Science.gov

Sample records for dispersion calculations final

  1. Calculations of precursor propagation in dispersive dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Larry Donald

    2003-08-01

    The present study is a numerical investigation of the propagation of electromagnetic transients in dispersive media. It considers propagation in water using Debye and composite Rocard-Powles-Lorentz models for the complex permittivity. The study addresses this question: For practical transmitted spectra, does precursor propagation provide any features that can be used to advantage over conventional signal propagation in models of dispersive media of interest? A companion experimental study is currently in progress that will attempt to measure the effects studied here.

  2. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  3. Final disposal room structural response calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    Finite element calculations have been performed to determine the structural response of waste-filled disposal rooms at the WIPP for a period of 10,000 years after emplacement of the waste. The calculations were performed to generate the porosity surface data for the final set of compliance calculations. The most recent reference data for the stratigraphy, waste characterization, gas generation potential, and nonlinear material response have been brought together for this final set of calculations.

  4. Overwater plume dispersion study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Godden, D.; Hanna, S.; Scire, J.; Strimaitis, D.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an air-quality modeling methodology to simulate the impact of emissions from oil exploration and production activities in California coastal waters. The study included the collection of data in a field program and the analysis of the data to determine a relationship between Gaussian dispersion coefficients and overwater transport distance and meteorological variable observed near the source and the shoreline. A plume of sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) and visible smoke was released from an offshore location in the Santa Barbara Channel during onshore flow conditions, and the dispersion of the plume was documented by measuring SF/sub 6/ concentrations at various distances downwind and by taking a variety of photographs. Experiments were conducted in the Santa Barbara Channel during two one-week period in 1986.

  5. Overwater plume dispersion study: Appendix. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Godden, D.; Hanna, S.; Scire, J.; Strimaitis, D.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an air-quality modeling methodology to simulate the impact of emissions from oil exploration and production activities in California coastal waters. The study included the collection of data in a field program, and the analysis of the data to determine a relationship between Gaussian dispersion coefficients and overwater transport distance and meteorological variable observed near the source and the shoreline. This appendix contains data taken during the study.

  6. Perturbation approach to dispersion curves calculation for nonlinear Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of elastic wave propagation in nonlinear media has gained recent research attention due to the recognition of their amplitude-dependent behavior. This creates opportunities for increased accuracy of damage detection and localization, development of new structural monitoring strategies, and design of new structures with desirable acoustic behavior (e.g., amplitude-dependent frequency bandgaps, wave beaming, and filtering). This differs from more traditional nonlinear analysis approaches which target the prediction of higher harmonic growth. Of particular interest in this work is the analysis of amplitude-dependent shifts in Lamb wave dispersion curves. Typically, dispersion curves are calculated for nominally linear material parameters and geometrical features of a waveguide, even when the constitutive law is nonlinear. Instead, this work employs a Lindstedt - Poincare perturbation approach to calculate amplitude-dependent dispersion curves, and shifts thereof, for nonlinearly-elastic plates. As a result, a set of first order corrections to frequency (or equivalently wavenumber) are calculated. These corrections yield significant amplitude dependence in the spectral characteristics of the calculated waves, especially for high frequency waves, which differs fundamentally from linear analyses. Numerical simulations confirm the analytical shifts predicted. Recognition of this amplitude-dependence in Lamb wave dispersion may suggest, among other things, that the analysis of guided wave propagation phenomena within a fully nonlinear framework needs to revisit mode-mode energy flux and higher harmonics generation conditions.

  7. Substructure Versus Property-Level Dispersed Modes Calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.; Peck, Jeff A.; Bush, T. Jason; Fulcher, Clay W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper calculates the effect of perturbed finite element mass and stiffness values on the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the finite element model. The structure is perturbed in two ways: at the "subelement" level and at the material property level. In the subelement eigenvalue uncertainty analysis the mass and stiffness of each subelement is perturbed by a factor before being assembled into the global matrices. In the property-level eigenvalue uncertainty analysis all material density and stiffness parameters of the structure are perturbed modified prior to the eigenvalue analysis. The eigenvalue and eigenvector dispersions of each analysis (subelement and property-level) are also calculated using an analytical sensitivity approximation. Two structural models are used to compare these methods: a cantilevered beam model, and a model of the Space Launch System. For each structural model it is shown how well the analytical sensitivity modes approximate the exact modes when the uncertainties are applied at the subelement level and at the property level.

  8. Common Errors in Calculating Final Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    The author has discovered that errors in grades often occur when scores are combined for final marks. These errors are not related to the grading individual assignments. Rather, they occur when teachers at all grade levels bring individual test and assignment scores together for the students' final grades. Unfortunately, professors of mathematics…

  9. Carbon fiber dispersion models used for risk analysis calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    For evaluating the downwind, ground level exposure contours from carbon fiber dispersion, two fiber release scenarios were chosen. The first is the fire and explosion release in which all of the fibers are released instantaneously. This model applies to accident scenarios where an explosion follows a short-duration fire in the aftermath of the accident. The second is the plume release scenario in which the total mass of fibers is released into the fire plume. This model applies to aircraft accidents where only a fire results. These models are described in detail.

  10. Calculating dispersion interactions using maximally localized Wannier functions.

    PubMed

    Andrinopoulos, Lampros; Hine, Nicholas D M; Mostofi, Arash A

    2011-10-21

    We investigate a recently developed approach [P. L. Silvestrelli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 053002 (2008); J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 5224 (2009)] that uses maximally localized Wannier functions to evaluate the van der Waals contribution to the total energy of a system calculated with density-functional theory. We test it on a set of atomic and molecular dimers of increasing complexity (argon, methane, ethene, benzene, phthalocyanine, and copper phthalocyanine) and demonstrate that the method, as originally proposed, has a number of shortcomings that hamper its predictive power. In order to overcome these problems, we have developed and implemented a number of improvements to the method and show that these modifications give rise to calculated binding energies and equilibrium geometries that are in closer agreement to results of quantum-chemical coupled-cluster calculations. PMID:22029295

  11. Final report on the safety assessment of disperse Blue 7.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    Disperse Blue 7 is an anthraquinone dye used in cosmetics as a hair colorant in five hair dye and color products reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Hair dyes containing Disperse Blue 7, as "coal tar" hair dye products, are exempt from the principal adulteration provision and from the color additive provision in sections 601 and 706 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938 when the label bears a caution statement and "patch test" instructions for determining whether the product causes skin irritation. Disperse Blue 7 is also used as a textile dye. The components of Disperse Blue 7 reportedly include Disperse Turquoise ALF Granules, Disperse Turquoise LF2G, Reax 83A, Tamol SW, and Twitchell Oil. No data were available that addressed the acute, short-term, or chronic toxicity of Disperse Blue 7. A mouse lymph node assay used to predict the sensitization potential of Disperse Blue 7 was negative. Although most bacterial assays for genotoxicity were negative in the absence of metabolic activation, consistently positive results were found with metabolic activation in Salmonella strains TA1537, TA1538, and TA98, which were interpreted as indicative of point mutations. Studies using L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells appeared to confirm this mutagenic activity. Mammalian assays for chromosome damage, however, were negative and animal tests found no evidence of dominant lethal mutations. Cases reports describe patients patch tested with Disperse Blue 7 to determine the source of apparent adverse reactions to textiles. In most patients, patch tests were negative, but there are examples in which the patch test for Disperse Blue 7 was positive. In general, anthraquinone dyes are considered frequent causes of clothing dermatitis. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel determined that there was a paucity of data regarding the safety of Disperse Blue 7 as used in cosmetics. The following data are needed in order to arrive at a conclusion on the safety of

  12. Water quality criteria for Disperse Red 9: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, K.A.; Hovatter, P.S.

    1987-07-01

    The available data on the environmental fate, aquatic toxicity, and mammalian toxicity of Disperse Red 9 (1-methylaminoanthraquinone), an organic dye used in pyrotechnic smoke signals, were reviewed. Disperse Red 9 is insoluble in water and exhibits negligible volatility, indicating that environmental dispersal should be minimal. An environmental fate model predicts that the dye would primarily accumulate in water. Limited information is available concerning the transport, transformation, or degradation of Disperse Red 9 in the environment. The dye will undergo photodecomposition. Transformation combustion is by oxidation to 1-aminoathraquinone and 2-aminoanthraquinone. Although Disperse Red 9 is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, it has only mild acute and subchronic oral toxic effects in laboratory animals. It has no dermal toxicity in laboratory animals, but in humans it causes dermal irritation and delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Disperse Red 9 causes mild toxic effects in humans exposed orally or by inhalation. Acute inhalation exposure in rodent and nonrodent species causes nasal irritation, salivation, gagging, regurgitation, dyspnea, and death, depending on the dose and duration of exposure. In genotoxicity tests, Disperse Red 9 is negative in Salmonella typhimurium, positive in mouse lymphoma cells in the presence and absence of S9, and positive in unscheduled DNA synthesis assays only in the presence of S9. 56 refs., 7 tabs.

  13. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  14. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  15. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we presented different representations of Khuri-Treiman equation, the advantage and disadvantage of each representations are discussed. With a scattering amplitude toy model, we also studied the sensitivity of solution of KT equation to left-hand cut of toy model and to the different approximate methods. At last, we give a brief discussion of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  16. A comparison of dispersion calculations in bluff body wakes using LES and unsteady RANS

    SciTech Connect

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-01-19

    Accurate modeling of the dispersion behavior of sprays or particles is critical for a variety of problems including combustion, urban pollution or release events, and splash and spray transport around heavy vehicles. Bluff body wakes are particularly challenging since these flows are both highly separated and strongly unsteady. Attempting to model the dispersion of droplets or particles interacting with bluff body wakes is even more difficult since small differences in the flow field encountered by particles can lead to large differences in the dispersion behavior. Particles with finite inertia can exhibit additional complicating effects such as preferential concentration. In this preliminary study, we consider the dispersion of solid particles in the wake of a rectangular plane at a Reynolds number (Re) of 10000 and that of droplets in the wake of a simplified tractor-trailer geometry at Re = 2 x 10{sup 6} using both the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) turbulence modeling approaches. The calculations were performed using identical meshes for both the LES and URANS models. Particle stresses are not backcoupled to the carrier fluid velocity solution. In the case of the rectangular plane wake, the LES calculation predicts a finer-scale and more persistent wake structure than the URANS one; the resulting particle dispersion is considerably ({approx} 40%) underpredicted for low inertia particles. For the case of the simplified tractor-trailer geometry, although the LES is underresolved, similar trends are observed with strong differences in the vertical and horizontal dispersion of the smallest particles. These results suggest that it may be necessary to use LES to accurately capture the dispersion behavior of small, low inertia particles or droplets, but that URANS may be sufficient for problems in which only large particles with substantial inertia are of primary concern.

  17. Beam dispersion measurements with wire scanners in the SLC final focus systems

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P.; McCormick, D.; Ross, M.C.

    1993-05-01

    A method is described to make a direct measurement of the horizontal and vertical momentum dispersion of the electron and positron beams as they pass through the chromatic correction sections (CCS) of the SLC final focus systems. The method is advantageous since it cleanly separates betatron components of the beam size from dispersive components, can be measured during standard colliding beams machine conditions in a minute or two, and directly measures the energy-position correlation within the beam.

  18. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  19. Long-range dispersion forces between molecules subject to attosecond pulses from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael; Komarova-Vladimirova, Ksenia; Remacle, Francoise; Vertraete, Matthieu

    The London-van der Waals dispersion forces arising from instantaneously induced dipoles in molecules are a key ingredient in a wide range of phenomena in physics, chemistry, and biology. Therefore, the ability to control and manipulate dispersion forces between atoms and molecules is of great importance. Because those dispersion interactions depend crucially on the electronic properties of the molecular systems, a simple route to achieve this would consist in manipulating their electronic states. The recent development of ultra-short optical pulses has given researchers unprecedented control over the electronic degrees of freedom. These pulses, tailored in their frequency and envelope, allow the generation of a strongly out of equilibrium population of electronic states. In this talk we show how the Hamacker constants characterizing the London-van der Waals interaction between two molecules subject to an optical pulse can be calculated using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) or standard quantum chemistry methods and present several test cases of molecules subjected to IR and UV attosecond pulses.

  20. Advective-diffusive/dispersive transport of chemically reacting species in hydrothermal systems. Final report, FY83-85

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, P.C.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1986-06-20

    A general formulation of multi-phase fluid flow coupled to chemical reactions was developed based on a continuum description of porous media. A preliminary version of the computer code MCCTM was constructed which implemented the general equations for a single phase fluid. The computer code MCCTM incorporates mass transport by advection-diffusion/dispersion in a one-dimensional porous medium coupled to reversible and irreversible, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical reactions. These reactions include aqueous complexing, oxidation/reduction reactions, ion exchange, and hydrolysis reactions of stoichiometric minerals. The code MCCTM uses a fully implicit finite difference algorithm. The code was tested against analytical calculations. Applications of the code included investigation of the propagation of sharp chemical reaction fronts, metasomatic alteration of microcline at elevated temperatures and pressures, and ion-exchange in a porous column. Finally numerical calculations describing fluid flow in crystalline rock in the presence of a temperature gradient were compared with experimental results for quartzite.

  1. Factors influencing separation distances against odour annoyance calculated by Gaussian and Lagrangian dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piringer, Martin; Knauder, Werner; Petz, Erwin; Schauberger, Günther

    2016-09-01

    Direction-dependent separation distances to avoid odour annoyance, calculated with the Gaussian Austrian Odour Dispersion Model AODM and the Lagrangian particle diffusion model LASAT at two sites, are analysed and compared. The relevant short-term peak odour concentrations are calculated with a stability-dependent peak-to-mean algorithm. The same emission and meteorological data, but model-specific atmospheric stability classes are used. The estimate of atmospheric stability is obtained from three-axis ultrasonic anemometers using the standard deviations of the three wind components and the Obukhov stability parameter. The results are demonstrated for the Austrian villages Reidling and Weissbach with very different topographical surroundings and meteorological conditions. Both the differences in the wind and stability regimes as well as the decrease of the peak-to-mean factors with distance lead to deviations in the separation distances between the two sites. The Lagrangian model, due to its model physics, generally calculates larger separation distances. For worst-case calculations necessary with environmental impact assessment studies, the use of a Lagrangian model is therefore to be preferred over that of a Gaussian model. The study and findings relate to the Austrian odour impact criteria.

  2. Inverse dispersion method for calculation of complex photonic band diagram and PT symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-04-01

    We suggest an inverse dispersion method for calculating a photonic band diagram for materials with arbitrary frequency-dependent dielectric functions. The method is able to calculate the complex wave vector for a given frequency by solving the eigenvalue problem with a non-Hermitian operator. The analogy with PT -symmetric Hamiltonians reveals that the operator corresponds to the momentum as a physical quantity, and the singularities at the band edges are related to the branch points and responses for the features on the band edges. The method is realized using a plane wave expansion technique for a two-dimensional periodic structure in the case of TE and TM polarizations. We illustrate the applicability of the method by the calculation of the photonic band diagrams of an infinite two-dimensional square lattice composed of dielectric cylinders using the measured frequency-dependent dielectric functions of different materials (amorphous hydrogenated carbon, silicon, and chalcogenide glass). We show that the method allows one to distinguish unambiguously between Bragg and Mie gaps in the spectra.

  3. Nonanalyticity, Valley Quantum Phases, and Lightlike Exciton Dispersion in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Theory and First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Diana Y.; Cao, Ting; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-10-01

    Exciton dispersion as a function of center-of-mass momentum Q is essential to the understanding of exciton dynamics. We use the ab initio G W -Bethe-Salpeter equation method to calculate the dispersion of excitons in monolayer MoS2 and find a nonanalytic lightlike dispersion. This behavior arises from an unusual |Q |-term in both the intra- and intervalley exchange of the electron-hole interaction, which concurrently gives rise to a valley quantum phase of winding number two. A simple effective Hamiltonian to Q2 order with analytic solutions is derived to describe quantitatively these behaviors.

  4. Final thermal conditions override the effects of temperature history and dispersal in experimental communities

    PubMed Central

    Limberger, Romana; Low-Décarie, Etienne; Fussmann, Gregor F.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the effect of climate change on biodiversity is a multifactorial problem that is complicated by potentially interactive effects with habitat properties and altered species interactions. In a microcosm experiment with communities of microalgae, we analysed whether the effect of rising temperature on diversity depended on the initial or the final temperature of the habitat, on the rate of change, on dispersal and on landscape heterogeneity. We also tested whether the response of species to temperature measured in monoculture allowed prediction of the composition of communities under rising temperature. We found that the final temperature of the habitat was the primary driver of diversity in our experimental communities. Species richness declined faster at higher temperatures. The negative effect of warming was not alleviated by a slower rate of warming or by dispersal among habitats and did not depend on the initial temperature. The response of evenness, however, did depend on the rate of change and on the initial temperature. Community composition was not predictable from monoculture assays, but higher fitness inequality (as seen by larger variance in growth rate among species in monoculture at higher temperatures) explained the faster loss of biodiversity with rising temperature. PMID:25186000

  5. Ambient PM 10 concentrations from wood combustion - Emission modeling and dispersion calculation for the city area of Augsburg, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Christian; Kunde, Robert; Dobmeier, Bernhard; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Orasche, Jürgen; Schmoeckel, Gerhard; Diemer, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Gaderer, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    Ambient PM 10 concentration monitoring as well as dispersion calculations were conducted to determine the influence of emissions from domestic heating on ambient PM 10 concentrations in Augsburg, Germany. Based on the Augsburg emission inventory for domestic heating an average emission factor for particulate emissions from the combustion of different solid fuels (wood logs, pellets, briquettes) in different types of stoves under various combustion conditions was found to be 120 mg MJ -1 related to energy input. Hence an emission model as well as a wind field model were created for dispersion calculation of the emitted PM from wood combustion within Augsburg. The results of the dispersion calculation concurred with the ambient PM 10 monitoring data measured during the heating period 2007/2008. One result found that in residential areas with a high density of stoves the observed maximum concentration value of 9 μg m -3 from wood combustion was up to 50% higher than in the city center. Ambient monitoring as well as dispersion calculation have shown a significant influence of wood combustion on ambient PM 10 concentrations in Augsburg. Based on these results the impact of wood combustion in a city can be estimated.

  6. Field evaluation of fog dispersal tests at Elmira, NY: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.W.; Wattle, B.J.; Mack, E.J.

    1987-06-01

    Calspan Corp., under contract to Energy Innovations, Inc., assisted in tests of the EGD Fog Precipiation System at Elmira/Corning Regional Airport in New York during the summer/fall fog season of 1986 by conducting an independent, objective evaluation of the EGD System during these tests. Specifically, Calspan's role was to: Establish and maintain a network of ground-based visibility monitors and supporting meteorological instrumentation for measuring fog characteristics during EGD System tests at Elmira; provide weather forecasts of the potential for fog at Elmira during the summer-fall fog season; analyze visibility and surface wind velocity measurements to determine the efficacy of the EGD system in producing visibility improvement during dispersal tests; and provide a final independent summary report documenting experiment protocol and the results of Calspan's analyses. 2 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Highly dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction. Phase 1 final report, August 23--November 22, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B.; Ghaly, O.

    1995-03-22

    The ultimate goal of this project is to develop novel processes for making the conversion of coal into distillable liquids competitive to that of petroleum products in the range of $25/bbl. The objectives of Phase 1 were to determine the utility of new precursors to highly dispersed catalysts for use of syngas atmospheres in coal liquefaction, and to estimate the effect of such implementation on the cost of the final product. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Tasks 1 and 2 are the analyses and liquefaction experiments, respectively, and Task 3 deals with the economic effects of using these methods during coal liquefaction. Results are presented on the following: Analytical Support--screening tests and second-stage conversions; Laboratory-Scale Operations--catalysts, coal conversion in synthetic solvents, Black Thunder screening studies, and two-stage liquefaction experiments; and Technical and economic Assessment--commercial liquefaction plant description, liquefaction plant cost; and economic analysis.

  8. Dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of terahertz vibration, and evidence for weak hydrogen bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2013-03-01

    A weak hydrogen bond (WHB) such as CH-O is very important for the structure, function, and dynamics in a chemical and biological system WHB stretching vibration is in a terahertz (THz) frequency region Very recently, the reasonable performance of dispersion-corrected first-principles to WHB has been proven. In this lecture, we report dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of the vibrational absorption of some organic crystals, and low-temperature THz spectral measurement, in order to clarify WHB stretching vibration. The THz frequency calculation of a WHB crystal has extremely improved by dispersion correction. Moreover, the discrepancy in frequency between an experiment and calculation and is 10 1/cm or less. Dispersion correction is especially effective for intermolecular mode. The very sharp peak appearing at 4 K is assigned to the intermolecular translational mode that corresponds to WHB stretching vibration. It is difficult to detect and control the WHB formation in a crystal because the binding energy is very small. With the help of the latest intense development of experimental and theoretical technique and its careful use, we reveal solid-state WHB stretching vibration as evidence for the WHB formation that differs in respective WHB networks The research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (Grant No. 22550003).

  9. Numerical calculation of electromagnetic eigenfields and dispersion relations for slow-wave device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oslake, J.M.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Slow-wave structures support microwave amplification via electromagnetic coupling with an injected electron beam. Critical in the design of such devices is the dependence of the dispersion relation on the geometry of the guiding structure. The dispersion relation provides phase and group velocities, and the fields provide the impedance as seen by the beam. To this end, a computer model is developed which first numerically solves a wave equation in finite difference form subject to boundary conditions periodic in z and conducting elsewhere. For decades, the desired dispersion and impedance have been obtained experimentally from cold tests (no beam) on slow-wave structures by varying structure dimensions. However, the numerical approach condenses this process to a few minutes of simulation.

  10. Fabrication of single-electron devices using dispersed nanoparticles and fitting experimental results to values calculated based on percolation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Masataka; Huong, Tran Thi Thu; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Shimada, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yasuo; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Mizugaki, Yoshinao

    2016-08-01

    We calculated the connection probability, P C, between electrodes on the basis of the triangular lattice percolation model for investigating the effect of distance variation between electrodes and the electrode width on fabricated capacitively coupled single-electron transistors. Single-electron devices were fabricated via the dispersion of gold nanoparticles (NPs). The NPs were dispersed via the repeated dropping of an NP solution onto a chip. The experimental results were fitted to the calculated values, and the fitting parameters were compared with the occupation probability, P O, which was estimated for one drop of the NP solution. On the basis of curves of the drain current versus the drain-source voltage ( I D- V DS) measured at 77 K, the current was suppressed at approximately 0 V.

  11. Use of a 3-D dispersion model for calculation of distribution of horse allergen and odor around horse facilities.

    PubMed

    Haeger-Eugensson, Marie; Ferm, Martin; Elfman, Lena

    2014-04-01

    The interest in equestrian sports has increased substantially during the last decades, resulting in increased number of horse facilities around urban areas. In Sweden, new guidelines for safe distance have been decided based on the size of the horse facility (e.g., number of horses) and local conditions, such as topography and meteorology. There is therefore an increasing need to estimate dispersion of horse allergens to be used, for example, in the planning processes for new residential areas in the vicinity of horse facilities. The aim of this study was to develop a method for calculating short- and long-term emissions and dispersion of horse allergen and odor around horse facilities. First, a method was developed to estimate horse allergen and odor emissions at hourly resolution based on field measurements. Secondly, these emission factors were used to calculate concentrations of horse allergen and odor by using 3-D dispersion modeling. Results from these calculations showed that horse allergens spread up to about 200 m, after which concentration levels were very low (<2 U/m³). Approximately 10% of a study-group detected the smell of manure at 60m, while the majority--80%-90%--detected smell at 60 m or shorter distance from the manure heap. Modeling enabled horse allergen exposure concentrations to be determined with good time resolution. PMID:24690946

  12. Use of a 3-D Dispersion Model for Calculation of Distribution of Horse Allergen and Odor around Horse Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Haeger-Eugensson, Marie; Ferm, Martin; Elfman, Lena

    2014-01-01

    The interest in equestrian sports has increased substantially during the last decades, resulting in increased number of horse facilities around urban areas. In Sweden, new guidelines for safe distance have been decided based on the size of the horse facility (e.g., number of horses) and local conditions, such as topography and meteorology. There is therefore an increasing need to estimate dispersion of horse allergens to be used, for example, in the planning processes for new residential areas in the vicinity of horse facilities. The aim of this study was to develop a method for calculating short- and long-term emissions and dispersion of horse allergen and odor around horse facilities. First, a method was developed to estimate horse allergen and odor emissions at hourly resolution based on field measurements. Secondly, these emission factors were used to calculate concentrations of horse allergen and odor by using 3-D dispersion modeling. Results from these calculations showed that horse allergens spread up to about 200 m, after which concentration levels were very low (<2 U/m3). Approximately 10% of a study-group detected the smell of manure at 60m, while the majority—80%–90%—detected smell at 60 m or shorter distance from the manure heap. Modeling enabled horse allergen exposure concentrations to be determined with good time resolution. PMID:24690946

  13. Numerical calculation of electromagnetic eigenfields and dispersion relation for slow-wave device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oslake, J.M.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Slow-wave structures support microwave amplification via electromagnetic coupling with an injected electron beam. Critical in the design of such devices is the dependence of the dispersion relation on the geometry of the guiding structure. The dispersion relation provides phase and group velocities, and the fields provide the impedance as seen by the beam. To this end, a computer model is developed which first numerically solves a wave equation in finite difference from subject to boundary conditions periodic in z and conducting elsewhere. Here the direction of wave propagation is along the z-axis. The solution produces a sequence of eigenfrequencies and eigenfields beginning with cut-off. Fourier decomposition of each eigenfield along selected mesh lines coincident with the location of the electron beam is then performed to establish a correspondence between eigenfrequency and wave number. From this data the dispersion relation for the slow-wave structure can then be formed. An example showing the first two TM passbands and E{sub z} fields for a slotted waveguide in xz coordinates is demonstrated. The authors plan to incorporate plasma loading with space-time dependent dielectric constant.

  14. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.

    1995-05-01

    The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Dispersion of the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities of Bismuth subcarbonate Bi2O2CO3: DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Auluck, S.

    2014-12-01

    The dispersion of the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities of bismuth subcarbonate Bi2O2CO3 are calculated using density functional theory (DFT). We have employed the state-of-art all-electron full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. Calculations are performed within the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ) to obtain the self consistency conditions. The calculated linear optical susceptibilities exhibit a considerable anisotropy which is useful for second harmonic generation (SHG) and optical parametric oscillation (OPO). The calculated absorption coefficient show good agreement with the available experimental data. The values of calculated uniaxial anisotropy δɛ = -0.168 and the birefringence Δn(0) = 0.166 indicate considerable anisotropy. The calculated SHG of the dominant component |χ322(2) (ω) | is about d32 = 5.3 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm (1.165 eV) which is in excellent agreement with the available experimental data (d32 = 5.49 pm/V) obtained using pulsed Nd:YAG laser at wavelength λ = 1064 nm (10 ns, 3 mj 10 kHz). To analyze the origin of the high SHG of bismuth subcarbonate Bi2O2CO3 we have correlated the features of |χ322(2) (ω) | spectra with the features of ɛ2(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω.

  16. Harmonic phonon theory for calculating thermal conductivity spectrum from first-principles dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Takuma; Aketo, Daisuke; Feng, Lei; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, nanostructuring of dielectric and semiconducting crystals has enhanced controllability of their thermal conductivity. To carry out computational materials search for nanostructured materials with desirable thermal conductivity, a key property is the thermal conductivity spectrum of the original single crystal, which determines the appropriate length scale of nanostructures and mutual adaptability of different kinds of nanostructures. Although the first-principles phonon transport calculations have become accessible, the anharmonic lattice dynamics calculations are still expensive to scan many materials. To this end, we have developed an empirical model that describes the thermal conductivity spectrum in terms only of harmonic phonon properties and bulk thermal conductivity. The model was tested for several crystals with different structures and thermal conductivities, and was confirmed to reproduce the overall profiles of thermal conductivity spectra and their accumulation functions obtained by the first-principles anharmonic calculations.

  17. Entrained liquid fraction calculation in adiabatic disperse-annular flows at low rate in film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagov, V. V.; Minko, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we continue our study [1] and extend further an approach to low reduced pressures. An approximate model of droplets entrainment from the laminar film surface and an equation for calculating entrainment intensity are proposed. To carry out direct verification of this equation using experimental data is extremely difficult because the integral effect—liquid flow rate in a film at a dynamic equilibrium between entrainment and deposition—is usually measured in the experiments. The balance between flows of droplets entrainment and deposition corresponds to the dynamic equilibrium because of turbulent diffusion. The transcendental equation, which was obtained on the basis of this balance, contains one unknown numerical factor and allows one to calculate the liquid rate. Comparing calculation results with the experimental data for the water-air and water-helium flows at low reduced pressures (less than 0.03) has shown their good agreement at the universal value of a numerical constant, if an additional dimensionless parameter, a fourth root of vaporliquid densities ratio, is introduced. The criterion that determines the boundary of using methods of this work and that of [1] in calculations and that reflects effect of pressure and state of film surface on distribution of the liquid in the annular flow is proposed; the numerical value of this criterion has been determined.

  18. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR using a U7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2014-06-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The LEU fuel may be a monolithic foil (LEUm) of U10Mo (10% molybdenum by weight in an alloy with uranium) or a dispersion of U7Mo in aluminum (LEUd). A previous report provided neutronic calculations for the LEUm fuel and this report presents the neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel. The neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel are compared to those previously obtained for the present HEU fuel and the proposed LEUm fuel. The results show no significant differences between the LEUm and the LEUd other than the LEUd fuel requires slightly less uranium than the LEUm fuel due to less molybdenum being present. The calculations include kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions under normal operation and with misloaded fuel elements.

  19. Empirical model derived from dispersion calculations to determine separation distances between livestock buildings and residential areas to avoid odour nuisance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauberger, Günther; Schmitzer, Rainer; Kamp, Martin; Sowa, Andreas; Koch, Roman; Eckhof, Wilfried; Eichler, Franziska; Grimm, Ewald; Kypke, Joachim; Hartung, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    A new VDI guideline is under development in Germany to calculate the separation distance S (m) required between livestock and residential areas to avoid odour annoyance by an empirical model. On the basis of model calculations for 23 sites by a Lagrangian dispersion model (AUSTAL2000) a regression model was developed, using a power function S = aE b. The power function is defined by three input parameters which were restricted for an improved fit of the regression model. The basis of the power function is the odour emission flow rate E (ou E s -1) in the range between 500 ou E s -1 ≤ E ≤ 50,000 ou E s -1. The two other predictors are the relative frequency of the wind direction F (‰) of a 10° sector (10‰ ≤ F ≤ 60‰) and the odour exceedance probability P (%) (7% ≤ P ≤ 40%) of the odour impact criterion, which define the exponent b and the multiplicative factor a of the power function. One of the requirements for this empirical model was a conservative assessment, which results in only a 12% underestimation of the separation distance compared to the dispersion model. The model can be used in a "paper and pencil" mode, which enabling a simple and straightforward first evaluation of a planned livestock building. For a more detailed assessment, a dispersion model can be applied with the entire meteorological information available (e.g. stability of the atmosphere, wind velocity), the geometry of the emission source, a time dependant odour emission rate, as well as the orography of the site.

  20. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier; Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Brucher, Wenzel; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-03-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively

  1. Handling, transport and dispersion of sorbent powder for in-furnace injection. Third year final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Bavarian, F.; Lee, R.J.; Hsia, Chung-wei; Abou-Zeida, E.; Jiang, Peijun; Dastidar, A.G.; Mahuli, S.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to explain, using fundamental theories of interparticle forces, the difference in transport and dispersion between various sorbents. This project is closely tied with 1.1 through the focus of maximum utilization of sorbent materials used in the LIMB process. Interparticle forces lead to agglomeration or removal to transport tube walls of the sorbent fine particles, reducing sulfur removal capabilities. In the first and second years, the pneumatic transport of sorbent powders was investigated for four typical sorbent materials, calcium carbonate, dolomite, dolomitic hydrate and hydrated lime. Results indicate that hydrated lime has the best dispersion and flowability. Studies in the third year involved investigating improving the performance of hydrated lime with additives. The addition of calcium liposulfonate to the water of hydration appears to improve both the dispersibility and reactivity of the resulting product hydrate. Increased reactivity is closely tied to available surface area for reaction, as expected. However, in applications where powder flowability becomes important, such as in the use of hydrate in flue-gas desulfurization, a balance between the flowability and surface area must be considered. If the powder has poor flowability, the added surface area may not be utilized. Powder dispersion and the high-temperature are used to determine the dispersibility of the modified and unmodified sorbents at room temperature and at typical furnace temperatures. Results verify that an increase in dispersibility is realized with the liposulfonate-modified hydrate. Phase 1 results show this increased dispersibility to be due to electrostatic repulsion between liposulfonate molecules on the surface of the dry powder.

  2. Investigation of 2D laterally dispersive photonic crystal structures : LDRD 33602 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Guo, Junpeng; Peters, David William; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2003-12-01

    Artificially structured photonic lattice materials are commonly investigated for their unique ability to block and guide light. However, an exciting aspect of photonic lattices which has received relatively little attention is the extremely high refractive index dispersion within the range of frequencies capable of propagating within the photonic lattice material. In fact, it has been proposed that a negative refractive index may be realized with the correct photonic lattice configuration. This report summarizes our investigation, both numerically and experimentally, into the design and performance of such photonic lattice materials intended to optimize the dispersion of refractive index in order to realize new classes of photonic devices.

  3. Industrial Source Complex (ISC) Dispersion Model User's Guide. Second edition. Volume 1 (revised). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, C.P.

    1987-12-01

    The Second Edition (Revised) of the Industrial Source Complex Dispersion (ISC) Model User's Guide provides a detailed technical discussion of the updated ISC Model. The ISC Model was designed in response to the need for a comprehensive set of dispersion-model computer programs that could be used to evaluate the air-quality impact of emissions from large industrial source complexes. Air-quality impact analyses for source complexes often require consideration of factors such as fugitive emissions, aerodynamic building-wake effects, time-dependent exponential decay of pollutants, gravitational settling, and dry deposition. The ISC Model consists of two computer programs that are designed to consider these and other factors so as to meet the dispersion modeling needs of air-pollution-control agencies and others responsible for performing dispersion-modeling analyses. Major features in the revised model code include: (1) a regulatory default option; (2) a CALMS processing procedure; (3) a new Urban Mode 3; (4) revised sets of wind-speed profile exponents for rural and urban scenarios.

  4. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P.

    1997-11-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  5. Handling, transport and dispersion of sorbent powder for in-furnace injection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Abou-Zeida, E.; Liang, Shu-Chien; Luo, Xukun

    1996-02-01

    The focus of this project is on sorbent injection technologies using dry, calcium-based sorbents for high-sulfur coal flue gas desulfurization. The goal is to provide research findings on handling, transport and dispersion of sorbent powder, aimed at improving SO{sub 2} (to at least 90%) removal and increasing sorbent utilization in a cost-effective fashion. With this goal, the purpose of this project is to investigate the fundamental aspects of powder technology relevant to the fine sorbent powders, and to provide means of improving sorbent performance through superior dispersion and reduced dispersed particle size. The fifth year`s project contains three phases, Phase I ``Characterization of Electrostatic Properties``, Phase II ``Cohesive Strength of Modified Sorbents``. and Phase III ``Modeling of Powder Dispersion``. Work under Phase I involves characterization of the sorbents in terms of their electrostatic properties. Phase II investigates the flow properties of several calcium-based sorbents under different handling and transporting conditions. In Phase III, experimental studies are performed to measure the sorbent powder size distribution in different apparatuses and under different conditions. The population balance model proposed in previous studies can reasonably simulate these experiment results. These three areas of investigations are discussed in this report.

  6. I-BIEM calculations of the frequency dispersion and ac current distribution at disk and ring-disk electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The Iterative Boundary Integral Equation Method (I-BIEM) has been applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at a disk electrode in a finite geometry. The I-BIEM permits the direct evaluation of the AC potential (a complex variable) using complex boundary conditions. The point spacing was made highly nonuniform, to give extremely high resolution in those regions where the variables change most rapidly, i.e., in the vicinity of the edge of the disk. Results are analyzed with respect to IR correction, equipotential surfaces, and reference electrode placement. The current distribution is also examined for a ring-disk configuration, with the ring and the disk at the same AC potential. It is shown that the apparent impedance of the disk is inductive at higher frequencies. The results are compared to analytic calculations from the literature, and usually agree to better than 0.001 percent.

  7. I-BIEM calculations of the frequency dispersion and AC current distribution at disk and ring-disk electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The Iterative Boundary Integral Equation Method (I-BIEM) has been applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at a disk electrode in a finite geometry. The I-BIEM permits the direct evaluation of the AC potential (a complex variable) using complex boundary conditions. The point spacing was made highly nonuniform, to give extremely high resolution in those regions where the variables change most rapidly, i.e., in the vicinity of the edge of the disk. Results are analyzed with respect to IR correction, equipotential surfaces, and reference electrode placement. The current distribution is also examined for a ring-disk configuration, with the ring and the disk at the same AC potential. It is shown that the apparent impedance of the disk is inductive at higher frequencies. The results are compared to analytic calculations from the literature, and usually agree to better than 0.001 percent.

  8. Defining the contributions of permanent electrostatics, Pauli repulsion, and dispersion in density functional theory calculations of intermolecular interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Horn, Paul R; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-03-21

    In energy decomposition analysis of Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations, the so-called frozen (or pre-polarization) interaction energy contains contributions from permanent electrostatics, dispersion, and Pauli repulsion. The standard classical approach to separate them suffers from several well-known limitations. We introduce an alternative scheme that employs valid antisymmetric electronic wavefunctions throughout and is based on the identification of individual fragment contributions to the initial supersystem wavefunction as determined by an energetic optimality criterion. The density deformations identified with individual fragments upon formation of the initial supersystem wavefunction are analyzed along with the distance dependence of the new and classical terms for test cases that include the neon dimer, ammonia borane, water-Na(+), water-Cl(-), and the naphthalene dimer. PMID:27004862

  9. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, that can help achieve national energy conservation goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. A study of trends reveals that the need for DSG monitoring and control equipment by 1990 to 2000 will be great, measured in tens of thousands. Criteria for assessing DSG integration have been defined and indicate that economic and institutional as well as technical and other factors must be included. The principal emphasis in this report is on the functional requirements for DSG monitoring and control in six major categories. Twenty-four functional requirements have been prepared under these six categories and serve to indicate how to integrate the DSGs with the distribution and other portions of the electric utility system. The results indicate that there are no fundamental technical obstacles to prevent the connection of dispersed storage and generation to the distribution system. However, a communication system of some sophistication will be required to integrate the distribution system and the dispersed generation sources for effective control. The large-size span of generators from 10 kW to 30 MW means that a variety of remote monitoring and control may be required. The results show that an increased effort is required to develop demonstration equipment to perform the DSG monitoring and control functions and to acquire experience with this equipment in the utility distribution environment.

  10. Carbon black dispersion pre-plating technology for printed wire board manufacturing. Final technology evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, D.W.; Gavaskar, A.R.; Jones, J.A.; Olfenbuttel, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    The project compared chemical use, waste generation, cost, and product quality between electroless copper and carbon-black-based preplating technologies at the printed wire board (PWB) manufacturing facility of McCurdy Circuits in Orange, CA. The carbon-black based preplating technology evaluated is used as an alternative process for electroless copper (EC) plating of through-holes before electrolytic copper plating. The specific process used at McCurdy is the BlackHole (BH) technology process, which uses a dispersion of carbon black in an aqueous solution to provide a conductive surface for subsequent electrolytic copper plating. The carbon-black dispersion technology provided effective waste reduction and long-term cost savings. The economic analysis determined that the new process was cost efficient because chemical use was reduced and the process proved more efficient; the payback period was less than 4 yrs.

  11. User`s guide for the CALPUFF dispersion model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the CALPUFF dispersion model and associated processing programs. The CALPUFF model described in this report reflect improvements to the model including (1) new modules to treat buoyant rise and dispersion from area sources (such as forest fires), buoyant line sources, and volume sources, (2) an improved treatment of complex terrain, (3) additional model switches to facilitate its use in regulatory applications, (4) an enhanced treatment of wind shear through puff splitting, and (4) an optional PC-based GUI. CALPUFF has been coupled to the Emissions Production Model (EPM) developed by the Forest Service through an interface processor. EPM provides time-dependent emissions and heat release data for use in modeling controlled burns and wildfires.

  12. Water adsorption in SAPO-34: elucidating the role of local heterogeneities and defects using dispersion-corrected DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael

    2015-10-14

    The chabazite-type silicoaluminophosphate SAPO-34 is a promising adsorbent for applications in thermal energy storage using water adsorption-desorption cycles. In order to develop a microscopic understanding of the impact of local heterogeneities and defects on the water adsorption properties, the interaction of different models of SAPO-34 with water was studied using dispersion-corrected density-functional theory (DFT-D) calculations. In addition to SAPO-34 with isolated silicon atoms, the calculations considered models incorporating two types of heterogeneities (silicon islands, aluminosilicate domains), and two defect-containing (partially and fully desilicated) systems. DFT-D optimisations were performed for systems with small amounts of adsorbed water, in which all H2O molecules can interact with framework protons, and systems with large amounts of adsorbed water (30 H2O molecules per unit cell). At low loadings, the host-guest interaction energy calculated for SAPO-34 with isolated Si atoms amounts to approximately -90 kJ mol(-1). While the presence of local heterogeneities leads to the creation of some adsorption sites that are energetically slightly more favourable, the interaction strength is drastically reduced in systems with defects. At high water loadings, energies in the range of -70 kJ mol(-1) are obtained for all models. The DFT-D interaction energies are in good agreement with experimentally measured heats of water adsorption. A detailed analysis of the equilibrium structures was used to gain insights into the binding modes at low coverages, and to assess the extent of framework deprotonation and changes in the coordination environment of aluminium atoms at high water loadings. PMID:26352329

  13. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  14. Vaporization, dispersion, and radiant fluxes from LPG spills. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Both burning and non-burning spills of LPG (primarily propane) were studied. Vaporization rates for propane spills on soil, concrete, insulating concrete, asphalt, sod, wood, and polymer foams were measured. Thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficients, and steady state vaporization rates were determined. Vapor concentrations were measured downwind of open propane pools and a Gaussian dispersion model modified for area sources provided a good correlation of measured concentrations. Emitted and incident radiant fluxes from propane fires were measured. Simplified flame radiation models were adequate for predicting radiant fluxes. Tests in which propane was sprayed into the air showed that at moderately high spray rates all the propane flashed to vapor or atomized; no liquid collected on the ground.

  15. Contact repulsion controls the dispersion and final distribution of Cajal-Retzius cells

    PubMed Central

    Villar-Cerviño, Verona; Molano-Mazón, Manuel; Catchpole, Timothy; Valdeolmillos, Miguel; Henkemeyer, Mark; Martínez, Luis M.; Borrell, Víctor; Marín, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells play a fundamental role in the development of the mammalian cerebral cortex. They control the formation of cortical layers by regulating the migration of pyramidal cells through the release of Reelin. The function of CR cells critically depends on their regular distribution throughout the surface of the cortex, but little is known about the events controlling this phenomenon. Using time-lapse video microscopy in vivo and in vitro, we found that movement of CR cells is regulated by repulsive interactions, which leads to their random dispersion throughout the cortical surface. Mathematical modeling reveals that contact repulsion is both necessary and sufficient for this process, which demonstrates that complex neuronal assemblies may emerge during development through stochastic events. At the molecular level, we found that contact repulsion is mediated by Eph/ephrin interactions. Our observations reveal a novel mechanism that controls the even distribution of neurons in the developing brain. PMID:23395373

  16. Dispersion analysis of Humboldt Bay, California, interim offshore disposal site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffner, N.W.

    1992-06-01

    The dispersive characteristics of an interim offshore dredged material disposal site located seaward of the entrance to Humboldt Bay, California, are investigated. These characteristics must be known to determine potential impact of the dredging operation on the local environment. Two phases of investigation were employed. A short-term analysis of the disposal operation was conducted to examine the immediate fate of material following release from the barge and subsequent descent to the ocean bottom. The second phase examined the long-term fate to determine whether local ocean currents are capable of eroding and transporting deposited material beyond the designated limits of the site. Results of this study indicate the site to be nondispersive, with little erosion and transport of material indicated under both normal and moderate storm conditions. Disposal site classification, Sediment fate, Disposal site stability, Sediment transport, Dredged material.

  17. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  18. Final Aperture Superposition Technique applied to fast calculation of electron output factors and depth dose curves

    SciTech Connect

    Faddegon, B.A.; Villarreal-Barajas, J.E.

    2005-11-15

    The Final Aperture Superposition Technique (FAST) is described and applied to accurate, near instantaneous calculation of the relative output factor (ROF) and central axis percentage depth dose curve (PDD) for clinical electron beams used in radiotherapy. FAST is based on precalculation of dose at select points for the two extreme situations of a fully open final aperture and a final aperture with no opening (fully shielded). This technique is different than conventional superposition of dose deposition kernels: The precalculated dose is differential in position of the electron or photon at the downstream surface of the insert. The calculation for a particular aperture (x-ray jaws or MLC, insert in electron applicator) is done with superposition of the precalculated dose data, using the open field data over the open part of the aperture and the fully shielded data over the remainder. The calculation takes explicit account of all interactions in the shielded region of the aperture except the collimator effect: Particles that pass from the open part into the shielded part, or visa versa. For the clinical demonstration, FAST was compared to full Monte Carlo simulation of 10x10,2.5x2.5, and 2x8 cm{sup 2} inserts. Dose was calculated to 0.5% precision in 0.4x0.4x0.2 cm{sup 3} voxels, spaced at 0.2 cm depth intervals along the central axis, using detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment head of a commercial linear accelerator for six different electron beams with energies of 6-21 MeV. Each simulation took several hours on a personal computer with a 1.7 Mhz processor. The calculation for the individual inserts, done with superposition, was completed in under a second on the same PC. Since simulations for the pre calculation are only performed once, higher precision and resolution can be obtained without increasing the calculation time for individual inserts. Fully shielded contributions were largest for small fields and high beam energy, at the surface, reaching a

  19. Comparison of chlorine and ammonia concentration field trial data with calculated results from a Gaussian atmospheric transport and dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Timothy J

    2013-06-15

    The Jack Rabbit Test Program was sponsored in April and May 2010 by the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration to generate source data for large releases of chlorine and ammonia from transport tanks. In addition to a variety of data types measured at the release location, concentration versus time data was measured using sensors at distances up to 500 m from the tank. Release data were used to create accurate representations of the vapor flux versus time for the ten releases. This study was conducted to determine the importance of source terms and meteorological conditions in predicting downwind concentrations and the accuracy that can be obtained in those predictions. Each source representation was entered into an atmospheric transport and dispersion model using simplifying assumptions regarding the source characterization and meteorological conditions, and statistics for cloud duration and concentration at the sensor locations were calculated. A detailed characterization for one of the chlorine releases predicted 37% of concentration values within a factor of two, but cannot be considered representative of all the trials. Predictions of toxic effects at 200 m are relevant to incidents involving 1-ton chlorine tanks commonly used in parts of the United States and internationally. PMID:23643957

  20. CFD calculations of gas leak dispersion and subsequent gas explosions: validation against ignited impinging hydrogen jet experiments.

    PubMed

    Middha, Prankul; Hansen, Olav R; Grune, Joachim; Kotchourko, Alexei

    2010-07-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools are increasingly employed for quantifying incident consequences in quantitative risk analysis (QRA) calculations in the process industry. However, these tools must be validated against representative experimental data, involving combined release and ignition scenarios, in order to have a real predictive capability. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) has recently carried out experiments involving vertically upwards hydrogen releases with different release rates and velocities impinging on a plate in two different geometrical configurations. The dispersed cloud was subsequently ignited and resulting explosion overpressures recorded. Blind CFD simulations were carried out prior to the experiments to predict the results. The simulated gas concentrations are found to correlate reasonably well with observations. The overpressures subsequent to ignition obtained in the blind predictions could not be compared directly as the ignition points chosen in the experiments were somewhat different from those used in the blind simulations, but the pressure levels were similar. Simulations carried out subsequently with the same ignition position as those in the experiments compared reasonably well with the observations. This agreement points to the ability of the CFD tool FLACS to model such complex scenarios even with hydrogen as a fuel. Nevertheless, the experimental set-up can be considered to be small-scale. Future large-scale data of this type will be valuable to confirm ability to predict large-scale accident scenarios. PMID:20346585

  1. Numerical calculation of phase-matching properties in photonic crystal fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingtao; Liu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Shutao; Wang, Wei; Han, Ying; Liu, Zhaolun; Li, Shuguang; Hou, Lantian

    2015-10-19

    Photonic crystal fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths are presented through special design of the structural parameters, in which the closing to zero and ultra-flattened dispersion can be obtained. The unique phase-matching properties of the fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths are analyzed. Variation of the phase-matching wavelengths with the pump wavelengths, pump powers, dispersion properties, and fiber structural parameters is analyzed. The presence of three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths can realize wavelength conversion of optical soliton between two anomalous dispersion regions, generate six phase-matching sidebands through four-wave mixing and create more new photon pairs, which can be used for the study of supercontinuum generation, optical switches and quantum optics. PMID:26480448

  2. Integration of AMS and ERDS Measurement Data into NARAC Dispersion Models FY05 Technology Integration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K; Arnold, E; Bonner, D; Eme, B; Fischer, K; Gash, J; Nasstrom, J; Walker, H; Guber, A; Logan, C; Wasiolek, P; Fulton, J

    2005-09-20

    Staff from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Bechtel Nevada Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) completed the proposed work for the Technology Integration Project titled Integration of AMS and ERDS Measurement Data into NARAC Dispersion Models. The objectives of this project were to develop software to convert Aerial Measurement Survey (AMS) and Emergency Response Data System (ERDS) field measurement data into a standard electronic format for transmission to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), and to streamline aspects of the NARAC operational atmospheric dispersion modeling system to quickly process these data for use in generating consequence calculations based on refined, field measurement-based estimates of the source strength. Although NARAC continues to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art atmospheric dispersion modeling system, model predictions are constrained by the availability of information to properly characterize the source term. During an actual atmospheric release, very little may be known initially about the source material properties, amount, or release time and location. Downwind measurements often provide the best information about the scope and nature of the release. The timely integration of field measurement data with model calculations is an obvious approach toward improving the model consequence predictions. By optimizing these predictions a more accurate representation of the consequences may be provided to (a) predict contamination levels which may be below the detectable limit of sensors, but which may still pose a significant hazard, (b) determine contamination is areas where measurements have not yet been made, and (c) prioritize the locations of future measurement surveys. By automating and streamlining much of the related field measurement data processing, these optimized predictions may be provided within a significantly reduced period, and with a reduction in

  3. Influence of dispersive forces on the final shape of a reverse micelle.

    PubMed

    León, I; Montero, R; Longarte, A; Fernández, José A

    2015-01-21

    Micelles are interesting self-organized structures with multiple applications in chemistry and related with the formation of biological structures. Their final shape depends on a subtle equilibrium between several weak forces: namely, van der Waals and hydrogen bond interactions. In order to address the influence of each type of interaction, the aggregation of cyclohexanol molecules was studied in the gas phase. The geometry of the clusters formed with sizes from 2 to 6 cyclohexanol molecules was elucidated by an IR double resonance technique that combines fs and ns lasers. Comparison of the structures obtained with those from previous studies demonstrates that hydrogen bond plays a central role in defining the general shape, but that its contribution to the overall stabilization energy may be lower than expected in systems with multiple C-H···π interactions. PMID:25486453

  4. National vaccine injury compensation program: calculation of average cost of a health insurance policy. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-07-01

    Subtitle 2 of Title XXI of the Public Health Service Act, as enacted by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, as amended (the Act), governs the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). The VICP, administered by the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary), provides that a proceeding for compensation for a vaccine-related injury or death shall be initiated by service upon the Secretary, and the filing of a petition with the United States Court of Federal Claims (the Court). In some cases, the injured individual may receive compensation for future lost earnings, less appropriate taxes and the "average cost of a health insurance policy, as determined by the Secretary." The final rule establishes the new method of calculating the average cost of a health insurance policy and determines the amount of the average cost of a health insurance policy to be deducted from the compensation award. PMID:17674490

  5. Influence of the diagnostic wind field model on the results of calculation of the microscale atmospheric dispersion in moderately complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalets, Ivan V.; Korolevych, Vladimir Y.; Khalchenkov, Alexander V.; Ievdin, Ievgen A.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Andronopoulos, Spyros

    2013-11-01

    The impact of diagnostic wind field model on the results of calculation of microscale atmospheric dispersion in moderately complex terrain conditions was investigated. The extensive radiological and meteorological data set collected at the site of the research reactor of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Canada had been compared with the results of calculations of the Local Scale Model Chain of the EU nuclear emergency response system JRODOS. The diagnostic wind field model based on divergence minimizing procedure and the atmospheric dispersion model RIMPUFF were used in calculations. Taking into account complex topography features with the use of diagnostic wind field model improved the results of calculations. For certain months, the level of improvement of the normalized mean squared error reached the factor of 2. For the whole simulation period (January-July, 2007) the level of improvement by taking into account terrain features with the diagnostic wind field model was about 9%. The use of diagnostic wind field model also significantly improved the fractional bias of the calculated results. Physical analysis of the selected cases of atmospheric dispersion at the CRL site had been performed.

  6. Structure and stability of acrolein and allyl alcohol networks on Ag(111) from density functional theory based calculations with dispersion corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Branda, Maria Marta; Illas, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of acrolein and allyl alcohol with the Ag(111) surface has been studied by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations including explicitly dispersion terms. Different coverage values have been explored going from isolated adsorbed molecules to isolated dimers, interacting dimers or ordered overlayers. The inclusion of the dispersion terms largely affects the calculated values of the adsorption energy and also the distance between adsorbed molecule and the metallic surface but much less the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. Owing to the large dipole moment of acrolein, the present calculations predict that at high coverage this molecule forms a stable extensive two-dimensional network on the surface, caused by the alignment of the adsorbate dipoles. For the case of allyl alcohol, dimers and complex networks exhibit similar stability.

  7. Thermal properties of molecular crystals through dispersion-corrected quasi-harmonic ab initio calculations: the case of urea.

    PubMed

    Erba, Alessandro; Maul, Jefferson; Civalleri, Bartolomeo

    2016-01-31

    An ab initio quantum-mechanical theoretical framework is presented to compute the thermal properties of molecular crystals. The present strategy combines dispersion-corrected density-functional-theory (DFT-D), harmonic phonon dispersion, quasi-harmonic approximation to the lattice dynamics for thermal expansion and thermodynamic functions, and quasi-static approximation for anisotropic thermo-elasticity. The proposed scheme is shown to reliably describe thermal properties of the urea molecular crystal by a thorough comparison with experimental data. PMID:26670006

  8. Segregation of acid plume pixels from background water pixels, signatures of background water and dispersed acid plumes, and implications for calculation of iron concentration in dense plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahn, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Two files of data, obtained with a modular multiband scanner, for an acid waste dump into ocean water, were analyzed intensively. Signatures were derived for background water at different levels of effective sunlight intensity, and for different iron concentrations in the dispersed plume from the dump. The effect of increased sunlight intensity on the calculated iron concentration was found to be relatively important at low iron concentrations and relatively unimportant at high values of iron concentration in dispersed plumes. It was concluded that the basic equation for iron concentration is not applicable to dense plumes, particularly because lower values are indicated at the very core of the plume, than in the surrounding sheath, whereas radiances increase consistently from background water to dispersed plume to inner sheath to innermost core. It was likewise concluded that in the dense plume the iron concentration would probably best be measured by the higher wave length radiances, although the suitable relationship remains unknown.

  9. Calculating the vulnerability of synthetic polymers to autoignition during nuclear flash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, R.; Reitter, T.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the rapid progression of fire to flashover conditions in a furnished room, observed in a 1953 nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site (the Encore Event), might be typical behavior rather than an aberration. If flashover under such conditions is indeed likely, this phenomenon is worth pursuing in view of the increased threat to buildings and human life from possible large-scale fires. We placed special emphasis on fires that occurred in modern rooms, i.e., ones furnished with upholstery and drapery materials made from synthetic polymers. Examination of photochemical processes showed them to be an unlikely explanation, either in Encore or in the future. Our calculation of rapid radiant-heating behavior of a few materials demonstrated that fabrics and fabric-covered foams would exceed their autoignition temperature when exposed to a 25-cal/cm/sup 2/ fluence from a 1-Mt air burst weapon. Because synthetic polymers have higher heating values and release heat faster during combustion than do the cellulosics used in the Encore experiment, early flashover should not be unexpected in contemporary households. However, the far-field thermal fluence required would be higher because of the absorption of thermal energy by windows and window coverings. Because of the complexity of the problem, carefully planned, full-scale experiments will be needed to finally answer the question. 39 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Multi-camera PIV imaging in two-phase flow for improved dispersed-phase concentration and velocity calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Kiger, Ken

    2015-11-01

    PIV/PTV has been widely used in making simultaneous measurements of velocity and concentration within multi-phase flows. A major problem confronted by researchers during data processing is to separate the image signals of the dispersed phase from carrier phase reliably and within the same measurement volume. For dilute concentrations, size and brightness criteria have been shown to provide satisfying results in identifying the dispersed phase. However this method is limited to fairly small concentrations due to effects of multiple-scattering and obscuration. To extend this technique, we introduce multi-camera imaging as a means to provide a more precise and reliable identification of the dispersed phase in the face of increased concentration. Specifically, the size-brightness criteria is used to nominally match corresponding dispersed-phase images of the same particle within the other views, and the subsequent out-of-plane position is used to get a more precise 3D location of the particle. In order to demonstrate this method, experiments using static test cell of solid glass sphere suspended in an aqueous gel have been conducted under various concentration and compared to corresponding single camera results.

  11. 40 CFR 66.43 - Final decision; submission of penalty calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Agency decision that it is in violation of applicable legal requirements or is not entitled to an... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final decision; submission of penalty... Requests and Challenges to Notices of Noncompliance § 66.43 Final decision; submission of...

  12. Calculations of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. Final report, April 23--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This task involved the calculation of neutron and proton radii of cesium isotopes. The author has written a computer code that calculates radii according to two models: Myers 1983 and FRDM 1992. Results of calculations in both these models for both cesium and francium isotopes are attached as figures. He is currently interpreting these results in collaboration with D. Vieira and J.R. Nix, and they expect to use the computer code for further studies of nuclear radii.

  13. Three dimensional model calculations of the global dispersion of high speed aircraft exhaust and implications for stratospheric ozone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Rood, Richard B.; Jackman, Charles H.; Weaver, Clark J.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional (zonally averaged) photochemical models are commonly used for calculations of ozone changes due to various perturbations. These include calculating the ozone change expected as a result of change in the lower stratospheric composition due to the exhaust of a fleet of supersonic aircraft flying in the lower stratosphere. However, zonal asymmetries are anticipated to be important to this sort of calculation. The aircraft are expected to be restricted from flying over land at supersonic speed due to sonic booms, thus the pollutant source will not be zonally symmetric. There is loss of pollutant through stratosphere/troposphere exchange, but these processes are spatially and temporally inhomogeneous. Asymmetry in the pollutant distribution contributes to the uncertainty in the ozone changes calculated with two dimensional models. Pollutant distributions for integrations of at least 1 year of continuous pollutant emissions along flight corridors are calculated using a three dimensional chemistry and transport model. These distributions indicate the importance of asymmetry in the pollutant distributions to evaluation of the impact of stratospheric aircraft on ozone. The implications of such pollutant asymmetries to assessment calculations are discussed, considering both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions.

  14. Conversion of electrostatic plasma waves into electromagnetic waves - Numerical calculation of the dispersion relation for all wavelengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oya, H.

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion curves have been computed for a wide range of wavelengths from electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in a magnetoactive warm plasma with a Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The computation was carried out mainly for the perpendicular propagation mode. The upper hybrid resonance is the connection point of the electrostatic waves and the electromagnetic waves. The electrostatic waves not associated with the upper hybrid resonance are subjected to electron cyclotron damping when the wavelength becomes long. Oblique propagation is allowed for the electrostatic waves in a frequency range from the plasma frequency to the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the long-wavelength region where Landau damping can be neglected and where the electrostatic mode smoothly connects to the electromagnetic X-mode. In a slightly inhomogeneous plasma, the Bernstein-mode electrostatic wave can escape by being converted into the O-mode electromagnetic wave; two reflections take place during this escape process.

  15. Effect of mountain-valley terrains on dispersion of pollutants. Technical final report, November 1, 1981-May 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.N.

    1983-05-01

    This research investigated meteorological and topographical effects on the transport and dispersion of pollutants in valleys and terrains for use in optimum site selections for power plants and industrial plants in mountain-valley terrain. Field studies are reported.

  16. Methodology for calculating combustible gas concentration in radwaste containers: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deltete, C.P.

    1987-03-01

    In September 1984, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued I and E Notice No. 84-72 dealing with the generation of hydrogen (H/sub 2/) and other combustible gases in radioactive waste containers. As an alternative to the tests and/or measurements required by the Notice, a calculational procedure was developed to predict the concentration of H/sub 2/ present inside a waste container after a specified storage duration. The calculational methodology determines the total dose absorbed by the waste as a function of curie loading, waste density, and container geometry, and then calculates H/sub 2/ generation as a function of absorbed dose and a predetermined gas generation constant. To ''benchmark'' the theoretical predictions against actual gas measurements from representative waste packages, liners containing dewatered resin waste that originated during cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) were used for comparison. On average, the predicted H/sub 2/ gas concentrations using the calculational model were within 20% of the H/sub 2/ concentrations measured when the liners were vented prior to shipment. The entire calculational procedure has been implemented on a desk top computer ''electronic spreadsheet,'' designed to be a simple, easy-to-implement tool to calculate H/sub 2/ generation in waste containers with minimal input by the user. Accompanying this report diskette containing the spreadsheet translated into several computer languages for use with various systems. 8 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

  18. Benchmarking dispersion and geometrical counterpoise corrections for cost-effective large-scale DFT calculations of water adsorption on graphene.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Marco; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Maschio, Lorenzo; Sgroi, Mauro; Pullini, Daniele

    2014-09-15

    The physisorption of water on graphene is investigated with the hybrid density functional theory (DFT)-functional B3LYP combined with empirical corrections, using moderate-sized basis sets such as 6-31G(d). This setup allows to model the interaction of water with graphene going beyond the quality of classical or semiclassical simulations, while still keeping the computational costs under control. Good agreement with respect to Coupled Cluster with singles and doubles excitations and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) results is achieved for the adsorption of a single water molecule in a benchmark with two DFT-functionals (Perdew/Burke/Ernzerhof (PBE), B3LYP) and Grimme's empirical dispersion and counterpoise corrections. We apply the same setting to graphene supported by epitaxial hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), leading to an increased interaction energy. To further demonstrate the achievement of the empirical corrections, we model, entirely from first principles, the electronic properties of graphene and graphene supported by h-BN covered with different amounts of water (one, 10 water molecules per cell and full coverage). The effect of h-BN on these properties turns out to be negligibly small, making it a good candidate for a substrate to grow graphene on. PMID:25056422

  19. CALCULATION OF THE FINAL ACUTE VALUE FOR WATER QUALITY CRITERIA FOR AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Final Acute Value (FAV) for a material, which is an integral part of the procedure for deriving water quality criteria for aquatic organisms, is an estimate of the fifth percentile of a statistical population represented by the set of Mean Acute Values (MAV) available for the...

  20. Missing final states and the spectral endpoint in exciton model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbach, C.

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies of (n, xp) spectra at incident energies of 28 to 63 MeV have emphasized a previously noted trend that exciton model calculations do not extend to high enough emission energies in some (p, xn) and (n, xp) reactions. Improved agreement between experiment and calculation is achieved by including in the residual nucleus state density those configurations that can be populated but were not being counted because the Fermi level moves down during particle emission. This necessitates minor adjustments in other model parameters. The situation is generalized to reactions with complex particle channels, and significant effects are seen in the calculations for a few reactions on light targets, though the average level of agreement with experiment is unchanged from earlier work.

  1. Efficient technique for calculating multiple solutions of electric-field problems. Part I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lauber, T.S.

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a digital computer program capable of calculating the electrostatic field in an arbitrary two-dimensional configuration. The program was developed as a preliminary result in a project aimed at producing a three-dimensional program. Thus, this report represents an interim report on the entire project.

  2. Choosing a density functional for modeling adsorptive hydrogen storage: reference quantum mechanical calculations and a comparison of dispersion-corrected density functionals.

    PubMed

    Kocman, Mikuláš; Jurečka, Petr; Dubecký, Matúš; Otyepka, Michal; Cho, Yeonchoo; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen storage in carbonaceous materials and their derivatives is currently a widely investigated topic. The rational design of novel adsorptive materials is often attempted with the help of computational chemistry tools, in particular density functional theory (DFT). However, different exchange-correlation functionals provide a very wide range of hydrogen binding energies. The aim of this article is to offer high level QM reference data based on coupled-cluster singles and doubles calculations with perturbative triple excitations, CCSD(T), and a complete basis set limit estimate that can be used to assess the accuracy of various DFT-based predictions. For one complex, the CCSD(T) result is verified against diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Reference binding curves are calculated for two model compounds representing weak and strong hydrogen adsorption: coronene (-4.7 kJ mol(-1) per H2), and coronene modified with boron and lithium (-14.3 kJ mol(-1)). The reference data are compared to results obtained with widely used density functionals including pure DFT, M06, DFT-D3, PBE-TS, PBE + MBD, optB88-vdW, vdW-DF, vdW-DF2 and VV10. We find that whereas DFT-D3 shows excellent results for weak hydrogen adsorption on coronene, most of the less empirical density based dispersion functionals except VV10 overestimate this interaction. On the other hand, some of the less empirical density based dispersion functionals better describe stronger binding in the more polar coroB2Li22H2 complex which is one of realistic models for high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. Our results may serve as a guide for choosing suitable DFT methods for quickly evaluating hydrogen binding potential and as a reference for assessing the accuracy of the previously published DFT results. PMID:25655486

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Title I operator dose calculations. Final report, LATA report No. 90

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.

    1980-02-01

    The radiation exposure dose was estimated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) operating personnel who do the unloading and transporting of the transuranic contact-handled waste. Estimates of the radiation source terms for typical TRU contact-handled waste were based on known composition and properties of the waste. The operations sequence for waste movement and storage in the repository was based upon the WIPP Title I data package. Previous calculations had been based on Conceptual Design Report data. A time and motion sequence was developed for personnel performing the waste handling operations both above and below ground. Radiation exposure calculations were then performed in several fixed geometries and folded with the time and motion studies for individual workers in order to determine worker exposure on an annual basis.

  4. Calculations to assist in a new Hiroshima yield estimate. Final report, August 19-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, L.W.; Roth, L.A.; Needham, C.E.

    1984-06-15

    This report describes calculations and analysis performed in an attempt to provide a new estimate for the yield of the Hiroshima weapon. Newly discovered meteorological data was adapted for use in one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamic codes, and a series of calculations was then run for different values of yield. The objective was to determine what yield produced an overpressure record which could best be correlated with an actual trace measured at a parachute-dropped canister. Altitude of the bomb and canister-carrying aircraft at drop time was also a variable parameter. The analysis provides an estimate of 16.6 + 0.3 kt for the yield of the Hiroshima weapon. A drop altitude of near 35,500 feet is shown to be consistent with the signal time-of-arrival. This yield value is within the range of other estimates, but the drop altitude is higher than that previously assumed to be reasonable.

  5. Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry LDRD 13-0144 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott A.; Ebeida, Mohamed Salah; Romero, Vicente J.; Swiler, Laura Painton; Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Abdelkader, Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    This SAND report summarizes our work on the Sandia National Laboratory LDRD project titled "Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry" which was project #165617 and proposal #13-0144. This report merely summarizes our work. Those interested in the technical details are encouraged to read the full published results, and contact the report authors for the status of the software and follow-on projects.

  6. Relativistic calculations of excitation and ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.H.

    1992-04-15

    Our rapid relativistic atomic structure program and relativistic distorted-wave programs for excitation and ionization of highly charged ions were further improved. The generalized Briet interaction and other QED corrections were added to the atomic structure program, and the speed of the distorted-wave excitation program was increased by over an order of magnitude over what it was when our initial large-scale relativistic calculations of excitation of Ne-like ions were made. The improved programs were then used to calculate collision strengths for 330 transitions in F-like ions with 22 {le} Z {le} 92 and 248 transitions in Ni-like ions with 60 {le} Z {le} 92. We expanded the relativistic collision program to include an option to use atomic structure data by the well-known multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) program of Grant and A coworkers. This was used in calculating collision strengths for the 45 {Delta}n = 0 transitions with n=2 in Be-like ions with 8 {le} Z {le} 92. This relativistic collision strength program was also extended to include an option to include the generalized Breis interaction in the scattering matrix elements and the importance of this for He-like, He-like and Li-like ions with Z = 26, 54 and 92 was studied. The factorization method was applied to ionization. Regardless of the complexity of the ion the ionization cross sections could be written as a sum of the products of a readily calculated coefficient that depends only on ion properties and a hydrogen-like cross section. Work was also done on excitation and ionization by directive and, in some cases spin-polarized electrons, which is of interest for some EBIT experiments and the study of solar flares. We also used our extensive collision strength results to test the

  7. HVDC-AC system interaction from AC harmonics. Volume 1. Harmonic impedance calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, G D; Chow, J H; Lindh, C B; Miller, N W; Numrich, F H; Price, W W; Turner, A E; Whitney, R R

    1982-09-01

    Improved methods are needed to characterize ac system harmonic behavior for ac filter design for HVDC systems. The purpose of this General Electric Company RP1138 research is to evaluate the present filter design practice and to investigate methods for calculating system harmonic impedances. An overview of ac filter design for HVDC systems and a survey of literature related to filter design have been performed. Two methods for calculating system harmonic impedances have been investigated. In the measurement method, an instrumentation system for measuring system voltage and current has been assembled. Different schemes of using the measurements to calculate system harmonic impedances have been studied. In the analytical method, a procedure to include various operating conditions has been proposed. Computer programs for both methods have been prepared, and the results of the measurement and analytical methods analyzed. A conclusion of the project is that the measurement and analytical methods both provided reasonable results. There are correlations between the measured and analytical results for most harmonics, although there are discrepancies between the assumptions used in the two methods. A sensitivity approach has been proposed to further correlate the results. From the results of the analysis, it is recommended that both methods should be tested further. For the measurement method, more testing should be done to cover different system operating conditions. In the analytical method, more detailed models for representing system components should be studied. In addition, alternative statistical and sensitivity approaches should be attempted.

  8. Three-dimensional turbulent particle dispersion submodel development. Final report, 15 April 1991--15 April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.

    1993-12-31

    Many practical combustion processes which use solid particles, liquid droplets, or slurries as fuels introduce these fuels into turbulent environments. Examples include spray combustion, pulverized coal and coal slurry combustion, fluidized beds, sorbent injection, and hazardous waste incineration. The interactions of the condensed phases with turbulent environments in such applications have not been well described. Such a description is complicated by the difficulty of describing turbulence in general, even in the absence of particles or droplets. But the complications in describing the dispersion and reaction of the condensed phases in turbulent environments do not stem entirely, or even primarily, from the uncertainties in the description of the turbulence. Even when the turbulence characteristics are known, computational methods for coupling the dynamics of the particulate phase with the continuous phase have not been well established. Several new theoretical descriptions of the turbulent dispersion of particles and droplets have been proposed over the past few years. It has been the purpose of this project to explore the potential of these theories for coupling with the other aspects of three-dimensional, reacting, turbulent, particle-laden systems, to provide computational simulations that could be useful for addressing industrial problems. Two different approaches were explored in this project. The major thrust of this project was on identifying a suitable dispersion submodel for dilute dispersed flows, implementing it in a comprehensive three-dimensional CFD code framework for combustion simulation and evaluating its performance rigorously. In another effort the potential of a dispersion submodel for densely loaded systems was analyzed. This report discusses the main issues that were resolved as part of this project.

  9. Parametric radionuclide release calculations using the MAAP-3. 0 computer code: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Z.T.

    1988-11-01

    This report documents an analysis of the radiological source terms for severe accidents in Light Water Reactors (LWR) using the Industry Degraded Core Rulemaking Program (IDCOR) integrated accident analysis methodology. The analytical study is an on-going effort sponsored by EPRI to investigate the sensitivity of the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) code predictions. This supplements an analysis, reported in an interim report (EPRI NP-4437), that had used an earlier version of the code. Two reference plant containment designs were evaluated: (1) a BWR Mark I containment design, represented by the Peach Bottom Plant, and (2) a PWR large dry containment design, represented by the Zion Nuclear Power Station. These reference LWR plants have been analyzed in the Severe Accidents Risk Reduction/Risk Rebaselining Program (SARRP) conducted by NRC. Source terms were calculated for accident scenarios to be dominant in the SARRP (NUREG-1150) risk assessments: a transient event with failure to scram and station blackout sequences for Peach Bottom; and a pump seal LOCA and transient events for Zion. The predicted results were not very sensitive to code input parameter changes, with the exception of assumptions related to sequence definitions such as active operator actions and containment failure characterization for the BWR plant. For the PWR Zion analysis, early containment failure at vessel breach to simulate the NUREG-1150 STCP calculations could not be achieved because by differences between the MARCH3 (STCP) and MAAP3.0 modeling assumptions relative to hydrogen production and combustion. Under similar sequence definitions, the MAAP3.0 code calculates slightly higher CsI release fractions than STCP due to revaporization, but exhibited a wide range of values in the distribution within the containment system. 17 refs., 48 figs., 41 tabs.

  10. Implementation of routine ash predictions using a general purpose atmospheric dispersion model (HYSPLIT) adapted for calculating ash thickness on the ground.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Tony; Davis, Cory; Deligne, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    GNS Science currently produces twice-daily forecasts of the likely ash deposition if any of the active or recently active volcanoes in New Zealand was to erupt, with a number of alternative possible eruptions for each volcano. These use our ASHFALL program for calculating ash thickness, which uses 1-D wind profiles at the location of each volcano derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model output supplied by MetService. HYSPLIT is a hybrid Lagrangian dispersion model, developed by NOAA/ARL, which is used by MetService in its role as a Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre, to model airborne volcanic ash, with meteorological data provided by external and in-house NWP models. A by-product of the HYSPLIT volcanic ash dispersion simulations is the deposition rate at the ground surface. Comparison of HYSPLIT with ASHFALL showed that alterations to the standard fall velocity model were required to deal with ash particles larger than about 50 microns, which make up the bulk of ash deposits near a volcano. It also required the ash injected into the dispersion model to have a concentration based on a typical umbrella-shaped eruption column, rather than uniform across all levels. The different parameters used in HYSPLIT also caused us to revisit what possible combinations of eruption size and column height were appropriate to model as a likely eruption. We are now running HYSPLIT to produce alternative ash forecasts. It is apparent that there are many times at which the 3-D wind model used in HYSPLIT gives a substantially different ash deposition pattern to the 1-D wind model of ASHFALL, and the use of HYSPLIT will give more accurate predictions. ASHFALL is likely still to be used for probabilistic hazard forecasting, in which very large numbers of runs are required, as HYSPLIT takes much more computer time.

  11. Transient fuel-pin temperature calculations using describing functions. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, T.E.; Peddicord, K.L.; Nielsen, L.H.

    1982-02-01

    Temperature dependent properties make the transient thermal analysis of reactor fuel pins nonlinear. Traditionally, finite difference or finite element methods have been used to solve this system. An analytically based method is presented in which the transient temperature profiles are calculated using describing functions to characterize the system nonlinearities. In the past the describing functions approach has been used exclusively in the solution of ordinary differential equation systems. This study appears to be the first application of describing functions in the solution of partial differential equations.

  12. Terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory calculation of anthracene: Effect of dispersion force on the vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Tominaga, Keisuke E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp; Hayashi, Michitoshi E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp Wang, Houng-Wei; Kambara, Ohki; Sasaki, Tetsuo; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp

    2014-05-07

    The phonon modes of molecular crystals in the terahertz frequency region often feature delicately coupled inter- and intra-molecular vibrations. Recent advances in density functional theory such as DFT-D{sup *} have enabled accurate frequency calculation. However, the nature of normal modes has not been quantitatively discussed against experimental criteria such as isotope shift (IS) and correlation field splitting (CFS). Here, we report an analytical mode-decoupling method that allows for the decomposition of a normal mode of interest into intermolecular translation, libration, and intramolecular vibrational motions. We show an application of this method using the crystalline anthracene system as an example. The relationship between the experimentally obtained IS and the IS obtained by PBE-D{sup *} simulation indicates that two distinctive regions exist. Region I is associated with a pure intermolecular translation, whereas region II features coupled intramolecular vibrations that are further coupled by a weak intermolecular translation. We find that the PBE-D{sup *} data show excellent agreement with the experimental data in terms of IS and CFS in region II; however, PBE-D{sup *} produces significant deviations in IS in region I where strong coupling between inter- and intra-molecular vibrations contributes to normal modes. The result of this analysis is expected to facilitate future improvement of DFT-D{sup *}.

  13. Calculations from compliance emissions of long and short term SO/sub 2/ concentrations in the southwest Pennsylvania air quality control region. Final report, 1979 - 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The results of dispersion model calculations of maximum annual, 24 hour and 3 hour average ground level SO2 concentrations for selected areas in the region (AQOR) is described. The primary purpose of the model calculations was to assist EPA Region III and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources in determining the attainment or nonattainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for SO2 in the Beaver Valley and Monongahela Valley Air Basins exclusive of Allegheny County. All of the dispersion model calculations were made using the LONGZ and SHORTZ dispersion models with 1980 compliance emissions inventories containing 492 major SO2 sources located within the AQOR and in Ohio and West Virginia near the western border of the AQOR.

  14. Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) - additional modifications to final report as per GTP's request.

    SciTech Connect

    Gowda, Varun; Hogue, Michael

    2015-07-17

    This report will discuss the methods and the results from economic impact analysis applied to the development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. As part of this work, the Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI) has developed a web-based Geothermal Economics Calculator (Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC)) tool that is aimed at helping the industry perform geothermal systems analysis and study the associated impacts of specific geothermal investments or technological improvements on employment, energy and environment. It is well-known in the industry that geothermal power projects will generate positive economic impacts for their host regions. Our aim in the assessment of these impacts includes quantification of the increase in overall economic output due to geothermal projects and of the job creation associated with this increase. Such an estimate of economic impacts of geothermal investments on employment, energy and the environment will also help us understand the contributions that the geothermal industry will have in achieving a sustainable path towards energy production.

  15. A predictive mathematical model for the calculation of the final mass of Graves' disease thyroids treated with 131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traino, Antonio C.; Di Martino, Fabio; Grosso, Mariano; Monzani, Fabio; Dardano, Angela; Caraccio, Nadia; Mariani, Giuliano; Lazzeri, Mauro

    2005-05-01

    Substantial reductions in thyroid volume (up to 70-80%) after radioiodine therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism are common and have been reported in the literature. A relationship between thyroid volume reduction and outcome of 131I therapy of Graves' disease has been reported by some authors. This important result could be used to decide individually the optimal radioiodine activity A0 (MBq) to administer to the patient, but a predictive model relating the change in gland volume to A0 is required. Recently, a mathematical model of thyroid mass reduction during the clearance phase (30-35 days) after 131I administration to patients with Graves' disease has been published and used as the basis for prescribing the therapeutic thyroid absorbed dose. It is well known that the thyroid volume reduction goes on until 1 year after therapy. In this paper, a mathematical model to predict the final mass of Graves' diseased thyroids submitted to 131I therapy is presented. This model represents a tentative explanation of what occurs macroscopically after the end of the clearance phase of radioiodine in the gland (the so-called second-order effects). It is shown that the final thyroid mass depends on its basal mass, on the radiation dose absorbed by the gland and on a constant value α typical of thyroid tissue. α has been evaluated based on a set of measurements made in 15 reference patients affected by Graves' disease and submitted to 131I therapy. A predictive equation for the calculation of the final mass of thyroid is presented. It is based on macroscopic parameters measurable after a diagnostic 131I capsule administration (0.37-1.85 MBq), before giving the therapy. The final mass calculated using this equation is compared to the final mass of thyroid measured 1 year after therapy administration in 22 Graves' diseased patients. The final masses calculated and measured 1 year after therapy are in fairly good agreement (R = 0.81). The possibility, for the physician, to decide a

  16. Closure of the Averaged Equations for Disperse Two-Phase Flow by Direct Numerical Simulation: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Prosperetti

    2006-03-24

    The report briefly describes the activities carried out in the course of the project. A first line of research was the development of systematic closure relations for averaged equations for disperse multiphase flow. A second line was the development of efficient numerical methods for the simulation of Navier-Stokes flows with many suspended particles. The report also lists the 21 journal articles in which this work is more fully decsribed.

  17. Handling, transport and dispersion of sorbent powder for in-furnace injection. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.S.; Abou-Zeida, E.; Liang, S.C.; Luo, Xukun

    1995-02-01

    The focus of this project is on sorbent injection technologies using dry, calcium-based sorbents for high-sulfur coal flue gas desulfurization. The goal is to provide research findings on handling, transport and dispersion of sorbent powder, aimed at improving SO{sub 2} (to at least 90%) removal and increasing sorbent utilization in a cost-effective fashion. The purpose of this project is to investigate the fundamental aspects of powder technology relevant to the fine sorbent powders, and to provide means of improving sorbent performance through superior dispersion and reduced dispersed particle size. This project is in two phases, Phase 1 ``Powder Characterization`` and Phase 2 ``Powder Mechanical Properties``. Phase 1 involves characterization of the sorbents in terms of their electrostatic properties. The triboelectric charging of powders are studied in detail by measuring sorbent charging as a function of material properties as well as transport conditions. A variety of sorbents are tested, including laboratory-made lignohydrates, calcite, dolomite, dolomitic hydrate and hydrated lime. The effects of transport tube material and gas properties, specifically humidity and velocity on the extent of sorbent charging are also investigated. A population balance model is developed to account for the particle size distribution for powder dispersion through gas-solid injection nozzles. The variations of the transition probability with the booster air velocities is examined. Simulation of particle size distributions under some operating conditions is conducted. Phase 2 investigates the flow properties of several calcium-based sorbents under different handling and transporting conditions. Effect of moisture content, as an important handling condition, on these properties is examined. Determined properties has been analyzed to study their effect on the transport and handling processes.

  18. Final Technical Report - High-Performance, Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Tubes for Production of Ethylene adn Other Industrial Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    McKimpson, Marvin G.

    2006-04-06

    This project was undertaken by Michigan Technological University and Special Metals Corporation to develop creep-resistant, coking-resistant oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) tubes for use in industrial-scale ethylene pyrolysis and steam methane reforming operations. Ethylene pyrolysis tubes are exposed to some of the most severe service conditions for metallic materials found anywhere in the chemical process industries, including elevated temperatures, oxidizing atmospheres and high carbon potentials. During service, hard deposits of carbon (coke) build up on the inner wall of the tube, reducing heat transfer and restricting the flow of the hydrocarbon feedstocks. About every 20 to 60 days, the reactor must be taken off-line and decoked by burning out the accumulated carbon. This decoking costs on the order of $9 million per year per ethylene plant, accelerates tube degradation, and requires that tubes be replaced about every 5 years. The technology developed under this program seeks to reduce the energy and economic cost of coking by creating novel bimetallic tubes offering a combination of improved coking resistance, creep resistance and fabricability not available in current single-alloy tubes. The inner core of this tube consists of Incoloy(R) MA956, a commercial ferritic Fe-Cr-Al alloy offering a 50% reduction in coke buildup combined with improved carburization resistance. The outer sheath consists of a new material - oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Alloy 803(R) developed under the program. This new alloy retains the good fireside environmental resistance of Alloy 803, a commercial wrought alloy currently used for ethylene production, and provides an austenitic casing to alleviate the inherently-limited fabricability of the ferritic Incoloy(R) MA956 core. To provide mechanical compatibility between the two alloys and maximize creep resistance of the bimetallic tube, both the inner Incoloy(R) MA956 and the outer ODS Alloy 803 are oxide dispersion

  19. Final Report for "Design calculations for high-space-charge beam-to-RF conversion".

    SciTech Connect

    David N Smithe

    2008-10-17

    Accelerator facility upgrades, new accelerator applications, and future design efforts are leading to novel klystron and IOT device concepts, including multiple beam, high-order mode operation, and new geometry configurations of old concepts. At the same time, a new simulation capability, based upon finite-difference “cut-cell” boundaries, has emerged and is transforming the existing modeling and design capability with unparalleled realism, greater flexibility, and improved accuracy. This same new technology can also be brought to bear on a difficult-to-study aspect of the energy recovery linac (ERL), namely the accurate modeling of the exit beam, and design of the beam dump for optimum energy efficiency. We have developed new capability for design calculations and modeling of a broad class of devices which convert bunched beam kinetic energy to RF energy, including RF sources, as for example, klystrons, gyro-klystrons, IOT's, TWT’s, and other devices in which space-charge effects are important. Recent advances in geometry representation now permits very accurate representation of the curved metallic surfaces common to RF sources, resulting in unprecedented simulation accuracy. In the Phase I work, we evaluated and demonstrated the capabilities of the new geometry representation technology as applied to modeling and design of output cavity components of klystron, IOT's, and energy recovery srf cavities. We identified and prioritized which aspects of the design study process to pursue and improve in Phase II. The development and use of the new accurate geometry modeling technology on RF sources for DOE accelerators will help spark a new generational modeling and design capability, free from many of the constraints and inaccuracy associated with the previous generation of “stair-step” geometry modeling tools. This new capability is ultimately expected to impact all fields with high power RF sources, including DOE fusion research, communications, radar and

  20. Final Technical Report: Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2007-05-01

    Activities at U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training and testing ranges can be sources of dust in local and regional airsheds governed by air-quality regulations. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the DoD in addressing particulate air-quality issues at military training and testing ranges.

  1. Dispersed, decentralized and renewable energy sources: alternatives to national vulnerability and war. Final report, July 1979-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McCasker, J.; Clark, W.

    1980-12-01

    Section 1 and 2 of this report contain background information on centralized energy systems and the relationship between vulnerability of these systems, energy planning, and existing civil defense programs. Section 3 and 4 contain an extensive investigation, review and categorization of alternative approaches to centralized, vulnerable energy systems; a review of dispersed and renewable technologies which can be appropriately implemented at the local level; and matrices for evaluation of these technologies for emergency and crisis planning. Specific recommendations to FEMA are included on the use of localized energy approaches for emergency response and recovery situations.

  2. Final Report for the Joint Urban 2003 Atmospheric Dispersion Study in Oklahoma City: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory participation

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M J

    2005-10-12

    The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was designed to collect meteorological and tracer data resolving atmospheric dispersion at scales-of-motion ranging from flows in and around a single city block, in and around several blocks in the downtown Central Business District (CBD), and into the suburban Oklahoma City area a few km from the CBD. Indoor tracer and flow measurements within four downtown study buildings were also made in conjunction with detailed outdoor measurements investigating the outdoor-indoor exchange rates and mechanisms. The movement of tracer within the study buildings was also studied. The data from the field experiment is being used to evaluate models that are being developed for predicting dispersion of contaminants in urban areas. These models may be fast-response models based on semi-empirical algorithms that are used in real-time emergencies, or highly sophisticated computational fluid dynamics models that resolve individual building faces and crevices. The data from the field experiment, together with the models, can then be used to develop other advanced tools that are especially valuable in the efforts to thwart terrorists. These include tools for finding location and characteristics of a contaminant source; tools that can be used for real-time response or for forensic investigation. The tools will make use of monitoring networks for biological agents that are being established in several sensitive cities throughout the nation. This major urban study was conducted beginning June 28 and ending July 31, 2003. It included several integrated scientific components necessary to describe and understand the physical processes governing dispersion within and surrounding an urban area and into and within building environments. The components included characterizing: (1) the urban boundary layer and the development of the urban boundary layer within the atmospheric boundary layer, (2) the flows within and downwind of the tall-building core, (3

  3. Workshop on Plant Dispersal and Migration Modeling. Final Report for period June 1, 2001 - May 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Pitelka, L. F.

    2002-11-04

    Global environmental change is causing shifts in the geographical locations of habitats suitable for particular plant species. While it is established that the future distributions of plant species will be strongly influenced by the ability of plants to migrate to sites of suitable habitat, our ability to predict potential and actual migration rates is rudimentary. This workshop organized by the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems (GCTE) core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program provided scientists with interests and expertise in global change and plant migration with a forum for developing a new collaborative synthesis of understanding on long distance dispersal and migration modeling. This grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, provided partial support for the workshop by supporting the participation of U.S. scientists.

  4. Novel molecular sources for dispersing boron in carbon-carbon composites. Final report, 1 Jun-30 Nov 91

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.S.; Stevens, W.C.

    1991-12-31

    Improving the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites is key to expanding the use of this material system into higher temperature applications. While boron particles have been added to these materials to seal cracks in protective coatings, oxidation of the carbon matrix neighboring the boron particles seriously affects composite strength. This problem is exacerbate by a natural segregation of the boron particles to fiber rich areas of the composites. Carborane, a robust molecular source of boron, was used as the precursor for atomically dispersed boron in a phenolic derived carbon matrix. Modifications of the chemical structure of carborane were used to improve the solubility in phenolic. Additions of carboranes into the phenolic resins dramatically improved the oxidation resistance of the carbonized char. The char yield of the phenolic resin was also increased significantly.

  5. Using DUSTRAN to Simulate Fog-Oil Dispersion and Its Impacts on Local Insect Populations at Ft. Hood: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-12-29

    Smokes and obscurants (S&O) are important screening agents used during military training exercises on many military installations. Although the use of S&O is subject to environmental laws, the fate and effects of S&O on natural habitats are not well documented. One particular concern is the impact S&O may have on local insect populations, which can be important components of terrestrial food chains of endangered species. Fog-oil (FO) is an S&O that is of particular concern. An important part of assessing potential ecosystem impacts is the ability to predict downwind FO concentrations. This report documents the use of the comprehensive atmospheric dispersion modeling system DUST TRANsport (DUSTRAN) to simulate the downwind transport and diffusion of a hypothetical FO release on the U.S. Army installation at Ft. Hood, TX.

  6. Calculations from compliance emissions of long- and short-term SO/sub 2/ concentrations in the southwest Pennsylvania air quality control region. Final report 1979-80

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This report describes the results of dispersion-model calculations of maximum annual, 24-hour and 3-hour average ground-level SO2 concentrations for selected areas in the Southwest Pennsylvania Air Quality Control Region (AQCR). The primary purpose of the model calculations was to assist EPA Region III and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources in determining the attainment or non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for SO2 in the Beaver Valley and Monongahela Valley Air Basins exclusive of Allegheny County. All of the dispersion-model calculations were made using the LONGZ and SHORTZ dispersion models with 1980 compliance emissions inventories containing 492 major SO2 sources located within the Southwest Pennsylvania AQCR and in Ohio and West Virginia near the western border of the AQCR. The only calculated maximum that exceeds the NAAQS for SO2 is the maximum annual average concentration at an isolated grid point located on high terrain about 1 kilometer north of the Monessen Plant of Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel. The model calculations also indicate contributions of major SO2 sources located along the Ohio River in Ohio and West Virginia to the air quality in the Southwest Pennsylvania AQCR.

  7. Full-CI calculation of imaginary frequency-dependent dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities of ground state LiH and the C 7 dispersion coefficients of LiH-LiH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luigi Bendazzoli, Gian; Magnasco, Valerio; Figari, Giuseppe; Rui, Marina

    2002-09-01

    Full-CI calculations of frequency-dependent dipole and dipole-quadrupole polarizabilities of ground state LiH have been performed in the imaginary frequency range 0-56 a.u. using a set of 58 Gaussian type orbitals (GTOs) giving a Full-CI dimension of about 700.000 determinants in each symmetry-adapted subspace. A 16-point Gauss-Legendre quadrature of the Casimir-Polder formula over imaginary frequencies allows calculation of the dipole-quadrupole dispersion constants for the LiH-LiH homodimer, from which C 7 dispersion coefficients are derived for the first time.

  8. Final-State Projection Method in Charge-Transfer Multiplet Calculations: An Analysis of Ti L-Edge Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Thomas; Solomon, Edward I; de Groot, Frank M F

    2015-10-29

    A projection method to determine the final-state configuration character of all peaks in a charge transfer multiplet calculation of a 2p X-ray absorption spectrum is presented using a d(0) system as an example. The projection method is used to identify the most important influences on spectral shape and to map out the configuration weights. The spectral shape of a 2p X-ray absorption or L2,3-edge spectrum is largely determined by the ratio of the 2p core-hole interactions relative to the 2p3d atomic multiplet interaction. This leads to a nontrivial spectral assignment, which makes a detailed theoretical description of experimental spectra valuable for the analysis of bonding. PMID:26226507

  9. Novel molecular sources for dispersing boron in carbon-carbon composites. Final report, 8 September 1992-7 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.S.; Stevens, W.C.

    1993-11-07

    Improving the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites is key to extending the applications of this material system into higher temperature regimes. While molecularly dispersed boron, through addition of carborane, helps to provide oxidation protection to phenolic derived carbon, the moisture affinity of the boria seriously affects composite performance. Substitution of furfuryl and pitch as the resin precursors significantly improved the moisture resistance of the carbon matrix material by stabilizing the boron at low temperatures and minimizing premature boria formation. Carborane addition to a commercial furfuryl/pitch blend (Kaiser Code88A) yielded a carbon char with reduced moisture affinity and improved oxidation resistance. Mechanical properties of the Code88A matrix composites were not significantly affected by the addition of carborane. Although sample size limitations in testing detracted from the demonstration of success, data suggests that the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbons can be significantly enhanced via this approach without detriment to the physical attributes and moisture resistance of the composite.

  10. Atmospheric Dispersion at Spatial Resolutions Below Mesoscale for university of Tennessee SimCenter at Chattanooga: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David Whitfield; Dr. Daniel Hyams

    2009-09-14

    In Year 1 of this project, items 1.1 and 1.2 were addressed, as well as item 2.2. The baseline parallel computational simulation tool has been refined significantly over the timeline of this project for the purpose of atmospheric dispersion and transport problems; some of these refinements are documented in Chapter 3. The addition of a concentration transport capability (item 1.2) was completed, along with validation and usage in a highly complex urban environment. Multigrid capability (item 2.2) was a primary focus of Year 1 as well, regardless of the fact that it was scheduled for Year 2. It was determined by the authors that due to the very large nature of the meshes required for atmospheric simulations at mesoscale, multigrid was a key enabling technology for the rest of the project to be successful. Therefore, it was addressed early according to the schedule laid out in the original proposal. The technology behind the multigrid capability is discussed in detail in Chapter 5. Also in Year 1, the issue of ground topography specification is addressed. For simulations of pollutant transport in a given region, a key prerequisite is the specification of the detailed ground topography. The local topography must be placed into a form suitable for generating an unstructured grid both on the topography itself and the atmospheric volume above it; this effort is documented in Chapter 6. In Year 2 of this project, items 1.3 and 2.1 were addressed. Weather data in the form of wind speeds, relative humidity, and baseline pollution levels may be input into the code in order to improve the real-world fidelity of the solutions. Of course, the computational atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) boundary condition developed in Year 1 may still be used when necessary. Cloud cover may be simulated via the levels of actinic flux allowed in photochemical reactions in the atmospheric chemistry model. The primary focus of Year 2 was the formulation of a multispecies capability with included

  11. Extended grassland calculation results with comparisons to priscilla experimental data and a near-ideal calculation. Final report, October 1993-March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Ekler, R.G.; Needham, C.E.; Kennedy, L.W.

    1995-07-01

    An extended calculation of the nonideal airblast environment resulting from a PRISCILLA-like nuclear detonation has been completed. This calculation used the results of the S-CUBED THRML code to determine the structure of the preshock turbulence, surface roughness, and material lofted during the burning process in determining the near surface blast environment. No dust sweep up was used. The argument is that the roots of the grass will remain intact and prevent the erosion and entrainment of large amounts of dust. Full hydrodynamic definition of the precursor environment is now available from ground zero to a distance of nearly 2 km. Information includes full spatial definition at about 25 selected times and full time resolved waveforms at over 1,000 locations. The results of the calculation are compared to experimental data from the PRISCILLA shot and show the influence of the more intense thermal layer created by the burning grassland. An accompanying calculation without a thermal layer was also extended over a 2-km range. This calculation served as the ideal case. The ideal calculation included the effects of surface roughness and turbulence but not an interaction with a thermal layer or dust sweep up. Results of this calculation are used to quantify the differences specifically caused by thermal interactions. The enhancement and extent of the precursor effects of this calculation relative to the experiment demonstrate that precursors over desert surfaces do not result in the worst-case environments for detonations over real surfaces. The definition and understanding of the free-field environment is the necessary first step to predicting loads and response of vehicles or other targets subjected to such an environment.

  12. Advances in radiation modeling in ALEGRA :a final report for LDRD-67120, efficient implicit mulitgroup radiation calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Kurecka, Christopher J.; McClarren, Ryan; Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul

    2005-11-01

    The original LDRD proposal was to use a nonlinear diffusion solver to compute estimates for the material temperature that could then be used in a Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculation. At the end of the first year of the project, it was determined that this was not going to be effective, partially due to the concept, and partially due to the fact that the radiation diffusion package was not as efficient as it could be. The second, and final year, of the project focused on improving the robustness and computational efficiency of the radiation diffusion package in ALEGRA. To this end, several new multigroup diffusion methods have been developed and implemented in ALEGRA. While these methods have been implemented, their effectiveness of reducing overall simulation run time has not been fully tested. Additionally a comprehensive suite of verification problems has been developed for the diffusion package to ensure that it has been implemented correctly. This process took considerable time, but exposed significant bugs in both the previous and new diffusion packages, the linear solve packages, and even the NEVADA Framework's parser. In order to manage this large suite of problem, a new tool called Tampa has been developed. It is a general tool for automating the process of running and analyzing many simulations. Ryan McClarren, at the University of Michigan has been developing a Spherical Harmonics capability for unstructured meshes. While still in the early phases of development, this promises to bridge the gap in accuracy between a full transport solution using IMC and the diffusion approximation.

  13. The Sensitivity of Atmospheric Dispersion Calculations in Near-field Applications: Modeling of the Full Scale RDD Experiments with Operational Models in Canada, Part I.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Luke; Bourgouin, Pierre; Chouhan, Sohan; Ek, Nils; Korolevych, Volodymyr; Malo, Alain; Bensimon, Dov; Erhardt, Lorne

    2016-05-01

    Three radiological dispersal devices were detonated in 2012 under controlled conditions at Defence Research and Development Canada's Experimental Proving Grounds in Suffield, Alberta. Each device comprised a 35-GBq source of (140)La. The dataset obtained is used in this study to assess the MLCD, ADDAM, and RIMPUFF atmospheric dispersion models. As part one of a two-part study, this paper focuses on examining the capabilities of the above three models and evaluating how well their predictions of air concentration and ground deposition match observations from the full-scale RDD experiments. PMID:27023037

  14. Oil dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a symposium of the American Society for Testing and Materials. The topics covered include: The effect of elastomers on the efficiency of oil spill dispersants; planning for dispersant use; field experience with dispersants for oil spills on land; and measurements on natural dispersion.

  15. Animal seed-dispersers as key elements for conservation of tropical forests: A case study in the Nyungwe Forest Seserve, Rwanda. Final report, July 1989-July 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Moermond, T.C.; Mvukiyumwami, J.

    1993-07-01

    Seed dispersal is a critical step in the natural regeneration of tropical forests. The pattern of dispersal of tree seeds is likely to have an important influence on the future tree species composition of the forests and hence on the natural diversity associated with those tree species. Animal seed-dispersers are considered to be important agents for the dispersal of the seeds of the majority of tropical tree species. This study is aimed at defining the role of several species of animal dispersers in the dispersal of the ecologically and economically important tree species of the Nyungwe Forest of Rwanda. The Nyungwe Forest is an appropriate target for such a study since it is one of the richest remaining islands of montane forest in central Africa. However, the population and political pressure will require that the forest provide benefits in the form of forest products. A management plan is needed for Nyungwe which can allow exploitation while maintaining the natural biodiversity.

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 1, Calculations, Final design for construction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Volume one contains calculations for: embankment design--embankment material properties; Union Carbide site--bedrock contours; vicinity properties--origin of contamination; North Continent and Union Carbide sites contaminated materials--excavation quantities; and demolition debris--quantity estimate.

  17. Hydrodynamic behavior and electrochemical impedance of the Hanging Meniscus Rotating Disk (HMRD) electrode. I - Meniscus shape under rotation. II - I-BIEM calculations of frequency dispersion and minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The shape equations for an HMRD in static and rotating configurations are developed and solved numerically. A rationale for the applicability of the standard Levich equations to the rotating case is given. The region of stability of the HMRD is examined, and the observed small negative intercept for a Levich plot is explained. The iterative boundary integral equation method is applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at an HMRD electrode. It is shown that a range of disk sizes and heights can be chosen to give almost uniform primary and secondary current distribution and minimal frequency disperison.

  18. Comparisons of COBRA-SFS calculations with data from simulated sections of unconsolidated and consolidated BWR spent fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, J.M.; Creer, J.M.

    1986-08-01

    The COBRA-SFS code was used to calculate temperatures in test sections modeling consolidated and unconsolidated spent fuel rods. The test sections were two-feet long, oriented horizontally, and designed so that the predominate direction of heat flow was in the radial direction. The data consisted of temperature measurements obtained on the electrically heated rods in the test assemblies, and on the boundary walls of the test sections. The COBRA-SFS calculations were in excellent agreement with the measured data from the consolidated test sections. The temperature calculated for the unconsolidated tests were somewhat higher than the measured values. Sensitivity studies on the models for the various modes of heat transfer available in the test sections show that for the consolidated geometry, the COBRA-SFS results are in agreement with the data, and well within experimental error. For the unconsolidated geometry, the COBRA-SFS results are conservative due to an idealized representation of the actual geometry.

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 2, Calculations, Final design for construction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Volume two contains calculations for: embankment design--slope stability analysis; embankment design--excavation stability; embankment design--settlement and cover cracking analysis; radon barrier design--statistical analysis of ra-226 concentrations for North Continent and Union Carbide sites; radon barrier design--RAECOM input data; radon barrier design--design thickness; and cover design--frost penetration depth.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1, Volume 4. Calculations, Final design for construction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Volume four contains calculations for: Borrow areas--site evaluation; temporary facilities--material quantities; embankment quantities--excavation and cover materials; Burro Canyon site excavation quantities--rippable and unrippable materials; site restoration--earthwork quantities and seeding; and bid schedule quantities and material balance.

  1. Mars Exploration Rovers Landing Dispersion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knocke, Philip C.; Wawrzyniak, Geoffrey G.; Kennedy, Brian M.; Desai, Prasun N.; Parker, TImothy J.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Duxbury, Thomas C.; Kass, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Landing dispersion estimates for the Mars Exploration Rover missions were key elements in the site targeting process and in the evaluation of landing risk. This paper addresses the process and results of the landing dispersion analyses performed for both Spirit and Opportunity. The several contributors to landing dispersions (navigation and atmospheric uncertainties, spacecraft modeling, winds, and margins) are discussed, as are the analysis tools used. JPL's MarsLS program, a MATLAB-based landing dispersion visualization and statistical analysis tool, was used to calculate the probability of landing within hazardous areas. By convolving this with the probability of landing within flight system limits (in-spec landing) for each hazard area, a single overall measure of landing risk was calculated for each landing ellipse. In-spec probability contours were also generated, allowing a more synoptic view of site risks, illustrating the sensitivity to changes in landing location, and quantifying the possible consequences of anomalies such as incomplete maneuvers. Data and products required to support these analyses are described, including the landing footprints calculated by NASA Langley's POST program and JPL's AEPL program, cartographically registered base maps and hazard maps, and flight system estimates of in-spec landing probabilities for each hazard terrain type. Various factors encountered during operations, including evolving navigation estimates and changing atmospheric models, are discussed and final landing points are compared with approach estimates.

  2. Application of RELAP5/MOD1 for calculation of safety and relief valve discharge piping hydrodynamic loads. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    A series of operability tests of spring-loaded safety valves was performed at Combustion Engineering in Windsor, CT as part of the PWR Safety and Relief Valve Test Program conducted by EPRI on behalf of PWR Utilities in response to the recommendations of NUREG-0578 and the requirements of the NRC. Experimental data from five of the safety valve tests are compared with RELAP5/MOD1 calculations to evaluate the capability of the code to determine the fluid-induced transient loads on downstream piping. Comparisons between data and calculations are given for transients with discharge of steam, water, and water loop seal followed by steam. RELAP5/MOD1 provides useful engineering estimates of the fluid-induced piping loads for all cases.

  3. The Issue of Calculating the Final Temperature of the Products of Rapid Exothermic Chemical Reactions with Significant Energy Release in a Closed Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarev, V.; Geidmanis, D.

    2016-02-01

    The theoretical problem solved in this article is the calculation of thermodynamic parameters such as final temperature, distribution of the liquid and dry saturated vapour phases of the substance that are considered to be in thermodynamic equilibrium, and pressure of the system of several reaction products after adding to the system a certain amount of heat or the thermal effect released during rapid exothermic reaction in a closed volume that occurs so fast that it can be considered to be adiabatic, and when the volume of liquid reagents is several orders of magnitude less than the volume of the reactor. The general multi-substance problem is reduced to a theoretical problem for one substance of calculation thermodynamic parameters of system after adding a certain amount of heat that gives theoretically rigorous isochoric calculation. In this article, we substantiate our view that isochoric pass of calculation is more robust compared to seemingly more natural isobaric pass of calculation, if the later involves quite not trivial calculation of the adiabatic compression of a two-phase system (liquid - dry saturated vapour) that can pass itself into another kind of state (liquid - wet saturated vapour), which requires, apparently, more complex descriptions compared with isochoric calculation because the specific heat capacity of wet saturated vapour can be negative. The solved theoretical problem relates to a practical problem that has been a driver for our research as part of a design of the reactor of the titanium reduction from magnesium and titanium tetrachloride supplied into atmosphere of the reactor at high temperatures when both reagents are in gaseous state. The reaction is known to be exothermic with a high thermal effect, and estimate of the final temperature and pressure of the products of reaction, for instance, designing the reactor allows eliminating the possibility of the reaction products to penetrate backwards into supply tracts of the reagents

  4. Synthesis and properties of layered synthetic microstructure (LSM) dispersion elements for 62 eV (200A) to 1. 24 keV (10A) radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    The opportunities offered by engineered synthetic multilayer dispersion elements for x-rays have been recognized since the earliest days of x-ray diffraction analysis. In this paper, application of sputter deposition technology to the synthesis of Layered Synthetic Microstructure (LSMs) of sufficient quality for use as x-ray dispersion elements is discussed. It will be shown that high efficiency, controllable bandwidth dispersion elements, with d spacings varying from 15 A to 180 A, may be synthesized onto both mechanically stiff and flexible substrates. Multilayer component materials include tungsten, niobium, molybdenum, titanium, vanadium, and silicon layers separated by carbon layers. Experimental observations of peak reflectivity in first order, integrated reflectivity in first order, and diffraction performance at selected photon energies in the range, 100 to 15,000 eV, will be reported and compared to theory.

  5. Calculated in-air leakage spectra and power levels for the ANSI standard minimum accident of concern. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.L. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    This document represents Phase I of a two-phase project. The entire project consists of determining a series of minimum accidents of concern and their associated neutron and photon leakage spectra that may be used to determine Criticality Accident Alarm compliance with ANSI/ANS-8.3. The inadvertent assembly of a critical mass of material presents a multitude of unknown quantities. Depending on the particular process, one can make an educated guess as to fissile material. In a gaseous diffusion cascade, this material is assumed to be uranyl fluoride. However, educated assumptions cannot be readily made for the other variables. Phase I of this project is determining a bounding minimum accident of concern and its associated neutron and photon leakage spectra. To determine the composition of the bounding minimum accident of concern, work was done to determine the effects of geometry, moderation level, and enrichment on the leakage spectra of a critical assembly. The minimum accident of concern is defined as the accident that may be assumed to deliver the equivalent of an absorbed dose in free air of 20 rad at a distance of 2 meters from the reacting material within 60 seconds. To determine this dose, an analyst makes an assumption and choose an appropriate flux to dose response function. The power level required of a critical assembly to constitute a minimum accident of concern depends heavily on the response function chosen. The first step in determining the leakage spectra was to attempt to isolate the effects of geometry, after which all calculations were conducted on critical spheres. The moderation level and enrichment of the spheres were varied and their leakage spectra calculated. These spectra were then multiplied by three different response functions: the Henderson Flux to Dose conversion factors, the ICRU 44 Kerma in Air, and the MCNP Heating Detector. The power level required to produce a minimum accident of concern was then calculated for each combination.

  6. Do Ag{sub n} (up to n = 8) clusters retain their identity on graphite? Insights from first-principles calculations including dispersion interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Akansha; Sen, Prasenjit; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2014-04-28

    Adsorption of pre-formed Ag{sub n} clusters for n = 1 − 8 on a graphite substrate is studied within the density functional theory employing the vdW-DF2 functional to treat dispersion interactions. Top sites above surface layer carbon atoms turn out to be most favorable for a Ag adatom, in agreement with experimental observations. The same feature is observed for clusters of almost all sizes which have the lowest energies when the Ag atoms are positioned over top sites. Most gas phase isomers retain their structures over the substrate, though a couple of them undergo significant distortions. Energetics of the adsorption can be understood in terms of a competition between energy cost of disturbing Ag–Ag bonds in the cluster and energy gain from Ag–C interactions at the surface. Ag{sub 3} turns out to be an exceptional candidate in this regard that undergoes significant structural distortion and has only two of the Ag atoms close to surface C atoms in its lowest energy structure.

  7. Calculation of calorific values of coals from ultimate analyses: theoretical basis and geochemical implications. Final report. Part 8

    SciTech Connect

    Given, P.H.; Weldon, D.; Zoeller, J.H.

    1984-03-01

    The various formulae for calculating calorific values for coals from ultimate analyses depend essentially on a propositon due to Dulong, that the heat of combustion of an organic compound is nearly equal to the heats of combustion of the elements in it, multiplied by their percentage content in the compound in question. This proposition assumes that the enthalpy of decomposition is negligible compared with the heat of combustion. The various published formulae, such as that due to Mott and Spooner, include empirical adjustments to allow for the fact that the enthalpy of formation or decomposition of no organic compound is zero (except rarely by chance). A new equation is proposed, which excludes empirical correction terms but includes a term explicitly related to the enthalpy of decomposition. As expected from the behavior of known compounds, this enthalpy varies with rank, but it also varies at the same level of rank with the geological history of the sample: rank is not the only source of variance in coal properties. The new equation is at least as effective in predicting calorific values for a set of 992 coals as equivalent equations derived for 6 subsets of the coals. On the whole, the distributions of differences between observed and calculated calorific values are skewed to only a small extent. About 86% of the differences lie between -300 and +300 Btu/lb (+- 700 kJ/kg). 10 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Coastal flooding and storm protection program; field verification program. Mathematical modeling of three-dimensional coastal currents and sediment dispersion: model development and application. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Y.P.

    1983-09-01

    A comprehensive model of Coastal currents and sediment dispersion has been formulated and applied to the Mississippi Sound and adjacent continental shelf waters. The study combines mathematical modeling of various hydrodynamic and sedimentary processes with laboratory and field experiments. Of primary importance is the development of an efficient and comprehensive three-dimensional, finite-difference model of coastal, estuarine, and lake currents (CELC3D). The model resolves currents driven by tide, wind, and density gradient. It has been applied to the Mississippi Sound, and results agree well with measured surface displacements and currents during two episodes. Rates of entrainment and deposition of the Mississippi Sound sediments have been studied in a laboratory flume. Effects of (1) bottom shear stress, (2) bed properties, (3) salinity of water, and (4) sediment type on the erodability of sediments have been examined. Results of the laboratory study have been incorporated into the bottom boundary conditions for a three-dimensional sediment dispersion model. Gravitational settling and particle size distribution of the Mississippi Sound sediments were also studied in laboratories. Bottom boundary layer dynamics and wave effect on sediment dispersion have been studied by means of a turbulent transport model and a wave model. Model simulations of sediment dispersion in the Mississippi Sound agree well available data from ship surveys.

  9. LOCA hydroloads calculations with multidimensional nonlinear fluid/structure interaction. Volume 3. Fluid/structure interaction studies using 3-D STEALTH/WHAMSE. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.; Mortensen, G.A.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.B.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1982-11-01

    This report, the third in a series of reports for RP-1065, describes the final step in the stepwise approach for developing the three-dimensional, nonlinear, fluid-structure interaction methodology to assess the hydroloads on a large PWR during the subcooled portions of a hypothetical LOCA. The final step in the methodology implements enhancements and special modifications to the STEALTH 3D computer program and the WHAMSE 3D computer program. After describing the enhancements, the individual and the coupled computer programs are assessed by comparing calculational results with either analytical solutions or with experimental data. The coupled 3D STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program is then applied to the simulation of HDR Test V31.1 to further assess the program and to investigate the role that fluid-structure interaction plays in the hydrodynamic loading of reactor internals during subcooled blowdown.

  10. Ocular dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1999-06-01

    Spectrally resolved white-light interferometry (SRWLI) was used to measure the wavelength dependence of refractive index (i.e., dispersion) for various ocular components. The accuracy of the technique was assessed by measurement of fused silica and water, the refractive indices of which have been measured at several different wavelengths. The dispersion of bovine and rabbit aqueous and vitreous humor was measured from 400 to 1100 nm. Also, the dispersion was measured from 400 to 700 nm for aqueous and vitreous humor extracted from goat and rhesus monkey eyes. For the humors, the dispersion did not deviate significantly from water. In an additional experiment, the dispersion of aqueous and vitreous humor that had aged up to a month was compared to freshly harvested material. No difference was found between the fresh and aged media. An unsuccessful attempt was also made to use the technique for dispersion measurement of bovine cornea and lens. Future refinement may allow measurement of the dispersion of cornea and lens across the entire visible and near-infrared wavelength band. The principles of white- light interferometry including image analysis, measurement accuracy, and limitations of the technique, are discussed. In addition, alternate techniques and previous measurements of ocular dispersion are reviewed.

  11. Interactive calculation procedure for supersonic flows. Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., 1976. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tassa, Y.; Anderson, B. H.; Reshotko, E.

    1977-01-01

    An interactive procedure was developed for supersonic viscous flows that can be used for either two-dimensional or axisymmetric configurations. The procedure is directed to supersonic internal flows as well as those supersonic external flows that require consideration of mutual interaction between the outer flow and the boundary layer flow. The flow field is divided into two regions: an inner region which is highly viscous and mostly subsonic and an outer region where the flow is supersonic and in which viscous effects are small but not negligible. For the outer region a numerical solution is obtained by applying the method of characteristics to a system of equations which includes viscous and conduction transport terms only normal to the streamlines. The inner region is treated by a system of equations of the boundary layer type that includes higher order effects such as longitudinal and transverse curvature and normal pressure gradients. These equations are coupled and solved simultaneously in the physical coordinates by using an implicit finite difference scheme. This system can also be used to calculate laminar and turbulent boundary layers using a scalar eddy viscosity concept.

  12. Systematic assembly homogenization and local flux reconstruction for nodal method calculations. Final report, January 1, 1990--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dorning, J.J.

    1993-05-01

    The report is divided into three parts. The main mathematical development of the new systematic simultaneous lattice-cell and fuel-assembly homogenization theory derived from the transport equation is summarized in Part I. Also included in Part I is the validation of this systematic homogenization theory and the resulting calculational procedures for coarse-mesh nodal diffusion methods that follow from it, in the form of their application to a simple one-dimensional test problem. The results of the application of this transport-equation-based systematic homogenization theory are summarized in Part II in which its superior accuracy over traditional flux and volume weighted homogenization procedures and over generalized equivalence theory is demonstrated for small and large practical two-dimensional PWR problems. The mathematical development of a second systematic homogenization theory -- this one derived starting from the diffusion equation -- is summarized in Part III where its application to a practical two-dimensional PWR model also is summarized and its superior accuracy over traditional homogenization methods and generalized equivalence theory is demonstrated for this problem.

  13. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume II. Final report, Appendix A: selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this survey and identification of DSG technologies is to present an understanding of the special characteristics of each of these technologies in sufficient detail so that the physical principles of their operation and the internal control of each technology are evident. In this way, a better appreciation can be obtained of the monitoring and control requirements for these DSGs from a remote distribution dispatch center. A consistent approach is being sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. From this study it appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

  14. Is axial dispersion within rotating cylinders governed by the Froude number?

    PubMed

    Third, J R; Müller, C R

    2012-12-01

    Axial dispersion rates of particles within horizontal rotating cylinders have been calculated for a decade of cylinder diameters. Throughout the range studied the rate of axial dispersion was found to be independent of the cylinder diameter. This phenomenon has been investigated further by spatially resolving the local contribution to the axial dispersion coefficient. This analysis demonstrates that, although the highest rates of axial dispersion occur at the free surface of the bed, there is a significant contribution to axial dispersion throughout the flowing region of the bed. Finally, based on an analogy with a Galton board, a linear relationship is proposed between the local rate of axial dispersion within a horizontal rotating cylinder and the product of the local particle concentration and the local shear rate in a plane perpendicular to the cylinder axis. PMID:23367939

  15. Calculation of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents using the integral diffusion method -- Final Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, L.J.

    1999-05-01

    Final designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the cladding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. A description is given of the implementation of the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 code.

  16. Calculation of Hydrogen and Oxygen Uptake in Fuel Rod Cladding During Severe Accidents Using the Integral Diffusion Method - Final Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siefken, Larry James

    1999-06-01

    Final designs are described for models of hydrogen and oxygen uptake in fuel rod cladding during severe accidents. Calculation of the uptake involves the modeling of seven processes: (1) diffusion of oxygen from the bulk gas into the boundary layer at the external cladding surface, (2) diffusion from the boundary layer into the oxide layer, (3) diffusion from the inner surface of the oxide layer into the metallic part of the cladding, (4) uptake of hydrogen in the event that the cladding oxide layer is dissolved in a steam-starved region, (5) embrittlement of cladding due to hydrogen uptake, (6) cracking of cladding during quenching due to its embrittlement and (7) release of hydrogen from the cladding after cracking of the cladding. An integral diffusion method is described for calculating the diffusion processes in the cladding. Experimental results are presented that show a rapid uptake of hydrogen in the event of dissolution of the oxide layer and a rapid release of hydrogen in the event of cracking of the oxide layer. These experimental results are used as a basis for calculating the rate of hydrogen uptake and the rate of hydrogen release. A description is given of the implementation of the models for hydrogen and oxygen uptake and cladding embrittlement into the programming framework of the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.3 code.

  17. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  18. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  19. Dispersion Analysis Research Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-11-10

    The DART thermomechanical model, for the prediction of fission-product-induced swelling in aluminum dispersion fuels, calculates irradiation-induced fission gas bubbles as a function of fuel morphology. DART calculates the behavior of a rod, tube, or plate during closure of as-fabricated porosity, during which the fuel particle swelling is accommodated by the relatively soft aluminum matrix flowing into the existing porosity. The code also determines the subsequent macroscopic changes in rod diameter or plate/tube thickness caused bymore » additional fuel deformation processes. In addition, a calculation for the effect of irradiation on the thermal conductivity of the dispersion fuel, and for fuel restructuring and swelling due to the aluminum fuel reaction, amorphization, and recrystallization is included.« less

  20. Development of a nitride dispersion strengthened (NDS) metallic alloy for high-temperature recuperators. Final report, 1 October 1982-30 September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Kindlimann, L.E.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of using nitride dispersion-strengthened (NDS) stainless steel in fabricating a recuperator for advanced gas turbine engines. Test results showed an alloy--designated NDS 300--to have tensile properties comparable to those of Inconel 625 at temperatures up to 1650 F, and at higher temperatures the properties of the NDS alloy exceeded those of the Inconel 625. However, creep test results showed a three-fold improvement in strength of NDS 300 over Inconel 625 at temperatures above 1500 F. The NDS material demonstrated adequate formability and joinability by brazing with a filler metal of nominal composition Ni-19Cr-10Si (J8100). The same filler metal proved to be a good coating for high-temperature oxidation resistance. Tests on specimens prepared to a typical plate-fin recuperator configuration confirmed the strength of the brazing alloy and demonstrated the marked superiority of the NDS material over Inconel 625.

  1. Medicare Program; Medicare Shared Savings Program; Accountable Care Organizations--Revised Benchmark Rebasing Methodology, Facilitating Transition to Performance-Based Risk, and Administrative Finality of Financial Calculations. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    Under the Medicare Shared Savings Program (Shared Savings Program), providers of services and suppliers that participate in an Accountable Care Organization (ACO) continue to receive traditional Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) payments under Parts A and B, but the ACO may be eligible to receive a shared savings payment if it meets specified quality and savings requirements. This final rule addresses changes to the Shared Savings Program, including: Modifications to the program's benchmarking methodology, when resetting (rebasing) the ACO's benchmark for a second or subsequent agreement period, to encourage ACOs' continued investment in care coordination and quality improvement; an alternative participation option to encourage ACOs to enter performance-based risk arrangements earlier in their participation under the program; and policies for reopening of payment determinations to make corrections after financial calculations have been performed and ACO shared savings and shared losses for a performance year have been determined. PMID:27295736

  2. Dispersion Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiansky, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the need for more accurate and complete input data and field verification of the various models of air pollutant dispension. Consideration should be given to changing the form of air quality standards based on enhanced dispersion modeling techniques. (Author/RE)

  3. Particulate behavior in a controlled-profile pulverized coal-fired reactor: A study of coupled turbulent particle dispersion and thermal radiation transport. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, M.; Webb, B.W.

    1996-06-01

    To aid in the evaluation and development of advanced coal-combustion models, comprehensive experimental data sets are needed containing information on both the condensed and gas phases. To address this need a series of test were initiated on a 300 kW laboratory-scale, coal-fired reactor at a single test condition using several types of instrumentation. Data collected on the reactor during the course of the test includes: gas, particle, and wall temperature profiles; radiant, total, and convective heat fluxes to the walls; particle size and velocity profiles; transmission measurements; and gas species concentrations. Solid sampling was also performed to determine carbon and total burnout. Along with the extensive experimental measurements, the particle dispersion and radiation submodels in the ACERC comprehensive 2D code were studied in detail and compared to past experimental measurements taken in the CPR. In addition to the presentation and discussion of the experimental data set, a detailed description of the measurement techniques used in collecting the data, including a discussion of the error associated with each type of measurement, is given.

  4. Fog dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Christensen, L. S.; Collins, F. G.; Camp, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of economically viable techniques for dispersing warm fog at commercial airports is presented. Five fog dispersion techniques are examined: evaporation suppression, downwash, mixing, seeding with hygroscopic material, thermal techniques, and charged particle techniques. Thermal techniques, although effective, were found to be too expensive for routine airport operations, and detrimental to the environment. Seeding or helicopter downwash are practical for small-scale or temporary fog clearing, but are probably not useful for airport operations on a routine basis. Considerable disagreement exists on the capability of charged particle techniques, which stems from the fact that different assumptions and parameter values are used in the analytical models. Recommendations resulting from the review of this technique are listed, and include: experimental measurements of the parameters in question; a study to ascertain possible safety hazards, such as increased electrical activity or fuel ignition during refueling operations which could render charged particle techniques impractical; and a study of a single charged particle generator.

  5. Radiation Modeling and Finite Cloud Effects for Atmospheric Dispersion Calculations in Near-field Applications: Modeling of the Full Scale RDD Experiments with Operational Models in Canada, Part II.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Luke; Bourgouin, Pierre; Chouhan, Sohan; Ek, Nils; Korolevych, Volodymyr; Malo, Alain; Bensimon, Dov; Erhardt, Lorne

    2016-05-01

    Three radiological dispersal devices were detonated in 2012 under controlled conditions at Defence Research and Development Canada's Experimental Proving Grounds in Suffield, Alberta. Each device comprised a 35-GBq source of (140)La. The dataset obtained is used in this study to assess the MLCD, ADDAM, and RIMPUFF atmospheric dispersion models. As a continuation of Lebel et al. (2016), this paper examines different methodologies for making dose estimates with atmospheric dispersion models. PMID:27023038

  6. Computation of generalized and exact dispersion relations for longitudinal plasma waves in nonextensive statistics and the effects of the nonextensivity on the oscillation modes and damps

    SciTech Connect

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Ebrahimi, V.

    2014-03-15

    We have derived generalized dispersion relations for longitudinal waves in collisionless thermal plasma using linear Vlasov-Poisson kinetic model and nonextensive distributions for electrons. The Maxwellian limit of the dispersion relations, where the q-nonextensive parameter tends to one, is calculated. The generalized dispersion relations are reduced to polynomials for some specific values of q. The well-known modes of oscillations such as the Langmuir and electron acoustic waves have been obtained by solving the dispersion relations. Some new modes of oscillation are also found. Finally, the dependence of the oscillation modes and damps on q is discussed.

  7. Dispersion in Unconsolidated Aquatic Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhury, A. N.

    2001-11-01

    Inert tracer breakthrough experiments were used to parameterize hydrodynamic dispersion in undisturbed cores of surface sediment from lacustrine, estuarine, and marine depositional environments. The sediments studied cover wide ranges of composition, porosity (46 to 83%), mean grain size (10 -5to 10 -2 cm), and sorting (0·48-1·26). As expected, hydrodynamic dispersion depends on the average longitudinal fluid flow velocity through the sediment plug. At linear flow velocities exceeding 10 -4 cm s -1, mechanical dispersion exceeds diffusion in all sediment cores studied. Compared to the classical studies on dispersion in sand columns, however, Peclet numbers based on particle size measurements do not provide a reliable guide for predicting the transition from molecular diffusion-dominated to mechanical dispersion-dominated flow regimes in the sediments. It is believed that the influence of pore structure on dispersion is much larger than that of particle size and that the characteristic pore lengths in the finest, highly porous sediments are orders of magnitude larger than the mean grain size. Aggregation, microlaminations, and a heterogeneous pore size distribution may all contribute to non-ideal flow conditions in the sediments. Tailing of the breakthrough curve occurred occasionally in fine grain sediment, signifying micro and macro scale dispersion and non-ideal flow behavior. Experiments showing significant non-ideal flow through the sediment plug were not used for calculation of hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient.

  8. Relative dispersion in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCasce, Joe; Graff, Lise; Guttu, Sigmund

    2014-05-01

    The relative dispersion of pairs of particles in flows is of central importance when describing environmental dispersion, for example of volcanic ash. Atmospheric relative dispersion was examined previously in two balloon experiments in the Southern Hemisphere (the EOLE and TWERLE experiments). In both cases, the dispersion at scales below 1000 km grew exponentially in time, indicating the kinetic energy spectrum is steep. Subsequent analyses suggested though that the dispersion had a power law dependence on time, implying a shallower kinetic energy spectrum. The results from studies employing synthetic particles advected by reanalysis winds are similarly inconsistent, with indications of exponential growth in some cases and power law growth in others. Here we use a different statistic---the probability density function (PDF) of pair displacements---to study dispersion the dispersion of large numbers of synthetic particles, advected by ERA-Interim reanalysis winds. The particles were deployed in the troposphere and stratosphere, both in the tropics and the extra-tropics. We examine the PDFs for the different deployments and compare them to analytical expressions derived for different turbulent inertial ranges. In line with the earlier balloon experiments, the results indicate exponential growth at the sub-deformation (1000 km) scales. At larger scales, the dispersion is anisotropic (predominantly zonal) and pair motion becomes decorrelated. Structure functions calculated from the wind data are in line with these conclusions.

  9. Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, W. B.; Saville, D. A.; Schowalter, W. R.

    1992-03-01

    The book covers the physical side of colloid science from the individual forces acting between submicron particles suspended in a liquid through the resulting equilibrium and dynamic properties. The relevant forces include Brownian motion, electrostatic repulsion, dispersion attraction, both attraction and repulsion due to soluble polymer, and viscous forces due to relative motion between the particles and the liquid. The balance among Brownian motion and the interparticle forces decides the questions of stability and phase behavior. Imposition of external fields produces complex effects, i.e. electrokinetic phenomena (electric field), sedimentation (gravitational field), diffusion (concentration/chemical potential gradient), and non-Newtonian rheology (shear field). The treatment aims to impart a sound, quantitative understanding based on fundamental theory and experiments with well-characterized model systems. This broad grasp of the fundamentals lends insight and helps to develop the intuitive sense needed to isolate essential features of technological problems and design critical experiments. Some exposure to fluid mechanics, statistical mechanics, and electricity and magnetism is assumed, but each subject is reintroduced in a self-contained manner.

  10. Dispersibility of Amphibious Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Meng-Heng; Hwang, Weng-Sing; Kuo, Wuei-Jueng

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a suitable method to convert hydrophilic montmorillonite into amphibious montmorillonite by replacing the sodium ions normally found in clay with poly(oxyethylene) (POE)-amide chlorite cations. Amphibious montmorillonite has a high d-spacing and good dispersion characteristics in many different types of solutions, including those having an intermediate hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) value. Four different modifying cations are tested and X-ray diffraction analysis is performed to measure the resulting changes in the d-spacing of the MMT. Scanning electron microscopy is employed to investigate the morphology of the modified clays. A laser-doppler particle analyzer is used to measure the particle size of the clays in various solutions. Dobrat’s method is applied to calculate the dispersibility of each clay and Stoke’s law is used to evaluate the settling rate. The results indicate that the d-spacing of the POE-amide chlorite cation modified montmorillonite increases from 1.28 to 3.51 nm. The amphibious montmorillonite demonstrates good dispersion characteristics in eight commonly employed coating solutions with intermediate HLB values.

  11. Dispersion of elastic moduli in a porous-cracked rock: Theoretical predictions for squirt-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelinet, M.; Fortin, J.; Guéguen, Y.

    2011-04-01

    Crustal rocks contain variable amount of both cracks and equant pores depending on tectonic and thermal stresses but also on their geological origin. Crack damage and porosity change result in effects on elastic waves velocities. When rocks are fluid saturated, dispersion of the P- and S-waves should be taken into account. This paper deals with frequency dispersion of elastic moduli in a fluid saturated porous and cracked rock with the assumption that squirt-flow is the dominant process. We develop a theoretical approach to calculate both high (HF) and low (LF) frequency bulk and shear moduli. The HF moduli are derived from a new effective medium model, called CPEM, with an isotropic distribution of pores or cracks with idealized geometry, respectively spheres and ellipsoids. LF moduli are obtained by taking HF dry moduli from the CPEM and substituting into Gassmann's equations. In the case of a porosity only supported by equant pores, the calculated dispersion in elastic moduli is equal to zero. In the case of a crack porosity, no bulk dispersion is predicted but a shear dispersion appears. Finally in the general case of a mixed porosity (pores and cracks), dispersion in bulk and in shear is predicted. Our results show that the maximum dispersion is predicted for a mixture of pores and spheroidal cracks with a very small aspect ratio (≤ 10 - 3 ). Our theoretical predictions are compared to experimental data obtained during hydrostatic experiment performed on a basaltic rock and a good agreement is observed. We also used our theoretical model to predict elastic waves velocities and Vp/Vs ratio dispersion. We show that the P-waves dispersion can reach almost 20% and the Vp/Vs dispersion a maximum value of 9% for a crack porosity of about 1%. Since laboratory data are ultrasonic measurements and field data are obtained at much lower frequencies, these results are useful for geophysicists to interpret seismic data in terms of fluid and rock interactions.

  12. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of two hypothetical 1-MT nuclear bursts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from two hypothetical 1-Mt nuclear bursts. Calculations are made of the debris from two types of bombs: one containing /sup 235/U as a fissionable material (designated oralloy), the other containing /sup 238/U (designated tuballoy). 4 references.

  13. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, Albertinka J

    2015-11-15

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and transport of the oil. We aim to identify how natural, chemical and mechanical dispersion could be quantified in oil spill models. For each step in the dispersion process, we review available experimental data in order to identify overall trends and propose an algorithm or calculation method. Additionally, the conditions for successful mechanical and chemical dispersion are defined. Two commonly identified key parameters in surface oil dispersion are: oil properties (viscosity and presence of dispersants) and mixing energy (often wind speed). Strikingly, these parameters play a different role in several of the dispersion sub-processes. This may explain difficulties in simply relating overall dispersion effectiveness to the individual parameters. PMID:26412415

  14. Dispersal Timing: Emigration of Insects Living in Patchy Environments.

    PubMed

    Lakovic, Milica; Poethke, Hans-Joachim; Hovestadt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal is a life-history trait affecting dynamics and persistence of populations; it evolves under various known selective pressures. Theoretical studies on dispersal typically assume 'natal dispersal', where individuals emigrate right after birth. But emigration may also occur during a later moment within a reproductive season ('breeding dispersal'). For example, some female butterflies first deposit eggs in their natal patch before migrating to other site(s) to continue egg-laying there. How breeding compared to natal dispersal influences the evolution of dispersal has not been explored. To close this gap we used an individual-based simulation approach to analyze (i) the evolution of timing of breeding dispersal in annual organisms, (ii) its influence on dispersal (compared to natal dispersal). Furthermore, we tested (iii) its performance in direct evolutionary contest with individuals following a natal dispersal strategy. Our results show that evolution should typically result in lower dispersal under breeding dispersal, especially when costs of dispersal are low and population size is small. By distributing offspring evenly across two patches, breeding dispersal allows reducing direct sibling competition in the next generation whereas natal dispersal can only reduce trans-generational kin competition by producing highly dispersive offspring in each generation. The added benefit of breeding dispersal is most prominent in patches with small population sizes. Finally, the evolutionary contests show that a breeding dispersal strategy would universally out-compete natal dispersal. PMID:26132493

  15. On the dispersion of geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Bashir, M. F.; Elfimov, A. G.; Yagi, M.; Miyato, N.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of dispersion of geodesic acoustic modes is revisited with two different methods for the solution of the kinetic equation. The dispersive corrections to the mode frequency are calculated by including the m = 2 poloidal harmonics. Our obtained results agree with some earlier results but differ in various ways with other previous works. Limitations and advantages of different approaches are discussed.

  16. Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Appendix C to Attachment 3, Calculations. Final

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This volume contains calculations for: Slick Rock processing sites background ground water quality; Slick Rock processing sites lysimeter water quality; Slick Rock processing sites on-site and downgradient ground water quality; Slick Rock disposal site background water quality; Burro Canyon disposal site, Slick Rock, Colorado, average hydraulic gradients and average liner ground water velocities in the upper, middle, and lower sandstone units of the Burro Canyon formation; Slick Rock--Burro Canyon disposal site, Burro Canyon pumping and slug tests--analyses; water balance and surface contours--Burro Canyon disposal cell; and analytical calculation of drawdown in a hypothetical well completed in the upper sandstone unit of the Burro Canyon formation.

  17. Dispersion in alluvial convergent estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    The Van der Burgh's equation for longitudinal effective dispersion is a purely empirical method with practical implications. Its application to the effective tidal average dispersion under equilibrium conditions appears to have excellent performance in a wide range of alluvial estuaries. In this research, we try to find out the physical meaning of Van der Burgh's coefficient. Researchers like MacCready, Fischer, Kuijper, Hansen and Rattray have tried to split up dispersion into its constituents which did not do much to explain overall behaviour. In addition, traditional literature on dispersion is mostly related to flumes with constant cross-section. This research is about understanding the Van der Burgh's coefficient facing the fact that natural estuaries have exponentially varying cross-section. The objective is to derive a simple 1-D model considering both longitudinal and lateral mixing processes based on field observations (theoretical derivation). To that effect, we connect dispersion with salinity using the salt balance equation. Then we calculate the salinity along the longitudinal direction and compare it to the observed salinity. Calibrated dispersion coefficients in a range of estuaries are then compared with new expressions for the Van der Burgh's coefficient K and it is analysed if K varies from estuary to estuary. The set of reliable data used will be from estuaries: Kurau, Perak, Bernam, Selangor, Muar, Endau, Maputo, Thames, Corantijn, Sinnamary, Mae Klong, Lalang, Limpopo, Tha Chin, Chao Phraya, Edisto and Elbe.

  18. Nuclear safety analyses and core design calculations to convert the Texas A & M University Nuclear Science Center reactor to low enrichment uranium fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, T.A.

    1995-03-02

    This project involved performing the nuclear design and safety analyses needed to modify the license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to allow operation of the Texas A& M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) with a core containing low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. The specific type of LEU fuel to be considered was the TRIGA 20-20 fuel produced by General Atomic. Computer codes for the neutronic analyses were provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the assistance of William Woodruff of ANL in helping the NSCR staff to learn the proper use of the codes is gratefully acknowledged. The codes applied in the LEU analyses were WIMSd4/m, DIF3D, NCTRIGA and PARET. These codes allowed full three dimensional, temperature and burnup dependent calculations modelling the NSCR core to be performed for the first time. In addition, temperature coefficients of reactivity and pulsing calculations were carried out in-house, whereas in the past this modelling had been performed at General Atomic. In order to benchmark the newly acquired codes, modelling of the current NSCR core with highly enriched uranium fuel was also carried out. Calculated results were compared to both earlier licensing calculations and experimental data and the new methods were found to achieve excellent agreement with both. Therefore, even if an LEU core is never loaded at the NSCR, this project has resulted in a significant improvement in the nuclear safety analysis capabilities established and maintained at the NSCR.

  19. Two-point derivative dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Erasmo; Sesma, Javier

    2013-03-01

    A new derivation is given for the representation, under certain conditions, of the integral dispersion relations of scattering theory through local forms. The resulting expressions have been obtained through an independent procedure to construct the real part and consist of new mathematical structures of double infinite summations of derivatives. In this new form the derivatives are calculated at the generic value of the energy E and separately at the reference point E = m that is the lower limit of the integration. This new form may be more interesting in certain circumstances and directly shows the origin of the difficulties in convergence that were present in the old truncated forms called standard-derivative dispersion relations (DDR). For all cases in which the reductions of the double to single sums were obtained in our previous work, leading to explicit demonstration of convergence, these new expressions are seen to be identical to the previous ones. We present, as a glossary, the most simplified explicit results for the DDR's in the cases of imaginary amplitudes of forms (E/m)λ[ln (E/m)]n that cover the cases of practical interest in particle physics phenomenology at high energies. We explicitly study the expressions for the cases with λ negative odd integers, that require identification of cancelation of singularities, and provide the corresponding final results.

  20. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  1. Dispersive transport across interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Adler, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Experiments demonstrating asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials have recently been performed. Here, this phenomenon is studied numerically on the pore scale. The flow field is derived by solving the Stokes equation. The dispersive transport is simulated by a large number of particles undergoing random walks under the simultaneous action of convection and diffusion. Two main two-dimensional configurations are studied; each consists of two segments (called coarse and fine) with the same structure, porosity, and length along the main flow, but different characteristic solid/pore sizes. One structure consists of two channels containing cavities of different sizes, and the second of square "grains" of different sizes. At time t=0, a large number of particles is injected (as a pulse) around a given cross-section. The corresponding breakthrough curves (BTCs) are registered as functions of time at six different cross sections. Calculations are made twice; in the first case (CtoF), particles are injected in the coarse side and are transported towards the fine one; in the second one (FtoC), the opposite case is studied. These calculations are performed for various Péclet numbers (Pe). Comparison of the resulting BTCs shows features that are similar to experimental observations, but with qualitative and quantitative differences. The influences of the medium, of the injection and observation planes, and of Pe are detailed and discussed. A BTC for pulse injection can be characterized by its maximum M(t_M) and the time tM at which it occurs. The observed differences for channels bounded by cavities are very small. However for the granular structures, M(t_M) is always larger for FtoC than for CtoF ; tM depends on all the parameters, namely Pe, the size ratio between the large and small grains, the injection and the observation planes. The numerical results are systematically compared with solutions of one

  2. Application of computer methods for calculation of multicomponent phase diagrams of high-temperature structural ceramics. Final report, August 1984-July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, L.

    1987-07-31

    A data base is being developed for calculation of quasi-binary and quasi-ternary phase diagrams of ceramic systems. Previous segments of this base cover combinations of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgO, A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SiO/sub 2/, CaO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, A1N, BeO, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Ce/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Sixty -six quasi binary and nineteen quasi ternary systems have been calculated. Current work extends the base to cover GeO/sub 2/, HfO3, ZrO/sub 2/ and TiO/sub 2/ which are of interest in applications requiring toughness and structural performance at high temperatures. This has been effected by employing available source of thermochemical and phase-diagram data. Recently it has been shown that by alloying GeO/sub 2/ with SiO/sub 2/ a whole range of glasses can be synthesized with tailor-made coefficients of expansion. Utilization of such compositions offers the possibility of enhancing the high temperature oxidation resistance of ceramic composites in which a mixed GeO/sub 2/-SiO/sub 2/ phase which a desired CTE would replace the conventional SiO/sub 2/ as a filler.

  3. The Doubling Theory: Dark Matter and Dark Energy Finally Explained, Speed of Light and Fine Structure Constant Calculated for the First Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, Jean-Pierre Garnier

    2010-09-01

    Developed in previous papers [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], the ``doubling'' (of space and time) theory uses finite horizons of several virtual space-times which are embedded within the observable space-time. A specific fundamental movement creates imperceptible time instants (called ``temporal openings'') in the time flow. Considering different scale levels, it modifies the perception of the time flow and gives to each horizon instantaneous potential futures. This theory explains the cyclical planetary movement in the solar system, the entanglement between particles, the dissymmetry of matter/antimatter and the existence of the dark matter and dark energy. It can also calculate ``for the first time'' universal constants: the speed of light and the fine structure constant.

  4. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Appendix A of Attachment 3: Calculations, Final

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report contains calculations for: hydraulic gradients for Alluvial Aquifer and Salt Wash Aquifer; slug test analysis to determine hydraulic conductivity for Alluvial Aquifer and Salt Wash Aquifer; average linear groundwater velocity for Alluvial Aquifer and Salt Wash Aquifer; statistical analysis of the extent of existing groundwater contamination; hydraulic gradients for Dakota/Burro Canyon Formation and Salt Wash Aquifer; slug test analysis to determine hydraulic conductivity for Dakota/Burro Canyon Formation and Perched Salt Wash Aquifer; determination of hydraulic conductivity of the Dakota/Burro Canyon Formation from Packer Tests; average linear groundwater velocity for Dakota/Burro Canyon and Salt Wash Aquifer; chemical and mineralogical characterization of core samples from the Dry Flats Disposal Site; and demonstration of low groundwater yield from Uppermost Aquifer.

  5. Harmonic and Anharmonic Properties of Diamond Structure Crystals with Application to the Calculation of the Thermal Expansion of Silicon. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanser, K. H.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon has interesting harmonic and anharmonic properties such as the low lying transverse acoustic modes at the X and L points of the Brillouin zone, negative Gruneisen parameters, negative thermal expansion and anomalous acoustic attenuation. In an attempt to understand these properties, a lattice dynamical model employing long range, nonlocal, dipole-dipole interactions was developed. Analytic expression for the Gruneisen parameters of several modes are presented. These expressions explain how the negative Gruneisen parameters arise. This model is applied to the calculation of the thermal expansion of silicon from 5K to 1700K. The thermoelastic contribution to the acoustic attenuation of silicon is computed from 1 to 300 K. Strong attenuation anomalies associated with negative thermal expansion are found in the vicinity of 17K and 125K.

  6. Phonon dispersion in thalous halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    1984-07-01

    The phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, g( v), and Debye-characteristic temperature, θ D, of TlCl and TlBr have been studied. The theoretical model adopted for this purpose is a 9-parameter bond-bending force model (BBFM) which was recently developed and successfully applied to study the crystal dynamics of CsCl-structure crystals. The theoretical results compare well with the available measurements for phonon dispersion in the high symmetry directions. The discrepancy between calculated and experimental values of θ D, particularly at higher temperatures, is reasonably attributed to the predominating anharmonic effects. The values of the compressibilities (χ), calculated using the Brout sum rule, are in a reasonably good agreement with the existing observed values. A critical-point-phonon analysis has also been performed to interpret the observed infrared (IR) and Raman peaks.

  7. Steady State Dense Gas Dispersion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-01

    SLAB-LLNL is a steady-state one-dimensional program which calculates the atmospheric dispersion of a heavier than air gas that is continuously released at ground level. The model is based on the steady-state crosswind-averaged conservation equations of species, mass, energy, and momentum. It uses the air entrainment concept to account for the turbulent mixing of the gas cloud with the surrounding atmosphere and similarity profiles to determine the crosswind dependence.

  8. A review of dispersion modelling and its application to the dispersion of particles: An overview of different dispersion models available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, N. S.; Morawska, L.

    This paper provides the first review of the application of atmospheric models for particle dispersion. The different types of dispersion models available, from simple box type models to complex fluid dynamics models are outlined and the suitability of the different approaches to dispersion modelling within different environments, in regards to scale, complexity of the environment and concentration parameters is assessed. Finally, several major commercial and non-commercial particle dispersion packages are reviewed, detailing which processes are included and advantages and limitations of their use to modelling particle dispersion. The models reviewed included: Box models (AURORA, CPB and PBM), Gaussian models (CALINE4, HIWAY2, CAR-FMI, OSPM, CALPUFF, AEROPOL, AERMOD, UK-ADMS and SCREEN3), Lagrangian/Eulerian Models (GRAL, TAPM, ARIA Regional), CFD models (ARIA Local, MISKAM, MICRO-CALGRID) and models which include aerosol dynamics (GATOR, MONO32, UHMA, CIT, AERO, RPM, AEROFOR2, URM-1ATM, MADRID, CALGRID and UNI-AERO).

  9. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  10. Dispersion y dinamica poblacional

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispersal behavior of fruit flies is appetitive. Measures of dispersion involve two different parameter: the maximum distance and the standard distance. Standard distance is a parameter that describes the probalility of dispersion and is mathematically equivalent to the standard deviation around ...

  11. Pay dispersion and performance in teams.

    PubMed

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a "team". This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  12. Pay Dispersion and Performance in Teams

    PubMed Central

    Bucciol, Alessandro; Foss, Nicolai J.; Piovesan, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Extant research offers conflicting predictions about the effect of pay dispersion on team performance. We collected a unique dataset from the Italian soccer league to study the effect of intra-firm pay dispersion on team performance, under different definitions of what constitutes a “team”. This peculiarity of our dataset can explain the conflicting evidence. Indeed, we also find positive, null, and negative effects of pay dispersion on team performance, using the same data but different definitions of team. Our results show that when the team is considered to consist of only the members who directly contribute to the outcome, high pay dispersion has a detrimental impact on team performance. Enlarging the definition of the team causes this effect to disappear or even change direction. Finally, we find that the detrimental effect of pay dispersion is due to worse individual performance, rather than a reduction of team cooperation. PMID:25397615

  13. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  14. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions. PMID:27250315

  15. Molecular mobility in glassy dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Mehak; McKenna, Gregory B.; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was used to characterize the structural relaxation in pharmaceutical dispersions containing nifedipine (NIF) and either poly(vinyl) pyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS). The shape of the dielectric response (permittivity versus log time) curve was observed to be independent of temperature. Thus, for the pure NIF as well as the dispersions, the validity of the time-temperature superposition principle was established. Furthermore, though the shape of the full dielectric response varied with polymer concentration, the regime related to the α- or structural relaxation was found to superimpose for the dispersions, though not with the response of the NIF itself. Hence, there is a limited time-temperature-concentration superposition for these systems as well. Therefore, in this polymer concentration range, calculation of long relaxation times in these glass-forming systems becomes possible. We found that strong drug-polymer hydrogen bonding interactions improved the physical stability (i.e., delayed crystallization) by reducing the molecular mobility. The strength of hydrogen bonding, structural relaxation time, and crystallization followed the order: NIF-PV P>NIF-HPMCAS>NIF. With an increase in polymer concentration, the relaxation times were longer indicating a decrease in molecular mobility. The temperature dependence of relaxation time, in other words fragility, was independent of polymer concentration. This is the first application of the superposition principle to characterize structural relaxation in glassy pharmaceutical dispersions.

  16. Dispersive photonic crystals from the plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Cabrera, E.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Flores-Desirena, B.; Gaspar-Armenta, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays photonic crystals are widely used in many different applications. One of the most used methods to compute their band structure is the plane wave method (PWM). However, it can only be applied directly to non-dispersive media and be extended to systems with a few model dielectric functions. We explore an extension of the PWM to photonic crystals containing dispersive materials, that solves an eigenvalue equation for the Bloch wave vectors. First we compare our calculation with analytical results for one dimensional photonic crystals containing Si using experimental values of its optical parameters, and obtainig very well agreement, even for the spectrum region with strong absorption. Then, using the same method, we computed the band structure for a two dimensional photonic crystal without absorption, formed by an square array of MgO cylinders in air. The optical parameters for MgO were modeled with the Lorentz dielectric function. Finally, we studied an array of MgO cylinders in a metal, using Drude model without absorption, for the metal dielectric function. For this last case, we study the gap-midgap ratio as a function of the filling fraction for both the square and triangular lattice. The gap-midgap ratio is larger for the triangular lattice, with a maximum value of 10% for a filling fraction of 0.6. Our results show that the method can be applied to dispersive materials, and then to a wide range of applications where photonic crystals can be used.

  17. Chromatic dispersions in highly nonlinear glass nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Chitrarekha; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2008-08-01

    We design air cladding tellurite (TeO2), bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) based, and chalcogenide (As2S3) nanofibers, and calculate the chromatic dispersions. For each material, wavelength dependent propagation constants of the nanofiber are obtained from the exact solutions of the Maxwell's equations, and from the propagation constants the chromatic dispersion is calculated. We tailor the dispersion to zero at the communication wavelength, 1.5 μm, by proper selection of the core diameter of the nanofiber for all the above materials. We further explain the technique for flattening the zero dispersion in telecommunication window, using glass instead of air, as the cladding of the nanofiber structure. Using the glass cladding has the advantage of easy handling, specially, for the communication purposes. Further, the glass cladding causes larger effective index difference between various modes of the nanofiber, thus reducing the mode coupling. We present the numerical results of the dispersion flattening technique by assuming the borosilicate glass cladding to the chalcogenide As2S3 glass core nanofiber. With the borosilicate cladding the dispersion characteristics of the nanofiber change drastically and flattening of the zero dispersion is achieved at 1.408 μm wavelength, when the core diameter is 724 nm.

  18. Exact averaging of laminar dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnakar, Ram R.; Balakotaiah, Vemuri

    2011-02-01

    We use the Liapunov-Schmidt (LS) technique of bifurcation theory to derive a low-dimensional model for laminar dispersion of a nonreactive solute in a tube. The LS formalism leads to an exact averaged model, consisting of the governing equation for the cross-section averaged concentration, along with the initial and inlet conditions, to all orders in the transverse diffusion time. We use the averaged model to analyze the temporal evolution of the spatial moments of the solute and show that they do not have the centroid displacement or variance deficit predicted by the coarse-grained models derived by other methods. We also present a detailed analysis of the first three spatial moments for short and long times as a function of the radial Peclet number and identify three clearly defined time intervals for the evolution of the solute concentration profile. By examining the skewness in some detail, we show that the skewness increases initially, attains a maximum for time scales of the order of transverse diffusion time, and the solute concentration profile never attains the Gaussian shape at any finite time. Finally, we reason that there is a fundamental physical inconsistency in representing laminar (Taylor) dispersion phenomena using truncated averaged models in terms of a single cross-section averaged concentration and its large scale gradient. Our approach evaluates the dispersion flux using a local gradient between the dominant diffusive and convective modes. We present and analyze a truncated regularized hyperbolic model in terms of the cup-mixing concentration for the classical Taylor-Aris dispersion that has a larger domain of validity compared to the traditional parabolic model. By analyzing the temporal moments, we show that the hyperbolic model has no physical inconsistencies that are associated with the parabolic model and can describe the dispersion process to first order accuracy in the transverse diffusion time.

  19. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume III. Final report, Appendix B: state of the art, trends, and potential growth of selected DSG technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this document is to identify the present status, trends, potential growth for selected DSGs, and implications on DSG monitoring and control. Based on current projections, it appears that DSG electrical energy will comprise only a small portion, from 4 to 10%, of the national total by the end of this century. In general, the growth potential for DSG seems favorable in the long term because of finite fossil energy resources and increasing fuel prices. Recent trends, especially in the institutional and regulatory fields, have favored greater use of DSGs for the future. This study has assimilated the considered estimates and opinions of others, for the DSG markets and the DSG's ability to serve them. So far as possible a cross section of various sources has been included in composite projections.

  20. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume IV. Final report, Appendix C: identification from utility visits of present and future approaches to integration of DSG into distribution networks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. As a result of visits to four utilities concerned with the use of DSG power sources on their distribution networks, some useful impressions of present and future approaches to the integration of DSGs into electrical distribution network have been obtained. A more extensive communications and control network will be developed by utilities for control of such sources for future use. Different approaches to future utility systems with DSG are beginning to take shape. The new DSG sources will be in decentralized locations with some measure of centralized control. The utilities have yet to establish firmly the communication and control means or their organization. For the present, the means for integrating the DSGs and their associated monitoring and control equipment into a unified system have not been decided.

  1. Temporal dispersion of a spectrometera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Pollock, B. B.

    2008-10-01

    The temporal dispersion of an optical spectrometer has been characterized for a variety of conditions related to optical diagnostics to be fielded at the National Ignition Facility (e.g., full-aperture backscatter station, Thomson scattering). Significant time smear is introduced into these systems by the path length difference through the spectrometer. The temporal resolution is shown to depend only on the order of the grating, wavelength, and the number of grooves illuminated. To enhance the temporal resolution, the spectral gratings can be masked limiting the number of grooves illuminated. Experiments have been conducted to verify these calculations. The size and shape of masks are investigated and correlated with the exact shape of the temporal instrument function, which is required when interpreting temporally resolved data. The experiments used a 300 fs laser pulse and a picosecond optical streak camera to determine the temporal dispersion. This was done for multiple spectral orders, gratings, and optical masks.

  2. Temporal dispersion of a spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Visco, A; Drake, R P; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B B

    2008-10-01

    The temporal dispersion of an optical spectrometer has been characterized for a variety of conditions related to optical diagnostics to be fielded at the National Ignition Facility (e.g., full-aperture backscatter station, Thomson scattering). Significant time smear is introduced into these systems by the path length difference through the spectrometer. The temporal resolution is shown to depend only on the order of the grating, wavelength, and the number of grooves illuminated. To enhance the temporal resolution, the spectral gratings can be masked limiting the number of grooves illuminated. Experiments have been conducted to verify these calculations. The size and shape of masks are investigated and correlated with the exact shape of the temporal instrument function, which is required when interpreting temporally resolved data. The experiments used a 300 fs laser pulse and a picosecond optical streak camera to determine the temporal dispersion. This was done for multiple spectral orders, gratings, and optical masks. PMID:19044687

  3. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. PMID:24962790

  4. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal. Volume 1 contains the dissertation of Ghosal which covers the characterization of fly ash and the measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  5. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  6. Dispersive suspended microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Yu; Lu, Yue-Le; Wu, Tong; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Dong-Hui

    2011-11-14

    A novel sample pre-treatment technique termed dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame photometric detection (GC-FPD) has been developed for the determination of eight organophosphorus pesticides (ethoprophos, malathion, chlorpyrifos, isocarbophos, methidathion, fenamiphos, profenofos, triazophos) in aqueous samples. In this method, both extraction and two phases' separation process were performed by the assistance of magnetic stirring. After separating the two phases, 1 μL of the suspended phase was injected into GC for further instrument analysis. Varieties of experiment factors which could affect the experiment results were optimized and the following were selected: 12.0 μL p-xylene was selected as extraction solvent, extraction speed was 1200 rpm, extraction time was 30 s, the restoration speed was 800 rpm, the restoration time was 8 min, and no salt was added. Under the optimum conditions, limits of detections (LODs) varied between 0.01 and 0.05 μg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSDs, n=6) ranged from 4.6% to 12.1%. The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 0.1-100.0 μg L(-1). Correlation coefficients (r) varied from 0.9964 to 0.9995. The enrichment factors (EFs) were between 206 and 243. In the final experiment, the developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides in wine and tap water samples and the obtained recoveries were between 83.8% and 101.3%. Compared with other pre-treatment methods, DSME has its own features and could achieve satisfied results for the analysis of trace components in complicated matrices. PMID:22023861

  7. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  8. Dispersal of forest insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  9. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  10. Spores Disperse, Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Donna N.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests the use of spores and spore-producing structures to show adaptations facilitating spore dispersal and dispersal to favorable environments. Describes several activities using horsetails, ferns, and mosses. Lists five safety factors related to use of mold spores in the classroom. (DS)

  11. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  12. Characterization and stability of ternary solid dispersions with PVP and PHPMA.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Hisham; Ke, Peng; Brocchini, Steve; Buckton, Graham

    2011-10-31

    The effect of adding a third polymer to immiscible binary solid dispersions was investigated. The model actives griseofulvin (GF), progesterone (PG) and phenindione (PD) were selected because they exemplify a key property of many poorly soluble molecules of having at least one hydrogen bonding acceptor moiety while not having any hydrogen bond donating moieties. Ternary solid dispersions of the drug, PVP (polyvinylpyrrolidone) (proton acceptor) and PHPMA (poly[2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate]) (proton acceptor and donor) were prepared by spray drying. Stability results showed that binary solid dispersions (API and PVP) of GF and PVP crystallized quickly while the amorphous form was not possible to prepare for PG and PD. The amorphous form was prolonged upon the incorporation of PHPMA in the solid dispersion (API, PHPMA and PVP). Based on measuring the melting points, the energy of mixing the drug with the polymer was calculated using the Flory-Huggins theory. The results showed that GF had the lowest free energy followed by PG and finally PD which agreed well with the stability results. These results suggest that the addition of a third polymer to immiscible binary solid dispersions can significantly improve the stability of the amorphous form. PMID:21801822

  13. Air-dispersion modeling and the real world

    SciTech Connect

    Beychok, M.T.

    1996-06-01

    Use of computerized programs to model stack-gas dispersion mathematically has grown immensely in the last 15 years. In most dispersion models, determining ground-level pollutant concentrations beneath an elevated, buoyant plume of dispersing stack gas involves two major steps. First, the height to which the plume rises at a given downward distance from the plume source is calculated. The calculated plume rise is added to the height of the source stack, or emission point, to determine the effective stack height, also called the plume centerline height. Second, ground-level concentrations beneath the plume are predicted using the Gaussian dispersion equation.

  14. Dispersion and space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring.

  15. Raman Based Dispersive Systems for Short Pulse Generation and Optical Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu, Salih Kagan

    corresponding to ˜2.5 bit higher resolution. The last part of the thesis introduces a novel technique of using MEMS based digital micro mirror technology as a digital spatial light modulator for fast programmable all-optical RF arbitrary waveform generation. In particular, the detailed procedure is described and the analytical modeling that discusses the limits of the proposed technique in terms achievable temporal resolution, repetition rate, modulation index and the rise/fall times of the final waveform is calculated as figure of merit. Experimental generation of square and sawtooth waveforms is demonstrated as a proof-of concept. By using the state of the art MEMS technology arbitrary waveforms up to 1GHz rate and reconfigurable in ˜30micros are achievable.

  16. Wind tunnel modeling of heavy gas dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König-Langlo, G.; Schatzmann, M.

    Assessment of risk attending the manufacturing, storing and transportation of flammable and toxic gases involves the quantification of the ensuing dispersion in case of an accidental release. Worst case considerations have to be applied in order to obtain conservative estimates The paper describes a method for the determination of lower flammability distances for gases heavier than air under unfavorable atmospheric conditions. The method is based on the results of a wind tunnel study investigating the dispersion of instantaneous as well as continuous releases into a boundary-layer shear flow disturbed and undisturbed by surface obstacles. Thermodynamic effects on the dispersing cloud have been taken into account through modification of source parameters. The results have been compared with those from corresponding field trials. The agreement is generally fair. The method has now been converted into a detailed guideline for dispersion calculations within risk assessment studies for flammable and toxic heavy gases (VDI 3783, Part 2, Beuth Verlag, Berlin, 1990).

  17. UNSTEADY DISPERSION IN RANDOM INTERMITTENT FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The longitudinal dispersion coefficient of a conservative tracer was calculated from flow tests in a dead-end pipe loop system. Flow conditions for these tests ranged from laminar to transitional flow, and from steady to intermittent and random. Two static mixers linked in series...

  18. Polymer-grafted gold nanorods in polymer thin films: Dispersion and plasmonic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hore, Michael-Jon Ainsley

    This dissertation describes complementary experimental and theoretical studies to deter- mine the thermodynamic factors that affect the dispersion of polymer-grafted Au nanorods within polymer thin films. Au nanorods exhibit a uniform dispersion with a regular spacing for favorable brush / matrix interactions, such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-Au / poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS)-Au / poly(2,6-dimethyl-p-phenylene oxide) (PPO). For PEG-Au / PMMA, the nanorods are locally oriented and their dispersion is independent of the ratio of the degree of polymerization of the matrix (P) to that of the brush (N), α = P/N, whereas for chemically similar brush / matrix combinations, such as PS-Au / PS and PEG-Au / poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), nanorods are randomly dispersed for α 2. For aggregated systems (α > 2), nanorods are found primarily within aggregates containing side-by-side aligned nanorods with a spacing that scales with N. UV-visible spectroscopy and discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations demonstrate that coupling between surface plasmons within the aggregates leads to a blue shift in the optical absorption as α increases, indicating the sensitivity of spectroscopy for determining nanorod dispersion in polymer nanocomposite films. Self-consistent field theory (SCFT) calculations and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that the aggregation of nanorods for α > 2 can be attributed to depletion-attraction forces caused by autophobic dewetting of the brush and matrix. Finally, miscible blends of PS and PPO are investigated as a route to control depletion-attraction interactions between PS-Au nanorods. Initially, nanorods aggregate in matrices having 50 vol. % PPO and then gradually disperse as PPO becomes the majority component. The brush and matrix density profiles, determined by SCFT, show that PPO segregates into the PS brush, and acts as a compatibilizer, which improves dispersion. As dispersion improves, coupling between surface

  19. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  20. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  1. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  2. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  3. Simple Methods of Calculating Dispersion from Urban Area Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Steven R.

    A simple but physically realistic model is shown to be adequate for estimating long-term average pollutant concentrations due to area sources in cities. In this model, the surface concentration is directly proportional to the local area source strength and inversely proportional to the wind speed. The model performs nearly as well as much more…

  4. Dispersion management for wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton transmission.

    PubMed

    Forysiak, W; Devaney, J F; Smith, N J; Doran, N J

    1997-05-01

    Residual frequency shifts that are due to two-soliton collisions in stepwise exponentially dispersion-tapered fiber are calculated. Two-step dispersion profiles to minimize the frequency shifts and associated timing jitter are specifically identified. These profiles will improve the performance of wavelength-division-multiplexed soliton systems and permit operation with longer amplifier spans over an increased bandwidth. PMID:18185603

  5. Dispersal in relation to carrying capacity

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    Dispersal of the herbivorous vole Microtus pennsylvanicus from grassland to woodland was studied in an experimental field system during spring to autumn 1969. Dispersal first occurred when there was at least 100 times more energy available than was required by the population. Sodium and phosphorus were in short supply in the food. By feeding selectively or copiously, voles could make up nutrient deficits and still consume only 10% of what was available. However, calculations show that depletion of the food was potentially severe in the forthcoming winter; consumption of energy- and nutrient-sufficient food had the potential of approaching 100%. These results suggest the following explanation of presaturation dispersal. Nutrients may be more limiting to herbivores than is total energy. Selective or copious harvesting becomes increasingly necessary as density increases. Natural selection, acting upon known genetic variation in dispersal propensity, has favored a dispersal response to environmental conditions that presage food shortage. Aggressive behavior and other forms of interactive behavior are the means by which land-tenured breeding individuals control their access to food resources and by which nontenured individuals are excluded and induced to disperse. Herbivore populations in general are limited well below carrying capacity. Carrying capacity may have been overestimated by ignoring chemical quality of the food, but the relationship is still probably true. The above explanation helps us to understand it. Because animals need to feed selectively, exploitation is based on cost-benefit balances and is less than total. PMID:16592536

  6. Quantification of statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Matthew; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika

    2015-11-01

    Understanding of turbulent dispersions is of great importance for environmental and industrial applications. This includes developing a greater understanding of particle movement in atmospheric flows, and providing data that can be used to validate CFD models aimed at producing more accurate simulations of dispersed turbulent flows, aiding design of many industrial components. Statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry. Experiments were carried out in a two dimensional channel over a Reynolds number range of 10000-30000, using water and 500 micron hydrogel particles. Particles were injected at the channel entrance, and dispersion properties were characterised at different distances downstream from the injection point. Probability density functions were compiled for the velocity components of the hydrogels for differing flow conditions. Higher order PDFs were constructed to investigate the behaviour of particle pairs. Dispersed phase data was also used to investigate the mechanics of collisions between hydrogel particles, allowing for calculation of the co-efficient of restitution. PIV algorithms were used to create velocity maps for the continuous phase for varying dispersed phase fractions. Thanks to support of Chevron grant as part of TMF consortium.

  7. Can non-breeding be a cost of breeding dispersal?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danchin, E.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Breeding habitat selection and dispersal are crucial processes that affect many components of fitness. Breeding dispersal entails costs, one of which has been neglected: dispersing animals may miss breeding opportunities because breeding dispersal requires finding a new nesting site and mate, two time- and energy-consuming activities. Dispersers are expected to be prone to non-breeding. We used the kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla) to test whether breeding dispersal influences breeding probability. Breeding probability was associated with dispersal, in that both were negatively influenced by private information (previous individual reproductive success) and public information (average reproductive success of conspecifics) about patch quality. Furthermore, the probability of skipping breeding was 1.7 times higher in birds that settled in a new patch relative to those that remained on the same patch. Finally, non-breeders that resumed breeding were 4.4 times more likely to disperse than birds that bred in successive years. Although private information may influence breeding probability directly, the link between breeding probability and public information may be indirect, through the influence of public information on breeding dispersal, non-breeding thus being a cost of dispersal. These results support the hypothesis that dispersal may result in not being able to breed. More generally, non-breeding (which can be interpreted as an extreme form of breeding failure) may reveal costs of various previous activities. Because monitoring the non-breeding portion of a population is difficult, non-breeders have been neglected in many studies of reproduction trade-offs.

  8. Protein Formulations for Emulsions and Solid-in-Oil Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Martins, Madalena; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Silva, Carla; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-06-01

    Needs from medical and cosmetic areas have led to the design of novel nanosized emulsions and solid-in-oil dispersions of proteins. Here, we describe the production of those emulsions and dispersions using high-energy methodologies such as high-pressure homogenization or ultrasound. Recent work has resulted in new mechanistic insights related to the formation of protein emulsions and dispersions. The production method and composition of these formulations can determine major parameters such as size, stability, and functionality, and therefore their final application. Aqueous nanoemulsions of proteins can be used for drug delivery, while solid-in-oil dispersions are often used in transdermal applications. PMID:26996614

  9. When is dispersal for dispersal? Unifying marine and terrestrial perspectives.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Scott C; Baskett, Marissa L; Grosberg, Richard K; Morgan, Steven G; Strathmann, Richard R

    2016-08-01

    Recent syntheses on the evolutionary causes of dispersal have focused on dispersal as a direct adaptation, but many traits that influence dispersal have other functions, raising the question: when is dispersal 'for' dispersal? We review and critically evaluate the ecological causes of selection on traits that give rise to dispersal in marine and terrestrial organisms. In the sea, passive dispersal is relatively easy and specific morphological, behavioural, and physiological adaptations for dispersal are rare. Instead, there may often be selection to limit dispersal. On land, dispersal is relatively difficult without specific adaptations, which are relatively common. Although selection for dispersal is expected in both systems and traits leading to dispersal are often linked to fitness, systems may differ in the extent to which dispersal in nature arises from direct selection for dispersal or as a by-product of selection on traits with other functions. Our analysis highlights incompleteness of theories that assume a simple and direct relationship between dispersal and fitness, not just insofar as they ignore a vast array of taxa in the marine realm, but also because they may be missing critically important effects of traits influencing dispersal in all realms. PMID:26118564

  10. Post-crash fuel dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1997-03-01

    This paper is a brief overview of work over the last several decades in understanding what occurs to jet fuel stored in aircraft fuel tanks on impact with the ground. Fuel dispersal is discussed in terms of the overall crash dynamics process and impact regimes are identified. In a generic sense, the types of flow regimes which can occur are identified and general descriptions of the processes are given. Examples of engineering level tools, both computational and experimental, which have applicability to analyzing the complex environments are presented. Finally, risk based decision is discussed as a quick means of identifying requirements for development of preventative or mitigation strategies, such as further work on the development of an anti-misting agent.

  11. Cauchy's dispersion equation reconsidered : dispersion in silicate glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. Y.; Inokuti, M.; Karstens, W.; Physics; Univ. of Vermont; St. Michael's College

    2002-01-01

    We formulate a novel method of characterizing optically transparent substances using dispersion theory. The refractive index is given by a generalized Cauchy dispersion equation with coefficients that are moments of the uv and ir absorptions. Mean dispersion, Abbe number, and partial dispersion are combinations of these moments. The empirical relation between index and dispersion for families of glasses appears as a consequence of Beer's law applied to the uv spectra.

  12. KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

    1996-12-01

    Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

  13. Fog dispersal technology.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in fog dispersal technology is briefly discussed. Fog is categorized as supercooled fog, occurring in air temperatures below freezing, and warm fog, occurring at above-freezing temperatures. Operational techniques are available to disperse supercooled fog in the airport area. It is much more difficult to cope with warm fog. Various known concepts to disperse warm fog are evaluated as to their operational merits. The most effective concept for immediate use involves heating the air to cause fog evaporation. Use of helicopter downwash has some application, possibly complementing the promising concept of seeding with sized hygroscopic particles. These latter two concepts appear to have future application, pending further research. The concept using polyelectrolytes is of uncertain value, lacking both a scientific explanation and a substantive evaluation of reported operational successes.

  14. Drilling mud dispersants

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, P. A.; Brase, I. E.

    1985-05-21

    Dispersants useful in aqueous drilling mud formulations employed in the drilling of subterranean wells where high temperature and high pressure environments are encountered are disclosed. The dispersants, when used in amounts of about 0.1 to 25 ppb provide muds containing colloidal material suspended in an aqueous medium with improved high temperature and high pressure stability. The dispersants are water soluble sulfonated vinyl toluene-maleic anhydride copolymers which have a molar ratio of vinyl toluene to maleic anhydride of about 1:1 to less than about 2:1, a molecular weight of 1,000 to 25,000 and at least about 0.7 sulfonic acid groups per vinyl toluene unit.

  15. About measuring velocity dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellhauer, M.

    A lot of our knowledge about the dynamics and total masses of pressure dominated stellar systems relies on measuring the internal velocity disper- sion of the system. We assume virial equilibrium and that we are able to measure only the bound stars of the system without any contamination. This article shows how likely it is to measure the correct velocity dispersion in reality. It will show that as long as we have small samples of velocity mea- surements the distribution of possible outcomes can be very large and as soon as we have a source of error the velocity dispersion can wrong by several standard deviations especially in large samples.

  16. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  17. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for applicationmore » to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.« less

  18. Correlation between annealing and irradiation behavior of dispersion fuels: Final report. [U/sub 3/Si/sub x/, U/sub 6/Mn, U/sub 3/SiAl, U/sub 6/Fe, U/sub 75/Ga/sub 10/Si/sub 15/, U/sub 75/Ga/sub 15/Ge/sub 10/

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.

    1987-06-01

    Studying the effects of annealing of scaled-down dispersion fuel plates is an important part of the data base for fuel performance. One of the most critical aspects of fuel performance is the stability of a fuel/matrix dispersion which is usually measured by volumetric changes of the fuel zone. A correlation has been proposed that fission-induced amorphization is responsible for the instability of the fuel and that such transformations can be predicted by the thermodynamic properties of the fuel. It is proposed that annealing studies may be used as a screening test for new fuels for which no thermodynamic properties have been measured and/or no irradiation data are available. Estimations of irradiation performance could be obtained faster and without the expense of irradiating the fuels under investigation. Miniature fuel plates were fabricated by standard procedures and annealed at 400/sup 0/C for up to 1981 hrs in a resistance wound furnace. At periodic intervals the plates were removed and the fuel zone volumes were calculated based on immersion density measurement data. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Surface Adsorption from the Exchange-Hole Dipole Moment Dispersion Model.

    PubMed

    Christian, Matthew S; Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto; Johnson, Erin R

    2016-07-12

    The accurate calculation of intermolecular interaction energies with density functional theory requires methods that include a treatment of long-range, nonlocal dispersion correlation. In this work, we explore the ability of the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) dispersion correction to model molecular surface adsorption. Adsorption energies are calculated for six small aromatic molecules (benzene, furan, pyridine, thiophene, thiophenol, and benzenediamine) and the four DNA nucleobases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) on the (111) surfaces of the three coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold). For benzene, where the experimental reference data is most precise, the mean absolute error in the computed absorption energies is 0.04 eV. For the other aromatic molecules, the computed binding energies are found to be within 0.09 eV of the available reference data, on average, which is well below the expected experimental uncertainties for temperature-programmed desorption measurements. Unlike other dispersion-corrected functionals, adequate performance does not require changes to the canonical XDM implementation, and the good performance of XDM is explained in terms of the behavior of the exchange hole. Additionally, the base functional employed (B86bPBE) is also optimal for molecular studies, making B86bPBE-XDM an excellent candidate for studying chemistry on material surfaces. Finally, the noncovalent interaction (NCI) plot technique is shown to detect adsorption effects in real space on the order of tenths of an eV. PMID:27253340

  20. The permeability of poly-disperse porous media and effective particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markicevic, B. I.; Preston, C.; Osterroth, S.; Iliev, O.; Hurwitz, M.

    2015-11-01

    The interactions between the fluid and solid phases in porous media account for the openness and length of the flow path that the fluid needs to travel within. The same reasoning applies for both mono- and poly-disperse media, and is reflected in the adoption of the same permeability models. The only difference is that an effective particle size diameter has to be used for the poly-disperse samples. A filtration experiment is used to form a particle layer, filter cake, consisting of particles of different sizes. Both inflow and outflow particle size distribution are measured by particle counting method, and from their difference, the particle size distribution in the cake is determined. In a set of experiments, the filtration history is altered by changing (i) filtration medium; (ii) suspension flow rate; and (iii) particle concentration, where in all cases investigated the cake permeability remains constant. In order to predict the permeability of poly-disperse cake from the analytical models, the particle size distribution moments are calculated, and the permeability is found for each moment. Comparing the experimental to the analytical permeability values the effective particle size is found, where the permeability calculated by using the harmonic mean of the particle size distribution reproduces the permeability experimental value best. Finally, in the parametric study, reducing the cake porosity and/or lowering the particle retention shifts effective particle size used in the permeability model toward higher moments of the particle size distribution function.

  1. Black hole radiation with modified dispersion relation in tunneling paradigm: free-fall frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang; Ying, Shuxuan

    2016-01-01

    Due to the exponential high gravitational red shift near the event horizon of a black hole, it might appear that the Hawking radiation would be highly sensitive to some unknown high energy physics. To study the effects of any unknown physics at the Planck scale on the Hawking radiation, the dispersive field theory models have been proposed, which are variations of Unruh's sonic black hole analogy. In this paper, we use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to investigate the dispersive field theory models. The preferred frame is the free-fall frame of the black hole. The dispersion relation adopted agrees with the relativistic one at low energy but is modified near the Planck mass mp. The corrections to the Hawking temperature are calculated for massive and charged particles to {O}( mp^{-2}) and neutral and massless particles with λ =0 to all orders. The Hawking temperature of radiation agrees with the standard one at the leading order. After the spectrum of radiation near the horizon is obtained, we use the brick wall model to compute the thermal entropy of a massless scalar field near the horizon of a 4D spherically symmetric black hole and a 2D one. Finally, the luminosity of a Schwarzschild black hole is calculated by using the geometric optics approximation.

  2. Dispersal of Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source; 2) close stellar encounters; 3) stellar winds; and 4) photoevaporation by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the inner disk (r approx. or less than 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r approx. or greater than 10 AU for low mass stars. Disk dispersal timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed he solar nebula is called into question. Finally, we model the small bright objects ('proplyds') observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV (ultraviolet) photons from the nearby massive star Theta(1)C.

  3. Dispersal of Disks Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2001-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the inner disk (r < or approx. equals 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r > or approx. equals 10 AU for low mass stars. Disk dispersal timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed the solar nebula is called into question. Finally, we model the small bright objects ("proplyds") observed in the Orion Nebula as disks around young, low mass stars which are externally illuminated by the UV photons from the nearby massive star Theta(sup 1)C.

  4. Warm fog dispersal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1983-01-01

    The charged particle generator was further tested after some design modification. The generator performance was measured with additional instrumentation and found to confirm previous measurements. Plans for a field testing were than developed. The overall status of the program and the field test plans were presented to a group of atmospheric scientists and electrostatic experts at the NASA/MSFC sponsored USRA Workshop on Electrostatic Fog Dispersal at NCAR, Boulder, Colorado discussed in previous sections. The recommendations from this workshop are being evaluated as to whether NASA should proceed with the field test or whether further theoretical research on the phenomenon of electrostatic fog dispersal and additional development of the charged particle generator should be carried out. Information obtained from the USRA Workshop clearly identified three physical mechanisms that could possibly influence the fog dispersal process, which heretofore have not been considered, and which may provide additional insight to the direction of further fog dispersal work. These mechanisms are: the effect of corona discharge on the electric field strength at the surface, the influx of fog into the cleared volume by turbulent diffusion, and the increase in supersaturation as liquid water is removed, activating haze particles, and thus generating more fog. Plans are being formulated to investigate these mechanisms.

  5. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  6. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  7. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  8. Amplitude-dependent Lamb wave dispersion in nonlinear plates.

    PubMed

    Packo, Pawel; Uhl, Tadeusz; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Leamy, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a perturbation approach for calculating amplitude-dependent Lamb wave dispersion in nonlinear plates. Nonlinear dispersion relationships are derived in closed form using a hyperelastic stress-strain constitutive relationship, the Green-Lagrange strain measure, and the partial wave technique integrated with a Lindstedt-Poincaré perturbation approach. Solvability conditions are derived using an operator formalism with inner product projections applied against solutions to the adjoint problem. When applied to the first- and second-order problems, these solvability conditions lead to amplitude-dependent, nonlinear dispersion corrections for frequency as a function of wavenumber. Numerical simulations verify the predicted dispersion shifts for an example nonlinear plate. The analysis and identification of amplitude-dependent, nonlinear Lamb wave dispersion complements recent research focusing on higher harmonic generation and internally resonant waves, which require precise dispersion relationships for frequency-wavenumber matching. PMID:27586758

  9. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth. PMID:27137538

  10. Dispersion of turbojet engine exhaust in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The dispersion of the exhaust of turbojet engines into the atmosphere is estimated by using a model developed for the mixing of a round jet with a parallel flow. The analysis is appropriate for determining the spread and dilution of the jet exhaust from the engine exit until it is entrained in the aircraft trailing vortices. Chemical reactions are not expected to be important and are not included in the flow model. Calculations of the dispersion of the exhaust plumes of three aircraft turbojet engines with and without afterburning at typical flight conditions are presented. Calculated average concentrations for the exhaust plume from a single engine jet fighter are shown to be in good agreement with measurements made in the aircraft wake during flight.

  11. First principles calculations for analysis martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, B.N.; Zhao, G.L.; Ho, K.M.; Chan, C.T.; Ye, Y.Y.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, B.L.

    1993-10-01

    The change in crystal energy is calculated for atomic displacements corresponding to phonons, elastic shears, and lattice transformations. Anomalies in the phonon dispersion curves of NiAl and NiTi are analyzed and recent calculations for TiPd alloys are presented.

  12. WBGT Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  13. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  14. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  15. Tomography of dispersive media

    PubMed

    Ernst; Herman

    2000-07-01

    When waves propagate through layered structures, the phase velocity is frequency dependent (dispersive). If one wants to reconstruct the velocity variations in this medium, conventional traveltime-based tomographic methods cannot be used, since each frequency component has a different traveltime. A tomographic method is presented for reconstructing the phase velocity of guided waves in laterally varying media. The dispersive character of guided waves is explicitly accounted for by using a phase-based error criterium instead of "picked" traveltimes. Phase velocity and source waveform can be reconstructed to within a few percent, and the algorithm is shown to be robust in the presence of interference noise. When applied to seismic field data, the reconstructed phase velocity field correlates well with the topography of the area. PMID:10923876

  16. Nikolaevskiy equation with dispersion.

    PubMed

    Simbawa, Eman; Matthews, Paul C; Cox, Stephen M

    2010-03-01

    The Nikolaevskiy equation was originally proposed as a model for seismic waves and is also a model for a wide variety of systems incorporating a neutral "Goldstone" mode, including electroconvection and reaction-diffusion systems. It is known to exhibit chaotic dynamics at the onset of pattern formation, at least when the dispersive terms in the equation are suppressed, as is commonly the practice in previous analyses. In this paper, the effects of reinstating the dispersive terms are examined. It is shown that such terms can stabilize some of the spatially periodic traveling waves; this allows us to study the loss of stability and transition to chaos of the waves. The secondary stability diagram ("Busse balloon") for the traveling waves can be remarkably complicated. PMID:20365845

  17. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  18. Ascent trajectory dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The results of a Space Transportation System ascent trajectory dispersion analysis are documented. Critical trajectory parameter values useful for the definition of lightweight external tank insulation requirements are provided. This analysis was conducted using two of the critical missions specified for the Space Transportation System: a 28.5 deg inclination trajectory launched from the Eastern Test Range (ETR) and a Western Test Range (WTR) trajectory launched into a 104 deg orbital inclination.

  19. Light dispersion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, L. C.

    2015-09-01

    Considering an idea of F. Arago in 1853 regarding light dispersion through the light ether in the interstellar space, this paper presents a new idea on an alternative interpretation of the cosmological red shift of the galaxies in the universe. The model is based on an analogy with the temporal material dispersion that occurs with light in the optical fiber core. Since intergalactic space is transparent, according to the model, this phenomenon is related to the gravitational potential existing in the whole space. Thus, it is possible to find a new interpretation to Hubble's constant. In space, light undergoes a dispersion process in its path, which is interpreted by a red shift equation of the type Δz = HL, since H = (d2n/dλ2 Δv Δλ), where H means the Hubble constant, n is the refractive index of the intergalactic space, Δλ is the spectral width of the extragalactic source, and Δv is the variation of the speed of light caused by the gravitational potential. We observe that this "constant" is governed by three new parameters. Light traveling the intergalactic space undergoes red shift due to this mechanism, while light amplitude decreases with time, and the wavelength always increases, thus producing the same type of behavior given by Hubble's Law. It can be demonstrated that the dark matter phenomenon is produced by the apparent speed of light of the stars on the periphery of the galaxies, without the existence of dark energy. Based on this new idea, the model of the universe is static, lacking expansion. Other phenomena may be interpreted based on this new model of the universe. We have what we call temporal gravitational dispersion of light in space produced by the variations of the speed of light, due to the presence of the gravitational potential in the whole space.

  20. Succinimide lubricating oil dispersant

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Bloch, R.; Brownwell, D.W.; Chen, F.J.; Gutierrez, A.

    1987-08-11

    A lubricating oil composition is described exhibiting improved dispersancy in both gasoline and diesel engines comprising a major amount of lubricating oil and 0.5 to 10 weight percent of a dispersant, the dispersant being prepared in a sequential process comprising the steps of: (a) in a first step reacting an oil-soluble polyolefin succinic anhydride, the olefin being a C/sub 3/ or C/sub 4/ olefin and an alkylene polyamine of the formula H/sub 2/N(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/(NH(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/)/sub m/sup -// NH/sub 2/ wherein n is 2 or 3 and m is 0 to 10, in a molar ratio of about 1.0 to 2.2 moles of polyolefin succinic anhydride per mole of polyamine, and (b) reacting the product of step (a) with dicarboxylic acid anhydride selected from the group consisting of maleic anhydride and succinic anhydride in sufficient molar proportions to provide a total mole ratio of about 2,3 to 3.0 moles of anhydride compounds per mole of polyamine.

  1. Dispersion Distance and the Matter Distribution of the Universe in Dispersion Space.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Sigurdson, Kris

    2015-09-18

    We propose that "standard pings," brief broadband radio impulses, can be used to study the three-dimensional clustering of matter in the Universe even in the absence of redshift information. The dispersion of radio waves as they travel through the intervening plasma can, like redshift, be used as a cosmological distance measure. Because of inhomogeneities in the electron density along the line of sight, dispersion is an imperfect proxy for radial distance and we show that this leads to calculable dispersion-space distortions in the apparent clustering of sources. Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a new class of radio transients that are the prototypical standard ping and, due to their high observed dispersion, have been interpreted as originating at cosmological distances. The rate of fast radio bursts has been estimated to be several thousand over the whole sky per day and, if cosmological, the sources of these events should trace the large-scale structure of the Universe. We calculate the dispersion-space power spectra for a simple model where electrons and FRBs are biased tracers of the large-scale structure of the Universe, and we show that the clustering signal could be measured using as few as 10 000 events. Such a survey is in line with what may be achieved with upcoming wide-field radio telescopes. PMID:26430980

  2. Industrial Source Complex (ISC) dispersion model. Software

    SciTech Connect

    Schewe, G.; Sieurin, E.

    1980-01-01

    The model updates various EPA dispersion model algorithms and combines them in two computer programs that can be used to assess the air quality impact of emissions from the wide variety of source types associated with an industrial source complex. The ISC Model short-term program ISCST, an updated version of the EPA Single Source (CRSTER) Model uses sequential hourly meteorological data to calculate values of average concentration or total dry deposition for time periods of 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours. Additionally, ISCST may be used to calculate 'N' is 366 days. The ISC Model long-term computer program ISCLT, a sector-averaged model that updates and combines basic features of the EPA Air Quality Display Model (AQDM) and the EPA Climatological Dispersion Model (CDM), uses STAR Summaries to calculate seasonal and/or annual average concentration or total deposition values. Both the ISCST and ISCLT programs make the same basic dispersion-model assumptions. Additionally, both the ISCST and ISCLT programs use either a polar or a Cartesian receptor grid...Software Description: The programs are written in the FORTRAN IV programming language for implementation on a UNIVAC 1110 computer and also on medium-to-large IBM or CDC systems. 65,000k words of core storage are required to operate the model.

  3. a Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System for Simulations of Topographically Induced Atmospheric Flow and Air Pollution Dispersion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boybeyi, Zafer

    release were then evaluated using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model. The numerical experiments suggested that the reported complex dispersion characteristics of the gas at Bhopal could have resulted from the interaction of thermally forced mesoscale systems. Finally, the mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modeling system is validated using the data collected during Tennessee Plume Study field experiment. This field experiment was designed to provide information on and insight into the dynamics of plume transport and transformation over long distances. Three-dimensional mesoscale circulation was simulated by the mesoscale model and then associated dispersion of SO_2 from the Cumberland steam plant on August 23, 1978 was carried out using the Eulerian dispersion model and the Lagrangian particle dispersion model. The results demonstrated that the atmospheric dispersion modeling system performed satisfactorily, reproducing the track and the spread of the plume.

  4. Spin crossover transition of Fe(phen)2(NCS)2: periodic dispersion-corrected density-functional study.

    PubMed

    Bučko, Tomáš; Hafner, Jürgen; Lebègue, Sébastien; Ángyán, János G

    2012-04-28

    Periodic dispersion corrected DFT calculations have been performed to study the spin-crossover transition of Fe(phen)(2)(NCS)(2) in the molecular and in the crystalline state. We show that London dispersion interactions play a crucial role in the cohesion of the crystals. Based on calculations of vibrational eigenstates of the isolated molecule and of the crystalline phase in both the low- and high-spin states, the transition entropies and enthalpies have been calculated. We demonstrate that, due to the stabilization of the low-spin state by intermolecular dispersion forces, the transition enthalpy at the transition temperature is larger for the crystalline phase in comparison with an isolated molecule. The effective coordination number of the nitrogen atoms of the ligands around the iron atom has been identified as the order parameter driving the quasi-reversible low-spin to high-spin transition in the crystal. Finally, using constrained geometry relaxations at fixed values of the coordination number, we computed the energy barrier of the LS to HS transition and found it to be in a reasonable agreement with the experimental value. PMID:22415338

  5. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  6. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  7. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  8. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  9. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  10. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.