thoetphum; Kuanprasert, Sarun; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that there was a correlation between low ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) and the presence of the coronary artery disease (CAD). However, few studies have investigated the correlation between ABPI and the severity of CAD by using a scoring system. The authors aimed to investigate this correlation by using ABPI and CAD diagnosed by coronary angiography (CAG). A total of 213 consecutive patients awaiting CAG in Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital from July 2009 to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. The ABPI was measured before CAG. The severity of CAD was graded on CAG by using SYNTAX scores. The authors found a significantly negative correlation between ABPI and SYNTAX scores (correlation coefficient = -.172, P = .01). The authors concluded that ABPI appeared to correlate negatively with the severity of CAD in the Thai population. PMID:22561522

  11. Correlation between serum cystatin C level and elderly hypertensive patients combined coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Xianming; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Wei; Wang, Ying; He, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the correlation between serum cystatin C level and elderly hypertension with coronary heart disease patients. Methods: 500 hypertensive patients combined coronary heart disease were selected by coronary angiography. 321 of them were elderly patients with hypertension (male 204, female 117), and 400 of them were elderly patients with coronary heart disease (male 257, female 143), The serum cystatin C level of all patients were detected by immunoturbidimetry, and analyzed the correlation between the serum cystatin C level and different degree of blood pressure and the degree of coronary artery stenosis in elderly patients. Results: The serum cystatin C level was closely related with the blood pressure and the degree of the coronary artery stenosis. The higher the blood pressure level and the more serious the coronary artery stenosis, the higher the serum cystatin C level; The serum cystatin C level of hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease patients (Group D) were markedly higher than the level of the patients without hypertension and coronary heart disease patients (Group A), and the level of the patients with coronary heart disease (Group B) and the hypertension group (Group C) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The serum cystatin C level of elderly patients with hypertension and coronary heart disease were closely related with the degree of blood pressure and coronary arteries stenosis. The serum cystatin C maybe a predictor of disease severity in elderly hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26131241

  12. Correlation between automated writing movements and striatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Wieland; Eggers, Birk; Barthel, Henryk; Clark, Daniel; Villmann, Thomas; Hesse, Swen; Grahmann, Friedrich; Kühn, Hans-Jürgen; Sabri, Osama; Wagner, Armin

    2002-08-01

    Handwriting defects are an early sign of motor impairment in patients with Wilson's disease. The basal ganglia being the primary site of copper accumulation in the brain suggests a correlation with lesions in the nigrostiatal dopaminergic system. We have analysed and correlated striatal dopaminergic innervation using [(123)I]beta-CIT-SPECT and automated handwriting movements in 37 patients with Wilson's disease. There was a significant correlation of putaminal dopaminergic innervation with fine motor ability (p < 0,05 for NIV [number of inversion in velocity], NIA [number of inversion in acceleration], frequency). These data suggest that loss of dorsolateral striatal dopaminergic innervation has a pathophysiological function for decreased automated motor control in Wilson's disease. Furthermore analysis of automated handwriting movements could be useful for therapy monitoring and evaluation of striatal dopaminergic innervation. PMID:12195459

  13. Using Electronic Patient Records to Discover Disease Correlations and Stratify Patient Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Schmock, Henriette; Dalgaard, Marlene; Andreatta, Massimo; Hansen, Thomas; Søeby, Karen; Bredkjær, Søren; Juul, Anders; Werge, Thomas; Jensen, Lars J.; Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracting phenotype information from the free-text in such records we demonstrate that we can extend the information contained in the structured record data, and use it for producing fine-grained patient stratification and disease co-occurrence statistics. The approach uses a dictionary based on the International Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently can be mapped to systems biology frameworks. PMID:21901084

  14. Correlation Between Low Bone Density and Disease Activity in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Amiriani, Taghi; Besharat, Sima; Pourramezan, Zahra; Mirkarimi, Honey Sadat; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Joshaghani, Hamidreza; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Faghani, Maryam; Besharat, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Different clinical and epidemiological studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry have shown an increased prevalence of low bone mineral density in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between bone density and the disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 52 patients with ulcerative colitis (duration of the disease less than 5 years) were invited to our research center, Golestan province, northeast of Iran, during February 2012 up to August 2012. A demographic checklist and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index was completed for each patients and 5 cc of blood sample was taken after obtaining the informed consent. We used colorimetry method for measuring serum calcium, UV method for serum phosphorus and ELISA for serum vitamin D. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was done to evaluate the bone density. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 16. Normality of data was assessed using Kolmogorov– Smirnov test. T and ANOVA tests were used if data had normal distribution. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the remaining data. Correlation between qualitative variables was evaluated by Chi-square test. RESULTS The mean (±SD) age and disease activity of the patients were 37.72 (±12.18) years and 4.78 (±1.98), respectively. There were no correlation between disease activity and mean age. Low bone density was seen in 30.8%, 11.5%, and 15.4% in spine, femur neck, and hip, respectively. There was no relationship between Z-score of total hip, spine, and femur neck with disease activity, age, and duration of disease (p>0.05). CONCLUSION Our results showed an acceptable rate of low bone density in patients with ulcerative colitis without any correlation with the disease activity index. PMID:25628850

  15. Correlation between low bone density and disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Amiriani, Taghi; Besharat, Sima; Pourramezan, Zahra; Mirkarimi, Honey Sadat; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Joshaghani, Hamidreza; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Faghani, Maryam; Besharat, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Different clinical and epidemiological studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry have shown an increased prevalence of low bone mineral density in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between bone density and the disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 52 patients with ulcerative colitis (duration of the disease less than 5 years) were invited to our research center, Golestan province, northeast of Iran, during February 2012 up to August 2012. A demographic checklist and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index was completed for each patients and 5 cc of blood sample was taken after obtaining the informed consent. We used colorimetry method for measuring serum calcium, UV method for serum phosphorus and ELISA for serum vitamin D. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was done to evaluate the bone density. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 16. Normality of data was assessed using Kolmogorov- Smirnov test. T and ANOVA tests were used if data had normal distribution. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the remaining data. Correlation between qualitative variables was evaluated by Chi-square test. RESULTS The mean (±SD) age and disease activity of the patients were 37.72 (±12.18) years and 4.78 (±1.98), respectively. There were no correlation between disease activity and mean age. Low bone density was seen in 30.8%, 11.5%, and 15.4% in spine, femur neck, and hip, respectively. There was no relationship between Z-score of total hip, spine, and femur neck with disease activity, age, and duration of disease (p>0.05). CONCLUSION Our results showed an acceptable rate of low bone density in patients with ulcerative colitis without any correlation with the disease activity index. PMID:25628850

  16. Specificity of immunoglobulin E in coccidioidomycosis and correlation with disease involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R A; Baker, B S; Stevens, D A

    1982-01-01

    Serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies were quantitated in 26 patients with active pulmonary coccidioidomycosis, 59 patients with active disseminated disease, 12 patients in clinical remission, and 91 healthy subjects. Significant differences were obtained in IgE serum levels of patients with active disease versus healthy subjects (P less than 0.0001). Patients with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis did not differ in their IgE levels when compared with patients with disseminated disease. However, serum IgE levels were significantly increased in patients with disease involving two or more organ systems when compared with patients with pulmonary disease or extrapulmonary disease involving a single organ system (P less than 0.02). Total serum IgE correlated with anti-Coccidioides IgE (P less than 0.001), but with only six exceptions, patients with anti-Coccidioides IgE also exhibited IgE antibodies to 1 or more of 12 common allergens. The correlation between hyperproduction of IgE and disease severity coupled with the depressed cell-mediated immune status of patients with this disease suggests a defect(s) in the T-lymphocyte population which functions to regulate IgE synthesis. PMID:7118252

  17. [Correlation between cognitive impairment and postural instability in patients with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Owan, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Hidetomo; Mori, Yukiko; Yamagishi, Keiko; Watanabe, Daishi; Kato, Hirotaka; Kezuka, Machiko; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Correlation between frontal-executive function and motor functions, such as gait and postural control, has attracted attention in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, correlations between other cognitive functional domains and motor functions have not been examined. Thus, we examined the correlation between different domains of cognitive function and motor functions. Sixty-five PD patients were recruited for the present study. Cognitive functions were assessed by the 10 subtests of the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination (COGNISTAT). Motor functions were assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) as partIII for general motor function and sum of related items for tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. Spearman's correlation coefficients between each cognitive and motor assessment were compared. Among the 10 subtests of the COGNISTAT, constructions showed significant correlation with UPDRS partIII (p<0.01), bradykinesia (p<0.01), and postural instability (p<0.001). The latter correlation was stronger than those between all motor assessments and both all patients backgrounds and other COGNISTAT subtests. In PD patients, postural instability correlates with not only frontal executive dysfunctions but also parietal dysfunctions, such as visuospatial and constructive impairments. The postural maintenance system is suggested to share common physiology with not only frontal-executive function but also parietal functions. PMID:25585439

  18. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Recognizing Face Expressions in Mild Stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sapey-Triomphe, Laurie-Anne; Heckemann, Rolf A; Boublay, Nawele; Dorey, Jean-Michel; Hénaff, Marie-Anne; Rouch, Isabelle; Padovan, Catherine; Hammers, Alexander; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Early Alzheimer's disease can involve social disinvestment, possibly as a consequence of impairment of nonverbal communication skills. This study explores whether patients with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage have impaired recognition of emotions in facial expressions, and describes neuroanatomical correlates of emotion processing impairment. As part of the ongoing PACO study (personality, Alzheimer's disease and behaviour), 39 patients with Alzheimer's disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage and 39 matched controls completed tests involving discrimination of four basic emotions-happiness, fear, anger, and disgust-on photographs of faces. In patients, automatic volumetry of 83 brain regions was performed on structural magnetic resonance images using MAPER (multi-atlas propagation with enhanced registration). From the literature, we identified for each of the four basic emotions one brain region thought to be primarily associated with the function of recognizing that emotion. We hypothesized that the volume of each of these regions would be correlated with subjects' performance in recognizing the associated emotion. Patients showed deficits of basic emotion recognition, and these impairments were correlated with the volumes of the expected regions of interest. Unexpectedly, most of these correlations were negative: better emotional facial recognition was associated with lower brain volume. In particular, recognition of fear was negatively correlated with the volume of amygdala, disgust with pallidum, and happiness with fusiform gyrus. Recognition impairment in mild stages of Alzheimer's disease for a given emotion was thus associated with less visible atrophy of functionally responsible brain structures within the patient group. Possible explanations for this counterintuitive result include neuroinflammation, regional β-amyloid deposition, or transient overcompensation during early stages of

  19. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Recognizing Face Expressions in Mild Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sapey-Triomphe, Laurie-Anne; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Boublay, Nawele; Dorey, Jean-Michel; Hénaff, Marie-Anne; Rouch, Isabelle; Padovan, Catherine; Hammers, Alexander; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Early Alzheimer’s disease can involve social disinvestment, possibly as a consequence of impairment of nonverbal communication skills. This study explores whether patients with Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage have impaired recognition of emotions in facial expressions, and describes neuroanatomical correlates of emotion processing impairment. As part of the ongoing PACO study (personality, Alzheimer’s disease and behaviour), 39 patients with Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia stage and 39 matched controls completed tests involving discrimination of four basic emotions—happiness, fear, anger, and disgust—on photographs of faces. In patients, automatic volumetry of 83 brain regions was performed on structural magnetic resonance images using MAPER (multi-atlas propagation with enhanced registration). From the literature, we identified for each of the four basic emotions one brain region thought to be primarily associated with the function of recognizing that emotion. We hypothesized that the volume of each of these regions would be correlated with subjects’ performance in recognizing the associated emotion. Patients showed deficits of basic emotion recognition, and these impairments were correlated with the volumes of the expected regions of interest. Unexpectedly, most of these correlations were negative: better emotional facial recognition was associated with lower brain volume. In particular, recognition of fear was negatively correlated with the volume of amygdala, disgust with pallidum, and happiness with fusiform gyrus. Recognition impairment in mild stages of Alzheimer’s disease for a given emotion was thus associated with less visible atrophy of functionally responsible brain structures within the patient group. Possible explanations for this counterintuitive result include neuroinflammation, regional β-amyloid deposition, or transient overcompensation during early

  20. Serum Paraoxonase Levels are Correlated with Impaired Aortic Functions in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Efe, Tolga H; Ertem, Ahmet G; Altunoglu, Alpaslan; Koseoglu, Cemal; Erayman, Ali; Bilgin, Murat; Kurmuş, Özge; Aslan, Turgay; Bilge, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background The correlation between aortic functions and paraoxonase levels has been previously demonstrated by several earlier studies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the correlation between serum paraoxonase levels and aortic functions among patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods Our study enrolled 46 chronic kidney disease patients and 45 healthy controls. From these patients, serum cholesterol, creatinine, hemoglobin, and paraoxonase-1 levels were analyzed. Results Paraoxonase-1 levels were significantly lower in patients with chronic kidney disease compared to the controls (p < 0.001). Additionally, the extent of aortic stiffness index (%) was significantly higher in chronic kidney disease patients, but aortic strain and aortic distensibility were significantly higher in healthy controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). We further found that paraoxonase-1 levels were correlated with aortic stiffness index, aortic strain, and aortic distensibility (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that serum paraoxonase-1 levels were significantly correlated with impaired aortic functions. The results of this study highlight the impact of serum paraoxonase-1 activity on atherosclerosis and cardiovascular adverse events. PMID:27122934

  1. Fecal calprotectin correlated with endoscopic remission for Asian inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Chen; Wong, Jau-Min; Tung, Chien-Chih; Lin, Ching-Pin; Chou, Jen-Wei; Wang, Horng-Yuan; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liu, Heng-Hsiu; Wei, Shu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the correlation between fecal calprotectin (fC), C-reactive protein (CRP), and endoscopic disease score in Asian inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: Stool samples were collected and assessed for calprotectin levels by Quantum Blue Calprotectin High Range Rapid test. Crohn’s disease endoscopic index of severity (CDEIS) and ulcerative colitis endoscopic index of severity (UCEIS) were used for endoscopic lesion scoring. RESULTS: A total of 88 IBD patients [36 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 52 with ulcerative colitis (UC)] were enrolled. For CD patients, fC correlated with CDEIS (r = 0.465, P = 0.005) and CRP (r = 0.528, P = 0.001). fC levels in UC patients correlated with UCEIS (r = 0.696, P < 0.0001) and CRP (r = 0.529, P = 0.0005). Calprotectin could predict endoscopic remission (CDEIS < 6) with 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity (AUC: 0.74) in CD patients when using 918 μg/g as the cut-off. When using 191 μg/g as the cut-off in UC patients, calprotectin could be used for predicting endoscopic remission (UCEIS < 3) with 88% sensitivity and 75% specificity (AUC: 0.87). CONCLUSION: fC correlated with both CDEIS and UCEIS. fC could be used as a predictor of endoscopic remission for Asian IBD patients. PMID:26730169

  2. Raised serum level of APRIL in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: correlations with disease activity indices.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, M; Darwish, H; Darweesh, H; El-Shehaby, A; Emad, Y

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess serum APRIL levels in SLE patients versus rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and normal control and to correlate serum APRIL levels in SLE patients with disease activity indices. Serum APRIL levels was measured in 40 SLE patients, 20 patients with RA and 20 healthy volunteers who served as control group. Disease activity in SLE patients was assessed by the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and results were correlated with serum APRIL levels. Significantly higher serum APRIL levels was observed in SLE patients compared to RA patients and normal controls (p=0.003 and p < or = 0.001, respectively). Positive correlations were found between serum APRIL levels and total BILAG index (r=0.486 and p=0.001), BILAG musculoskeletal score (r=0.848 and p < or = 0.001) and BILAG cardiorespiratory score (r=0.326 and 0.04). Serum APRIL was higher in SLE patients compared to RA patients and normal control subjects and positively correlates with BILAG index and higher levels may be associated with musculoskeletal manifestations of the disease. APRIL antagonism could be a potential therapeutic target in SLE. PMID:20116334

  3. Clinical correlates of selective pathology in the amygdala of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Harding, Antony J; Stimson, Emily; Henderson, Jasmine M; Halliday, Glenda M

    2002-11-01

    The amygdala exhibits significant pathological changes in Parkinson's disease, including atrophy and Lewy body (LB) formation. Amygdala pathology has been suggested to contribute to some clinical features of Parkinson's disease, including deficits of olfaction and facial expression. The degree of neuronal loss in amygdala subnuclei and the relationship with LB formation in non-demented Parkinson's disease cases have not been examined previously. Using stereological methods, the volume of neurones and the number of neurones in amygdala subdivisions were estimated in 18 prospectively studied, non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease and 16 age- and sex-matched controls. Careful exclusion (all cortical disease) and inclusion (non-demented, levodopa-responsive, idiopathic Parkinson's disease or controls) criteria were applied. Seven Parkinson's disease cases experienced well-formed visual hallucinations many years after disease onset, while nine Parkinson's disease cases and three controls were treated for depression. Anatomically, the amygdala was subdivided into the lateral nucleus, the basal (basolateral and basomedial) nuclei and the corticomedial (central, medial and cortical nuclei) complex. LB and Lewy neurites were identified by immunohistochemistry for alpha-synuclein and ubiquitin and were assessed semiquantitatively. LB were found throughout the amygdala in Parkinson's disease, being present in approximately 4% of neurones. Total amygdala volume was reduced by 20% in Parkinson's disease (P = 0.02) and LB concentrated in the cortical and basolateral nuclei. Lewy neurites were present in most cases but did not correlate with any structural or functional variable. Amygdala volume loss was largely due to a 30% reduction in volume (P = 0.01) and the total estimated number of neurones (P = 0.007) in the corticomedial complex. The degree of neurone loss and the proportion of LB-containing neurones in the cortical nucleus within this complex were constant

  4. Synchrotron radiation analysis of possible correlations between metal status in human cementum and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, R R; Naftel, S J; Nelson, A J; Edwards, M; Mithoowani, H; Stakiw, J

    2010-03-01

    Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects up to 50% of an adult population. It is a chronic condition involving inflammation of the periodontal ligament and associated tissues leading to eventual tooth loss. Some evidence suggests that trace metals, especially zinc and copper, may be involved in the onset and severity of periodontitis. Thus we have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging on cross sections of diseased and healthy teeth using a microbeam to explore the distribution of trace metals in cementum and adhering plaque. The comparison between diseased and healthy teeth indicates that there are elevated levels of zinc, copper and nickel in diseased teeth as opposed to healthy teeth. This preliminary correlation between elevated levels of trace metals in the cementum and plaque of diseased teeth suggests that metals may play a role in the progress of periodontitis. PMID:20157281

  5. Synchrotron radiation analysis of possible correlations between metal status in human cementum and periodontal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.R.; Naftel, S.J.; Nelson, A.J.; Edwards, M.; Mithoowani, H.; Stakiw, J.

    2010-03-16

    Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects up to 50% of an adult population. It is a chronic condition involving inflammation of the periodontal ligament and associated tissues leading to eventual tooth loss. Some evidence suggests that trace metals, especially zinc and copper, may be involved in the onset and severity of periodontitis. Thus we have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging on cross sections of diseased and healthy teeth using a microbeam to explore the distribution of trace metals in cementum and adhering plaque. The comparison between diseased and healthy teeth indicates that there are elevated levels of zinc, copper and nickel in diseased teeth as opposed to healthy teeth. This preliminary correlation between elevated levels of trace metals in the cementum and plaque of diseased teeth suggests that metals may play a role in the progress of periodontitis.

  6. Voxel-based analysis in neuroferritinopathy expands the phenotype and determines radiological correlates of disease severity.

    PubMed

    Keogh, M J; Aribisala, B S; He, J; Tulip, E; Butteriss, D; Morris, C; Gorman, G; Horvath, R; Chinnery, P F; Blamire, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is an autosomal dominant adult-onset movement disorder which occurs due to mutations in the ferritin light chain gene (FTL). Extensive iron deposition and cavitation are observed post-mortem in the basal ganglia, but whether more widespread pathological changes occur, and whether they correlate with disease severity is unknown. 3D-T1w and quantitative T2 whole brain MRI scans were performed in 10 clinically symptomatic patients with the 460InsA FTL mutation and 10 age-matched controls. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and voxel-based relaxometry (VBR) were subsequently performed. Clinical assessment using the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) and Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) was undertaken in all patients. VBM detected significant tissue changes within the substantia nigra, midbrain and dentate together with significant cerebellar atrophy in patients (FWE, p < 0.05). Iron deposition in the caudate head and cavitation in the lateral globus pallidus correlated with UDRS score (p < 0.001). There were no differences between groups with VBR. Our data show that progressive iron accumulation in the caudate nucleus, and cavitation of the globus pallidus correlate with disease severity in neuroferritinopathy. We also confirm sub-clinical cerebellar atrophy as a feature of the disease. We suggest that VBM is an effective technique to detect regions of iron deposition and cavitation, with potential wider utility to determine radiological markers of disease severity for all NBIA disorders. PMID:26142024

  7. Correlation between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kotulska, Anna; Kopeć-Mędrek, Magdalena; Grosicka, Anida; Kubicka, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) are the acute phase reactants most commonly determined in patients with rheumatic diseases. The indices are affected by different factors, but both of them are applied for evaluation of the disease activity in patients with inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Material and methods The authors compared the results of ESR and CRP, which were carried out during routine diagnosis in 200 patients admitted to the Department of Rheumatology. Results A significant correlation between ESR and CRP was found (ESR after 1 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6944, ESR after 2 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6126). There was no difference in ESR or CRP between male and female patients, and patients older than 40 years had higher ESR and CRP. Conclusions The obtained results support the usefulness of both indices in the clinical practice of rheumatologists.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of genetic correlation in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Rita; Escott-Price, Valentina; Darwent, Lee; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G; Nalls, Michael A; Clark, Lorraine; Honig, Lawrence; Marder, Karen; van der Flier, Wiesje; Holstege, Henne; Louwersheimer, Eva; Lemstra, Afina; Scheltens, Philip; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Londos, Elisabet; Zetterberg, Henrik; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Ferman, Tanis J; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ross, Owen A; Barber, Imelda; Braae, Anne; Brown, Kristelle; Morgan, Kevin; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lashley, Tammaryn; Compta, Yaroslau; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Cairns, Nigel J; Halliday, Glenda M; Mann, David; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Powell, John; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle K; Dickson, Dennis; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Bras, Jose

    2016-02-01

    The similarities between dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are many and range from clinical presentation, to neuropathological characteristics, to more recently identified, genetic determinants of risk. Because of these overlapping features, diagnosing DLB is challenging and has clinical implications since some therapeutic agents that are applicable in other diseases have adverse effects in DLB. Having shown that DLB shares some genetic risk with PD and AD, we have now quantified the amount of sharing through the application of genetic correlation estimates, and show that, from a purely genetic perspective, and excluding the strong association at the APOE locus, DLB is equally correlated to AD and PD. PMID:26643944

  9. Correlation of serum homocysteine levels with the severity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Vijetha; Mehendale, Veena; Prabhu, Krishnananda; Shetty, Ranjan; Rao, Pragna

    2014-07-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become the most common cause of mortality in the entire world. Homocysteine is implicated as an early atherosclerotic promoter. We studied the relationship between levels of serum homocysteine with severity of coronary artery disease. Total of 70 subjects who scheduled for coronary angiogram consented to participate in this study. In all the patients Gensini scoring system was used to assess the severity of CAD. Venous samples were taken from the patients in fasting state before angiography. Homocysteine levels in patients were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbant method and were compared with respective Genseni scores of participants. Fasting serum homocysteine levels in CAD patients were significantly higher than patients without coronary artery disease (p < 0.001). Also Homocyseine levels correlated significantly with increasing severity of CAD (p < 0.001). Serum homocysteine levels correlated well with the severity of CAD. PMID:24966483

  10. Genome-wide analysis of genetic correlation in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Rita; Escott-Price, Valentina; Darwent, Lee; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf; Hernandez, Dena G.; Nalls, Michael A.; Clark, Lorraine; Honig, Lawrence; Marder, Karen; van der Flier, Wiesje; Holstege, Henne; Louwersheimer, Eva; Lemstra, Afina; Scheltens, Philip; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Londos, Elisabet; Zetterberg, Henrik; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Ferman, Tanis J.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Ross, Owen A.; Barber, Imelda; Braae, Anne; Brown, Kristelle; Morgan, Kevin; Maetzler, Walter; Berg, Daniela; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lashley, Tammaryn; Compta, Yaroslau; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Cairns, Nigel J.; Halliday, Glenda M.; Mann, David; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Powell, John; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle K.; Dickson, Dennis; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Bras, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The similarities between dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are many and range from clinical presentation, to neuropathological characteristics, to more recently identified, genetic determinants of risk. Because of these overlapping features, diagnosing DLB is challenging and has clinical implications since some therapeutic agents that are applicable in other diseases have adverse effects in DLB. Having shown that DLB shares some genetic risk with PD and AD, we have now quantified the amount of sharing through the application of genetic correlation estimates, and show that, from a purely genetic perspective, and excluding the strong association at the APOE locus, DLB is equally correlated to AD and PD. PMID:26643944

  11. Correlation of Alzheimer Disease Neuropathologic Changes With Cognitive Status: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter T.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bouras, Constantin; Braak, Heiko; Cairns, Nigel J.; Castellani, Rudolph J.; Crain, Barbara J.; Davies, Peter; Del Tredici, Kelly; Duyckaerts, Charles; Frosch, Matthew P.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hof, Patrick R.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jellinger, Kurt A.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Kövari, Enikö; Kukull, Walter A.; Leverenz, James B.; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Mann, David M.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Schneider, Julie A.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Thal, Dietmar R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woltjer, Randall L.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Clinicopathologic correlation studies are critically important for the field of Alzheimer disease (AD) research. Studies on human subjects with autopsy confirmation entail numerous potential biases that affect both their general applicability and the validity of the correlations. Many sources of data variability can weaken the apparent correlation between cognitive status and AD neuropathologic changes. Indeed, most persons in advanced old age have significant non-AD brain lesions that may alter cognition independently of AD. Worldwide research efforts have evaluated thousands of human subjects to assess the causes of cognitive impairment in the elderly, and these studies have been interpreted in different ways. We review the literature focusing on the correlation of AD neuropathologic changes (i.e. β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) with cognitive impairment. We discuss the various patterns of brain changes that have been observed in elderly individuals to provide a perspective for understanding AD clinicopathologic correlation and conclude that evidence from many independent research centers strongly supports the existence of a specific disease, as defined by the presence of Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Although Aβ plaques may play a key role in AD pathogenesis, the severity of cognitive impairment correlates best with the burden of neocortical neurofibrillary tangles. PMID:22487856

  12. Polygenic risk of Parkinson disease is correlated with disease age at onset

    PubMed Central

    Escott‐Price, Valentina; Nalls, Mike A.; Morris, Huw R.; Lubbe, Steven; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have investigated the polygenic architecture of Parkinson disease (PD) and have also explored the potential relationship between an individual's polygenic risk score and their disease age at onset. Methods This study used genotypic data from 4,294 cases and 10,340 controls obtained from the meta‐analysis of PD genome‐wide association studies. Polygenic score analysis was performed as previously described by the International Schizophrenia Consortium, testing whether the polygenic score alleles identified in 1 association study were significantly enriched in the cases relative to the controls of 3 independent studies. Linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between an individual's polygenic score for PD risk alleles and disease age at onset. Results Our polygenic score analysis has identified significant evidence for a polygenic component enriched in the cases of each of 3 independent PD genome‐wide association cohorts (minimum p = 3.76 × 10−6). Further analysis identified compelling evidence that the average polygenic score in patients with an early disease age at onset was significantly higher than in those with a late age at onset (p = 0.00014). Interpretation This provides strong support for a large polygenic contribution to the overall heritable risk of PD and also suggests that early onset forms of the illness are not exclusively caused by highly penetrant Mendelian mutations, but can also be contributed to by an accumulation of common polygenic alleles with relatively low effect sizes. Ann Neurol 2015;77:582–591 PMID:25773351

  13. Localization of coronary artery disease with exercise electrocardiography: correlation with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, R.F.; Freedman, B.; Bailey, I.K.; Uren, R.F.; Kelly, D.T.

    1981-11-01

    In 61 patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (70 percent or greater obstruction of luminal diameter in only one vessel) and no previous myocardial infarction, the sites of ischemic changes on 12 lead exercise electrocardiography and on thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning were related to the obstructed coronary artery. The site of exercise-induced S-T segment depression did not identify which coronary artery was obstructed. In the 37 patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in the inferior leads and leads V4 to V6, and in the 18 patients with right coronary artery disease and in the 6 patients with left circumflex artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in leads V5 and V6. Although S-T segment elevation was uncommon in most leads, it occurred in lead V1 or a VL, or both, in 51 percent of the patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. A reversible anterior defect on exercise thallium scanning correlated with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (probability (p) less than 0.0001) and a reversible inferior thallium defect correlated with right coronary or left circumflex artery disease (p less than 0.0001). In patients with single vessel disease, the site of S-T segment depression does not identify the obstructed coronary artery; S-T segment elevation in lead V1 or aVL, or both, identifies left anterior descending coronary artery disease; and the site of reversible perfusion defect on thallium scanning identifies the site of myocardial ischemia and the obstructed coronary artery.

  14. Neuropathologic correlates of trial-related instruments for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Ringman, John; Vinters, Harry V

    2014-01-01

    To advance disease-modifying therapies, it is critical to understand the relationship between the neuropathological changes of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and the clinical measures used in therapeutic trials. We reviewed neuropathologically proven cases of AD from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center (NACC) and examined correlations between neuropathological changes and clinical-trial related instruments collected as part of the Uniform Dataset (UDS). We explored the relationships between neurofibrillary tangles, neuritic plaques, and total pathology burden with immediate and delayed recall, Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes, Functional Activity Questionnaire, Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire, and Mini-Mental State Examination scores. 169 patients in NACC database had appropriate neuropathological and clinical data. All instruments correlated highly with neuritic plaques, Braak staging, and total pathology. Correlation coefficients for the relationships were relatively modest, suggesting that the pathologic burden examined accounts for between 13 and 40% of the variance of each of the instruments assessed. We conclude that there is a strong correlation between clinical trial-related measures and neuropathology identified at autopsy in AD. The amount of variance explained by the pathology is limited and other factors, both disease- and measurement-related, contribute to the variability observed in clinical measurements. PMID:24754002

  15. Diffusion-weighted MRI findings and clinical correlations in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ting; Lyu, Jin-Hao; Zhang, Jia-Tang; Lou, Xin; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Ming; Yao, Yan; Tan, Qing-Che; Tian, Cheng-Lin; Huang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Lin; Yu, Sheng-Yuan

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and its clinical correlation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). Patients who suffered from sCJD and followed up at the Department of Neurology at the General Hospital of the People's Liberation Army during the period of June 1, 2007 to July 1, 2014 were reviewed. The location of the hyperintense lesions on DWI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the hyperintense lesions were correlated with symptoms and clinical course. A total of 58 sCJD patients and ten healthy controls were included. Hyperintense lesions on DWI were observed in all the patients. The patients with basal ganglia (BG) hyperintense lesions on DWI had shorter disease duration and higher incidence of myoclonus (92 versus 44 %) than those without BG hyperintense lesions. The patients with occipital cortex hyperintense lesions on DWI had shorter disease duration between symptom onset and akinetic mutism than those without these lesions. The lower of the BG ADC value the faster presence of akinetic mutism and the shorter disease duration the patients will have. The presence of BG and occipital cortex hyperintense lesions on DWI and BG ADC values is correlated with the clinical course and clinical symptoms. PMID:25860342

  16. Correlation Between Decreased CSF α-Synuclein and Aβ1-42 in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buddhala, Chandana; Campbell, Meghan C.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Kotzbauer, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein (α-syn) protein in Lewy bodies and neurites is the cardinal pathologic feature of Parkinson disease (PD), but abnormal deposition of other proteins may also play a role. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of proteins known to accumulate in PD may provide insight into disease-associated changes in protein metabolism and their relationship to disease progression. We measured CSF α-syn, Aβ1-42 and tau from seventy-seven non-demented PD and thirty control participants. CSF α-syn and Aβ1-42 were significantly lower in PD compared to controls. In contrast to increased CSF tau in Alzheimer disease, CSF tau did not significantly differ between PD and controls. CSF protein levels did not significantly correlate with ratings of motor function or performance on neuropsychological testing. As expected, CSF Aβ1-42 inversely correlated with [11C]-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) mean cortical binding potential, with PiB+ PD participants having lower CSF Aβ1-42 compared to PiB− PD participants. Furthermore, CSF α-syn positively correlated with Aβ1-42 in PD participants but not in controls, suggesting a pathophysiologic connection between the metabolisms of these proteins in PD. PMID:25212463

  17. Complement genetics and susceptibility to inflammatory disease. Lessons from genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Different genome-wide linkage and association studies performed during the last 15 years have associated mutations and polymorphisms in complement genes with different diseases characterized by tissue damage and inflammation. These are complex disorders in which genetically susceptible individuals usually develop the pathology as a consequence of environmental triggers. Although complement dysregulation is a common feature of these pathologies, how the disease phenotype is determined is only partly understood. One way to advance understanding is to focus the research in the analysis of the peculiar genotype-phenotype correlations that characterize some of these diseases. I will review here how understanding the functional consequences of these disease-associated complement genetic variants is providing us with novel insights into the underpinning complement biology and a better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying each of these pathologies. These advances have important therapeutic and diagnostic implications. PMID:26004345

  18. Inflammatory Leukocyte Phenotypes Correlate with Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bethany B.; Fry, Chris; Zhou, Yueren; Murray, Susan; Han, MeiLan K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Flaherty, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by progressive deposition of extracellular matrix, worsening dyspnea, and eventual mortality. Pathogenesis of IPF is poorly understood and the role inflammation and activated leukocytes play in the disease process is controversial. Previous studies demonstrated that activated leukocyte subsets characterize IPF patients. We sought to validate this observation in a well-defined cohort of 35 IPF patients and to correlate the observed leukocyte phenotypes with robust parameters of disease progression. We demonstrate that in univariate and multivariate analyses, increases in the CD14hi, CD16hi subset of monocytes measured at baseline correlated with disease progression, with a threshold value >0.5% of the total peripheral blood mononuclear cells being a significant predictor for worse outcome. In addition, several T cell subsets, including CD25 expressing CD4 cells, and CXCR3 expressing CD4 and CD8 subsets correlated with disease progression when found in increased percentages in the peripheral blood of IPF patients when sampled at baseline. Somewhat surprising in comparison to previous literature, the CD4 T cells did not appear to have lost expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD28, but the CD8 T cells did. Taken together, these results are consistent with the presence of an inflammatory process in IPF patients who eventually progress. However, when longitudinal measurements of these same markers were examined, there was significant heterogeneity of expression and these biomarkers did not necessarily remain elevated in IPF patients with progressive disease. We interpret this heterogeneity to suggest that IPF patients experience episodic inflammatory events that once triggered, may lead to disease progression. This longitudinal heterogeneity in biomarker analyses may explain why such markers are not consistently measured in all IPF cohorts. PMID:25580363

  19. Serotonin content of platelets in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Correlation with clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Zeller, J; Weissbarth, E; Baruth, B; Mielke, H; Deicher, H

    1983-04-01

    Significantly decreased platelet serotonin contents were measured in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis, and mixed connective tissue disease. An inverse relationship between platelet serotonin levels and clinical disease activity was observed in both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. SLE patients with multiple organ involvement showed the lowest platelet serotonin values. No correlation was observed between platelet serotonin contents and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug treatment, presence of circulating platelet reactive IgG, or the amount of circulating immune complexes. The results are interpreted as indicating platelet release occurring in vivo during inflammatory episodes of the rheumatic disorders investigated. PMID:6838676

  20. Disgust and happiness recognition correlate with anteroventral insula and amygdala volume respectively in preclinical Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Kipps, C M; Duggins, A J; McCusker, E A; Calder, A J

    2007-07-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) can show disproportionate impairments in recognizing facial signals of disgust, but the neural basis of this deficit remains unclear. Functional imaging studies have implicated the anterior insula in the ability to recognize disgust, but have identified other structures as well, including the basal ganglia. In view of variable insula and basal ganglia volume changes in HD, we used voxel-based morphometry to map regional variations in gray matter (GM) volume in participants carrying the mutation for HD, and correlated this with their performance on a test of facial emotion recognition for six basic emotions (disgust, fear, anger, happiness, sadness, surprise). The volume of the anteroventral insula was strongly correlated with performance on the disgust recognition task. The amygdala volume (bilaterally) correlated with the ability to recognize happy facial expressions. There was marked specificity of the regional correlations for the emotion involved. Recognition of other emotion expressions, or more general cognitive or motor performance as measured by a standardized rating scale, did not correlate with regional brain volume in this group. Control participants showed no effect for any measure. The strong linear correlations for disgust and happiness recognition imply direct involvement of the anterior insula in disgust appreciation, and a similar role for the amygdala in recognizing happy facial expressions. The absence of a significant correlation with the basal ganglia suggests a less critical role for these structures in disgust recognition than has previously been suggested. The findings also highlight the role of neurodegenerative diseases combined with statistical imaging techniques in elucidating the brain basis of behavior and cognition. PMID:17583995

  1. Automated Gait and Balance Parameters Diagnose and Correlate with Severity in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Daniel C.; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Bernstein, Ira; Khemani, Pravin; Dewey, Richard B.; Querry, Ross; Chitnis, Shilpa; Dewey, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the suitability of instrumented gait and balance measures for diagnosis and estimation of disease severity in PD. Methods Each subject performed iTUG (instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go) and iSway (instrumented Sway) using the APDM® Mobility Lab. MDS-UPDRS parts II and III, a postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD) score, the mobility subscale of the PDQ-39, and Hoehn & Yahr stage were measured in the PD cohort. Two sets of gait and balance variables were defined by high correlation with diagnosis or disease severity and were evaluated using multiple linear and logistic regressions, ROC analyses, and t-tests. Results 135 PD subjects and 66 age-matched controls were evaluated in this prospective cohort study. We found that both iTUG and iSway variables differentiated PD subjects from controls (area under the ROC curve was 0.82 and 0.75 respectively) and correlated with all PD severity measures (R2 ranging from 0.18 to 0.61). Objective exam-based scores correlated more strongly with iTUG than iSway. The chosen set of iTUG variables was abnormal in very mild disease. Age and gender influenced gait and balance parameters and were therefore controlled in all analyses. Interpretation Our study identified sets of iTUG and iSway variables which correlate with PD severity measures and differentiate PD subjects from controls. These gait and balance measures could potentially serve as markers of PD progression and are under evaluation for this purpose in the ongoing NIH Parkinson Disease Biomarker Program. PMID:25082782

  2. Histomorphometry of feline chronic kidney disease and correlation with markers of renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Elliott, J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is common in geriatric cats, but most cases have nonspecific renal lesions, and few studies have correlated these lesions with clinicopathological markers of renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to identify the lesions best correlated with renal function and likely mediators of disease progression in cats with chronic kidney disease. Cats were recruited through 2 first-opinion practices between 1992 and 2010. When postmortem examinations were authorized, renal tissues were preserved in formalin. Sections were evaluated by a pathologist masked to all clinicopathological data. They were scored semiquantitatively for the severity of glomerulosclerosis, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis. Glomerular volume was measured using image analysis; the percentage of glomeruli that were obsolescent was recorded. Sections were assessed for hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis and tubular mineralization. Kidneys from 80 cats with plasma biochemical data from the last 2 months of life were included in the study. Multivariable linear regression (P < .05) was used to assess the association of lesions with clinicopathological data obtained close to death. Interstitial fibrosis was the lesion best correlated with the severity of azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and anemia. Proteinuria was associated with interstitial fibrosis and glomerular hypertrophy, whereas higher time-averaged systolic blood pressure was associated with glomerulosclerosis and hyperplastic arteriolosclerosis. PMID:22773469

  3. Cortical correlates of affective syndrome in dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hayata, Thaís T; Bergo, Felipe P G; Rezende, Thiago J; Damasceno, Alfredo; Damasceno, Benito P; Cendes, Fernando; Stella, Florindo; Balthazar, Marcio L F

    2015-07-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are prevalent, however their relationship with patterns of cortical atrophy is not fully known. Objectives To compare cortical atrophy's patterns between AD patients and healthy controls; to verify correlations between neuropsychiatric syndromes and cortical atrophy. Method 33 AD patients were examined by Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Patients and 29 controls underwent a 3T MRI scanning. We considered four NPI syndromes: affective, apathy, hyperactivity and psychosis. Correlations between structural imaging and neuropsychiatric scores were performed by Freesurfer. Results were significant with a p-value < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons. Results Patients exhibited atrophy in entorhinal cortices, left inferior and middle temporal gyri, and precuneus bilaterally. There was correlation between affective syndrome and cortical thickness in right frontal structures, insula and temporal pole. Conclusion Cortical thickness measures revealed atrophy in mild AD. Depression and anxiety symptoms were associated with atrophy of right frontal, temporal and insular cortices. PMID:26200048

  4. Brain region-specific monoaminergic correlates of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Aerts, Tony; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are present during the disease course of nearly all AD patients and consist of psychosis, agitation/aggression, and depression, among others. Given their detrimental consequences regarding life expectancy, cognition, and socio-economic costs, it is essential to elucidate their neurochemical etiology to facilitate the development of novel and effective pharmacotherapeutics. This study attempted to identify brain region-specific monoaminergic correlates of NPS by measuring the levels of eight monoamines and metabolites in nine relevant postmortem brain regions of 40 behaviorally characterized AD patients, i.e., dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), (nor)epinephrine and their respective metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), using RP-HPLC-ECD. Likewise, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score correlates of monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations were calculated. As a result, MMSE scores, used as a measure of dementia severity, correlated positively with hippocampal 5-HIAA levels as well as with 5-HT levels of the superior temporal gyrus and cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, hippocampal 5-HIAA levels inversely correlated with agitation scores, whereas thalamic MHPG levels comparably did with the presence of hallucinations. Finally, in the cerebellar cortex, DOPAC/DA ratios, indicative of DA turnover, correlated with physically agitated behavior while MHPG levels correlated with affective disturbances. These findings support the assumption that specific NPS features in AD might be (in)directly related to brain region-specific monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations. Additionally, the effect of AD pathology on neurochemical alterations in the cerebellum requires further examination due to its important but underestimated role in the neurochemical pathophysiology of NPS in AD. PMID:24685637

  5. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  6. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-01-01

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy. PMID:26927097

  7. Neural correlates of attention‐executive dysfunction in lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kobeleva, Xenia; Cherry, George; Killen, Alison; Gallagher, Peter; Burn, David J.; Thomas, Alan J.; O'Brien, John T.; Taylor, John‐Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Attentional and executive dysfunction contribute to cognitive impairment in both Lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Using functional MRI, we examined the neural correlates of three components of attention (alerting, orienting, and executive/conflict function) in 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 32 patients with Lewy body dementia (19 with dementia with Lewy bodies and 13 with Parkinson's disease with dementia), and 23 healthy controls using a modified Attention Network Test. Although the functional MRI demonstrated a similar fronto‐parieto‐occipital network activation in all groups, Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia patients had greater activation of this network for incongruent and more difficult trials, which were also accompanied by slower reaction times. There was no recruitment of additional brain regions or, conversely, regional deficits in brain activation. The default mode network, however, displayed diverging activity patterns in the dementia groups. The Alzheimer's disease group had limited task related deactivations of the default mode network, whereas patients with Lewy body dementia showed heightened deactivation to all trials, which might be an attempt to allocate neural resources to impaired attentional networks. We posit that, despite a common endpoint of attention‐executive disturbances in both dementias, the pathophysiological basis of these is very different between these diseases. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1254–1270, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26705763

  8. Motor and non-motor correlates of olfactory dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Berendse, Henk W; Roos, Dareia S; Raijmakers, Pieter; Doty, Richard L

    2011-11-15

    Hyposmia is highly prevalent in the motor phase of Parkinson's disease (PD) and is an established pre-motor sign of PD that may precede the onset of motor symptoms by as long as 5 years. The data presented here are part of an ongoing study to determine the relationship of the olfactory deficit in PD with both motor and non-motor features of the disease. The study population so far includes 96 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PD (UK PD Society Brain Bank criteria; mean age 64.9 years; mean disease duration 4.8 years). Olfactory testing was performed using the 40-item UPSIT. We analyzed the relationship between UPSIT scores and measures of motor (disease duration, stage and severity) and non-motor (cognitive function, depression, anxiety and sleep) function. In 60 PD patients, [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT scans were available to assess the relationship between UPSIT scores and striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding. Preliminary analyses revealed correlations of the olfactory deficit in PD with both motor and non-motor features, as well as with striatal DAT binding. These data suggest that the olfactory deficit in PD is not stationary by the time the motor phase is entered, but continues to progress over time. Hyposmia may therefore be useful as a marker of disease progression, at least in the early disease stages. PMID:21705022

  9. Tissue culture correlational study of genetic cholangiopathy of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Sato, Yasunori; Harada, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are epithelial cells that line the biliary tract and are also known as biliary epithelial cells (BECs). In vitro culture studies of BECs in correlation with tissue section examination may give us a comprehensive analysis of biliary tract diseases. Herein, we discuss genetic cholangiopathy of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD), mainly using a polycystic kidney (PCK) rat, an animal model of ARPKD. The hepatobiliary lesions in ARPKD patients (Caroli's disease and congenital hepatic fibrosis) and in PCK rats are speculated to be related to mutations to polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1) which have been recently demonstrated, though the exact causal relation between these mutations and hepatobiliary pathology remain to be clarified. Recently we clarified that BECs of PCK rat showed increased cell proliferation followed by irregular dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. We also identified the essential involvement of the MEK5-ERK5 pathway in the abnormal proliferation of BECs in the PCK rat. The degradation of laminin and type IV collagen (basal membrane components of bile ducts) was closely related to the biliary dysgenesis and cystogenesis in the PCK rats. BECs also showed mesenchymal phenotype followed by progressive portal tract fibrosis, indicating TGF-β1 may be involved in this acquisition of mesenchymal phenotype. Detailed tissue culture correlation studies of ARPKD and PCK rats are mandatory to evaluate the pathogenesis of this genetic cholangiopathy. PMID:23097114

  10. Spatial correlation between the prevalence of transmissible spongiform diseases and British soil geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Imrie, C E; Korre, A; Munoz-Melendez, G

    2009-02-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of fatal neurological conditions affecting a number of mammals, including sheep and goats (scrapie), cows (BSE), and humans (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The diseases are widely believed to be caused by the misfolding of the normal prion protein to a pathological isoform, which is thought to act as an infectious agent. Outbreaks of the disease are commonly attributed to contaminated feed and genetic susceptibility. However, the implication of copper and manganese in the pathology of the disease, and its apparent geographical clustering, have prompted suggestions of a link with trace elements in the environment. Nevertheless, studies of soils at regional scales have failed to provide evidence of an environmental risk factor. This study uses geostatistical techniques to investigate the correlations between the distribution of TSE prevalence and soil geochemical variables across the UK according to different spatial scales. A similar spatial pattern in scrapie and BSE occurrence is identified, which may be linked with increasing pH and total organic carbon, and decreasing iodine concentration. However, the pattern also resembles that of the density of dairy farming. Nevertheless, despite the low spatial resolution of the TSE data available for this study, the fact that significant correlations are detected indicates there is a possibility of a link between soil geochemistry, scrapie, and BSE. It is suggested that further investigations of the prevalence of TSE and environmental exposure to trace metals should take into account the factors affecting their bioavailability. PMID:18427934

  11. The correlation between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mahami Oskouei, Mahmoud; Hamidi, Faezeh; Talebi, Mahnaz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Fallah, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all nucleate cells of vertebrates. Human infected by vertical transmission and also using raw or undercooked meat or food and water that contaminated with mature oocysts. Parkinson's disease as neurodegenerative disease affects people above 60 years. Due to high prevalence of toxoplasmosis in Iran and evidence about effects of T. gondii on neurodegenerative diseases, this study has been conducted to investigate possible correlation between Toxoplasma and Parkinson's disease in Iran. Seventy five Parkinson's patients and equal healthy volunteers were enrolled. After obtaining informed consent and sociodemographic features, 5 ml blood sample were collected and then anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM levels were examined by ELISA method. Data was analyzed with Chi-squre and Fisher's test by usig stata 11 software. Binary logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis in assessing the correlation between toxoplasmosis and Parkinson. Eighty five percent of Parkinson's group and 90.3 % of control group were positive for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody. In this investigation no statically differences were observed between groups and age, gender, residency and using raw or undercooked meat. There is no significant association between IgG positive titer and Parkinson's disease. However, statistically significant association was found between Parkinson and keeping cat (P = 0.03) as well as the using of undercooked egg (P = 0.004). Although there is high level of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody in Parkinson's patients which reflects chronic Toxoplasma infection; we couldn't detect any statistical association between T. gondii infection and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27605800

  12. D-dimer assay in Egyptian patients with Gaucher disease: correlation with bone and lung involvement.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Eman M; Tantawy, Azza A G; Adly, Amira A M; Kader, Hossam A; Ismail, Eman A R

    2011-04-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder. Bone and lung involvement are two major causes of morbidity in this disease. D-dimer is a reliable indicator of active microvascular thrombosis, even in patients without overt hypercoagulation. This study aimed to assess D-dimer levels in Gaucher disease, correlating this marker to clinical characteristics and radiological parameters to investigate its role as a potential predictor for the occurrence and severity of skeletal and pulmonary manifestations. The study population consisted of 56 Egyptian patients with Gaucher disease, 36 had type 1 Gaucher disease (64.3%) and 20 had type 3 Gaucher disease (35.7%). Thirty healthy individuals were enrolled as a control group. D-dimer levels were significantly higher in all patients with Gaucher disease compared with controls (P < 0.001). Patients with type 3 showed significantly higher D-dimer concentrations compared with type 1 (P < 0.001). Pulmonary involvement was present in a significant proportion among type 3 Gaucher patients (P < 0.05), whereas bone changes were present in a higher percentage in type 1 compared with type 3 Gaucher patients. D-dimers were significantly higher in patients with abnormal MRI findings of the long bones and in those with ground glass appearance on high-resolution computerized tomography of the chest compared with patients with normal radiology (P < 0.001). Splenectomized patients displayed significantly higher D-dimer levels compared with nonsplenectomized patients (P < 0.001). Our results suggest that D-dimer is significantly elevated in Gaucher disease, particularly type 3, and may be considered as a potential marker of risk prediction of bone and lung involvement that could be used to monitor treatment response. PMID:21346558

  13. Circulating APRIL levels are correlated with advanced disease and prognosis in rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lascano, V; Hahne, M; Papon, L; Cameron, K; Röeder, C; Schafmayer, C; Driessen, L; van Eenennaam, H; Kalthoff, H; Medema, J P

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that the tumor necrosis factor family member a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) enhances intestinal tumor growth in various preclinical tumor models. Here, we have investigated whether APRIL serum levels at time of surgery predict survival in a large cohort of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. We measured circulating APRIL levels in a cohort of CRC patients (n=432) using a novel validated monoclonal APRIL antibody (hAPRIL.133) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) setup. APRIL levels were correlated with clinicopathological features and outcome. Overall survival was examined with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox proportional hazards ratios were calculated. We observed that circulating APRIL levels were normally distributed among CRC patients. High APRIL expression correlated significantly with poor outcome measures, such as higher stage at presentation and development of lymphatic and distant metastases. Within the group of rectal cancer patients, higher circulating APRIL levels at time of surgery were correlated with poor survival (log-rank analysis P-value 0.008). Univariate Cox regression analysis for overall survival in rectal cancer patients showed that patients with elevated circulating APRIL levels had an increased risk of poor outcome (hazard ratio (HR) 1.79; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-2.76; P-value 0.009). Multivariate analysis in rectal cancer patients showed that APRIL as a prognostic factor was dependent on stage of disease (HR 1.25; 95% CI 0.79-1.99; P-value 0.340), which was related to the fact that stage IV rectal cancer patients had significantly higher levels of APRIL. Our results revealed that APRIL serum levels at time of surgery were associated with features of advanced disease and prognosis in rectal cancer patients, which strengthens the previously reported preclinical observation of increased APRIL levels correlating with disease progression. PMID:25622308

  14. Polysomnographic Findings and Clinical Correlates in Huntington Disease: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Carla; Losurdo, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo; Solito, Marcella; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Provini, Federica; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Cortelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the sleep pattern and the motor activity during sleep in a cohort of patients affected by Huntington disease (HD). Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients: Thirty HD patients, 16 women and 14 men (mean age 57.3 ± 12.2 y); 30 matched healthy controls (mean age 56.5 ± 11.8 y). Interventions: Subjective sleep evaluation: Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS); Berlin's Questionnaire, interview for restless legs syndrome (RLS), questionnaire for REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Clinical evaluation: disease duration, clinical severity (unified Huntington disease motor rating scale [UHDMRS]), genetic tests. Laboratory-based full-night attended video-polysomnography (V-PSG). Measurements and Results: The duration of the disease was 9.4 ± 4.4 y, UHMDRS score was 55.5 ± 23.4, CAG repeats were 44.3 ± 4.1. Body mass index was 21.9 ± 4.0 kg/m2. No patients or caregivers reported poor sleep quality. Two patients reported symptoms of RLS. Eight patients had an ESS score ≥ 9. Eight patients had high risk of obstructive sleep apnea. At the RBD questionnaire, two patients had a pathological score. HD patients, compared to controls, showed shorter sleep, reduced sleep efficiency index, and increased arousals and awakenings. Four patients presented with sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Periodic limb movements (PLMs) during wake and sleep were observed in all patients. No episode of RBD was observed in the V-PSG recordings, and no patients showed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia. The disease duration correlated with ESS score (P < 0.02). UHMDRS correlated positively with the ESS score (P < 0.005), and negatively with the percentage of REM sleep. Conclusions: Patients with Huntington disease showed a severe sleep disruption and a high prevalence of periodic limb movements, but no evidence of sleep disordered breathing or REM sleep behavior disorder. Citation: Piano C, Losurdo A, Della Marca G, Solito M

  15. Socioeconomic Status Correlates with the Prevalence of Advanced Coronary Artery Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bashinskaya, Bronislava; Nahed, Brian V.; Walcott, Brian P.; Coumans, Jean-Valery C. E.; Onuma, Oyere K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasingly studies have identified socioeconomic factors adversely affecting healthcare outcomes for a multitude of diseases. To date, however, there has not been a study correlating socioeconomic details from nationwide databases on the prevalence of advanced coronary artery disease. We seek to identify whether socioeconomic factors contribute to advanced coronary artery disease prevalence in the United States. Methods and Findings State specific prevalence data was queried form the United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2009. Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft were identified as principal procedures. Non-cardiac related procedures, lung lobectomy and hip replacement (partial and total) were identified and used as control groups. Information regarding prevalence was then merged with data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, the largest, on-going telephone health survey system tracking health conditions and risk behaviors in the United States. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated for individual socioeconomic variables including employment status, level of education, and household income. Household income and education level were inversely correlated with the prevalence of percutaneous coronary angioplasty (−0.717; −0.787) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (−0.541; −0.618). This phenomenon was not seen in the non-cardiac procedure control groups. In multiple linear regression analysis, socioeconomic factors were significant predictors of coronary artery bypass graft and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (p<0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively). Conclusions Socioeconomic status is related to the prevalence of advanced coronary artery disease as measured by the prevalence of percutaneous coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:23050011

  16. Serum homocysteine levels are correlated with behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Homocysteine has been associated with cognitive impairment and various psychiatric symptoms. This study was designed to clarify whether a relationship exists between the serum levels of homocysteine and the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Methods Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (n=77) and control subjects (n=37) were included in this study. History taking, physical examination, and cognitive assessment were carried out as part of the investigation for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. The Mini-Mental State Examination, Global Deterioration Scale, Clinical Dementia Rating, and the Korean version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory were applied to all patients. The patients’ serum homocysteine, folate, and vitamin B12 levels were measured. Results Patients with Alzheimer’s disease had statistically significantly lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores and higher serum homocysteine levels compared to the control subjects. Mean serum folate and vitamin B12 concentration were significantly lower in patients with Alzheimer’s disease compared to control subjects. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the serum homocysteine levels and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory subdomains, including delusion, agitation/aggression, depression/dysphoria, elation/euphoria, apathy/indifference, and disinhibition. No statistically significant correlation was found between the serum homocysteine concentration and the Mini-Mental State Examination, Global Deterioration Scale, or Clinical Dementia Rating. Conclusion Associations between the serum homocysteine levels and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia were observed, raising the possibility of an etiological role. However, the correlations between the folate or vitamin B12 levels and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory scores were not significant. The pathophysiological

  17. Rainbow trout resistance to bacterial cold-water disease is moderately heritable and is not adversely correlated with growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to estimate the heritabilities for and genetic correlations among resistance to bacterial cold-water disease and growth traits in a population of rainbow trout. Bacterial cold-water disease, a chronic disease of rainbow trout, is caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilu...

  18. Correlation of CT perfusion and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna; Zimny, Anna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Both brain atrophy and decrease of perfusion are observed in dementive diseases. The aim of the study was to correlate the results of brain perfusion CT (pCT) and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Material/Methods: Forty-eight patients with AD (mean age of 71.3 years) underwent brain pCT and CT volumetry. The pCT was performed at the level of basal ganglia after the injection of contrast medium (50 ml, 4 ml/sec.) with serial scanning (delay 7 sec, 50 scans, 1 scan/sec). Volumetric measurements were carried out on the basis of source images, with the use of a dedicated CT software combined with manual outlining of the regions of interest in extracerebral and intraventricular CSF spaces. Perfusion parameters of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) from the grey matter of frontal and temporal as well as basal ganglia were compared statistically with the volumetric measurements of frontal and temporal cortical atrophy as well as subcortical atrophy. Results: A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the values of CBF and CBV in the basal ganglia and the volumes of the lateral and third ventricles. The comparison of CBF and CBV results with the volumetric measurements in the areas of the frontal and temporal lobes showed mostly negative correlations, but none of them was of statistical significance. Conclusions: In patients with AD, the degree of cortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the grey matter and subcortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the basal ganglia region. It suggests that functional and structural changes in AD are not related to each other. PMID:22802771

  19. Increased type I collagen degradation correlates with disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, M; Risteli, L; Manelius, J; Nieminen, P; Risteli, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the extent and clinical significance of type I collagen degradation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS--Serum samples from 90 consecutive patients with RA from a cross-sectional population based study and 90 age- and sex-matched controls were analysed with the new assay of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). RESULTS--Patients with RA had significantly higher concentrations of ICTP than the controls. ICTP correlated strongly with measures of impairment in RA, such as the erosive state of joint disease (ES) (r = 0.57, p < 0.001) and Keitel function test (KFT) (r = 0.49, p < 0.001), and more weakly with various disease activity markers. When erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), ES or KFT were used as indicators of disease severity among the patients with disease duration over five years, ICTP distinguished the more serious RA from milder cases. CONCLUSIONS--Elevated serum concentrations of ICTP are common in RA and are associated with signs of aggressive disease. PMID:8311537

  20. Correlations between Root-Associated Microorganisms and Peach Replant Disease Symptoms in a California Soil

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiue-in; Ruegger, Paul M.; McKenry, Michael V.; Becker, J. Ole; Borneman, James

    2012-01-01

    Background Replant disease often occurs when certain crops are “replanted” in a soil that had previously supported the same or similar plant species. This disease typically leads to reductions in plant growth, crop yields, and production duration, and its etiology remains ill-defined. The objective of this study was to identify microorganisms associated with peach replant disease symptoms at a field location in California, USA. Soil samples were subjected to treatments to create various levels of replant disease symptoms. Clonal peach seedlings were grown in the treated soils in greenhouse trials. After 6 weeks, plant growth parameters were measured, and both culture and culture-independent analyses were performed to identify root-associated bacteria, fungi and stramenopiles. Results A total of 295,785 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTU) were identified by an Illumina-based, high throughput sequence analysis of rRNA genes. Among the 60 most abundant OTUs, 27 showed significant (P<0.05) negative correlation with peach shoot weights while 10 were positively correlated. Most of these OTUs belonged to the bacterial phylum Proteobacteria (96%), including the classes Gammaproteobacteria (44.4%), Betaproteobacteria (33.3%) and Alphaproteobacteria (22.2%), and the orders Pseudomonadales, Burkholderiales, Chromatiales, Rhodocyclales, and Sphingomonadales. The most abundant fungi were Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma virens, Fusarium oxysporum, Ceratocystis fimbriata and Fusarium solani. The most abundant stramenopiles were Pythium vexans, Pythium violae and an unidentified Aplanochytrium species. Validation experiments using sequence-selective quantitative PCR analyses identified negative and positive associations between P. vexans and Trichoderma spp. and peach shoot weights, respectively. Conclusions This study identified numerous microorganisms associated with peach replant symptoms, some of which have been previously identified while others represent new

  1. Correlation between clinical and MRI disease activity scores in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    MacKay, James W; Aboelmagd, Sharief; Gaffney, J Karl

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based disease activity scores (DAS) in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) are rarely employed in the normal clinical setting, whereas clinical DAS are used routinely to monitor disease activity and set thresholds for biologic treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the correlation between MR and clinical DAS in a general axSpA outpatient population and to assess the difference in MR DAS in individuals with high and low clinical DAS. This was a prospective, cross-sectional observational study. Forty participants with axSpA who presented for MR of the whole spine and sacroiliac joints as part of ongoing management were included. Completion of Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) was performed at the time of MR examination. MR images were scored by two independent observers using the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) MR DAS. There were weak, non-significant correlations between total SPARCC score and BASDAI (r = 0.18, p = 0.26), ASDAS using erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR) (r = 0.31, p = 0.07) and ASDAS using C-reactive protein level (ASDAS-CRP) (r = 0.31, p = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the SPARCC score of participants with high and low clinical DAS. MR DAS may provide information about disease activity not provided by the current standard of clinical DAS and may be considered as a useful adjunct in clinical practice. PMID:25894437

  2. Correlation between high density lipoprotein and monocyte subpopulations among stable coronary atherosclerotic heart disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong-Hai; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wang, Xue-Jun; Liang, Jian-Guang; Liu, Jia-Chao

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is a structurally and functionally heterogeneous molecular particle whose function is unclear in atherosclerosis at present. Studies show that small HDL functional imbalance may exist in Coronary Atherosclerotic Heart Disease (CAD) patients. Monocyte is considered to play an important role in atherosclerosis, in accordance with the expression of superficial CD14 and CD16, it can be divided into three subpopulations. The purpose of this study was to explore the relation between HDL and monocyte subpopulations among CAD patients. We report 90 cases of stable CAD patients and define the monocyte subpopulations as classical monocyte (CD14++CD16-; CM), intermediate monocyte (CD14+CD16+; IM), and non-classical monocyte (CD14+CD16++; NCM); HDL group is measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results indicated that the small HDL in blood serum has a correlation with proinflammatory NCM in circulation but a negative correction with CM and no relationship with diabetes, saccharify hemoglobin, hypertension, smoking history and taking dose of statins drugs and severity of disease. In conclusion, this study primarily confirms that micromolecule HDL level correlates with the increase of non-classical monocyte subpopulations and decrease of classical monocyte quantity. Thus demonstrates the proinflammatory correlation between micromolecule HDL and internal immunity in the development of stable atherosclerosis. PMID:26629252

  3. N30 Somatosensory Evoked Potential Is Negatively Correlated with Motor Function in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk Yun; Ma, Hyeo-Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate frontal N30 status in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and to examine the correlation between the amplitude of frontal N30 and the severity of motor deficits. Methods The frontal N30 was compared between 17 PD patients and 18 healthy volunteers. Correlations between the amplitude of frontal N30 and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score of the more severely affected side was examined. Results The mean latency of the N30 was not significantly different between patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.981), but the mean amplitude was lower in PD patients (p < 0.025). There was a significant negative correlation between the amplitude of N30 and the UPDRS motor score (r = -0.715, p = 0.013). Conclusions The frontal N30 status indicates the motor severity of PD. It can be a useful biomarker reflecting dopaminergic deficits and an objective measurement for monitoring the clinical severity of PD. PMID:26828214

  4. Hope and spirituality among patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis: a correlational study1

    PubMed Central

    Ottaviani, Ana Carolina; Souza, Érica Nestor; Drago, Natália de Camargo; de Mendiondo, Marisa Silvana Zazzetta; Pavarini, Sofia Cristina Iost; Orlandi, Fabiana de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Objective to analyze the relationship between the hope and spirituality of patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis. Method this is a cross-sectional, correlational study. The sample was composed of 127 patients of a Renal Replacement Unit. Data were collected through individual interviews guided by the following instruments: participant characterization, Herth Hope Index (HHI), and Pinto Pais-Ribeiro Spirituality Scale (PP-RSS). Results the average HHI score was 38.06 (±4.32) while the average PP-RSS score was 3.67 (±0.62) for "beliefs" and 3.21 (±0.53) for "hope/optimism". Spearman's coefficient indicated there was a moderate positive correlation between the HHI and PP-RSS dimensions of "beliefs" (r=0.430; p<0.001) and "hope/optimism" (r=0.376; p<0.001). Conclusion Since a relationship between the sense of hope and spirituality of patients with chronic kidney disease was found, these constructs should be taken into account at the time health professionals deliver care to help patients coping with the disease and treatment. PMID:26107832

  5. Fatal Kawasaki disease with incomplete criteria: Correlation between optical coherence tomography and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Audrey; Kokta, Victor; Chami, Rose; Morissette, Geneviève; Dahdah, Nagib

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery aneurysm is a serious complication of Kawasaki disease (KD). A 3-month-old infant presented with severe KD 27 days after onset of fever. The patient presented with shock, inferolateral ischemia on electrocardiogram and high troponin. Echocardiography showed severe myocardial dysfunction with diffuse coronary dilation and right coronary artery aneurysm. Arterial Doppler demonstrated thrombosis of aneurysmal axillary and iliac arteries. Withdrawal of support was implemented due to multi-organ failure. Post-mortem optical coherence tomography correlated with pathology. The pulmonary artery was normal on OCT and histology. Coronary arteries showed aneurysmal dilatation, with intimal hyperplasia and preserved media on OCT. Pathology confirmed these findings, with destruction of the internal elastic lamina, luminal myofibroblastic proliferation, neovascularization, and partial disappearance of the media. This is the first report of pathologic correlation in KD with OCT at the subacute stage, which adequately identified structural wall changes. PMID:26711918

  6. Are Long-Range Structural Correlations Behind the Aggregration Phenomena of Polyglutamine Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2012-01-01

    We have characterized the conformational ensembles of polyglutamine peptides of various lengths (ranging from to ), both with and without the presence of a C-terminal polyproline hexapeptide. For this, we used state-of-the-art molecular dynamics simulations combined with a novel statistical analysis to characterize the various properties of the backbone dihedral angles and secondary structural motifs of the glutamine residues. For (i.e., just above the pathological length for Huntington's disease), the equilibrium conformations of the monomer consist primarily of disordered, compact structures with non-negligible -helical and turn content. We also observed a relatively small population of extended structures suitable for forming aggregates including - and -strands, and - and -hairpins. Most importantly, for we find that there exists a long-range correlation (ranging for at least residues) among the backbone dihedral angles of the Q residues. For polyglutamine peptides below the pathological length, the population of the extended strands and hairpins is considerably smaller, and the correlations are short-range (at most residues apart). Adding a C-terminal hexaproline to suppresses both the population of these rare motifs and the long-range correlation of the dihedral angles. We argue that the long-range correlation of the polyglutamine homopeptide, along with the presence of these rare motifs, could be responsible for its aggregation phenomena. PMID:22577357

  7. Seasonal Distribution and Climatic Correlates of Dengue Disease in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ivonne; Salje, Henrik; Saha, Samir; Gurley, Emily S

    2016-06-01

    Dengue has been regularly reported in Dhaka, Bangladesh, since a large outbreak in 2000. However, to date, we have limited information on the seasonal distribution of dengue disease and how case distribution correlates with climate. Here, we analyzed dengue cases detected at a private diagnostic facility in Dhaka during 2010-2014. We calculated Pearson cross-correlation coefficients to examine the relationship between the timing of cases and both rainfall and temperature. There were 2,334 cases diagnosed during the study period with 76% over the age of 15 years. Cases were reported in every month of the study; however, 90% of cases occurred between June and November. Increases in rainfall were correlated with increases in cases 2 months later (correlation of 0.7). The large proportion of adult cases is consistent with substantial population susceptibility and suggests Dhaka remains at risk for outbreaks. Although cases occurred year-round, public health preparedness should be focused during peak months. PMID:27114293

  8. The Geomagnetic Field and Correlations with Multiple Sclerosis: A Possible Etiology of Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Brett

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease that results in a demyelinating process of the central nervous system. It is the most common, progressive, neurological disease affecting young adults, and there is no cure. A curious feature of MS is its distinct global prevalence with high rates of occurrence between 40 and 60 degrees latitude. While genetics may partially explain this phenomenon, studies have shown that the influence of genetics is modest. Many non-genetic variables, such as viruses, vitamin D, smoking, diet, hormones, etc., have been shown to be related to the expression of MS but none of these variables have been determined to be necessarily strong enough to exclude other factors. The geomagnetic field, which is a non-uniform, three dimensional entity which protects all living things from ionizing radiation, is suggested in this research to be related to global MS prevalence. This study hypothesized that either the total field, the vertical field, or the horizontal field strength of the geomagnetic field will be correlated with MS. Using secondary sources of prevalence studies (N=131) and geomagnetic data, the results supported all three hypotheses with the strongest correlation being an inverse relationship between the horizontal field and MS (r = -.607). The explanation for the inverse relationship being most strongly correlated with MS prevalence is explained by the fact that the horizontal aspect of the geomagnetic field has a protective effect from incoming cosmic radiation. Chronic exposure to high levels of background radiation can have deleterious health effects. This research suggests that living in areas of a weak horizontal field increases a person's exposure to ionizing radiation and therefore increases the risk for developing MS. While it was not the intention of this research, it became clear that an explanation which explained the results of this research and also attempted to unify the mechanisms of all non

  9. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, J P; Leeds, T D; Marancik, D P; LaPatra, S E; Wiens, G D

    2015-04-01

    Columnaris disease (CD), caused by Flavobacterium columnare, is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives of this study were to 1) estimate heritability of CD resistance in a rainbow trout line (ARS-Fp-R) previously selected 4 generations for improved bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) resistance; 2) estimate genetic correlations among CD resistance, BCWD resistance, and growth to market BW; and 3) compare CD resistance among the ARS-Fp-R, ARS-Fp-S (selected 1 generation for increased BCWD susceptibility), and ARS-Fp-C (selection control) lines. Heritability of CD resistance was estimated using data from a waterborne challenge of 44 full-sib ARS-Fp-R families produced using a paternal half-sib mating design, and genetic correlations were estimated using these data and 5 generations of BCWD resistance, 9-mo BW (approximately 0.5 kg), and 12-mo BW (approximately 1.0 kg) data from 405 ARS-Fp-R full-sib families. The CD and BCWD challenges were initiated at approximately 52 and 84 d posthatch, or approximately 650 and 1,050 degree days (°C × d), respectively. Survival of ARS-Fp-R families ranged from 0 to 48% following CD challenge and heritability estimates were similar between CD (0.17 ± 0.09) and BCWD (0.18 ± 0.03) resistance, and the genetic correlation between these 2 traits was favorable (0.35 ± 0.25). Genetic correlations were small and antagonistic (-0.15 ± 0.08 to -0.19 ± 0.24) between the 2 resistance traits and 9- and 12-mo BW. Two challenges were conducted in consecutive years to compare CD resistance among ARS-Fp-R, ARS-Fp-C, and ARS-Fp-S families. In the first challenge, ARS-Fp-R families (83% survival) had greater CD resistance than ARS-Fp-C (73.5%; P = 0.02) and ARS-Fp-S (68%; P < 0.001) families, which did not differ (P = 0.16). In the second challenge, using an approximately 2.5-fold greater challenge dose, ARS-Fp-R families exhibited greater CD resistance (56% survival) than ARS-Fp-S (38% survival; P = 0.02) families

  10. Computed tomography, lymphography, and staging laparotomy: correlations in initial staging of Hodgkin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Blank, N.; Young, S.W.; Neumann, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-07-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated Hodgkin disease underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scanning and bipedal lymphography. These studies were followed by staging laparotomy, which included biopsy of the liver, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes, and splenectomy. Correlation of the results of the imaging studies with the histopathologic diagnoses revealed a small - but significant - increased accuracy of lymphography compared with CT in assessing the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The theoretical advantages of CT scanning in detecting lymphomatous deposits in lymph nodes about the celiac axis and the mesentery, or in the liver and spleen, were not confirmed.

  11. Prevalence and correlates of vitamin K deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jan K; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Szaflarska-Poplawska, Anna; Klincewicz, Beata; Adamczak, Daria; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Plawski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Although vitamin K deficiency has been implicated in adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), its prevalence in pediatric IBD remains unknown. We carried out a cross-sectional study in 63 children with Crohn's disease (CD) and 48 with ulcerative colitis (UC) to assess the prevalence of vitamin K deficiency and to search for potential correlation between vitamin K status and pediatric IBD activity. Vitamin K status was assessed using protein induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II; ELISA). Prevalence of vitamin K deficiency was 54.0% in CD and 43.7% in UC. Vitamin K deficiency was more common in patients with higher CD activity, in CD patients with higher mass Z-scores, and less common among children with CD treated with infliximab. Relation of vitamin K deficiency to pediatric IBD clinical course and treatment demand further research. PMID:24759680

  12. Correlation of mast cells in different stages of human periodontal diseases: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Raina; Gupta, Jagriti; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate the relationship between mast cells counts and different stages of human periodontal diseases. Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 50 patients, which were divided into three groups, consisting of 10 cases of clinically healthy gingival tissues (control group) 20 cases of dental plaque-induced gingivitis with no attachment loss and 20 cases of localized chronic periodontitis (LCP) characterized by the loss of periodontal support. The samples for control group were obtained during tooth extractions for orthodontic reasons. The specimens were immediately fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Conclusion: In this study, LCP cases had higher mast cell counts compared to gingivitis sites or healthy tissues. Increased mast cell counts in the progressing sites of periodontal diseases may indicate the importance of these cells in the progression of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27194868

  13. Prevalence and correlates of valvular heart diseases in the elderly population in Hubei, China

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chang; Chen, Si; Qin, Tingting; Fu, Zhen; Sun, Tucheng; Xie, Mingxing; Zhang, Li; Dong, Nianguo; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of valvular heart diseases (VHD) in the elderly population. The participants’ personal information, medical history, behavioral habits and clinical status were assessed by questionnaire, while the left ventricular dimensions, function and the presence and severity of VHD were evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography. This study analyzed the data of 3948 participants who were older than 60 years. Significant VHD was present in 1.93% of participants; the standardized prevalence of VHD among the elderly population in Hubei was 2.05% (95% CI: 1.61–2.49). The most frequent VHD was aortic regurgitation, followed by tricuspid regurgitation, mitral regurgitation and multiple valve diseases. Univariate analysis results indicated that compared with participants without VHD, those with VHD were older (p < 0.001), with a higher body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001), were more likely to smoke (p = 0.04), and had higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) (p < 0.001) and arrhythmia (p < 0.001). The results of multinomial regression analysis of complex sampling indicated that combined mitral and aortic valve diseases were related to older age, male sex and smoking; CAD was associated with single left-sided VHD. PMID:27250873

  14. Prevalence and correlates of valvular heart diseases in the elderly population in Hubei, China.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chang; Chen, Si; Qin, Tingting; Fu, Zhen; Sun, Tucheng; Xie, Mingxing; Zhang, Li; Dong, Nianguo; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of valvular heart diseases (VHD) in the elderly population. The participants' personal information, medical history, behavioral habits and clinical status were assessed by questionnaire, while the left ventricular dimensions, function and the presence and severity of VHD were evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography. This study analyzed the data of 3948 participants who were older than 60 years. Significant VHD was present in 1.93% of participants; the standardized prevalence of VHD among the elderly population in Hubei was 2.05% (95% CI: 1.61-2.49). The most frequent VHD was aortic regurgitation, followed by tricuspid regurgitation, mitral regurgitation and multiple valve diseases. Univariate analysis results indicated that compared with participants without VHD, those with VHD were older (p < 0.001), with a higher body mass index (BMI) (p < 0.001), were more likely to smoke (p = 0.04), and had higher rates of coronary artery disease (CAD) (p < 0.001) and arrhythmia (p < 0.001). The results of multinomial regression analysis of complex sampling indicated that combined mitral and aortic valve diseases were related to older age, male sex and smoking; CAD was associated with single left-sided VHD. PMID:27250873

  15. Pediatric Small Bowel Crohn Disease: Correlation of US and MR Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ethan A.; Sanchez, Ramon J.; DiPietro, Michael A.; DeMatos-Maillard, Vera; Strouse, Peter J.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel Crohn disease is commonly diagnosed during the pediatric period, and recent investigations show that its incidence is increasing in this age group. Diagnosis and follow-up of this condition are commonly based on a combination of patient history and physical examination, disease activity surveys, laboratory assessment, and endoscopy with biopsy, but imaging also plays a central role. Ultrasonography (US) is an underutilized well-tolerated imaging modality for screening and follow-up of small bowel Crohn disease in children and adolescents. US has numerous advantages over computed tomographic (CT) enterography and magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, including low cost and no required use of oral or intravenous contrast material. US also has the potential to provide images with higher spatial resolution than those obtained at CT enterography and MR enterography, allows faster examination than does MR enterography, does not involve ionizing radiation, and does not require sedation or general anesthesia. US accurately depicts small bowel and mesenteric changes related to pediatric Crohn disease, and US findings show a high correlation with MR imaging findings in this patient population. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:25839736

  16. Non linear approach to study the dynamics of neurodegenerative diseases by Multifractal Detrended Cross-correlation Analysis-A quantitative assessment on gait disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Srimonti; Ghosh, Dipak; Samanta, Shukla

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies the human gait pattern of normal people and patients suffering from Parkinson's disease using the MFDXA (Multifractal Detrended Cross-correlation Analysis) methodology. The auto correlation and cross correlation of the time series of the total force under the left foot and right foot were studied. The study reveals that the degree of multifractality (W) and degree of correlation (γ) are generally more for normal patients than the diseased set. It is also observed that the values of W and γ are nearly same for left foot and right. It is also observed that the study of autocorrelation alone is not sufficient, cross correlations should also be studied to get a better concept of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Theory of Mind Deficit in Parkinson’s Disease: A Multimodal Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Cirarda, María; Ojeda, Natalia; Peña, Javier; Cabrera-Zubizarreta, Alberto; Gómez-Beldarrain, María Ángeles; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos; Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients show theory of mind (ToM) deficit since the early stages of the disease, and this deficit has been associated with working memory, executive functions and quality of life impairment. To date, neuroanatomical correlates of ToM have not been assessed with magnetic resonance imaging in PD. The main objective of this study was to assess cerebral correlates of ToM deficit in PD. The second objective was to explore the relationships between ToM, working memory and executive functions, and to analyse the neural correlates of ToM, controlling for both working memory and executive functions. Methods Thirty-seven PD patients (Hoehn and Yahr median = 2.0) and 15 healthy controls underwent a neuropsychological assessment and magnetic resonance images in a 3T-scanner were acquired. T1-weighted images were analysed with voxel-based morphometry, and white matter integrity and diffusivity measures were obtained from diffusion weighted images and analysed using tract-based spatial statistics. Results PD patients showed impairments in ToM, working memory and executive functions; grey matter loss and white matter reduction compared to healthy controls. Grey matter volume decrease in the precentral and postcentral gyrus, middle and inferior frontal gyrus correlated with ToM deficit in PD. White matter in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (adjacent to the parietal lobe) and white matter adjacent to the frontal lobe correlated with ToM impairment in PD. After controlling for executive functions, the relationship between ToM deficit and white matter remained significant for white matter areas adjacent to the precuneus and the parietal lobe. Conclusions Findings reinforce the existence of ToM impairment from the early Hoehn and Yahr stages in PD, and the findings suggest associations with white matter and grey matter volume decrease. This study contributes to better understand ToM deficit and its neural correlates in PD, which is a basic

  18. Serum matrix metalloproteinase‐3 levels correlate with disease activity in relapsing‐remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kanesaka, T; Mori, M; Hattori, T; Oki, T; Kuwabara, S

    2006-01-01

    Background Adhesion molecules and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to be relevant to the ongoing development and disappearance of areas of demyelination in the white matter of the CNS of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. This study examined whether serum matrix metalloproteinase‐3 (MMP‐3) levels correlate with disease activity in MS. Methods Serum MMP‐3 levels in 47 consecutive patients with relapsing‐remitting MS were measured by immunoassay every 4 weeks over a 15 month period. Results During the study period, 48 clinical relapses occurred. Serum MMP‐3 levels within 1 month of relapse were significantly higher than during the remission phase. Sequential analysis showed that serum MMP‐3 levels had increased transiently at the time of clinical relapse but returned to the normal range within a month. Conclusions Circulatory MMP‐3 levels are correlated with disease activity in relapsing‐remitting MS. This may contribute to the breakdown of the blood‐brain barrier at the time of relapse. PMID:16421119

  19. Decreased drebrin mRNA expression in Alzheimer disease: correlation with tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Julien, Carl; Tremblay, Cyntia; Bendjelloul, Farid; Phivilay, Alix; Coulombe, Marie-Andrée; Emond, Vincent; Calon, Frédéric

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the mRNA expression of the dendritic spine protein drebrin in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed post-mortem in situ hybridization studies in brain sections from 20 AD patients and 21 controls. AD diagnosis was confirmed by decreased drebrin protein and increased Abeta(40) (+464%; P < 0.05), Abeta(42) (+369%; P < 0.0001), Abeta(42/40) ratio (+226%; P < 0.01), total tau (+2,725%; P < 0.0001), and paired helical filament tau (PHFtau; +867%; P < 0.001) compared with controls. We found significant decreases in drebrin mRNA in the parietal cortex (-27%; P < 0.01), the temporal cortex (-22%; P < 0.05), and the hippocampus (-25%; P < 0.05) of AD patients compared with controls. Cortical levels of drebrin mRNA correlated positively with soluble total tau (r(2) = +0.244) but negatively with duration of symptoms (r(2) = -0.357) and PHFtau (r(2) = -0.248). Drebrin mRNA levels were correlated to a lesser degree with the drebrin protein content (r(2) = +0.136) and with sim2 (r(2) = +0.176), a potential modulator of drebrin transcription. Our results suggest that the down-regulation of drebrin mRNA expression plays an important role in AD and is closely related to the progression of the disease. PMID:18338803

  20. Correlation of CT scanning and pathologic features of ophthalmic Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Trokel, S L; Jakobiec, F A

    1981-06-01

    Correlating the CT scan features of patients with orbital Graves' disease with histopathologic observations allows one to focus more specifically on the distinguishing features of this disease with future research implications. Both CT scanning and pathologic studies have shown clearly that the extraocular muscles are the primary focus of the disease. Swelling of the extraocular muscles generally occurs within their bellys with sparing of the tendons. This contrast with idiopathic inflammation of the muscles or myositis, which tends to involve the tendon as well. All of the associated findings in orbital Graves' disease probably flow from the enlarged volume of the extraocular muscles: proptosis, bowing of the medial lamina papyracea to accommodate the swollen belly of the medial rectus muscle, venous engorgement from stasis induced by direct compression of the orbital venous drainage, conjunctival and lid swelling, and lacrimal gland enlargement. Both radiographic and pathologic changes in the orbital fat are secondary and comparatively insignificant. While there appears to be no selective inflammation of the optic nerve meninges or the perineural connective tissues, enlargement of the extraocular muscle bellys where they converge at the crowded orbital apex brings about compression of the optic nerve, impairs its function, and causes visual decrease. Lymphocytic and plasmacytic infiltration along with edema within the endomysium of the extraocular muscles leads to the activation of fibroblasts with the production of acid mucopolysaccharides and progressive fibrosis. It is not known what attracts the lymphocytes to the extraocular muscles, why certain extraocular muscles are affected preferentially, why the disease may be asymmetrically unilateral, and whether a defect in T cell or B cell functions (or both) is immunologically at fault. PMID:6894976

  1. Ecologic Correlations of Selected Food Groups With Disease Incidence and Mortality in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Harold; Paccaud, Fred; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little information regarding the impact of diet on disease incidence and mortality in Switzerland. We assessed ecologic correlations between food availability and disease. Methods In this ecologic study for the period 1970–2009, food availability was measured using the food balance sheets of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Standardized mortality rates (SMRs) were obtained from the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics. Cancer incidence data were obtained from the World Health Organization Health For All database and the Vaud Cancer Registry. Associations between food availability and mortality/incidence were assessed at lags 0, 5, 10, and 15 years by multivariate regression adjusted for total caloric intake. Results Alcoholic beverages and fruit availability were positively associated, and fish availability was inversely associated, with SMRs for cardiovascular diseases. Animal products, meat, and animal fats were positively associated with the SMR for ischemic heart disease only. For cancer, the results of analysis using SMRs and incidence rates were contradictory. Alcoholic beverages and fruits were positively associated with SMRs for all cancer but inversely associated with all-cancer incidence rates. Similar findings were obtained for all other foods except vegetables, which were weakly inversely associated with SMRs and incidence rates. Use of a 15-year lag reversed the associations with animal and vegetal products, weakened the association with alcohol and fruits, and strengthened the association with fish. Conclusions Ecologic associations between food availability and disease vary considerably on the basis of whether mortality or incidence rates are used in the analysis. Great care is thus necessary when interpreting our results. PMID:24140818

  2. Correlation of Paraoxonase Status with Disease Activity Score and Systemic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Usha Dudeja; Siddiqui, Merajul Haque; Sharma, Dilutpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite, various preventive efforts on conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, the incidence of CVD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients increases continuously. To solve this conundrum one needs more investigations. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the plasma paraoxonase (PON) activity along with the markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and disease activity score-28 (DAS28) in RA patients and clarify their role in determining the probability of RA patients to develop future CVD risk. Materials and Methods Plasma PON, total antioxidant activity (TAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in 40 RA patients aged 40-55 years aged and 40 age-matched healthy controls. The data obtained were compared statistically by using Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Results Besides dyslipidaemia, marked reduction in plasma PON and TAA (p< 0.05) were observed in RA patients as compared with that of healthy controls. Erythrocyte MDA, plasma CRP and synovial IL-6 levels were increased significantly (p<0.05) in RA patients. PON was negatively correlated with MDA (r = - 0.672; p < 0.001), CRP (r = -0.458; p<0.05), IL-6 (r = -0.426; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r = -0.598; p < 0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.648; p<0.001) and TAA (r = 0.608; p< 0.001) levels in RA patients. Conclusion Alteration in PON activity might contribute to the progression of future CVD risk in RA patients, which may result from interplay of several confounding factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, plasma PON activity, CRP and TAA levels could be considered as non-traditional factors to predict CVD risk. Thus, it is suggested that future drugs could be developed to target the non-traditional risk factors in RA patients. PMID:27134854

  3. Clinical Correlations With Lewy Body Pathology in LRRK2-Related Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Lorraine V.; Lang, Anthony E.; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Hurtig, Howard I.; Alcalay, Roy N.; Marder, Karen S.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Gaig, Carles; Tolosa, Eduardo; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier; Marti-Masso, Jose F.; Ferrer, Isidre; de Munain, Adolfo López; Goldman, Samuel M.; Schüle, Birgitt; Langston, J. William; Aasly, Jan O.; Giordana, Maria T.; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Puschmann, Andreas; Canesi, Margherita; Pezzoli, Gianni; De Paula, Andre Maues; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brice, Alexis; Stoessl, A. Jon; Marras, Connie

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common cause of genetic Parkinson disease (PD) known to date. The clinical features of manifesting LRRK2 mutation carriers are generally indistinguishable from those of patients with sporadic PD. However, some PD cases associated with LRRK2 mutations lack Lewy bodies (LBs), a neuropathological hallmark of PD. We investigated whether the presence or absence of LBs correlates with different clinical features in LRRK2-related PD. OBSERVATIONS We describe genetic, clinical, and neuropathological findings of 37 cases of LRRK2-related PD including 33 published and 4 unpublished cases through October 2013. Among the different mutations, the LRRK2 p.G2019S mutation was most frequently associated with LB pathology. Nonmotor features of cognitive impairment/dementia, anxiety, and orthostatic hypotension were correlated with the presence of LBs. In contrast, a primarily motor phenotype was associated with a lack of LBs. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinicopathological correlations in a series of LRRK2-related PD cases. Findings from this selected group of patients with PD demonstrated that parkinsonian motor features can occur in the absence of LBs. However, LB pathology in LRRK2-related PD may be a marker for a broader parkinsonian symptom complex including cognitive impairment. PMID:25401511

  4. Neuropsychological and Neuroanatomical Correlates of the Social Norms Questionnaire in Frontotemporal Dementia Versus Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Hemali; Paholpak, Pongsatorn; Lee, Grace; Carr, Andrew; Barsuglia, Joseph P; Mather, Michelle; Jimenez, Elvira; Mendez, Mario F

    2016-06-01

    Traditional neuropsychological batteries may not distinguish early behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from Alzheimer's disease (AD) without the inclusion of a social behavioral measure. We compared 33 participants, 15 bvFTD, and 18 matched patients with early-onset AD (eAD), on the Social Norms Questionnaire (SNQ), neuropsychological tests and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The analyses included correlations of SNQ results (total score, overendorsement or "overadhere" errors, and violations or "break" errors) with neuropsychological results and tensor-based morphometry regions of interest. Patients with BvFTD had significantly lower SNQ total scores and higher overadhere errors than patients with eAD. On neuropsychological measures, the SNQ total scores correlated significantly with semantic knowledge and the overadhere subscores with executive dysfunction. On MRI analysis, the break subscores significantly correlated with lower volume of lateral anterior temporal lobes (aTL). The results also suggest that endorsement of social norm violations corresponds to the role of the right aTL in social semantic knowledge. PMID:26646114

  5. Refining Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young-Hwan; Conklin, John; Chan, Winnie; Roslin, Nicole M; Liu, Jannel; He, Ning; Wang, Kairong; Sundsbak, Jamie L; Heyer, Christina M; Haider, Masoom; Paterson, Andrew D; Harris, Peter C; Pei, York

    2016-06-01

    Renal disease variability in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is strongly influenced by the gene locus (PKD1 versus PKD2). Recent studies identified nontruncating PKD1 mutations in approximately 30% of patients who underwent comprehensive mutation screening, but the clinical significance of these mutations is not well defined. We examined the genotype-renal function correlation in a prospective cohort of 220 unrelated ADPKD families ascertained through probands with serum creatinine ≤1.4 mg/dl at recruitment. We screened these families for PKD1 and PKD2 mutations and reviewed the clinical outcomes of the probands and affected family members. Height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) was obtained in 161 affected subjects. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling for renal and patient survival was performed in 707 affected probands and family members. Overall, we identified pathogenic mutations in 84.5% of our families, in which the prevalence of PKD1 truncating, PKD1 in-frame insertion/deletion, PKD1 nontruncating, and PKD2 mutations was 38.3%, 4.3%, 27.1%, and 30.3%, respectively. Compared with patients with PKD1 truncating mutations, patients with PKD1 in-frame insertion/deletion, PKD1 nontruncating, or PKD2 mutations have smaller htTKV and reduced risks (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]) of ESRD (0.35 [0.14 to 0.91], 0.10 [0.05 to 0.18], and 0.03 [0.01 to 0.05], respectively) and death (0.31 [0.11 to 0.87], 0.20 [0.11 to 0.38], and 0.18 [0.11 to 0.31], respectively). Refined genotype-renal disease correlation coupled with targeted next generation sequencing of PKD1 and PKD2 may provide useful clinical prognostication for ADPKD. PMID:26453610

  6. Cytotoxic immune responses in the lungs correlate to disease severity in patients with hantavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Rasmuson, J; Pourazar, J; Mohamed, N; Lejon, K; Evander, M; Blomberg, A; Ahlm, C

    2016-04-01

    Hantavirus infections may cause severe and sometime life-threatening lung failure. The pathogenesis is not fully known and there is an urgent need for effective treatment. We aimed to investigate the association between pulmonary viral load and immune responses, and their relation to disease severity. Bronchoscopy with sampling of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was performed in 17 patients with acute Puumala hantavirus infection and 16 healthy volunteers acting as controls. Lymphocyte subsets, granzyme concentrations, and viral load were determined by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. Analyses of BAL fluid revealed significantly higher numbers of activated CD8(+) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, as well as higher concentrations of the cytotoxins granzymes A and B in hantavirus-infected patients, compared to controls. In patients, Puumala hantavirus RNA was detected in 88 % of BAL cell samples and correlated inversely to the T cell response. The magnitude of the pulmonary cytotoxic lymphocyte response correlated to the severity of disease and systemic organ dysfunction, in terms of need for supplemental oxygen treatment, hypotension, and laboratory data indicating renal failure, cardiac dysfunction, vascular leakage, and cell damage. Regulatory T cell numbers were significantly lower in patients compared to controls, and may reflect inadequate immune regulation during hantavirus infection. Hantavirus infection elicits a pronounced cytotoxic lymphocyte response in the lungs. The magnitude of the immune response was associated with disease severity. These results give insights into the pathogenesis and possibilities for new treatments. PMID:26873376

  7. Correlation between cag Pathogenicity Island Composition and Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastroduodenal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Christina; Sillén, Anna; Eriksson, Lena; Strand, Mona-Lisa; Enroth, Helena; Normark, Staffan; Falk, Per; Engstrand, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with a variety of outcomes ranging from seemingly asymptomatic coexistence to peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island (PAI) contains genes associated with a more aggressive phenotype and has been suggested to be a determinant of severe disease outcome. The cagA gene has served as a marker for the cag PAI. However, the presence of this single gene does not necessarily indicate the presence of a complete set of cag PAI genes. We have analyzed the composition of the cag PAI in 66 clinical isolates obtained from patients with duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, and nonulcer dyspepsia. Hybridization of DNA to microarrays containing all the genes of the cag PAI showed that 76 and 9% of the strains contained all or none of the cag PAI genes, respectively. Partial deletions of the cag PAI were found in 10 isolates (15%), of which 3 were cagA negative. The ability to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in AGS cells was correlated to the presence of a complete cag PAI. Strains carrying only parts of the island induced IL-8 at levels significantly lower than those induced by cag PAI-positive isolates. The presence of an intact cag PAI correlates with development of more severe pathology, and such strains were found more frequently in patients with severe gastroduodenal disease (odds ratio, 5.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 17.4). Partial deletions of the cag PAI appear to be sufficient to render the organism less pathogenic. PMID:14573679

  8. Is Serum Uric Acid Level Correlated with Erectile Dysfunction in Coronary Artery Disease Patients?

    PubMed

    Salavati, Alborz; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Allameh, Farzad; Alizadeh, Farimah; Namdari, Farshad; Hosseinian, Mehdi; Salimi, Elaheh; Heidari, Fariba; Pourmand, Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and vascular insufficiency are consequences of modern lifestyle, and vasogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the leading causes of sexual dysfunction which could be prevented like ischemic heart disease if the risk factors are discovered and managed. Seventy-five men scheduled for coronary angiography were asked to fill out the IIEF5 questionnaire and underwent serum lipoprotein-a, uric acid, lipid profile, testosterone, Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG), dehyderoepiandrostendion sulfate (DHEAS) tests; and the results were compared with those of erectile dysfunction patients with and without coronary artery disease. Ten out of 32 CAD patients (30%) and 6 of 43 normal coronary men had ED Prevalence (P=0.04). The average serum uric acid in ED patients with normal coronary was 5.6 (± 0.68) 6.5 ±078 mg/dl in ED patients of CAD group P=0.034. Men with both ED and CAD had significantly higher levels of lipoprotein-a compared to those CAD patients with normal sexual function. Higher uric acid and lipoprotein-a levels are correlated with the presence of ED in patients with CAD. PMID:27107521

  9. Clinicopathological correlation of psychosis and brain vascular changes in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Simon Kang Seng; Hao, Ying; Chia, Pei Shi; Tan, Eng-King; Hameed, Shahul

    2016-01-01

    Psychosis is common in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, studies on neuropathology in vascular etiology contributing to psychosis in AD is lacking to date. The aim of this study was to investigate neuropathological vascular related changes in Alzheimer’s disease with psychosis. Data of patients with AD from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center between 2005 to September 2013 was accessed and reviewed. Presence of psychosis was determined based on Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire taken from the last visit within one year prior to death, and patients were divided into psychosis positive and negative group. Comparison of clinical details and neuropathological vascular changes between the groups was performed using Wilcoxon rank sum test and Chi-square/ Fisher’s exact test. Significant variables were further included in a multivariate logistic model. Overall, 145 patients was included. Of these, 50 patients were psychosis positive. Presence of one or more cortical microinfarcts and moderate to severe arteriosclerosis was found to be positively associated with psychosis. Our results suggest vascular changes correlate with psychosis in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26868671

  10. Discriminative Learning for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis via Canonical Correlation Analysis and Multimodal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Baiying; Chen, Siping; Ni, Dong; Wang, Tianfu

    2016-01-01

    To address the challenging task of diagnosing neurodegenerative brain disease, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), we propose a novel method using discriminative feature learning and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) in this paper. Specifically, multimodal features and their CCA projections are concatenated together to represent each subject, and hence both individual and shared information of AD disease are captured. A discriminative learning with multilayer feature hierarchy is designed to further improve performance. Also, hybrid representation is proposed to maximally explore data from multiple modalities. A novel normalization method is devised to tackle the intra- and inter-subject variations from the multimodal data. Based on our extensive experiments, our method achieves an accuracy of 96.93% [AD vs. normal control (NC)], 86.57 % (MCI vs. NC), and 82.75% [MCI converter (MCI-C) vs. MCI non-converter (MCI-NC)], respectively, which outperforms the state-of-the-art methods in the literature. PMID:27242506

  11. Joint and fascial chronic graft-vs-host disease: correlations with clinical and laboratory parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vukić, Tamara; Smith, Sean Robinson; Ljubas Kelečić, Dina; Desnica, Lana; Prenc, Ema; Pulanić, Dražen; Vrhovac, Radovan; Nemet, Damir; Pavletic, Steven Z.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine if there are correlations between joint and fascial chronic graft-vs-host disease (cGVHD) with clinical findings, laboratory parameters, and measures of functional capacity. Methods 29 patients were diagnosed with cGVHD based on National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Criteria at the University Hospital Centre Zagreb from October 2013 to October 2015. Physical examination, including functional measures such as 2-minute walk test and hand grip strength, as well as laboratory tests were performed. The relationship between these evaluations and the severity of joint and fascial cGVHD was tested by logistical regression analysis. Results 12 of 29 patients (41.3%) had joint and fascial cGVHD diagnosed according to NIH Consensus Criteria. There was a significant positive correlation of joint and fascial cGVHD and skin cGVHD (P < 0.001), serum C3 complement level (P = 0.045), and leukocytes (P = 0.032). There was a significant negative correlation between 2-minute walk test (P = 0.016), percentage of cytotoxic T cells CD3+/CD8+ (P = 0.022), serum albumin (P = 0.047), and Karnofsky score (P < 0.001). Binary logistic regression model found that a significant predictor for joint and fascial cGVHD was cGVHD skin involvement (odds ratio, 7.79; 95 confidence interval 1.87-32.56; P = 0.005). Conclusion Joint and fascial cGVHD manifestations correlated with multiple laboratory measurements, clinical features, and cGVHD skin involvement, which was a significant predictor for joint and fascial cGVHD. PMID:27374828

  12. The serum vitamin D level is inversely correlated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Goh Eun; Kim, Donghee; Kwak, Min-Sun; Yang, Jong In; Yim, Jeong Yoon; Lim, Seon Hee; Itani, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: A low vitamin D level has been associated with metabolic syndrome and diabetes. However, an association between a low vitamin D level and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has not yet been definitively established. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between a vitamin D level and NAFLD in Korea. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 6,055 health check-up subjects was conducted. NAFLD was diagnosed on the basis of typical ultrasonographic findings and a history of alcohol consumption. Results: The subjects were aged 51.7±10.3 years (mean±SD) and 54.7% were female. NAFLD showed a significant inverse correlation with the vitamin D level after adjusting for age and sex [odds ratio (OR)=0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.75–0.96]. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of NAFLD decreased steadily with increasing vitamin D level [OR=0.74, 95% CI=0.60–0.90, lowest quintile (≤14.4 ng/mL) vs highest quintile (≥28.9 ng/mL), p for trend <0.001]. Multivariate regression analysis after adjusting for other metabolic factors revealed that NAFLD showed a significant inverse correlation with both the vitamin D level (>20 ng/mL) [OR=0.86, 95% CI=0.75-0.99] and the quintiles of the vitamin D level in a dose-dependent manner (p for trend=0.001). Conclusions: The serum level of vitamin D, even when within the normal range, was found to be inversely correlated with NAFLD in a dose-dependent manner. Vitamin D was found to be inversely correlated with NAFLD independent of known metabolic risk factors. These findings suggest that vitamin D exerts protective effects against NAFLD. PMID:27044765

  13. Endoscopic evaluation of celiac disease severity and its correlation with histopathological aspects of the duodenal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bonatto, Mauro W.; Kotze, Luiz; Orlandoski, Marcia; Tsuchyia, Ricardo; de Carvalho, Carlos A.; Lima, Doryane; Kurachi, Gustavo; Orso, Ivan R.B.; Kotze, Lorete

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disorder affecting genetically predisposed individuals, triggered and maintained by the ingestion of gluten. Triggered and maintained by the ingestion of gluten, celiac disease is a chronic systemic autoimmune disorder affecting genetically predisposed individuals. Persistent related inflammation of the duodenal mucosa causes atrophy architecture detectable on esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and histopathology. We investigated the association between endoscopic features and histopathological findings (Marsh) for duodenal mucosa in celiac disease patients and propose an endoscopic classification of severity. Patients and methods: Between January 2000 and March 2010, an electronic database containing 34,540 EDGs of patients aged > 14 years was searched for cases of CD. Out of 109 cases, 85 met the inclusion criteria: conventional EGD combined with chromoendoscopy, zoom and biopsy. EGD types 0, I and II corresponds to Marsh grades 0, 1 and 2, respectively, while EGD type III corresponds to Marsh grade 3 and 4. Results: Five patients (5.8 %) were EGD I but not Marsh grade 1; 25 patients (29.4 %) were EGD II, 4 of whom (16 %) were classified as Marsh grade 2; and 55 patients (64.7 %) were EGD III, 51 (92.7 %) of whom were classified as Marsh grades 3 and 4. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r = 0.33) revealed a significant association between the methods (P = 0.002). Conclusions: Changes in the duodenal mucosa detected on EGD were significantly and positively associated with histopathologic findings. The use of chromoendoscopy in addition to conventional EGD enhances changes in the duodenal mucosa and permits diagnosis of CD, even in routine examinations. The proposed endoscopic classification is practical and easily reproducible and provides valuable information regarding disease extension. PMID:27556094

  14. Correlates of dietary energy sources with cardiovascular disease risk markers in Mexican school-age children.

    PubMed

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Rodríguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Muñoz-Manrique, Cinthya; Monge-Urrea, Adriana; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2010-02-01

    Dietary and lifestyle changes in Mexico have been linked to an increase in chronic diseases such as obesity and cardiovascular disease. Important dietary changes such as an increase in the consumption of energy-dense foods (high in oils, animal or processed fats, and sugars) have been recently reported. The objective of this study was to identify how key dietary energy sources correlated with other indexes of cardiovascular disease in a Mexican school-age population. From 2004 to 2006, a convenience sample (n=228) of 9- to 13-year-olds, 48.2% girls and 51.8% boys, from three public urban schools were included. Anthropometric, blood pressure, and dietary assessment (two multiple pass 24-hour recalls) were done. More than half of children did not meet the fruit and vegetable recommended intake. High-fat dairy foods (14% of total energy intake), refined carbohydrates (13.5%), red/processed meat (8.5%), added sugars/desserts (7%), corn tortilla (6.5%), and soft drinks/sweetened beverages (5%) were the highest dietary energy sources consumed. In a subgroup of children (n=185), a fasting blood sample was collected for biochemical analysis. A positive association was observed between glucose and diastolic blood pressure with the intake of soft drinks/sweetened beverages, insulin concentrations and the intake of white bread, and triglyceride concentrations with the intake of added fats. Unhealthful dietary energy sources are frequently consumed by these children. Culturally competent nutrition counseling should be offered to Mexican-American children and their families with a significant risk of cardiovascular disease. Efforts should be made to design and implement nutrition education and health promotion strategies in schools. PMID:20102853

  15. The Correlation Between Serum Adipokines and Liver Cell Damage in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Raika; Hatami, Neda; Kosari, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common cause of chronic hepatitis, which can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between serum adipocytokines and the histologic findings of the liver in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Patients and Methods This case-control study was performed on those with persistent elevated liver enzymes and with evidence of fatty liver in ultrasonography. After exclusion of patients with other etiologies causing abnormal liver function tests, the resulting patients underwent liver biopsies. NAFLD was diagnosed based on liver histology according to the Brunt scoring system. Results Waist circumferences and levels of blood glucose (after fasting), insulin, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferases (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferases (AST) were higher in patients with NAFLD than in those in the control group. ALT, AST, and gamma glutamine transferase (GGT) levels were lower in patients with liver steatosis of a grade of less than 33% than those with higher degrees of steatosis. Serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL), cholesterol, and hepcidin levels were significantly higher in those with lobular inflammation of grade 0 - 1 than in those with inflammation of grade 2 - 3 (Brunt score). Meanwhile, AST was significantly lower in those with lobular inflammation of grade 1 than in those with grade 2-3. Hepcidin and resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with moderate to severe fibrosis than in those with mild fibrosis. Conclusions It seems that surrogate liver function tests and adipocytokine levels were correlated with the histologic findings of the liver. PMID:27313636

  16. Serum Indicators Reflecting Gastric Function May Also Correlate with Other Extragastric Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuehua; Wang, Wei; Li, Yi; Yuan, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Serological indicators of organ function can reveal intrinsic links between different organs. The present study aimed to determine the correlations of serum indicators for gastric and extragastric function. Methods. A total of 823 individuals were enrolled. Data on indicators reflecting blood lipids, blood glucose, indexes of stomach, kidney, liver, and thyroid function, and H. pylori IgG antibody level were collected. Results. As creatine (Cr) levels increased, PGI (pepsinogen I), PGII concentrations, and PGI/II ratio increased monotonically from 79.7 to 105.15 µg/L, 6.5 to 8.4 µg/L, and 11.97 to 12.27, respectively (P < 0.05). As thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) levels increased, PGI level decreased from 100.85 to 84 µg/L (P < 0.05) and as thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) increased, PGI/II ratio increased monotonically from 11.54 to 12.68 (P < 0.05). As triglyceride (TG) levels increased, gastrin 17 (G17) concentrations increased monotonically from 1.73 to 2.7 pmol/L (P < 0.05). As serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) increased, PGI/II concentrations increased monotonically from 11.98 to 12.67 and 9.7 to 13.54 (P < 0.05), respectively. Conclusions. Serum PG and G17 levels were associated with blood glucose and lipids, kidney function, and thyroid function but not with liver function. Serum indicators reflecting gastric function may correlate not only with primary diseases, but also with other extragastric diseases. PMID:26339238

  17. Neuropsychological correlates of theory of mind in patients with early Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Gabriella; Vitale, Carmine; Trojano, Luigi; Errico, Domenico; Amboni, Marianna; Barbarulo, Anna Maria; Grossi, Dario; Barone, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The theory of mind is the ability to attribute mental states to oneself and others and to understand that others have beliefs, desires and intentions different from one's own. The aim of the study was to explore the neuropsychological correlates of theory of mind in patients affected by early Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty-three PD patients and 33 age-, sex-, and education-matched control subjects underwent the Frontal Assessment Battery, as well as tasks assessing "cognitive" and "affective" theory of mind, and memory abilities; questionnaires evaluating behavioral disorders and quality of life were also administrated. Although the 2 groups did not differ on neuropsychological tasks, PD patients' performance on tasks assessing cognitive and affective theory of mind was significantly worse than controls. Moreover, PD patients had more behavioral disorders and worse quality of life than controls. After covarying for behavioral and quality of life scores, the differences between patients and controls on theory of mind tasks remained significant. "Cognitive" theory of mind was associated with Frontal Assessment Battery score and 2 domains of quality of life scale, whereas "affective" theory of mind scores correlated only with behavioral scales such as the Frontal Behavioral Inventory and Apathy Evaluation Scale. The results demonstrate that both affective and cognitive aspects of theory of mind are simultaneously impaired in early PD and suggest that deficits in the 2 subcomponents of theory of mind may be linked to dysfunction of different frontosubcortical circuitries in early PD. PMID:21915910

  18. Subthalamic nucleus phase–amplitude coupling correlates with motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Bernadette C.M.; Beudel, Martijn; Jha, Ashwani; Oswal, Ashwini; Foltynie, Tom; Hariz, Marwan I.; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Green, Alexander L.; Brown, Peter; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Objective High-amplitude beta band oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus are frequently associated with Parkinson’s disease but it is unclear how they might lead to motor impairments. Here we investigate a likely pathological coupling between the phase of beta band oscillations and the amplitude of high-frequency oscillations around 300 Hz. Methods We analysed an extensive data set comprising resting-state recordings obtained from deep brain stimulation electrodes in 33 patients before and/or after taking dopaminergic medication. We correlated mean values of spectral power and phase–amplitude coupling with severity of hemibody bradykinesia/rigidity. In addition, we used simultaneously recorded magnetoencephalography to look at functional interactions between the subthalamic nucleus and ipsilateral motor cortex. Results Beta band power and phase–amplitude coupling within the subthalamic nucleus correlated positively with severity of motor impairment. This effect was more pronounced within the low-beta range, whilst coherence between subthalamic nucleus and motor cortex was dominant in the high-beta range. Conclusions We speculate that the beta band might impede pro-kinetic high-frequency activity patterns when phase–amplitude coupling is prominent. Furthermore, results provide evidence for a functional subdivision of the beta band into low and high frequencies. Significance Our findings contribute to the interpretation of oscillatory activity within the cortico-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:26971483

  19. Seroprevalence of Bartonella henselae infection and correlation with disease status in cats in Switzerland.

    PubMed Central

    Glaus, T; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Greene, C; Glaus, B; Wolfensberger, C; Lutz, H

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of infection with Bartonella henselae was investigated in cats from different areas of Switzerland. Serum samples of 728 cats were examined for antibodies to B. henselae by immunofluorescent antibody testing, and the results were analyzed with a view to a possible correlation between a positive titer and signalment, clinical signs, infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline coronavirus (FCoV), or feline spumavirus (FeSFV), and the living environments of the cats. The seroprevalence in all cats was 8.3%. No significantly different prevalence was found in sick versus healthy cats (9.2 versus 7.2%); however, in sick cats seropositive for B. henselae, there was an increased frequency of stomatitis and a variety of diseases of the kidneys and the urinary tract. There was an increased prevalence of B. henselae in cats positive for FCoV (P = 0.0185) or FeSFV (P = 0.0235) and no statistically significant increased prevalence in cats infected with FeLV or FIV. There was no correlation between a positive titer and sex or breed. The same prevalence of B. henselae antibodies was found in cats with and without access to the outdoors and in cats from single- and multicat households. The seroprevalence was increased in cats living south of the Alps (12.1%); however, this difference was not significant (P = 0.0616). PMID:9350752

  20. Ventromedial-frontopolar prefrontal cortex atrophy correlates with insight loss in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hornberger, Michael; Yew, Belinda; Gilardoni, Silvia; Mioshi, Eneida; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Manes, Facundo; Hodges, John R

    2014-02-01

    Loss in insight is a major feature of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) but has been investigated relatively little. More importantly, the neural basis of insight loss is still poorly understood. The current study investigated insight deficit profiles across a large cohort of neurodegenerative patients (n = 81), including FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We employed a novel insight questionnaire, which tapped into changes across different domains: social interaction, emotion, diagnosis/treatment, language, and motivation. FTD subtypes varied considerably for insight loss, with the behavioral variant worst and the progressive non-fluent variant least affected. All other subtypes and AD showed milder but consistent insight loss. Voxel-based morphometry analysis revealed that overall insight loss correlated with ventromedial and frontopolar prefrontal atrophy, with exception of social interaction and emotion insight loss, which additionally correlated with lateral temporal and amygdala atrophy, respectively. Our results show that patients with neurodegenerative conditions show variable loss of insight, with ventromedial and frontopolar cortex regions appearing to be particularly important for insight. PMID:23125121

  1. Correlating changes in lung function with patient outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Relationships between improvements in lung function and other clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not documented extensively. We examined whether changes in trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) are correlated with changes in patient-reported outcomes. Methods Pooled data from three indacaterol studies (n = 3313) were analysed. Means and responder rates for outcomes including change from baseline in Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI), St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores (at 12, 26 and 52 weeks), and COPD exacerbation frequency (rate/year) were tabulated across categories of ΔFEV1. Also, generalised linear modelling was performed adjusting for covariates such as baseline severity and inhaled corticosteroid use. Results With increasing positive ΔFEV1, TDI and ΔSGRQ improved at all timepoints, exacerbation rate over the study duration declined (P < 0.001). Individual-level correlations were 0.03-0.18, but cohort-level correlations were 0.79-0.95. At 26 weeks, a 100 ml increase in FEV1 was associated with improved TDI (0.46 units), ΔSGRQ (1.3-1.9 points) and exacerbation rate (12% decrease). Overall, adjustments for baseline covariates had little impact on the relationship between ΔFEV1 and outcomes. Conclusions These results suggest that larger improvements in FEV1 are likely to be associated with larger patient-reported benefits across a range of clinical outcomes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00393458, NCT00463567, and NCT00624286 PMID:22206353

  2. Regional metabolic correlates of surgical outcome following unilateral pallidotomy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Eidelberg, D; Moeller, J R; Ishikawa, T; Dhawan, V; Spetsieris, P; Silbersweig, D; Stern, E; Woods, R P; Fazzini, E; Dogali, M; Beric, A

    1996-04-01

    Stereotaxic ventral pallidotomy has been employed in the symptomatic treatment of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). To understand the pathophysiology of clinical outcome following this procedure, we studied 10 PD patients (5 men and 5 women; mean age 60.0 +/- 6.1 years; mean Hoehn and Yahr stage 3.8 +/- 1.0) with quantitative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET). All patients were scanned preoperatively; 8 of 10 patients were rescanned 6 to 8 months following surgery. Clinical performance was assessed off medications before and after surgery using standardized timed motor tasks. We found that preoperative lentiform metabolism correlated significantly with improvement in contralateral motor tasks at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months following unilateral pallidotomy (p<0.03). Postoperatively, significant metabolic increases were noted in the primary motor cortex, lateral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (p<0.01) of the hemisphere that underwent surgery. Improvement in contralateral limb motor performance correlated significantly with surgical declines in thalamic metabolism (p<0.01) and increases in lateral frontal metabolism (p<0.05). Principal components analysis disclosed a significant covariance pattern characterized by postoperative declines in ipsilateral lentiform and thalamic metabolism associated with bilateral increase in supplementary motor control metabolism. Subject scores for this pattern correlated significantly with improvements in both contralateral and ipsilateral limb performance (p<0.005). These results suggest that pallidotomy reduced the preoperative overaction of the inhibitory pallidothalamic projection. Clinical improvement may be associated with modulations in regional brain metabolism occurring remote from the lesion site. PMID:8619523

  3. Buccal Cell Cytokeratin 14 Correlates with Multiple Blood Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Leifert, Wayne R; Nguyen, Tori; Rembach, Alan; Martins, Ralph; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie; Masters, Colin L; Ames, David; Rowe, Christopher C; Macaulay, S Lance; François, Maxime; Fenech, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may reflect early stages of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our hypothesis was that cytokeratin 14 (CK14) expression could be used with blood-based biomarkers such as homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folate to identify individuals with MCI or AD from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) flagship study of aging. Buccal cells from 54 individuals were analyzed by a newly developed method that is rapid, automated, and quantitative for buccal cell CK14 expression levels. CK14 was negatively correlated with plasma Mg²⁺ and LDL, while positively correlated with vitamin B12, red cell hematocrit/volume, and basophils in the MCI group and positively correlated with insulin and vitamin B12 in the AD group. The combined biomarker panel (CK14 expression, plasma vitamin B12, and homocysteine) was significantly lower in the MCI (p = 0.003) and AD (p = 0.0001) groups compared with controls. Receiver-operating characteristic curves yielded area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.829 for the MCI (p = 0.002) group and 0.856 for the AD (p = 0.0003) group. These complex associations of multiple related parameters highlight the differences between the MCI and AD cohorts and possibly an underlying metabolic pathology associated with the development of early memory impairment. The changes in buccal cell CK14 expression observed in this pilot study supports previous results suggesting the peripheral biomarkers and metabolic changes are not restricted to brain pathology alone in MCI and AD and could prove useful as a potential biomarker in identifying individuals with an increased risk of developing MCI and eventually AD. PMID:26402008

  4. Clinical Correlates of Apathy in Patients Recently Diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease: The ANIMO Study

    PubMed Central

    Cubo, Esther; Benito-León, Julián; Coronell, Carlos; Armesto, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Little is known about apathy in the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). We determined the clinical correlates of apathy in a large representative sample of patients recently diagnosed with PD (ANIMO study). Methods PD patients, diagnosed within 2 years of inclusion, were recruited in 102 outpatient clinics situated in 82 populations throughout Spain. Apathy was quantified using the Lille Apathy Rating Scale (LARS). Clinical comparisons and correlations were performed using nonparametric tests. Regression analyses were used to test the association of clinical variables with apathy. Results We recruited 557 PD patients (60.3% men) with a mean age of 68.8 ± 9.7 years, and UPDRS motor score of 21.1 ± 10.8. Apathy only was diagnosed in 186 (33.4%), and apathy and depression in 215 patients (38.6%). Patients with higher comorbidity (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.01−1.20, p = 0.001), motor impairment (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03−1.10, p < 0.0001), and lower education (OR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.21−;3.85, p = 0.009) had higher odds of having apathy, in contrast to patients living in a rural environment (OR = 0.35, 95% CI 0.32–0.85, p = 0.01), and left predominant PD motor laterality (OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.13–0.88, p = 0.01). LARS scores were significantly correlated with UPDRS motor scores (rs = 0.44, p < 0.001), predominantly with axial score (rs = 0.43, p < 0.001). Conclusions In PD, apathy is a very common and disabling nonmotor symptom separable from depression. Patients living in a rural environment, with lower comorbidity and motor impairment, higher education background, and left predominant PD motor laterality are at lower risk of suffering from apathy. PMID:22236943

  5. Preserved serotonin transporter binding in de novo Parkinson's disease: negative correlation with the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Strecker, Karl; Wegner, Florian; Hesse, Swen; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Patt, Marianne; Meyer, Philipp M; Lobsien, Donald; Schwarz, Johannes; Sabri, Osama

    2011-01-01

    Recent imaging and neuropathological studies indicate reduced serotonin transporter (SERT) in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, data on SERT in early PD patients are sparse. Following the hypothesis that the serotonergic system is damaged early in PD, the aim of our study was to investigate SERT availability by means of PET imaging. Since the loss of dopaminergic neurons is the pathologic hallmark of PD and SERT might be associated with psychiatric co-morbidity, we further sought to correlate SERT availability with the availability of dopamine transporter (DAT) and depressive or motor symptoms in early PD. We prospectively recruited nine early PD patients (4 female, 5 male; 42-76 years) and nine age matched healthy volunteers (5 female, 4 male; 42-72 years). Diagnosis of PD was confirmed by the UK brain bank criteria and DAT imaging. SERT availability was measured by means of [11C]DASB PET. For neuropsychiatric assessment done on the day of PET we applied UPDRS parts I, II and III, Beck's Depression Inventory, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Mini-Mental State Examination and Demtect. SERT was not reduced in any of 14 investigated regions of interest in the nine PD patients compared to healthy controls (p>0.13). SERT was negatively associated with DAT in the striatum (r=-0.69; p=0.04) but not within the midbrain. There was no correlation of SERT availability with depressive symptoms. No alteration of SERT binding in our patients suggests that the serotonergic system is remarkably preserved in early PD. Correlation with DAT might point to a compensatory regulation of the serotonergic system in early stages of PD. PMID:20644949

  6. Genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian patients with Hb H disease.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimkhani, Saedieh; Azarkeivan, Azita; Bayat, Nooshin; Houry-Parvin, Mahdieh; Jalil-Nejad, Sayeh; Zand, Shima; Golkar, Zahra; Hadavi, Valeh; Imanian, Hashem; Oberkanins, Christian; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Thalassemia is the most common genetic disorder in Iran. Some α-globin genotypes leading to Hb H disease may cause severe anemia and dependence on regular blood transfusions. In this study, 40 patients were analyzed for the molecular basis and the genotype-phenotype correlation of Hb H disease in Iran. α-Globin molecular analysis was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by agarose gel electrophoresis, reverse hybridization test strips or DNA sequencing. The most frequently observed α-globin genotypes were -α(3.7)/- -(MED) in 10 patients (25%), - -(20.5)/α(-5nt)α in six patients (15%) and - -(20.5)/-α(3.7) in four patients (10%). A subset of the identified Hb H genotypes, including - -(MED)/α(CS)α, - -(MED)/α(PolyA2)α and α(CS)α/α(CS)α, was associated with a need for regular or irregular blood transfusions. Our findings provide a basis for predicting phenotype severity by identifying the Hb H genotype and making more selective decisions for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:21250880

  7. Fractal correlation property of heart rate variability in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Tatiana D; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Fereira, Celso; Pitta, Fábio O; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Valenti, Vitor E; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2011-01-01

    Background It was reported that autonomic nervous system function is altered in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We evaluated short- and long-term fractal exponents of heart rate variability (HRV) in COPD subjects. Patients and methods We analyzed data from 30 volunteers, who were divided into two groups according to spirometric values: COPD (n = 15) and control (n = 15). For analysis of HRV indices, HRV was recorded beat by beat with the volunteers in the supine position for 30 minutes. We analyzed the linear indices in the time (SDNN [standard deviation of normal to normal] and RMSSD [root-mean square of differences]) and frequency domains (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF], and LF/HF), and the short- and long-term fractal exponents were obtained by detrended fluctuation analysis. We considered P < 0.05 to be a significant difference. Results COPD patients presented reduced levels of all linear exponents and decreased short-term fractal exponent (alpha-1: 0.899 ± 0.18 versus 1.025 ± 0.09, P = 0.026). There was no significant difference between COPD and control groups in alpha-2 and alpha-1/alpha-2 ratio. Conclusion COPD subjects present reduced short-term fractal correlation properties of HRV, which indicates that this index can be used for risk stratification, assessment of systemic disease manifestations, and therapeutic procedures to monitor those patients. PMID:21311690

  8. Sinonasal Anatomical Variants: CT and Endoscopy Study and Its Correlation with Extent of Disease.

    PubMed

    Mendiratta, Vandana; Baisakhiya, Nitish; Singh, Dalbir; Datta, Ginni; Mittal, Amit; Mendiratta, Parveen

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the incidence of anatomical variations in sinonasal area by nasal endoscopy and CT scan paranasal sinuses and to correlate the anatomical variations in sinonasal area with extent of disease. The present study was conducted on 40 patients of chronic sinusitis. All the patients underwent CT scan paranasal sinus axial and coronal view and nasal endoscopy. The most common anatomical variations were agger nasi cells (80 %), deviated nasal septum (72.5 %) and concha bullosa (47.5 %). Other anatomical variations seen in sinonasal region were uncinate process variations, paradoxical middle turbinate, haller cells, accessory ostia of maxillary sinus, multiseptated sphenoid. Osteomeatal unit (87.5 %) and maxillary sinuses (87.5 %) were the most commonly involved which was followed by anterior ethmoids (70 %), posterior ethmoids (50 %), frontal sinuses (32.5 %) and the sphenoids (20 %). Considering the results obtained, we believe that anatomical variations may increase the risk of sinus mucosal disease. We therefore, emphasize the importance of a careful evaluation of CT study in patients with persistent symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:27508139

  9. Prevalence and correlates of cognitive asymmetry in a large sample of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Alverson, W Alexander; Massman, Paul J; Doody, Rachelle S

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has suggested that a significant minority of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) exhibit asymmetric cognitive profiles (greater verbal than visuospatial impairment or vice versa) and that these patient subgroups may differ in demographic and other characteristics. Prior studies have been relatively small, and this investigation sought to examine correlates of asymmetry in a large patient sample (N = 438). Patients were classified into the following cognitive profile groups: low verbal, symmetric, and low visuospatial. Consistent with past research, 28.3% of participants were classified as having asymmetric cognitive profiles, with more participants in the low visuospatial subgroup. Low visuospatial participants were younger than members of the other subgroups, and low verbal participants performed worse on a measure estimating premorbid verbal intelligence. Findings regarding apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 genotype were equivocal, although results provided some evidence for an effect of the ɛ4 allele on cognitive asymmetry. These results suggest systematic differences between neuropsychological asymmetry profiles that support the possibility of distinct subgroups of the disease. PMID:26757777

  10. Hippocampal transcriptome-guided genetic analysis of correlated episodic memory phenotypes in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jingwen; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Chen, Rui; Risacher, Shannon L.; Moore, Jason H.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    As the most common type of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder initially manifested by impaired memory performances. While the diagnosis information indicates a dichotomous status of a patient, memory scores have the potential to capture the continuous nature of the disease progression and may provide more insights into the underlying mechanism. In this work, we performed a targeted genetic study of memory scores on an AD cohort to identify the associations between a set of genes highly expressed in the hippocampal region and seven cognitive scores related to episodic memory. Both main effects and interaction effects of the targeted genetic markers on these correlated memory scores were examined. In addition to well-known AD genetic markers APOE and TOMM40, our analysis identified a new risk gene NAV2 through the gene-level main effect analysis. NAV2 was found to be significantly and consistently associated with all seven episodic memory scores. Genetic interaction analysis also yielded a few promising hits warranting further investigation, especially for the RAVLT list B Score. PMID:25859259

  11. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports.

    PubMed

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection. PMID:27252814

  12. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports

    PubMed Central

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection. PMID:27252814

  13. Severity of atopic disease inversely correlates with intestinal microbiota diversity and butyrate-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nylund, L; Nermes, M; Isolauri, E; Salminen, S; de Vos, W M; Satokari, R

    2015-02-01

    The reports on atopic diseases and microbiota in early childhood remain contradictory, and both decreased and increased microbiota diversity have been associated with atopic eczema. In this study, the intestinal microbiota signatures associated with the severity of eczema in 6-month-old infants were characterized. Further, the changes in intestinal microbiota composition related to the improvement of this disease 3 months later were assessed. The severity of eczema correlated inversely with microbiota diversity (r = -0.54, P = 0.002) and with the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (r = -0.52, P = 0.005). During the 3-month follow-up, microbiota diversity increased (P < 0.001) and scoring atopic dermatitis values decreased (P < 0.001) in all infants. This decrease coincided with the increase in bacteria related to butyrate-producing Coprococcus eutactus (r = -0.59, P = 0.02). In conclusion, the high diversity of microbiota and high abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria were associated with milder eczema, thus suggesting they have a role in alleviating symptoms of atopic eczema. PMID:25413686

  14. Ophthalmologic correlates of disease severity in children and adolescents with Wolfram syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoekel, James; Chisholm, Smith Ann; Al-Lozi, Amal; Hershey, Tamara; Tychsen, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe an ophthalmic phenotype in children at relatively early stages of Wolfram syndrome. Methods Quantitative ophthalmic testing of visual acuity, color vision, automated visual field sensitivity, optic nerve pallor and cupping, and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed in 18 subjects 5–25 years of age. Subjects were also examined for presence or absence of afferent pupillary defects, cataracts, nystagmus, and strabismus. Results Subnormal visual acuity was detected in 89% of subjects, color vision deficits in 94%, visual field defects in 100%, optic disk pallor in 94%, abnormally large optic nerve cup:disk ratio in 33%, thinned RNFL in 100%, afferent pupillary defects in 61%, cataracts in 22%, nystagmus in 39%, and strabismus in 39% of subjects. RNFL thinning (P < 0.001), afferent pupillary defects (P = 0.01), strabismus (P = 0.04), and nystagmus (P = 0.04) were associated with more severe disease using the Wolfram United Rating Scale. Conclusions Children and adolescents with Wolfram syndrome have multiple ophthalmic markers that correlate with overall disease severity. RNFL thickness measured by OCT may be the most reliable early marker. PMID:25439303

  15. Correlation between CAG repeat length and clinical features in Machado-Joseph disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, P.; Gaspar, C.; Silveira, I.

    1995-07-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is associated with the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in a novel gene on 14q32.1. We confirmed the presence of this expansion in 156 MJD patients from 33 families of different geographic origins: 15 Portuguese Azorean, 2 Brazilian, and 16 North American of Portuguese Azorean descent. Normal chromosomes contain between 12 and 37 CAG repeats in the MJD gene, whereas MJD gene carriers have alleles within the expanded range of 62-84 CAG units. The distribution of expanded alleles and the gap between normal and expanded allele sizes is either inconsistent with a premutation hypothesis or most (if not all) of the alleles we studied descend from a common ancestor. There is a strong correlation between the expanded repeat size and the age at onset of the disease as well as the clinical presentation. There is mild instability of the CAG tract length with transmission of the expanded alleles; both increase and decrease in size between parents and progeny occur, with larger variations in male than in female transmissions. Together, these effects can partly explain the variability of age at onset and of phenotypic features in MJD; however, other modifying factors must exist. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Correlation between CAG Repeat Length and Clinical Features in Machado-Joseph Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Patrícia; Gaspar, Claudia; DeStefano, Anita L.; Silveira, Isabel; Coutinho, Paula; Radvany, João; Dawson, David M.; Sudarsky, Lewis; Guimarães, João; Loureiro, Jose E. L.; Nezarati, Marjan M.; Corwin, Lee I.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Rooke, Karen; Rosenberg, Roger; MacLeod, Patrick; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Sequeiros, Jorge; Rouleau, Guy A.

    1995-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is associated with the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in a novel gene on 14q32.1. We confirmed the presence of this expansion in 156 MJD patients from 33 families of different geographic origins: 15 Portuguese Azorean, 2 Brazilian, and 16 North American of Portuguese Azorean descent. Normal chromosomes contain between 12 and 37 CAG repeats in the MJD gene, whereas MJD gene carriers have alleles within the expanded range of 62–84 CAG units. The distribution of expanded alleles and the gap between normal and expanded allele sizes is either inconsistent with a premutation hypothesis or most (if not all) of the alleles we studied descend from a common ancestor. There is a strong correlation between the expanded repeat size and the age at onset of the disease as well as the clinical presentation. There is mild instability of the CAG tract length with transmission of the expanded alleles; both increase and decrease in size between parents and progeny occur, with larger variations in male than in female transmissions. Together, these effects can partly explain the variability of age at onset and of phenotypic features in MJD; however, other modifying factors must exist. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:7611296

  17. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) serum levels in rheumatoid arthritis: correlations with insulin resistance and disease activity scores.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Hodson, James; Sandoo, Aamer; Smith, Jacqueline; Kitas, George D

    2015-09-01

    Vascular abnormalities predisposing to atherosclerosis are present in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and associate with excess cardiovascular risk. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity, has been recognised as novel risk factor for endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We aimed to compare SDMA levels in RA patients and controls and to investigate whether they are influenced by demographic, inflammatory or metabolic factors. Serum SDMA levels were measured in 197 RA individuals [median age: 67 years (quartiles: 59-3), 153 (78 %) females] and 82 controls [median age: 44 years [quartiles: 33-55, 50 (61 %) females]. Routine biochemistry tests, lipid profile, glycemic profile [glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI)], as well as inflammatory markers were measured in all patients. Paired analysis was employed for the comparison of SDMA in two groups and multivariable regression models were performed to identify predictors of SDMA in the RA cohort. SDMA was significantly lower in RA than control patients in both unpaired and paired analyses (P < 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively), with the magnitude of the difference being similar in both models. QUICKI (P = 0.005) and disease activity score-28 (P = 0.007) were positively related to SDMA in the RA cohort, whilst a negative correlation with renal function (eGFR) was detected (P = 0.005). The molecular explanation of lower serum SDMA is unclear, but the established relationships with indices of disease activity and insulin resistance, may underline the pathogenetic role of the L-arginine/NO pathway dysregulation in the development of atherosclerosis in RA. The biological and clinical importance of SDMA in RA remains to be evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. PMID:25772817

  18. Correlates of preclinical cardiovascular disease in Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Haluska, Brian A; Chan, Lionel; Jeffriess, Leanne; Shaw, A Andrew; Shaw, Joanne; Marwick, Thomas H

    2008-01-01

    Background The high frequency of premature death from cardiovascular disease in indigenous Australians is often attributed to the high prevalence of risk factors, especially type II diabetes mellitus (DM). We evaluated the relationship of ethnicity to atherosclerotic burden, as evidenced by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), independent of risk factor status. Methods We studied 227 subjects (147 men; 50 ± 13 y): 119 indigenous subjects with (IDM, n = 54), and without DM (InDM, n = 65), 108 Caucasian subjects with (CDM, n = 52), and without DM (CnDM, n = 56). IMT was measured according to standard methods and compared with clinical data and cardiovascular risk factors. Results In subjects both with and without DM, IMT was significantly greater in indigenous subjects. There were no significant differences in gender, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between any of the groups, and subjects with DM showed no difference in plasma HbA1c. Cardiovascular risk factors were significantly more prevalent in indigenous subjects. Nonetheless, ethnicity (β = -0.34; p < 0.0001), age (β = 0.48; p < 0.0001), and smoking (β = 0.13; p < 0.007) were independent predictors of IMT in multiple linear regression models. Conclusion Ethnicity appears to be an independent correlate of preclinical cardiovascular disease, even after correction for the high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in indigenous Australians. Standard approaches to control currently known risk factors are vital to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, but in themselves may be insufficient to fully address the high prevalence in this population. PMID:18627637

  19. Experiential and Doctrinal Religious Knowledge Categorization in Parkinson's Disease: Behavioral and Brain Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Modestino, Edward J.; O'Toole, Partrick; Reinhofer, AnnaMarie

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest changes in religious cognition in a subgroup of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD e.g., Butler et al., 2011). It is unclear whether this deficit extends to both doctrinal and experiential categorization forms of religious cognition. Kapogiannis et al. (2009b) dissociated experiential and doctrinal religious knowledge to different neural networks using fMRI. We examined Kapogiannis' dissociation against the background of PD side of onset (LOPD, ROPD), assessing performance both On- and Off-medication. In the behavioral portion of the study, we used a statement classification task in combination with scholar derived test sets for experiential and doctrinal religious knowledge categorization in conjunction with neuropsychological measures. In the neuroimaging portion of the study, we expanded on Kapogiannis' study by examining the same networks in PD. The behavioral data revealed that all groups rated (categorized) the scholar derived tests of experiential and doctrinal significantly differently than the scholars. All groups, including the scholars, classified more phrases as doctrinal than experiential. Religious cognition differed in the PD groups: those with PD Off-medication and LOPD Off-medication comprehended scholar defined experiential phrases with more difficulty, making them more likely to be classified as mixed or doctrinal. This was in contrast to the subjective frequency of classification of phrases as experiential paired with a cognitive decline in PD Off-medication; whereas PD On-medication showed a positive correlation with cognitive state and subjective doctrinal classification. For ROPD, cognitive state was associated with subjective experiential and doctrinal frequency of classification. With more intact intellect, there was a greater likelihood of classifying phrases subjectively as mixed, and the converse for experiential. Furthermore, religiosity negatively predicted subjective doctrinal frequency in LOPD, with the

  20. Experiential and Doctrinal Religious Knowledge Categorization in Parkinson's Disease: Behavioral and Brain Correlates.

    PubMed

    Modestino, Edward J; O'Toole, Partrick; Reinhofer, AnnaMarie

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest changes in religious cognition in a subgroup of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD e.g., Butler et al., 2011). It is unclear whether this deficit extends to both doctrinal and experiential categorization forms of religious cognition. Kapogiannis et al. (2009b) dissociated experiential and doctrinal religious knowledge to different neural networks using fMRI. We examined Kapogiannis' dissociation against the background of PD side of onset (LOPD, ROPD), assessing performance both On- and Off-medication. In the behavioral portion of the study, we used a statement classification task in combination with scholar derived test sets for experiential and doctrinal religious knowledge categorization in conjunction with neuropsychological measures. In the neuroimaging portion of the study, we expanded on Kapogiannis' study by examining the same networks in PD. The behavioral data revealed that all groups rated (categorized) the scholar derived tests of experiential and doctrinal significantly differently than the scholars. All groups, including the scholars, classified more phrases as doctrinal than experiential. Religious cognition differed in the PD groups: those with PD Off-medication and LOPD Off-medication comprehended scholar defined experiential phrases with more difficulty, making them more likely to be classified as mixed or doctrinal. This was in contrast to the subjective frequency of classification of phrases as experiential paired with a cognitive decline in PD Off-medication; whereas PD On-medication showed a positive correlation with cognitive state and subjective doctrinal classification. For ROPD, cognitive state was associated with subjective experiential and doctrinal frequency of classification. With more intact intellect, there was a greater likelihood of classifying phrases subjectively as mixed, and the converse for experiential. Furthermore, religiosity negatively predicted subjective doctrinal frequency in LOPD, with the

  1. Toxoplasmosis – A Global Threat. Correlation of Latent Toxoplasmosis with Specific Disease Burden in a Set of 88 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Prandota, Joseph; Sovičková, Michaela; Israili, Zafar H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmosis is becoming a global health hazard as it infects 30–50% of the world human population. Clinically, the life-long presence of the parasite in tissues of a majority of infected individuals is usually considered asymptomatic. However, a number of studies show that this ‘asymptomatic infection’ may also lead to development of other human pathologies. Aims of the Study The purpose of the study was to collect available geoepidemiological data on seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis and search for its relationship with mortality and disability rates in different countries. Methods and Findings Prevalence data published between 1995–2008 for women in child-bearing age were collected for 88 countries (29 European). The association between prevalence of toxoplasmosis and specific disease burden estimated with age-standardized Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) or with mortality, was calculated using General Linear Method with Gross Domestic Product per capita (GDP), geolatitude and humidity as covariates, and also using nonparametric partial Kendall correlation test with GDP as a covariate. The prevalence of toxoplasmosis correlated with specific disease burden in particular countries explaining 23% of variability in disease burden in Europe. The analyses revealed that for example, DALY of 23 of 128 analyzed diseases and disease categories on the WHO list showed correlations (18 positive, 5 negative) with prevalence of toxoplasmosis and another 12 diseases showed positive trends (p<0.1). For several obtained significant correlations between the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis and specific diseases/clinical entities, possible pathophysiological, biochemical and molecular explanations are presented. Conclusions The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis correlated with various disease burden. Statistical associations does not necessarily mean causality. The precautionary principle suggests however that possible role of toxoplasmosis as a triggering

  2. Natural human antibodies to synthetic peptide autoantigens: correlations with age and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Marchalonis, J J; Schluter, S F; Wilson, L; Yocum, D E; Boyer, J T; Kay, M M

    1993-01-01

    Clinically healthy humans as well as patients suffering from various autoimmune diseases produce natural antibodies against a variety of self-components. Such antibodies have been proposed to carry out a physiologic role in maintaining the integrity of self, as well as potentially destructive roles in the generation of autoimmune diseases. Because human autoantigens, particularly membrane proteins, are usually present in extremely small amounts, it is generally impossible to obtain enough to carry out a detailed characterization of the antibodies or the antigenic determinants recognized. To circumvent this difficulty, we developed synthetic autoantigens predicted from the gene sequence of two functionally critical membrane proteins; the band 3 anion transport protein which is found on all cells, and the T-cell receptor (beta chain) which is the antigen-specific receptor on thymus-derived lymphocytes. We have investigated the natural human IgM and IgG antibody responses to peptides selected on the basis of predicted molecular surface exposure and previously known antigenicity, and correlate levels of binding with changes in age and by comparison with autoimmune diseases. We report that the IgM response to synthetic autoantigens tends to be higher than that of IgG molecules, but significant IgG binding occurs to some peptides. This situation is particularly noticeable in comparison of rheumatoid arthritis patients with normal individuals. Distinct peptide portions of individual molecules are recognized differently by the autochthonous immune system as manifested by age dependence of the response and differential levels of IgM and IgG activity. The synthetic autoantigens that tend to generate the highest amounts of natural antibody are those that are either exposed on the surface of the cell (band 3 peptides) or are exposed in the predicted 3-dimensional folding of the molecule (T-cell receptor beta peptides). Rheumatoid arthritis patients tend to give higher Ig

  3. Decreased Circulating T Regulatory Cells in Egyptian Patients with Nonsegmental Vitiligo: Correlation with Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Attia, Mohamed Attia Saad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary skin disorder resulting from autoimmune destruction of melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), specifically CD4+CD25+ and Forkhead box P3+ (FoxP3+) Tregs, acquired notable attention because of their role in a variety of autoimmune pathologies. Dysregulation of Tregs may be one of the factors that can break tolerance to melanocyte self-antigens and contribute to vitiligo pathogenesis. Methods. In order to sustain the role of Tregs in pathogenesis and disease activity of vitiligo, surface markers for CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ peripheral Tregs were evaluated by flow cytometry in 80 Egyptian patients with nonsegmental vitiligo in addition to 60 healthy control subjects and correlated with clinical findings. Results. Vitiligo patients had significantly decreased numbers of both peripheral CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ T cells compared to control subjects (11.49%  ± 8.58% of CD4+ T cells versus 21.20%  ± 3.08%, and 1.09%  ± 0.96% versus 1.44%  ± 0.24%, resp., P < 0.05 for both). Peripheral numbers of CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ Tregs correlated negatively with VIDA score. Conclusion. Treg depletion with impaired immune downregulatory function might play a key role in the autoimmune conditions beyond nonsegmental vitiligo particularly in active cases. Effective Treg cell-based immunotherapies might be a future hope for patients with progressive vitiligo. PMID:26788051

  4. B7-H1 Expression in Wilms Tumor: Correlation With Tumor Biology and Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Jonathan C.; Ashley, Richard A.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Husmann, Douglas A.; Kramer, Stephen A.; Kwon, Eugene D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Despite tremendous gains in improving prognosis, 10% of patients with Wilms tumor will ultimately experience disease recurrence. The identification of novel prognostic markers and tumor associated targets for patients at risk could enable clinicians to treat recurrences more aggressively and, thus, optimize outcomes. We have previously shown that tumor expression of the T cell coregulatory ligand B7-H1 portends a poor prognosis for adults with renal cell carcinoma and represents a promising target to improve therapy. We hypothesize that this finding may be true for Wilms tumor. Materials and Methods We identified 81 patients with Wilms tumor treated at 1 institution between 1968 and 2004. Histopathological features, including Wilms tumor B7-H1 expression, were correlated with clinical observations and outcome. Results Tumor recurrences were noted in 22% of patients with Wilms tumor and 14% died. B7-H1 was expressed in 11 tumors (14%) and was more likely to occur in anaplastic Wilms tumor (p = 0.03). Tumor B7-H1 expression was associated with a 2.7-fold increased risk of recurrence, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.06). However, in favorable histology tumors B7-H1 expression was associated with a 3.7-fold increased risk of recurrence (p = 0.03). Conclusions B7-H1 is expressed by Wilms tumor, correlates with tumor biology and is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in patients with favorable histology tumors. B7-H1 may prove useful in identifying high risk patients who could benefit from more aggressive initial treatment regimens, and may represent a promising therapeutic target. Multi-institutional studies to elucidate the role of B7-H1 in the treatment of Wilms tumor are warranted. PMID:18355839

  5. Correlates of hippocampal neuron number in Alzheimer's disease and ischemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V; Ellis, William G; Weiner, Michael W; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C

    2005-06-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer's disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia-ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5-7 slabs/case), cut into 50 microm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging-derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  6. Correlates of Hippocampal Neuron Number in Alzheimer’s Disease and Ischemic Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zarow, Chris; Vinters, Harry V.; Ellis, William G.; Weiner, Michael W.; Mungas, Dan; White, Lon; Chui, Helena C.

    2007-01-01

    The cornu ammonis 1 region of the hippocampus (CA1) sector of hippocampus is vulnerable to both Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-type neurofibrillary degeneration and anoxia–ischemia. The objective of this article is to compare number and size of neurons in CA1 in AD versus ischemic vascular dementia. Unbiased stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of neurons in 28 autopsy-derived brain samples. For each case, the entire hippocampus from one cerebral hemisphere was sliced into 5mm slabs (5–7 slabs/case), cut into 50μm sections, and stained with gallocyanine. Using the optical dissector, we systematically sampled the number and size of neurons throughout the extent of CA1 and CA2. The total number of neurons was significantly less in AD compared with ischemic vascular dementia (p < 0.02), but there was no significant difference in neuron size. The greatest loss of neurons was observed in two cases with combined AD and hippocampal sclerosis. Regardless of causative diagnosis, the number of CA1 neurons correlates with magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume (r = 0.72; p < 0.001) and memory score (r = 0.62; p < 0.01). We conclude that although CA1 neuron loss is more consistently observed in AD than ischemic vascular dementia, severity of loss shows the expected correlation with structure and function across causative subtype. Reductions in magnetic resonance imaging–derived hippocampal volume reflect loss, rather than shrinkage, of CA1 neurons. PMID:15929035

  7. Correlation between the different pH-metry scores in gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    PubMed

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuţa; Paduraru, Gabriela; Ciubara, Anamaria; Moscalu, Mihaela; Marginean, Cristina Oana; Burlea, Marin

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour esophageal pH-metry is the most widely used method to diagnose the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study compares the different scores obtained during the 24-hour esophageal pH-metry. A retrospective study over 5 years including 234 children (1 month and 18 years old) admitted in a pediatric gastroenterology regional center in Northeast Romania, with suspicion of GERD. They underwent 24- hour esophageal pH-metry, and the scores obtained (Boix-Ochoa, DeMeester, Johnson-DeMeester) were compared. Out of the 234 children, 172 (73.50%) had positive Boix-Ochoa score and 62 (26.50%) had normal Boix-Ochoa score (<11.99). Based on the DeMeester score, 149 children (63.68%) were positive and 85 (36.32%) were negative. The correlation of the Demeester score with the Boix-Ochoa score was very high (r = 0.978, P <  < 0.01, 95% confidence interval). Considering the Johnson-DeMeester score, 120 cases (51.28%) had GERD and 114 (48.72%) did not. The correlation of the Johnson-DeMeester score with the Boix-Ochoa score was still high (r = 0.94, P <  < 0.01, 95% 95% confidence interval). As considered until now, the Boix-Ochoa score is the most accurate score to be used in pediatrics for the diagnosis of GERD. The use of the different scores-Boix-Ochoa, DeMeester, Johnson-DeMeester-showed a high sensitivity and specificity of the pH-metry measurements applied to the study lot, but the last score has a higher risk of false-negative results. PMID:27367982

  8. Correlation between the different pH-metry scores in gastroesophageal reflux disease in children

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuţa; Paduraru, Gabriela; Ciubara, Anamaria; Moscalu, Mihaela; Marginean, Cristina Oana; Burlea, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The 24-hour esophageal pH-metry is the most widely used method to diagnose the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study compares the different scores obtained during the 24-hour esophageal pH-metry. A retrospective study over 5 years including 234 children (1 month and 18 years old) admitted in a pediatric gastroenterology regional center in Northeast Romania, with suspicion of GERD. They underwent 24- hour esophageal pH-metry, and the scores obtained (Boix-Ochoa, DeMeester, Johnson-DeMeester) were compared. Out of the 234 children, 172 (73.50%) had positive Boix-Ochoa score and 62 (26.50%) had normal Boix-Ochoa score (<11.99). Based on the DeMeester score, 149 children (63.68%) were positive and 85 (36.32%) were negative. The correlation of the Demeester score with the Boix-Ochoa score was very high (r = 0.978, P <  < 0.01, 95% confidence interval). Considering the Johnson-DeMeester score, 120 cases (51.28%) had GERD and 114 (48.72%) did not. The correlation of the Johnson-DeMeester score with the Boix-Ochoa score was still high (r = 0.94, P <  < 0.01, 95% 95% confidence interval). As considered until now, the Boix-Ochoa score is the most accurate score to be used in pediatrics for the diagnosis of GERD. The use of the different scores—Boix-Ochoa, DeMeester, Johnson-DeMeester—showed a high sensitivity and specificity of the pH-metry measurements applied to the study lot, but the last score has a higher risk of false-negative results. PMID:27367982

  9. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder Symptoms Correlate with Domains of Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Ru; Chen, Jing; Yang, Zi-Jiao; Zhang, Hui-Jun; Fu, Yun-Ting; Shen, Yun; He, Pei-Cheng; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known regarding the relation between the severity of RBD and the different domains of cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was: (1) to investigate the domains of cognitive impairment in patients with PD and RBD, and (2) to explore risk factors for PD-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) and the relationship between RBD severity and impairment in different cognitive domains in PD. Methods: The participants were grouped as follows: PD without RBD (PD-RBD; n = 42), PD with RBD (PD + RBD; n = 32), idiopathic RBD (iRBD; n = 15), and healthy controls (HCs; n = 36). All participants completed a battery of neuropsychological assessment of attention and working memory, executive function, language, memory, and visuospatial function. The information of basic demographics, diseases and medication history, and motor and nonmotor manifestations was obtained and compared between PD-RBD and PD + RBD groups. Particular attention was paid to the severity of RBD assessed by the RBD Questionnaire-Hong Kong (RBDQ-HK) and the RBD Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ), then we further examined associations between the severity of RBD symptoms and cognitive levels via correlation analysis. Results: Compared to PD-RBD subjects, PD + RBD patients were more likely to have olfactory dysfunction and their Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores were higher (P < 0.05). During neuropsychological testing, PD + RBD patients performed worse than PD-RBD patients, including delayed memory function, especially. The MCI rates were 33%, 63%, 33%, and 8% for PD-RBD, PD + RBD, iRBD, and HC groups, respectively. RBD was an important factor for the PD-MCI variance (odds ratio = 5.204, P = 0.018). During correlation analysis, higher RBDSQ and RBDQ-HK scores were significantly associated with poorer performance on the Trail Making Test-B (errors

  10. Correlation Between Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Hung, Peir-Haur; Chung, Chi-Jung; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has been investigated in Western countries and identified to be associated with chronic pelvic pain and inflammation. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a complex syndrome that is significantly more prevalent in women than in men. Chronic pelvic pain is a main symptom of BPS/IC, and chronic inflammation is a major etiology of BPS/IC. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between BPS/IC and PID using a population-based dataset. We constructed a case–control study from the Taiwan National Health Insurance program. The case cohort comprised 449 patients with BPS/IC, and 1796 randomly selected subjects (about 1:4 matching) were used as controls. A Multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to estimate the association between BPS/IC and PID. Of the 2245 sampled subjects, a significant difference was observed in the prevalence of PID between BPS/IC cases and controls (41.7% vs 15.4%, P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) for PID among cases was 3.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.89–4.71). Furthermore, the ORs for PID among BPS/IC cases were 4.52 (95% CI: 2.55–8.01), 4.31 (95% CI: 2.91–6.38), 3.00 (95% CI: 1.82–4.94), and 5.35 (95% CI: 1.88–15.20) in the <35, 35–49, 50–64, and >65 years age groups, respectively, after adjusting for geographic region, irritable bowel syndrome, and hypertension. Joint effect was also noted, specifically when patients had both PID and irritable bowel disease with OR of 10.5 (95% CI: 4.88–22.50). This study demonstrated a correlation between PID and BPS/IC. Clinicians treating women with PID should be alert to BPS/IC-related symptoms in the population. PMID:26579800

  11. Domains and correlates of clinical balance impairment associated with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jesse V; Boyd, James T; Hogarth, Penelope; Horak, Fay B

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to (a) determine the domains of clinical balance impairments associated with Huntington's disease (HD), and (b) evaluate associations between balance test scores and other disease-related impairments. Eighteen subjects with genetically definite HD and 17 age-matched control subjects were evaluated on the Mini-BESTest for their clinical balance impairments as well as the Unified HD Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor and total functional capacity scales, Activity-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale-short form, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). Results showed that subjects with HD exhibited significantly lower total Mini-BESTest scores than subjects without HD (mean (95% CI)=76 (64-87)% with HD, 98 (96-99)% without HD; p=0.0011). Mini-BESTest item scores were significantly lower for subjects with HD on one-leg stance, postural responses, standing with eyes closed on foam, and dual-task timed up-and-go. Mini-BESTest scores significantly correlated with UHDRS motor (r(2)=0.68; p=0.00003) and total functional capacity (r(2)=0.75; p=0.000006) scores as well as with scores on the ABC short form (r(2)=0.45; p=0.0024), SDMT (r(2)=0.42; p=0.0036), and MoCA (r(2)=0.23; p=0.046) assessments. This study, therefore, demonstrates that balance impairments associated with HD span domains of anticipatory postural adjustments, postural responses, stance in challenging sensory conditions, and gait. Although preliminary, clinical balance impairment appears to be an efficient proxy evaluation of multiple HD-related factors due to associations with functional capacity, other motor impairments, balance confidence, and cognitive abilities. PMID:25797790

  12. Olfactory functions in patients with psoriasis vulgaris: correlations with the severity of the disease.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Ersin; Tekeli, Hakan; Karabacak, Ercan; Altunay, İlknur Kıvanç; Aydın, Çigdem; Çerman, Aslı Aksu; Altundağ, Aytuğ; Salihoğlu, Murat; Çayönü, Melih

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that psoriasis is not only limited to skin, but a systemic autoimmune disease with various comorbidities. Olfactory dysfunction, one of as a common but lesser known symptom of patients with autoimmune diseases, often presents with smell loss. The aim of this study was to assess the olfactory functions in patients with psoriasis and to compare with healthy controls. A total of 50 patients with psoriasis and 43 control subjects were included to the study. The clinical severity of psoriasis was calculated by psoriasis area and severity index (PASI). Patients were classified into two groups according to PASI score as mild (PASI ≤10) and moderate-severe (PASI >10). Olfactory function was evaluated with "Sniffin'Sticks" test. Total test scores (max. 48 points) of threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) were classified as normal olfaction = normosmia (>30.3 points), decreased olfaction = hyposmia (16.5-30.3 points) and loss of olfaction = anosmia (<16.5 points). Psoriasis patients had significantly lower smell scores compared with healthy controls (p < 0.001). Of the 50 psoriasis patients, 40 (80 %) were hyposmic. We found negative correlation between TDI and PASI (r = -0.34, p = 0.014). The TDI scores of the patients with moderate-severe psoriasis (PASI score >10) were found to be significantly lower than the patients with mild psoriasis (PASI ≤10) (p < 0.001). Olfactory dysfunction in patients with psoriasis could be thought as a comorbidity as in other inflammatory disorders. Physicians should be aware of olfactory impairment when evaluating psoriasis patients in their clinical practice. PMID:27299882

  13. Sphingolipid Metabolism Correlates with Cerebrospinal Fluid Beta Amyloid Levels in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fonteh, Alfred N.; Ormseth, Cora; Chiang, Jiarong; Cipolla, Matthew; Arakaki, Xianghong; Harrington, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a) total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b) levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c) three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but not impaired

  14. Prediction of Low versus High Recurrence Scores in Estrogen Receptor-Positive, Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Breast Cancer on the Basis of Radiologic-Pathologic Features: Comparison with Oncotype DX Test Recurrence Scores.

    PubMed

    Dialani, Vandana; Gaur, Shantanu; Mehta, Tejas S; Venkataraman, Shambhavi; Fein-Zachary, Valerie; Phillips, Jordana; Brook, Alexander; Slanetz, Priscilla J

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To review mammographic, ultrasonographic (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and pathologic characteristics of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, lymph node-negative invasive breast cancer and to determine the relationship of these characteristics to Oncotype DX (Genomic Health, Redwood City, Calif) test recurrence scores (ODRS) for breast cancer recurrence. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved retrospective study was performed in a single large academic medical center. The study population included patients with ER-positive, lymph node-negative invasive breast cancer who underwent genomic testing from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013. Imaging features of the tumor were classified according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon by breast imagers who were blinded to the ODRS. Mammography was performed in 86% of patients, US was performed in 84%, and MR imaging was performed in 33%, including morphologic and kinetic evaluation. Images from each imaging modality were evaluated. Each imaging finding, progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, and tumor grade were then individually correlated with ODRS. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences for each imaging feature. Regression analysis was used to calculate prediction of recurrence on the basis of imaging features combined with histopathologic features. Results The 319 patients had a mean age ± standard deviation of 55 years ± 8.7 (range, 31-82 years). Imaging features with a positive correlation with ODRS included a well-circumscribed oval mass (P = .024) at mammography, vascularity (P = .047) and posterior enhancement (P = .004) at US, and lobulated mass (P = .002) at MR imaging. Recurrence scores were predicted by using these features in combination with PR and HER2 status and tumor grade by using the threshold of more than 30 as a high recurrence score. With a regression tree, there

  15. Circulating tumor cells are correlated with disease progression and treatment response in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Fan, Zhichao; Wu, Xiufeng; Xu, Min; Jiang, Jiahao; Tan, Changjun; Wu, Weizhong; Wei, Xunbin; Zhou, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant tumor characterized by rapid progression, poor prognosis, and frequent hematogenous metastasis. A minimally invasive diagnostic biomarker that can predict disease progression and treatment response would be of extraordinary benefit. Therefore, we have investigated whether the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is correlated with disease progression and treatment response in HCC. Here we report that the number of CTCs, monitored by in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC), is strongly correlated with disease progression and treatment response in a highly metastatic orthotopic nude mouse model of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled HCC. Sorafenib treatment reduces the number of CTCs significantly. The decreased number of CTCs is consistent with low lung metastasis. This study has demonstrated a considerable clinical value of CTCs as a biomarker in predicting disease progression and monitoring therapeutic efficacy in patients with HCC. PMID:26355643

  16. Asymmetries of amyloid-β burden and neuronal dysfunction are positively correlated in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Frings, Lars; Hellwig, Sabine; Spehl, Timo S; Bormann, Tobias; Buchert, Ralph; Vach, Werner; Minkova, Lora; Heimbach, Bernhard; Klöppel, Stefan; Meyer, Philipp T

    2015-10-01

    Clinical Alzheimer's disease affects both cerebral hemispheres to a similar degree in clinically typical cases. However, in atypical variants like logopenic progressive aphasia, neurodegeneration often presents asymmetrically. Yet, no in vivo imaging study has investigated whether lateralized neurodegeneration corresponds to lateralized amyloid-β burden. Therefore, using combined (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, we explored whether asymmetric amyloid-β deposition in Alzheimer's disease is associated with asymmetric hypometabolism and clinical symptoms. From our database of patients who underwent positron emission tomography with both (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (n = 132), we included all amyloid-positive patients with prodromal or mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (n = 69). The relationship between (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding potential and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was assessed in atlas-based regions of interest covering the entire cerebral cortex. Lateralizations of amyloid-β and hypometabolism were tested for associations with each other and with type and severity of cognitive symptoms. Positive correlations between asymmetries of Pittsburgh compound B binding potential and hypometabolism were detected in 6 of 25 regions (angular gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, superior parietal gyrus, inferior and middle temporal gyrus), i.e. hypometabolism was more pronounced on the side of greater amyloid-β deposition (range: r = 0.41 to 0.53, all P < 0.001). Stronger leftward asymmetry of amyloid-β deposition was associated with more severe language impairment (P < 0.05), and stronger rightward asymmetry with more severe visuospatial impairment (at trend level, P = 0.073). Similarly, patients with predominance of language deficits showed more left-lateralized amyloid-β burden and hypometabolism than patients with predominant visuospatial impairment

  17. Supervised multi-view canonical correlation analysis: fused multimodal prediction of disease diagnosis and prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singanamalli, Asha; Wang, Haibo; Lee, George; Shih, Natalie; Rosen, Mark; Master, Stephen; Tomaszewski, John; Feldman, Michael; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    While the plethora of information from multiple imaging and non-imaging data streams presents an opportunity for discovery of fused multimodal, multiscale biomarkers, they also introduce multiple independent sources of noise that hinder their collective utility. The goal of this work is to create fused predictors of disease diagnosis and prognosis by combining multiple data streams, which we hypothesize will provide improved performance as compared to predictors from individual data streams. To achieve this goal, we introduce supervised multiview canonical correlation analysis (sMVCCA), a novel data fusion method that attempts to find a common representation for multiscale, multimodal data where class separation is maximized while noise is minimized. In doing so, sMVCCA assumes that the different sources of information are complementary and thereby act synergistically when combined. Although this method can be applied to any number of modalities and to any disease domain, we demonstrate its utility using three datasets. We fuse (i) 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features with cerbrospinal fluid (CSF) proteomic measurements for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (n = 30), (ii) 3T Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) MRI and T2w MRI for in vivo prediction of prostate cancer grade on a per slice basis (n = 33) and (iii) quantitative histomorphometric features of glands and proteomic measurements from mass spectrometry for prediction of 5 year biochemical recurrence postradical prostatectomy (n = 40). Random Forest classifier applied to the sMVCCA fused subspace, as compared to that of MVCCA, PCA and LDA, yielded the highest classification AUC of 0.82 +/- 0.05, 0.76 +/- 0.01, 0.70 +/- 0.07, respectively for the aforementioned datasets. In addition, sMVCCA fused subspace provided 13.6%, 7.6% and 15.3% increase in AUC as compared with that of the best performing individual view in each of the three datasets, respectively. For the biochemical recurrence

  18. Do executive dysfunction and freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease share the same neuroanatomical correlates?

    PubMed

    Brugger, Florian; Abela, Eugenio; Hägele-Link, Stefan; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Galovic, Marian; Kägi, Georg

    2015-09-15

    Current hypotheses postulate a relationship between executive dysfunction and freezing of gait (FOG) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Hitherto, most evidence comes from entirely clinical approaches, while knowledge about this relationship on the morphological level is sparse. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the overlap of gray matter atrophy associated with FOG and executive dysfunction in PD. We included 18 PD patients with FOG and 20 without FOG in our analysis. A voxel-based morphometry approach was used to reveal voxel clusters in the gray matter which were associated with FOG and executive dysfunction as measured by the Frontal Assessment Battery, respectively. Conjunction analysis was applied to detect overlaps of the associated patterns. FOG correlated with different cortical clusters in the frontal and parietal lobes, whereas those associated with the FAB scores were, although widespread, widely confined to the frontal lobe. Conjunction analysis revealed a significant cluster of gray matter loss in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We could show that the patterns of neurodegeneration associated with FOG and executive dysfunction (as measured by the FAB) share atrophic changes in the same cortical areas. However, there is also a considerable number of cortical areas where neurodegenerative changes are only unique for either sign. Particularly, the involvement of parietal lobe areas seems to be more specific for FOG. PMID:26159626

  19. Optimal control problem in correlation between smoking and epidemic of respiratory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldila, D.; Apri, M.

    2014-02-01

    Smoking appears to be a risk factor that may increase the number of different pulmonary infections. This link is likely to be mediated by smoking adverse effects on the respiratory defenses. A mathematical model to describe correlation between the number of smokers and its effect on the number of infected people suffer from respiratory disease like influenza is constructed in this paper. Promotion of healthy life is accounted in the model as an optimal control problem to reduce the number of smokers. In this work, the transition rates from smokers to non-smokers and from non-smokers to smokers are regarded as the control variables. Assuming the control variables are constant, equilibrium points of the model can be obtained analytically. The basic reproductive ratio as the endemic threshold is taken from the spectral radius of the next-generation matrix. Using numerical simulation, we show that the healthy life promotion can reduce the number of infected person significantly by reducing the number of smokers. Furthermore, different initial conditions to show different situations in the field are also simulated. It is shown that a large effort to increase the transition rate from smokers to non-smokers and to reduce the transition from non-smokers to smokers should be applied in the endemic reduction scenario.

  20. Urinary CYP Eicosanoid Excretion Correlates with Glomerular Filtration in African-Americans with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dreisbach, Albert W; Smith, Stanley V; Kyle, Patrick B; Ramaiah, Manjunath; Amenuke, Margaret; Garrett, Michael R; Lirette, Seth T; Griswold, Michael E; Roman, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA), i.e., 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), play an important role in the regulation of renal tubular and vascular function. The present study for the first time profiled HETEs and epoxygenase derived dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid diHETEs levels in spot urines and plasma in 262 African American patients from the University of Mississippi Chronic Kidney Disease Clinic and 31 African American controls. Significant correlations in eGFR and urinary 20-HETE/creatinine and 19-HETE/ creatinine levels were observed. The eGFR increased by 17.47 [p=0.001] and 60.68 [(p=0.005] ml/min/ for each ng/mg increase in 20-HETE and 19-HETE levels, respectively. Similar significant positive associations were found between the other urinary eicosanoids and eGFR and also with 19-HETE/urine creatinine concentration and proteinuria. We found that approximately 80% of plasma HETEs and 30% diHETEs were glucuronidated and the fractional excretion of 20-HETE was less than 1%. These results suggest that there is a significant hepatic source of urinary 20-HETE glucuronide and EETs with extensive renal biotransformation to metabolites which may play a role in the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:25151892

  1. Structural MRI Correlates of Episodic Memory Processes in Parkinson’s Disease Without Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pirogovsky-Turk, Eva; Filoteo, J. Vincent; Litvan, Irene; Harrington, Deborah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Changes in episodic memory are common early in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and may be a risk factor for future cognitive decline. Although medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory and frontostriatal (FS) executive systems are thought to play different roles in distinct components of episodic memory impairment in PD, no study has investigated whether different aspects of memory functioning are differentially associated with MTL and FS volumes in nondemented patients without mild cognitive impairment (PD-woMCI). Objectives The present study investigated MRI markers of different facets of memory functioning in 48 PD-woMCI patients and 42 controls. Methods Regional volumes were measured in structures comprising the MTL and FS systems and then correlated with key indices of memory from the California Verbal Learning Test. Results In PD-woMCI patients, memory was impaired only for verbal learning, which was not associated with executive, attention/working memory, or visuospatial functioning. Despite an absence of cortical atrophy, smaller right MTL volumes in patients were associated with poorer verbal learning, long delayed free recall, long delayed cued recall, and recognition memory hits and false positives. Smaller right pars triangularis (inferior frontal) volumes were also associated with poorer long delayed cued recall and recognition memory hits. These relationships were not found in controls. Conclusions The findings indicate that MTL volumes are sensitive to subtle changes in almost all facets of memory in PD-woMCI, whereas FS volumes are sensitive only to memory performances in cued-testing formats. PMID:26577652

  2. The neural correlates of spatial and object working memory in elderly and Parkinson's disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Silvia P; Siri, Chiara; Guidi, Lucia; Antonini, Angelo; Perani, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    This fMRI study deals with the neural correlates of spatial and objects working memory (SWM and OWM) in elderly subjects (ESs) and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). Normal aging and IPD can be associated with a WM decline. In IPD population, some studies reported similar SWM and OWM deficits; others reported a greater SWM than OWM impairment. In the present fMRI research, we investigated whether compensated IPD patients and elderly subjects with comparable performance during the execution of SWM and OWM tasks would present differences in WM-related brain activations. We found that the two groups recruited a prevalent left frontoparietal network when performing the SWM task and a bilateral network during OWM task execution. More specifically, the ESs showed bilateral frontal and subcortical activations in SWM, at difference with the IPD patients who showed a strict left lateralized network, consistent with frontostriatal degeneration in IPD. The overall brain activation in the IPD group was more extended as number of voxels with respect to ESs, suggesting underlying compensatory mechanisms. In conclusion, notwithstanding comparable WM performance, the two groups showed consistencies and differences in the WM activated networks. The latter underline the compensatory processes of normal typical and pathological aging. PMID:25861157

  3. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Multimodality Imaging Approach with Clinical-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Revzin, Margarita V; Mathur, Mahan; Dave, Haatal B; Macer, Matthew L; Spektor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a common medical problem, with almost 1 million cases diagnosed annually. Historically, PID has been a clinical diagnosis supplemented with the findings from ultrasonography (US) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, the diagnosis of PID can be challenging because the clinical manifestations may mimic those of other pelvic and abdominal processes. Given the nonspecific clinical manifestations, computed tomography (CT) is commonly the first imaging examination performed. General CT findings of early- and late-stage PID include thickening of the uterosacral ligaments, pelvic fat stranding with obscuration of fascial planes, reactive lymphadenopathy, and pelvic free fluid. Recognition of these findings, as well as those seen with cervicitis, endometritis, acute salpingitis, oophoritis, pyosalpinx, hydrosalpinx, tubo-ovarian abscess, and pyometra, is crucial in allowing prompt and accurate diagnosis. Late complications of PID include tubal damage resulting in infertility and ectopic pregnancy, peritonitis caused by uterine and/or tubo-ovarian abscess rupture, development of peritoneal adhesions resulting in bowel obstruction and/or hydroureteronephrosis, right upper abdominal inflammation (Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome), and septic thrombophlebitis. Recognition of these late manifestations at CT can also aid in proper patient management. At CT, careful assessment of common PID mimics, such as endometriosis, adnexal torsion, ruptured hemorrhagic ovarian cyst, adnexal neoplasms, appendicitis, and diverticulitis, is important to avoid misinterpretation, delay in management, and unnecessary surgery. Correlation with the findings from complementary imaging examinations, such as US and MR imaging, is useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618331

  4. Oxysterols and Parkinson's disease: evidence that levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol in cerebrospinal fluid correlates with the duration of the disease.

    PubMed

    Björkhem, Ingemar; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Leoni, Valerio; Meaney, Steve; Brodin, Lovisa; Salveson, Lisette; Winge, Kristian; Pålhagen, Sven; Svenningsson, Per

    2013-10-25

    Oxysterols are important for cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and may be affected in neurodegenerative diseases. The levels of the brain-derived oxysterol 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) have been reported to be markedly reduced in the circulation of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Lee et al., Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11 (2009) 407-420). The finding is surprising in view of the fact that other neurodegenerative diseases are associated with relatively modest effects on the circulating levels of 24S-OH. We determined the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of 24S-OH and 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OH) in patients with PD with different disease duration using a highly accurate method based on isotope dilution-mass spectrometry. All the patients had plasma levels of the different oxysterols within the normal range. When analyzing CSF, 10% of the PD patients were found to have levels of 24S-OH above the cut-off level and interestingly there was a significant correlation between levels of 24S-OH in CSF and duration of the disease (r=0.40, P<0.05). The CSF level of 27-OH was found to be above the cut-off level in 10% of the patients, indicating a defect blood-brain barrier function. There was no correlation between levels of 27-OH in CSF and duration of the disease. These data indicates that oxysterol levels in CSF may be of value to follow disease progression. PMID:24035896

  5. Growth Patterns of Clostridium difficile - Correlations with Strains, Binary Toxin and Disease Severity: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Tschudin-Sutter, Sarah; Braissant, Olivier; Erb, Stefan; Stranden, Anne; Bonkat, Gernot; Frei, Reno; Widmer, Andreas F

    2016-01-01

    A broad spectrum of symptoms has been associated with C. difficile infection (CDI). Several studies indicate that toxin-production correlates with growth rates of C. difficile. This study aimed to correlate growth rates of C. difficile with disease severity and strain characteristics. From 01/2003 to 10/2011, strains from a prospective cohort of all inpatients with CDI at the University Hospital Basel, Switzerland were analyzed regarding binary toxin, presence of the tcdC deletion and ribotype. Isothermal microcalorimetry was performed to determine growth rates, quantified by the Gompertz function. Ordered logistic regression models were used to correlate disease severity with strain features and clinical characteristics. Among 199 patients, 31 (16%) were infected with binary toxin-producing strains, of which the tcdC gene-deletion nt117 was detected in 9 (4%). Disease severity was classified as mild in 130 patients (65.3%), as severe in 59 patients (29.7%) and as severe/complicated in 10 patients (5.0%). Growth rates were inversely associated with disease severity in univariable (OR 0.514, 95%CI 0.29-0.91, p = 0.023) and multivariable analyses (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.26-0.97, p = 0.040). While none of the strain characteristics such as presence of the tcdC gene deletion or binary toxin predicted CDI severity, growth rates were inversely correlated with disease severity. Further investigations are needed to analyze growth-regulators and respective correlations with the level of toxin production in C. difficile, which may be important determinants of disease severity. PMID:27598309

  6. Correlation between optical coherence tomography-derived assessments of lower tear meniscus parameters and clinical features of dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Pho; Huang, David; Li, Yan; Sadda, Srinivas R.; Ramos, Sylvia; Pappuru, Rajeev R.; Yiu, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To measure the correlation between subjective symptom score, conventional clinical tests, and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) of lower tear meniscus parameters in patients with dry eye disease. Methods Eighteen patients with dry eye disease requiring medical therapy and/or punctal occlusion were recruited for this prospective, nonrandomized, observational case series. Severity of symptoms of dry eye disease was assessed using the Indiana Dry Eye Questionnaire 2002. Clinical assessments were completed using slit-lamp biomicroscopy, rose bengal dye staining, fluorescein tear break-up time (TBUT), and 5-minute Schirmer’s test with topical anesthesia. The lower tear meniscus was imaged using a FD-OCT system with 5-μm axial resolution and measured manually by a masked grader using computer calipers. Correlation was assessed using Spearman’s correlation coefficient (ρ). Results The mean scaled symptom score was 58 ± 21 (±SD), with a range of 0 to 100. Vital staining test averaged 1.7 ± 3.4, TBUT averaged 4.4 ± 1.8 seconds, and Schirmer’s tests averaged 10.2 ± 8.1 mm. As determined by OCT, the meniscus height was 228 ± 153 μm, depth was 127 ± 79 μm, and cross-sectional area was 0.018 ± 0.021 mm2. OCT meniscus area was negatively correlated with the symptom questionnaire score (P < 0.01) and positively correlated with Schirmer’s test results (P < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between symptom score and rose bengal staining, TBUT, or Schirmer’s test results (P > 0.01). Conclusions Lower tear meniscus measurement with FD-OCT is an objective, noninvasive test that correlates well with symptoms of dry eye disease and the Schirmer’s test. PMID:22378111

  7. Increased expression of low density granulocytes in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients correlates with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Midgley, A; Beresford, M W

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils are implicated in a wide range of non-infectious inflammatory conditions. A subset of neutrophils in the peripheral circulation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been described and termed low density granulocytes (LDGs). This study investigates the expression of LDG in juvenile-onset SLE (JSLE) patients compared to controls, and any correlations with disease activity.Neutrophils and LDGs were isolated from JSLE (n = 13) and paediatric non-inflammatory control patients (n = 12). Cell populations were assessed and compared using flow cytometry and morphological analysis. Standard clinical data, which included disease activity markers/scores, were collected for each patient.Significantly increased LDG expression (%mean ± SEM, range) was observed in JSLE patients (10.4 ± 3.26, 3.41-36.3) compared to controls (2.4 ± 0.44, 0.36-5.27; p = 0.005). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between LDG expression and the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (correlation coefficient 0.685; p = 0.010) and SLE Disease Activity Index (correlation coefficient 0.567; p = 0.043) and the biomarker of dsDNA-antibodies (correlation coefficient 0.590; p = 0.043).Here we observe increased expression in LDGs in JSLE patients, which correlate with dsDNA antibody concentration and scores of disease activity. These correlations indicate that the increased LDG expression observed in this study may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of JSLE, and may be a useful biomarker. PMID:26453665

  8. Quality of life of dogs with skin disease and of their owners. Part 2: administration of a questionnaire in various skin diseases and correlation to efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Noli, Chiara; Colombo, Silvia; Cornegliani, Luisa; Ghibaudo, Giovanni; Persico, Paola; Vercelli, Antonella; Galzerano, Mario

    2011-08-01

    A previously validated 15-item questionnaire on dogs' life quality (QoL1) and that of their owners (QoL2) was applied in a multicentre study to owners of 200 dogs with different dermatological conditions, together with a question on the owner-perceived disease severity (S). Factor analysis was applied to the whole questionnaire. The correlation of S with QoL1 and QoL2 scores was evaluated using Spearman's rank correlation tests. Owner sex, age, educational level and willingness to pay for a potential definitive cure of the disease were recorded, and compared with quality of life (QoL) scores. In 23 atopic dogs, CADESI-03, pruritus Visual Analogue Scale and QoL scores were obtained before and after therapy, and their correlation was evaluated with linear regression. Factor analysis revealed that three factors (S, QoL1 and QoL2) explained 75% of the variance. Owner-perceived severity correlated significantly with QoL1 and QoL2 (P = 0.002 and P = 0.015, respectively). The five diseases with the worst QoL scores were scabies, pododermatitis, complicated atopic dermatitis, pemphigus foliaceus and endocrine alopecia. Pruritic diseases did not give significantly higher QoL1 or QoL2 scores compared with nonpruritic diseases (P = 0.19, Kruskall-Wallis test). Owner sex, age or educational level did not influence QoL scores. Female sex, a younger age and a higher educational level were significantly associated with more willingness to pay. In atopic dogs, all the scores decreased after therapy, but post-treatment CADESI-03 and Visual Analogue Scale scores did not correlate with QoL1 and QoL2. Questions related to the burden of maintenance therapy showed the lowest improvements in score. PMID:21435044

  9. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) resistance to columnaris disease is heritable and favorably correlated with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease (CD), caused by Flabobacterium columnare, is an emerging disease affecting rainbow trout aquaculture. Objectives of this study were to 1) estimate heritability of innate CD resistance in a rainbow trout line (ARS-Fp-R) previously selected four generations for improved bacterial co...

  10. The ratio of N-acetyl aspartate to glutamate correlates with disease duration of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Abe, Takashi; Izumi, Yuishin; Harada, Masafumi; Kaji, Ryuji

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate (Glu)-induced excitotoxicity has been implicated in the neuronal loss of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To test the hypothesis that Glu in the primary motor cortex contributes to disease severity and/or duration, the Glu level was investigated using MR spectroscopy. Seventeen patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were diagnosed according to the El Escorial criteria for suspected, possible, probable or definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and enrolled in this cross-sectional study. We measured metabolite concentrations, including N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine, choline, inositol, Glu and glutamine, and performed partial correlation between each metabolite concentration or NAA/Glu ratio and disease severity or duration using age as a covariate. Considering our hypothesis that Glu is associated with neuronal cell death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we investigated the ratio of NAA to Glu, and found a significant correlation between NAA/Glu and disease duration (r=-0.574, p=0.02). The "suspected" amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients showed the same tendency as possible, probable and definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in regard to correlation of NAA/Glu ratio with disease duration. The other metabolites showed no significant correlation. Our findings suggested that glutamatergic neurons are less vulnerable compared to other neurons and this may be because inhibitory receptors are mainly located presynaptically, which supports the notion of Glu-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:26765768

  11. Correlations Between the Incidence of National Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Public Open Data, Including Meteorological Factors and Medical Facility Resources

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jin-Hwa; Lee, Ji-Hae; Je, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Myeong-Ji; Bae, Young Mee; Son, Hyeon Seok; Ahn, Insung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the incidence of national notifiable infectious diseases (NNIDs) and meteorological factors, air pollution levels, and hospital resources in Korea. Methods: We collected and stored 660 000 pieces of publicly available data associated with infectious diseases from public data portals and the Diseases Web Statistics System of Korea. We analyzed correlations between the monthly incidence of these diseases and monthly average temperatures and monthly average relative humidity, as well as vaccination rates, number of hospitals, and number of hospital beds by district in Seoul. Results: Of the 34 NNIDs, malaria showed the most significant correlation with temperature (r=0.949, p<0.01) and concentration of nitrogen dioxide (r=-0.884, p<0.01). We also found a strong correlation between the incidence of NNIDs and the number of hospital beds in 25 districts in Seoul (r=0.606, p<0.01). In particular, Geumcheon-gu was found to have the lowest incidence rate of NNIDs and the highest number of hospital beds per patient. Conclusions: In this study, we conducted a correlational analysis of public data from Korean government portals that can be used as parameters to forecast the spread of outbreaks. PMID:26265666

  12. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Hwang, Jinha; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP)-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located -374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1 expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the -374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI patients and control

  13. Correlation of Clinico-pathological Classification of Hansen's Disease in a South Indian City.

    PubMed

    Lobo, A C; Pai, R R; Gautam, K; Kuruvila, M

    2014-01-01

    Hansen's Disease (HD) presents itself in different forms depending on the individual's immune status, and based on this Ridley-Jopling classified the disease into five sub-groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of histopathology and bacteriological index (BI) in accurate staging of HD with clinical correlation. Fifty HD patients with clinical diagnosis confirmed by histopathology were included. Patients in reaction and on treatment were excluded. Case records and histopathological slides were viewed and BI was recorded. In 10/50 cases, a diagnosis of HD was made or suspected, but were not clinically classified. In these, histopathology proved useful in diagnosis and classification. Indeterminate HD was the most common histopathological diagnosis (6 cases). The remaining 40 patients, were clinically classified using the Ridley-Jopling classification, as Indeterminate Leprosy (IL) in 10/40 (25%), Tuberculoid Leprosy (TT) 5/40 (12.5%), Borderline Tuberculoid (BT) 16/40 (40%), Borderline Lepromatous (BL) 4/40 (10%) and Lepromatous Leprosy (LL) 5 (12.5%). HD was common in males with male to female ratio of 1.66:1 and affected the younger individuals (maximum in 21 to 30 years). On histopathology BT was the most common type (40%) followed by IL (27.5%), BL (12.5%), TT (10%) and LL (10%). No case of Mid-Borderline (BB) type was diagnosed clinically or histopathologically. Overall concordance between clinical and histopathological diagnosis was 65% (26/40 cases) and for each type was IL = 80%, TT = 20%, BT = 75%, BL = 50% and LL = 60%. Where classification seemed difficult as in cases of BT and BL, II played an important role. The overall concordance between clinical classification and histopathological diagnosis of DO is 65% in this study. Th *discordance that is observed is between BT and TT, the paucibacillary type and BL andILL the multibacillary type and hence the treatment is not affected. Overall, IL was a common diagnosis on histopathology in this

  14. Correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Ying; Wang, Min; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Gao, Lang; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yin, Teng-Fei

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric diseases and colorectal neoplasia. METHODS: Patients included in this study underwent a colonoscopy and esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) along with histopathological measurement between March 2012 and March 2015 at Qi-Lu Hospital of Shandong University, who also had results of H. pylori detection. A total of 233 cases were selected. Demographic data, H. pylori infection status (including results of rapid urease tests and gastric mucosa pathological examinations) and histopathological examination results of gastric and colorectal mucosa were gathered and analyzed. The statistical analysis focused on the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms among patients with various histopathological categories of the stomach. ORs and their 95%CI were calculated to describe the strengths of the associations. RESULTS: The incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIEN) (OR = 2.400, 95%CI: 0.969-5.941), adenoma with HGIEN (5.333, 1.025-27.758) and adenocarcinoma (1.455, 0.382-5.543) were all higher for patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis than for those in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma with HGIEN (3.218, 0.767-13.509) was higher in patients with intestinal metaplasia than in the control group, while the incidence rates of adenoma without HGIEN (0.874, 0.414-1.845) and adenocarcinoma (0.376, 0.096-1.470) were lower in the intestinal metaplasia group than in the control group. The incidence rate of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (3.111, 1.248-7.753) was significantly higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group than in the control group, while the rates of adenoma with HGIEN (1.481, 0.138-15.941) and adenocarcinoma (2.020, 0.561-7.272) were higher in the gastric intraepithelial neoplasia group. Incidence rates of colorectal adenoma without HGIEN (1.067, 0.264-4.314), adenoma with HGIEN (2.667, 0

  15. Correlations of lung morphology, pulmonary vascular resistance, and outcome in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bush, A; Busst, C M; Haworth, S G; Hislop, A A; Knight, W B; Corrin, B; Shinebourne, E A

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular resistance was measured in air, oxygen, and after administration of vasodilators in 14 children with pulmonary hypertension and congenital heart disease. Lung morphology was examined by light microscopy and assessed quantitatively. In this selected group of patients (a) medial muscle thickness of greater than 20% in the intra-acinar arteries and Heath-Edwards changes of I or II were significantly associated with perioperative death from pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery; (b) children with lower percentage medial muscle thickness had a higher baseline resistance (r = -0.84) associated with Heath-Edwards grade III or higher changes (most of these patients were not offered corrective surgery); (c) when the lowest pulmonary vascular resistance was less than 3 units, Heath-Edwards grading was I or II (n = 4). When the pulmonary vascular resistance was greater than 6 units, however, there was no direct correlation with Heath-Edwards grading (n = 9). Four patients with a resistance of greater than 6 units had only grade I or II changes. Three had a medial muscle thickness above 20%, and were among those who died at or soon after operation. It is concluded that (a) patients with a lowest pulmonary vascular resistance of greater than 6 units have a bad prognosis whatever their lung morphology; and (b) some patients with Heath-Edwards grade I or II will have a high resistance (this group has a high medial muscle mass and a poor prognosis and would not be detected by Heath-Edwards grading alone). PMID:3370183

  16. Prevalence and correlates of Willis-Ekbom's disease/restless legs syndrome in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bathla, Nitik; Ahmad, Sohaib; Gupta, Ravi; Ahmad, Shahbaj

    2016-01-01

    Willis-Ekbom's disease/restless legs syndrome (WED/RLS) has been described in subjects undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Different studies have reported varying prevalence rates and different factors associated with this condition; however, the results are inconsistent. Thus, this study was conducted to assess the prevalence of WED/RLS in patients undergoing HD. Another aim of the study was to identify if any comorbidities or biochemical factors were associated with this condition. A total of 194 adult patients undergoing maintenance HD were included in this study. They were screened for WED/RLS using International RLS Study Group criteria on the face-to-face interview and clinical examination. Most recent laboratory parameters were gathered from the medical records. In addition, seroreactivity to hepatitis B and C was also recorded. The mean age of all the subjects included in the study was 54.4 ± 15 years (range: 18-92 years); 58.2% were males. The mean duration on HD was 36.6 ± 19.3 months. WED/RLS was seen in 5.2% of the study subjects. Subjects with and without WED/RLS were comparable with regard to gender (P = 0.23), adequacy of dialysis (P = 0.82), shift of dialysis (P = 0.93), presence of diabetes mellitus (P = 0.91), hypertension (P = 0.26), smoking (P = 0.22), alcohol use (P = 0.45), and reactivity to hepatitis C (P = 0.19) and hepatitis B (P = 0.80), as well as various hematological and biochemical parameters. The prevalence of WED/RLS of 5% in the HD group was higher than in the general population. However, this study could not find any correlation between RLS and any biochemical parameters or comorbidities. This is an important area to be considered in future and requires more work with larger sample size. PMID:27424684

  17. Hyperuricemia Inversely Correlates with Disease Severity in Taiwanese Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jee-Fu; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Yu, Ming-Lung; Huang, Chung-Feng; Dai, Chia-Yen; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Ching-I; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Chern; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Asians are more susceptible to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) as well as metabolic disorder than other ethnicities. We aimed to assess the interaction between metabolic factors and fibrosis in Taiwanese NASH patients. Methods A total of 130 biopsy-proven Taiwanese NASH patients (94 males, age = 43.0 ± 13.0 years) were consecutively enrolled. Their demographic, metabolic profiles and histopathological manifestations were analyzed. Results Twenty-four (18.5%) NASH patients were non-obese. Thirty-three (25.4%) patients had significant fibrosis (F2) or more: 22 (16.9%) patients were of F2, whilst 11 (8.5%) patients were of advanced fibrosis (F3-4). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and hypertension were 60.8%, 39.4%, and 61.5%, respectively. There was a significant inverse correlation between hyperuricemia and fibrosis stages, ranging from 48.4% of F0-1, 33.3% of F2, and 9.1% of F3-4, respectively (P = 0.01, linear trend). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a decreased serum albumin level (OR = 40.0, 95% CI = 4.5–300, P = 0.001) and normal uric acid level (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.5–21.7, P = 0.01) were the significant factors associated with significant fibrosis. Conclusions Hyperuricemia inversely predicts fibrosis stages. Females might carry a more disease severity than males in Taiwanese NASH patients. PMID:26441244

  18. Mother-daughter correlation of central obesity and other noncommunicable disease risk factors: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Zahra; Hosseinpanah, Farhad; Barzin, Maryam; Safarkhani, Maryam; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mother-daughter correlation for central obesity and other noncommunicable disease risk factors. The authors used metabolic and anthropometric data from the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, enrolling 1041 mother-daughter pairs for the current study. Three age strata were defined: 3 to 9 years for childhood (146 mother-daughter pairs), 10 to 17 years for adolescence (395 mother-daughter pairs), and 18 to 25 years for early adulthood (500 mother-daughter pairs). Familial associations for central obesity and other noncommunicable disease risk factors were assessed. The prevalence of central obesity was 44.7% in mothers and 11.2% in daughters (6.2% in the 3-9, 19.2% in the 10-17, and 6.4% in the 18-25 years groups). Mothers with central obesity were more likely than nonobese mothers to have daughters with central obesity (10.5% and 1.7%, respectively; P = .0001). Central obesity indices among daughters were positively correlated with those of their mothers in all 3 age strata. Correlations for other noncommunicable disease risk factors were analyzed before and after adjusting the risk factor levels for mothers' and daughters' waist circumferences (WCs) within each group to determine whether risk factor correlations were, in part, a result of the central obesity correlations. After the non-communicable disease risk factor levels of participants were adjusted for their WCs, the mother-daughter correlations remained significant. The consistent association of central obesity between mothers and daughters may indicate the key role that could be played by the mother in the primary prevention of central obesity, particularly in high-risk families. PMID:22500034

  19. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages. Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I. Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = −0.76, BUN: r = −0.72, and cystatin C: r = −0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603–0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746–0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P

  20. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages.Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I.Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = -0.76, BUN: r = -0.72, and cystatin C: r = -0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603-0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746-0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P = 0.811, and e

  1. Inheritance of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss spleen size and correlation with bacterial cold water disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious disease causes substantial loss in aquaculture and selective breeding for increased innate resistance offers an attractive strategy for controlling disease. In 2005, the NCCCWA implemented a selective breeding program to increase rainbow trout survival following challenge with Flavobacte...

  2. Clinicopathologic Correlations in a Large Alzheimer Disease Center Autopsy Cohort: Neuritic Plaques and Neurofibrillary Tangles “Do Count” When Staging Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Liu, Huaichen; Davis, Daron G.; Mendiondo, Marta S.; Abner, Erin L.; Markesbery, William R.

    2011-01-01

    There is uncertainty regarding the association of cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease (AD) with classic histopathologic features—neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and “neuritic” amyloid plaques (NPs). This uncertainty fuels doubts about the diagnostic importance of NFTs and NPs and leads to confusion regarding hypotheses of AD pathogenesis. Three hundred ninety subjects who underwent longitudinal premortem clinical workup and postmortem quantitative neuropathologic assessment served as the group to address this issue. Subjects with concomitant brain disease(s) were analyzed independently to more accurately assess the contribution of distinct pathologies to cognitive decline. More than 60% of patients of all age groups had important non-AD brain pathologies. However, subjects without superimposed brain diseases showed strong correlations between AD-type pathology counts (NFTs > NPs) and premortem Mini-Mental State Examination scores. The observed correlation was stronger in isocortex than in allocortex and was maintained across age groups including patients older than 90 years. A theoretical model is proposed in which our results are interpreted to support the “amyloid cascade hypothesis” of AD pathogenesis. Our data show that there are many important contributory causes to cognitive decline in older persons. However, NFTs and NPs should not be dismissed as irrelevant in AD based on clinicopathologic correlation. PMID:18090922

  3. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Anastasia; De Stefanis, Cristiano; Stronati, Laura; Franchitto, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Onori, Paolo; De Vito, Rita; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production. PMID:27310371

  4. Childhood atopic dermatitis-Brain-derived neurotrophic factor correlates with serum eosinophil cationic protein and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Fölster-Holst, R; Papakonstantinou, E; Rüdrich, U; Buchner, M; Pite, H; Gehring, M; Kapp, A; Weidinger, S; Raap, U

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that neurotrophins including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD). BDNF is increased in the serum samples of adults with AD. Interestingly, eosinophils of these patients can release and produce BDNF. We analyzed BDNF serum levels with ELISA and their correlation with SCORAD score, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), total IgE, IL-4, IL-13 and IL-31 in children with AD (n = 56) compared to nonatopic healthy children (n = 25). In addition, we analyzed FLG loss-of-function mutations in 17 children with AD and their connection to BDNF. BDNF serum levels were significantly higher in children with AD. Further, BDNF correlated with disease activity, serum ECP, and total IgE serum levels in AD. There was no difference in BDNF levels of filaggrin-positive or filaggrin-negative children with AD, and there was no correlation of BDNF with IL-31 and Th2 cytokines including IL-4 and IL-13. Together, our data add new insights into the pathophysiology of AD, suggesting that serum BDNF which correlates with disease severity contributes to the regulation of inflammation in an eosinophil-, but not Th2-dependent manner. PMID:27087278

  5. Correlation of Promis Scales and Clinical Measures Among Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients With and Without Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Debra E.; Atwood, Charles A.; Hays, Ron D.; Spritzer, Karen; Liu, Honghu; Donohue, James F.; Leidy, Nancy Kline; Yount, Susan E.; DeWalt, Darren A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) initiative was developed to advance the methodology of PROs applicable to chronic diseases. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive chronic disease associated with poor health. This study was designed to examine the correlation of PROMIS health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scales and clinical measures among COPD patients. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was conducted comparing patients who were stable (n = 100) with those currently experiencing a COPD exacerbation (n=85). All PROMIS measures for adults available at the time of the study (2008), disease-targeted and other HRQOL instruments, health literacy, percent predicted FEV1, and a 6-minute walk distance were assessed when patients were considered clinically stable. Results Stable COPD patients reported significantly (p≤0.05) better health-related quality of life on PROMIS domains than patients experiencing an exacerbation. PROMIS domain scores were significantly (p≤0.01) correlated with each of legacy measures. Six-minute walk scores were most highly correlated with the PROMIS physical function domain scores (r=0.53) followed by the fatigue (r=-0.26), social (r=0.24) and to a lesser extent depression (r=-0.23) and anxiety (r=-0.22) domain scores. Percent predicted FEV1 score was significantly associated with PROMIS physical function scores (r=0.27). Conclusion This study provides support for the validity of the PROMIS measures in COPD patients. PMID:25307510

  6. Correlating Cognitive Decline with White Matter Lesion and Brain Atrophy MRI Measurements in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bilello, Michel; Doshi, Jimit; Nabavizadeh, S. Ali; Toledo, Jon B.; Erus, Guray; Xie, Sharon X.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Han, Xiaoyan; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular risk factors are increasingly recognized as risks factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and early conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. While neuroimaging research in AD has focused on brain atrophy, metabolic function or amyloid deposition, little attention has been paid to the effect of cerebrovascular disease to cognitive decline. Objective To investigate the correlation of brain atrophy and white matter lesions with cognitive decline in AD, MCI, and control subjects. Methods Patients with AD and MCI, and healthy subjects were included in this study. Subjects had a baseline MRI scan, and baseline and follow-up neuropsychological battery (CERAD). Regional volumes were measured, and white matter lesion segmentation was performed. Correlations between rate of CERAD score decline and white matter lesion load and brain structure volume were evaluated. In addition, voxel-based correlations between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy and white matter lesion measures were computed. Results CERAD rate of decline was most significantly associated with lesion loads located in the fornices. Several temporal lobe ROI volumes were significantly associated with CERAD decline. Voxel-based analysis demonstrated strong correlation between baseline CERAD scores and atrophy measures in the anterior temporal lobes. Correlation of baseline CERAD scores with white matter lesion volumes achieved significance in multilobar subcortical white matter. Conclusion Both baseline and declines in CERAD scores correlate with white matter lesion load and gray matter atrophy. Results of this study highlight the dominant effect of volume loss, and underscore the importance of small vessel disease as a contributor to cognitive decline in the elderly. PMID:26402108

  7. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width is Independently Correlated With Diurnal QTc Variation in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanmin; Xiao, Qiang; Zeng, Wei; Guo, Huimei; Jiang, Ke; Zhong, Ming; Zhong, Jingquan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and diurnal corrected QT (QTc) variation in patients with coronary heart disease. This retrospective study included 203 patients who underwent coronary angiography between February 2013 and June 2014. RDW values and dynamic electrocardiography (Holter) results were collected to investigate the relationship between RDW and diurnal QTc variation. Patients were separated into three groups (A, B, and C) by binning their RDW values in an ascending order. RDW values, coronary artery scores and diurnal QTc variations were significantly different among these groups (P < 0.05). While coronary artery scores gradually rose with increased RDW, diurnal QTc variation decreased. Pearson's correlation analysis was applied to control for confounding factors, and multiple correlation analysis showed that coronary artery score was positively correlated with RDW (r = 0.130, P = 0.020), while it was not correlated with the diurnal QTc variation (r = −0.226, P = 0.681). RDW was negatively correlated with diurnal QTc variation (r = −0.197, P = 0.035). RDW is independently associated with diurnal QTc variation in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26061304

  8. [Possible correlations between periodontitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Martos, Renáta; Márton, Ildikó

    2011-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex, multifactorial inflammatory disease of the airways and the pulmonary parenchyme, caused by infection, air pollution and particles. 4-7% of the adult population is involved. COPD is the 4th-6th common cause of death throughout the world. The main aetiological factor is smoking. Bacteria, such as bacteria from the oral cavity, could play a keyrole in the progression of the disease. Epidemiologic studies have noted a relationship between poor oral hygiene or periodontal bone loss and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The prevalence and mortality of the disease is increasing worldwide, the treatment is expensive, the efficiency of the present pharmacotherapy is poor, so the importance of prevention should be increasing. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are prone to frequent exacerbations which are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This review is a short summary of studies about the possible relationship between periodontitis and COPD. PMID:22039714

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease activity assessed by fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin: correlation with laboratory parameters, clinical, endoscopic and histological indexes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Research has shown that fecal biomarkers are useful to assess the activity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of the study is: to evaluate the efficacy of the fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin as indicators of inflammatory activity. Findings A total of 78 patients presenting inflammatory bowel disease were evaluated. Blood tests, the Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), Mayo Disease Activity Index (MDAI), and Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS) were used for the clinical and endoscopic evaluation. Two tests were performed on the fecal samples, to check the levels of calprotectin and lactoferrin. The performance of these fecal markers for detection of inflammation with reference to endoscopic and histological inflammatory activity was assessed and calculated sensitivity, specificity, accuracy. A total of 52 patient's samples whose histological evaluations showed inflammation, 49 were lactoferrin-positive, and 40 were calprotectin-positive (p = 0.000). Lactoferrin and calprotectin findings correlated with C-reactive protein in both the CD and UC groups (p = 0.006; p = 0.000), with CDAI values (p = 0.043; 0.010), CDEIS values in DC cases (p = 0,000; 0.000), and with MDAI values in UC cases (p = 0.000). Conclusion Fecal lactoferrin and calprotectin are highly sensitive and specific markers for detecting intestinal inflammation. Levels of fecal calprotectin have a proportional correlation to the degree of inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. PMID:19874614

  10. Osteopontin is increased in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease and its levels correlate with cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Comi, Cristoforo; Carecchio, Miryam; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Nicola, Stefania; Galimberti, Daniela; Fenoglio, Chiara; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Monaco, Francesco; Scarpini, Elio; Dianzani, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is believed to play a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Osteopontin (OPN) is a molecule involved in macrophage recruitment and activation and implicated in neurodegeneration. In order to elucidate the role of OPN in AD, we evaluated its levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 67 AD patients, 46 frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients, and 69 controls. We found that OPN levels: i) are significantly increased in the CSF of AD patients; ii) correlate with MMSE score; and iii) are higher in the early disease phases ( 2 years). These findings support a role of OPN in AD pathogenesis. PMID:20308780