Science.gov

Sample records for diseases

  1. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Gum Disease KidsHealth > Teens > Diseases & Conditions > Mouth & Teeth > Gum ... which is both embarrassing and serious!). What Is Gum Disease? Gum disease is also known as periodontal ( ...

  2. Lentil Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major lentil diseases around the world have been described and reviewed. The major diseases include Ascochyta blight, Fusarium wilt, Botrytis Gray Mold, Lentil rust, Stemphylium blight, Anthracnose, and virus diseases. The management practices for these diseases are also presented....

  3. Hirschsprung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to Expect Hirschsprung Disease KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Digestive System > Hirschsprung Disease Print A A A Text Size ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Digestive System Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Inflammatory Bowel Disease X- ...

  4. Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, S.T. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Genetic analysis of Kawasaki disease; Late onset valvular dysfunction in Kawasaki disease; ischemic heart disease in Kawasaki disease; Evaluation of evidence related to streptococci in the etiology of Kawasaki disease; and Immune complexes and cytotoxicity.

  5. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Wilson Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Wilson Disease? Wilson disease (WD) is a rare inherited ...

  6. Alzheimer Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Alzheimer Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Alzheimer Disease Print A ... slow it down. When Someone You Love Has Alzheimer Disease You might feel sad or angry — or ...

  7. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Is Lyme Disease? People get Lyme disease through tick bites. The disease is caused by a bacterium ... these infections do you worry about most? Ixodes ticks (also called black-legged or deer ticks) are ...

  8. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... link in the menu on the left. Common Names Kinky hair disease Menkes disease Menkes syndrome Steely hair disease Medical or Scientific Names Congenital hypocupremia (pronounced kuhn-JEN-i-tl hahy- ...

  9. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDF. Home | Disease Recognition | Potential Disease Sources | Investigation Protocol | Outbreak Response eTools Home : Legionnaires' Disease Safety and Health Topic Page | Scope | FAQ | PDF | Credits Freedom of Information Act | Privacy & Security Statement | Disclaimers | Important Web Site Notices | International | Contact ...

  10. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that ... higher if a family member has had the disease. No treatment can stop the disease. However, some ...

  11. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  12. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste away. ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of getting ...

  13. Alpers' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease? Alpers' disease is a progressive, neurodevelopmental, mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome characterized by three co-occurring clinical ... by mutation in the gene for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase POLG. The disease occurs in about one ...

  14. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease are very similar to those of ulcerative colitis , except that Crohn’s disease can happen anywhere along ... from the mouth to the anus , while ulcerative colitis is restricted to the colon . Crohn’s disease may ...

  15. Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the ...

  16. Alzheimer Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Alzheimer Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Alzheimer Disease Print A A ... slow it down. When Someone You Love Has Alzheimer Disease You might feel sad or angry — or both — ...

  17. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who have celiac disease? In people who have celiac disease, gluten causes the immune system to attack the small ... on the small intestine that gluten causes in celiac disease. Symptoms of gluten sensitivity are generally milder than those seen in ...

  18. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share External Link Disclaimer Digestive Diseases Wilson Disease Alternate Versions Wilson Disease (444 KB) You can also ... things psychosis—when a person loses contact with reality Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms ...

  19. Hirschsprung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Digestive System X-Ray Exam: Upper ... Bowel Disease Inflammatory Bowel Disease Your Digestive System Irritable Bowel Syndrome Upper GI (Video) Inflammatory Bowel Disease Digestive ...

  20. Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2004, nearly 60 percent more women died of cardiovascular disease (both heart disease and stroke) than from all ... Program Director Heart Failure & Arrhythmias Branch Division of Cardiovascular Diseases National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Content last ...

  1. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... him/her feel better? Should I tell my child’s school/daycare provider that he/she has Kawasaki disease? Could I get Kawasaki disease from my child? Source Kawasaki Disease by KA Taubert, ST Shulman ( ...

  2. Fabry's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fabry Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fabry Disease? Fabry disease is caused by the lack of ...

  3. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  4. Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  5. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  6. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Huntington's Disease Information Page Condensed from Huntington's Disease: Hope Through ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Huntington's Disease? Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disorder that ...

  7. [Prion diseases].

    PubMed

    StoÄ­da, N I; Zavalishin, I A

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are a family of progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by prions. There are four human prion diseases: Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome, fatal insomnia and Kuru. They can arise in three different ways: acquired, familial or sporadic. We review clinical presentations, pathophysiology, morphological picture, diagnostic procedures and available treatment options of prion diseases. PMID:23235426

  8. Newcastle disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND), referred to as Exotic Newcastle disease (END) in the U. S., is an acute viral disease of domestic poultry and many other bird species and a recognized worldwide problem. Occurrence of END is due to an infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and is a ...

  9. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. ... extra copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, ...

  10. Alexander Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be other genetic or perhaps even non-genetic causes of Alexander disease. Current research is aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which the mutations cause disease, developing better animal models for the disorder, ...

  11. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or prescribing new medications. [ Top ] Crohn's Disease and Colon Cancer People with Crohn's disease in the large intestine may be more likely to develop colon cancer. People who receive ongoing treatment and remain in ...

  12. Raynaud's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Raynaud's disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. It causes the ... secondary Raynaud's, which is caused by injuries, other diseases, or certain medicines. People in colder climates are ...

  13. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

  14. Liver Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis A, ... the skin, can be one sign of liver disease. Cancer can affect the liver. You could also ...

  15. Addison Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  16. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from ... spread from person to person. Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever, chills, a cough, and sometimes ...

  17. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

  18. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder in which you do not have enough of an enzyme called glucocerebrosidase. ... It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types 1 ...

  19. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  20. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  1. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  2. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  3. Meniere's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Meniere's disease is a disorder of the inner ear. It can cause severe dizziness, a roaring sound in your ... together over several days. Some people with Meniere's disease have "drop attacks" during which the dizziness is ...

  4. Fungal Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the flu or tuberculosis. Some fungal diseases like fungal meningitis and bloodstream infections are less common than skin ... System Outbreaks Rhizopus Investigation CDC at Work Global fungal diseases Cryptococcal meningitis Histoplasmosis Antifungal Resistance Resources File Formats Help: How ...

  5. Huntington disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Huntington disease is a disorder in which nerve cells in certain parts of the brain waste away, or ... Huntington disease is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4. The defect causes a part of DNA ...

  6. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small ...

  7. Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Heart Disease KidsHealth > Kids > Health Problems of Grown-Ups > ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the ...

  8. Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  9. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  10. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... print versions from our online catalog. ? Additional Links Hypothyroidism Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Thyroid Tests Find a ... disease often leads to reduced thyroid function, or hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a disorder that occurs when the ...

  11. Parkinson disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Parkinson disease causes certain brain cells to die. These are the cells that help control movement and ... called dopamine to help control muscle movement. With Parkinson disease, the brain cells that make dopamine slowly ...

  12. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom ... Muscle and joint aches A stiff neck Fatigue Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because you may ...

  13. Chagas disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Kirchhoff LV. Chagas' disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 355. Kirchhoff LV. Trypanosoma species (American trypanosomiasis, Chagas' disease): Biology ...

  14. Colonic Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... where your body makes and stores stool. Many disorders affect the colon's ability to work properly. Some ... abdominal cramping and other symptoms Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its ...

  15. Grover's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rights Job Postings Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Grover's Disease Share | Grover's disease (transient acantholytic dermatosis) ...

  16. Krabbe Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Krabbe Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) ... cells. Krabbe disease, also known as globoid cell leukodystrophy, is characterized by the presence of globoid cells ( ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... You may have seen the actor Michael J. Fox on TV talking about Parkinson's disease. He has ... and help find a cure. Mostly adults (like Fox and boxer Muhammad Ali) get Parkinson's disease. It's ...

  18. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rash Parvovirus B19 and Other Illnesses References Fifth Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page Signs & Symptoms Transmission Transmission Diagnosis Prevention & Treatment Fifth disease is a mild rash illness caused by parvovirus ...

  19. Kyrle's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ataseven, Arzu; Ozturk, Perihan; Kucukosmanoglu, Iknur; Kurtipek, Gulcan Saylam

    2014-01-01

    Kyrle's disease (KD) is a dermatosis which was first described by Kyrle as “hyperkeratosis follicularis et parafollicularis in cutem penetrans” in 1916. Perforating dermatoses are a heterogeneous disorder group characterised by transepithelial elimination. KD has been seen in association with multiple disorders, including diabetes mellitus, renal and liver diseases, congestive heart failure, hyperlipidaemia, infective diseases and abnormal metabolism of vitamin A. This case report presents two patients with KD with associated systemic disease. PMID:24429045

  20. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  1. Crinkle Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crinkle disease of hop was first described in Europe in 1930, and subsequent reports of the disease appear in literature published in the 1960s and 1970s. The disease appears to be of little importance in most regions of hop production. A fastidious rickettsia-like organism (RLO) is thought to cau...

  2. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Prostate Diseases Basic Facts & Information What are Prostate Diseases? The prostate—one of the components of ... out anything serious. The Most Common Types of Prostate Diseases Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) Prostatitis Prostate cancer ...

  3. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Alzheimer's Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Alzheimer's Disease? Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related, non- ...

  4. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease (AD) is one form of dementia. It affects ... The exact cause of Alzheimer disease (AD) is not known. Research shows that certain changes in the brain lead to AD. You are more likely to ...

  5. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  6. Meniere's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schessel, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Meniere's disease is characterized by unpredictable spells of severe vertigo and fluctuations in hearing and tinnitus. This article discusses the incidence of Meniere's disease, the present status of our understanding of this disease, controversies in its diagnosis, and the multiple therapeutic modalities recruited in its treatment. (Contains…

  7. NEWCASTLE DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concise information about Newcastle disease (ND) is provided for a book that serves as a quick reference guide to the infectious, parasitic, metabolic, nutritional, and toxic diseases of domesticated animals and birds as well some exotic species that a veterinarian might encounter. Newcastle disease...

  8. Sandhoff Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... body. Sandhoff disease is a severe form of Tay-Sachs disease, the incidence of which had been particularly high ... gene therapy seen in an animal model of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases for use in humans. NIH Patient Recruitment for ...

  9. Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Sundel, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the archetypal pediatric vasculitis, exemplifying the unique aspects and challenges of vascular inflammation in children. The condition is almost unheard of in adults, is closely associated with infections, and is self-limited, with fever resolving after an average of 12 days even without treatment. Yet KD is also a potentially fatal disease and the most common cause of acquired heart disease in the developed world. Unraveling of the developmental, immunologic, and genetic secrets of Kawasaki disease promises to improve our understanding of vasculitis in particular, and perhaps also to provide a window on the fundamental mysteries of inflammatory diseases in general. PMID:25399940

  10. Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Soumya Brata; Sarkar, Subrata; Ghosh, Supratim; Bandyopadhyay, Subhankar

    2012-10-01

    Addison's disease is a rare endocrinal disorder, with several oral and systemic manifestations. A variety of pathological processes may cause Addison's disease. Classically, hyperpigmentation is associated with the disease, and intraoral pigmentation is perceived as the initial sign and develops earlier than the dermatological pigmentation. The symptoms of the disease usually progress slowly and an event of illness or accident can make the condition worse and may lead to a life-threatening crisis. In this case, several oral as well as systemic manifestation of the Addison's disease was encountered. PMID:23633816

  11. Prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Takada, Leonel T; Geschwind, Michael D

    2013-09-01

    Prion diseases are a group of diseases caused by abnormally conformed infectious proteins, called prions. They can be sporadic (Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease [JCD]), genetic (genetic JCD, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker, and familial fatal insomnia), or acquired (kuru, variant JCD, and iatrogenic JCD). The clinical features associated with each form of prion disease, the neuroimaging findings, cerebrospinal fluid markers, and neuropathological findings are reviewed. Sporadic JCD is the most common form of human prion disease, and will be discussed in detail. Genetic prion diseases are caused by mutations in the prion-related protein gene (PRNP), and they are classified based on the mutation, clinical phenotype, and neuropathological features. Acquired prion diseases fortunately are becoming rarer, as awareness of transmission risk has led to implementation of measures to prevent such occurrences, but continued surveillance is necessary to prevent future cases. Treatment and management issues are also discussed. PMID:24234356

  12. [Social diseases, civilization diseases or lifestyle diseases?].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stans?aw

    2007-01-01

    In general, the development of civilization is viewed as a positive step for the well-being of the human species, leading to an increased duration and quality of life. The accelerated progress of civilization (mainly industrialization, urbanization and nutrition) has lead to new possibilities for adverse effects on human health. In former high civilization--like old Egypt, Greece, Roman, Chinese, Indian, Maya civilizations--the "modem civilization diseases" were unknown. Modem science through improved sanitation, vaccination and antibiotics as well as improved social and economical conditions, has eliminated the threat of death from most infectious diseases. In the years after World War II the social, economic and health conditions changed. Most deaths have resulted from heart disease, stroke, cancer and other diseases as a result of an inappropriate relationship of people with their environment and changed lifestyle. Lifestyle diseases are different from other diseases because they are potentially preventable and can be lowered with changes in diet, lifestyle and environment. PMID:18350729

  13. Infectious disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  14. [Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, U

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic neuropathological changes. It is the most common form of dementia. As a definitive diagnosis requires a neuropathological examination, clinical criteria have been established for the diagnostics of a probable Alzheimer's disease. In addition to the articles in this issue that focus on the imaging of dementia, this article provides a brief overview of clinically relevant aspects of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25957008

  15. Borna disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hatalski, C. G.; Lewis, A. J.; Lipkin, W. I.

    1997-01-01

    Borna disease virus, a newly classified nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus with international distribution, infects a broad range of warm-blooded animals from birds to primates. Infection causes movement and behavioral disturbances reminiscent of some neuropsychiatric syndromes. The virus has not been clearly linked to any human disease; however, an association between infection with the virus and selected neuropsychiatric disorders has been suggested. We reviewed recent advances in Borna disease virus research, focusing on evidence of infection in humans. PMID:9204293

  16. Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagral, Aabha

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the commonest lysosomal storage disease seen in India and worldwide. It should be considered in any child or adult with an unexplained splenohepatomegaly and cytopenia which are seen in the three types of Gaucher disease. Type 1 is the non-neuronopathic form and type 2 and 3 are the neuronopathic forms. Type 2 is a more severe neuronopathic form leading to mortality by 2 years of age. Definitive diagnosis is made by a blood test–the glucocerebrosidase assay. There is no role for histological examination of the bone marrow, liver or spleen for diagnosis of the disease. Molecular studies for mutations are useful for confirming diagnosis, screening family members and prognosticating the disease. A splenectomy should not be performed except for palliation or when there is no response to enzyme replacement treatment or no possibility of getting any definitive treatment. Splenectomy may worsen skeletal and lung manifestations in Gaucher disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has completely revolutionized the prognosis and is now the standard of care for patients with this disease. Best results are seen in type 1 disease with good resolution of splenohepatomegaly, cytopenia and bone symptoms. Neurological symptoms in type 3 disease need supportive care. ERT is of no benefit in type 2 disease. Monitoring of patients on ERT involves evaluation of growth, blood counts, liver and spleen size and biomarkers such as chitotriosidase which reflect the disease burden. Therapy with ERT is very expensive and though patients in India have so far got the drug through a charitable access programme, there is a need for the government to facilitate access to treatment for this potentially curable disease. Bone marrow transplantation is an inferior option but may be considered when access to expensive ERT is not possible. PMID:25755533

  17. Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Portlock, C.S.

    1984-05-01

    The outlook for patients with Hodgkin's disease has improved dramatically over the past 20 years. The question is no longer whether cure is possible, but rather, how can cure be best achieved. With better understanding of the biology of Hodgkin's disease and with continued evolution of treatment approaches, the goal of curing all patients with Hodgkin's disease is clearly within reach. This article provides a summary of current concepts in the biology and management of Hodgkin's disease. Staging, treatment options, and complications of therapy are discussed.

  18. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dry, thinning hair Heavy menstrual flow or irregular periods Depression A slowed heart rate Problems getting pregnant Return to top Who gets Hashimoto's disease? Hashimoto's disease is about 7 times more common in women than in men. It can occur in teens ...

  19. Hodgkin Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or bone marrow. The exact cause is unknown. Hodgkin disease is rare. Symptoms include Painless swelling of the lymph nodes in the neck, armpits, or groin Fever and chills Night sweats Weight loss Loss of appetite Itchy skin To diagnose Hodgkin disease, doctors use a physical exam and history, ...

  20. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  1. Prion Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases comprise a set of rare fatal neurological diseases found in humans and other mammals. A prion is a protein capable of converting a normal cellular protein (PrPC) into a prion and thereby propagating an infection. A prion and PrPC differ solely in their conformation. There are differen...

  2. Mycobacterial Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . ​ Related Links Tuberculosis Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ... coats that can be found throughout the world. Tuberculosis and leprosy (Hansen’s disease) are the best known ...

  3. Blount Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... need to have surgery. Many different types of surgeries can correct Blount disease — some involve cutting the tibia, realigning it, and ... complete recovery. The Outlook Most teens who have surgery to correct Blount disease soon find themselves returning to all their normal ...

  4. Disease management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilborne pathogens that cause root diseases spend most of their life cycle in or on the soil. Soil management decisions will influence the survival, growth of these pathogens and severity of disease. Many of the cultural methods that growers have relied on in the past to reduce the impact of the...

  5. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  6. Buerger's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... smoker. More recently, however, a higher percentage of women and people over the age of 50 have been recognized to have this disease. Buerger’s disease is most common in the Orient, Southeast Asia, India and the Middle East, but appears to be ...

  7. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can start eating gluten again. For someone with celiac disease, gluten will always irritate the intestines and, if this ... problems will return. If you're diagnosed with celiac disease, it can be a challenge to learn which foods contain gluten. You may not be able to remember them ...

  8. Peyronie's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Behcet’s syndrome––inflammation of the blood vessels Family History of Peyronie’s Disease Medical experts believe that Peyronie’s disease ... radiation and recorded on film or on a computer. The amount of radiation used is small. The ...

  9. Liver disease.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    Essential facts Liver disease is the fifth biggest killer in the UK and, according to the British Liver Trust, the only major cause of death still increasing year on year. NHS Choices says there are more than 100 different types of liver disease affecting at least two million people in the UK at any one time. PMID:26530565

  10. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causing the swelling, tenderness, and pain of Sever's disease. Such stress commonly results from physical activities and sports that ... and Joints Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions Osgood-Schlatter Disease Problems With Legs and ... Injuries Contact Us Print Resources Send to a ...

  11. Newcastle disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this chapter, are viruses of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1). All isolates of APMV-1 are of one serotype and are referred to as Newcastle disease viruses (NDV). Newcastle disease (ND) is caused only by infections with virulent isolates of APMV-1 (virulent NDV or vNDV). Virulent ...

  12. [Celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Malamut, Georgia; Cellier, Christophe

    2008-06-15

    Celiac disease is an enteropathy due to gluten intake in genetically predisposed persons (HLA DQ2/DQ8). Celiac disease occurs in adults and children at rates approaching 1% of population in Europe and USA. Clinical presentation of celiac disease is extremely varied. Anaemia, oral aphthous stomatis, amenorrhea or articular symptoms may reveal celiac disease. Diagnosis relies on evidence of duodenal villous atrophy and specific serum antibodies. Treatment relies on eviction of gluten (wheat, barley, rye). Gluten-free diet allows prevention of malignant complications and osteopenia. The main cause of resistance to gluten-free diet is its bad observance. On the contrary, serious complications of celiac disease, such as clonal refractory celiac sprue and intestinal T cell lymphoma need to be screen. PMID:18689116

  13. Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Tamer M.; Ariganjoye, Rafiu O.; Alsaeed, Gihad I.

    2015-01-01

    We aim to describe an 8-year-old boy with an unusual clinical presentation of Gaucher disease (GD). Gaucher disease is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of the specific enzyme glucocerebrosidase with varying clinical features, but often involving the monocytes-macrophages systems. This child ran a progressive course with a devastating outcome. Three distinct GD subtypes have been described with varying clinical features based on the presence or absence of neurologic involvement. Gaucher disease diagnosis is obtained via: enzyme activity assay, gene mutation study, bone marrow aspiration in addition to multiple other tests that have been successfully used in diagnosis of cases of GD. Treatment modalities include enzyme replacement treatment, substrate reduction therapy, bone marrow transplantation, blood transfusion, and surgery are available management modalities for GD. Gaucher disease is a chronic disease requiring a multidisciplinary team approach with regular follow up with multiple subspecialties. PMID:26166597

  14. Beryllium disease.

    PubMed Central

    Jones Williams, W.

    1988-01-01

    The increasing use of beryllium in a variety of industries continues to be a hazard. New cases are still being reported to the UK Beryllium Case Registry, now numbering 60 in the period 1945-1988. The majority of cases follow inhalation which results in acute beryllium disease (chemical pneumonitis) or more commonly chronic beryllium disease--a granulomatous pneumonitis. Granulomatous skin nodules also occur following local implantation. The clinical and radiological features are briefly described with the emphasis on pathology and immunology. Laser microprobe mass spectrometry analysis of tissue sections is a major advance in diagnosis. Detection of beryllium distinguishes the granulomas of chronic beryllium disease from other diseases, in particular sarcoidosis. The role of beryllium lymphocyte transformation tests is discussed. Chronic beryllium disease is steroid dependent and local excision of skin lesions appears to be curative. There is no evidence that beryllium is carcinogenic. Images Figure 1 PMID:3074283

  15. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Nat, Laura Bogdana; Simiti, Adriana Liana; Poanta, Laura Irina

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borreliosis), also called the "disease of 1000 faces", is produced by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted by the Ixodes tick. The clinical picture is non-specific and polymorph, with multisystemic involvement. Diagnosis is most often one of exclusion, and certain diagnosis is based on the presence of Borellia antibodies. The treatment is done differently depending on the stage of the disease and the severity of injuries, being used antibiotics like Doxycycline, Amoxicillin, Erythromycin or Penicillin. Under treatment the disease quickly heals without sequel, in the early stages, but advanced stages are usually resistant to treatment and chronic injuries can occur. Symptoms get worse without treatment and become chronic. We present the case of a woman of 66-year-old with a complex history of disease, which began one year prior to admission, through multiple and nonspecific symptoms; she presented herself in numerous medical services (gastroenterology, rheumatology--where an immunosuppressive treatment was initiated, hematology) without determining a final diagnosis. She was admitted in our service with altered general state and worsening symptoms, predominantly fever, muscle pain, joint pain, the patient being immobilized in bed. After multiple investigations and the problem of differential diagnosis with multiple pathologies, we finally established the diagnosis of Lyme disease. The peculiarities of the case are represented by the severity of the clinical manifestations and fulminant disease evolution under the unjustified administration of immunosuppressive treatment, and atypical joint involvement regarding localization and evolution that raised the issue of differential diagnosis with osteosarcoma or bone tuberculosis. PMID:25726630

  16. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Playfer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  17. Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Taubert, K A; Shulman, S T

    1999-06-01

    Kawasaki disease is a leading cause of acquired heart disease among children in the United States and other developed countries. Most children who contract this illness are less than two years old, and 80 percent of affected children are younger than five years of age. A generalized vasculitis of unknown etiology, Kawasaki disease can cause coronary artery abnormalities, including coronary aneurysms. From 20 to 25 percent of untreated children develop coronary artery abnormalities, which may resolve or persist. These abnormalities are of particular concern because they can lead to thrombosis, evolve into segmental stenosis or, rarely, rupture. The principal cause of death from Kawasaki disease is myocardial infarction. The cause of the disease remains unknown, but epidemiologic investigations and the clinical presentation suggest a microbial agent. Diagnostic criteria, including fever and other principal features, have been established. In the acute phase of the disease, treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and intravenously administered immunoglobulin is directed at reducing inflammation of the coronary arteries and myocardium. Early recognition and treatment of Kawasaki disease can reduce the development of potentially life-threatening coronary artery abnormalities. PMID:10392592

  18. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R

    1993-05-01

    The clinical features of Lyme disease have been well documented since its description as a distinct clinical entity in 1975. A better understanding of the diversity of Borrelia strains and species that cause the disease as well as new insights into the immunology and pathogenesis of Lyme disease help explain some of the observed variations in clinical manifestations. The diagnosis of Lyme disease may be straightforward when patients in endemic areas present with typical clinical features; however, the diagnosis should be in doubt when the clinical picture is nonspecific or atypical, or a feasible exposure history cannot be obtained. Laboratory diagnosis is primarily based on serologic techniques, but interpretation of test results can be fraught with uncertainty. Treatment with appropriate antibiotics is successful in the majority of cases of Lyme disease. However, some patients may not respond, and in these cases multiple repeated courses are usually ineffective and unwarranted. More data are needed to determine the appropriate treatment of Lyme disease during pregnancy, and the appropriate management of ixodes tick bites. A suitable arthropod vector and a competent animal reservoir host are essential for perpetuating Lyme disease in a geographic location. The intricate ecologic forces at work are well understood in certain endemic areas but are poorly defined elsewhere, particularly where the disease is sporadic or its existence is in question. Prevention of Lyme disease is best achieved through education regarding avoidance of the tick vector. A vaccine using a recombinant form of the OspA protein of B. burgdorferi has been successful in animal models. Whether an effective human vaccine can be developed remains unknown. PMID:8502779

  19. Infectious bursal disease (Gumboro disease).

    PubMed

    van den Berg, T P; Eterradossi, N; Toquin, D; Meulemans, G

    2000-08-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) (Gumboro disease) has been described throughout the world, and the socio-economic significance of the disease is considerable world-wide. Various forms of the disease have been described, but typing remains unclear, since antigenic and pathotypic criteria are used indiscriminately, and the true incidence of different types is difficult to determine. Moreover, the infection, when not fatal, leads to a degree of immunosuppression which is often difficult to measure. Finally, the control measures used are subject to variations, and seldom follow a specific or standardised plan. In the context of expanding international trade, the authors provide an overview of existing knowledge on the subject to enhance available information on the epidemiology of IBD, the identification of reliable viral markers for diagnosis, and the implementation of specific control measures to ensure a global and co-ordinated approach to the disease. PMID:10935278

  20. Cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W B

    1996-07-01

    Cerebrovascular disease may be secondary to various disorders including hypothyroidism, sepsis, neoplasia, hypertension, vascular malformation, and coagulopathy. Brain infarction or hemorrhage should be suspected in an animal with a sudden onset of a focal brain lesion. The recent availability of CT and MRI has improved our ability to diagnose cerebrovascular disease in animals. Treatment is directed at maintaining adequate oxygenation of the brain, controlling elevations of ICP, treating seizures, and identifying and treating any underlying disease. With appropriate care, many animals can recover. PMID:8813757

  1. Gaucher's disease.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Vijay; Nair, Velu

    2011-07-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) is the most common amongst the various disorders classified under the lysosomal storage disorders. GD is a model for applications of molecular medicine to clinical delineation, diagnosis, and treatment. The multiorgan and varied presentation of the disease makes it a challenge to diagnose GD early. The advent of enzyme replacement therapy in the early 1990s changed the management, and survival, of patients with GD. In addition to this, development of substrate reduction, pharmacological chaperone, and gene therapies has broadened the horizon for this rare disease. However, in resource-poor countries like ours, optimal management is still a distant dream. PMID:21897894

  2. [CELIAC DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Malamut, Georgia; Cellier, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy, autoimmune-like, due to gluten intake in genetically predisposed persons with HLA-DQ2/DQ8 genotyping. Prevalence rates are approaching 1% of population in Europe and USA. Clinical expression of celiac disease is extremely various. Screening is based on detection of serum celiac antibodies and diagnosis is confirmed with duodenal biopsy. Treatment relies on gluten free diet (GFD) with eviction of wheat, barley and rye. GFD allows prevention of osteopenia, autoimmune diseases and malignant complications. The main cause of resistance to GFD because is its bad observance. PMID:26979028

  3. [Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Boggio, Paula; Luna, Paula Carolina; Abad, María Eugenia; Larralde, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Fabry disease is an uncommon, X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, caused by partial or complete deficiency of the enzyme a-galactosidase A. The defect leads to accumulation of uncleaved globotriaosylceramide on the vascular endothelium and visceral tissues, being the skin, heart, kidneys and central nervous system the most affected organs. We performed review of the literature related to the disease and emphasized that early recognition of angiokeratomas and hypohidrosis are key diagnostic signs of this serious disease. We also addressed the need of multidisciplinary assessment of these patients. PMID:19851669

  4. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... removed it, save it in a jar of alcohol for identification. Ticks begin transmitting Lyme disease about ... the tick, you will need tweezers and isopropyl alcohol. Your child may be scared, but you should ...

  5. Binswanger's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Binswanger's Disease ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  6. Gaucher Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Gaucher Disease ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  7. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Menkes Disease ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  8. Batten Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Batten Disease ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  9. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Behcet's Disease ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  10. Leigh's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Leigh's Disease ... Funding | News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | ...

  11. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can help control symptoms, and may include medicines, nutrition supplements, and/or surgery. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  12. Lung disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the lungs to take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. People with this type of lung disorder often ... the lungs to take up oxygen and release carbon dioxide. These diseases may also affect heart function. An ...

  13. Lyme disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi ( B burgdorferi ). Blacklegged ticks and other species of ticks can carry these bacteria. The ticks pick up the bacteria when they bite ...

  14. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi that's usually found in animals like mice ... on mice, deer, and other animals that carry Borrelia burgdorferi . When the tick feeds on infected animals, ...

  15. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, J

    1994-07-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is the most common arthropod-borne infection. The majority of cases occur in the Northeast, the Midwest, and California, which are areas with established foci of Borrelia burgdorferi. Phenotypic and genotypic diversity of B. burgdorferi has resulted in its classification into three separate genospecies and may account for differences in disease expression. Clinical features of Lyme disease have expanded to include a flulike illness without erythema migrans and the persistence of intrathecal antibody responses after successful antibiotic therapy in neuroborreliosis. Better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of Lyme arthritis will help guide future treatment decisions, and recent progress made in assessing the risk of infection from tick bites and vaccine development may help calm public anxiety about Lyme disease. PMID:8068513

  16. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q& ... pressure on the heel, such as swimming and biking, but check with a doctor first. The doctor ...

  17. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on Carcinogens: Captafol A Human Health Perspective on Climate Change (Full Report) (4MB) Certain Glass Wool Fibers ( ... Environmental Public Health (PEPH) (1MB) Programs and Initiatives: Climate Change and Human Health Respiratory Disease and the ...

  18. Farber's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and ... some of the major challenges in the diagnosis, management, and therapy of rare diseases, including the lipid ...

  19. Prion Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload ... the human prion disease CJD ​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of ...

  20. [Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Portillo, Aránzazu; Santibáńez, Sonia; Oteo, José A

    2014-02-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is a worldwide-distributed multisystemic process caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) and transmitted by hard ticks. In fact, it is the most common tick-borne infectious disease in the northern hemisphere. In Spain it is transmitted by Ixodes ricinus ticks and Borrelia garinii is the genoespecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. mostly involved in our area. LD is known as "the last great imitator" due to the broad clinical spectrum that may cause. Except in the case of erythema migrans (pathognomonic feature of the disease), the remaining clinical manifestations should be confirmed using microbiological tests. This review is intended to provide readers a current vision of the etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, laboratory diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in our environment. Controversial aspects arising from the use of non-validated microbiological tests that are being used without scientific rigor are highlighted. PMID:24630582

  1. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Behçet’s disease. They are particularly interested in whether Streptococcus, the bacterium that causes strep throat, is associated ... the eye and the reproductive and urinary tracts. Streptococcus. A bacterium that causes infections such as strep ...

  2. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Pneumococcal Disease Streptococcus pneumoniae are bacteria frequently found in the upper ... T et al . Outcome of meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children ...

  3. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease. It ranges from simple gum inflammation, called gingivitis, to serious damage to the tissue and bone ... the worst cases, you can lose teeth. In gingivitis, the gums become red and swollen. They can ...

  4. Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vaccine Campaign Podcast: Meningitis Immunization for Adolescents Meningitis Sepsis Meningococcal Home About the Disease Risk Factors Age ... April 1, 2014 Page last updated: March 4, 2016 Content source: Content source: National Center for Immunization ...

  5. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Old Silk Route,” which spans the region from Japan and China in the Far East to the ... the disease’s epidemiology is not well understood. In Japan, Behcet’s disease ranks as a leading cause of ...

  6. Gaucher disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Symptoms vary, but may include: Bone pain and fractures Cognitive impairment Easy bruising Enlarged spleen Enlarged liver Fatigue Heart valve problems Lung disease Seizures Severe swelling at birth Skin changes

  7. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, you might ... help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that ...

  8. Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, A R L; Nitz, N; Guimaro, M C; Gomes, C

    2006-01-01

    Chagas disease is the clinical condition triggered by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The infection is transmitted by triatomine insects while blood feeding on a human host. Field studies predict that one third of an estimated 18 million T cruzi?infected humans in Latin America will die of Chagas disease. Acute infections are usually asymptomatic, but the ensuing chronic T cruzi infections have been associated with high ratios of morbidity and mortality: Chagas heart disease leads to unexpected death in 37.5% of patients, 58% develop heart failure and die and megacolon or megaoesophagus has been associated with death in 4.5%. The pathogenesis of Chagas disease appears to be related to a parasite?induced mutation of the vertebrate genome. Currently, treatment is unsatisfactory. PMID:17148699

  9. Graves disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is called hyperthyroidism. (An underactive thyroid leads to hypothyroidism .) Graves disease is the most common cause of ... radioactive iodine usually will cause an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Without getting the correct dosage of thyroid hormone ...

  10. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... focus on helping people maintain mental function, manage behavioral symptoms, and slow or delay the symptoms of disease. Researchers hope to develop therapies targeting specific genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms so that the actual ...

  11. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on Chagas disease, please visit www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas and click “General Information“ or call 404. ... information in Spanish, please visit www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/es CS226359 Center for Global Health Division ...

  12. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a condition in which the bones become less dense and more likely to fracture 4  Wilson Disease ... To learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinic ...

  13. Autoinflammatory Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in symptoms and the inflammation underlying the disease. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) TRAPS (TNF ... a genetic defect in a protein known as tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR). TNFR sits on the surface of ...

  14. Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Environmental/lifestyle factors: It is likely that your environment and your lifestyle habits also affect your risk for Alzheimer’s disease. A history of head trauma, cardiovascular or heart problems, diabetes, and obesity appear to increase your risk ...

  15. Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Rioux, John D.; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Huett, Alan; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Wileman, Tom; Mizushima, Noboru; Carding, Simon; Akira, Shizuo; Parkes, Miles; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract.1 Prevalence in western populations is 100–150/100,000 and somewhat higher in Ashkenazi Jews. Peak incidence is in early adult life, although any age can be affected and a majority of affected individuals progress to relapsing and chronic disease. Medical treatments rely significantly on empirical corticosteroid therapy and immunosuppression, and intestinal resectional surgery is frequently required. Thus, 80% of patients with CD come to surgery for refractory disease or complications. It is hoped that an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms, for example by studying the genetic basis of CD and other forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), will lead to improved therapies and possibly preventative strategies in individuals identified as being at risk. PMID:20729636

  16. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  17. Kennedy's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... weakness which usually begins in the pelvic or shoulder regions. Weakness of the facial and tongue muscles ... research is being done? The NINDS supports a broad spectrum of research on motor neuron diseases, such ...

  18. Menetrier's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ménétrier’s disease in children to infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV). CMV is one of the herpes viruses. This group ... mono. Most healthy children and adults infected with CMV have no symptoms and may not even know ...

  19. [Prion disease].

    PubMed

    Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-11-01

    Human prion diseases are classified into 3 categories according to etiologies: idiopathic of unknown cause, acquired of infectious origin, and genetic by PRNP mutation. The surveillance committee have analyzed 2,494 cases and identified 1,402 as prion diseases. Most of them are idiopathic, namely sporadic CJD (77%) with less genetic and acquired prion diseases (17% and 5%, respectively). The number of patients identified by the surveillance committee in these years is about 120 which are less than the number of annual death of prion disease. The difference might be due to partly the fact our surveillance need the consent from patients' family and is not complete. The mean age at onset of prion disease is late 60s while the range is fairly wide. Brain MRIs and increase of CSF 14-3-3 and tau protein levels are very characteristic. Classical sporadic CJD could show completely normal T1WI with patchy high signals in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia on DWI. In Japan, classical sporadic CJD (MM1) is most popular but there are some rare atypical subtypes. Among them, MM2-thalamic CJD is hardest to diagnose because it shows no high intensity signals on DWI, in addition to frequent absence of CSF and EEG characteristics. In this case, CBF decrease in the thalamus on SPECT is very helpful. Genetic prion diseases in Japan are quite distinct from those in Europe. V180I and M232R mutations are unique to Japan and show sporadic CJD phenotype. Dura graft-associated CJD (dCJD) are composed of 67% of classical sporadic CJD phenotype and 33% of atypical phenotype showing slower progression with amyloid plaques. Trace-back experiments suggested the PrP(sc) of the atypical dCJD was likely to be modified from infection of abnormal VV2 protein. Although there are some atypical forms of prion diseases as mentioned above, almost all prion cases could be diagnosed with EEG, MRI, genetic test, CSF test and SPECT. We also have some incidents in which brain surgery was done before the diagnosis of prion disease and many other patients were operated using the same operating instruments before their sterilization against prion disease had been done. The explanation of possibility of prion disease infection to the patients and their follow-up was started by the incident committee. It is very important for all the nations to cooperate with each other in order to overcome this intractable disease. PMID:21921445

  20. [Ledderhose's disease].

    PubMed

    Bardelli, M; D'Arienzo, M; Veneziani, C

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical appearance of Ledderhose disease and emphasize the association with Dupuytren disease. They report on a series of patients treated at the 2nd Orthopedic Unit of University of Florence and describe the operating technique used. They believe that the procedure of removal of nodules must always be performed in association with careful exeresis of normal tissue, employing total aponeurectomy only in revision surgery. PMID:1843082

  1. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are at higher risk of getting tick-borne diseases. Ticks usually wait near the top of grassy plants and low bushes for people or animals to brush up against their perch. Ticks will often crawl upward on people's clothes or bodies for up to several hours or more before attaching to ... How can my doctor tell if I have Lyme disease? The best way to find out if you ...

  2. Noncommunicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Shannon; Adashi, Eli Y

    2015-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), long considered diseases of little significance to global health, represent the greatest threat to economic development and human health. The main NCDs-diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and chronic respiratory disease-are the world's number one killer and bear the greatest burden on the poor. On September 19-20, 2011, the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) convened a high-level meeting (HLM) on the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases. The only other HLM held on a health issue in the past had been in 2001 for HIV/AIDS and resulted in ambitious targets, global surveillance, and billions of dollars in aid. The 2011 HLM for NCDs did not measure up to the previous meeting in funding, targets, or advocacy but gave birth to a series of commitments in the form of a political declaration. In this article, we discuss the extent to which NCD is effecting the global population, what has and has not transpired since the 2011 HLM, and what lies ahead if we are to successfully tackle this growing burden of disease before it grows beyond our reach. PMID:25565510

  3. Disease mongering.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Subish, P

    2007-04-01

    Convincing healthy people that they are sick and require medicines can enormously expand the market. Disease mongering can turn ordinary ailments like baldness into medical problems, consider risk factors such as hypertension and osteoporosis as diseases and frame prevalence estimates to increase potential markets. In Asia, conditions like erectile dysfunction, male pattern baldness, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and irritable bowel syndrome, and the drugs to treat them, are widely promoted. Fairness creams and traditional medicines are also widely used. The cost of disease mongering to the individual and the community is expected to be high. Some authors have argued that medicalisation of illnesses may not be a problem and the real problem may be the lack of medicines. Doctors will play a key role in combating disease mongering. Disentanglement from the pharmaceutical industry and development of a capacity for critical analysis are required. Educating patients and empowering them to make decisions are important. Several initiatives have been undertaken to combat disease mongering. Initiatives at the level of the patient and the physician are especially important. Studies on the extent and knowledge of disease mongering among doctors and medical students, and their economic and social consequences are urgently required. PMID:17384871

  4. Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Burillo, Almudena; Bouza, Emilio

    2016-01-23

    Since first identified in early 1977, bacteria of the genus Legionella are recognised as a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and a rare cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. Legionella bacteria multisystem manifestations mainly affect susceptible patients as a result of age, underlying debilitating conditions, or immunosuppression. Water is the major natural reservoir for Legionella, and the pathogen is found in many different natural and artificial aquatic environments such as cooling towers or water systems in buildings, including hospitals. The term given to the severe pneumonia and systemic infection caused by Legionella bacteria is Legionnaires' disease. Over time, the prevalence of legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease has risen, which might indicate a greater awareness and reporting of the disease. Advances in microbiology have led to a better understanding of the ecological niches and pathogenesis of the condition. Legionnaires' disease is not always suspected because of its non-specific symptoms, and the diagnostic tests routinely available do not offer the desired sensitivity. However, effective antibiotics are available. Disease notification systems provide the basis for initiating investigations and limiting the scale and recurrence of outbreaks. This report reviews our current understanding of this disease. PMID:26231463

  5. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  6. [Meničre's Disease].

    PubMed

    Plontke, S K; Gürkov, R

    2015-08-01

    Meničre`s disease is one of the most common inner ear and vestibular disorders. It is defined as the idiopathic syndrome of endolymphatic hydrops (ELH). Despite the development of several different animal models of ELH, its etiology and pathogenesis is still unresolved. In humans, endolymphatic hydrops may occur spontaneously or as a consequence of specific disorders with distinct inner ear pathologies, e.?g., infectious labyrinthitis, noise induced hearing loss or vestibular schwannoma. Recent imaging studies using MRI have shown that hydropic ear disease is associated not only with the full triad of vertigo, hearing, loss and tinnitus/aural pressure, but also with inner ear symptoms that do not fulfill the clinical criteria of definite Meničre's disease as set forth by the AAO-HNS. Therefore, terms like "atypical" or "cochlear"/"vestibular" Meničre's disease or "forme fruste" should be avoided and the term "Meničre's disease" should universally be applied according only to these guidelines. Besides that, the recent possibility of visualizing endolymphatic hydrops on MRI and thereby ascertaining the diagnosis in difficult cases and new audiovestibular function tests for the indirect detection of endolymphatic hydrops show promising results. Evidenced based reviews of currently available therapeutic options still reveal many uncertainties with regard to efficacy, with the exception of the ablative therapies, e.?g., intratympanic gentamicin application. PMID:26243634

  7. Infection and Cardiovascular Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Infarction; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Atherosclerosis

  8. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, E C; Calne, D B

    1989-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease there is degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra, with consequent depletion of the neurotransmitter dopamine. The triad of tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia is the clinical hallmark. Drugs currently used for palliative therapy fall into three categories: anticholinergic agents, dopamine precursors (levodopa combined with extracerebral decarboxylase inhibitors) and artificial dopamine agonists. It has been argued, on theoretical grounds, that some drugs slow the progress of Parkinson's disease, although no firm evidence has supported this. Treatment must be individualized, and more than one type of drug can be given concurrently after a careful build-up in dosage. We review the adverse effects of various drugs and consider new developments such as slow-release preparations, selective D-1 and D-2 agonists and transplants of dopaminergic cells into the brain. The treatment of Parkinson's disease can be demanding, rewarding and sometimes frustrating, but it remains a most challenging exercise in pharmacotherapy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2563667

  9. Dent's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1) or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2) genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl-/H+ exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl- channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome), hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and the prevention of nephrolithiasis. The vital prognosis is good in the majority of patients. Progression to end-stage renal failure occurs between the 3rd and 5th decades of life in 30-80% of affected males. PMID:20946626

  10. Dent's disease.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2010-01-01

    Dent's disease is a renal tubular disorder characterized by manifestations of proximal tubule dysfunction, including low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, and progressive renal failure. These features are generally found in males only, and may be present in early childhood, whereas female carriers may show a milder phenotype. Prevalence is unknown; the disorder has been reported in around 250 families to date. Complications such as rickets or osteomalacia may occur. The disease is caused by mutations in either the CLCN5 (Dent disease 1) or OCRL1 (Dent disease 2) genes that are located on chromosome Xp11.22 and Xq25, respectively. CLCN5 encodes the electrogenic Cl?/H(+) exchanger ClC-5, which belongs to the CLC family of Cl? channels/transporters. OCRL1 encodes a phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP?) 5-phosphatase and mutations are also associated with Lowe Syndrome. The phenotype of Dent's disease is explained by the predominant expression of ClC-5 in the proximal tubule segments of the kidney. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been described thus far, and there is considerable intra-familial variability in disease severity. A few patients with Dent's disease do not harbour mutations in CLCN5 and OCRL1, pointing to the involvement of other genes. Diagnosis is based on the presence of all three of the following criteria: low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria and at least one of the following: nephrocalcinosis, kidney stones, hematuria, hypophosphatemia or renal insufficiency. Molecular genetic testing confirms the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes other causes of generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubules (renal Fanconi syndrome), hereditary, acquired, or caused by exogenous substances. Antenatal diagnosis and pre-implantation genetic testing is not advised. The care of patients with Dent's disease is supportive, focusing on the treatment of hypercalciuria and the prevention of nephrolithiasis. The vital prognosis is good in the majority of patients. Progression to end-stage renal failure occurs between the 3rd and 5th decades of life in 30-80% of affected males. PMID:20946626

  11. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  12. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with minor illnesses (i.e., a cold or influenza) with aspirin has been linked with a serious disease called Reye syndrome. Always consult your pediatrician before giving aspirin to your child. Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Caring for Your Baby and Young Child: Birth ...

  13. Addison disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Chaker AJ, Vaidya B. Addison disease in adults: diagnosis and management. Am J Med . 2010;123:409-13. PMID: ... In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  14. [Darier disease].

    PubMed

    Klausegger, A; Laimer, M; Bauer, J W

    2013-01-01

    Darier disease (Darier-White disease, dyskeratosis follicularis) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis with regional differences in prevalence. The responsible mutations have been identified on chromosome 12q23-24.1. The gene encodes a calcium-ATPase type 2 in the sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2), which belongs to the large family of P-type cation pumps. This pump couples ATP hydrolysis to the transport of cations across membranes and thus plays a significant role in intracellular calcium signaling. Neuropsychiatric disorders are often associated with Darier disease. However, these diseases are not due to mutations in the gene ATP2A2 but to a susceptibility locus in a 6.5 Mb region near this gene. Currently, the treatment is strictly limited to the relief of symptoms. In severe cases, oral retinoids (acitretin: initial 10-20 mg/Tag and isotretinoin: 0.5-1 mg/kg/day) lead to a response in 90% of cases. However, side effects often prevent long-term use of vitamin A derivatives. PMID:23337962

  15. Prionic diseases.

    PubMed

    AraĂşjo, Abelardo Q-C

    2013-09-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative illnesses due to the accumulation of small infectious pathogens containing protein but apparently lacking nucleic acid, which have long incubation periods and progress inexorably once clinical symptoms appear. Prions are uniquely resistant to a number of normal decontaminating procedures. The prionopathies [Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and its variants, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) syndrome and fatal familial insomnia (FFI)] result from accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein in the brains of normal animals on both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. The accumulation of this protein or fragments of it in neurons leads to apoptosis and cell death. There is a strong link between mutations in the gene encoding the normal prion protein in humans (PRNP) - located on the short arm of chromosome 20 - and forms of prion disease with a familial predisposition (familial CJD, GSS, FFI). Clinically a prionopathy should be suspected in any case of a fast progressing dementia with ataxia, myoclonus, or in individuals with pathological insomnia associated with dysautonomia. Magnetic resonance imaging, identification of the 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, tonsil biopsy and genetic studies have been used for in vivo diagnosis circumventing the need of brain biopsy. Histopathology, however, remains the only conclusive method to reach a confident diagnosis. Unfortunately, despite numerous treatment efforts, prionopathies remain short-lasting and fatal diseases. PMID:24141515

  16. Sunflower diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sunflower disease chapter is part of the Sunflower Oilseeds Monograph, which will be a new publication in the AOCS Oilseeds Monograph series. The monograph contains an overview and history of sunflower crop development, how the oilseed is cultivated, how the oilseed is produced, how the seed is...

  17. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E; Assiri, A; Guandalini, S

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease, with a prevalence around 1% of the general population, is the most common genetically-induced food intolerance in the world. Triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals, this enteropathy may appear at any age, and is characterized by a wide variety of clinical signs and symptoms. Among them, gastrointestinal presentations include chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss or failure to thrive in children; but extra-intestinal manifestations are also common, and actually appear to be on the rise. They include a large variety of ailments, such as dermatitis Herpetiformis, anemia, short stature, osteoporosis, arthritis, neurologic problems, unexplained elevation of transaminases, and even female infertility. For the clinician interested in oral diseases, celiac disease can lead to delayed tooth eruption, dental enamel hypoplasia, recurrent oral aphthae. Diagnosing celiac disease requires therefore a high degree of suspicion followed by a very sensitive screening test: serum levels of the autoantibody anti-tissue transglutaminase. A positive subject will then be confirmed by an intestinal biopsy, and will then be put on a strict gluten-free diet, that in most cases will bring a marked improvement of symptoms. Newer forms of treatment which in the future will probably be available to the non-responsive patients are currently being actively pursued. PMID:23496382

  18. SMUT DISEASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF MOST ASPECTS OF COMMON BUNT AND DWARF BUNT DISEASES OF WHEAT IS PRESENTED. INCLUDED ARE SECTIONS ON HISTORY, DISTRIBUTION AND ECONOMIC IMPORTANCE, TAXONOMY, MORPHOLOGY, SPORE GERMINATION, CULTURE, AND PHYSIOLOGY. EXTENSIVE SECTIONS DEAL WITH RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND DISEA...

  19. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs. PMID:26601457

  20. Celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common autoimmune disorder, induced by the intake of gluten proteins present in wheat, barley and rye. Contrary to common belief, this disorder is a protean systemic disease, rather than merely a pure digestive alteration. CD is closely associated with genes that code HLA-II antigens, mainly of DQ2 and DQ8 classes. Previously, it was considered to be a rare childhood disorder, but is actually considered a frequent condition, present at any age, which may have multiple complications. Tissue transglutaminase-2 (tTG), appears to be an important component of this disease, both, in its pathogenesis and diagnosis. Active CD is characterized by intestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms, villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia, and strongly positive tTG auto-antibodies. The duodenal biopsy is considered to be the “gold standard” for diagnosis, but its practice has significant limitations in its interpretation, especially in adults. Occasionally, it results in a false-negative because of patchy mucosal changes and the presence of mucosal villous atrophy is often more severe in the proximal jejunum, usually not reached by endoscopic biopsies. CD is associated with increased rates of several diseases, such as iron deficiency anemia, osteoporosis, dermatitis herpetiformis, several neurologic and endocrine diseases, persistent chronic hypertransami-nasemia of unknown origin, various types of cancer and other autoimmune disorders. Treatment of CD dictates a strict, life-long gluten-free diet, which results in remission for most individuals, although its effect on some associated extraintestinal manifestations remains to be established.

  1. Fabry disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a progressive, X-linked inherited disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficient or absent lysosomal α-galactosidase A activity. FD is pan-ethnic and the reported annual incidence of 1 in 100,000 may underestimate the true prevalence of the disease. Classically affected hemizygous males, with no residual α-galactosidase A activity may display all the characteristic neurological (pain), cutaneous (angiokeratoma), renal (proteinuria, kidney failure), cardiovascular (cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia), cochleo-vestibular and cerebrovascular (transient ischemic attacks, strokes) signs of the disease while heterozygous females have symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase A results in progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide within lysosomes, believed to trigger a cascade of cellular events. Demonstration of marked α-galactosidase A deficiency is the definitive method for the diagnosis of hemizygous males. Enzyme analysis may occasionnally help to detect heterozygotes but is often inconclusive due to random X-chromosomal inactivation so that molecular testing (genotyping) of females is mandatory. In childhood, other possible causes of pain such as rheumatoid arthritis and 'growing pains' must be ruled out. In adulthood, multiple sclerosis is sometimes considered. Prenatal diagnosis, available by determination of enzyme activity or DNA testing in chorionic villi or cultured amniotic cells is, for ethical reasons, only considered in male fetuses. Pre-implantation diagnosis is possible. The existence of atypical variants and the availability of a specific therapy singularly complicate genetic counseling. A disease-specific therapeutic option - enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human α-galactosidase A - has been recently introduced and its long term outcome is currently still being investigated. Conventional management consists of pain relief with analgesic drugs, nephroprotection (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptors blockers) and antiarrhythmic agents, whereas dialysis or renal transplantation are available for patients experiencing end-stage renal failure. With age, progressive damage to vital organ systems develops and at some point, organs may start to fail in functioning. End-stage renal disease and life-threatening cardiovascular or cerebrovascular complications limit life-expectancy of untreated males and females with reductions of 20 and 10 years, respectively, as compared to the general population. While there is increasing evidence that long-term enzyme therapy can halt disease progression, the importance of adjunctive therapies should be emphasized and the possibility of developing an oral therapy drives research forward into active site specific chaperones. PMID:21092187

  2. Thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, S.

    1990-01-01

    Presenting a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, this volume provides a comprehensive picture of current thyroid medicine and surgery. The book integrates the perspectives of the many disciplines that deal with the clinical manifestations of thyroid disorders. Adding to the clinical usefulness of the book is the state-of-the-art coverage of many recent developments in thyroidology, including the use of highly sensitive two-site TSH immunoradionetric measurements to diagnose thyroid activity; thyroglobulin assays in thyroid cancer and other diseases; new diagnostic applications of MRI and CT; treatment with radionuclides and chemotherapy; new developments in thyroid immunology, pathology, and management of hyperthyroidism; suppressive treatment with thyroid hormone; and management of Graves' ophthalmopathy. The book also covers all aspects of thyroid surgery, including surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism; papillary, follicular, and other carcinomas; thyroidectomy; and prevention and management of complications.

  3. Morgellons disease?

    PubMed

    Accordino, Robert E; Engler, Danielle; Ginsburg, Iona H; Koo, John

    2008-01-01

    Morgellons disease, a pattern of dermatologic symptoms very similar, if not identical, to those of delusions of parasitosis, was first described many centuries ago, but has recently been given much attention on the internet and in the mass media. The present authors present a history of Morgellons disease, in addition to which they discuss the potential benefit of using this diagnostic term as a means of building trust and rapport with patients to maximize treatment benefit. The present authors also suggest "meeting the patient halfway" and creating a therapeutic alliance when providing dermatologic treatment by taking their cutaneous symptoms seriously enough to provide both topical ointments as well as antipsychotic medications, which can be therapeutic in these patients. PMID:18318880

  4. Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Yuri A; Hopkin, Robert J

    2008-10-18

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by abnormalities in the GLA gene, which leads to a deficiency in alpha-galactosidase A. The consequent abnormal accumulation of glycosphingolipids results in several clinical signs and symptoms and substantial morbidity and mortality. This review covers all basic aspects of the disease such as epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation by systems, diagnosis, management, prevention, and repercussions on quality of life. With the development of enzyme replacement therapy in the past few years, early initiation of treatment is key for improvement in major affected organs with decreased cardiac mass and stabilisation of kidney function, and improvement in neuropathic pain, sweating, gastrointestinal symptoms, hearing loss, and pulmonary symptoms. However, treatment of individual symptoms in addition to enzyme replacement therapy seems to be needed for many patients, especially those who have had some degree of organ dysfunction. Additional data are needed to document long-term treatment outcomes. PMID:18940466

  5. Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Mignot, Cyril; Gelot, Antoinette; De Villemeur, Thierry Billette

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive condition due to glucocerebrosidase deficiency responsible for the lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide, a complex lipid derived from cell membranes, mainly in macrophages. It is due to mutations mostly in the GBA gene, although saposine C deficiency is due to mutations in the PSAP gene. It encompasses an extremely heterogeneous spectrum of clinical involvement from the fetus to adulthood. Splenomegaly, blood cytopenia, and bone involvement are the main manifestations of Gaucher disease, but nervous system degeneration is observed in about 5-10% of patients. The accumulation in neurons of glucosylceramide and its derivative, psychosine, are thought to underlie neuronal dysfunction and death, although Gaucher cells that mostly accumulate such substances are mainly macrophages. Enzyme replacement therapy dramatically improves the outcome of patients because of its extreme efficacy in the treatment of the systemic involvement. However, it has only limited effects on most neurological signs. PMID:23622393

  6. Menkes disease

    PubMed Central

    Tümer, Zeynep; Mřller, Lisbeth B

    2010-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is a lethal multisystemic disorder of copper metabolism. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances, together with the peculiar ‘kinky' hair are the main manifestations. MD is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait, and as expected the vast majority of patients are males. MD occurs due to mutations in the ATP7A gene and the vast majority of ATP7A mutations are intragenic mutations or partial gene deletions. ATP7A is an energy dependent transmembrane protein, which is involved in the delivery of copper to the secreted copper enzymes and in the export of surplus copper from cells. Severely affected MD patients die usually before the third year of life. A cure for the disease does not exist, but very early copper-histidine treatment may correct some of the neurological symptoms. PMID:19888294

  7. [Wilsons disease].

    PubMed

    Mare?ek, Z; Br?ha, R

    2013-07-01

    Wilsons disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder in which copper accumulates in tissues, especially in the liver and the brain. The genetic defect affects the P type ATPase gene (ATP7B). More than 500 mutations causing Wilsons disease have been described. The most common mutation in Central Europe concerns H1069Q. The symptoms of Wilsons disease include hepatic or neurological conditions. The hepatic condition is manifested as steatosis, acute or chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis. The neurological conditions are most often manifested after the age of 20 as motor disorders (tremor, speech and writing disorders), which may result in severe extrapyramidal syndrome with rigidity, dysarthria and muscle contractions. The dia-gnosis is based on clinical and laboratory assessments (neurological signs, liver lesions, low ceruloplasmin, increased free serum copper, high Cu volumes in urine, KayserFleischer ring). The dia-gnosis is confirmed by a high Cu level in liver tissue or genetic proof. Untreated Wilsons disease causes death of the patient. If treated properly the survival rate approximates to the survival rate of the common population. The treatment concerns either removal of copper from the body using chelating agents excreted into the urine (Penicillamine, Trientine) or limitation of copper absorption from the intestine and reducing the toxicity of copper (zinc, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate). In the Czech Republic, Penicillamine or zinc is used. A liver transplant is indicated in patients with fulminant hepatic failure or decompensated liver cirrhosis. In the family all siblings of the affected individual need to be screened in order to treat any asymptomatic subjects. PMID:23909262

  8. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Don’t worry! Fifth disease is caused by parvovirus, but it isn’t the same type of “parvo” that infects dogs and cats, so you aren’t at risk of catching it from pets. ... the pattern of the rash. A blood test also can be used to check for the antibody to parvovirus. An antibody is a type of protein that ...

  9. Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Conditions Living Well with Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy & Rheumatic Disease Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Diseases with the ... your rheumatologist. What are the effects of rheumatic disease on pregnancy? During pregnancy, the effects of inflammation when a ...

  10. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in the United States for men and women. Coronary ...

  11. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Diabetic Heart Disease? The term "diabetic heart disease" (DHD) refers ... Kidney Diseases' Introduction to Diabetes Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD ...

  12. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  13. [Goodpasture disease].

    PubMed

    Fomegné, G; Dratwa, M; Wens, R; Mesquita, M; Van der Straaten, M; Vanden Haute, K; Fosso, C

    2006-01-01

    We report one case of acute renal failure with oliguria, microscopic haematuria and normocytic anemia in a 86-year old Swedish woman. A full investigation led to the diagnosis of Goodpasture disease, an isolated form of Goodpasture syndrome. Goodpasture disease is and autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies to the NC1 domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen, found mainly in glomerular basement membranes (GBM). When the disease affects both the lung and the kidney, it is called Goodpasture syndrome but the pulmonary or renal involvement can be isolated or separated in years. Its pathogenesis is not well known. It occurs essentially in Caucasian subjects, preferentially from Nordic and Anglo-Saxon countries (higher prevalence of HLA DR B1-15 and B1-4 group). Are also mentioned, the exposure to hydrocarbons, rustproof, insecticides and greasy solvents. The annual incidence of Goodpasture syndrome is rare and has been estimated in Europe to be about 0.5 to 1 case per million inhabitants. The isolated renal form represents about 1/3 of the cases. The clinical presentation is characterized by rapidly progressive renal failure with oliguria or anuria and in case of lung involvement, pulmonary hemorrhage responsible of hemoptysis, sometimes massive. Renal biopsy and immunofluorescence analysis play a key role in the diagnosis. The presence of both linear deposits of IgG along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and circulating anti-GBM antibodies is of paramount importance. The treatment, which depends on the degree of renal involvement, is based on the association of corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide and plasma exchanges. PMID:16894954

  14. [Postoperative disease].

    PubMed

    Germain, A

    1976-01-01

    Post-operative disease, which is well known clinically, is characterised in the laboratory and metabolically by a succession of two stages=an initial short stage, lasting a few days, marked by intensive catabolism and, after a change, there is a second phase, much longer, lasting several weeks, anabolic in nature, during which are reconstituted the reserves lost during the first phase. The mechanism of post-operative disease enters into the general field of post-aggressive reaction bringing into play an adrenocorticoid process. But a whole series of factors, included in the agression without neuro-endocrine background, cause diffuse metabolic disturbances in the organism with their own appearance of severity. Occurring at the same time as the operation, they may also occur in the pre and postoperative periods. In order to minimise and shorten the post-operative disease, it is important to combat as far as possible, these different specific factors by good preparation, correct anesthetic and surgical techniques and the prevention and treatment of complications. One should also pay attention to nutritional problems. When, before operation, patients are particularly under-nourished, or when, after operation, muscle wasting lasts abnormally owing to the temporary incapacity of the digestive tract to fulfil its role, or when catabolism takes on a dangerous appearance owing to the magnitude of the surgical aggression, or the onset of a complication, such as suppuration, it is essential to administer a high calory diet, either by venous catheter in a large vein, or, by continuous administration through a gastric catheter and using the nutripump. PMID:134395

  15. [Legionnaires disease].

    PubMed

    Jarraud, Sophie; Reyrolle, Monique; Meugnier, Hélčne; Forey, Françoise; Etienne, Jérôme

    2007-02-01

    Legionnaires disease, more formally known as legionellosis, is a relatively common form of severe pneumonia caused by Legionella, a genus of waterborne bacteria. Legionellosis is acquired by inhalation of legionellae from contaminated environmental sources. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 is responsible for more than 80% of cases in most countries. More than 1500 cases were reported in France in 2005. Initial diagnosis is based on tests for urinary antigens. The mortality rate for legionellosis depends on the promptness of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Macrolides (erythromycin or intravenous azithromycin, which is preferred to erythromycin for its better pharmacodynamic properties) and fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin) are the antibiotics of choice for severe legionellosis. PMID:17258676

  16. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, H B; Kirchhoff, L V; Simon, D; Morris, S A; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1992-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of morbidity in many countries in Latin America. The important modes of transmission are by the bite of the reduviid bug and blood transfusion. The organism exists in three morphological forms: trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and epimastigotes. The mechanism of transformation and differentiation is currently being explored, and signal transduction pathways of the parasites may be involved in this process. Parasite adherence to and invasion of host cells is a complex process involving complement, phospholipase, penetrin, neuraminidase, and hemolysin. Two clinical forms of the disease are recognized, acute and chronic. During the acute stage pathological damage is related to the presence of the parasite, whereas in the chronic stage few parasites are found. In recent years the roles of tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, and the interleukins in the pathogenesis of this infection have been reported. The common manifestations of chronic cardiomyopathy are arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. Autoimmune, neurogenic, and microvascular factors may be important in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. The gastrointestinal tract is another important target, and "mega syndromes" are common manifestations. The diagnosis and treatment of this infection are active areas of investigation. New serological and molecular biological techniques have improved the diagnosis of chronic infection. Exacerbations of T. cruzi infection have been reported for patients receiving immuno-suppressive therapy and for those with AIDS. Images PMID:1423218

  17. Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Tapia, Alberto; Murray, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize recent advances in celiac disease (CD) published between August 2008 and July 2009. Recent findings CD affects ~1% of most populations but remains largely unrecognized. In the last year, work has shown that the prevalence of CD has increased dramatically, not simply due to increased detection. Also, undiagnosed CD may be associated with increased mortality. Significant progress has been made in understanding how gliadin peptides can cross the intestinal border and access the immune system. New genetic loci and candidate genes that may contribute to the risk of CD and its overlap with type 1 diabetes mellitus have been identified. New deamidated gliadin peptides antibodies have better diagnostic accuracy over native gliadin-based tests. The inclusion of duodenal bulb biopsy specimens may increase the rate of CD detection. The spectrum of CD likely includes a minority of patients with mild enteropathy. A practical 7-item instrument may facilitate standardized evaluation of gluten-free diet adherence. Finally, refractory CD, whilst rare, is associated with a poor prognosis. Summary Celiac disease is a global health problem that requires a multidisciplinary and increasingly cooperative multinational research effort. PMID:20040864

  18. Vibration disease.

    PubMed

    Kákosy, T

    1989-04-01

    Today, in this age of technology, vibration caused by machinery is an almost universal hazard. Vibration transferred from a machine to the human body may cause discomfort, a reduction of performance, and even injury. Vibratory manual tools may cause damage to the circulatory system of the upper extremities (Raynaud's syndrome), to the peripheral nerves (peripheral neuropathy), and to the bones and joints (aseptic necrosis, fatigue fractures, degenerative joint disease). Vehicles and machines causing floor vibration cause degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. The pathogenesis of vibration injuries is still not completely clear and there is no effective treatment. Some of the abnormalities are irreversible and may cause permanent decrease of working ability, and even unemployment. This is why prevention is so important. Prevention is complex, including technical and organizational measures, use of individual protective clothing and footwear, and medical supervision both before and during employment. Workers who are exposed to vibration should be protected against other aggravating factors such as cold and noise, etc. Vibration-induced injuries are recognized in law in many countries as grounds for financial compensation. Their cost to industry is rising and, unless a means of prevention or cure is found, will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. PMID:2661029

  19. Diabetes and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease Chronic Venous Insufficiency Congenital Vascular Malformation Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes and Vascular Disease Fibromuscular Dysplasia High ...

  20. Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Nussbaum, Justin M.; Seward, Matthew E.; Bloom, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) has traditionally been thought to involve the misfolding and aggregation of two different factors that contribute in parallel to pathogenesis: amyloid-? (A?) peptides, which represent proteolytic fragments of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein, and tau, which normally functions as a neuronally enriched, microtubule-associated protein that predominantly accumulates in axons. Recent evidence has challenged this model, however, by revealing numerous functional interactions between A? and tau in the context of pathogenic mechanisms for AD. Moreover, the propagation of toxic, misfolded A? and tau bears a striking resemblance to the propagation of toxic, misfolded forms of the canonical prion protein, PrP, and misfolded A? has been shown to induce tau misfolding in vitro through direct, intermolecular interaction. In this review we discuss evidence for the prion-like properties of both A? and tau individually, as well as the intriguing possibility that misfolded A? acts as a template for tau misfolding in vivo. PMID:22965142

  1. Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, B A; Fitzpatrick, P C; Gianoli, G J

    2000-07-01

    Meniere's disease is an idiopathic disorder of the inner ear characterized by the syndrome of endolymphatic hydrops, episodic vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. People with this disorder may be severely disabled. Medical therapy exists in the form of diuretics and dietary restriction of salt to minimize the fluid pressure in the labyrinth and cochlea. Treatment of allergies with desensitization and steroids has also shown to be effective in selected patients. Surgical therapies exist in two categories, conservative and ablative. Endolymphatic sac decompression with or without shunt placement remains highly effective and we feel that it should be the first line surgical therapy for patients who fail medical therapy. Ablative therapies include labyrinthectomy (medical or surgical) and vestibular neurectomy. Both of these procedures control the episodic vertigo by destroying vestibular function in the affected ear and should be reserved for patients who have persistent vertigo in spite of more conservative treatments. PMID:10986841

  2. [Prurigo diseases].

    PubMed

    Hundeiker, M

    1987-08-15

    The term "prurigo" is universally used in dermatology. But, up to now, no definition of this term has been generally accepted. The "classic" description of the "urticarial papules" as the primary skin eruptions of prurigo is not correct, for these papules do not show any momentary edema but a persistent cellular infiltration. In the past, some authors already pointed out that the histologic structure of such papules looks very much like that of the characteristic papulovesicles in eczema--especially those in atopic dermatitis. The various forms of the prurigo nodes secondarily develop in case of the coincidence of three main factors: (1) the particular cutaneous response to repeated irritation (especially in autosomally dominant ichthyosis simplex), (2) reduced threshold for or constitutional disposition to pruritus (especially in atopy), and (3) internal (e.g. intestinal disorders) or external (e.g. insect bites) triggers. Probably none of the prurigo diseases represents a nosologic entity. PMID:3673156

  3. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? Vanishing White Matter Disease (VWM) is inherited ... about this). Other Clinical Names for Vanishing White Matter Disease Other clinical names of Vanishing White Matter ...

  4. Depression and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information on Heart Disease Citations Reprints Depression and Heart Disease Order a free hardcopy En Espańol Introduction ... see the NIMH booklet on Depression . What is heart disease? Heart disease refers to a number of ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's ...

  6. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cardiovascular disease in women. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, et al. eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: ... of coronary heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, et al. eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: ...

  7. About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms Early signs and symptoms Mild Alzheimer's disease ... more about other early signs of Alzheimer's » Mild Alzheimer's disease As the disease progresses, people experience greater memory ...

  8. About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment How is Alzheimer's disease treated? What drugs ... being researched? What are clinical trials? How is Alzheimer's disease treated? Alzheimer's disease is complex, and it is ...

  9. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cholesterol metabolism or halt progression of the disease. Fabry disease , also known as alpha-galactosidase-A deficiency, causes ... autonomic nervous system, eyes, kidneys, and cardiovascular system. Fabry disease is the only X-linked lipid storage disease. ...

  10. Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Cross, G M

    1991-11-01

    Since 1926, there have been three epizootics of ND. The latter two have been directly linked with psittacine species and Racing Pigeons. The modern poultry industry is extremely vulnerable to the effects of NDV, once it gains entry to any facet of the industry. Consequently considerable expense and effort are expended to keep the virus at bay. The main threat continues to come from psittacine species and racing pigeons. The considerable international trade in these birds, together with rapid air transport, can allow virulent NDV to gain entry to a country while exotic birds are incubating the disease. It is hoped that quarantine barriers and requirements will prevent the virus from entering a country, but smuggling continues and constitutes the biggest risk. Domestic avian pets are also vulnerable to the virus. It is hoped that new in vitro testing procedures, such as monoclonal antibody and oligonucleotide fingerprinting techniques, may be used to identify rapidly and characterize emergent virulent strains, so that appropriate measures may be taken to prevent infection of commercial poultry and domestic pets. PMID:1767471

  11. Glomerulocystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Siroky, Brian J.; Yin, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Glomerulocystic disease is a rare renal cystic disease with a long descriptive history. Findings from recent studies have significantly advanced the pathophysiological understanding of the disease processes leading to this peculiar phenotype. Many genetic syndromes associated with glomerulocystic disease have had their respective proteins localized to primary cilia or centrosomes. Transcriptional control of renal developmental pathways is dysregulated in obstructive diseases that also lead to glomerulocystic disease, emphasizing the importance of transcriptional choreography between renal development and renal cystic disease. PMID:20091054

  12. RARE DISEASES LIST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rare disease list includes rare diseases and conditions for which information requests have been made to the Office of Rare Diseases. A rare disease is defined as a disease or condition for which there are fewer than 200,000 affected persons alive in the United States. The Of...

  13. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease. Heart disease risk is also higher among Mexican Americans, American Indians, native Hawaiians and some Asian ... blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol. Genetic factors, type 2 diabetes, smoking, being overweight and ...

  14. Alzheimer's Disease: The Death of the Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Lynn W.

    1987-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a form of dementia in middle-age and older adults is becoming more evident because of growing numbers of older people and better diagnosis and detection methods. Describes the behavioral and physical symptoms of the disease as well as specific suggestions for care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, including dealing with…

  15. Ebola Virus Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2014 Fact sheets Features Commentaries 2014 Multimedia Contacts Ebola virus disease Fact sheet N°103 Updated January ... for survivors of Ebola virus disease Symptoms of Ebola virus disease The incubation period, that is, the ...

  16. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Español The term sickle cell disease (SCD) ... common forms of SCD. Some Forms of Sickle Cell Disease Hemoglobin SS Hemoglobin SC Hemoglobin Sβ 0 thalassemia ...

  17. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MD Dept. of Medicine View full profile Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Overview Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is ... they may make informed decisions Learn more. Interstitial Lung Disease Program As a center specializing in the ...

  18. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Tay-Sachs Disease KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Genetic, Chromosomal & Metabolic Conditions > Tay-Sachs Disease Print A A A Text Size What's in ...

  19. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  20. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MD Dept. of Medicine View full profile Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Overview Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a ... they may make informed decisions Learn more. Interstitial Lung Disease Program As a center specializing in the care ...

  1. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  2. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sleep and Sleep Disorders Share Compartir Sleep and Chronic Disease As chronic diseases have assumed an increasingly common role in premature ... sleep health in the development and management of chronic diseases has grown. Notably, insufficient sleep has been linked ...

  3. Parkinson disease - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may ...

  4. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  5. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... celiac disease must follow a lifelong gluten free diet Children are at higher risk for celiac disease if they have: Type 1 diabetes Autoimmune thyroid disease Dermatitis herpetiformis Down syndrome Turner ...

  6. Mad Cow Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Mad Cow Disease KidsHealth > Teens > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Mad ... are people to get it? What Is Mad Cow Disease? Mad cow disease is an incurable, fatal ...

  7. Understanding Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to Know Introduction Many ...

  8. Alzheimer's Disease Medications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Medications Fact Sheet Treatment for Mild to ...

  9. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  10. Kidney disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - kidney disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on kidney disease: National Kidney Disease Education Program -- www.nkdep.nih.gov National Kidney Foundation -- www.kidney.org National ...

  11. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Paget's Disease of Bone What is Paget's Disease of Bone? Click for more information Enlarged and Misshapen Bones Paget's disease of bone causes affected bones to ...

  12. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vietnamese) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Untreated sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a ... plain language for individuals with general questions about sexually transmitted diseases. The content here can be syndicated (added to ...

  13. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider diagnose ...

  14. What Is Crohn's Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Crohn's & Colitis? > What is Crohn’s Disease? Crohn’s Disease is a Chronic Condition By understanding your body and ... can live a full and rewarding life What is Crohn’s Disease? Email Print + Share Named after Dr. ...

  15. Tay-Sachs disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Tay-Sachs disease is a life-threatening disease of the nervous system passed down through families. ... Tay-Sachs disease occurs when the body lacks hexosaminidase A. This is a protein that helps break down a ...

  16. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  17. Lipid Storage Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the lipid storage disorders, although Gaucher and Fabry diseases have effective enzyme replacement therapies. Eligustat tartrate has ... from infection or progressive neurological loss. Children with Fabry disease often die prematurely of complications from heart disease, ...

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  19. Atheroembolic renal disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Renal disease - atheroembolic; Cholesterol embolization syndrome; Atheroemboli - renal; Atherosclerotic disease - renal ... disorder of the arteries. It occurs when fat, cholesterol, and other substances build up in the walls ...

  20. Diseases of Dairy Animals: Infectious Diseases: Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne's disease is a chronic, debilitating intestinal disorder in cattle, sheep and wild ruminants, characterized by diarrhea, weight loss and death. Animals usually become infected when they are young by ingesting feces or milk containing the causative bacteria. However, clinical signs of disease...

  1. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  2. What's Mad Cow Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cow disease is an illness also known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (say: BO-vine SPUN-jih-form en-seh- ... a human form of the disease, called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or vCJD. It's a very serious disease that ...

  3. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  4. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tay-Sachs Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Tay-Sachs Disease? Tay-Sachs disease is a inherited metabolic disease ...

  5. Fungal and Bacterial Diseases.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial diseases are important constraints to production. Recognition of diseases and information on their biology is important in disease management. This chapter is aimed at providing diagnostic information on fungal and bacterial diseases of sugar beet and their biology, epidemiolo...

  6. Periodontal disease in Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Nuti, Niccolň; Ferrari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A 59-year-old man suffering from Paget's disease of bone and periodontal disease was examined in anticipation of bisphosphonate treatment. The previous therapy with clodronate resulted ineffective and markers of bone turnover were markedly elevated. Periodontal disease was correctly approached and treated with an excellent outcome. 5 mg zoledronate iv infusion induced a remarkable reduction of bone markers which persisted on time within the normal range. After zoledronate treatment no signs of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) were observed. A correct management of periodontal disease is mandatory in pagetic patients on bisphosphonate treatment. PMID:26604949

  7. Prion Diseases as Transmissible Zoonotic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first reported in the United Kingdom in 1986. Variant CJD (vCJD) is a disease that was first detected in 1996, which affects humans and is linked to the BSE epidemic in cattle. vCJD is presumed to be caused by consumption of contaminated meat and other food products derived from affected cattle. The BSE epidemic peaked in 1992 and decreased thereafter; this decline is continuing sharply owing to intensive surveillance and screening programs in the Western world. However, there are still new outbreaks and/or progression of prion diseases, including atypical BSE, and iatrogenic CJD and vCJD via organ transplantation and blood transfusion. This paper summarizes studies on prions, particularly on prion molecular mechanisms, BSE, vCJD, and diagnostic procedures. Risk perception and communication policies of the European Union for the prevention of prion diseases are also addressed to provide recommendations for appropriate government policies in Korea. PMID:24159531

  8. Prion diseases as transmissible zoonotic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Su Yeon; Hwang, Kyu Jam; Ju, Young Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-02-01

    Prion diseases, also called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), lead to neurological dysfunction in animals and are fatal. Infectious prion proteins are causative agents of many mammalian TSEs, including scrapie (in sheep), chronic wasting disease (in deer and elk), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE; in cattle), and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD; in humans). BSE, better known as mad cow disease, is among the many recently discovered zoonotic diseases. BSE cases were first reported in the United Kingdom in 1986. Variant CJD (vCJD) is a disease that was first detected in 1996, which affects humans and is linked to the BSE epidemic in cattle. vCJD is presumed to be caused by consumption of contaminated meat and other food products derived from affected cattle. The BSE epidemic peaked in 1992 and decreased thereafter; this decline is continuing sharply owing to intensive surveillance and screening programs in the Western world. However, there are still new outbreaks and/or progression of prion diseases, including atypical BSE, and iatrogenic CJD and vCJD via organ transplantation and blood transfusion. This paper summarizes studies on prions, particularly on prion molecular mechanisms, BSE, vCJD, and diagnostic procedures. Risk perception and communication policies of the European Union for the prevention of prion diseases are also addressed to provide recommendations for appropriate government policies in Korea. PMID:24159531

  9. Obesity and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, E

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of mortality in rich countries and today it has the same meaning for health care as the epidemics of past centuries had for medicine in earlier times: 50% of the population in these countries die of cardiovascular disease. The amount of cardiovascular disease is also increasing in the developing countries together with economic growth. By 2015 one in three deaths will globally be due to cardiovascular diseases. Coronary heart disease is a chronic disease that starts in childhood, even if the symptoms first occur in the middle age. The risks for coronary heart disease are well-known: lipid disorders, especially high serum LDL-cholesterol concentration, high blood pressure, tobacco smoking, obesity, diabetes, male gender and physical inactivity. Obesity is both an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease but is also closely connected with several other risk factors. This review focuses on the connection between overweight or obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25387321

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Surya P; Dransfield, Mark T

    2013-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory disease of the lung associated with progressive airflow limitation and punctuated by episodes of acute exacerbation. There is growing recognition that the inflammatory state associated with COPD is not confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs. Epidemiologic and mechanistic studies indicate that COPD is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias, independent of shared risk factors. Possible pathways include complex interrelationships between chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and oxidative stress as well as shared risk factors such as age, cigarette smoking, and environmental pollutants. In this review, we provide an overview of the epidemiologic data linking COPD with cardiovascular disease, comment on the interrelationships among COPD, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease, and highlight diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. PMID:23727296

  11. Lyme disease and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J M; Cox, S M

    1995-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly transmitted vector-borne disease in the United States, with many regions of the country at risk. Like other spirochete-borne infections, Lyme disease progresses in stages, making diagnosis in the early stages of the illness and prompt treatment important for cure. An early diagnosis is made difficult by the less-than-ideal serologic tests and the varied clinical presentations of the disease. Although Lyme disease has been reported in pregnancy, the transmission rate to the fetus and potential harmful effects are largely unknown. This review discusses the diagnosis, clinical course, and treatment of Lyme disease with an emphasis on the pregnant patient. PMID:18476053

  12. Darier's disease and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tang, C; Chan, M; Lee, J; Hariram, J

    2010-12-01

    Darier's disease, also known as Darier-White disease or keratosis follicularis, is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis. Clinical experience has long suggested an association between neuropsychiatric abnormalities and Darier's disease. Although there are no formal epidemiological studies confirming this association, there have been a number of reports of patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations and Darier's disease in the literature. However, most reports have come from Caucasian populations, with limited reports of Darier's disease and its neuropsychiatric associations among Asian populations. This report describes 2 Asian patients presenting with associated schizophrenia and Darier's disease. PMID:22348929

  13. Lung Disease and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Airflow limitation is a predictor of future risks of hypertension and cardiovascular events. COPD is now understood as a systemic inflammatory disease, with the focus on inflammation of the lungs. An association between inflammation and sympathetic overactivity has also been reported. In this article, we review the association between chronic lung disease and the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic approach to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in patients with lung diseases. PMID:26587450

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Gaucher disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bone disease, and mild enlargement of the spleen (splenomegaly). How common is Gaucher disease? Gaucher disease occurs ... cerebroside lipidosis syndrome Gaucher's disease Gauchers disease Gaucher ... deficiency glucocerebrosidosis glucosylceramidase deficiency ...

  15. Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem Heath and Aging Kidney Disease: A Silent Problem Kidney Disease Who Is ... hormones that your body needs to stay healthy. Kidney Disease Kidney disease can sometimes develop very quickly, ...

  16. About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's Basics What is Alzheimer's disease? What happens ... with Alzheimer's disease? What is dementia? What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder ...

  17. Your Disease Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Site ... Welcome to Your Disease Risk , the source on prevention. Here, you can find out your risk of developing five of the most important diseases in the United States and get personalized tips for preventing them. Developed over the past ...

  18. Lung disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/health/dci/Diseases/Asthma/Asthma_WhatIs.html Emphysema/COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease): COPD Foundation -- www.copdfoundation.org National Emphysema Foundation -- www.emphysemafoundation.org National Heart, Lung, and ...

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... do I have a higher chance of getting colon cancer? Can my inflammatory bowel disease make it harder ... do I have a higher chance of getting colon cancer? Yes. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can increase your ...

  20. Pneumococcal Disease Fast Facts

    MedlinePLUS

    ... World Health Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis Fast Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... World Health Organization National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  1. Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... link in the menu on the left. Common Names Sexually transmitted diseases STDs Sexually transmitted infections STIs Medical or Scientific Names Sexually transmitted diseases Sexually transmitted infections Last Reviewed: ...

  2. Cardiovascular Disease Screenings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... service covered? Search Medicare.gov for covered items Cardiovascular disease screenings How often is it covered? Medicare Part ... video) Medicare & You: women's health (video) Medicare & You: heart disease (video) Medicare & You: Million Hearts initiative (video) Return ...

  3. Cat Scratch Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Cat scratch disease (CSD) is an illness caused by the bacterium Bartonella henselae. Almost half of all cats carry the infection ... symptoms of CSD, call your doctor. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  4. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  5. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Tay-Sachs disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It causes too much of a fatty substance to build up in the ... mental and physical problems. Infants with Tay-Sachs disease appear to develop normally for the first few ...

  6. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  7. Lewy Body Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lewy body disease is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Dementia is the loss of mental ... to affect normal activities and relationships. Lewy body disease happens when abnormal structures, called Lewy bodies, build ...

  8. Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that you can get from having sex with someone who has the infection. The causes ... is no cure. Sometimes medicines can keep the disease under control. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly ...

  9. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare, degenerative brain disorder. Symptoms usually start around age 60. Memory problems, behavior changes, vision ... during a medical procedure Cattle can get a disease related to CJD called bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) ...

  10. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  11. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  12. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi , which is found in small animals like ... that feed on these animals can then transmit Borrelia burgdorferi to people through tick bites. Ticks are ...

  13. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Disease Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... True or False: Only African Americans get sickle cell disease. A True B False 2. True or ...

  14. Genetic Disease Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mission to help prevent, manage and treat inherited genetic diseases. View our latest News Brief here . You can ... contributions to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of genetic diseases. Learn how advances at Mount Sinai have impacted ...

  15. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common type ...

  16. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Cyanotic heart disease refers to a group of many different heart defects that are present at birth (congenital) that result ... Transposition of the great arteries Truncus arteriosus Cyanotic heart diseases may be caused by: Chemical exposure Genetic and ...

  17. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions Print A ... cell or organism converts oxygen and food into energy. nodule: This is a small mass of rounded ...

  18. Managing Your Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  19. Head Lice: Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  20. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... LS. Epidemiology of beryllium sensitizations and disease in nuclear workers. Am Rev Respir Dis 1993; 148:985- ... chronic beryllium disease. In: Rossman MD, Preuss OP, Powers MB, eds. Beryllium: Biomedical and Environmental Aspects. Baltimore: ...

  1. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  2. Thyroid Disease (for Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Endocrine System Metabolism What Is a Growth Disorder? A to ... Scan: Neck Blood Test: T4 (Thyroxine) Thyroid Disorders Endocrine System Metabolism Thyroid Disease Thyroid Disease Definitions Growth Problems ...

  3. Diseases and Their Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Important diseases and their management practices of lentil were reviewed. The diseases reveiwed include Ascochyta blight (Ascochyta lentis), Anthracnose (Colletotrichum truncatum), White mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), rust (Uromyces viciae-fabae), Botrytis gray mold (Botrytis cinerea and B. faba...

  4. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  5. Lyme Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Impetigo Head Lice Vomiting Chickenpox Helping ... Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Lyme Disease KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Lyme Disease Print A ...

  6. Niemann-Pick Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a group of inherited metabolic disorders known as lipid storage diseases. Lipids (fatty materials such as waxes, fatty acids, oils, ... body. In Niemann-Pick disease, harmful quantities of lipids accumulate in the brain, spleen, liver, lungs, and ...

  7. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  8. Minimal change disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... microscope. It can only be seen under an electron microscope. Minimal change disease is the most common cause ... biopsy and examination of the tissue with an electron microscope can show signs of minimal change disease. An ...

  9. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    .org Metastatic Bone Disease Cancer that begins in an organ, such as the lungs, breast, or prostate, and then spreads to bone is called metastatic bone disease (MBD). More than 1.2 million new cancer ...

  10. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the medicines used to ...

  11. Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Page Content On this page: ... responds by decreasing TSH production. [ Top ] How does pregnancy normally affect thyroid function? Two pregnancy-related hormones— ...

  12. Digestive Diseases Materials

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Disease Education Program CUSTOMER SERVICE Online Ordering Policies Contact Us BACK TO... NIDDK Health Information NIDDK Home NIDDK Image Library Digestive Disease, Nutrition, and Weight-control Materials Healthy ...

  13. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and requires immediate medical attention. [ Top ] How do health care providers diagnose autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Health ... when test results are available. [ Top ] How do health care providers treat autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease? Although ...

  14. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  15. Women and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  16. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  17. Bile Duct Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... carry the bile to your small intestine. Different diseases can block the bile ducts and cause a ... liver failure. A rare form of bile duct disease called biliary atresia occurs in infants. It is ...

  18. Liver Disease and IBD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 34% of Crohn’s patients with disease of the terminal ileum (the last segment of the small intestine). ... increased risk for developing gallstones because the diseased terminal ileum cannot absorb bile salts, which are necessary ...

  19. Polycystic kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is passed down through families (inherited), usually as an autosomal dominant trait. If one parent ...

  20. Kidney Disease Basics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Links Take the first step Alternate Language URL Kidney Disease Basics Page Content Your kidneys filter extra ... blood pressure are the most common causes of kidney disease. ​These conditions can slowly damage the kidneys ...

  1. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  2. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today What is Parkinson’s Disease? Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and ...

  3. Mad Cow Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is an incurable, fatal brain disease that affects cattle. Different versions of the disease can affect certain ... These prohibit the use of any high-risk cattle materials in the feed of any animal. In ...

  4. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be the same one that causes vCJD in humans. Varient CJD causes less than 1% of all ... Scrapie (found in sheep) Other very rare inherited human diseases, such as Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease and ...

  5. Diseases and Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Menu Menu Public Health Public Health Home Military Exposures Military Exposures Home 4 Ways to Find Exposures Related ... Studies Publications & Reports Diseases & Conditions Diseases & Conditions Index Military Exposure Related Health Concerns Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses ...

  6. Fibrocystic breast disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Fibrocystic breast disease; Mammary dysplasia; Diffuse cystic mastopathy; Benign breast disease; Glandular breast changes ... made in the ovaries may make a woman's breasts feel swollen, lumpy, or painful before or during ...

  7. Liver disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - liver disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on liver disease : American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org Children's Liver Association for Support Services -- www.classkids.org Hepatitis ...

  8. Parkinson disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - Parkinson disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Parkinson disease : The Michael J. Fox Foundation -- www.michaeljfox.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  9. Alcoholic liver disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the final phase of alcoholic liver disease. Alcoholic liver disease does ... and nervous system symptoms include: Problems with thinking, memory, and mood Fainting and lightheadedness Numbness in legs ...

  10. About Alzheimer's Disease: Caregiving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Caregiving On this page: Caregiving Tip Sheets and ... Care Caregiving News Caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease can have high physical, emotional, and financial costs. ...

  11. Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3900 Find your chapter: search by state Home > Alzheimer's Disease > Treatments Overview What Is Dementia? What Is Alzheimer's? ... and move closer to a cure. Treatments for Alzheimer's disease Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's. But ...

  12. About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Causes Age-related changes in the brain Genetics ... Scientists don’t yet fully understand what causes Alzheimer's disease in most people. In people with early-onset ...

  13. About Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnosis What should I do if I’m ... health issue is causing the problem. How is Alzheimer’s disease diagnosed? Doctors use several methods and tools to ...

  14. Celiac disease - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    ... counseling from a registered dietitian who specializes in celiac disease and gluten-free diets. An expert can tell you where ... additional information: Celiac Disease Foundation -- www.celiac.org ... Information Clearinghouse -- www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/ ...

  15. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePLUS

    Paget's disease of bone causes your bones to grow too large and weak. They also might break easily. ... as arthritis and hearing loss. You can have Paget's disease in any bone, but it is most common ...

  16. Celiac Disease: Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Greg; Feighery, Conleth F

    2015-01-01

    Historically the diagnosis of celiac disease has relied upon clinical, serological, and histological evidence. In recent years the use of sensitive serological methods has meant an increase in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The heterogeneous nature of the disorder presents a challenge in the study and diagnosis of the disease with patients varying from subclinical or latent disease to patients with overt symptoms. Furthermore the related gluten-sensitive disease dermatitis herpetiformis, while distinct in some respects, shares clinical and serological features with celiac disease. Here we summarize current best practice for the diagnosis of celiac disease and briefly discuss newer approaches. The advent of next-generation assays for diagnosis and newer clinical protocols may result in more sensitive screening and ultimately the possible replacement of the intestinal biopsy as the gold standard for celiac disease diagnosis. PMID:26498608

  17. Machado-Joseph Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in patients with cerebellar disorders. Investigators Explore Selective Silencing of Disease Genes October 2003 news summary on a method for selectively silencing disease genes. Publicaciones en Español Enfermedad de Machado- ...

  18. Mitochondrial Disease: Possible Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms Getting a Diagnosis Treatments & Therapies Replacement Therapy EPI-743 Other Diseases Linked to Mitochondrial Disease FAQ's ... Call NAMDC RDCRN Medical/Scientific Meetings Replacement Therapy EPI-743 Research Grants Grand Rounds National Symposium Patient ...

  19. United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms Getting a Diagnosis Treatments & Therapies Replacement Therapy EPI-743 Other Diseases Linked to Mitochondrial Disease FAQ's ... Mito On Call NAMDC RDCRN Medical/Scientific Meetings EPI-743 Research Grants Grand Rounds National Symposium Patient ...

  20. Gum Disease and Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... re With Find a Periodontist Gum Disease and Men Periodontal health for men is extremely important as it may impact a ... has found that periodontal disease is higher in men (56.4 percent) than in women (38.4 ...

  1. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes.

  2. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... very helpful in examining the genetic and environmental influences that may cause rheumatic disease. Ankylosing spondylitis and ... very helpful in examining the genetic and environmental influences that may cause rheumatic disease. Identical twins have ...

  3. Cat scratch disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Cat scratch disease is an infection with Bartonella bacteria that is believed to be transmitted by cat scratches and bites. ... Cat scratch disease is caused by Bartonella henselae . The disease ... cat (a bite or scratch). It also can be spread through contact ...

  4. Lyme Disease Transmission

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sex with a person who has Lyme disease. Lyme disease acquired during pregnancy may lead to infection of the placenta and possible stillbirth; however, no negative effects on the fetus have been found ... of Lyme disease transmission from breast milk. Although no cases of ...

  5. What Is Behcet's Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 38 Size: 8.1 MB November 2014 What Is Behçet’s Disease? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read ... person is having symptoms are called flares. How Is Behçet’s Disease Diagnosed? Behçet’s disease is hard to ...

  6. Chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease of deer, elk, and moose in North America. This fatal neurodegenerative disease was first recognized 50 years ago and its distribution was limited to the Rocky Mountains for several decades. In the past few years, CWD has been found in the ea...

  7. Disease control operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton; Franson, J. Christian

    1987-01-01

    Individual disease outbreaks have killed many thousands of animals on numerous occasions. Tens of thousands of migratory birds have died in single die-offs with as many as 1,000 birds succumbing in 1 day. In mammals, individual disease outbreaks have killed hundreds to thousands of animals with, for example, hemorrhagic disease in white-tailed deer, distemper in raccoon, Errington's disease in muskrat, and sylvatic plague in wild rodents. The ability to successfully combat such explosive situations is highly dependent n the readiness of field personnel to deal with them. Because many disease agents can spread though wildlife populations very fast, advance preparation is essential in preventing infected animals from spreading disease to additional species and locations. Carefully though-out disease contingency plans should be developed as practical working documents for field personnel and updated as necessary. Such well-designed plans can prove invaluable in minimizing wildlife losses and costs associated with disease control activities. Although requirements for disease control operations vary and must be tailored to each situation, all disease contingency planning involved general concepts and basic biological information. This chapter, intended as a practical guide, identifies the major activities and needs of disease control operations, and relates them to disease contingency planning.

  8. [Bluetongue disease reaches Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, M; Griot, C; Chaignat, V; Perler, L; Thür, B

    2008-02-01

    Since 2006 bluetongue disease is rapidly spreading across Europe and reached Switzerland in October 2007. In the present article a short overview about the disease and the virus is given, and the first three clinical bluetongue disease cases in cattle, and the respective laboratory findings are presented. PMID:18369049

  9. Venereal Disease. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Stephen J.

    This book is one in a series of contemporary topics in health science for students. The first chapter deals with the behavioral aspects of venereal disease and how the disease has been affected by our changing society. Chapter 2 discusses the magnitude of the problem, presenting various maps and charts. The history of venereal disease and the…

  10. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  11. [Pancreatitis in intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Gubergrits, N B; Lukashevich, G M; Golubova, O A; Fomenko, P G

    2010-01-01

    In article review of the literature and own data about pathogenesis of pancreatitis and secondary pancreatic insufficiency in various diseases of small and large intestines is presented. The special attention is given to pancreatic insufficiency in celiac disease and in inflammatory bowel disease. The main directions of pancreatitis and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency therapy are grounded. PMID:21268323

  12. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sickle cell disease? Sickle cell disease, also called sickle cell anemia, is a hereditary condition (which means it runs ... or blocks blood and oxygen reaching nearby tissues. Sickle cell disease ... the whites of the eyes) Anemia (the decreased ability of the blood to carry ...

  13. Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Foundation Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Amyloidosis and Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  14. Etiopathogenesis of Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; García-Carrasco, Mario; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Jiménez Hernández, Cesar; Riebeling-Navarro, Carlos; Nava Zavala, Arnulfo; Vera Recabarren, Mauricio; Espinosa, Gerard; Jara Quezada, Javier; Cervera, Ricard

    2010-02-01

    Bechet's disease (BD) is an inflammatory, multi systemic disease with spontaneous remissions and relapses similar to various autoimmune diseases. BD leads to organ damage, including the eyes, skin, joints, etc., which produces various clinical manifestations. The central histopathologic characteristic is systemic vasculitis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates. The etiopathogenesis is unknown, although immunological abnormalities, possibly induced by susceptible microbiological pathogens, have been postulated. PMID:19879978

  15. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... onset of disease. People with ACKD already have chronic kidney disease when they develop cysts. Kidneys Ureters Bladder What ... kidney failure and finding treatment to stop its progression. The NIDDK’s Division ... Diseases sup ports basic research into normal kidney function ...

  16. What's Mad Cow Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How the Body Works Main Page What's Mad Cow Disease? KidsHealth > Kids > Q&A > Q&A > What's Mad Cow Disease? Print A A A Text Size What's ... You might have heard news reports about mad cow disease and wondered: What the heck is that? ...

  17. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the body resulting in a variety of problems. The phrase "connective tissue disease" is used to describe the diseases of the immune system that are treated primarily by rheumatologists. These represent systemic autoimmune diseases that often involve the joints, cartilage, ...

  18. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Information Page Condensed from Creutzfeldt-Jakob ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease? Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a ...

  19. Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epizootic haemorrhagic disease (EHD) is an infectious non contagious viral disease transmitted by insects of the genus Culicoides which affects wild and domestic ruminants. The causative agent, the epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), belongs to the family Reoviridae, genus Orbivirus and sha...

  20. Pregnancy and Fifth Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... B19 and Other Illnesses References Pregnancy and Fifth Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page Testing for Parvovirus B19 during Pregnancy Monitoring Parvovirus B19 Infection during Pregnancy Fifth Disease Outbreaks in the Workplace & Pregnancy Fifth disease is ...

  1. Tay-Sachs Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Tay-Sachs Disease KidsHealth > For Parents > Tay-Sachs Disease Print A A A Text Size What's in ... can interfere with growth. But a baby with Tay-Sachs disease is born without one of those important enzymes, ...

  2. Venereal Disease. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Stephen J.

    This book is one in a series of contemporary topics in health science for students. The first chapter deals with the behavioral aspects of venereal disease and how the disease has been affected by our changing society. Chapter 2 discusses the magnitude of the problem, presenting various maps and charts. The history of venereal disease and the…

  3. [Is Parkinson's disease a prion disease?].

    PubMed

    Brandel, J-P; Corbillé, A-G; Derkinderen, P; Haïk, S

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of a specific protein in aggregated form is a common phenomenon in human neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, this protein is α-synuclein which is a neuronal protein of 143 amino acids. With a monomeric conformation in solution, it also has a natural capacity to aggregate into amyloid structures (dimers, oligomers, fibrils and Lewy bodies or neurites). It therefore fulfils the characteristics of a prion protein (different conformations, seeding and spreading). In vitro and in vivo experimental evidence in transgenic and wild animals indicates a prion-like propagation of Parkinson's disease. The sequential and predictive distribution of α-synuclein demonstrated by Braak et al. and its correlation with non-motor signs are consistent with the prion-like progression. Although the triggering factor causing the misfolding and aggregation of the target protein is unknown, Parkinson's disease is a highly relevant model for the study of these mechanisms and also to test specific treatments targeting the assemblies of α-synuclein and propagation from pre-motor phase of the disease. Despite this prion-like progression, there is currently no argument indicating a risk of human transmission of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26563663

  4. Disease-modifying strategies for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Lorraine V; Kalia, Suneil K; Lang, Anthony E

    2015-09-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an increasingly prevalent and progressively disabling neurodegenerative disease. The impact of PD on patients and their families as well as its burden on health care systems could be substantially reduced by disease-modifying therapies that slow the rate of neurodegeneration or stop the disease process. Multiple agents have been studied in clinical trials designed to assess disease modification in PD, but all have failed. Over the last 3 years, clinical trials investigating the potential of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV)-neuturin, coenzyme Q10, creatine, pramipexole, and pioglitazone reported negative findings or futility. Despite these disappointments, progress has been made by expanding our understanding of molecular pathways involved in PD to reveal new targets, and by developing novel animal models of PD for preclinical studies. Currently, at least eight ongoing clinical trials are testing the promise of isradipine, caffeine, nicotine, glutathione, AAV2-glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), as well as active and passive immunization against ?-synuclein (?-Syn). In this review, we summarize the clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies for PD that were published since 2013 as well as clinical trials currently in progress. We also discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges in this area of PD research. PMID:26208210

  5. Meditation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Newberg, Andrew B; Serruya, Mijail; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé Sattar; Reibel, Diane; Monti, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases pose a significant problem for the healthcare system, doctors, and patients. With an aging population, more and more individuals are developing neurodegenerative diseases and there are few treatment options at the present time. Meditation techniques present an interesting potential adjuvant treatment for patients with neurodegenerative diseases and have the advantage of being inexpensive, and easy to teach and perform. There is increasing research evidence to support the application of meditation techniques to help improve cognition and memory in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the current data on meditation, memory, and attention, and the potential applications of meditation techniques in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23924172

  6. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  7. Prion diseases. An overview.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, Niels Jřrn

    2002-01-01

    Prion disease is the new designation of a group of spongiform encephalopathies, all invariably fatal, which show similar clinical and neuropathological changes. They comprise a range of distinct diseases in both animals and man, and spontaneous, hereditary and transmissible forms are recognized. Until the sudden occurrence in the mid-1980s of an epizootic of a formerly unknown disease, popularly named 'mad cow disease', in cattle in the UK, very little attention had been paid to these rather obscure diseases. Concurrently it was asserted that the disease-causing agent appeared to be a ubiquitous mammalian brain constituent, and the disease mechanism a conformational change of its structure. These events have not only led to a new understanding of these extraordinary diseases, but have also provided insight into both neurodegeneration and disease mechanisms at the molecular level. Moreover, in 1997 the prion concept earned its originator the second Nobel price for medicine within this scientific field. In this introduction and overview of prion diseases, historical and philosophical perspectives are presented along with descriptions of the diseases in both animals and man. Epidemiology, genetics and transmissibility are also covered. PMID:12064253

  8. Prioritising Infectious Disease Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, David M.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Wiebe, Antoinette; Battle, Katherine E.; Golding, Nick; Gething, Peter W.; Dowell, Scott F.; Farag, Tamer H.; Garcia, Andres J.; Kimball, Ann M.; Krause, L. Kendall; Smith, Craig H.; Brooker, Simon J.; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J. L.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing volumes of data and computational capacity afford unprecedented opportunities to scale up infectious disease (ID) mapping for public health uses. Whilst a large number of IDs show global spatial variation, comprehensive knowledge of these geographic patterns is poor. Here we use an objective method to prioritise mapping efforts to begin to address the large deficit in global disease maps currently available. Methodology/Principal Findings Automation of ID mapping requires bespoke methodological adjustments tailored to the epidemiological characteristics of different types of diseases. Diseases were therefore grouped into 33 clusters based upon taxonomic divisions and shared epidemiological characteristics. Disability-adjusted life years, derived from the Global Burden of Disease 2013 study, were used as a globally consistent metric of disease burden. A review of global health stakeholders, existing literature and national health priorities was undertaken to assess relative interest in the diseases. The clusters were ranked by combining both metrics, which identified 44 diseases of main concern within 15 principle clusters. Whilst malaria, HIV and tuberculosis were the highest priority due to their considerable burden, the high priority clusters were dominated by neglected tropical diseases and vector-borne parasites. Conclusions/Significance A quantitative, easily-updated and flexible framework for prioritising diseases is presented here. The study identifies a possible future strategy for those diseases where significant knowledge gaps remain, as well as recognising those where global mapping programs have already made significant progress. For many conditions, potential shared epidemiological information has yet to be exploited. PMID:26061527

  9. Atopic disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael S; Kemp, Andrew S

    2005-03-21

    A child with atopy produces IgE antibodies after exposure to common environmental allergens. The atopic diseases (eczema, asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis) are clinical syndromes each defined by a group of symptoms and signs. Not all children with atopy will have atopic disease or develop symptoms after exposure to an allergen. Both genetic and environmental factors determine the development of atopic disease. The presence of specific IgE antibodies to environmental allergens is determined with skin prick or radioallergosorbent testing in children with atopy. Test results should be interpreted in the context of the clinical history and further investigations (eg, allergen avoidance or challenge). Management of atopic disease is frequently symptomatic, but it is important to avoid identified allergen triggers. Immunotherapy may be considered in selected school-age children with severe rhinoconjunctivitis. Preventing atopic disease in high-risk infants and hindering progression of disease in children with established disease are the areas of active research. PMID:15777148

  10. How to Prevent Vascular Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease Chronic Venous Insufficiency Congenital Vascular Malformation Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes and Vascular Disease Fibromuscular Dysplasia High ...

  11. Disease monitoring in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shannon; Malter, Lisa; Hudesman, David

    2015-01-01

    The optimal method for monitoring quiescent disease in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis is yet to be determined. Endoscopic evaluation with ileocolonoscopy is the gold standard but is invasive, costly, and time-consuming. There are many commercially available biomarkers that may be used in clinical practice to evaluate disease status in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the most widely adopted biomarkers are C-reactive protein (CRP) and fecal calprotectin (FC). This review summarizes the evidence for utilizing CRP and FC for monitoring IBD during clinical remission and after surgical resection. Endoscopic correlation with CRP and FC is evaluated in each disease state. Advantages and drawbacks of each biomarker are discussed with special consideration of isolated ileal CD. Fecal immunochemical testing, traditionally used for colorectal cancer screening, is mentioned as a potential new alternative assay in the evaluation of IBD. Based on a mixture of information gleaned from biomarkers, clinical status, and endoscopic evaluation, the best treatment decisions can be made for the patient with IBD. PMID:26523100

  12. Epigenetic Inheritance of Disease and Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Bohacek, Johannes; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks in an organism can be altered by environmental factors throughout life. Although changes in the epigenetic code can be positive, some are associated with severe diseases, in particular, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent evidence has indicated that certain epigenetic marks can be inherited, and reshape developmental and cellular features over generations. This review examines the challenging possibility that epigenetic changes induced by environmental factors can contribute to some of the inheritance of disease and disease risk. This concept has immense implications for the understanding of biological functions and disease etiology, and provides potential novel strategies for diagnosis and treatment. Examples of epigenetic inheritance relevant to human disease, such as the detrimental effects of traumatic stress or drug/toxic exposure on brain functions, are reviewed. Different possible routes of transmission of epigenetic information involving the germline or germline-independent transfer are discussed, and different mechanisms for the maintenance and transmission of epigenetic information like chromatin remodeling and small noncoding RNAs are considered. Future research directions and remaining major challenges in this field are also outlined. Finally, the adaptive value of epigenetic inheritance, and the cost and benefit of allowing acquired epigenetic marks to persist across generations is critically evaluated. PMID:22781843

  13. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (?8C/G) is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit. PMID:24490108

  14. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a protein disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, R

    2001-06-01

    Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (CJD) is essentially a protein disease. All forms of CJD are characterized by the deposition of an abnormal coformation of a normal cellular protein. This protein (PrPc) is encoded for by the PRNP gene on chromosome 20 in humans. There are important genetic influences on susceptibility to CJD and on the resulting clinico-pathological picture. The abnormal protein (PrPSc), may be the infectious agent itself or the main component of it. However, its precise role in the pathogenesis of disease is not clear. The detection of PrPSc plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of CJD and its electrophoretic characteristics are used to classify different forms of CJD. However, the "molecular diagnosis" of CJD is not without uncertainties. PMID:11677782

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Lu, Hong-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are two diseases that are common in the general population. To date, many studies have been conducted and demonstrate a direct link between NAFLD and CVD, but the exact mechanisms for this complex relationship are not well established. A systematic search of the PubMed database revealed that several common mechanisms are involved in many of the local and systemic manifestations of NAFLD and lead to an increased cardiovascular risk. The possible mechanisms linking NAFLD and CVD include inflammation, oxidative stress, insulin resistance, ectopic adipose tissue distribution, dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction, and adiponectin, among others. The clinical implication is that patients with NAFLD are at an increased risk of CVD and should undergo periodic cardiovascular risk assessment. PMID:25024598

  16. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nective tissue diseases (scleroderma and lupus for example), chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, or HIV infec- tion. Finally ... tion, to rule out PoPH. Any patient with chronic liver disease and shortness of breath (even if he or ...

  17. FastStats: Infectious Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mental Health Diabetes Digestive and Liver Digestive Diseases Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis Kidney Disease Oral and Dental Health Respiratory and Allergies Allergies and Hay Fever Asthma Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Infectious/Immune AIDS and HIV ...

  18. FastStats: Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mental Health Diabetes Digestive and Liver Digestive Diseases Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis Kidney Disease Oral and Dental Health Respiratory and Allergies Allergies and Hay Fever Asthma Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Infectious/Immune AIDS and HIV ...

  19. FastStats: Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Mental Health Diabetes Digestive and Liver Digestive Diseases Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis Kidney Disease Oral and Dental Health Respiratory and Allergies Allergies and Hay Fever Asthma Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Infectious/Immune AIDS and HIV ...

  20. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Lyme Disease - Neurological Complications Table ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterial organism ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Alzheimer disease On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed May 2013 What is Alzheimer disease? Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the ...

  2. What Causes Coronary Microvascular Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors ... Microvascular Disease? The same risk factors that cause atherosclerosis may cause coronary microvascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a ...

  3. How Is Wilson Disease Inherited?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fleischer Rings Frequently Asked Questions Definitions Transplantation How is Wilson disease inherited? Wilson disease is an autosomal ... eventually they will develop severe lethal disease. What is the likelihood of inheriting Wilson disease? One in ...

  4. Viral Disease Networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  5. Management of Orbital Diseases.

    PubMed

    Betbeze, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Orbital diseases are common in dogs and cats and can present on emergency due to the acute onset of many of these issues. The difficulty with diagnosis and therapy of orbital disease is that the location of the problem is not readily visible. The focus of this article is on recognizing classical clinical presentations of orbital disease, which are typically exophthalmos, strabismus, enophthalmos, proptosis, or intraconal swelling. After the orbital disease is confirmed, certain characteristics such as pain on opening the mouth, acute vs. chronic swelling, and involvement of nearby structures can be helpful in determining the underlying cause. Abscesses, cellulitis, sialoceles, neoplasia (primary or secondary), foreign bodies, and immune-mediated diseases can all lead to exophthalmos, but it can be difficult to determine the cause of disease without advanced diagnostic imaging, such as ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography scan. Fine-needle aspirates and biopsies of the retrobulbar space can also be performed. PMID:26494502

  6. Sulfadiazine for kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.; Bernier, A.F.; Whipple, W.J.; Burrows, R.E.

    1951-01-01

    The blueback salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus nerka) at the U.S. Fish-Cultural Station at Winthrop, Washington, underwent an infection that was caused by a very short, Gram-positive, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacterium. A further description is impossible at this time, as the organism has not been grown satisfactorily for proper identification. The disease was characterized by white, raised areas of dead tissue mainly in the kidney: for this reason it is referred to as kidney disease. Belding and Merrill (1935) described a disease among the brook, brown, and rainbow trout at a State hatchery in Massachusetts which, from the description, might be the same as kidney disease. J.H. Wales of the California Division of Fish and Game described (unpublished manuscript, 1941) a disease in hatchery trout in California which seems to be identical to kidney disease.

  7. Liver disease in menopause.

    PubMed

    Brady, Carla W

    2015-07-01

    There are numerous physiologic and biochemical changes in menopause that can affect the function of the liver and mediate the development of liver disease. Menopause represents a state of growing estrogen deficiency, and this loss of estrogen in the setting of physiologic aging increases the likelihood of mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, declining immune responses to injury, and disarray in the balance between antioxidant formation and oxidative stress. The sum effect of these changes can contribute to increased susceptibility to development of significant liver pathology, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as accelerated progression of fibrosis in liver diseases, as has been particularly demonstrated in hepatitis C virus liver disease. Recognition of the unique nature of these mediating factors should raise suspicion for liver disease in perimenopausal and menopausal women and offer an opportunity for implementation of aggressive treatment measures so as to avoid progression of liver disease to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. PMID:26167064

  8. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    de Villemeur, Thierry Billette

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare in children. Three types are known: kuru, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and iatrogenic CJD. All three affect children and young adults, and are transmitted by infectious contamination. Kuru was the result of ritual funeral practices similar to cannibalism; variant CJD affects young people who have eaten meat from cows with mad cow disease (mostly in the UK); and iatrogenic CJD is secondary to graft of human tissues performed in the 1980s (dura mater, pituitary extracted growth hormone). The disease appears after 4-30 years of incubation. The initial symptomatology is frequently neurological (cerebellar ataxia, oculomotor disturbance, peripheral nerve pain, pyramidal syndrome) followed by dementia. There is no biological test available that can give a definite diagnosis of prion disease apart from neuropathology, although prion accumulation in vCJD can be demonstrated in pharyngeal tonsil by immunohistochemical techniques. This devastating disease results inevitably in death. No specific treatment is available. PMID:23622328

  9. Liver disease in menopause

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Carla W

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous physiologic and biochemical changes in menopause that can affect the function of the liver and mediate the development of liver disease. Menopause represents a state of growing estrogen deficiency, and this loss of estrogen in the setting of physiologic aging increases the likelihood of mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular senescence, declining immune responses to injury, and disarray in the balance between antioxidant formation and oxidative stress. The sum effect of these changes can contribute to increased susceptibility to development of significant liver pathology, particularly nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as accelerated progression of fibrosis in liver diseases, as has been particularly demonstrated in hepatitis C virus liver disease. Recognition of the unique nature of these mediating factors should raise suspicion for liver disease in perimenopausal and menopausal women and offer an opportunity for implementation of aggressive treatment measures so as to avoid progression of liver disease to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. PMID:26167064

  10. Nutrition in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Krok, Karen L; Lichtenstein, Gary R

    2003-03-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in the pathogenesis, treatment, and morbidity of Crohn disease. Approximately two thirds to three fourths of hospitalized patients with active disease and one fourth of outpatients with Crohn disease are malnourished. Malnutrition, which can be present even when Crohn disease is in remission, can affect growth, cellular and humoral immunity, bone density, and wound healing. Decreased nutrient intake, malabsorption, drug-nutrient interactions, anorexia, and protein-losing enteropathy can all contribute to the protein-calorie malnutrition and other specific nutrient deficiencies seen in Crohn disease. Therefore, by preventing and correcting nutrient deficiencies, nutritional therapy is an important component in the overall management of patients with Crohn disease. PMID:15703556

  11. Pediatric Moyamoya disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagiub, Mohamed; Allarakhia, Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a progressive cerebrovascular occlusive disease of the bilateral internal carotid arteries that leads to a compensatory abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Its average annual incidence 0.54 per 100,000 population but it is the most common pediatric cerebrovascular disease in East Asia. The reported incidence in USA is approximately 0.086 per 100,000 patients. Case Report: We present a case of Moyamoya disease that was to detected in a 7-year-old female who presented with transient altered mental status. Conclusions: Moyamoya disease can be diagnosed if history, physical exam and brain imaging is highly suspicious. Conventional angiography remains the gold standard for diagnosis and aids in surgical planning for patients with suspected Moyamoya disease. PMID:23826451

  12. [Physical diseases in alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Takase, Kojiro

    2015-09-01

    Rapid excessive alcohol drinking frequently causes disturbance of consciousness due to head trauma, brain edema, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hepatic coma and so on, provoked by acute alcohol intoxication. Rapid differential diagnosis and management are extremely important to save a life. On the other hands, the chronic users of alcohol so called alcoholism has many kinds of physical diseases such as liver diseases (i.e., fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, alcoholic liver cirrhosis and miscellaneous liver disease), diabetes mellitus, injury to happen in drunkenness, pancreas disease (i.e., acute and chronic pancreatitis and deterioration of chronic pancreatitis), gastrontestinal diseases (i.e., gastroduodenal ulcer), and so on. Enough attention should be paid to above mentioned diseases, otherwise they would turn worse more with continuation and increase in quantity of the alcohol. It should be born in its mind that the excessive drinking becomes the weapon threatening life. PMID:26394519

  13. Pancytopenia in Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehrzad, Raman; Bravoco, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    We present a 49-year-old man with subacute onset of fever, weakness, shortness of breath, unilateral lower extremity oedema and pancytopenia who was found to have positive serology for Lyme disease. The patient presented with an intravascular haemolytic pattern on laboratory findings where an extensive infectious disease and haematological workup ruled out ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, HIV, hepatitis B and other parasitic infections. This left a very atypical presentation of Lyme disease. PMID:24596410

  14. Infectious diseases following disasters.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Srinivas; Christian, Michael D

    2010-10-01

    Infectious diseases following natural disasters tend to occur as a result of the prolonged secondary effects of the disaster, mostly when there is an interruption of public health measures resulting from destruction of the local infrastructure. This article will review the infectious risks that occur as a result of natural disasters, with a focus on the mechanism of disease spread, infectious diseases after specific disasters, and various evidence-based interventions. PMID:21149220

  15. [Neurogenetics in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Stefanache, F; Hodorog, D; Cuciureanu, D

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, a progressive degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, remains obscure. 20% of cases are familial. The disorder may be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Some monogenic forms of Parkinson's disease have been described. Many genetic studies explore whether a candidate gene may confer an increased risk for this disease. The search for a genetic susceptibility may lead to establish a preventive therapy. PMID:12092169

  16. Equine Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    McCue, Patrick M

    2002-12-01

    Equine Cushing's disease (ECD) is a chronic progressive disease of the intermediate pituitary gland of older horses. Horses with Cushing's disease often have other health problems, such as laminitis, chronic infections, pseudolactation, and other issues. Diagnosis of ECD is usually based on clinical signs and endocrine tests. Medical management of affected horses is usually a long-term or lifelong commitment. The goal of this article is to review the pathophysiology of ECD, outline diagnostic tests, and present treatment options. PMID:12516933

  17. Preventing Chronic Disease

    Cancer.gov

    Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) is a peer-reviewed electronic journal established by the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to address the interface between applied public health research, practice, and policy. Articles focus on preventing and controlling chronic diseases and conditions, promoting health, and examining the biological, behavioral, physical, and social determinants of health and their impact on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality across the life span.

  18. [Male breast diseases].

    PubMed

    Firmin-Lefebvre, D; Misery, L

    2013-01-01

    Because andrology is relatively undeveloped in France, the dermatologist is often the doctor first consulted for diseases of the nipple in men. All dermatological diseases can in fact occur at this site. There are some specific nipple diseases such as gynaecomastia, congenital abnormalities, hyperplasia, benign tumours and breast cancer. All clinical examinations and laboratory examinations should focus on diagnosis of this type of cancer and its elimination. PMID:23773741

  19. Small animal disease surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Fernando; Jones, Philip H; Menacere, Tarek; Heayns, Bethaney; Wardeh, Maya; Newman, Jenny; Radford, Alan D; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind; Noble, Peter J M; Everitt, Sally; Day, Michael J; McConnell, Katie

    2015-12-12

    This is the first UK small animal disease surveillance report from SAVSNET. Future reports will expand to other syndromes and diseases. As data are collected for longer, the estimates of changes in disease burden will become more refined, allowing more targeted local and perhaps national interventions. Anonymised data can be accessed for research purposes by contacting the authors. SAVSNET welcomes feedback on this report. PMID:26667432

  20. [Koi herpesvirus disease].

    PubMed

    Iida, Takaji; Sano, Motohiko

    2005-06-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) disease emerged at the late 1990s, and has rapidly spread to the world. In Japan, KHV disease first occurred at October 2003. The disease resulted in mass mortality of wild carp as well as cultured carp. Until now, KHV-infected carp were found in 42 out of 47 prefectures in Japan. Only carp Cyprinus carpio is susceptible to KHV, while goldfish, closely-related species to carp, is not. The affected carp swim lethargically. Sunken eyes and gill necrosis are frequently noticed, but no marked internal signs are observed. Optimal water temperature for the disease is 18-23 degrees C. Under 13 degrees C or over 28 degrees C, no death occurs. Keep at over 30 degrees C cures KHV disease, but can make the fish latent carriers. Because the fish do not get acquired immunity against KHV disease under low water temperature, the disease recurs with increase of water temperature. Isolation of KHV is difficult. KHV disease is diagnosed through epidemiological investigation, disease signs and PCR detection of KHV DNA. Vaccine development is ongoing for restart of culturing carp at KHV-contaminated places. PMID:16308541

  1. Biomarkers of aortic diseases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toru; Bossone, Eduardo; Sawaki, Daigo; Jánosi, Rolf Alexander; Erbel, Raimund; Eagle, Kim; Nagai, Ryozo

    2013-01-01

    The development of diagnostic biomarkers of acute cardiovascular disease remains an important topic of interest given potential use to aid in early diagnosis. Cardiac biomarkers of ischemia and heart failure have already proven to be clinically useful. Biomarkers of aortic diseases are also needed, especially for life-threatening conditions such as aortic dissection. In this review, we discuss the present status of the development of biomarkers of aortic diseases. Although aortic dissection has been most vigorously pursued, there has also been notable recent progress in biomarkers of aneurysms and inflammatory aortic disease. PMID:23237129

  2. "Diseases and natural kinds".

    PubMed

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2005-01-01

    David Thomasma called for the development of a medical ethics based squarely on the philosophy of medicine. He recognized, however, that widespread anti-essentialism presented a significant barrier to such an approach. The aim of this article is to introduce a theory that challenges these anti-essentialist objections. The notion of natural kinds presents a modest form of essentialism that can serve as the basis for a foundationalist philosophy of medicine. The notion of a natural kind is neither static nor reductionistic. Disease can be understood as making necessary reference to living natural kinds without invoking the claim that diseases themselves are natural kinds. The idea that natural kinds have a natural disposition to flourish as the kinds of things that they are provides a telos to which to tether the notion of disease - an objective telos that is broader than mere survival and narrower than subjective choice. It is argued that while nosology is descriptive and may have therapeutic implications, disease classification is fundamentally explanatory. Sickness and illness, while referring to the same state of affairs, can be distinguished from disease phenomenologically. Scientific and diagnostic fallibility in making judgments about diseases do not diminish the objectivity of this notion of disease. Diseases are things, not kinds. Injury is a concept parallel to disease that also makes necessary reference to living natural kinds. These ideas provide a new possibility for the development of a philosophy of medicine with implications for medical ethics. PMID:16292605

  3. Interstitial lung disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP) ... The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each ...

  4. [Immunology of Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Reyes López, P A

    1978-01-01

    American trypanosoniasis or Chagas' Disease is a serious health problem in Latin America. Schizotrypanum (Trypanosome) cruzi infection produce an inmune response, cellular and humoral well identified in all mammals so far studied, including man. The initial parasistemic disease is brought promptly under control, maybe as result of such inmune response. Chronical disease result of individual responses, through inmune aberration as main pathogenic factor. There is not, and there is no probability to develop it in a short time, suitable inmunoprophylaxis for Chagas' disease. PMID:101156

  5. Pathophysiology of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kupfer, Sonia S; Jabri, Bana

    2012-10-01

    Celiac disease results from the interplay of genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors. An understanding of the pathophysiology of celiac disease, in which the trigger (wheat, rye, and barley) is known, will undoubtedly reveal basic mechanisms that underlie other autoimmune diseases (eg, type 1 diabetes) that share many common pathogenic perturbations. This review describes seminal findings in each of the 3 domains of the pathogenesis of celiac disease, namely genetics, environmental triggers, and immune dysregulation, with a focus on newer areas of investigation such as non-HLA genetic variants, the intestinal microbiome, and the role of the innate immune system. PMID:23083984

  6. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. Other symptoms... Chronic fatigue, bone pain, muscle cramps, balance problems, migraine headaches, seizures, behavior and memory problems, ...

  7. [Malnutrition in chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Cano, Noël; Melchior, Jean-Claude

    2003-02-01

    During chronic diseases, malnutrition is found in approximately 40% of patients. Malnutrition is correlated with complication rates, handicap, need for care as well as mortality. Malnutrition can be related to two mechanisms: insufficient feeding and abnormal nutrient absorption or metabolism. Nutritional assessment of patients with chronic diseases should be helpful for the early detection and management of malnutrition. Nutritional supplementation was shown to improve both nutritional status and survival in selected conditions. Future therapies of malnutrition in chronic diseases rely to the selection of patients susceptible to respond to a new therapeutic approach which, depending on primary disease, may associate nutritional supplementation to rehabilitation and, in some conditions, anabolizing hormones. PMID:12688057

  8. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePLUS

    Hashimoto thyroiditis; Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis; Autoimmune thyroiditis ... Imaging studies are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may also change the results of ...

  9. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact CDC-INFO Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Information For: Travelers ...

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, R M; Croft, N M; Fell, J M; Afzal, N A; Heuschkel, R B

    2006-01-01

    Twenty five per cent of inflammatory bowel disease presents in childhood. Growth and nutrition are key issues in the management with the aim of treatment being to induce and then maintain disease remission with minimal side effects. Only 25% of Crohn's disease presents with the classic triad of abdominal pain, weight loss, and diarrhoea. Most children with ulcerative colitis have blood in the stool at presentation. Inflammatory markers are usually although not invariably raised at presentation (particularly in Crohn's disease). Full investigation includes upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and ileocolonoscopy. Treatment requires multidisciplinary input as part of a clinical network led by a paediatrician with special expertise in the management of the condition. PMID:16632672

  11. Lyme disease and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  12. Candidate parasitic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, K.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses five parasitic diseases: American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease), dracunculiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis and schistosomiasis. The available technology and health infrastructures in developing countries permit the eradication of dracunculiasis and the elimination of lymphatic filariasis due to Wuchereria bancrofti. Blindness due to onchocerciasis and transmission of this disease will be prevented in eleven West African countries; transmission of Chagas disease will be interrupted. A well-coordinated international effort is required to ensure that scarce resources are not wasted, efforts are not duplicated, and planned national programmes are well supported. PMID:10063677

  13. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... blood pressure. This is because if you have diabetic nephropathy, you likely also have high blood pressure. ...

  14. Probiotics and diverticular disease.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Sheth A; Floch M

    2009-02-01

    Diverticular disease is one of the most common medical conditions affecting Western populations. Inflammatory complications are the most common manifestation of the disease and typically cause acute bouts of abdominal pain and fever. Chronic symptoms can also occur and can be mistakenly attributed to irritable bowel syndrome and rarely to inflammatory bowel disease. Alterations in peridiverticular bacterial flora are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diverticular inflammation. This article discusses the rationale and reviews the existing clinical data regarding the role of probiotics in the management of diverticular disease.

  15. Probiotics and diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Anish; Floch, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Diverticular disease is one of the most common medical conditions affecting Western populations. Inflammatory complications are the most common manifestation of the disease and typically cause acute bouts of abdominal pain and fever. Chronic symptoms can also occur and can be mistakenly attributed to irritable bowel syndrome and rarely to inflammatory bowel disease. Alterations in peridiverticular bacterial flora are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diverticular inflammation. This article discusses the rationale and reviews the existing clinical data regarding the role of probiotics in the management of diverticular disease. PMID:19244147

  16. Colonic Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Traci L.; Friel, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Colonic Crohn disease is a complicated disease entity that requires a multidisciplinary effort on the part of the surgeon, gastroenterologist, and pathologist. Crohn disease affects ?500,000 people in North America with nearly 300,000 people suffering from colonic manifestations. This represents a significant portion of the patient population in the typical colorectal surgeon's practice. As such, an intimate understanding of the disease process, presentation, and treatment options is imperative. In this article, the authors review the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatment options with a focus on current strategies for surgical management. PMID:24436655

  17. Neurodegenerative disease. Genetic discrimination in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2009-10-01

    A survey conducted in Canada examined the prevalence of perceived genetic discrimination against patients with Huntington disease. The respondents reported discrimination not only by insurance or mortgage companies, but also in family and social contexts. Discrimination was more frequently attributed to family history than to genetic test results. PMID:19794509

  18. Defining an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future. PMID:26470448

  19. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Narayan, S K; Dutta, J K

    2005-09-01

    Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease is a prion protein disease causing a transmissible, subacute, fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a spongiform encephalopathy. Though rare, ever since Pruisner described the pathogenesis in 1982, this disease kept the clinicians as well as biologists spellbound, because of its distinct clinical picture and the novel mechanism of transmission. There was a further quantum leap in the interest in the disease with the establishment of its new clinical variant, the so called 'mad cow disease' in the late 1990s and had led to more stringent measures to ensure the quality of cattle-feeds and cattle-derived food products. The sporadic genetic variants, the commonest form of the disease, continue to challenge the genetic scientists. Advances in neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid marker proteins and genetic linkage studies now offer excellent diagnostic methods, while advances in therapeutic medicine which use products from cadaveric extracts such as growth hormone for treatment of hypopituitarism, dural grafts for neurosurgical procedures and cornea for transplantation etc. have thrown new challenges in controlling this serious disease. PMID:16334625

  20. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Aug 13,2015 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that ... healthier lifestyle. This content was last reviewed July 2015. Learn more: ... What Are My Risks Of Getting Heart Disease Infographic Take the My ...

  1. Rare Diseases Research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Extensive public-private partnerships, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the rare diseases community, which is seeing a renewed industry interest in smaller niche markets, have resulted in an increase of interventions for rare diseases. Significant collaborative efforts are required among the pharmaceutical industry, foundations, patient-advocacy groups, academic and government investigators and funding programs, regulatory scientists, and reimbursement agencies to meet the unmet diagnostic and treatment needs for approximately 25 million people in the United States with 7,000 rare diseases. The expanding role and outreach activities of patient-advocacy groups have increased public awareness. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as a disorder or condition with a prevalence of < 200,000 people. In 2011, the NIH provided > $3.5 billion for rare diseases research, including $750 million for orphan product development activities, nearly 11.4% of the NIH research budget. Several research institutes and centers of the NIH, including the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, have initiated varied translational research efforts to address the absence of preclinical and clinical data required for regulatory review purposes. Clinicians can expect to see significant increases in requests from patients and their families to participate in patient registries and natural history or observational studies to gather specific information from a larger pool of patients on the progression of the disease or response to treatments. An expanding emphasis on rare diseases provides hope for the millions of patients with rare diseases. PMID:23880676

  2. Nickle and plant disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the nutritional physiology of nickel (Ni) is relatively meager. Accumulating evidence indicates that attention to management of Ni nutrition may potentially benefit yield, quality, disease resistance, and disease control of certain crop species, most notably those transporting ureido-ni...

  3. [Lyme disease and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, R; Hajrić, A; Cirković, A; Miković, Z; Dmitrović, R

    1993-01-01

    The authors have investigated Borrelia infection in pregnant women with two or more spontaneous abortions, but with no clinical manifestations of Lyme disease. In 42 such cases the results were negative. On the other hand, in two cases with positive epidemiologic data, but without clinical manifestations of Lyme disease, serologic findings were positive. No complications during pregnancy or after childbirth were recorded. PMID:8262402

  4. Immunotherapy of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    van Montfrans, C; Camoglio, L; van Deventer, S J

    1998-01-01

    Although the initiating events of Crohn's disease are unknown, models of experimental colitis have provided new insights in the immunologically mediated pathways of mucosal inflammation. In Crohn's disease activated mucosal T lymphocytes produce proinflammatory cytokines within the mucosal compartment. With this understanding, there has been a shift in past years from the use of unspecific anti-inflammatory agents (corticosteroids, aminosalicylates) to the use of immunomodulatory drugs (azathioprine, methotrexate). Moreover, novel strategies have been designed for specific targets in Crohn's disease, in particular T lymphocytes and cytokines. In an open label study treatment of steroid-refractory Crohn's disease with anti- CD4+ antibodies was well tolerated and showed clinical benefit. However, a sustained depletion of the CD4+ cells precluded further clinical trials. In controlled clinical studies, anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) antibodies induced complete remissions and few side effects were observed. One study suggested efficacy in active Crohn's disease of recombinant interleukin-10. Long term treatment studies will have to answer questions about the indications for use, benefit and toxicity. Altogether, these results hold promise for future management of Crohn's disease, where disease-modifying interventions and strategies that effectively maintain disease remission will play a key role. PMID:9705600

  5. Foliar diseases of corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf blights and spots caused by fungi are some of the most destructive diseases of corn in the US and around the world. Correct identification of the disease is very important in determining the best means of control. For example, gray leaf spot of maize can be caused by one of at least two species...

  6. Mycobiota in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pranab K; Sendid, Boualem; Hoarau, Gautier; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Poulain, Daniel; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2015-02-01

    New insights gained through the use of state-of-the-art technologies, including next-generation sequencing, are starting to reveal that the association between the gastrointestinal tract and the resident mycobiota (fungal community) is complex and multifaceted, in which fungi are active participants influencing health and disease. Characterizing the human mycobiome (the fungi and their genome) in healthy individuals showed that the gastrointestinal tract contains 66 fungal genera and 184 fungal species, with Candida as the dominant fungal genera. Although fungi have been associated with a number of gastrointestinal diseases, characterization of the mycobiome has mainly been focused on patients with IBD and graft-versus-host disease. In this Review, we summarize the findings from studies investigating the relationship between the gut mycobiota and gastrointestinal diseases, which indicate that fungi contribute to the aggravation of the inflammatory response, leading to increased disease severity. A model explaining the mechanisms underlying the role of the mycobiota in gastrointestinal diseases is also presented. Our understanding of the contribution of the mycobiota to health and disease is still in its infancy and leaves a number of questions to be addressed. Answering these questions might lead to novel approaches to prevent and/or manage acute as well as chronic gastrointestinal disease. PMID:25385227

  7. Mummy berry disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mummy Berry is the most important disease of blueberry worldwide. It has not been as severe in the southeastern U.S. on rabbiteye blueberry has it is in other areas on highbush blueberry. However, it has caused severe losses on some farms in some years. This poster gives the symptoms, disease cyc...

  8. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePLUS

    Heart disease and depression often go hand-in-hand. You are are more likely to feel sad or depressed after a heart attack ... heart disease. The good news is that treating depression may help improve both your mental and physical ...

  9. Raspberry Mosaic Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry mosaic disease (RMD) is an overarching term used to describe a range of diseases caused by various combinations of different viruses that are each transmitted by aphids. In the scientific literature RMD has been given various alternative names, including red raspberry mosaic, type b mosaic...

  10. [Recklinghausen disease and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Oney, T; Weitzel, H

    1987-01-01

    Morbus Recklinghausen is an autosomal dominant disease with a high rate of new mutations. Progression of the skin lesions and the development of severe preeclampsia are the most important complications during gestation. In the following paper three cases with Recklinghausen's disease in pregnancy are reported and the consequence of the complications as well as the importance of genetic counseling are discussed. PMID:3120432

  11. Neoplastic Diseases of Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Depending on whether the etiologic agent is known, neoplastic diseases of poultry are divided into two main classes, virus-induced tumors and tumors of unknown etiology. As a group, neoplastic diseases of poultry comprise a variety of related and unrelated conditions with a single common denominator...

  12. Controlling Infectious Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Wm. Lane; Fidler, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Advocates establishing programs to educate the public about the growing threat of communicable diseases and to promote effective strategies. Utilizes recent successes and failures to formulate those strategies. Profiles three recent infectious disease outbreaks that illustrate some of the current problems. Identifies four ways that lawyers can…

  13. Treating Pompe Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Julie; Joseph, Drew; Darwiche, Houda

    2015-01-01

    One of the crosscutting concepts in science is cause and effect. A disease model can provide understanding of cause and effect, as teachers scaffold student thinking from molecular changes in the DNA to visible traits in the organism. The project described in this article uses Pompe disease, a rare recessive disorder, as a model of cause and…

  14. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  15. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  16. Diseases Caused by Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The symptoms, causal agents, epidemiology and management of important virus diseases in chickpea and lentil crops were reviewed in depth. The virus diseases include.Alflafa mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaiv virus, Faba bean necrotic yellows virus, Pea enation mosaic virus, Pea seed-borne mosaci virus,...

  17. Foodborne Disease Epidemiologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2005-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 76 million cases of foodborne illness occur in the U.S. each year; 5,000 are fatal. Most of these illnesses are caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, and parasites and the remaining are poisonings triggered by harmful toxins or chemicals. To Jack Guzewich, a foodborne disease

  18. Apple Replant Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Apple replant disease is a significant impediment to the establishment of viable orchards on sites previously planted to the same or related crop. Symptoms of replant disease are evident during the first growing season. Vigorous young trees exhibit an initial period of vegetati...

  19. Ethics in Prion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Kendra; Geschwind, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is intended to discuss some of the scientific and ethical issues that are created by increased research efforts towards earlier diagnosis, as well as to treatment of, human prion diseases (and related dementias), including the resulting consequences for individuals, their families, and society. Most patients with prion disease currently are diagnosed when they are about 2/3 of the way through their disease course (Geschwind, Kuo et al. 2010; Paterson, Torres-Chae et al. 2012), when the disease has progressed so far that even treatments that stop the disease process would probably have little benefit. Although there are currently no treatments available for prion diseases, we and others have realized that we must diagnose patients earlier and with greater accuracy so that future treatments have hope of success. As approximately 15% of prion diseases have a autosomal dominant genetic etiology, this further adds to the complexity of ethical issues, particularly regarding when to conduct genetic testing, release of genetic results, and when or if to implement experimental therapies. Human prion diseases are both infectious and transmissible; great care is required to balance the needs of the family and individual with both public health needs and strained hospital budgets. It is essential to proactively examine and address the ethical issues involved, as well as to define and in turn provide best standards of care. PMID:23906487

  20. [Aluminum and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Belojevi?, G; Jakovljevi?, B

    1998-01-01

    Neuro-toxic effects of aluminium, with disorders mainly in motor coordination, have been proved in epidemiological studies of subjects professionally exposed to aluminium. However, there is, as yet, no adequate evidence that neurotoxicity of aluminium leads to progressive dementia and Alzheimer's disease. It is likely that long-term use of drinking water with a high aluminium concentration, with pH about or less than 7.0, and with low fluoride concentration, is associated with the increased relative risk of Alzheimer's disease. The use of aluminium-containing antiacids, antiperspirants and beverages from aluminium cans, are probably of small importance concerning Alzheimer's disease. The relation of aluminium cumulated in the brain to onset of Alzheimer's disease is still unclear, as neuro-pathological lesions, which can be noticed in acute dementia caused with aluminium, significantly differ from those in Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, morphological and biochemical characteristics of neurofibrillary tangles which occur in the brain after experimental injection of aluminium are different from the tangles in Alzheimer's disease. Results of the studies concerning aluminium concentrations in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease are incoherent. To resolve this scientific problem it is necessary to follow-up the prognosis of neurotoxic disorders caused by aluminium. It should be clarified as well whether aluminium in neuro-pathological findings of Alzheimer's disease is an artefact caused by alumino-silicates present in most reagents for tissue-staining. PMID:9863396

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The most common causes of CKD are high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. Chronic kidney disease can also ... healthy diet can also help to lower your blood pressure. If you have diabetes, your doctor will tell you what to do ...

  2. Ethics in prion disease.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Kendra; Geschwind, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    This paper is intended to discuss some of the scientific and ethical issues that are created by increased research efforts towards earlier diagnosis, as well as to treatment of, human prion diseases (and related dementias), including the resulting consequences for individuals, their families, and society. Most patients with prion disease currently are diagnosed when they are about 2/3 of the way through their disease course (Geschwind et al., 2010a; Paterson et al., 2012b), when the disease has progressed so far that even treatments that stop the disease process would probably have little benefit. Although there are currently no treatments available for prion diseases, we and others have realized that we must diagnose patients earlier and with greater accuracy so that future treatments have hope of success. As approximately 15% of prion diseases have a autosomal dominant genetic etiology, this further adds to the complexity of ethical issues, particularly regarding when to conduct genetic testing, release of genetic results, and when or if to implement experimental therapies. Human prion diseases are both infectious and transmissible; great care is required to balance the needs of the family and individual with both public health needs and strained hospital budgets. It is essential to proactively examine and address the ethical issues involved, as well as to define and in turn provide best standards of care. PMID:23906487

  3. Forecasting Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fackelmann, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that doctors may one day be able to identify healthy people who will develop Alzheimer's disease. Discusses recent studies in which characteristics of a person's writing early in life appear to predict the disease, and brain scans can highlight changes that may precede dementia. (CCM)

  4. Anthocyanins and heart disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins are red, blue, and purple pigments distributed throughout nature, and in our diet. One potential health benefit of dietary anthocyanins is protection against cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence for beneficial effects of anthocyanins with respect to heart disease comes from epidemio...

  5. Disease concerns in energycane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diseases may be a limiting factor in the production of energycane, a perennial crop, by reducing annual yields and reducing the longevity of the crop cycle. Disease concerns also include the potential that a compatible pathogen could spread between energycane and sugarcane, sorghum, or corn. Widesp...

  6. Respiratory Diseases of Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new Respiratory Diseases of Poultry CRIS will be established effective October 1, 2006. Initially, the disease agents to be studied will include Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT), Bordetella avium (BART) and Pasteurella multocida. The research will focus on development of more effective vacc...

  7. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... acquired cystic kidney disease should talk with their health care provider about when to begin screening. [ Top ] Eating, Diet, and Nutrition No specific diet will prevent or delay acquired cystic kidney disease. In general, a diet designed for people on hemodialysis or ...

  8. CAM and respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Sorkness, Ronald L

    2009-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine is used commonly for respiratory diseases. This review summarizes data that identify potential links between dietary intake and asthma, and results of interventional trials of herbal substances for the treatment of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and acute bronchitis. PMID:19841248

  9. Celiac disease - sprue

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help from a registered dietitian who specializes in celiac disease and the gluten-free diet. A support group may also help ... the diagnosis is made. Some problems caused by celiac disease may ... such as a shorter than expected height and damage to the teeth.

  10. Viral disease in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of infectious disease has been an important issue for poultry breeders, particularly since the introduction of high density rearing. Selection for enhanced genetic resistance to disease is an important factor for poultry breeding companies in gaining market share, maintaining consumer confid...

  11. Treating Pompe Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Julie; Joseph, Drew; Darwiche, Houda

    2015-01-01

    One of the crosscutting concepts in science is cause and effect. A disease model can provide understanding of cause and effect, as teachers scaffold student thinking from molecular changes in the DNA to visible traits in the organism. The project described in this article uses Pompe disease, a rare recessive disorder, as a model of cause and…

  12. Management of diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Pfützer, Roland H; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Diverticular disease is a common condition in Western countries and the incidence and prevalence of the disease is increasing. The pathogenetic factors involved include structural changes in the gut that increase with age, a diet low in fibre and rich in meat, changes in intestinal motility, the concept of enteric neuropathy and an underlying genetic background. Current treatment strategies are hampered by insufficient options to stratify patients according to individual risk. One of the main reasons is the lack of an all-encompassing classification system of diverticular disease. In response, the German Society for Gastroenterology and Digestive Diseases (DGVS) has proposed a classification system as part of its new guideline for the diagnosis and management of diverticular disease. The classification system includes five main types of disease: asymptomatic diverticulosis, acute uncomplicated and complicated diverticulitis, as well as chronic diverticular disease and diverticular bleeding. Here, we review prevention and treatment strategies stratified by these five main types of disease, from prevention of the first attack of diverticulitis to the management of chronic complications and diverticular bleeding. PMID:26170219

  13. Sickle Cell Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with SCD. Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of inherited red blood ... scientists. About Us Overview of CDC’s work. CDC Facebook Posts ... Tweets VIDEO Sickle Cell Disease Education and Awareness in Your Community What is ...

  14. [Cytokines and skin diseases].

    PubMed

    Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1995-01-01

    Many skin diseases such as eczema and psoriasis are characterised by a chronic inflammatory skin condition. In this respect they resemble other chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, bronchial asthma, ulcerous colitis and Crohn's disease. A persistent accumulation, predominantly of T-lymphocytes constitutes the central pathophysiological feature of such diseases. The past 15-20 years have witnessed the characterisation of an extensive series of peptides known as cytokines. These are soluble, relatively low molecular weight peptides which at low concentrations mediate regulation of cellular receptors, new phenotype expression, secretion and migration. Many cytokines have been found to be present in conjunction with skin diseases, and it is suggested that they are involved in the development of inflammation. PMID:7892122

  15. Peyronie's Disease: A Review.

    PubMed

    Jalkut, Mark; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor; Rajfer, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    Peyronie's disease is an acquired benign condition without known systemic sequelae with presenting symptoms that include the presence of a plaque or induration of the penile shaft, penile curvature or deformity during erection, penile pain, and erectile dysfunction. This article reviews the natural history of the disease, discusses the disease's etiology (widely thought to involve minor penile trauma with subsequent aberrant wound healing), and outlines proper clinical evaluation of Peyronie's disease patients. Medical treatments can be systemic (colchicine, potassium aminobenzoate, vitamin E), intralesional (steroids, verapamil, collagenase, interferons), or topical. Surgical therapy for Peyronie's disease (plication, graft-based, and prosthetic techniques) should be reserved for the man who has failed conservative therapy and whose curvature, indentation, or erectile dysfunction precludes intercourse. Regardless of the surgical procedure, the patient should be made aware of the inherent risks of surgery. PMID:16985635

  16. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L; Jacobs, Andreas H; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G; Brooks, David J; Hunot, Stéphane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A; Breitner, John C; Cole, Greg M; Golenbock, Douglas T; Kummer, Markus P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity, are likely to interfere with immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. Modulation of risk factors and targeting of these immune mechanisms could lead to future therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25792098

  17. Why infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, John G

    2014-09-15

    Infectious diseases is a broad discipline that is almost unique in contemporary medicine with its ability to cure and prevent disease, to identify specific disease causes (microbes), and to deal with diverse, sometimes massive outbreaks. The value of the infectious disease practitioner is now magnified by the crisis of antibiotic resistance, the expanding consequences of international travel, the introduction of completely new pathogen diagnostics, and healthcare reform with emphasis on infection prevention and cost in dollars and lives. Infectious disease careers have great personal rewards to the practitioner based on these observations. It is unfortunate that we have been so effective in our work, but relatively ineffective in convincing the healthcare system of this value. PMID:25151484

  18. Obesity Disease and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulhim, Abdulrahman Saleh; Al-Hussaini, Hessah Abdulaziz; Al-Jalal, Bashaeer Abdullah; Al-Moagal, Rehab Omar; Al-Najjar, Sara Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a medical disease that is increasing significantly nowadays. Worldwide obesity prevalence doubled since 1980. Obese patients are at great risk for complications with physical and psychological burdens, thus affecting their quality of life. Obesity is well known to have higher risk for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, musculoskeletal diseases and shorter life expectancy. In addition, obesity has a great impact on surgical diseases, and elective surgeries in comparison to general population. There is higher risk for wound infection, longer operative time, poorer outcome, and others. The higher the BMI (body mass index), the higher the risk for these complications. This literature review illustrates the prevalence of obesity as a diseases and complications of obesity in general as well as, in a surgical point of view, general surgery perioperative risks and complications among obese patients. It will review the evidence-based updates in these headlines. PMID:26464861

  19. Nutrition, Epigenetics, and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence suggests that maternal nutrition and environmental exposure early in development play an important role in susceptibility to disease in later life. In addition, these disease outcomes seem to pass through subsequent generations. Epigenetic modifications provide a potential link between the nutrition status during critical periods in development and changes in gene expression that may lead to disease phenotypes. An increasing body of evidence from experimental animal studies supports the role of epigenetics in disease susceptibility during critical developmental periods, including periconceptional period, gestation, and early postnatal period. The rapid improvements in genetic and epigenetic technologies will allow comprehensive investigations of the relevance of these epigenetic phenomena in human diseases. PMID:24527414

  20. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  1. [Skin diseases with photosensitivity].

    PubMed

    Amblard, P; Leccia, M T

    1992-06-01

    Skin diseases associated with photosensitivity are numerous and may be divided into three main groups: photo-aggravated dermatoses, genophotodermatoses and metabolic photodermatoses. Photo-aggravated dermatoses are autonomous skin diseases in which exposure to sunlight may make the disease worse or precipitate its onset and/or its progressiveness; this group includes lupus erythematosus, autoimmune bullous diseases, acantolytic dyskeratoses, acne vulgaris, rosacea and cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates. To these must be added photosensitive forms of autonomous dermatoses such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, herpes labialis, erythema multiforme, granuloma and disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis. Genophotodermatoses are genodermatoses which are made photosensitive by a recognized or as yet unidentified deficiency of the natural photoprotection system. In this group are albinism, vitiligo, xeroderma pigmentosum and poikiloderma. Metabolic photodermatoses are diseases in which photosensitization reactions, often revealing, are due to the accumulation in the skin of an endogenous chromophore as a result of a congenital (porphyria) or acquired (pellagra) enzymatic disorder. PMID:1529248

  2. Celiac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Garnier-Lengliné, Hélène; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Ruemmele, Frank M

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy, triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Since the use of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies in the early 1990s, two main groups of clinical presentation can be identified: patients with a symptomatic form of the disease, and patients with a pauci (a)-symptomatic form detected during the work-up of another autoimmune disease or due to a family history of celiac disease. The prevalence of both forms of the disease is currently estimated between 1/100 and 1/400. Classical form of the disease is characterized by occurrence of diarrhoea, failure to thrive, and abdominal bloating in young infants in the months following gluten introduction. Serological tests show high level of anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysium antibodies. Until recently, the diagnosis required duodenal biopsies that show villous atrophy. HLA genotype can help for diagnosis: the absence of the HLA-DQ2 or DQ8 alleles has a high negative predictive value. European guidelines recently proposed to reconsider the need for systematic endoscopy in typical symptomatic forms with high level of anti-transglutaminase and positive anti-endomysium. These recommendations are being assessed now. Currently, the gluten-free diet remains the only effective treatment for celiac disease. Children with celiac disease have to exclude from their diet all products containing wheat, barley and rye. Gluten-free diet causes clinical remission within a few weeks, but normalization of the small bowel mucosa and negativity of anti-transglutaminase antibodies are obtained in several months or even years. Gluten-free diet is useful to obtain clinical assessment, but also to prevent long-term complications of celiac disease, mainly osteoporosis, other autoimmune diseases, decreased fertility and cancers. PMID:26186878

  3. Chromatin deregulation in disease.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Anne C; Foster, Benjamin M; Bartke, Till

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of chromatin by epigenetic mechanisms plays a central role in gene expression and is essential for development and maintenance of cell identity and function. Aberrant chromatin regulation is observed in many diseases where it leads to defects in epigenetic gene regulation resulting in pathological gene expression programmes. These defects are caused by inherited or acquired mutations in genes encoding enzymes that deposit or remove DNA and histone modifications and that shape chromatin architecture. Chromatin deregulation often results in neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities, frequently linked to physical and developmental abnormalities, but can also cause neurodegenerative diseases, immunodeficiency, or muscle wasting syndromes. Epigenetic diseases can either be of monogenic origin or manifest themselves as complex multifactorial diseases such as in congenital heart disease, autism spectrum disorders, or cancer in which mutations in chromatin regulators are contributing factors. The environment directly influences the epigenome and can induce changes that cause or predispose to diseases through risk factors such as stress, malnutrition or exposure to harmful chemicals. The plasticity of chromatin regulation makes targeting the enzymatic machinery an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention and an increasing number of small molecule inhibitors against a variety of epigenetic regulators are in clinical use or under development. In this review, we will give an overview of the molecular lesions that underlie epigenetic diseases, and we will discuss the impact of the environment and prospects for epigenetic therapies. PMID:26188466

  4. Indian genetic disease database

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sanchari; Sengupta, Mainak; Dutta, Anirban; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Bag, Sumit K.; Dutta, Chitra; Ray, Kunal

    2011-01-01

    Indians, representing about one-sixth of the world population, consist of several thousands of endogamous groups with strong potential for excess of recessive diseases. However, no database is available on Indian population with comprehensive information on the diseases common in the country. To address this issue, we present Indian Genetic Disease Database (IGDD) release 1.0 (http://www.igdd.iicb.res.in)—an integrated and curated repository of growing number of mutation data on common genetic diseases afflicting the Indian populations. Currently the database covers 52 diseases with information on 5760 individuals carrying the mutant alleles of causal genes. Information on locus heterogeneity, type of mutation, clinical and biochemical data, geographical location and common mutations are furnished based on published literature. The database is currently designed to work best with Internet Explorer 8 (optimal resolution 1440?×?900) and it can be searched based on disease of interest, causal gene, type of mutation and geographical location of the patients or carriers. Provisions have been made for deposition of new data and logistics for regular updation of the database. The IGDD web portal, planned to be made freely available, contains user-friendly interfaces and is expected to be highly useful to the geneticists, clinicians, biologists and patient support groups of various genetic diseases. PMID:21037256

  5. Indian genetic disease database.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sanchari; Sengupta, Mainak; Dutta, Anirban; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Bag, Sumit K; Dutta, Chitra; Ray, Kunal

    2011-01-01

    Indians, representing about one-sixth of the world population, consist of several thousands of endogamous groups with strong potential for excess of recessive diseases. However, no database is available on Indian population with comprehensive information on the diseases common in the country. To address this issue, we present Indian Genetic Disease Database (IGDD) release 1.0 (http://www.igdd.iicb.res.in)--an integrated and curated repository of growing number of mutation data on common genetic diseases afflicting the Indian populations. Currently the database covers 52 diseases with information on 5760 individuals carrying the mutant alleles of causal genes. Information on locus heterogeneity, type of mutation, clinical and biochemical data, geographical location and common mutations are furnished based on published literature. The database is currently designed to work best with Internet Explorer 8 (optimal resolution 1440 × 900) and it can be searched based on disease of interest, causal gene, type of mutation and geographical location of the patients or carriers. Provisions have been made for deposition of new data and logistics for regular updation of the database. The IGDD web portal, planned to be made freely available, contains user-friendly interfaces and is expected to be highly useful to the geneticists, clinicians, biologists and patient support groups of various genetic diseases. PMID:21037256

  6. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  7. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  8. Aging and liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee; Kisseleva, Tatiana; Brenner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Aging is a condition in which a person gradually loses the ability to maintain homeostasis, due to structural alteration or dysfunction. Aging is a major risk factor for most chronic diseases. As the liver has a remarkable ability to regenerate, this review assessed the effect of aging on clinical liver disease with references to preclinical models when relevant to pathogenesis. Recent findings Aging has been shown to not only enhance vulnerability to acute liver injury but also increase susceptibility of the fibrotic response. Aging is associated with the severity and poor prognosis of various liver diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, hepatitis C, and liver transplantation. Summary Treatment of older patients with liver disease may require different or longer interventions. Transplantation of an older liver will be less tolerant of subsequent injury. Future studies are needed to understand more about the molecular mechanism of aging and contribute to the development of a noble treatment strategy that can block the progression of aging-induced liver diseases. PMID:25850346

  9. Genetic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the primary cause of a disease is essential for understanding its mechanisms and for adequate classification, prognosis, and treatment. Recently, the etiologies of many kidney diseases have been revealed as single-gene defects. This is exemplified by steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, which is caused by podocin mutations in ~25% of childhood and ~15% of adult cases. Knowledge of a disease-causing mutation in a single-gene disorder represents one of the most robust diagnostic examples of “personalized medicine”, because the mutation conveys an almost 100% risk of developing the disease by a certain age. Whereas single-gene diseases are rare disorders, polygenic “risk alleles” are found in common adult-onset diseases. This review will discuss prominent renal single-gene kidney disorders and polygenic risk alleles of common disorders. We delineate how emerging techniques of total exome capture and large-scale sequencing will facilitate molecular genetic diagnosis, prognosis and specific therapy and lead to a better understanding of disease mechanisms, thus enabling development of new targeted drugs. PMID:20382325

  10. [Chronic disease and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, U

    1992-01-25

    Chronic disease is not a strictly defined term and includes a large number of illnesses ranging from physical to mental impairment. It is estimated that between 10% and 20% of adolescents have a chronic disease. Independence and new relations, acceptance of a new body image and sexuality, career plans and cognitive maturation are core topics in development to adulthood. Chronic disease may interfere with these developmental tasks. Most often there is no specific psychopathology, but the type of impairment, its influence on family life and functioning, age at onset, gender, and other factors will interact with psychosocial maturation. Because of the important role of the family, not only the adolescent patient him/herself, but also parents and siblings need to be included in all major decisions. As hospitalizations may be disruptive they must be planned, taking in account the patient's plans and opinions. Chronic disease may lead to death during the period of adolescence. It is believed that the concept of one's own mortality develops at age 14 to 17 years, a fact that will influence care during the terminal stage of a disease. Whatever the problems and questions raised by the family, the developmental stage of the adolescent has always to be considered when dealing with specific issues of chronic disease. Periodic reassessment of psychosocial development is therefore one of the main tasks of the primary care physician. Counselling will address not only the disease but also the developmental tasks of any teenager. PMID:1734506

  11. Perianal Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Basu, Abhijit; Wexner, Steven D.

    2002-06-01

    Perianal Crohn's disease usually is associated with involvement of another primary site of Crohn's disease. However, there is conflicting evidence on the relationship between proximal disease activity and perianal symptoms. Therefore, although it is reasonable to treat active proximal disease, symptomatic perianal disease may have to be treated on its own right. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures are best treated medically. Fistulae and abscesses are treated with control of sepsis and resolution of inflammation while preserving continence and quality of life. Abscesses require surgical drainage, which needs to be prolonged for healing to be complete. Fistulae may be treated with medications first, especially if the rectum is diseased. Refractory fistulae respond better to surgical treatment and sometimes require fecal diversion. The medical management of patients with perianal Crohn's disease consists of rectal mesalamine, systemic antibi-otics, immunosuppressive agents, and infliximab. The role of infliximab is evolving and it may reduce the need for surgical intervention in some cases. Perianal hygiene and skin protection help to reduce local discomfort. PMID:12003714

  12. The Orphan Disease Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minlu; Zhu, Cheng; Jacomy, Alexis; Lu, Long J.; Jegga, Anil G.

    2011-01-01

    The low prevalence rate of orphan diseases (OD) requires special combined efforts to improve diagnosis, prevention, and discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. To identify and investigate relationships based on shared genes or shared functional features, we have conducted a bioinformatic-based global analysis of all orphan diseases with known disease-causing mutant genes. Starting with a bipartite network of known OD and OD-causing mutant genes and using the human protein interactome, we first construct and topologically analyze three networks: the orphan disease network, the orphan disease-causing mutant gene network, and the orphan disease-causing mutant gene interactome. Our results demonstrate that in contrast to the common disease-causing mutant genes that are predominantly nonessential, a majority of orphan disease-causing mutant genes are essential. In confirmation of this finding, we found that OD-causing mutant genes are topologically important in the protein interactome and are ubiquitously expressed. Additionally, functional enrichment analysis of those genes in which mutations cause ODs shows that a majority result in premature death or are lethal in the orthologous mouse gene knockout models. To address the limitations of traditional gene-based disease networks, we also construct and analyze OD networks on the basis of shared enriched features (biological processes, cellular components, pathways, phenotypes, and literature citations). Analyzing these functionally-linked OD networks, we identified several additional OD-OD relations that are both phenotypically similar and phenotypically diverse. Surprisingly, we observed that the wiring of the gene-based and other feature-based OD networks are largely different; this suggests that the relationship between ODs cannot be fully captured by the gene-based network alone. PMID:21664998

  13. Rheumatic Diseases and Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    BOJINCA, Violeta; JANTA, Iustina

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are many studies which demonstrate a higher risk for malignancy in patients with rheumatic diseases. There have been a number of possible explanations for the differences in the risk of certain malignancies in patients with rheumatic disease, compared with general population, but a clear mechanism is difficult to identify. Rheumatoid syndromes may be associated with malignancy as paraneoplastic conditions, which can antedate the neoplasm diagnosis. On the other hand, autoimmune rheumatic diseases have a higher risk of malignancy by themselves or because of the immunosuppressant treatments. PMID:23482881

  14. Exotic viral diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, Lassa fever, monkeypox, and Ebola virus diseases of humans have all been recognized since 1967. These are examples of some of the exotic virus diseases which through importation may present a potential public health problem in the United States. Some of these viruses are also highly hazardous to laboratory and medical personnel. This paper is a review of the general characteristics, the epidemiology, and laboratory diagnosis of the exotic viruses which have been described during the last 25 years. PMID:6246685

  15. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  16. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan

    2011-11-01

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  17. Bone hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, X H; Ding, L W

    2007-01-01

    Bone hydatid disease lacks a typical clinical appearance and image characteristics on x ray or CT are similar to those of tuberculosis, metastases and giant cell tumour or bone cysts. However, MRI does show distinctive diagnostic features of bone hydatid disease, especially in the spine. Until recently, treatment of osseous hydatid disease has been entirely surgical. Effective chemotherapy using benzimidazoles, particularly mebendazole, albendazole and combination treatments, has now been achieved in experimental studies and clinical practice. However, most of these drugs are still in the experimental stage or are in the early stages of clinical use. PMID:17675547

  18. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm. PMID:25999227

  19. Probiotics and liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Garg, Shashank; Aggarwal, Sourabh

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota play an important role in health and disease. The gut-liver axis provides for an interaction between bacterial components like lipopolysaccharide and hepatic receptors (Toll-like receptors). Dysbiosis and altered intestinal permeability may modulate this interaction and therefore result in hepatic disorders or worsening of hepatic disorders. Administration of health-promoting microbial strains may help ameliorate these harmful interactions and hepatic disorders. This review focuses on changes in gut microbiota in the context of liver disease and possible roles of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics in liver disease. PMID:24361022

  20. Celiac disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Rebecca; Koren, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    QUESTION: One of my patients was diagnosed with celiac disease and maintains a strict gluten-free diet. Is her fetus at risk of neural tube defects because she does not get folic acid from bread and other flour-based foods? ANSWER: A woman with celiac disease must supplement her diet with multivitamins, including folic acid. Most prenatal vitamins contain 0.8 to 0.9 mg of folic acid, double the amount recommended by Health Canada for prevention of neural tube defects. Without supplementation (eg, undiagnosed pregnancy), women with celiac disease might not take in enough folate to maintain protective levels. PMID:15526871

  1. [Lifestyle diseases in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Harth, W; Hillert, A

    2007-10-01

    Psychosocial disorders and lifestyle trends have become more important in dermatology. Lifestyle diseases are a biopsychosocial phenomenon that can only be diagnosed and treated by paying attention to the quickly changing sociocultural aspects. The naming and popularization of the particular lifestyle diseases takes place by the media, but there is only an imprecise medical classification of these phenomena. This article gives an overview of the current situation and medical conditions of lifestyle diseases and try to assign them to an established psychosomatic diagnosis, based on the clinical symptomatic. Most often somatoform disorders, somatization disorders with a repeated presentation of physical symptoms which cannot be medically objectified or depressive disturbances are found. PMID:17701144

  2. Gorham's disease: clinical case?

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Oliveira, Carolina; Rodrigues, André Sá; Amorim, Nelson; Pinto, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Gorham's disease, also known as idiopathic massive osteolysis, is a rare pathological condition characterized by vascular proliferation that results in destruction and reabsorption of the bone matrix, of unknown etiology. It was first described by Jackson in 1838, but it was Gorham and Stout, in 1955, who defined this disease as a specific entity. It has variable clinical presentation and generally has progressive behavior. Controversy continues regarding the treatment and there is no standard treatment. This pathological condition generally presents a favorable prognosis. Here, a case of Gorham's disease with involvement of the left hip is presented, in a male patient without relevant antecedents. PMID:26229923

  3. Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger disease).

    PubMed

    Seebald, Jessica; Gritters, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger disease) is an occlusive, nonatherosclerotic, inflammatory vasculitis that causes ischemia in small and medium vessels. Most commonly, Buerger disease is diagnosed in 40- to 45-year-old men with a heavy smoking history. Our case exemplifies the most common presentation, diagnosis, and treatment in a 53-year-old male smoker who presents with arm pain and dusky cool fingers. A Buerger diagnosis requires exclusion of autoimmune, diabetic, and embolic causes. The only recognized treatment for this disease is smoking cessation. PMID:26649109

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Leon A.; Angulo, Paul; Lindor, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    NONALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE is emerging as the most common chronic liver condition in the Western world. It is associated with insulin resistance and frequently occurs with features of the metabolic syndrome. Disease presentation ranges from asymptomatic elevated liver enzyme levels to cirrhosis with complications of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment recommendations are limited to weight loss and exercise, although several promising medications are on the horizon. In this article we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis and diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as well as approaches to its management. PMID:15795412

  5. Skin Diseases in Horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-08-01

    Skin disease in horses is a common and potentially challenging clinical problem. Information pertaining to skin disease is lacking in horses when compared with that in other companion animal species. Certainly, both horse-specific and location-specific patterns are present, but these can often be confounded by other factors. There are many possible ways in which to organize skin disease; in this article, they are organized based loosely on their most common clinical feature. Space limits the number of conditions that can be described here, and those chosen were seen relatively frequently in a multiinstitutional study of equine biopsies. PMID:26037605

  6. Zygomycetes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribes, Julie A.; Vanover-Sams, Carolyn L.; Baker, Doris J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zygomycetes represent relatively uncommon isolates in the clinical laboratory, reflecting either environmental contaminants or, less commonly, a clinical disease called zygomycosis. There are two orders of Zygomycetes containing organisms that cause human disease, the Mucorales and the Entomophthorales. The majority of human illness is caused by the Mucorales. While disease is most commonly linked to Rhizopus spp., other organisms are also associated with human infection, including Mucor, Rhizomucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Saksenaea, Cunninghamella, Cokeromyces, and Syncephalastrum spp. Although Mortierella spp. do cause disease in animals, there is no longer sufficient evidence to suggest that they are true human pathogens. The spores from these molds are transmitted by inhalation, via a variety of percutaneous routes, or by ingestion of spores. Human zygomycosis caused by the Mucorales generally occurs in immunocompromised hosts as opportunistic infections. Host risk factors include diabetes mellitus, neutropenia, sustained immunosuppressive therapy, chronic prednisone use, iron chelation therapy, broad-spectrum antibiotic use, severe malnutrition, and primary breakdown in the integrity of the cutaneous barrier such as trauma, surgical wounds, needle sticks, or burns. Zygomycosis occurs only rarely in immunocompetent hosts. The disease manifestations reflect the mode of transmission, with rhinocerebral and pulmonary diseases being the most common manifestations. Cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and allergic diseases are also seen. The Mucorales are associated with angioinvasive disease, often leading to thrombosis, infarction of involved tissues, and tissue destruction mediated by a number of fungal proteases, lipases, and mycotoxins. If the diagnosis is not made early, dissemination often occurs. Therapy, if it is to be effective, must be started early and requires combinations of antifungal drugs, surgical intervention, and reversal of the underlying risk factors. The Entomophthorales are closely related to the Mucorales on the basis of sexual growth by production of zygospores and by the production of coenocytic hyphae. Despite these similarities, the Entomophthorales and Mucorales have dramatically different gross morphologies, asexual reproductive characteristics, and disease manifestations. In comparison to the floccose aerial mycelium of the Mucorales, the Entomophthorales produce a compact, glabrous mycelium. The asexually produced spores of the Entomophthorales may be passively released or actively expelled into the environment. Human disease with these organisms occurs predominantly in tropical regions, with transmission occurring by implantation of spores via minor trauma such as insect bites or by inhalation of spores into the sinuses. Conidiobolus typically infects mucocutaneous sites to produce sinusitis disease, while Basidiobolus infections occur as subcutaneous mycosis of the trunk and extremities. The Entomophthorales are true pathogens, infecting primarily immunocompetent hosts. They generally do not invade blood vessels and rarely disseminate. Occasional cases of disseminated and angioinvasive disease have recently been described, primarily in immunocompromised patients, suggesting a possible emerging role for this organism as an opportunist. PMID:10756000

  7. Imaging in Hirayama disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Keshav; Sood, Shashank; Modi, Jayesh; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Hirayama disease, also known as Sobue disease is a rare nonprogressive spinal muscular atrophy. Here, we report a case series of three young males presenting with atrophy of distal upper limb and Hirayama disease as their clinico-radiological diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed loss of cervical lordosis with focal areas of lower cervical cord atrophy in a neutral position. MRI in flexion position revealed, anterior displacement of the detached posterior dura from the underlying lamina compressing the thecal sac and widened posterior epidural space with flow voids seen better on 3D-CISS images. All the three patients were managed conservatively. PMID:26933371

  8. Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger disease)

    PubMed Central

    Seebald, Jessica; Gritters, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger disease) is an occlusive, nonatherosclerotic, inflammatory vasculitis that causes ischemia in small and medium vessels. Most commonly, Buerger disease is diagnosed in 40- to 45-year-old men with a heavy smoking history. Our case exemplifies the most common presentation, diagnosis, and treatment in a 53-year-old male smoker who presents with arm pain and dusky cool fingers. A Buerger diagnosis requires exclusion of autoimmune, diabetic, and embolic causes. The only recognized treatment for this disease is smoking cessation. PMID:26649109

  9. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    ScienceCinema

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

    2014-06-25

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  10. Some Important Diseases of Tree Fruits - Diseases of Vegetable Crops - Diseases of Grapes - Diseases of Tree Nuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Donald H.; And Others

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University consists of four sections on plant disease recognition and control. The titles of these four sections are: (1) Some Important Diseases of Tree Fruits; (2) Diseases of Vegetable Crops; (3) Diseases of Crops; and (4) Diseases of Tree Nuts. The first section discusses…

  11. Respiratory diseases of global consequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory diseases are one of the two major categories of poultry diseases that cause the most severe economic losses globally (the other being enteric disease). The economic impact of respiratory disease is both direct, from the production losses caused by primary disease and indirect from preve...

  12. Some Important Diseases of Tree Fruits - Diseases of Vegetable Crops - Diseases of Grapes - Diseases of Tree Nuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Donald H.; And Others

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University consists of four sections on plant disease recognition and control. The titles of these four sections are: (1) Some Important Diseases of Tree Fruits; (2) Diseases of Vegetable Crops; (3) Diseases of Crops; and (4) Diseases of Tree Nuts. The first section discusses…

  13. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  14. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, and dehydration. Autoimmune Chronic Active Hepatitis Adisease of the liver that may be mistaken for alcoholic liver disease. 70% of patients are female. Symptoms can include fatigue, abdominal discomfort, ...

  15. About Haemophilus influenzae Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis About Haemophilus influenzae Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  16. Diet - liver disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of toxic waste products. Increasing your intake of carbohydrates to be in proportion with the amount of ... severe liver disease include: Eat large amounts of carbohydrate foods. Carbohydrates should be the major source of ...

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ago. Kidney Disease About your kidneys About your kidneys Your kidneys are vital organs that remove waste ... long as possible. Kidney-friendly diet for CKD Kidney-friendly diet You may be able to prevent ...

  18. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Autoimmune Diseases Progress and Promise Key Words The Immune System Your immune system is the network of cells and tissues throughout ... having two parts: the acquired and the innate immune systems. The acquired (or adaptive) immune system develops as ...

  19. Evolution of Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental tradeoff between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple tradeoffs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases. PMID:22975004

  20. Roseola (Sixth Disease)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share | Roseola (Sixth Disease) A parent's guide for infants and babies A A A Pink, flat, or ... with acetaminophen (Tylenol®) or ibuprofen and cool sponge baths. (Do not use very cold water, ice, or ...

  1. Protagonists with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Haan, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex disorder with many fascinating features. Its onset is creeping, the progression is slow but inevitable. There are motor symptoms, such as a tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, mask-like facial expression, and postural abnormalities, but also hallucinations, cognitive deterioration, and depression. In many novels, fictive patients with Parkinson's disease play a role. It seems that authors have used many aspects of the disease to emphasize their messages. Their narratives include themes such as rigidity, petrifaction, confusion, dementia, and hallucinations. In this chapter, as examples, several protagonists with Parkinson's disease will be described from works of John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, Sue Miller, J.M. Coetzee, and John Harding, among others. PMID:23485900

  2. Understanding cardiovascular disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of plaque. Narrow arteries reduce or block blood flow. When blood and oxygen can't get to the legs, it can injure nerves and tissue. High blood pressure (hypertension) is a cardiovascular disease that ...

  3. Diseases Caused by Nematodes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nematodes are important yield limiting factors in soybean production world wide. This article is a short, general introduction of nematodes for non nematologists and is a section of a larger soybean disease compendium....

  4. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  5. Heavy Chain Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Google+ LinkedIn Merck Manuals Consumer Version Blood Disorders Plasma Cell Disorders Heavy Chain Diseases Drugs Mentioned In ... to Consumer Version DOCTORS: Go to Professional Version Plasma Cell Disorders Overview of Plasma Cell Disorders Monoclonal ...

  6. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pulmonary embolism (blood clots), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and varicose veins. Everyone is at risk for vascular disease. With the increase in obesity and Type II diabetes in Americans and as the population ages, it ...

  7. Disease and Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Calvin

    1978-01-01

    Discusses disease and genetic disorders as evolutionary mechanisms. Emphasizes the archeological evidence from past human populations and societies, mentioning albinism, scurvy, sleeping sickness, bone conditions, various host-parasite relationships, rickets, sickle-cell anemia, diabetes, and influenza. (CS)

  8. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  9. Autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Řstensen, Monika; Cetin, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Rheumatic diseases (RDs) occur preferentially in women, often during the childbearing age. The interaction of pregnancy and the RD is varied, ranging from spontaneous improvement to aggravation of disease symptoms or life-threatening flares. Risks for the mother with RD and the child differ in regard to the presence of organ manifestations, organ damage, disease activity, presence of specific autoantibodies, and therapy. Pregnancy complications comprise hypertension, preeclampsia, premature delivery, and side effects of therapy. Adverse pregnancy outcomes include recurrent miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, and fetal demise, and they are frequently encountered in RD with organ manifestations and harmful autoantibodies. Because of the difference in the prevalence of RDs, knowledge on the gestational course of disease and pregnancy outcome is limited to the fairly common RDs such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in RD are connected with increased risks for mother and child and need interdisciplinary care and management. PMID:25891380

  10. About Kennedy's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kennedy, M.D. The KDA is proud to provide information, education, and support to over 3 Million visitors. Frequently Used Links What is Kennedy's Disease DNA Testing for KD Frequently Asked Questions Doctors familiar ...

  11. Kennedy's Disease Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kennedy, M.D. The KDA is proud to provide information, education, and support to over 3 Million visitors. Frequently Used Links What is Kennedy's Disease DNA Testing for KD Frequently Asked Questions Doctors familiar ...

  12. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Confirmed Patients with Ebola Virus Disease in the United States What's New (Continued) More Information for Specific Groups Travelers U.S. Healthcare Workers and Settings Information for Families and Loved ...

  13. Wilson's Disease Association International

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that when we speak to the legislature, the pharmaceutical companies, & medical associations, our voice is strong and our message is clear. Membership Information >> SHOP OR SEARCH FOR A ... About Wilson Disease Symptoms Diagnosis ...

  14. Learn About Neuromuscular Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Give Now Learn About Neuromuscular Disease Muscular dystrophy, ALS and related ... Become a Volunteer Advocate Become a Partner Donate Learn About Legacy Gifts Match Your Gift MDA Tools ...

  15. IMPROVING WATERBORNE DISEASE SURVEILLANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public health surveillance has played a key role in controlling the spread of communicable disease and identifying the need for specific publich health practices, such as the filteration and chlorination of drinking water supplies. However, the characteristics of waterborne ou...

  16. Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Gases Impact on Weather Health Effects Take Action Water Pollution Water Pollution Home Chemicals and Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water ... Water Treatment Videos Games Experiments For Teachers Home Water Pollution Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Print this Page Air Pollution ...

  17. Cilia and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jason M.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, cilia have moved from relative obscurity to a position of importance for understanding multiple complex human diseases. Now termed the ciliopathies, these diseases inflict devastating effects on millions of people worldwide. In this review, written primarily for teachers and students who may not yet be aware of the recent exciting developments in this field, we provide a general overview of our current understanding of cilia and human disease. We start with an introduction to cilia structure and assembly and indicate where they are found in the human body. We then discuss the clinical features of selected ciliopathies, with an emphasis on primary ciliary dyskinesia, polycystic kidney disease, and retinal degeneration. The history of ciliopathy research involves a fascinating interplay between basic and clinical sciences, highlighted in a timeline. Finally, we summarize the relative strengths of individual model organisms for ciliopathy research; many of these are suitable for classroom use. PMID:25960570

  18. Symptoms of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but not much higher 5839 S. Maryland Avenue, MC4069 Chicago, IL 60637 T: 773.702.7593 F: 773. ... diagnosis. For more information contact the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center at 773.702.7593 or ...

  19. [Wilson disease: liver form].

    PubMed

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Álvarez, Félix; Sumire Umeres, Julia; Cok García, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a disorder of copper metabolism that is inherited as an autosomal recessive, which produces toxic copper accumulation mainly in the liver and brain, in general has two ways presentation, liver at early ages and neurological in later ages. We present the case of a female patient of 21 years diagnosed of WD in liver cirrhosis that started with an edematous ascites without any neurological symptoms despite the age. Their laboratory studies showed decrease in serum ceruloplasmin and high cupruria within 24 hours of the disease , characteristic data of WD. Although WD is not a common disease should be suspected in all chronic liver disease of unknown etiology with negative viral markers and autoimmunity with or without neurological manifestations as soon as posible and starting treatment with copper chelating mainly leads to a substantial improvement the prognosis of these patients. PMID:26802892

  20. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a mild form that is reversible with good oral hygiene, and periodontitis, a more severe form that can ... treated for gum disease, sticking to a proper oral hygiene routine and visiting your dentist for regular cleanings ...

  1. Gum Disease Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Often They Floss Their Teeth Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Study: Alcohol Consumption ... Gum Disease Tuesday, July 28, 2015 Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Tuesday, June 23, ...

  2. Gum Disease and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Often They Floss Their Teeth Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Study: Alcohol Consumption ... Gum Disease Tuesday, July 28, 2015 Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Tuesday, June 23, ...

  3. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Often They Floss Their Teeth Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Study: Alcohol Consumption ... Gum Disease Tuesday, July 28, 2015 Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Tuesday, June 23, ...

  4. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NKF Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor for Kidney Disease Diabetes ... of your body. Are there different types of diabetes? The most common ones are Type 1 and ...

  5. Kidney Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Kidney Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 One of the more ... thereafter.) This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  6. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Mar 23,2016 The following statistics speak ... survey. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the fallopian tubes, uterus, or ovaries. Most girls develop PID after getting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Girls who have sex with different partners or don' ...

  8. Diet and Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

  9. [Tick borne diseases].

    PubMed

    Holzer, B R

    2005-11-01

    It is known for many years that tick-borne diseases have worldwide a high economical impact on farming industry and veterinary medicine. But only in the last twenty years the importance of such diseases were notified in human medicine by the medical community and the public with emerging of the tick borne encephalitis virus and the description of Borrelia burgdorferi. It is often forgotten that many other infectious agents as bacteria, virus, Rickettsia or protozoa can be transmitted by ticks. Such diseases are rarely diagnosed in Europe either they are overlooked and misdiagnosed or they are connected with special professional activities. The development of new regions for tourism with different out door activities (adventure trips, trekking, hunting) leads to an exposure to different tick borne diseases, which are often misdiagnosed. PMID:16350539

  10. Hemoglobin C disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Clinical hemoglobin C ... Hemoglobin C is an abnormal type of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It is ... Americans. You are more likely to have hemoglobin C disease if someone in your family has had ...

  11. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  12. Diphtheria Disease Villain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease villain from BAM! Body and Mind . Case file: tissue trolls Real name: diphtheria Known aliases: Corynebacterium ... Action Coalition (IAC) Diphtheria and the Alaskan Iditarod File Formats Help: How do I view different file ...

  13. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... very fast, but steady, heartbeat. Sick Sinus Syndrome ( SSS ) Sick sinus syndrome is not a disease, but ... the sinus node, is not working properly. In SSS , the heart rate can alternate between slow ( bradycardia ) ...

  14. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... Health checks Your Kidneys and You Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  15. Pregnancy and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rate Your Risk Quiz Featured Story African Americans & Kidney Disease Did you know that African Americans are ... Health checks Your Kidneys and You Featured Story Kidney Walk The Kidney Walk is the nation's largest ...

  16. Chronic kidney disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) slowly gets worse over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some ...

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  18. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Zika risk at high elevations Find a Clinic Yellow Fever Vaccinations Clinics FAQ Disease Directory Resources Resources for ... more ... by sudden onset of headache, fever, and stiffness of the neck, sometimes accompanied by ...

  19. Neuromuscular Disease Descriptions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... slow. Possible cognitive effects : When MMD appears in infancy or childhood, about 75 percent of children have ... mobility. Dejerine-Sottas (DS) disease • Age of onset: infancy Characteristics : Slow development of early motor skills, leading ...

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and a pitcher of soda — a well-deserved reward after hours of shooting free throws and running ... and teens who have diseases of the gastrointestinal system (the esophagus, stomach, intestines, and other organs that ...