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Sample records for dispersive mhd waves

  1. Dispersion equation of gravito-MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2016-03-01

    We derive the dispersion equation for gravito-MHD waves in an isothermal, gravitationally stratified plasma with a horizontal inhomogeneous magnetic field. In the present model the sound and the Alfvén speeds are constant. It is known that in this model analytical solutions can be obtained for linearized perturbations. There are three modes propagating in the considered plasma: the fast, the slow and the Alfvén mode, all modified by gravity. In the extreme short wavelength limit, these waves propagate in a locally uniform plasma. The waves with larger wavelengths will be affected by the nonuniformity of the medium resulting from the action of gravitational force ρg. In the case without magnetic field these waves become gravito-acoustic waves.

  2. Dispersive waves in a seeded MHD generator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    The equations giving the response of a slightly ionized plasma with monatomic components to sinusoidal perturbations have been formulated. Included in the model equations were the electron Hall effect, electron thermal diffusion, radiation, and electron-atom rate processes. Plasma conditions were limited to those where viscous effects, the induced magnetic field, ion slip, and atom-atom inelastic processes can be neglected. Presented are results of numerical calculations for MHD generators with a working fluid of potassium seeded argon.

  3. The modulational instability for the TDNLS equations for weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we study the modulational instability for the TDNLS equations derived by Hada (1993) and Brio, Hunter, and Johnson to describe the propagation of weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves in beta approximately 1 plasmas. We employ Whitham's averaged Lagrangian method to study the modulational instability. This complements studies of the modulational instability by Hada (1993) and Hollweg (1994), who did not use the averaged Lagrangian approach.

  4. Symmetries of the TDNLS equations for weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we consider the symmetries and conservation laws for the TDNLS equations derived by Hada (1993) and Brio, Hunter and Johnson, to describe the propagation of weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves in beta approximately 1 plasmas. The equations describe the interaction of the Alfven and magnetoacoustic modes near the triple umbilic, where the fast magnetosonic, slow magnetosonic and Alfven speeds coincide and a(g)(exp 2) = V(A)(exp 2) where a(g) is the gas sound speed and V(A) is the Alfven speed. We discuss Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations, and similarity solutions for the equations.

  5. MHD Wave in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere is one of the fastest developing fields in solar physics, and lies in the mainstream of using solar instrumentation data. This chapter first addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, and height localization with the mechanism of cutoff frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Then, it presents a review dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, and investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy. The chapter also addresses the initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  6. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  7. Study of MHD Effects on Surface Waves in Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Ji, H.; Pace, D.; Rappaport, H.

    2001-10-01

    The liquid metal experiment (LMX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has been constructed to study magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on the propagation of surface waves in liquid metals in an imposed horizontal magnetic field. The physics of liquid metal is of interest generally as a regime of small magnetic Reynolds number MHD and more specifically contributes basic knowledge to the applications of liquid lithium walls in a fusion reactor. Surface waves are driven by a wave driver controlled by a PC-based Labview system. A non-invasive diagnostic measures surface fluctuations at multiple locations accurately by reflecting an array of lasers off the surface and onto a screen recorded by an ICCD camera. The real part of the dispersion relation has been measured precisely and agrees well with a linear theory, revealing the role of surface oxidation. Experiments have also confirmed that a transverse magnetic field does not affect wave propagation, and have qualitatively observed MHD damping (a non-zero imaginary component of the dispersion relation) of waves propagating in a parallel magnetic field. Planned upgrades to LMX will enable quantitative measurement of this MHD damping rate as well as experiments on two-dimensional waves and nonlinear waves. Implications to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors will be discussed.

  8. Alfven Wave Tomography for Cold MHD Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin; N.J. Fisch

    2001-09-07

    Alfven waves propagation in slightly nonuniform cold plasmas is studied by means of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) nonlinear equations. The evolution of the MHD spectrum is shown to be governed by a matrix linear differential equation with constant coefficients determined by the spectrum of quasi-static plasma density perturbations. The Alfven waves are shown not to affect the plasma density inhomogeneities, as they scatter off of them. The application of the MHD spectrum evolution equation to the inverse scattering problem allows tomographic measurements of the plasma density profile by scanning the plasma volume with Alfven radiation.

  9. MHD Waves in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter focuses on reviewing several observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar wind, in particular on Alfvén waves, Alfvénic turbulent spectrum, and their role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. It also reviews computational models that incorporate Alfvén waves as the driving source of the wind in the lower corona (coronal holes) and in the inner heliosphere, with emphasis on multi-dimensional models. Evidence for MHD waves in the solar wind is obtained from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations using Earth-based radio telescope observations of distant (galactic) radio sources. The solar wind electron density variability in the line of sight affects the received radio signal. The propagating fluctuations and their correlations are used to estimate the solar wind velocity and the wave amplitude in the parallel and the perpendicular directions in line of sight.

  10. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  11. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  12. Analysis and gyrokinetic simulation of MHD Alfven wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kevin Derek

    The study of low-frequency turbulence in magnetized plasmas is a difficult problem due to both the enormous range of scales involved and the variety of physics encompassed over this range. Much of the progress that has been made in turbulence theory is based upon a result from incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), in which energy is only transferred from large scales to small via the collision of Alfven waves propagating oppositely along the mean magnetic field. Improvements in laboratory devices and satellite measurements have demonstrated that, while theories based on this premise are useful over inertial ranges, describing turbulence at scales that approach particle gyroscales requires new theory. In this thesis, we examine the limits of incompressible MHD theory in describing collisions between pairs of Alfven waves. This interaction represents the fundamental unit of plasma turbulence. To study this interaction, we develop an analytic theory describing the nonlinear evolution of interacting Alfven waves and compare this theory to simulations performed using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. Gyrokinetics captures a much richer set of physics than that described by incompressible MHD, and is well-suited to describing Alfvenic turbulence around the ion gyroscale. We demonstrate that AstroGK is well suited to the study of physical Alfven waves by reproducing laboratory Alfven dispersion data collected using the LAPD. Additionally, we have developed an initialization alogrithm for use with AstroGK that allows exact Alfven eigenmodes to be initialized with user specified amplitudes and phases. We demonstrate that our analytic theory based upon incompressible MHD gives excellent agreement with gyrokinetic simulations for weakly turbulent collisions in the limit that k⊥rho i << 1. In this limit, agreement is observed in the time evolution of nonlinear products, and in the strength of nonlinear interaction with respect to polarization and scale. We also examine the

  13. Two-fluid MHD Regime of Drift Wave Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shang-Chuan; Zhu, Ping; Xie, Jin-Lin; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Drift wave instabilities contribute to the formation of edge turbulence and zonal flows, and thus are believed to play essential roles in the anomalous transport processes in tokamaks. Whereas drift waves are generally assumed to be local and electrostatic, experiments have often found regimes where the spatial scales and the magnetic components of drift waves approach those of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes. In this work we study such a drift wave regime in a cylindrical magnetized plasma using a full two-fluid MHD model implemented in the NIMROD code. The linear dependency of growth rates on resistivity and the dispersion relation found in the NIMROD calculations qualitatively agree with theoretical analysis. As the azimuthal mode number increases, the drift modes become highly localized radially; however, unlike the conventional local approximation, the radial profile of the drift mode tends to shift toward the edge away from the center of the density gradient slope, suggesting the inhomogeneity of two-fluid effects. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 11275200 and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant 2014GB124002.

  14. Propagation and Dissipation of MHD Waves in Coronal Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    bholadwivedi@gmail.com In view of the landmark result on the solar wind outflow, starting between 5 Mm and 20 Mm above the photosphere in magnetic funnels, we investigate the propagation and dissipation of MHD waves in coronal holes. We underline the importance of Alfvén wave dissipation in the magnetic funnels through the viscous and resistive plasma. Our results show that Alfvén waves are one of the primary energy sources in the innermost part of coronal holes where the solar wind outflow starts. We also consider compressive viscosity and thermal conductivity to study the propagation and dissipation of long period slow longitudinal MHD waves in polar coronal holes. We discuss their likely role in the line profile narrowing, and in the energy budget for coronal holes and the solar wind. We compare the contribution of longitudinal MHD waves with high frequency Alfvén waves.

  15. Solitonization of a dispersive wave.

    PubMed

    Braud, F; Conforti, M; Cassez, A; Mussot, A; Kudlinski, A

    2016-04-01

    We report the observation of a nonlinear propagation scenario in which a dispersive wave is transformed into a fundamental soliton in an axially varying optical fiber. The dispersive wave is initially emitted in the normal dispersion region and the fiber properties change longitudinally so that the dispersion becomes anomalous at the dispersive wave wavelength, which allows it to be transformed into a soliton. The solitonic nature of the field is demonstrated by solving the direct Zakharov-Shabat scattering problem. Experimental characterization performed in spectral and temporal domains show evidence of the solitonization process in an axially varying photonic crystal fiber. PMID:27192249

  16. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  17. Vorticity equation for MHD fast waves in geospace environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The MHD vorticity equation is modified in order to apply it to nonlinear MHD fast waves or shocks when their extent along the magnetic field is limited. Field-aligned current (FAC) generation is also discussed on the basis of this modified vorticity equation. When the wave normal is not aligned to the finite velocity convection and the source region is spatially limited, a longitudinal polarization causes a pair of plus and minus charges inside the compressional plane waves or shocks, generating a pair of FACs. This polarization is not related to the separation between the electrons and ions caused by their difference in mass, a separation which is inherent to compressional waves. The resultant double field-aligned current structure exists both with and without the contributions from curvature drift, which is questionable in terms of its contribution to vorticity change from the viewpoint of single-particle motion.

  18. Alfven wave filamentation and dispersive phase mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sulem, P. L.; Passot, T.; Laveder, D.; Borgogno, D.

    2009-11-10

    The formation of three-dimensional magnetic structures from quasi-monochromatic left-hand polarized dispersive Alfven waves, under the effect of transverse collapse and/or the lensing effect of density channels aligned with the ambient magnetic field is discussed, both in the context of the usual Hall-MHD and using a fluid model retaining linear Landau damping and finite Larmor radius corrections. It is in particular shown that in a small-{beta} plasma (that is stable relatively to the filamentation instability in the absence of inhomogeneities), a moderate density enhancement leads the wave energy to concentrate into a filament whose transverse size is prescribed by the dimension of the channel, while for a strong density perturbation, this structure later on evolves to thin helical ribbons where the strong gradients permit dissipation processes to become efficient and heat the plasma. The outcome of this 'dispersive phase mixing' that leads to small-scale formation on relatively extended regions contrasts with the more localized oblique shocks formed in the absence of dispersion. Preliminary results on the effect of weak collisions that lead to an increase of the transverse ion temperature are also briefly mentioned.

  19. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. III. Leaky Waves in Zero-Beta Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate the time-dependent wave properties and the damping rate of propagating fast magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) waves when energy leakage into a magnetised atmosphere is considered. By considering a cold plasma, initial investigations into the evolution of MHD wave damping through this energy leakage will take place. The time-dependent governing equations have been derived previously in Williamson and Erdélyi (2014a, Solar Phys. 289, 899 - 909) and are now solved when the assumption of evanescent wave propagation in the outside of the waveguide is relaxed. The dispersion relation for leaky waves applicable to a straight magnetic field is determined in both an arbitrary tube and a thin-tube approximation. By analytically solving the dispersion relation in the thin-tube approximation, the explicit expressions for the temporal evolution of the dynamic frequency and wavenumber are determined. The damping rate is, then, obtained from the dispersion relation and is shown to decrease as the density ratio increases. By comparing the decrease in damping rate to the increase in damping for a stationary system, as shown, we aim to point out that energy leakage may not be as efficient a damping mechanism as previously thought.

  20. Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.

    2013-06-15

    Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvén waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

  1. MHD Wave Modes Resolved in Fine-Scale Chromospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verth, G.; Jess, D. B.

    2016-02-01

    Due to its complex and dynamic fine-scale structure, the chromosphere is a particularly challenging region of the Sun's atmosphere to understand. It is now widely accepted that to model chromospheric dynamics, even on a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scale, while also calculating spectral line emission, one must realistically include the effects of partial ionization and radiative transfer in a multi-fluid plasma under non-LTE conditions. Accurate quantification of MHD wave energetics must be founded on a precise identification of the actual wave mode being observed. This chapter focuses on MHD kink-mode identification, MHD sausage mode identification, and MHD torsional Alfvén wave identification. It then reviews progress in determining more accurate energy flux estimations of specific MHD wave modes observed in the chromosphere. The chapter finally examines how the discovery of these MHD wave modes has helped us advance the field of chromospheric magnetoseismology.

  2. Inductive-dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling via MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiannan; Song, Paul; Vasyliūnas, Vytenis M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate magnetosphere-ionosphere/thermosphere (M-IT) coupling via MHD waves by numerically solving time-dependent continuity, momentum, and energy equations for ions and neutrals, together with Maxwell's equations (Ampère's and Faraday's laws) and with photochemistry included. This inductive-dynamic approach we use is fundamentally different from those in previous magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling models: all MHD wave modes are retained, and energy and momentum exchange between waves and plasma are incorporated into the governing equations, allowing a self-consistent examination of dynamic M-I coupling. Simulations, using an implicit numerical scheme, of the 1-D ionosphere/thermosphere system responding to an imposed convection velocity at the top boundary are presented to show how magnetosphere and ionosphere are coupled through Alfvén waves during the transient stage when the IT system changes from one quasi steady state to another. Wave reflection from the low-altitude ionosphere plays an essential role, causing overshoots and oscillations of ionospheric perturbations, and the dynamical Hall effect is an inherent aspect of the M-I coupling. The simulations demonstrate that the ionosphere/thermosphere responds to magnetospheric driving forces as a damped oscillator.

  3. Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Terradas, Jaume; Verth, Gary; Soler, Roberto

    Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes Presenting author: M. Goossens Co-authors: R. Soler, J. Terradas, T. Van Doorsselaere, G. Verth The standard interpretation of the transverse MHD waves observed in the solar atmosphere is that they are non-axisymmetric kink m=1) waves on magnetic flux tubes. This interpretation is based on the fact that axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fluting waves do not displace the axis of the loop and the loop as a whole while kink waves indeed do so. A uniform transverse motion produces a Doppler displacement that is constant across the magnetic flux tube. A recent development is the observation of Doppler displacements that vary across the loop. The aim of the present contribution is to show that spatial variations of the Doppler displacements across the loop can be caused by kink waves. The motion associated with a kink wave is purely transverse only when the flux tube is uniform and sufficiently thin. Only in that case do the radial and azimuthal components of displacement have the same amplitude and is the azimuthal component a quarter of a period ahead of the radial component. This results in a unidirectional or transverse displacement. When the flux tube is non-uniform and has a non-zero radius the conditions for the generation of a purely transverse motion are not any longer met. In that case the motion in a kink wave is the sum of a transverse motion and a non-axisymmetric rotational motion that depends on the azimuthal angle. It can produce complicated variations of the Doppler displacement across the loop. I shall discuss the various cases of possible Doppler displacenents that can occur depending on the relative sizes of the amplitudes of the radial and azimuthal components of the displacement in the kink wave and on the orientation of the line of sight.

  4. Guided Waves with and Without Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narayan R.

    2008-02-01

    In the application of elastic waves of ultrasonic frequencies for nondestructive evaluations of industrial components and welded structures various types of waves like Rayleigh waves, Surface waves, Longitudinal body waves, Shear body waves, and Lamb waves are used to detect defects in the objects under investigation. In many cases these waves travel in bounded media and are affected by boundaries. Because they are guided by boundaries of objects under investigation, they are called sometimes guided waves or waveguides at other times. Some of these guided waves are dispersive in character while others are nondispersive. Efforts are made here to distinguish between guided waves with dispersion and those without dispersion.

  5. MHD-waves in the geomagnetic tail: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoliy; Mazur, Vitaliy; Kozlov, Daniil

    2015-03-01

    This article presents the review of experimental and theoretical studies on ultra-lowfrequency MHD oscillations of the geomagnetic tail. We consider the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause, oscillations with a discrete spectrum in the "magic frequencies"range, the ballooning instability of coupled Alfvén and slow magnetosonic waves, and "flapping" oscillations of the current sheet of the geomagnetic tail. Over the last decade, observations from THEMIS, CLUSTER and Double Star satellites have been of great importance for experimental studies. The use of several spacecraft allows us to study the structure of MHD oscillations with high spatial resolution. Due to this, we can make a detailed comparison between theoretical results and those obtained from multi-spacecraft studies. To make such comparisons in theoretical studies, in turn, we have to use the numerical models closest to the real magnetosphere.

  6. Is the magnetosphere a lens for MHD waves?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.; Valdivia, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    A viewpoint of the magnetosphere as a lens for MHD waves is presented. Using a simple model of the variation of the Alfven speed as proportional to the local magnetic value given by the Earth's dipole field and that due to the magnetopause currents represented by a current loop, it is found that the near-Earth magnetotail, in the range 8-16 R(sub E), is the focus of the magnetospheric lens. This location is found to be quite insensitive to a wide variation of parameters. By using simple diffraction theory analysis it is found that the focal region extends about 1 R(sub E) about the neutral sheet in the north-south plane and 0.2 - 0.5 R(sub E) along the Sun-Earth line. Compressive MHD waves carried by the solar wind or created by the interaction of the wind with the magnetopause can be amplified by a factor of about 100 in the focal region and this has potentially important implications to substorm activity.

  7. MHD waves and instabilities for gravitating, magnetized configurations in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, Rony; Goedbloed, Hans J. P.

    Seismic probing of equilibrium configurations is of course well-known from geophysics, but has also been succesfully used to determine the internal structure of the Sun to an amazing accuracy. The results of helioseismology are quite impressive, although they only exploit an equilibrium structure where inward gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient in a 1D radial fashion. In principle, one can do the same for stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibria, as needed to perform MHD seismology in astrophysical jets or accretion disks. The introduction of (sheared) differential rotation does require the important switch from diagnosing static to stationary equilibrium configurations. The theory to describe all linear waves and instabilities in ideal MHD, given an exact stationary, gravitating, magnetized plasma equilibrium, in any dimensionality (1D, 2D, 3D) has been known since 1960, and is governed by the Frieman-Rotenberg equation. The full (mathematical) power of spectral theory governing physical eigenmode determination comes into play when using the Frieman-Rotenberg equation for moving equilibria, as applicable to astrophysical jets, accretion disks, but also solar flux ropes with stationary flow patterns. I will review exemplary seismic studies of flowing equilibrium configurations, covering solar to astrophysical configurations in motion. In that case, even essentially 1D configurations require quantification of the spectral web of eigenmodes, organizing the complex eigenfrequency plane.

  8. Kelvin-Helmholtz Unstable Magnetotail Flow Channels: Deceleration and Radiation of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with burstybulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes areinvestigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. Theseinstabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow.At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modesinto propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling ofBBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBFexcitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for theobservations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  9. Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetotail flow channels: Deceleration and radiation of MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-06-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with bursty bulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes are investigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. These instabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow. At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modes into propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling of BBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBF excitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for the observations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  10. Propagation and damping of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous coronal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Anil; Murawski, K.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the propagation of slow MHD waves in a flowing viscous solar coronal plasma. The compressive viscosity and steady flow along and opposite to the wave propagation are taken into account to study the damping of slow waves. We numerically solve the MHD equations by MacCormack method to examine the effect of steady flow on the damping of slow MHD waves in viscous solar coronal plasma. Amplitude of velocity perturbation and damping time of slow waves decrease with the increase in the value of Mach number. Flow causes a phase shift in the perturbed velocity amplitude and an increase in wave period. The damping of slow waves in flowing viscous plasma is stronger than the damping of waves in viscous plasma. Slow wave in backward flow damps earlier than the wave in forward flow.

  11. Surface wave dispersion from small vertical scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, K.; Levshin, A. L.

    2004-10-01

    Heterogeneity in the subsurface creates conflicting types of dispersion of seismic waves. A laboratory and numerical experiment show that multiple scattering of elastic waves from isolated heterogeneities near the surface not only attenuates, but also delays coherent events. Because scattering off these impedance contrasts is frequency dependent, multiple scattering is a source of dispersion. If ignored, multiple scattering dispersion could be erroneously attributed to a model with horizontal homogeneous layers of different wave speeds.

  12. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  13. A Leaky Waveguide Model for MHD Wave Driven Winds from Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, driven by the large scale convective motions of the photosphere are suggested as a possible source of additional acceleration for the stellar wind. Most of the turbulent power in a coronal hole is carried by MHD waves with periods of a few hundred seconds or longer. This is evident from direct observations of turbulence in the solar photosphere, as well as in situ observations of turbulence in the solar wind. But waves with periods this long have wavelengths which are typically as large as the transverse scale of the coronal hole flux tube itself. For these waves boundary effects are important and the coronal hole must be treated as a waveguide. The propagation of MHD waves using this waveguide approach is discussed. The simple model presented demonstrates that coronal holes can act as waveguides for MHD waves. For typical solar parameters the waves are compressible and can generate a wave tensile force which tends to cancel at least part of the wave pressure force. This effect tends to decrease the efficiency of MHD wave acceleration.

  14. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. II. Finite Plasma Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-04-01

    The propagation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves is an area that has been thoroughly studied for idealised static and steady state magnetised plasma systems applied to numerous solar structures. By applying the generalisation of a temporally varying background density to an open magnetic flux tube, mimicking the observed slow evolution of such waveguides in the solar atmosphere, further investigations into the propagation of both fast and slow MHD waves can take place. The assumption of a zero-beta plasma (no gas pressure) was applied in Williamson and Erdélyi ( Solar Phys. 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0366-9, Paper I) is now relaxed for further analysis here. Firstly, the introduction of a finite thermal pressure to the magnetic flux tube equilibrium modifies the existence of fast MHD waves which are directly comparable to their counterparts found in Paper I. Further, as a direct consequence of the non-zero kinetic plasma pressure, a slow MHD wave now exists, and is investigated. Analysis of the slow wave shows that, similar to the fast MHD wave, wave amplitude amplification takes place in time and height. The evolution of the wave amplitude is determined here analytically. We conclude that for a temporally slowly decreasing background density both propagating magnetosonic wave modes are amplified for over-dense magnetic flux tubes. This information can be very practical and useful for future solar magneto-seismology applications in the study of the amplitude and frequency properties of MHD waveguides, e.g. for diagnostic purposes, present in the solar atmosphere.

  15. On The Role of MHD Waves in Heating Localised Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.; Nelson, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite and ground-based observations from e.g. SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, SDO and IRIS to DST/ROSA, IBIS, CoMP, STT/CRISP have provided a wealth of evidence of waves and oscillations present in a wide range of spatial scales of the magnetised solar atmosphere. Our understanding about localised solar structures has been considerably changed in light of these high spatial and time resolution observations. However, MHD waves not only enable us to perform sub-resolution magneto-seismology of magnetic waveguides but are also potential candidates to carry and damp the necessary non-thermal energy in these localised waveguides. First, we will briefly outline the basic recent developments in MHD wave theory focussing on linear waves. Next, we discuss the role of the most frequently studied wave classes, including the Alfven, and magneto-acoustic kink and sausage waves. The current theoretical (and often difficult) interpretations of the detected solar atmospheric wave and oscillatory phenomena within the framework of MHD will be shown. Last, the latest reported observational findings of potential MHD wave flux, in terms of localised plasma heating, in the solar atmosphere is discussed, bringing us closer to solve the coronal heating problem.

  16. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of MHD waves observed by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, S.; Thompson, B. J.; Plunkett, S. P.; Zhao, X. P.; Dryer, M.

    2001-11-01

    We investigate the global large amplitude waves propagating across the solar disk as observed by the SOHO/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). These waves appear to be similar to those observed in Hα in the chromosphere and which are known as ``Moreton waves,'' associated with large solar flares [Moreton, 1960, 1964]. Uchida [1968] interpreted these Moreton waves as the propagation of a hydromagnetics disturbance in the corona with its wavefront intersecting the chromosphere to produce the Moreton wave as observed in movie sequences of Hα images. To search for an understanding of the physical characteristics of these newly observed EIT waves, we constructed a three-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. Measured global magnetic fields, obtained from the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) at Stanford University, are used as the initial magnetic field to investigate hydromagnetics wave propagation in a three-dimensional spherical geometry. Using magnetohydrodynamic wave theory together with simulation, we are able to identify these observed EIT waves as fast mode MHD waves dominated by the acoustic mode, called magnetosonic waves. The results to be presented include the following: (1) comparison of observed and simulated morphology projected on the disk and the distance-time curves on the solar disk; (2) three-dimensional evolution of the disturbed magnetic field lines at various viewing angles; (3) evolution of the plasma density profile at a specific location as a function of latitude; and (4) computed Friedrich's diagrams to identify the MHD wave characteristics.

  17. Realistic Modeling of SDO/AIA-discovered Coronal Fast MHD Wave Trains in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution EUV observations by space telescopes have provided plenty of evidence for coronal MHD waves in active regions. In particular, SDO/AIA discovered quasi-periodic, fast-mode propagating MHD wave trains (QFPs), which can propagate at speeds of ~1000 km/s perpendicular to the magnetic field. Such waves can provide information on the energy release of their associated flares and the magnetized plasma structure of the active regions. Before we can use these waves as tools for coronal seismology, 3D MHD modeling is required for disentangling observational ambiguities and improving the diagnostic accuracy. We present new results of observationally contained models of QFPs using our recently upgraded radiative, thermally conductive, visco-resistive 3D MHD code. The waves are excited by time-depended boundary conditions constrained by the spatial (localized) and quasi-periodic temporal evolution of a C-class flare typically associated with QFPs. We investigate the excitation, propagation, and damping of the waves for a range of key model parameters, such as the background temperature, density, magnetic field structure, and the location of the flaring site within the active region. We synthesize EUV intensities in multiple AIA channels and then obtain the model parameters that best reproduce the properties of observed QFPs. We discuss the implications of our model results for the seismological application of QFPs and for understanding the dynamics of their associated flares.

  18. New generalized dispersion relation for low-frequency electromagnetic waves in Hall-magnetohydrodynamic dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Padma Kant; Kourakis, Ioannis; Stenflo, Lennart

    2005-10-31

    A generalized linear theory for electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous dusty magnetoplasma is presented. The waves described are characterized by a frequency which is much smaller (larger) than the electron gyrofrequency (dust plasma and dust gyrofrequencies), and a long wavelength (in comparison with the ion gyroradius and the electron skin depth). The generalized Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (GH-MHD) equations are derived by assuming massive charged dust macroparticles to be immobile, and Fourier transformed to obtain a general dispersion relation. The latter is analyzed to understand the influence of immobile charged dust grains on various electromagnetic wave modes in a magnetized dusty plasma.

  19. Fundamental Studies On Development Of MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) Generator Implement On Wave Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, M. F. M. A.; Apandi, Muhamad Al-Hakim Md; Sabri, M.; Shahril, K.

    2016-02-01

    As increasing of agricultural and industrial activities each year has led to an increasing in demand for energy. Possibility in the future, the country was not able to offer a lot of energy and power demand. This means that we need to focus on renewable energy to supply the demand for energy. Energy harvesting is among a method that can contribute on the renewable energy. MHD power generator is a new way to harvest the energy especially Ocean wave energy. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore performance of MHD generator. The effect of intensity of NaCl Solution (Sea Water), flow rate of NaCl solution, magnetic strength and magnet position to the current produce was analyzed. The result shows that each factor is give a significant effect to the current produce, because of that each factor need to consider on develop of MHD generator to harvest the wave energy as an alternative way to support the demand for energy.

  20. Renormalized Resonance Quartets in Dispersive Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjung; Kovačič, Gregor; Cai, David

    2009-07-01

    Using the (1+1)D Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak model as an example, we present an extension of the wave turbulence (WT) theory to systems with strong nonlinearities. We demonstrate that nonlinear wave interactions renormalize the dynamics, leading to (i) a possible destruction of scaling structures in the bare wave systems and a drastic deformation of the resonant manifold even at weak nonlinearities, and (ii) creation of nonlinear resonance quartets in wave systems for which there would be no resonances as predicted by the linear dispersion relation. Finally, we derive an effective WT kinetic equation and show that our prediction of the renormalized Rayleigh-Jeans distribution is in excellent agreement with the simulation of the full wave system in equilibrium.

  1. Shock wave dispersion in weakly ionized gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessaratikoon, Prasong

    2003-10-01

    Electrodeless microwave (MW) discharge in two straight, circular cylindrical resonant cavities in TE1,1,1 and TM0,1,2 modes were introduced to perform additional experimental studies on shock wave modification in non-equilibrium weakly ionized gases and to clarify the physical mechanisms of the shock wave modification process. The discharge was generated in 99.99% Ar at a gas pressure between 20 and 100 Torr and at a discharge power density less than 10.0 Watts/cm3. Power density used for operating the discharge was rather low in the present work, which was determined by evaluating the power loss inside the resonant cavity. It was found that the shock wave deflection signal amplitude was decreased while the shock wave local velocity was increased in the presence of the discharge. However, there was no apparent evidence of the multiple shock structure or the widening of the shock wave deflection signal, as observed in the d.c. glow discharge [3,5]. The shock wave always retained a more compact structure even in the case of strong dispersion in both the TE and the TM mode. The shock wave propagated faster through the discharge in the TE mode than in the TM mode. Discharge characteristics and local parameters such as gas temperature T g, electron density Ne, local electric field E, and average power density, were determined by using the MW discharge generated from an Argon gas mixture that contains 95% Ar, 5% H2, and traces of N2. The gas temperature was evaluated by using the amplitude reduction technique and the emission spectroscopy of Nitrogen. The gas temperature distribution was flat in the central region of the cavity. By comparing the gas temperature calculated from the shock wave local velocity and from the amplitude reduction technique, the present work was sufficiently accurate to indicate that the thermal effect is dominant. The electron density was obtained from measured line shapes of hydrogen Balmer lines by using the gas temperature and the well

  2. Eigen-Frequencies of MHD Wave Equations in the Presence of Longitudinal Stratification Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Shahriar; Nasiri, Mojtaba; Dadashi, Neda; Safari, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    Coronal Loops oscillations and MHD waves propagating in solar corona and transition region has been observed by TRACE telescope in 1999. In this Study, the MHD mode oscillations of the coronal plasma are studied. The aim is to identify the effect of structuring such as density on the frequencies of oscillations. We modeled the coronal medium as a zero-plasma with longitudinally density stratification. Magnetic flux tube oscillations are categorized into sausage, kink and torsion modes. The MHD equations are reduced and the governing equation are solved numerically using Finite Element Method. Eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions are extracted. The torsional mode is analyzed. By changing the stratification parameter the antinodes move towards the footpoints and we also concluded that in the thin tube approximation, leakage modes are propagated.

  3. Guided MHD waves as a coronal diagnostic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    A description is provided of how fast magnetoacoustic waves are ducted along regions of low Alfven velocity (high density) in the corona, exhibiting a distinctive wave signature which may be used as a diagnostic probe of in situ coronal conditions (magnetic field strength, density inhomogeneity, etc.). Some observational knowledge of the start time of the impulsive wave source, possibly a flare, the start and end times of the generated wave event, and the frequency of the pulsations in that event permits a seismological deduction of the physical properties of the coronal medium in which the wave propagated. With good observations the theory offers a new means of probing the coronal atmosphere.

  4. A dispersive wave equation using nonlocal elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challamel, Noël; Rakotomanana, Lalaonirina; Le Marrec, Loïc

    2009-08-01

    Nonlocal continuum mechanics allows one to account for the small length scale effect that becomes significant when dealing with micro- or nano-structures. This Note investigates a model of wave propagation in a nonlocal elastic material. We show that a dispersive wave equation is obtained from a nonlocal elastic constitutive law, based on a mixture of a local and a nonlocal strain. This model comprises both the classical gradient model and the Eringen's integral model. The dynamic properties of the model are discussed, and corroborate well some recent theoretical studies published to unify both static and dynamics gradient elasticity theories. Moreover, an excellent matching of the dispersive curve of the Born-Kármán model of lattice dynamics is obtained with such nonlocal model. To cite this article: N. Challamel et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  5. Shear wave speed and dispersion measurements using crawling wave chirps.

    PubMed

    Hah, Zaegyoo; Partin, Alexander; Parker, Kevin J

    2014-10-01

    This article demonstrates the measurement of shear wave speed and shear speed dispersion of biomaterials using a chirp signal that launches waves over a range of frequencies. A biomaterial is vibrated by two vibration sources that generate shear waves inside the medium, which is scanned by an ultrasound imaging system. Doppler processing of the acquired signal produces an image of the square of vibration amplitude that shows repetitive constructive and destructive interference patterns called "crawling waves." With a chirp vibration signal, successive Doppler frames are generated from different source frequencies. Collected frames generate a distinctive pattern which is used to calculate the shear speed and shear speed dispersion. A special reciprocal chirp is designed such that the equi-phase lines of a motion slice image are straight lines. Detailed analysis is provided to generate a closed-form solution for calculating the shear wave speed and the dispersion. Also several phantoms and an ex vivo human liver sample are scanned and the estimation results are presented. PMID:24658144

  6. Dispersive shock wave interactions and asymptotics.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Baldwin, Douglas E

    2013-02-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) are physically important phenomena that occur in systems dominated by weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is the universal model for systems with weak dispersion and weak, quadratic nonlinearity. Here we show that the long-time-asymptotic solution of the KdV equation for general, steplike data is a single-phase DSW; this DSW is the "largest" possible DSW based on the boundary data. We find this asymptotic solution using the inverse scattering transform and matched-asymptotic expansions. So while multistep data evolve to have multiphase dynamics at intermediate times, these interacting DSWs eventually merge to form a single-phase DSW at large time. PMID:23496590

  7. Dispersive wave-breaking in coherently driven passive cavities.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano

    2014-04-15

    We show that the intracavity field evolving in an externally driven passive Kerr resonator subject to weak normal dispersion undergoes wave-breaking, thus forming dispersive shock waves. At variance with the cavity-less propagation, such dispersive wave-breaking turns out to be strongly favored by cavity bistability and coexisting modulational instability. PMID:24979022

  8. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. I. Zero Plasma-β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-03-01

    MHD waves and oscillations in sharply structured magnetic plasmas have been studied for static and steady systems in the thin tube approximation over many years. This work will generalize these studies by introducing a slowly varying background density in time, in order to determine the changes to the wave parameters introduced by this temporally varying equilibrium, i.e. to investigate the amplitude, frequency, and wavenumber for the kink and higher order propagating fast magnetohydrodynamic wave in the leading order approximation to the WKB approach in a zero- β plasma representing the upper solar atmosphere. To progress, the thin tube and over-dense loop approximations are used, restricting the results found here to the duration of a number of multiples of the characteristic density change timescale. Using such approximations it is shown that the amplitude of the kink wave is enhanced in a manner proportional to the square of the Alfvén speed, . The frequency of the wave solution tends to the driving frequency of the system as time progresses; however, the wavenumber approaches zero after a large multiple of the characteristic density change timescale, indicating an ever increasing wavelength. For the higher order fluting modes the changes in amplitude are dependent upon the wave mode; for the m=2 mode the wave is amplified to a constant level; however, for all m≥3 the fast MHD wave is damped within a relatively small multiple of the characteristic density change timescale. Understanding MHD wave behavior in time-dependent plasmas is an important step towards a more complete model of the solar atmosphere and has a key role to play in solar magneto-seismological applications.

  9. Nonlinear Alfvén waves in dissipative MHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jugao; Chen, Yinhua; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear Alfvén wave trains in resistive and viscous magnetohydrodynamics plasmas are investigated. In weakly dissipative one-dimensional systems the inclusion of these effects leads to dissipative damping of Alfvén waves and heating of the plasma. It is found that plasma flow along the background magnetic field can reduce/increase the visco-resistive damping when the flow is along/against the Alfvén wave. In strongly dissipative systems, the front of the Alfvén wave train damps slower than the others, and it gradually forms a damping soliton. In two-dimensional systems, Alfvén wave phase mixing induced by inhomogeneity of the background plasma leads to enhancement of the dissipative damping and the corresponding plasma heating.

  10. The Generation and Damping of Propagating MHD Kink Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Hillier, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-03-01

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  11. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R.; Hillier, A. E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk

    2014-03-20

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  12. Lamb wave dispersion under finite plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuang C.; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study of the effects residual plastic strains have on Lamb wave velocities and time of flight measurements. The potential application of this research is non-destructive evaluation and structural health monitoring, particularly reconstructing plastic strain fields. The finite deformation of a semi-infinite plate due to residual plastic strain is used to accommodate the changes in plate thickness and elongation. The results show that the S0 mode exhibits significant variations in group velocity in the highly dispersive regions, as much as a 2% increase in velocity with a 1% plastic strain. However, for time of flight measurements, the plate elongation had an order of magnitude effect rather than showing velocity changes. By exploiting time delay measurements, it may be possible to use wave speed measurements to determine plastic zones through Lamb-like waves.

  13. Numerical modelling of MHD waves in the solar chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Mats; Bogdan, Thomas J

    2006-02-15

    Acoustic waves are generated by the convective motions in the solar convection zone. When propagating upwards into the chromosphere they reach the height where the sound speed equals the Alfvén speed and they undergo mode conversion, refraction and reflection. We use numerical simulations to study these processes in realistic configurations where the wavelength of the waves is similar to the length scales of the magnetic field. Even though this regime is outside the validity of previous analytic studies or studies using ray-tracing theory, we show that some of their basic results remain valid: the critical quantity for mode conversion is the angle between the magnetic field and the k-vector: the attack angle. At angles smaller than 30 degrees much of the acoustic, fast mode from the photosphere is transmitted as an acoustic, slow mode propagating along the field lines. At larger angles, most of the energy is refracted/reflected and returns as a fast mode creating an interference pattern between the upward and downward propagating waves. In three-dimensions, this interference between waves at small angles creates patterns with large horizontal phase speeds, especially close to magnetic field concentrations. When damping from shock dissipation and radiation is taken into account, the waves in the low-mid chromosphere have mostly the character of upward propagating acoustic waves and it is only close to the reflecting layer we get similar amplitudes for the upward propagating and refracted/reflected waves. The oscillatory power is suppressed in magnetic field concentrations and enhanced in ring-formed patterns around them. The complex interference patterns caused by mode-conversion, refraction and reflection, even with simple incident waves and in simple magnetic field geometries, make direct inversion of observables exceedingly difficult. In a dynamic chromosphere it is doubtful if the determination of mean quantities is even meaningful. PMID:16414886

  14. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock: Reinterpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Wong, H. K.; Vinas, A. F.; Smith, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock were previously interpreted as arising from a resonant electromagnetic ion beam instability. That interpretation was based on the conclusion that the observed fluctuations were predominantly right elliptically polarized in the solar wind rest frame. Because it was noted that the fluctuations are, in fact, left elliptically polarized, a reanalysis of the observations was necessary. Several mechanisms for producing left hand polarized MHD waves in the observed frequency range were investigated. Instabilities excited by protons appear unlikely to account for the observations. A resonant instability excited by relativistic electrons escaping from the Jovian magnetosphere is a likely source of free energy consistent with the observations. Evidence for the existence of such a population of electrons was found in both the Low Energy Charged Particle experiments and Cosmic Ray experiments on Voyager 2.

  15. Three-dimensional MHD modeling of flare-induced waves in coronal loops: thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, Elena; Ofman, Leon; Wang, Tongjiang

    EUV imaging and spectroscopic observations from several space missions (SOHO, TRACE, Hinode/EIS, SDO/AIA) have revealed the presence of MHD waves in solar coronal loops. Past analysis of SOHO/SUMER data suggested that slow magnetosonic waves in hot coronal loops are excited by flares at the loop`s footpoint. Recent Hinode/EIS observed propagating disturbances in active region loops were interpreted as flows as well as waves most likely generated by plasma outflows or jets. In order to understand dynamics of plasma in coronal loops due to flares or jets at the lower corona boundary, we perform full 3D MHD modeling of an active region and consider different mechanisms of wave excitation. We assume an initial equilibrium of the model active region with dipole magnetic field structure, gravitationally stratified density and temperature obtained from polytropic equation of state of the background coronal plasma. We extend previous isothermal studies by including full energy equation with empirical heating and radiative losses terms in the model. We study waves in both, short and long loops, and consider two excitation mechanisms in the model: impulsive plasma injection into the steady plasma upflow along the magnetic field lines, and impulsive heating at the footpoint of the loop. We show initiation and evolution of flows, excitation and damping of waves and flow-wave interaction in the loops. We compare our new results with previous models and observations.

  16. Determining the Importance of Energy Transfer between Magnetospheric Regions via MHD Waves using Constellations of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    This grant was focused on research in two specific areas: (1) development of new techniques and software for assimilation, analysis and visualization of data from multiple satellites making in-situ measurements; and (2) determination of the role of MHD waves in energy transport during storms and substorms. Results were obtained in both areas and presented at national meetings and in publications. The talks and papers that were supported in part or fully by this grant are listed in this paper.

  17. Adiabatic nonlinear waves with trapped particles. II. Wave dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-01-15

    A general nonlinear dispersion relation is derived in a nondifferential form for an adiabatic sinusoidal Langmuir wave in collisionless plasma, allowing for an arbitrary distribution of trapped electrons. The linear dielectric function is generalized, and the nonlinear kinetic frequency shift {omega}{sub NL} is found analytically as a function of the wave amplitude a. Smooth distributions yield {omega}{sub NL}{proportional_to}{radical}(a), as usual. However, beam-like distributions of trapped electrons result in different power laws, or even a logarithmic nonlinearity, which are derived as asymptotic limits of the same dispersion relation. Such beams are formed whenever the phase velocity changes, because the trapped distribution is in autoresonance and thus evolves differently from the passing distribution. Hence, even adiabatic {omega}{sub NL}(a) is generally nonlocal.

  18. Trapping and controlling the dispersive wave within a solitonic well.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhixiang; Fu, Xiquan; Liu, Jun; Zhao, Chujun; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-05-16

    We have numerically studied the effect of mutual interactions between soliton and dispersive waves and the possibility to create a solitonic well consisting of initial twin-solitons moving away from each other to trap the incident dispersive wave. Different from the case of the solitonic cage formed by the velocity-matched twin-solitons, the intense dispersive wave can break up into small pulses, which are almost completely trapped within the solitonic well. Moreover, the corresponding spectrum of the trapped dispersive wave can be narrowed firstly and then expanded, and a new dispersive wave can be generated as the twin-solitons collision occurred. By adjusting either the peak power or temporal width of incident dispersive wave, both the intensity of the collision-induced dispersive wave and the position where it is generated can be controlled. PMID:27409855

  19. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium.

  20. MHD waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Robert

    2006-02-15

    The Sun's magnetic field is responsible for many spectacularly dynamic and intricate phenomena, such as the 11 year solar activity cycle, the hot and tenuous outer atmosphere called the solar corona, and the continuously expanding stream of solar particles known as the solar wind.Recently, there has been an enormous increase in our understanding of the role of solar magnetism in producing the observed complex atmosphere of the Sun. One such advance has occurred in the detection, by several different high-resolution space instruments on-board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer satellites, of magnetic waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The new subjects of solar atmospheric and coronal seismology are undergoing rapid development. The aim of this Scientific Discussion Meeting was to address the progress made through observational, theoretical and numerical studies of wave phenomena in the magnetic solar plasma. Major theoretical and observational advances were reported by a wide range of international scientists and pioneers in this field, followed by lively discussions and poster sessions on the many intriguing questions raised by the new results. Theoretical and observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic waves and oscillations in general, and how these wave phenomena differ in various regions of the Sun, including sunspots, the transient lower atmosphere and the corona (in magnetic loops, plumes and prominences), were addressed through invited review papers and selected poster presentations. The results of these deliberations are collected together in this volume. PMID:16414880

  1. Non-dispersive, accelerated matter-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, Farhan; Naseer, Khalid; Ayub, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    It is shown that under certain dynamical conditions a material wave packet displays coherent, non-dispersive accelerated evolution in gravitational field over a modulated atomic mirror. The phenomenon takes place as a consequence of simultaneous presence of the dynamical localization and the coherent Fermi acceleration for the same modulation amplitude. It is purely a quantum mechanical effect as the windows of modulation strengths supporting dynamical localization and Fermi acceleration overlap for larger effective Planck constant. Present day experimental techniques make it feasible to realize the system in laboratory.

  2. Global MHD modeling of resonant ULF waves: Simulations with and without a plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the plasmaspheric influence on the resonant mode coupling of magnetospheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We present results from two different versions of the model, both driven by the same solar wind conditions: one version that contains a plasmasphere (the LFM coupled to the Rice Convection Model, where the Gallagher plasmasphere model is also included) and another that does not (the stand-alone LFM). We find that the inclusion of a cold, dense plasmasphere has a significant impact on the nature of the simulated ULF waves. For example, the inclusion of a plasmasphere leads to a deeper (more earthward) penetration of the compressional (azimuthal) electric field fluctuations, due to a shift in the location of the wave turning points. Consequently, the locations where the compressional electric field oscillations resonantly couple their energy into local toroidal mode field line resonances also shift earthward. We also find, in both simulations, that higher-frequency compressional (azimuthal) electric field oscillations penetrate deeper than lower frequency oscillations. In addition, the compressional wave mode structure in the simulations is consistent with a radial standing wave oscillation pattern, characteristic of a resonant waveguide. The incorporation of a plasmasphere into the LFM global MHD model represents an advance in the state of the art in regard to ULF wave modeling with such simulations. We offer a brief discussion of the implications for radiation belt modeling techniques that use the electric and magnetic field outputs from global MHD simulations to drive particle dynamics.

  3. Study on evaluation methods for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shi, L.; Tao, X.; Kayen, R.; Shi, H.; Yan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic is the key step for detecting S-wave velocity structure. By comparing the dispersion curves directly with the spectra analysis of surface waves (SASW) method, rather than comparing the S-wave velocity structure, the validity and precision of microtremor-array method (MAM) can be evaluated more objectively. The results from the China - US joint surface wave investigation in 26 sites in Tangshan, China, show that the MAM has the same precision with SASW method in 83% of the 26 sites. The MAM is valid for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic testing and has great application potentiality for site S-wave velocity structure detection.

  4. On the theory of MHD waves in a shear flow of a magnetized turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishonov, Todor M.; Maneva, Yana G.; Dimitrov, Zlatan D.; Hristov, Tihomir S.

    The set of equations for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a shear flow is consecutively derived. This investigation is devoted on the wave heating of space plasmas. The proposed scenario involves the presence of a self-sustained turbulence and magnetic field. In the framework of Langevin--Burgers approach the influence of the turbulence is described by an additional external random force in the MHD system. Kinetic equation for the spectral density of the slow magnetosonic (Alfvénic) mode is derived in the short wavelength (WKB) approximation. The results show a pressing need for conduction of numerical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with a random driver to take into account the influence of the long wavelength modes and to give a more precise analytical assessment of the short ones. Realistic MC calculations for the heating rate and shear stress tensor should give an answer to the perplexing problem for the missing viscosity in accretion disks and reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. It is supposed that the heating mechanism by alfvén waves absorption is common for many kinds of space plasmas from solar corona to active galactic nuclei and the solution of these longstanding puzzles deserves active interdisciplinary research. The work is illustrated by typical solutions of MHD equations and their spectral densities obtained by numerical calculations or by analytical solutions with the help of Heun functions. The amplification coefficient of slow magnetosonic wave in shear flow is analytically calculated. Pictorially speaking, if in WKB approximation we treat Alfvén waves as particles -- this amplification is effect of ``lasing of alfvons.''

  5. MHD waves on solar magnetic flux tubes - Tutorial review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the highly simplified models that have been developed for solar magnetic flux tubes, which are intense photospheric-level fields confined by external gas pressure but able to vary rapidly with height, are presently discussed with emphasis on the torsional Alfven mode's propagation, reflection, and non-WKB properties. The 'sausage' and 'kink' modes described by the thin flux-tube approximation are noted. Attention is also given to the surface waves and resonance absorption of X-ray-emitting loops, as well as to the results of recent work on the resonant instabilities that occur in the presence of bulk flows.

  6. Ultralow frequency MHD waves in Jupiter's middle magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, Krishan K.; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    1989-01-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) magnetohydrodynamic pulsations (periods between 10 and 20 min) were observed on July 8-11, 1979 as Voyager 2 traveled through the middle magnetosphere of Jupiter between radial distances of 10 R(J) and 35 R(J). The particle and magnetic pressure perturbations associated with the waves were anticorrelated. The electron and ion perturbations on the dayside were in phase. The pressure perturbations occurred both within and outside of the plasma sheet. Perturbations in the transverse components of the magnetic field were associated with the compressional perturbations but the transverse power peaked within the plasma sheet of Jupiter and diminished rapidly outside of it.

  7. Is the Alfven-wave propagation effect important for energy decay in homogeneous MHD turbulence?

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Murshed; Gray, Perry C.; Pontius, Duane H. Jr.; Matthaeus, William H.; Oughton, Sean

    1996-07-20

    We investigate the role of three-point decorrelation due to Alfven wave propagation in three-dimensional incompressible homogeneous MHD turbulence. By comparing numerical simulations with theoretical expectations, we have studied how this effect influences the decay of turbulent energy caused by both an external mean magnetic field and the fluctuating turbulent field. Decay is initially suppressed by a mean magnetic field, as expected, but the effect soon saturates. The decay rate does not scale with mean magnetic field for higher values. The disagreement with theoretical predictions can be accounted for by anisotropic spectral transfer. Thus, phenomenological models for energy decay that include decorrelation due to Alfvenic propagation are not substantiated. This work complements our detailed study of various models of energy decay in homogeneous MHD [Hossain et al., 1995].

  8. Dispersive Wave Analysis Using the Chirplet Transform

    SciTech Connect

    Kerber, Florian; Luangvilai, Kritsakorn; Kuttig, Helge; Niethammer, Marc; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2007-03-21

    Time-frequency representations (TFR) are a widely used tool to analyze signals of guided waves such as Lamb waves. As a consequence of the uncertainty principle, however, the resolution in time and frequency is limited for all existing TFR methods. Due to the multi-modal and dispersive character of Lamb waves, displacement or energy related quantities can only be allocated to individual modes when they are well-separated in the time-frequency plane.The chirplet transform (CT) has been introduced as a generalization of both the wavelet and Short-time Fourier transform (STFT). It offers additional degrees of freedom to adjust time-frequency atoms which can be exploited in a model-based approach to match the group delay of individual modes. Thus, more exact allocation of quantities of interest is possible.The objective of this research is to use a previously developed adaptive algorithm based on the CT for nondestructive evaluation. Both numerically and experimentally generated data for a single aluminum plate is analyzed to determine the accuracy and robustness of the new method in comparison the classical STFT.

  9. Study of nonlinear MHD equations governing the wave propagation in twisted coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parhi, S.; DeBruyne, P.; Goossens, M.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    1995-01-01

    The solar corona, modelled by a low beta, resistive plasma slab, sustains MHD wave propagations due to shearing footpoint motions in the photosphere. By using a numerical algorithm the excitation and nonlinear development of MHD waves in twisted coronal loops are studied. The plasma responds to the footpoint motion by sausage waves if there is no twist. The twist in the magnetic field of the loop destroys initially developed sausage-like wave modes and they become kinks. The transition from sausage to kink modes is analyzed. The twist brings about mode degradation producing high harmonics and this generates more complex fine structures. This can be attributed to several local extrema in the perturbed velocity profiles. The Alfven wave produces remnants of the ideal 1/x singularity both for zero and non-zero twist and this pseudo-singularity becomes less pronounced for larger twist. The effect of nonlinearity is clearly observed by changing the amplitude of the driver by one order of magnitude. The magnetosonic waves also exhibit smoothed remnants of ideal logarithmic singularities when the frequency of the driver is correctly chosen. This pseudo-singularity for fast waves is absent when the coronal loop does not undergo any twist but becomes pronounced when twist is included. On the contrary, it is observed for slow waves even if there is no twist. Increasing the twist leads to a higher heating rate of the loop. The larger twist shifts somewhat uniformly distributed heating to layers inside the slab corresponding to peaks in the magnetic field strength.

  10. Weak and strong interactions between dark solitons and dispersive waves.

    PubMed

    Oreshnikov, I; Driben, R; Yulin, A V

    2015-11-01

    The effect of mutual interactions between dark solitons and dispersive waves is investigated numerically and analytically. The condition of the resonant scattering of dispersive waves on dark solitons is derived and compared against the results of the numerical simulations. It is shown that the interaction with intense dispersive waves affects the dynamics of the solitons by accelerating, decelerating, or destroying them. It is also demonstrated that two dark solitons can form a cavity for dispersive waves bouncing between the two dark solitons. The differences of the resonant scattering of the dispersive waves on dark and bright solitons are discussed. In particular, we demonstrate that two dark solitons and a dispersive wave bouncing in between them create a solitonic cavity with convex "mirrors," unlike the concave "mirror" in the case of bright solitons. PMID:26512471

  11. Fast Wave Trains Associated with Solar Eruptions: Insights from 3D Thermodynamic MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Liu, W.; Torok, T.; Linker, J.; Mikic, Z.; Ofman, L.

    2015-12-01

    EUV imaging observations during the SDO/AIA era have provided new insights into a variety of wave phenomena occurring in the low solar corona. One example is the observation of quasi-periodic, fast-propagating wave trains that are associated with solar eruptions, including flares and CMEs. While there has been considerable progress in understanding such waves from both an observational and theoretical perspective, it remains a challenge to pin down their physical origin. In this work, we detail our results from a case-study 3D thermodynamic MHD simulation of a coronal mass ejection where quasi-periodic wave trains are generated during the simulated eruption. We find a direct correlation between the onset of non-steady reconnection in the flare current sheet and the generation of quasi-periodic wave train signatures when patchy, collimated downflows interact with the flare arcade. Via forward modeling of SDO/AIA observables, we explore how the appearance of the wave trains is affected by line-of-sight integration and the multi-thermal nature of the coronal medium. We also examine how the wave trains themselves are channeled by natural waveguides formed in 3D by the non-uniform background magnetic field. While the physical association of the reconnection dynamics to the generation of quasi-periodic wave trains appears to be a compelling result, unanswered questions posed from recent observations as well as future prospects will be discussed.

  12. On the Properties of Slow MHD Sausage Waves within Small-scale Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freij, N.; Dorotovič, I.; Morton, R. J.; Ruderman, M. S.; Karlovský, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of magnetoacoustic waves in magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere is well-documented. Applying the technique of solar magneto-seismology (SMS) allows us to infer the background properties of these structures. Here, we aim to identify properties of the observed magnetoacoustic waves and study the background properties of magnetic structures within the lower solar atmosphere. Using the Dutch Open Telescope and Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere instruments, we captured two series of high-resolution intensity images with short cadences of two isolated magnetic pores. Combining wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD), we determined characteristic periods within the cross-sectional (i.e., area) and intensity time series. Then, by applying the theory of linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we identified the mode of these oscillations within the MHD framework. Several oscillations have been detected within these two magnetic pores. Their periods range from 3 to 20 minutes. Combining wavelet analysis and EMD enables us to confidently find the phase difference between the area and intensity oscillations. From these observed features, we concluded that the detected oscillations can be classified as slow sausage MHD waves. Furthermore, we determined several key properties of these oscillations such as the radial velocity perturbation, the magnetic field perturbation, and the vertical wavenumber using SMS. The estimated range of the related wavenumbers reveals that these oscillations are trapped within these magnetic structures. Our results suggest that the detected oscillations are standing harmonics, and this allows us to estimate the expansion factor of the waveguides by employing SMS. The calculated expansion factor ranges from 4 to 12.

  13. Diffractive wave transmission in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescarret, Vincent

    The aim of this paper is to study the reflection-transmission of diffractive geometrical optic rays described by semi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems such as the Maxwell-Lorentz equations with the anharmonic model of polarization. The framework is that of P. Donnat's thesis [P. Donnat, Quelques contributions mathématiques en optique non linéaire, chapters 1 and 2, thèse, 1996] and V. Lescarret [V. Lescarret, Wave transmission in dispersive media, M3AS 17 (4) (2007) 485-535]: we consider an infinite WKB expansion of the wave over long times/distances O(1/ɛ) and because of the boundary, we decompose each profile into a hyperbolic (purely oscillating) part and elliptic (evanescent) part as in M. William [M. William, Boundary layers and glancing blow-up in nonlinear geometric optics, Ann. Sci. École Norm. Sup. 33 (2000) 132-209]. Then to get the usual sublinear growth on the hyperbolic part of the profiles, for every corrector, we consider E, the space of bounded functions decomposing into a sum of pure transports and a "quasi compactly" supported part. We make a detailed analysis on the nonlinear interactions on E which leads us to make a restriction on the set of resonant phases. We finally give a convergence result which justifies the use of "quasi compactly" supported profiles.

  14. Ultra-High-Resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, D. B.; Verth, G.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter reviews the recent observations of waves and oscillations manifesting in fine-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere, which are often interpreted as the "building blocks' of the magnetic Sun. The authors found, through phase relationships between the various waveforms, that small-scale magnetic bright points (MBPs) in the photosphere demonstrated signatures of specific magnetoacoustic waves, in particular the sausage and kink modes. Modern magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the lower solar atmosphere clearly show how torsional motions can easily be induced in magnetic elements in the photosphere through the processes of vortical motions and/or buffeting by neighboring granules. The authors detected significant power associated with high-frequency horizontal motions, and suggested that these cases may be especially important in the creation of a turbulent environment that efficiently promotes Alfvén wave dissipation.

  15. Study of Magnetorotational Instability and MHD Surface Waves in Liquid Gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Chen, F.; Kageyama, A.; Goodman, J.; Shoshan, E.; Rappaport, H.; Borg, M.; Halcrow, J.

    2002-11-01

    Two liquid gallium experiments have been constructed in PPPL to study basic MHD physics related to astrophysics and fusion sciences. The first experiment focuses on laboratory studies of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a rotating gallium disk or a short Couette flow geometry. The MRI has been proposed as a dominant mechanism for fast angular momentum transport in electrically-conducting accretion disks ranging from quasars and X-ray binaries to cataclysmic variables and perhaps even protoplanetary disks. Experiments using a prototype water disk has revealed importance of Ekman circulation, consistent with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. A revised design using multiple rings at each end of the flow are being implemented. The second experiment focuses on MHD surface waves in a large liquid gallium pool. It has been found that the damping rates of driven 1D surface waves propogating along a magnetic field are consistent with linear theory. The parametric excitation of 2D surface waves is being studied to elucidate effects of a horizonally imposed magnetic field on the dynamics of pattern formation. Detailed results will be presented for both experiments and implications to astrophysics and to the liquid metal wall concept in fusion reactors will be discussed. This work is supported by DoE.

  16. Stirring Coronal Spaghetti: Exploring Multiple Interactions Between MHD Waves and Density Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2016-05-01

    The solar corona has been revealed in the past few decades to be a highly dynamic nonequilibrium plasma environment. Both the loop-filled coronal base and the extended acceleration region of the solar wind appear to be strongly turbulent, and models that invoke the dissipation of incompressible Alfvenic fluctuations have had some success in explaining the heating. However, many of these models neglect the mounting evidence that density and pressure variations may play an important role in the mass and energy balance of this system. In this presentation I will briefly review observations of both compressible and incompressible MHD fluctuations in the corona and solar wind, and discuss future prospects with DKIST. I will also attempt to outline the many ways that these different fluctuation modes have been proposed to interact with one another -- usually with an eye on finding ways to enhance their dissipation and heating. One under-appreciated type of interaction is the fact that Alfven waves will undergo multiple reflections and refractions in a "background plasma" filled with localized density fluctuations. It is becoming increasingly clear that models must not only include the effects of longitudinal variability (e.g., magnetoacoustic waves and pulse-like jets) but also transverse "striations" that appear naturally in a structured magnetic field with small-scale footpoint variability. Future off-limb observations, such as those with DKIST's Cryo-NIRSP instrument, will be crucial for providing us with a detailed census of MHD waves and their mutual interactions in the corona.

  17. Possible signatures of nonlinear MHD waves in the solar wind: UVCS observations and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Romoli, M.; Davila, J. M.; Poletto, G.; Kohl, J.; Noci, G.

    1997-01-01

    Recent ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) white light channel observations are discussed. These data indicated quasi-periodic variations in the polarized brightness in the polar coronal holes. The Fourier power spectrum analysis showed significant peaks at about six minutes and possible fluctuations on longer time scales. The observations are consistent with the predictions of the nonlinear solitary-like wave model. The purpose of a planned study on plume and inter-plume regions of coronal holes, motivated by the result of a 2.5 magnetohydrodynamic model (MHD), is explained.

  18. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. III - Effect of equilibrium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.; Sakurai, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    The Hollweg et al. (1990) analysis of MHD surface waves in a stationary equilibrium is extended. The conservation laws and jump conditions at Alfven and slow resonance points obtained by Sakurai et al. (1990) are generalized to include an equilibrium flow, and the assumption that the Eulerian perturbation of total pressure is constant is recovered as the special case of the conservation law for an equilibrium with straight magnetic field lines and flow along the magnetic field lines. It is shown that the conclusions formulated by Hollweg et al. are still valid for the straight cylindrical case. The effect of curvature is examined.

  19. Localization of Dispersive Alfvén Wave in Solar wind plasmas and Turbulent Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind turbulence at large inertial scales is well known for decades and believed to consist of Alfvén cascade. The inertial range of Solar wind turbulence can be described by a magnetohydrodynamic model. But at small scales the MHD description is not valid. At scales of the order of proton inertial length, Alfvén cascade excites kinetic Alfvén wave or fast wave or whistler wave that carries wave energy to smaller scales. On the other hand, parallel propagating right(R) and left(L) circularly polarized Alfvén/ ion cyclotron wave in the framework of Hall MHD are also thought to be essential ingredients of the solar wind turbulence. Recently, He et.al[1] have used the magnetic field data from the STEREO spacecraft to calculate the magnetic helicities in the solar wind turbulence and reported the possible existence of Alfvén -cyclotron waves and their coexistence with the right handed polarized fluctuations. In the present article we intend to study the right circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) and their role in the solar wind turbulence. The inclusion of the Hall term causes the dispersion of the AW which, in the present study, is considered on account of the finite frequency (frequency comparable to ion gyro frequency) of the pump wave. Filamentation instability has been reported to occur for the case of circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) propagating parallel to ambient magnetic field. In the present study, the instability arises on account of the transverse density perturbations of the acoustic wave that may couple nonlinearly with the Alfvén wave and the driven ponderomotive force sequentially leads to growth of density perturbations. Numerical simulation involves finite difference method for the time domain and pseudo spectral method for the spatial domain. The power spectrum is investigated which shows a steepening for scales larger than the proton inertial length. These findings have been reported by Alexandrova et al

  20. Amplitude-dependent Lamb wave dispersion in nonlinear plates.

    PubMed

    Packo, Pawel; Uhl, Tadeusz; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Leamy, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a perturbation approach for calculating amplitude-dependent Lamb wave dispersion in nonlinear plates. Nonlinear dispersion relationships are derived in closed form using a hyperelastic stress-strain constitutive relationship, the Green-Lagrange strain measure, and the partial wave technique integrated with a Lindstedt-Poincaré perturbation approach. Solvability conditions are derived using an operator formalism with inner product projections applied against solutions to the adjoint problem. When applied to the first- and second-order problems, these solvability conditions lead to amplitude-dependent, nonlinear dispersion corrections for frequency as a function of wavenumber. Numerical simulations verify the predicted dispersion shifts for an example nonlinear plate. The analysis and identification of amplitude-dependent, nonlinear Lamb wave dispersion complements recent research focusing on higher harmonic generation and internally resonant waves, which require precise dispersion relationships for frequency-wavenumber matching. PMID:27586758

  1. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES AND CORONAL HEATING: UNIFYING EMPIRICAL AND MHD TURBULENCE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Van der Holst, Bart; Oran, Rona; Jin, Meng; Manchester, Ward B. IV; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Downs, Cooper; Roussev, Ilia I.; Evans, Rebekah M.

    2013-02-10

    We present a new global model of the solar corona, including the low corona, the transition region, and the top of the chromosphere. The realistic three-dimensional magnetic field is simulated using the data from the photospheric magnetic field measurements. The distinctive feature of the new model is incorporating MHD Alfven wave turbulence. We assume this turbulence and its nonlinear dissipation to be the only momentum and energy source for heating the coronal plasma and driving the solar wind. The difference between the turbulence dissipation efficiency in coronal holes and that in closed field regions is because the nonlinear cascade rate degrades in strongly anisotropic (imbalanced) turbulence in coronal holes (no inward propagating wave), thus resulting in colder coronal holes, from which the fast solar wind originates. The detailed presentation of the theoretical model is illustrated with the synthetic images for multi-wavelength EUV emission compared with the observations from SDO AIA and STEREO EUVI instruments for the Carrington rotation 2107.

  2. Dispersion analysis for broadband guided wave using generalized warblet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Peng, Z. K.; Zhang, W. M.; Meng, G.; Lang, Z. Q.

    2016-04-01

    Dispersive properties of guided waves (GW), which indicate the group velocity of the wave varies with the frequency, have been widely investigated in many applications. The broadband GW is usually highly dispersive and multimodal, which is a good candidate for time-frequency analysis (TFA). In the time-frequency (TF) domain, the dispersion trajectory of a dispersive single-modal wave, which is a function of frequency, corresponds to its frequency-dependent dispersion law. To analyze such highly dispersive and multimodal broadband guided wave (HDMB-GW) effectively, we proposed a generalized warblet transform (GWT) based TFA method, which comprises the GWT and a mode separation procedure. Advantages of the proposed method include distinguishing and obtaining the dispersion trajectories of highly dispersive and overlapped modes of the HDMB-GW in the TF domain. Comparing with the existing TFA methods, the proposed method is more suitable for the HDMB-GW, especially when the dispersion trajectories of different modes intersect with each other. Both the simulated and experimental analysis on Lamb waves verified the effectiveness of the proposed method in the dispersion analysis for the HDMB-GW.

  3. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS AND MINERAL FINES ON CRUDE OIL DISPERSION IN A WAVE TANK UNDER BREAKING WAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the ...

  4. The energy flux of MHD wave modes excited by realistic photospheric drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedun, Viktor; Von Fay-Siebenburgen, Erdélyi Robert; Mumford, Stuart

    The mechanism(s) responsible for solar coronal heating are still an unresolved and challenging task. In the framework of 3D numerical modelling of MHD wave excitation and propagation in the strongly stratified solar atmosphere we analyse the mode coupling and estimate the wave energy partition which can be supplied to the upper layers of the solar atmosphere by locally decomposed slow, fast and Alfven modes. These waves are excited by a number of realistic photospheric drivers which are mimicking the random granular buffeting, the coherent global solar oscillations and swirly motion observed in e.g. magnetic bright points. Based on a self-similar approach, a realistic magnetic flux tubes configuration is constructed and implemented in the VALIIIC model of the solar atmosphere. A novel method for decomposing the velocity perturbations into parallel, perpendicular and azimuthal components in 3D geometry is developed using field lines to trace a volume of constant energy flux. This method is used to identify the excited wave modes propagating upwards from the photosphere and to compute the percentage energy contribution of each mode. We have found, that for all cases where torsional motion is present, the main contribution to the flux (60%) is by Alfven wave. In the case of the vertical driver it is found to mainly excite the fast- and slow-sausage modes and a horizontal driver primarily excites the slow kink mode.

  5. STUDY ON DISPERSION OF LONGITUDINAL ELASTIC WAVES IN ROCK SPECIMENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Satoshi; Ohnishi, Yuzo; Yano, Takao; Takahashi, Manabu; Yoshimura, Kimitaka; Ando, Ken-Ichi

    In order to estimate the permeable properties and pore fluid properties in the ground, survey methods using dispersion and attenuation of elastic waves have been developed. The Biot theory have been applied to the frequency-dependent dispersion data, but the influence of geological properties on velocity dispersion and the relation between the permeable properties and velocity dispersion in rock specimens have not become clear. Sedimentary rock and granite specimens were tested using longitudinal waves for the difference of velocity dispersion phenomena observed in each specimen, and we examine whether the Biot theory can be applied to observed experimental data. Moreover, we tried to estimate the permeability of the rock specimen based on the theory and show that the Biot-squirt theory can be applied to estimating rock permeability using the seismic wave dispersion characteristics.

  6. The properties of MHD waves and instabilities in solar plasmas with anisotropic temperature and thermal fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Dzhalilov, Namig

    As confirmed by observations, the temperature anisotropy relative to the magnetic field and the thermal fluxes are typical characteristics of the collisionless and magnetized plasma of the solar corona and solar wind. The properties of such plasma are described in terms of the anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics based on the kinetic equation under the 16-moment approximation. MHD waves and instabilities in the collisionless solar plasma have been analyzed under the aforementioned approximation taking into account the anisotropy of the plasma pressure along and across the magnetic field and the thermal flux along the field. It is established that the thermal flux results in the asymmetry of phase velocities of the compressible wave modes with respect to the outer magnetic field, in a strong interaction between the modes (particularly, between the retrograde modes propagating against the magnetic field), and in oscillatory in-stability of these modes. The thresholds of the mirror and fire-hose instabilities coincide with their kinetic expressions; the increments coincide qualitatively. At a certain propagation angle, the resonance interaction of three retrograde modes (fast sound, slow magnetosound, and slow sound ones) under the occurrence conditions of the classical aperiodic fire-hose instability gives rise to the oscillatory "fire-hose" instability of compressible modes, whose maximum increment may exceed the maximum increment of the classical fire-hose instability. A good agreement of the results obtained in terms of anisotropic MHD with the low-frequency limit of the kinetic description allows us to consider the applied approximation adequate for the description of large-scale dynamics of collisionless anisotropic solar plasma and to use it in the study of waves and instabilities in magnetic tubes and other magnetic features in the solar corona, magnetic reconnection, etc.

  7. Effects of spatial transport and ambient wave intensity on the generation of MHD waves by interstellar pickup protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Intense MHD waves generated by the isotropization of interstellar pickup protons were predicted by Lee and Ip (1987) to appear in the solar wind whenever pickup proton fluxes were high enough. However, in reality these waves have proved surprisingly difficult to identify, even in the presence of observed pickup protons. We investigate the wave excitation by isotropization from an initially broad pitch-angle distribution instead of the narrow ring-beam assumed by Lee and Ip. The pitch angle of a newly-ionized proton is given by theta(sub o), the angle between the magnetic field (averaged over a pickup proton gyroradius) and the solar wind flow at the time of ionization. Then, a broadened distribution results from spatial transport of pickup protons prior to isotropization from regions upstream along the field containing different values of theta(sub o). The value of theta(sub o) will vary as a result of the ambient long-wavelength fluctuations in the solar wind. Thus, the range of initial pitch-angles is directly related to the amplitude of these fluctuations within a length-scale determined by the isotropization time. We show that a broad initial pitch-angle distribution can significantly modify the intensity and shape of the pickup-proton-generated wave spectrum, and we derive a criterion for the presence of observable pickup-proton generated waves given the intensity of the ambient long wavelength fluctuations.

  8. Long Distance Dispersal and Accelerating Waves of Disease: Empirical Relationships

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological invasions have substantial ecological and economic impacts. Classic approaches to modeling biological invasions predict "traveling waves" with invasion fronts of constant velocity that are determined by an organism's reproductive capacity and its dispersal ability. These approaches are ba...

  9. MHD nature of ionospheric wave packets generated by the solar terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, E. L.; Edemsky, I. K.; Voeykov, S. V.; Yasukevich, Yu. V.; Zhivetiev, I. V.

    2010-02-01

    The morphology of medium-scale traveling wave packets is for the first time presented based on the total electron content (TEC), measured at the global network of GPS receivers (up to 1500 stations) during the long period (from 1998 to 2007) and at the GPS/GEONET dense Japan network (1220 stations) in 2008—2009. In the time domain, these packets are chains of narrowband TEC variations (trains) with a duration of about 1—2 h, a total duration of up to 6 h, and a variation period of 10—30 min. In the winter Northern Hemisphere, traveling wave packets are observed mostly 3 h after the passage of the morning solar terminator. In the equinox they appear after the passage of the solar terminator without a pronounced delay or advance. In summer traveling wave packets are registered 1.5—2 h before the appearance of the evening solar terminator at the observation point when the solar terminator passes in the magnetically conjugate region. The spatial structure of traveling wave packets is characterized by a high degree of anisotropy and coherence at a distance larger than ten wavelengths (the wavelength is 100—300 km). A high quality of the oscillatory system and synchronization with the appearance of the solar terminator at the observation point and in the magnetically conjugate region indicate that the generation of traveling wave packets by the solar terminator is of the MHD nature. Our results for the first time experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the solar terminator generates ion sound waves, proposed by Huba et al. [2000b].

  10. Shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2013-07-01

    The reported compressional wave speed dispersion and attenuation could be explained by a modified gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model). In contrast, shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation have not been investigated in detail. No measurements of shear wave speed dispersion have been reported, and only Brunson's data provide the frequency characteristics of shear wave attenuation. In this study, Brunson's attenuation measurements are compared to predictions using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the BIMGS model accurately predicts the frequency dependence of shear wave attenuation. Then, the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand are measured in the frequency range of 4-20 kHz. The vertical stress applied to the sample is 17.6 kPa. The temperature of the sample is set to be 5 °C, 20 °C, and 35 °C in order to change the relaxation frequency in the BIMGS model. The measured results are compared with those calculated using the Biot-Stoll model and the BIMGS model. It is shown that the shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation are predicted accurately by using the BIMGS model. PMID:23862793

  11. Nonlinear Waves in Hall MHD: Analysis and Comparison to Known Linear Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, Jesse; Mahajan, Swadesh; Dorland, William

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a novel set of nonlinear waves were found to satisfy the Hall-Magnetohydrodynamic (HMHD) equations. The Mahajan-Krishan solution is a generalization of the classic Walén Nonlinear Alvén wave, of the form b=±αv. The implications of this mode are studied, including polarization and superposition. In particular, the gyrokinetic limit (k_⊥≫ k_\\|) is used in an attempt to match the MK wave to known Kinetic Alfvén waves and introduce FLR effects.

  12. Experimental investigation of two oil dispersion pathways by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Katz, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    This experimental study focuses on generation and size distribution of airborne and subsurface oil droplets as breaking surface waves interact with a crude oil slick (MC252 surrogate). Experiments in a specialized wave tank investigate the effects of wave height and wave properties (e.g. spilling vs. plunging), as well as drastically reducing the oil-water interfacial tension by orders of magnitude by introducing dispersant (Coexist 9500-A). This dispersant is applied at varying dispersant-to-oil ratios either by premixing or surface spraying, the latter consistent with typical application. The data include high-speed visualizations of processes affecting the entrainment of subsurface oil and bubbles as well as airborne aerosols. High-speed digital holographic cinematography is employed to track the droplet trajectories, and quantify the droplet size distributions above and below the surface. Introduction of dispersants drastically reduces the size of subsurface droplets to micron and even submicron levels. Ahead of the wave, the 25 μm (our present resolution limit) to 2 mm airborne droplet trajectories are aligned with the wave direction. Behind the wave, these droplets reverse their direction, presumably due to the airflow above the wave. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  13. Spectral-temporal analysis of dispersive wave generation in photonic crystal fibers of different dispersion slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Han, Fang; Hu, Hui; Wang, Weibin; Zeng, Qilin

    2014-03-01

    Based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we present a numerical investigation of dispersive wave generation in photonic crystal fibers pumped with femtosecond pulses in the anomalous dispersion region. Both positive dispersion slope and negative dispersion slope for pump wavelength are studied. It is demonstrated that the wavelength of the dispersive wave can be blue-shifted or red-shifted relative to the center wavelength of the soliton, depending on the dispersion slope of the pump wavelength. The spectral-temporal dynamics of dispersive wave generation is shown using the cross-correlation frequency-resolved optical gating (X-FROG) technique, which is numerically computed with a windowed Fourier transform. Further, we find a phenomenon that the X-FROG spectrogram of the corresponding output signal exhibits a parabolic shape, which is consistent with the wavelength dependence of the group delay. In particular, the phenomenon of soliton trapping of the dispersive wave is observed with an increase of pump power.

  14. High resolution surface wave dispersion studies in China

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.E.; Patton, H.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory regional calibration project is actively assembling a database of surface-wave dispersion information for China and surrounding areas. As part of the effort to characterize surface wave dispersion in China, we integrate prior long period results from the University of Colorado with our shorter period dispersion measurements in a high resolution survey of key monitoring areas. Focusing on western China initially, we employ broadband data recorded on CDSN stations, and regional events (m{sub b} 4 and above). Our approach is twofold, employing path specific calibration of key stations and well-recorded reference events, and tomographic inference to provide group velocity curves for regions with sparse station distribution and little seismic activity. Initial dispersion studies at Chinese stations WMQ and LZH show substantial azimuthal variation in dispersion, reinforcing the need for careful determination of source regions for path-specific calibration.

  15. Seismic waves velocity dispersion: An indicator of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, M.B.; Ryjkov, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    VSP data recorded in eleven wells located in different geological conditions were analyzed for studying the phase velocity dispersion of seismic waves. Strong positive dispersion (velocity increases with rising frequency) with the intensity of between 1.7 and 5.0% was obtained in all productive wells in depths of oil and gas pools. The close correlation between local increasing of velocity dispersion and absorption occurred in most cases. Background level of velocity dispersion with both signs (less then {+-}1.0%) which the authors consider as a level of mistakes was observed outside productive intervals and in ``dry`` wells. Modeling has shown that pseudodispersion caused by layered media may attain {+-}0.5% and, besides, curves of pseudodispersion and pseudoabsorption exhibit no correlation. Analysis of seismic waves dispersion together with the absorption may provide with reliable indicators of hydrocarbon pools.

  16. Perturbation approach to dispersion curves calculation for nonlinear Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of elastic wave propagation in nonlinear media has gained recent research attention due to the recognition of their amplitude-dependent behavior. This creates opportunities for increased accuracy of damage detection and localization, development of new structural monitoring strategies, and design of new structures with desirable acoustic behavior (e.g., amplitude-dependent frequency bandgaps, wave beaming, and filtering). This differs from more traditional nonlinear analysis approaches which target the prediction of higher harmonic growth. Of particular interest in this work is the analysis of amplitude-dependent shifts in Lamb wave dispersion curves. Typically, dispersion curves are calculated for nominally linear material parameters and geometrical features of a waveguide, even when the constitutive law is nonlinear. Instead, this work employs a Lindstedt - Poincare perturbation approach to calculate amplitude-dependent dispersion curves, and shifts thereof, for nonlinearly-elastic plates. As a result, a set of first order corrections to frequency (or equivalently wavenumber) are calculated. These corrections yield significant amplitude dependence in the spectral characteristics of the calculated waves, especially for high frequency waves, which differs fundamentally from linear analyses. Numerical simulations confirm the analytical shifts predicted. Recognition of this amplitude-dependence in Lamb wave dispersion may suggest, among other things, that the analysis of guided wave propagation phenomena within a fully nonlinear framework needs to revisit mode-mode energy flux and higher harmonics generation conditions.

  17. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. I - Connection formulae at the resonant surfaces. II - Absorption of sound waves by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, Takashi; Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1991-01-01

    The present method of addressing the resonance problems that emerge in such MHD phenomena as the resonant absorption of waves at the Alfven resonance point avoids solving the fourth-order differential equation of dissipative MHD by recourse to connection formulae across the dissipation layer. In the second part of this investigation, the absorption of solar 5-min oscillations by sunspots is interpreted as the resonant absorption of sounds by a magnetic cylinder. The absorption coefficient is interpreted (1) analytically, under certain simplifying assumptions, and numerically, under more general conditions. The observed absorption coefficient magnitude is explained over suitable parameter ranges.

  18. Wave-vector dispersion versus angular-momentum dispersion of collective modes in small metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekardt, W.

    1987-09-01

    The wave-vector dispersion of collective modes in small particles is investigated within the time-dependent local-density approximation as applied to a self-consistent jellium particle. It is shown that the dispersion of the volume plasmons can be understood from that in an infinite electron gas. For a given multipole an optimum wave vector exists for the quasiresonant excitation of the volume mode but not for the surface mode. It is pointed out that-for the volume modes-the hydrodynamic approximation gives a reasonable first guess for the relation between frequencies and size-quantized wave vectors.

  19. Dispersion Relation of Linear Waves in Quantum Magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    The quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model is applied in investigating the propagation of linear waves in quantum magnetoplasmas. Using the QMHD model, the dispersion equation for quantum magnetoplasmas and the dispersion relations of linear waves are deduced. Results show that quantum effects affect the propagation of electron plasma waves and extraordinary waves (X waves). When we select the plasma parameters of the laser-based plasma compression (LBPC) schemes for calculation, the quantum correction cannot be neglected. Meanwhile, the corrections produced by the Fermi degeneracy pressure and Bohm potential are compared under different plasma parameter conditions. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11447125) and the Research Training Program for Undergraduates of Shanxi University of China (Nos. 2014012167, 2015013182)

  20. Analysis of Dispersive Landslide Tsunami Waves in the Lagrangian Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L. A.; Mei, C.; Alam, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis' inundation heights must be accurately and efficiently predicted for a timely evacuation of coastal populations exposed to such hazardous incidents. To achieve this, approximate models have been developed for an efficient estimation of the wave propagation and runup on the world shorelines. The accuracy of these approximate models is yet a matter of dispute in regard to how much dispersion and nonlinearity should be included, and to how well the runup phenomenon is resolved. The linear shallow-water model-equation is widely used for runup predictions because it is computationally efficient. However, its lack of dispersive properties is known to adversely affect the correct prediction of wave height and arrival time. The Boussinesq set of equations considers weak dispersive and nonlinear effects and, despite being computationally more expensive, has a much better accuracy. The balance between dispersive and nonlinear effects is of significant importance for the problem of landslide generated tsunamis because such nonlinear waves have a relatively small horizontal length scale (wave length) compared to the domain of propagation. This renders dispersive effects a lot more pronounced than in the case of earthquake tsunamis. Here we compare the runup predictions of a linear shallow-water, Boussinesq (weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity) and fully nonlinear Boussinesq model (weak dispersion, no assumption on nonlinearity) for various landslide tsunami scenarios. The equations are derived in the Lagrangian framework to allow for an accurate calculation of the runup. Contrary to Eulerian models, long-wave models in Lagrangian framework can be arranged to yield a system of partial-differential equations for the vertical and horizontal displacements of the free-surface. These evolutionary equations are then solved using a finite-difference scheme for time integration and spatial differentiation. The effect of a ridge on a long-wave train climbing up a beach is

  1. Viscous Fluid Conduits as a Prototypical Nonlinear Dispersive Wave Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, Nicholas K.

    This thesis is devoted to the comprehensive characterization of slowly modulated, nonlinear waves in dispersive media for physically-relevant systems using a threefold approach: analytical, long-time asymptotics, careful numerical simulations, and quantitative laboratory experiments. In particular, we use this interdisciplinary approach to establish a two-fluid, interfacial fluid flow setting known as viscous fluid conduits as an ideal platform for the experimental study of truly one dimensional, unidirectional solitary waves and dispersively regularized shock waves (DSWs). Starting from the full set of fluid equations for mass and linear momentum conservation, we use a multiple-scales, perturbation approach to derive a scalar, nonlinear, dispersive wave equation for the leading order interfacial dynamics of the system. Using a generalized form of the approximate model equation, we use numerical simulations and an analytical, nonlinear wave averaging technique, Whitham-El modulation theory, to derive the key physical features of interacting large amplitude solitary waves and DSWs. We then present the results of quantitative, experimental investigations into large amplitude solitary wave interactions and DSWs. Overtaking interactions of large amplitude solitary waves are shown to exhibit nearly elastic collisions and universal interaction geometries according to the Lax categories for KdV solitons, and to be in excellent agreement with the dynamics described by the approximate asymptotic model. The dispersive shock wave experiments presented here represent the most extensive comparison to date between theory and data of the key wavetrain parameters predicted by modulation theory. We observe strong agreement. Based on the work in this thesis, viscous fluid conduits provide a well-understood, controlled, table-top environment in which to study universal properties of dispersive hydrodynamics. Motivated by the study of wave propagation in the conduit system, we

  2. The Foggy EUV Corona and Coronal Heating by MHD Waves from Explosive Reconnection Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Falconer, David A.

    2008-01-01

    In 0.5 arcsec/pixel TRACE coronal EUV images, the corona rooted in active regions that are at the limb and are not flaring is seen to consist of (1) a complex array of discrete loops and plumes embedded in (2) a diffuse ambient component that shows no fine structure and gradually fades with height. For each of two not-flaring active regions, found that the diffuse component is (1) approximately isothermal and hydrostatic and (2) emits well over half of the total EUV luminosity of the active-region corona. Here, from a TRACE Fe XII coronal image of another not-flaring active region, the large sunspot active region AR 10652 when it was at the west limb on 30 July 2004, we separate the diffuse component from the discrete loop component by spatial filtering, and find that the diffuse component has about 60% of the total luminosity. If under much higher spatial resolution than that of TRACE (e. g., the 0.1 arcsec/pixel resolution of the Hi-C sounding-rocket experiment proposed by J. W. Cirtain et al), most of the diffuse component remains diffuse rather being resolved into very narrow loops and plumes, this will raise the possibility that the EUV corona in active regions consists of two basically different but comparably luminous components: one being the set of discrete bright loops and plumes and the other being a truly diffuse component filling the space between the discrete loops and plumes. This dichotomy would imply that there are two different but comparably powerful coronal heating mechanisms operating in active regions, one for the distinct loops and plumes and another for the diffuse component. We present a scenario in which (1) each discrete bright loop or plume is a flux tube that was recently reconnected in a burst of reconnection, and (2) the diffuse component is heated by MHD waves that are generated by these reconnection events and by other fine-scale explosive reconnection events, most of which occur in and below the base of the corona where they are

  3. P-wave dispersion: What we know till now?

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    P-wave dispersion is defined as the difference between the maximum and the minimum P-wave duration recorded from multiple different-surface ECG leads. It has been known that increased P-wave duration and P-wave dispersion reflect prolongation of intraatrial and interatrial conduction time and the inhomogeneous propagation of sinus impulses, which are well-known electrophysiologic characteristics in patients with atrial arrhythmias and especially paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Extensive clinical evaluation of P-wave dispersion has been performed in the assessment of the risk for atrial fibrillation in patients without apparent heart disease, in hypertensives, in patients with coronary artery disease, in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, in patients with congenital heart diseases, as well as in other groups of patients suffering from various cardiac or non-cardiac diseases. In this paper, we aimed to summarize the measurement methods, current use in different clinical situations, strengths and limitations of the of P-wave dispersion. PMID:27081484

  4. The dispersion of parametrically excited surface waves in viscous ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Hanns Walter

    1999-07-01

    Surface waves on a ferrofluid, which is exposed to a normal magnetic field, may exhibit a non-monotonous behavior. Stationary standing waves can be excited mechanically by a vertical vibration of the vessel, or magnetically by a modulation of the applied field. A linear stability analysis for the onset of these parametrically excited waves is presented. It will be shown that a careful choice of the filling depth allows for a detection of the anomalous dispersion branch. Furthermore, a theoretical confirmation is provided for the synchronous wave response, recently observed in a magnetic Faraday experiment.

  5. Dispersion and phase shifts of torsional waves in forward models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. A.; Livermore, P. W.; Mound, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Torsional Alfvén waves have been thought to exist in the Earth's core since their theoretical prediction by Braginsky in 1970. More recently, they have been inferred from observations of secular variation and length of day, and also observed in geodynamo simulations. These inferences from geophysical data have provided an important means of estimating core properties such as viscosity and internal magnetic field strength. We produce 1D forward models of torsional waves in the Earth's core, also known as torsional oscillations, and study their evolution in a cylinder, a full sphere and an equatorially symmetric spherical shell. The key features of torsional waves in our models are: geometric dispersion, phase shifts and internal reflections. In all three core geometries, we find that travelling torsional waves undergo significant geometric dispersion that increases with successive reflections from the boundaries such that an initial wave pulse becomes unidentifiable within three transits of the core. This dispersion partly arises due to low amplitude wakes trailing behind sharply defined pulses during propagation, a phenomenon that is linked to the failure of Huygens' principle in the geometric setting of torsional waves. We investigate the relationship between geometric dispersion and wavelength, concluding that long wavelength features are more dispersive than short wavelength features. This result is particularly important because torsional waves inferred from secular variation are relatively long wavelength, and are therefore likely to undergo significant dispersion within the Earth's core. Torsional waves in all three geometries are reflected at the equator of the core-mantle boundary with the same sign as the incident wave, but display more complicated behaviour at the rotation axis. In a cylindrical core, the analytic solutions to the torsional wave equation are known. We use these to derive an expression for the phase shift that torsional waves undergo upon

  6. Langmuir wave dispersion relation in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2010-05-15

    The Langmuir wave dispersion relation is derived in partially ionized plasmas, where free electrons are confined to move in a nearest neighbor ions' potential well. The equilibrium velocity distribution function experiences then, a departure from Maxwell distribution function. The effect of the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function on the Langmuir phase and group velocities as well as the phase matching conditions and the nonlinear growth rate of decay instability is investigated. The proposed Langmuir wave dispersion relation is relevant to dense and cryogenic plasmas.

  7. Refractive phenomena in the shock wave dispersion with variable gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.

    2010-06-15

    In this article the refraction effects in the weak shock wave (SW) dispersion on an interface with a temperature variation between two mediums are described. In the case of a finite-gradient boundary, the effect of the SW dispersion is remarkably stronger than in the case of a step change in parameters. In the former case the vertical component of velocity for the transmitted SW (the refraction effect) must be taken into account. Results of comparative calculations based on the two-dimensional model corrected for the refraction effect show significant differences in the shapes of the dispersed SW fronts.

  8. Observation of dispersive wave emission by temporal cavity solitons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae K; Erkintalo, Miro; Murdoch, Stuart G; Coen, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We examine a coherently-driven, dispersion-managed, passive Kerr fiber ring resonator and report, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct experimental observation of dispersive wave emission by temporal cavity solitons (CSs). Our observations are in excellent agreement with analytical predictions and they are fully corroborated by numerical simulations. These results lead to a better understanding of the behavior of temporal CSs under conditions where higher-order dispersion plays a significant role. Significantly, since temporal CSs manifest themselves in monolithic microresonators, our results are likely to explain the origins of spectral features observed in broadband Kerr frequency combs. PMID:25360913

  9. Water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, Onno

    2010-05-01

    Cotter and Bokhove (Journal of Engineering Mathematics 2010) derived a variational water wave model with accurate dispersion and vertical vorticity. In one limit, it leads to Luke's variational principle for potential flow water waves. In the another limit it leads to the depth-averaged shallow water equations including vertical vorticity. Presently, focus will be put on the Hamiltonian formulation of the variational model and its boundary conditions.

  10. The effect of thermal dispersion on unsteady MHD convective heat transfer through vertical porous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadien, Ghada F.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of thermal dispersion on unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow is presented. A viscous incompressible conducting fluid in the vicinity of a semi infinite vertical porous through a moving plate in the presence of a magnetic fluid is studied. A cod (FORTRAN) was constructed for numerical computations for the velocity and temperature for various values of the affected parameters were carried out.

  11. MHD Effects on Surface Stability and Turbulence in Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Lauren; Ji, Hantau; Zweben, Stewart

    2000-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is a significant element in understanding many phenomena observed in space and laboratory plasmas. MHD models also appropriately describe behaviors of liquid metals. Currently, there are many interests in the utilization of liquid metal in fusion devices; therefore an understanding of MHD physics in liquid metals is imperative. A small experiment has been built to study the MHD effects on turbulence and surface waves in liquid metal. To fully examine the MHD properties, a reference case in hydrodynamics is established using water or Gallium without the presence of the magnetic field or electrical current. An external wave driver with varying frequency and amplitude excites surface waves on the liquid metal. The experimental case using Gallium is run with the presence of the magnetic field and/ or electric pulses. The magnetic field is induced using two magnetic field coils on either side of the liquid metal and the electrical current is induced using electrodes. The measured dispersion relations of the two cases are then compared to the theoretical predictions. Several diagnostics are used in concert to accurately measure the wave characteristics. The surface waves will be recorded visually through a camera and the amplitude and frequency of the waves will be measured using a laser and fiber-optic system. This successful experiment will significantly enhance knowledge of liquid metal wave behavior and therefore aid in the applications of MHD in fusion plasmas. This worked was conducted as part of the DOE-sponsored National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics

  12. Partial Wave Dispersion Relations: Application to Electron-Atom Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.; Drachman, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter we propose the use of partial wave dispersion relations (DR's) as the way of solving the long-standing problem of correctly incorporating exchange in a valid DR for electron-atom scattering. In particular a method is given for effectively calculating the contribution of the discontinuity and/or poles of the partial wave amplitude which occur in the negative E plane. The method is successfully tested in three cases: (i) the analytically solvable exponential potential, (ii) the Hartree potential, and (iii) the S-wave exchange approximation for electron-hydrogen scattering.

  13. A test of the Hall-MHD model: Application to low-frequency upstream waves at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1994-01-01

    Early studies suggested that in the range of parameter space where the wave angular frequency is less than the proton gyrofrequency and the plasma beta, the ratio of the thermal to magnetic pressure, is less than 1 magnetohydrodynamics provides an adequate description of the propagating modes in a plasma. However, recently, Lacombe et al. (1992) have reported significant differences between basic wave characteristics of the specific propagation modes derived from linear Vlasov and Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories even when the waves are only weakly damped. In this paper we compare the magnetic polarization and normalization magnetic compression ratio of ultra low frequency (ULF) upstream waves at Venus with magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio derived from both theories. We find that while the 'kinetic' approach gives magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio consistent with the data in the analyzed range of beta (0.5 less than beta less than 5) for the fast magnetosonic mode, the same wave characteristics derived from the Hall-MHD model strongly depend on beta and are consistent with the data only at low beta for the fast mode and at high beta for the intermediate mode.

  14. The Gaussian Shear Wave in a Dispersive Medium

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Kevin J.; Baddour, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Within the field of “imaging the biomechanical properties of tissues,” a number of approaches analyze shear wave propagation initiated by a short radiation force push. Unfortunately, it is experimentally observed that the displacement vs. time curves in lossy tissues are rapidly damped and distorted in ways that confound any simple tracking approach. This paper addresses the propagation, decay, and distortion of pulses in lossy and dispersive media, in order to derive closed form analytic expressions for the propagating pulses. The theory identifies key terms that drive the distortion and broadening of the pulse. Furthermore, the approach taken is not dependent on any particular viscoelastic model of tissue, but instead takes a general first order approach to dispersion. Examples with a Gaussian beam pattern and realistic dispersion parameters are given along with general guidelines for identifying the features of the distorting wave that are the most compact. PMID:24412170

  15. Measurements of Inertial Limit Alfven Wave Dispersion for Finite Perpendicular Wave Number

    SciTech Connect

    Kletzing, C. A.; Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Bounds, S. R.; Vincena, S.

    2010-03-05

    Measurements of the dispersion relation for shear Alfven waves as a function of perpendicular wave number are reported for the inertial regime for which V{sub A}>V{sub Te}. The parallel phase velocity and damping are determined as k{sub perpendicular} varies and the measurements are compared to theoretical predictions. The comparison shows that the best agreement between theory and experiment is achieved for a fully complex plasma dispersion relation which includes the effects of electron collisions.

  16. Dispersion of waves in porous cylinders with patchy saturation Part I. Formulaton and torsional waves

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G; Pride, S R

    2004-07-28

    Laboratory experiments on wave propagation through saturated and partially saturated porous media have often been conducted on porous cylinders that were initially fully saturated and then allowed to dry while continuing to acquire data on the wave behavior. Since it is known that drying typically progresses from outside to inside, a sensible physical model of this process is concentric cylinders having different saturation levels--the simplest example being a fully dry outer cylindrical shell together with a fully wet inner cylinder. We use this model to formulate the equations for wave dispersion in porous cylinders for patchy saturation (i.e. drainage) conditions. In addition to multiple modes of propagation obtained numerically from these dispersion relations, we find two distinct analytical expressions for torsional wave modes. We solve the dispersion relation for torsional waves for two examples: Massillon sandstone and Sierra White granite. The drainage analysis appears to give improved agreement with the data for both these materials.

  17. Experimental study of solitonic dispersive wave in photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Surajit; Roy, Samudra; Bhadra, Shyamal K.

    2015-06-01

    We experimentally observed the emission of phase-matched resonant radiation in the form of solitonic dispersive wave in a fabricated photonic crystal fiber by pumping picosecond and femtosecond pulses close to zero-dispersion wavelength in normal dispersion regime. The generation of such phase matched radiation does not require a soliton to be formed and red-shifted in nature. Shock front from the leading edge of the input pump initiates the resonant radiation. The radiation develops in the anomalous dispersion domain and found to be confined both in spectral and temporal domain. The resonance mechanism can be well explained from the numerical simulation governed by generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  18. Effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on crude oil dispersion in a wave tank under breaking waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Kepkay, Paul; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2007-07-01

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the formation of oil-mineral-aggregates (OMAs) in natural seawater. Results of ultraviolet spectrofluorometry and gas chromatography flame ionized detection analysis indicated that dispersants and mineral fines, alone and in combination, enhanced the dispersion of oil into the water column. Measurements taken with a laser in situ scattering and transmissometer (LISST-100X) showed that the presence of mineral fines increased the total concentration of the suspended particles from 4 to 10microl l(-1), whereas the presence of dispersants decreased the particle size (mass mean diameter) of OMAs from 50 to 10microm. Observation with an epifluorescence microscope indicated that the presence of dispersants, mineral fines, or both in combination significantly increased the number of particles dispersed into the water. PMID:17433372

  19. On the kinetic dispersion for shear Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lysak, R.L.; Lotko, W.

    1996-03-01

    Kinetic Alfven waves have been invoked is association with auroral currents and particle acceleration since the pioneering work of Hasegawa. However, to date, no work has considered the dispersion relation including the full kinetic effects for both electrons and ions. Results from such a calculation are presented, with emphasis on the role of Landua damping in dissipating Alfven waves which propogate from the warm plasma of the outer magnetosphere to the cold plasma present in the ionosphere. It is found that the Landua damping is not important when the perpendicular wavelength is larger than the ion acoustic gyroradius and the electron inertial length. In addition, ion gyroradius effects lead to a reduction in the Landua damping by raising the parallel phase velocity of the wave above the electron thermal speed in the short perpendicular wavelength regime. These results indicate that low-frequency Alfven waves with perpendicular wavelengths greater than the order of 10 km when mapped to the ionosphere will not be significantly affected by Landau damping. While these results based on the local dispersion relation, are strictly valid only for short parallel wavelength Alfven waves, they do give an indication of the importance of Landua damping for longer parallel wavelength waves such as field line resonances. 26 refs., 5 fig.

  20. Attenuative body wave dispersion at La Cerdanya, eastern Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correig, Antoni M.; Mitchell, Brian J.

    1989-11-01

    Coda- Q for P- and S-waves has been measured from digitally recorded events occurring in the La Cerdanya region of the eastern Pyrenees. Interpreted in terms of a power law, Q( f) = Q0fη, Q-coda for P-waves is characterized by Q0 = 14 and η = 1.07, and S-waves by Q0 = 14 and η = 1.13. Using a generalization of a model due to Dainty (1981), we obtain a Q model for S-waves in which intrinsic- Q is 23, the frequency dependence (ζ) of intrinsic- Q is 1.17, and the turbidity factor is 0.051. Interpreted in terms of a continuous relaxation model, where Qm is minimum Q, and τ1 and τ2 are high- and low-frequency cutoffs, respectively, the values of the parameters are Qm = 5 and τ1 = 0.37 when τ2 is assumed to be 10 000. Body wave dispersion, as computed from the differences in arrival times of the wave filtered at 3, 6, 12 and 24 Hz relative to that at 6 Hz has been measured and found to range from 0.067 at 3 Hz to -0.075 at 24 Hz. This dispersion constrains τ2 to be 43.

  1. Mode separation of Lamb waves based on dispersion compensation method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kailiang; Ta, Dean; Moilanen, Petro; Wang, Weiqi

    2012-04-01

    Ultrasonic Lamb modes typically propagate as a combination of multiple dispersive wave packets. Frequency components of each mode distribute widely in time domain due to dispersion and it is very challenging to separate individual modes by traditional signal processing methods. In the present study, a method of dispersion compensation is proposed for the purpose of mode separation. This numerical method compensates, i.e., compresses, the individual dispersive waveforms into temporal pulses, which thereby become nearly un-overlapped in time and frequency and can thus be extracted individually by rectangular time windows. It was further illustrated that the dispersion compensation also provided a method for predicting the plate thickness. Finally, based on reversibility of the numerical compensation method, an artificial dispersion technique was used to restore the original waveform of each mode from the separated compensated pulse. Performances of the compensation separation techniques were evaluated by processing synthetic and experimental signals which consisted of multiple Lamb modes with high dispersion. Individual modes were extracted with good accordance with the original waveforms and theoretical predictions. PMID:22501050

  2. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-07-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  3. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  4. Dispersion of guided waves in composite laminates and sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Christoph; Mal, Ajit

    2015-03-01

    In composite structures, damages are often invisible from the surface and can grow to reach a critical size, potentially causing catastrophic failure of the entire structure. Thus safe operation of these structures requires careful monitoring of the initiation and growth of such defects. Ultrasonic methods using guided waves offer a reliable and cost-effective method for structural health monitoring in advanced structures. Guided waves allow for long monitoring ranges and are very sensitive to defects within their propagation path. In this work, the relevant properties of guided Lamb waves for damage detection in composite structures are investigated. An efficient numerical approach is used to determine their dispersion characteristics, and these results are compared to those from laboratory experiments. The experiments are based on a pitch-catch method, in which a pair of movable transducers is placed on one surface of the structure to induce and detect guided Lamb waves. The specific cases considered include an aluminum plate and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel with woven composite face sheets. In addition, a disbond of the interface between one of the face sheets and the honeycomb core of the sandwich panel is also considered, and the dispersion characteristics of the two resultant waveguides are determined. Good agreement between numerical and experimental dispersion results is found, and suggestions on the applicability of the pitch-catch system for structural health monitoring are made.

  5. Dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M. X.; Guo, B. Peng, L.; Cai, X.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas are derived using a simplified method and investigated in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations for each eignwave, we explore how the chiral plasmas exhibit negative refraction and investigate the frequency region for negative refraction. The results show that chirality can induce negative refraction in plasmas. Moreover, both the degree of chirality and the external magnetic field have a significant effect on the critical frequency and the bandwidth of the frequency for negative refraction in chiral plasmas. The parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  6. Stratification parameters and dispersion of internal solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevalova, E. G.; Makarenko, N. I.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical model of internal solitary waves of large amplitude in a weakly stratified fluid is considered. It is assumed that the background density profile depends linearly or exponentially on the fluid depth. It is demonstrated that inverse problem on determining fine-scale structure of the density profile by a known curve of amplitude dispersion is reduced to solving a linear Fredholm integral equation of the first kind having special form of the kernel. The one-to-one correspondence between the density coefficient and the dispersion function is established in the case of analytical stratification.

  7. Mode properties of low-frequency waves: Kinetic theory versus Hall-MHD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.; Quest, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    In fluid theory, the ordering of low-frequency modes in a homogeneous plasma is based on the phase velocity, since modes do not intersect each other in dispersion diagrams as a function of wavenumber or other parameters. In linear kinetic theory, modes cross each other. Thus a consistent and useful classification should be based on the physical properties of the modes instead. This paper attempts such a classification by documeting the dispersion and general mode properties of the low-frequency waves (omega much less than (OMEGA(sub ci) OMEGA(sub ce) (exp 1/2)), where OMEGA(sub ci), OMEGA(sub ce) are the cyclotron frequencies of the ions and electrons, respectively) in kinetic theory, and by comparing them to the results of two-fluid theory. Kinetic theory gives a seperate Alfven/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) wave with phase speed Omega/k approximately = v(sub A) cos theta for omega much less than OMEGA(sub ci), where v(sub A) is the Alfven velocity and theta the angle of propagation between wave vector k and background magnetic field B(sub o). For a given wavenumber, the magnetosonic mode is a double-valued solution with a singular point in theta, beta parameter space, where beta is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. It is shown that a branch cut starting at the singular point theta approximately 30 deg, beta approximately 3 and leading to larger beta gives a practical and consitent seperation of this double-valued magnetosonic solution. Selection of this branch cut results in a moderately damped fast/magnetos onic and a heavily damped slow/sound wave. A comprehensive review of the polarization, compressibility and other mode properties is given and shown to be consistent with the selected branch cut. At small wavenumbers, the kinetic mode properties typically start to deviate significantly from their fluid counterparts at beta approximately 0.5. At larger beta, there is no longer a consistent correspondence between the fluid and kinetic modes. Kinetic

  8. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation on Human Femur Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Boulpaep, Frans; van Hemelrijck, Danny; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical bone is a highly heterogeneous material at the microscale and has one of the most complex structures among materials. Application of elastic wave techniques to this material is thus very challenging. In such media the initial excitation energy goes into the formation of elastic waves of different modes. Due to “dispersion”, these modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components. This work demonstrates elastic wave measurements on human femur specimens. The aim of the study is to measure parameters like wave velocity, dispersion and attenuation by using broadband acoustic emission sensors. First, four sensors were placed at small intervals on the surface of the bone to record the response after pencil lead break excitations. Next, the results were compared to measurements on a bulk steel block which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the same wave lengths. It can be concluded that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals. Of particular interest are waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, since in the next stage of research the bone specimens will be fractured with concurrent monitoring of acoustic emission. PMID:25196011

  9. Dispersion-Engineered Traveling Wave Kinetic Inductance Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas (Inventor); Day, Peter K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier comprises a superconducting transmission line and a dispersion control element. The transmission line can include periodic variations of its dimension along its length. The superconducting material can include a high normal state resistivity material. In some instances the high normal state resistivity material includes nitrogen and a metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, niobium and vanadium. The traveling wave kinetic inductance parametric amplifier is expected to exhibit a noise temperature below 100 mK/GHz.

  10. Ultrasonic wave velocity in the restructuring of disperse media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltsova, I. S.; Khomutova, A. S.; Deinega, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The ultrasonic wave velocities in the restructuring of disperse media were measured using interference and pulsed techniques and the coefficient of reflection in suspensions of starch, Al2O3, and SiO2 particles, glass bulbs, their porous sediments, and composites of Fe3O4 particles in 10% gelatin aqueous solution at a frequency of 3 MHz. The experiments showed alternating variation in the concentration velocity coefficient during the transition of the dispersed phase concentration from the subpercolation to percolation region. The minimum ultrasonic wave velocity in the region of discrete clusters correlates with the ratio between the particle and matrix densities. The results obtained are explained using the Isakovich, Chaban, Rytov, Biot, Hausdorff, and other theories.

  11. Emission of dispersive waves from a train of dark solitons in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marest, T.; Mas Arabí, C.; Conforti, M.; Mussot, A.; Milián, C.; Skryabin, D. V.; Kudlinski, A.

    2016-06-01

    We report the experimental observation of multiple dispersive waves emitted in the anomalous dispersion region of an optical fiber from a train of dark solitons. Each individual dispersive wave can be associated to one particular dark soliton of the train, using phase-matching arguments involving higher-order dispersion and soliton velocity. For a large number of dark solitons (>10), we observe the formation of a continuum associated with the efficient emission of dispersive waves.

  12. Evaluating crude oil chemical dispersion efficacy in a flow-through wave tank under regular non-breaking wave and breaking wave conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2009-05-01

    Testing dispersant effectiveness under conditions similar to that of the open environment is required for improvements in operational procedures and the formulation of regulatory guidelines. To this end, a novel wave tank facility was fabricated to study the dispersion of crude oil under regular non-breaking and irregular breaking wave conditions. This wave tank facility was designed for operation in a flow-through mode to simulate both wave- and current-driven hydrodynamic conditions. We report here an evaluation of the effectiveness of chemical dispersants (Corexit EC9500A and SPC 1000) on two crude oils (Medium South American [MESA] and Alaska North Slope [ANS]) under two different wave conditions (regular non-breaking and plunging breaking waves) in this wave tank. The dispersant effectiveness was assessed by measuring the water column oil concentration and dispersed oil droplet size distribution. In the absence of dispersants, nearly 8-19% of the test crude oils were dispersed and diluted under regular wave and breaking wave conditions. In the presence of dispersants, about 21-36% of the crude oils were dispersed and diluted under regular waves, and 42-62% under breaking waves. Consistently, physical dispersion under regular waves produced large oil droplets (volumetric mean diameter or VMD > or = 300 microm), whereas chemical dispersion under breaking waves created small droplets (VMD < or = 50 microm). The data can provide useful information for developing better operational guidelines for dispersant use and improved predictive models on dispersant effectiveness in the field. PMID:19157465

  13. Dispersion and mirror transmission characteristics of bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, Kimmo; Pensala, Tuomas; Kaivola, Matti

    2011-01-01

    A heterodyne laser interferometer is used for a detailed study of the acoustic wave fields excited in a 932-MHz solidly mounted ZnO thin-film BAW resonator. The sample is manufactured on a glass substrate, which also allows direct measurement of the vibration fields from the bottom of the acoustic mirror. Vibration fields are measured both on top of the resonator and at the mirror-substrate interface in a frequency range of 350 to 1200 MHz. Plate wave dispersion diagrams are calculated from the experimental data in both cases and the transmission characteristics of the acoustic mirror are determined as a function of both frequency and lateral wave number. The experimental data are compared with 1-D and 2-D simulations to evaluate the validity of the modeling tools commonly used in mirror design. All the major features observed in the 1-D model are identified in the measured dispersion diagrams, and the mirror transmission characteristics predicted for the longitudinal waves, by both the 1-D and the 2-D models, match the measured values well. PMID:21244989

  14. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled From Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lid velocity and lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere keels and faster upper mantle velocities under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West African Craton, Congo Craton, Baltic Shield, Russian Platform, Siberian Platform, Indian Shield, Kalahari Craton), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze Craton. There are also interesting variations within cratons like the Congo Craton. As expected, the thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, and also along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal lithospheric models of the continents, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models.

  15. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation in Partially Saturated Sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jian-Xin; Yang, Ding-Hui; Yang, Hui-Zhu

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the wave dispersion and attenuation in partially water-saturated sandstones based on the improved Biot/squirt (BISQ) model in which the saturation is introduced. Numerical experiments indicate that the phase velocity of the fast P-wave decreases as the saturation increases in the low-frequency range (102-104 Hz), and reaches the minimum at the full-saturation state. The behaviour of the phase velocity varying with the saturation in the high-frequency range (104-106 Hz), however, is opposite to that in the low-frequency range. The peak value of P-wave attenuation increases with increasing saturation, and is the maximum at the fully saturated state. Numerical models and experiments show that the improved BISQ model is better than the traditional Gassmann-Biot model.

  16. Observation of Dispersive Shock Waves, Solitons, and Their Interactions in Viscous Fluid Conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Michelle D.; Lowman, Nicholas K.; Anderson, Dalton V.; Schubert, Marika E.; Hoefer, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Dispersive shock waves and solitons are fundamental nonlinear excitations in dispersive media, but dispersive shock wave studies to date have been severely constrained. Here, we report on a novel dispersive hydrodynamic test bed: the effectively frictionless dynamics of interfacial waves between two high viscosity contrast, miscible, low Reynolds number Stokes fluids. This scenario is realized by injecting from below a lighter, viscous fluid into a column filled with high viscosity fluid. The injected fluid forms a deformable pipe whose diameter is proportional to the injection rate, enabling precise control over the generation of symmetric interfacial waves. Buoyancy drives nonlinear interfacial self-steepening, while normal stresses give rise to the dispersion of interfacial waves. Extremely slow mass diffusion and mass conservation imply that the interfacial waves are effectively dissipationless. This enables high fidelity observations of large amplitude dispersive shock waves in this spatially extended system, found to agree quantitatively with a nonlinear wave averaging theory. Furthermore, several highly coherent phenomena are investigated including dispersive shock wave backflow, the refraction or absorption of solitons by dispersive shock waves, and the multiphase merging of two dispersive shock waves. The complex, coherent, nonlinear mixing of dispersive shock waves and solitons observed here are universal features of dissipationless, dispersive hydrodynamic flows.

  17. Observation of Dispersive Shock Waves, Solitons, and Their Interactions in Viscous Fluid Conduits.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Michelle D; Lowman, Nicholas K; Anderson, Dalton V; Schubert, Marika E; Hoefer, Mark A

    2016-04-29

    Dispersive shock waves and solitons are fundamental nonlinear excitations in dispersive media, but dispersive shock wave studies to date have been severely constrained. Here, we report on a novel dispersive hydrodynamic test bed: the effectively frictionless dynamics of interfacial waves between two high viscosity contrast, miscible, low Reynolds number Stokes fluids. This scenario is realized by injecting from below a lighter, viscous fluid into a column filled with high viscosity fluid. The injected fluid forms a deformable pipe whose diameter is proportional to the injection rate, enabling precise control over the generation of symmetric interfacial waves. Buoyancy drives nonlinear interfacial self-steepening, while normal stresses give rise to the dispersion of interfacial waves. Extremely slow mass diffusion and mass conservation imply that the interfacial waves are effectively dissipationless. This enables high fidelity observations of large amplitude dispersive shock waves in this spatially extended system, found to agree quantitatively with a nonlinear wave averaging theory. Furthermore, several highly coherent phenomena are investigated including dispersive shock wave backflow, the refraction or absorption of solitons by dispersive shock waves, and the multiphase merging of two dispersive shock waves. The complex, coherent, nonlinear mixing of dispersive shock waves and solitons observed here are universal features of dissipationless, dispersive hydrodynamic flows. PMID:27176524

  18. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  19. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van

    2014-02-18

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  20. Dispersive photonic crystals from the plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Cabrera, E.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Flores-Desirena, B.; Gaspar-Armenta, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays photonic crystals are widely used in many different applications. One of the most used methods to compute their band structure is the plane wave method (PWM). However, it can only be applied directly to non-dispersive media and be extended to systems with a few model dielectric functions. We explore an extension of the PWM to photonic crystals containing dispersive materials, that solves an eigenvalue equation for the Bloch wave vectors. First we compare our calculation with analytical results for one dimensional photonic crystals containing Si using experimental values of its optical parameters, and obtainig very well agreement, even for the spectrum region with strong absorption. Then, using the same method, we computed the band structure for a two dimensional photonic crystal without absorption, formed by an square array of MgO cylinders in air. The optical parameters for MgO were modeled with the Lorentz dielectric function. Finally, we studied an array of MgO cylinders in a metal, using Drude model without absorption, for the metal dielectric function. For this last case, we study the gap-midgap ratio as a function of the filling fraction for both the square and triangular lattice. The gap-midgap ratio is larger for the triangular lattice, with a maximum value of 10% for a filling fraction of 0.6. Our results show that the method can be applied to dispersive materials, and then to a wide range of applications where photonic crystals can be used.

  1. The energy associated with MHD waves generation in the solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaTorre, A.

    1995-01-01

    Gyrotropic symmetry is usually assumed in measurements of electron distribution functions in the heliosphere. This prevents the calculation of a net current perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Previous theoretical results derived by one of the authors for a collisionless plasma with isotropic electrons in a strong magnetic field have shown that the excitation of MHD modes becomes possible when the external perpendicular current is non-zero. We consider then that any anisotropic electron population can be thought of as 'external', interacting with the remaining plasma through the self-consistent electromagnetic field. From this point of view any perpendicular current may be due to the anisotropic electrons, or to an external source like a stream, or to both. As perpendicular currents cannot be derived from the measured distribution functions, we resort to Ampere's law and experimental data of magnetic field fluctuations. The transfer of energy between MHD modes and external currents is then discussed.

  2. Interaction of high-order solitons with external dispersive waves.

    PubMed

    Oreshnikov, I; Driben, R; Yulin, A V

    2015-12-01

    The effect of mutual interaction between second-order soliton and dispersive waves (DWs) is investigated. It is predicted analytically and confirmed numerically that DWs (both transmitted and reflected components) become polychromatic after interaction with the soliton. Collision with DWs of considerable intensity can lead to acceleration/deceleration and central frequency shift of the soliton, while still preserving the soliton's oscillating structure. Two second-order solitons with resonant DWs trapped between them can form an effective solitonic cavity with "flat" or "concave mirrors," depending on the intensity of the input. PMID:26625049

  3. Dispersion properties of electrostatic sound wave modes in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2010-01-15

    The theoretical analysis of electrostatic sound wave modes in multiwalled carbon nanotubes is presented within the framework of the fluid theory in conjunction with the Poisson's equation. The electron and ion components of each wall of nanotubes are regarded as two-species plasma system, in which the perturbed electron number density is deduced by means of the quantum hydrodynamic model, while the ion density perturbation follows the classical expression. An analytical expression of the dispersion relation is obtained for the quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in the system. Numerical result is prepared for a two-walled carbon nanotube, giving rise to a splitting of the frequencies of the electrostatic oscillations due to the small coupling between the two cylinders.

  4. Wave-induced fluid flow in random porous media: attenuation and dispersion of elastic waves.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tobias M; Gurevich, Boris

    2005-05-01

    A detailed analysis of the relationship between elastic waves in inhomogeneous, porous media and the effect of wave-induced fluid flow is presented. Based on the results of the poroelastic first-order statistical smoothing approximation applied to Biot's equations of poroelasticity, a model for elastic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in 3-D randomly inhomogeneous poroelastic media is developed. Attenuation and dispersion depend on linear combinations of the spatial correlations of the fluctuating poroelastic parameters. The observed frequency dependence is typical for a relaxation phenomenon. Further, the analytic properties of attenuation and dispersion are analyzed. It is shown that the low-frequency asymptote of the attenuation coefficient of a plane compressional wave is proportional to the square of frequency. At high frequencies the attenuation coefficient becomes proportional to the square root of frequency. A comparison with the 1-D theory shows that attenuation is of the same order but slightly larger in 3-D random media. Several modeling choices of the approach including the effect of cross correlations between fluid and solid phase properties are demonstrated. The potential application of the results to real porous materials is discussed. PMID:15957744

  5. Wave velocity dispersion and attenuation in media exhibiting internal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Steeb, Holger; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamical and acoustical behavior of porous and heterogeneous rocks is of great importance in geophysics, e.g. earthquakes, and for various seismic engineering applications, e.g. hydrocarbon exploration. Within a heterogeneous medium oscillations with a characteristic resonance frequency, depending on the mass and internal length of the heterogeneity, can occur. When excited, heterogeneities can self-oscillate with their natural frequency. Another example of internal oscillations is the dynamical behavior of non-wetting fluid blobs or fluid patches in residually saturated pore spaces. Surface tension forces or capillary forces act as the restoring force that drives the oscillation. Whatever mechanism is involved, an oscillatory phenomena within a heterogeneous medium will have an effect on acoustic or seismic waves propagating through such a medium, i.e. wave velocity dispersion and frequency-dependent attenuation. We present two models for media exhibiting internal oscillations and discuss the frequency-dependent wave propagation mechanism. Both models give similar results: (1) The low-frequency (i.e. quasi-static) limit for the phase velocity is identical with the Gassmann-Wood limit and the high-frequency limit is larger than this value and (2) Around the resonance frequency a very strong phase velocity change and the largest attenuation occurs. (1) Model for a homogeneous medium exhibiting internal oscillations We present a continuum model for an acoustic medium exhibiting internal damped oscillations. The obvious application of this model is water containing oscillating gas bubbles, providing the material and model parameters for this study. Two physically based momentum interaction terms between the two inherent constituents are used: (1) A purely elastic term of oscillatory nature that scales with the volume of the bubbles and (2) A viscous term that scales with the specific surface of the bubble. The model is capable of taking into account

  6. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  7. Lithospheric thickness modeled from long-period surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithospheres under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  8. Dispersive waves induced by self-defocusing temporal solitons in a beta-barium-borate crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2015-09-15

    We experimentally observe dispersive waves in the anomalous dispersion regime of a beta-barium-borate (BBO) crystal, induced by a self-defocusing few-cycle temporal soliton. Together the soliton and dispersive waves form an energetic octave-spanning supercontinuum. The soliton was excited in the normal dispersion regime of BBO through a negative cascaded quadratic nonlinearity. Using pump wavelengths from 1.24 to 1.4 μm, dispersive waves are found from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, agreeing well with calculated resonant phase-matching wavelengths due to degenerate four-wave mixing to the soliton. We also observe resonant radiation from nondegenerate four-wave mixing between the soliton and a probe wave, which was formed by leaking part of the pump spectrum into the anomalous dispersion regime. We confirm the experimental results through simulations. PMID:26371910

  9. MHD Stability Analysis Using an X-ray Wave Array Diagnostic on the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Fonck, R.; Intrator, T.; Thorson, T.

    1998-11-01

    Tearing mode instabilities during plasma current ramp-up are important for extremely low aspect ratio devices. Fast current ramping, aided by the low internal inductance of low aspect ratio plasmas, induces skin currents. The resulting hollow current profile may produce double tearing modes, which allows for reconnection and current penetration. Another area of interest for MHD stability studies in the first phase of operation of the P EGASUS Experiment is the nature of the plasma stability boundary as the edge-q is lowered at extremely low aspect ratio. This boundary plays a major role in the accessibility to stable operation at very low toroidal field. P EGASUS will employ an X-ray diode (XRD) detector array to diagnose the internal plasma MHD structure. We are designing and installing a vertical 20 channel radially viewing pinhole array of XRD's for >= 50 eV photon measurement. Each channel will have a vertical resolution of 2 cm and an upper frequency limit of 100 kHz. The lithium drifted XRD's have a large surface area of 90 mm^2, thereby being quite sensitive and suited to a low temperature start-up plasma. The expected signal-to-noise ratio due to photon noise is < 0.1% for P EGASUS plasmas. * *Supported by U.S. DoE grant No. DE-FG02-96ER54375

  10. Shear wave velocity structure in West Java, Indonesia as inferred from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, Titi; Syuhada

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the crust and upper mantle of West Java, Indonesia by measuring the group velocity dispersion of surface waves. We analyzed waveform from four teleseismic earthquake recorded at three 3-component broadband seismometers. We analyzed fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves from vertical, radial, and transverse components using multiple filter technique. We inverted the measured group velocity to obtain shear wave velocity profile down to 200 km depth. We observed low shear wave velocity zone at depth of about 20 km. Shear velocity reduction is estimated to be 18% compared to the upper and lower velocity layer. The low velocity zone might be associated with the subducting slab of Indo-Australian Plate as similar characteristics of low velocity zones also observed at other subducting regions.

  11. Magnetopause surface waves triggered by a rotating IMF with the global MHD SWMF/BAT-S-RUS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyas, T.; Spencer, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    The solar wind driving of magnetopause surface waves is only partly understood. In particular we do not have a picture of the magnetopause surface wave properties and behavior when a magnetic cloud event, which sometimes involves a rotating IMF, impinges on the magnetosphere. Here we investigate the effect of a twisting or rotational IMF under moderate solar wind velocity (about 500 km/s) upon the magnetosphere with the Global MHD BATS-R-US code. Synthetic solar wind data is constructed to simulate the most important features of a magnetic cloud event, but without including shock features. A sinusoidally varying By component accompanied by a cosinusoidally varying Bz component of the IMF is input into the model with magnitude 10-20 nT. The synthetic data is representative of the magnetic cloud event that occurred on October 3-7 2000. We use the results of the simulation to infer the modes, properties, and particularly the phase speed and wavelength of the surface wave structures.

  12. A Lithospheric Study of Eastern Asia Using Surface Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasyanos, M. E.; Walter, W. R.; Flanagan, M. P.

    2003-12-01

    We have continued our study of surface-wave group-velocity dispersion across Eastern Asia in the vicinity of the Korean Peninsula, Yellow Sea, and Sea of Japan. We primarily use seismic data from permanent stations in South Korea, China, Japan, Taiwan and Russia. We also use data from several IRIS PASSCAL deployments in China and North Korea. We measure group-velocity using multiple narrow-band filters on deconvolved displacement data. We use a conjugate gradient method to perform a high-resolution group-velocity tomography over the region. Our current results include Rayleigh wave inversions for periods from 10 to 100 seconds. There is an excellent correspondence between the group velocities and tectonic structure, including large sedimentary features and crustal thickness variations. At long periods (> 50 sec), we find that the inversion has features associated with the subduction of the Pacific and Philippine Plates under the Eurasian continent, including the effects of the subducting slab and magmatic arc. We use the group-velocity results to model the shear-velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle across the region. We employ a grid-search technique to fit the Rayleigh wave group-velocities over the whole period range. This does a very good job at retrieving features in the crust and uppermost mantle. Deeper features in the mantle, however, are harder to model directly using this method. To resolve these features, we will be forwarding modeling the structure by constructing several models of the subduction zone. We will then be testing the various models by comparing the group velocities predicted by the models to the observed group velocities along cross-sections. Preliminary results indicate that the magmatic arc has the largest affect on the long period surface waves, with the subducting slab being a much subtler feature.

  13. Flexural wave dispersion in orthotropic plates with heavy fluid loading.

    PubMed

    Magliula, Elizabeth; McDaniel, J Gregory

    2008-05-01

    Orthotropic plates support flexural waves with wavenumbers that depend on their angle of propagation. The present work investigates the effect of fluid loading on this angular dependence, and finds that the effect is relatively small for typical composite plate materials in contact with water. This finding results from an analytical model of the fluid-loaded plate, in which the plate is modeled by classical laminated plate theory and the fluid is modeled as an ideal acoustic fluid. The resulting dispersion relation is a tenth-order polynomial in the flexural wavenumber. Direct numerical solution, as well as analysis at frequencies below coincidence, reveals that the angular dependence of wavenumber is magnified but not significantly distorted by the addition of fluid loading. PMID:18529085

  14. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, D P; Chen, Y; Kletzing, C A; Denton, M H; Kurth, W S

    2015-01-01

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10−3 nT2, using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons. PMID:26167444

  15. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  16. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; Hsu, Mick; Boogert, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Guided waves are propagated around the circumference of a pipe. In case of wall loss, the phase of the signal changes which is used to estimate the local wall thickness profile. A special EMAT sensor has been developed, which works in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. In order to improve the sensitivity, an inversion in performed on multiple orders of circumferential passes. Experimental results are presented on different pipes containing artificial and real defects.

  17. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van; Enthoven, Daniel; Verburg, Wesley

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. The phase spectrum is used to invert for a wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. An EMAT sensor design has been made to measure at the 12 o'clock position of a pipe. The concept is evaluated on measured data, showing good sizing capabilities on a variety simple defect profiles.

  18. Slow-Mode MHD Wave Penetration into a Coronal Null Point due to the Mode Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey N.; Uralov, Arkadiy M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and waves in solar active regions revealed their close link to quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring light curves. The nature of that link has not yet been understood in detail. In our analytical modelling we investigate propagation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a solar active region, taking into account wave refraction and transmission of the slow magnetoacoustic mode into the fast one. The wave propagation is analysed in the geometrical acoustics approximation. Special attention is paid to the penetration of waves in the vicinity of a magnetic null point. The modelling has shown that the interaction of slow magnetoacoustic waves with the magnetic reconnection site is possible due to the mode transmission at the equipartition level where the sound speed is equal to the Alfvén speed. The efficiency of the transmission is also calculated.

  19. On the nature of propagating MHD waves in polar coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Girjesh R.; Banerjee, Dipankar

    Waves play an important role in the heating of the solar corona and in the acceleration of the fast solar wind from polar Coronal Holes (pCHs). Recently using EIS/Hinode and SUMER/SOHO, we have reported the presence of accelerating waves in polar region (Gupta et al. 2010, ApJ, 718, 11). These waves appeared to be originating from a bright location on-disk, presumably the footprint of the coronal funnels. These waves were interpreted in terms of either propagating Alfven waves or fast magneto-acoustic waves. The new sets of observations are obtained from the EIS/Hinode 2'' slit and imaging data from AIA/SDO in various filters over plume and inter-plume regions as HOP175 programme. The combination of spectroscopic and imaging data will provide further details on mode identification and properties of these waves and will help in the energy calculations. In this presentation, preliminary results obtained from these observations in terms of different nature of propagating waves in plume and inter-plume regions and energy carried by these waves will be presented.

  20. Numerical simulation of surface wave dynamics of liquid metal MHD flow on an inclined plane in a magnetic field with spatial variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Donghong

    Interest in utilizing liquid metal film flows to protect the plasma-facing solid structures places increasing demand on understanding the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of such flows in a magnetic field with spatial variation. The field gradient effect is studied by a two-dimensional (2D) model in Cartesian coordinates. The thin film flow down an inclined plane in spanwise (z-direction) magnetic field with constant streamwise gradient and applied current is analyzed. The solution to the equilibrium flow shows forcefully the M-shaped velocity profile and dependence of side layer thickness on Ha-1/2 whose definition is based on field gradient. The major part of the dissertation is the numerical simulation of free surface film flows and understanding the results. The VOF method is employed to track the free surface, and the CSF model is combined with VOF method to account for surface dynamics condition. The code is validated with respect to Navier-Stokes solver and MHD implementation by computations of ordinary wavy films, MHD flat films and a colleague proposed film flow. The comparisons are performed against respective experimental, theoretical or numerical solutions, and the results are well matched with them. It is found for the ordinary water falling films, at low frequency and high flowrate, the small forcing disturbance at inlet flowrate develops into big roll waves preceded by small capillary bow waves; at high frequency and low Re, it develops into nearly sinusoidal waves with small amplitude and without fore-running capillary waves. The MHD surface instability is investigated for two kinds of film flows in constant streamwise field gradient: one with spatial disturbance and without surface tension, the other with inlet forcing disturbance and with surface tension. At no surface tension condition, the finite amplitude disturbance is rapidly amplified and degrades to irregular shape. With surface tension to maintain smooth interface, finite amplitude regular waves

  1. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore » intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  2. MHD wave generators with a screw flow-through channel for automated soldering of the printed-circuit assemblies of radioelectronic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Gel'fgat, Y.M.; Simsons, Y.A.

    1985-04-01

    The basic characteristics of MHDW for soldering with a continuous wave of solder are presented. A similar presentation of characteristics describe soldering with two jets of solder. A diagram of an MHDW with a screw flow-through channel for creating a single continuous wave of solder is illustrated, and consists of a vat with the melted metal. The vat's bottom is constructed in the form of a circular cylinder placed in the hollow of a three-phase rotating-magnetic-field inductor. The main designs of MHD wave generators have proved to be very efficient for mass and large series production.

  3. Rossby wave energy dispersion from tropical cyclone in zonal basic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenli; Fei, Jianfang; Huang, Xiaogang; Liu, Yudi; Ma, Zhanhong; Yang, Lu

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates tropical cyclone energy dispersion under horizontally sheared flows using a nonlinear barotropic model. In addition to common patterns, unusual features of Rossby wave trains are also found in flows with constant vorticity and vorticity gradients. In terms of the direction of the energy dispersion, the wave train can rotate clockwise and elongate southwestward under anticyclonic circulation (ASH), which contributes to the reenhancement of the tropical cyclone (TC). The wave train even splits into two obvious wavelike trains in flows with a southward vorticity gradient (WSH). Energy dispersed from TCs varies over time, and variations in the intensity of the wave train components typically occur in two stages. Wave-activity flux diagnosis and ray tracing calculations are extended to the frame that moves along with the TC to reveal the concrete progress of wave propagation. The direction of the wave-activity flux is primarily determined by the combination of the basic flow and the TC velocity. Along the flux, the distribution of pseudomomentum effectively illustrates the development of wave trains, particularly the rotation and split of wave propagation. Ray tracing involves the quantitative tracing of wave features along rays, which effectively coincide with the wave train regimes. Flows of a constant shear (parabolic meridional variation) produce linear (nonlinear) wave number variations. For the split wave trains, the real and complex wave number waves move along divergent trajectories and are responsible for different energy dispersion ducts.

  4. Coexistence of weak and strong wave turbulence in incompressible Hall MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyrand, Romain; Kiyani, Khurom; Galtier, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    We report a numerical investigation of 3D Hall Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a strong mean magnetic field. By using a helicity decomposition and a cross-bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear 3-wave coupling is substantial among ion cyclotron and whistler waves. By studying in detail the degree of nonlinearity of these two populations we show that ion cyclotron and whistler turbulent fluctuations belong respectively to strong and weak wave turbulence. The non trivial blending of these two regime give rise to anomalous anisotropy and scaling properties. The separation of the weak random wave and strong coherent turbulence component can however be effectively done using simultaneous space and time Fourier transforms. Using this techniques we show that it is possible to recover some statistical prediction of weak turbulent theory.

  5. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  6. Signal processing techniques for recovering input waveforms in dispersive Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo

    2014-02-01

    Lamb waves are extensively used in plate-like structure inspection because of their guided nature. However, their dispersive properties often limit their use in flaw detection and other applications. Dispersion weakens and defocuses interrogating Lamb waves and makes it difficult to accurately interpret signals reflected from defects or boundaries. Time reversal (TR) processing can be applied to compensate for the effect of dispersive Lamb waves. Thus, the TR operation will enable the amplification of dispersive Lamb wave signals by signal compression in time. In this study, experiments are performed in order to examine the refocusing and recovering the initial input waveform in the long range propagation of dispersive Lamb waves in a plate. Two different time reversal processes (regular TR and reciprocal TR or inverse filtering) are tested and the experimental results are compared.

  7. Wave Tank Studies On Formation And Transport Of OMA From The Chemically Dispersed Oil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on dispersion of oil, formation ...

  8. Are There Optical Solitary Wave Solutions in Linear Media with Group Velocity Dispersion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhonghao; Zhou, Guosheng

    1996-01-01

    A generalized exact optical bright solitary wave solution in a three dimensional dispersive linear medium is presented. The most interesting property of the solution is that it can exist in the normal group-velocity-dispersion (GVD) region. In addition, another peculiar feature is that it may achieve a condition of 'zero-dispersion' to the media so that a solitary wave of arbitrarily small amplitude may be propagated with no dependence on is pulse width.

  9. The Magnetic Coupling of Chromospheres and Winds From Late Type Evolved Stars: Role of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, Vladimir; Leake, James; Carpenter, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Stellar chromospheres and winds represent universal attributes of stars on the cool portion of H-R diagram. In this paper we derive observational constrains for the chromospheric heating and wind acceleration from cool evolved stars and examine the role of Alfven waves as a viable source of energy dissipation and momentum deposition. We use a 1.5D magnetohydrodynamic code with a generalized Ohm's law to study propagation of Alfven waves generated along a diverging magnetic field in a stellar photosphere at a single frequency. We demonstrate that due to inclusion of the effects of ion-neutral collisions in magnetized weakly ionized chromospheric plasma on resistivity and the appropriate grid resolution, the numerical resistivity becomes 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical resistivity. The motions introduced by non-linear transverse Alfven waves can explain non-thermally broadened and non-Gaussian profiles of optically thin UV lines forming in the stellar chromosphere of α Tau and other late-type giant and supergiant stars. The calculated heating rates in the stellar chromosphere model due to resistive (Joule) dissipation of electric currents on Pedersen resistivity are consistent with observational constraints on the net radiative losses in UV lines and the continuum from α Tau. At the top of the chromosphere, Alfven waves experience significant reflection, producing downward propagating transverse waves that interact with upward propagating waves and produce velocity shear in the chromosphere. Our simulations also suggest that momentum deposition by non-linear Alfven waves becomes significant in the outer chromosphere within 1 stellar radius from the photosphere that initiates a slow and massive winds from red giants and supergiants.

  10. Dispersion relation for small amplitude sound waves in rotating newtonian fluids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Antuña, José; Hernández-Rodríguez, Arezky; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    1996-11-01

    For a rotating newtonian fluid (which is viscous and compressible), the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, the continuity equation and the equation for isoentropic process are simultaneosly considered to obtain an equation for pressure waves. This equation is solved to get the dispersion law for such waves. In the dispersion law an adimensional parameter τ is used, which is given by the relation between the characteristic damping wave time and the period of the fluid rotation. The limit of a viscous compressible static fluid is obtained. The numerical results of the dispersion relation are given for different values of the angle between the direction of the wave propagation and the rotation axis and for the values of τ. The existence of gaps and of a typical wave guide effect are reported. The dispersion relation of the modes are given for the real and the imaginary parts of the wave vector.

  11. Do dispersive waves play a role in collisionless magnetic reconnection?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Daughton, W.; Li, H.; Karimabadi, H.; Peter Gary, S.

    2014-02-15

    Using fully kinetic simulations, we demonstrate that the properly normalized reconnection rate is fast ∼0.1 for guide fields up to 80× larger than the reconnecting field and is insensitive to both the system size and the ion to electron mass ratio. These results challenge conventional explanations of reconnection based on fast dispersive waves, which are completely absent for sufficiently strong guide fields. In this regime, the thickness of the diffusion layer is set predominantly by the electron inertial length with an inner sublayer that is controlled by finite gyro-radius effects. As the Alfvén velocity becomes relativistic for very strong guide fields, the displacement current becomes important and strong deviations from charge neutrality occur, resulting in the build-up of intense electric fields which absorb a portion of the magnetic energy release. Over longer time scales, secondary magnetic islands are generated near the active x-line while an electron inertial scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is driven within the outflow. These secondary instabilities give rise to time variations in the reconnection rate but do not alter the average value.

  12. Excitation of MHD waves upstream of Jupiter by energetic sulfur or oxygen ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Wong, H. K.; Eviatar, A.

    1986-01-01

    Large fluxes of heavy ions have been reported upstream of Jupiter's bow shock as Voyager 1 approached the planet (Zwickl et al., 1981; Krimigis et al., 1985). Enhanced low-frequency magnetic wave activity was also observed during the particle events. The fluctuations are left-handed, elliptically polarized in the plasma frame. The spectrum of these fluctuations contains a peak close to the Doppler-shifted resonance frequency of a sulfur or oxygen beam with streaming energy of approximately 30 keV. These fluctuations are also present in the spectrum of the magnitude of the field. It is concluded that the observations result from an instability driven by an energetic beam of either sulfur or oxygen. The wave observations can be described by a heavy ion distribution with both a streaming anisotropy and a temperature anisotropy. This class of heavy ion streaming instabilities may also play a role in wave-particle interactions in the vicinity of comets.

  13. Simple Dispersion Equation Based on Lamb-Wave Model for Propagating Pulsive Waves in Human Heart Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Naoaki; Shintani, Seine A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the Rayleigh-Lamb-type equation for propagating pulsive waves excited by aortic-valve closure at end-systole in the human heart wall. We theoretically investigate the transcendental dispersion equation of pulsive waves for the asymmetrical zero-order mode of the Lamb wave. We analytically find a simple dispersion equation with a universal constant for a small Lamb wavenumber. We show that the simple dispersion equation can qualitatively explain the myocardial noninvasive measurements in vivo of pulsive waves in the human heart wall. We can also consistently estimate the viscoelastic constant of the myocardium in the human heart wall using the simple dispersion equation for a small Lamb wavenumber instead of using a complex nonlinear optimization.

  14. Observation of spin-wave dispersion in Nd-Fe-B magnets using neutron Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K. Inami, N.; Saito, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Kawana, D.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Yano, M.; Shoji, T.; Manabe, A.; Kato, A.; Kaneko, Y.

    2014-05-07

    The low-energy spin-wave dispersion in polycrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets was observed using neutron Brillouin scattering (NBS). Low-energy spin-wave excitations for the lowest acoustic spin-wave mode were clearly observed. From the spin-wave dispersion, we were able to determine the spin-wave stiffness constant D{sub sw} (100.0 ± 4.9 meV.Å{sup 2}) and the exchange stiffness constant A (6.6 ± 0.3 pJ/m)

  15. Remarks on the parallel propagation of small-amplitude dispersive Alfvénic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champeaux, S.; Laveder, D.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.

    The envelope formalism for the description of a small-amplitude parallel-propagating Alfvén wave train is tested against direct numerical simulations of the Hall-MHD equations in one space dimension where kinetic effects are neglected. It turns out that the magnetosonic-wave dynamics departs from the adiabatic approximation not only near the resonance between the speed of sound and the Alfvén wave group velocity, but also when the speed of sound lies between the group and phase velocities of the Alfvén wave. The modulational instability then does not anymore affect asymptotically large scales and strong nonlinear effects can develop even in the absence of the decay instability. When the Hall-MHD equations are considered in the long-wavelength limit, the weakly nonlinear dynamics is accurately reproduced by the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation on the expected time scale, provided no decay instabilities are present. The stronger nonlinear regime which develops at later time is captured by including the coupling to the nonlinear dynamics of the magnetosonic waves.

  16. Nonreciprocal dispersion of spin waves in ferromagnetic thin films covered with a finite-conductivity metal

    SciTech Connect

    Mruczkiewicz, M.; Krawczyk, M.

    2014-03-21

    We study the effect of one-side metallization of a uniform ferromagnetic thin film on its spin-wave dispersion relation in the Damon–Eshbach geometry. Due to the finite conductivity of the metallic cover layer on the ferromagnetic film, the spin-wave dispersion relation may be nonreciprocal only in a limited wave-vector range. We provide an approximate analytical solution for the spin-wave frequency, discuss its validity, and compare it with numerical results. The dispersion is analyzed systematically by varying the parameters of the ferromagnetic film, the metal cover layer and the value of the external magnetic field. The conclusions drawn from this analysis allow us to define a structure based on a 30 nm thick CoFeB film with an experimentally accessible nonreciprocal dispersion relation in a relatively wide wave-vector range.

  17. Traveling waves for conservation laws with cubic nonlinearity and BBM type dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Michael; Spayd, Kimberly R.; Swanson, Ellen R.

    2015-10-01

    Scalar conservation laws with non-convex fluxes have shock wave solutions that violate the Lax entropy condition. In this paper, such solutions are selected by showing that some of them have corresponding traveling waves for the equation supplemented with dissipative and dispersive higher-order terms. For a cubic flux, traveling waves can be calculated explicitly for linear dissipative and dispersive terms. Information about their existence can be used to solve the Riemann problem, in which we find solutions for some data that are different from the classical Lax-Oleinik construction. We consider dispersive terms of a BBM type and show that the calculation of traveling waves is somewhat more intricate than for a KdV-type dispersion. The explicit calculation is based upon the calculation of parabolic invariant manifolds for the associated ODE describing traveling waves. The results extend to the p-system of one-dimensional elasticity with a cubic stress-strain law.

  18. Transverse collapse of Alfvén wave-trains with small dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champeaux, S.; Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    While in the presence of dispersion the circular polarization of a weakly nonlinear Alfvén wave-train is preserved, and the envelope dynamics governed by the usual scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, this is no longer the case in the small dispersion limit. It is shown that the wave amplitude then obeys a vector Schrödinger equation with an anisotropic diffraction term. The transverse collapse developing in three space dimensions then leads to the formation of thin layers of intense gradients instead of the foci characteristic of the dispersive case. The transition between the two regimes when the dispersion is decreased, is also analyzed.

  19. Small scale MHD wave processes in the solar atmosphere and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1987-01-01

    Solar wind observations suggesting wave-particle interactions via ion-cyclotron resonances are reviewed. The required power at high frequencies is presumably supplied via a turbulent cascade. Tu's (1987) model, which considers a turbulent cascade explicitly, is outlined. In the solar atmosphere, resonance absorption is considered. The meanings of the cusp and Alfven resonances are discussed, and it is shown how energy gets pumped into small scales. It is shown that resonance absorption can heat the corona and spicules in a manner consistent with observations, if turbulence provides an eddy viscosity.

  20. P Wave Dispersion and Maximum P Wave Duration Are Associated with Renal Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiun-Chi; Wei, Shu-Yi; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hung, Chi-Chih; Su, Ho-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    P wave parameters measured by 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are commonly used as a noninvasive tool to evaluate left atrial enlargement. This study was designed to assess whether P wave parameters were associated with renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This longitudinal study enrolled 439 patients with CKD stages 3–5. Renal end points were defined as the commencement of dialysis or death. Change in renal function was measured using the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. We measured two ECG P wave parameters corrected for heart rate, i.e., corrected P wave dispersion and corrected maximum P wave duration. The values of P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration were 88.8±21.7 ms and 153.3±21.7 ms, respectively. During the follow-up period (mean, 25.2 months), 95 patients (21.6%) started hemodialysis and 30 deaths (6.8%) were recorded. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified that increased P wave dispersion [hazard ratio (HR), 1.020; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.009–1.032; P<0.001] and maximum P wave duration (HR, 1.013; 95% CI, 1.003–1.024; P = 0.012) were associated with progression to renal end points. Furthermore, increased P wave dispersion (unstandardized coefficient β = –0.016; P = 0.037) and maximum P wave duration (unstandardized coefficient β = –0.014; P = 0.040) were negatively associated with the eGFR slope. We demonstrated that increased P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration were associated with progression to the renal end points of dialysis or death and faster renal function decline in CKD patients. Screening CKD patients on the basis of P wave dispersion and maximum P wave duration may help identify patients at high risk for worse renal outcomes. PMID:25006682

  1. Dispersion of Plasma Dust Acoustic Waves in the Strong-Coupling Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, J.B.; Goree, J.

    1996-10-01

    Low-frequency compressional waves were observed in a suspension of strongly coupled 9.4 {mu}m spheres in an rf Kr plasma. Both parts of the complex wave number were measured to determine the dispersion relation, which agreed with a theoretical model of damped dust acoustic waves, ignoring strong coupling, but not with a strongly coupled dust-lattice wave model. The results yield experimental values for the dust plasma frequency, charge, Debye length, and damping rate, and support the applicability of fluid-based dispersion relations to strongly coupled dusty plasmas, which has been a controversy. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Propagation estimates for dispersive wave equations: Application to the stratified wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, David W.

    1999-01-01

    The plane-stratified wave equation (∂t2+H)ψ=0 with H=-c(y)2∇z2 is studied, where z=x⊕y, x∈Rk, y∈R1 and |c(y)-c∞|→0 as |y|→∞. Solutions to such an equation are solved for the propagation of waves through a layered medium and can include waves which propagate in the x-directions only (i.e., trapped modes). This leads to a consideration of the pseudo-differential wave equation (∂t2+ω(-Δx))ψ=0 such that the dispersion relation ω(ξ2) is analytic and satisfies c1⩽ω'(ξ2)⩽c2 for c*>0. Uniform propagation estimates like ∫|x|⩽|t|αE(UtP±φ0)dkx⩽Cα,β(1+|t|)-β∫E(φ0)dkx are obtained where Ut is the evolution group, P± are projection operators onto the Hilbert space of initial conditions φ∈H and E(ṡ) is the local energy density. In special cases scattering of trapped modes off a local perturbation satisfies the causality estimate ||P+ρΛjSP-ρΛk||⩽Cνρ-ν for each ν<1/2. Here P+ρΛj (P-ρΛk) are remote outgoing/detector (incoming/transmitter) projections for the jth (kth) trapped mode. Also Λ⋐R+ is compact, so the projections localize onto formally-incoming (eventually-outgoing) states.

  3. Conversion of electrostatic plasma waves into electromagnetic waves - Numerical calculation of the dispersion relation for all wavelengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oya, H.

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion curves have been computed for a wide range of wavelengths from electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in a magnetoactive warm plasma with a Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The computation was carried out mainly for the perpendicular propagation mode. The upper hybrid resonance is the connection point of the electrostatic waves and the electromagnetic waves. The electrostatic waves not associated with the upper hybrid resonance are subjected to electron cyclotron damping when the wavelength becomes long. Oblique propagation is allowed for the electrostatic waves in a frequency range from the plasma frequency to the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the long-wavelength region where Landau damping can be neglected and where the electrostatic mode smoothly connects to the electromagnetic X-mode. In a slightly inhomogeneous plasma, the Bernstein-mode electrostatic wave can escape by being converted into the O-mode electromagnetic wave; two reflections take place during this escape process.

  4. Generalized reduced MHD equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.; Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general toroidal configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson.

  5. Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging and mode separating by high-resolution linear Radon transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.; Xia, J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) has been increasingly used for obtaining vertical shear-wave velocity profiles within near-surface materials. MASW uses a multichannel recording approach to capture the time-variant, full-seismic wavefield where dispersive surface waves can be used to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The technique consists of (1) acquisition of broadband, high-frequency ground roll using a multichannel recording system; (2) efficient and accurate algorithms that allow the extraction and analysis of 1D Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves; (3) stable and efficient inversion algorithms for estimating S-wave velocity profiles; and (4) construction of the 2D S-wave velocity field map.

  6. Case Studies on MHD Wave Propagation by the Exos-D Electric Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeong-Seon; Lee, Dong-Hun

    1997-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic wave phenomena have been investigated in the deep plasmasphere by the electric field measurements in the EXOS-D(Akebono) satellite. EXOS-D has highly eccentric orbits(the perigee: 274km, the apogee: 10,500km), which allows relatively long observational time interval near the apogee region compared to othe satellites which pass by the same region with less eccentric orbits. Case studies are peformed on one month data of October in 1989 where the apogee is located near the equator and the magnetic local time is about 9:00-12:00 a.m. in the dayside plasmasphere. The observational region ranges from L=2 to L=3 and the magnetic latitude is restricted to less than 30 degress. The power spectrum is examined for each 128 point series of 8-sec averaged data through a FFT, which covers f=0-62.3 mHz frequency bands. The results are well consistent with field line resonances(FLRs) and cavity modes in the plasmasphere.

  7. The relation between seismic P- and S-wave velocity dispersion in saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Jizba, D.

    1994-01-01

    Seismic velocity dispersion in fluid-saturated rocks appears to be dominated by two mechanisms: the large scale mechanism modeled by Biot, and the local flow or squirt mechanism. The two mechanisms can be distinguished by the ratio of P- to S-wave dispersions, or more conveniently, by the ratio of dynamic bulk to shear compliance dispersions derived from the wave velocities. The authors` formulation suggests that when local flow dominates, the dispersion of the shear compliance will be approximately 4/15 the dispersion of the compressibility. When the Biot mechanism dominates, the constant of proportionality is much smaller. Their examination of ultrasonic velocities from 40 sandstones and granites shows that most, but not all, of the samples were dominated by local flow dispersion, particularly at effective pressures below 40 MPa.

  8. Wave dispersion in a counterstreaming, cold, magnetized, electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    Verdon, M W; Melrose, D B

    2008-04-01

    The dispersion equation is analyzed for waves in a strongly magnetized, electron-positron plasma in which counterstreaming electrons are cold in their respective rest frames. For propagation parallel to the magnetic field the dispersion equation factorizes into equations for two longitudinal modes and four transverse modes. Instabilities occur in both longitudinal and transverse modes, with the most notable being at low wave numbers where a longitudinal branch has purely imaginary frequency. For oblique propagation at small angles, the modes reconnect at points where the parallel modes intersect, either deviating away from each another, or being separated by a pair of complex modes. In addition, intrinsically oblique branches of the dispersion equation appear. The results are applied to an oscillating model for a pulsar magnetosphere, in which the oscillations are purely temporal with a frequency well below relevant wave frequencies, and in which the counterstreaming becomes highly relativistic. We assume that the medium may be treated as time stationary in treating the wave dispersion and wave growth. The wave properties, including the wave frequency, vary periodically with the phase of the oscillations. The fastest growing instability is when the counterstreaming is nonrelativistic or mildly relativistic. A given wave can experience bursts of growth over many oscillations. Mode coupling associated with the cyclotron resonance may be effective in generating the observed orthogonally polarized modes at phases of the oscillation where the (relativistic) cyclotron and wave frequencies are comparable. PMID:18517741

  9. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Angus, J. R.

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  10. Increased P-wave dispersion a risk for atrial fibrillation in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Ertuğrul, İlker; Akgül, Sinem; Derman, Orhan; Karagöz, Tevfik; Kanbur, Nuray

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a prolonged P-wave dispersion is a risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate P-wave dispersion in adolescents with anorexia nervosa at diagnosis. We evaluated electrocardiographic findings, particularly the P-wave dispersion, at initial assessment in 47 adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Comparison of P-wave dispersion between adolescents with anorexia nervosa and controls showed a statistically significant higher P-wave dispersion in patients with anorexia nervosa (72 ± 16.3 msec) when compared to the control group (43.8 ± 9.5 msec). Percent of body weight lost, lower body mass index, and higher weight loss rate in the patients with anorexia nervosa had no effect on P-wave dispersion. Due to the fact that anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate we believe that cardiac pathologies such as atrial fibrillation must also be considered in the medical evaluation. PMID:25985103

  11. Emission of dispersive waves from a train of dark solitons in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Marest, T; Mas Arabí, C; Conforti, M; Mussot, A; Milián, C; Skryabin, D V; Kudlinski, A

    2016-06-01

    We report the experimental observation of multiple dispersive waves (DWs) emitted in the anomalous dispersion region of an optical fiber from a train of dark solitons. Each DW can be associated to one dark soliton of the train, using phase-matching arguments involving higher-order dispersion and soliton velocity. For a large number of dark solitons (>10), we observe the formation of a continuum associated with the efficient emission of DWs. PMID:27244387

  12. Dispersive matched filtering of ultrasonic guided waves for improved sparse array damage localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luppescu, Gregory C.; Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2016-02-01

    Although bulk waves have served as the industry standard in nondestructive evaluation for many years, guided waves (Lamb waves in plates) have become the focus of many current research efforts because they are able to interrogate larger areas of a structure in less time. Despite this advantage, guided waves also have characteristics that obfuscate data interpretation. The first property of guided waves that complicates analysis is their dispersive nature: their wave speed is a function of frequency. The second is that they are multimodal: they propagate as multiple symmetric and antisymmetric modes. Using pulse-compression techniques and a priori calculations of theoretical dispersion curves, the dispersive matched filter attempts to take advantage of these otherwise undesirable characteristics by maximizing the autocorrelation for only one mode, ideally increasing both the signal-to-noise ratio and time-resolution of ultrasonic guided wave measurements. In this research, the responses from broadband chirp excitations are recorded from a sparse transducer array after propagation through an aluminum plate containing no damage and simulated damage. Dispersive matched filtering is applied to the measurements and localization images are generated using the delay-and-sum method. Imaging results are compared to those obtained with narrowband tone burst excitations in terms of their ability to detect and localize the different scatterers. Results show that the dispersive matched filter notably improves the quality of the localization images.

  13. Shock wave dispersion of gas-particle mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Gubaidullin, D. A.; Tukmakov, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    The decay of a discontinuity in a two-component homogeneous gas mixture and the dispersion of a gas-particle mixture with a two-component carrier medium are numerically simulated. The mathematical model of the dynamics of heterogeneous media takes into account the interphase force interaction and interphase heat exchange. Experimental results known from the literature are compared with numerical results describing the dispersion of a gas-particle mixture in a shock tube.

  14. Parametric forcing of waves with a nonmonotonic dispersion relation: Domain structures in ferrofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Raitt, D.; Riecke, H.

    1997-05-01

    Surface waves on ferrofluids exposed to a dc magnetic field exhibit a nonmonotonic dispersion relation. The effect of a parametric driving on such waves is studied within suitable coupled Ginzburg-Landau equations. Due to the nonmonotonicity the neutral curve for the excitation of standing waves can have up to three minima. The stability of the waves with respect to long-wave perturbations is determined via a phase-diffusion equation. It shows that the band of stable wave numbers can split up into two or three subbands. The resulting competition between the wave numbers corresponding to the respective subbands leads quite naturally to patterns consisting of multiple domains of standing waves which differ in their wave number. The coarsening dynamics of such domain structures is addressed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Slowing and stopping of wave in dispersive metamaterial loaded helical guide.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dushyant K; Pathak, Surya K

    2016-02-01

    We propose a dispersive metamaterial loaded helical waveguide (DMLHG) structure that supports slowing and stopping of Electromagnetic (EM) wave. Analytical and computational characterizations have been done to visualize various modal characteristics in detail using the Drude model as a dispersive parameter. It is observed that metamaterial insertion enhances helical guide slow wave behaviour and it supports both forward wave (FW) and backward wave (BW) as well as mode degeneracy. Obtained mode degeneracy mechanism leads to trapping of EM wave. The proposed guide structure provides a dynamic control of wave velocity by varying its physical parameters. Two possible structures are designed and simulated using CST Microwave Studio Software. The simulation results verify the presence of similar characteristics as observed in analytical study such as FW, BW, mode-degeneracy, but in slightly shifted frequency spectrum. PMID:26906840

  16. A rapid signal processing technique to remove the effect of dispersion from guided wave signals.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Paul D

    2003-04-01

    Guided acoustic and ultrasonic waves have been utilized in various manners for non-destructive evaluation and testing. If a guided wave mode is dispersive, a pulse of energy will spread out in space and time as it propagates. For a long-range guided wave inspection application, this constrains the choice of operating point to regions on the dispersion curves where dispersion effects are small. A signal processing technique is presented that enables this constraint on operating point to be relaxed. The technique makes use of a priori knowledge of the dispersion characteristics of a guided wave mode to map signals from the time to distance domains. In the mapping process, dispersed signals are compressed to their original shape. The theoretical basis of the technique is described and an efficient numerical implementation is presented. The robustness of the technique to inaccuracies in the dispersion data is also addressed. The application of the technique to experimental data is shown and the resulting improvement in spatial resolution is demonstrated. The implications of using dispersion compensation in practical systems are briefly discussed. PMID:12744398

  17. Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging using a high-resolution linear radon transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) analysis is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear-wave profile. One of the key steps in the MASW method is to generate an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity domain, so dispersion curves can be determined by picking peaks of dispersion energy. In this paper, we propose to image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy by high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT). The shot gather is first transformed along the time direction to the frequency domain and then the Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy can be imaged by high-resolution LRT using a weighted preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. Synthetic data with a set of linear events are presented to show the process of generating dispersive energy. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that, compared with the slant stacking algorithm, high-resolution LRT can improve the resolution of images of dispersion energy by more than 50%. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  18. Dispersion relation for pure dust Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2011-07-15

    Pure dust Bernstein waves are investigated using non-Maxwellian kappa and (r,q) distribution functions in a collisionless, uniform magnetized dusty plasma. Dispersion relations for both the distributions are derived by considering waves whose frequency is of the order of dust cyclotron frequency, and dispersion curves are plotted. It is observed that the propagation band for dust Bernstein waves is rather narrow as compared with that of the electron Bernstein waves. However, the band width increases for higher harmonics, for both kappa and (r,q) distributions. Effect of dust charge on dispersion curves is also studied, and one observes that with increasing dust charge, the dispersion curves shift toward the lower frequencies. Increasing the dust to ion density ratio ((n{sub d0}/n{sub i0})) causes the dispersion curve to shift toward the higher frequencies. It is also found that for large values of spectral index kappa ({kappa}), the dispersion curves approach to the Maxwellian curves. The (r,q) distribution approaches the kappa distribution for r = 0, whereas for r > 0, the dispersion curves show deviation from the Maxwellian curves as expected. Relevance of this work can be found in astrophysical plasmas, where non-Maxwellian velocity distributions as well as dust particles are commonly observed.

  19. The selection of field acquisition parameters for dispersion images from multichannel surface wave data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.X.; Chan, L.S.; Xia, J.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy and resolution of surface wave dispersion results depend on the parameters used for acquiring data in the field. The optimized field parameters for acquiring multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) dispersion images can be determined if preliminary information on the phase velocity range and interface depth is available. In a case study on a fill slope in Hong Kong, the optimal acquisition parameters were first determined from a preliminary seismic survey prior to a MASW survey. Field tests using different sets of receiver distances and array lengths showed that the most consistent and useful dispersion images were obtained from the optimal acquisition parameters predicted. The inverted S-wave velocities from the dispersion curve obtained at the optimal offset distance range also agreed with those obtained by using direct refraction survey.

  20. Generation of Rayleigh-wave dispersion images from multichannel seismic data using sparse signal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Songchol; Bao, Yuequan; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    The accurate estimation of dispersion curves has been a key issue for ensuring high quality in geophysical surface wave exploration. Many studies have been carried out on the generation of a high-resolution dispersion image from array measurements. In this study, the sparse signal representation and reconstruction techniques are employed to obtain the high resolution Rayleigh-wave dispersion image from seismic wave data. First, a sparse representation of the seismic wave data is introduced, in which the signal is assumed to be sparse in terms of wave speed. Then, the sparse signal is reconstructed by optimization using l1-norm regularization, which gives the signal amplitude spectrum as a function of wave speed. A dispersion image in the f-v domain is generated by arranging the sparse spectra for all frequency slices in the frequency range. Finally, to show the efficiency of the proposed approach, the Surfbar-2 field test data, acquired by B. Luke and colleagues at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, are analysed. By comparing the real-field dispersion image with the results from other methods, the high mode-resolving ability of the proposed approach is demonstrated, particularly for a case with strongly coherent modes.

  1. Evaluating Crude Oil Chemical Dispersion Efficacy In A Flow-Through Wave Tank Under Regular Non-Breaking Wave And Breaking Wave Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing dispersant effectiveness under conditions similar to that of the open environment is required for improvements in operational procedures and the formulation of regulatory guidelines. To this end, a novel wave tank facility was fabricated to study the dispersion of crude ...

  2. Microscopic models for electromagnetic wave propagation in highly dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defacio, Brian

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to advance the understanding of the propagation of ultrafast picosecond electromagnetic pulses in biological solutions and ultimately, in human tissue. Present day standards of the allowed electromagnetic doses do not include dispersion, modulation or envelope effects, memory or nonlinearity. It is well-known experimentally that biological solutions are highly dispersive. It is plausible, but not established, that modulation, memory, and nonlinearity may be important in biological solutions. Hence, this project represents a first step toward better standards.

  3. The local dispersion relation for magneto-atmospheric waves. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The local dispersion relation for magneto-atmospheric waves is discussed in terms of the linearized theory of waves in a plane-stratified, inviscid, perfectly conducting atmosphere under uniform gravity. The normally used local dispersion relation is demonstrated to not be unique, depending instead on the order of derivation from the fundamental first-order perturbation equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and induction. Furthermore, it is shown that the local dispersion relation predicts that the cutoff frequency decreases with increasing magnetic field strength, while the WKB approximation method projects an increase in the cutoff frequency with increasing magnetic field strength. A new form of the local dispersion relation is developed, and consideration is given to the special case of a global dispersion relation in conditions of an isothermal atmosphere with a horizontal magnetic field.

  4. The incomplete plasma dispersion function: Properties and application to waves in bounded plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baalrud, S. D.

    2013-01-15

    The incomplete plasma dispersion function is a generalization of the plasma dispersion function in which the defining integral spans a semi-infinite, rather than infinite, domain. It is useful for describing the linear dielectric response and wave dispersion in non-Maxwellian plasmas when the distribution functions can be approximated as Maxwellian over finite, or semi-infinite, intervals in velocity phase-space. A ubiquitous example is the depleted Maxwellian electron distribution found near boundary sheaths or double layers, where the passing interval can be modeled as Maxwellian with a lower temperature than the trapped interval. The depleted Maxwellian is used as an example to demonstrate the utility of using the incomplete plasma dispersion function for calculating modifications to wave dispersion relations.

  5. Extending dispersive waves theory to use in semi-open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakova, Lyubov; Rosales, Ruben; Rzeznik, Andrew; Tabak, Esteban

    2015-11-01

    In the classical linear dispersive wave theory the sinusoidal waves e i (kx - ωt) carry energy with the group speed cg = dω / dk . This concept is limited to the case where both the frequency ω (k) and the wavenumber k are real. On the other hand, semi-open dispersive systems allow more than just sinusoidal solutions: they can have exponentially blowing up and/or decaying solutions as well. In this talk I will address the questions of what is direction and the speed of the energy propagation for these exponential waves, extend the classical concept of group velocity, and use this theory to construct radiation boundary conditions for semi-open dispersive systems. This approach will be demonstrated on an example of dry hydrostatic troposphere which experiences effective damping due to gravity waves propagating into the stratosphere. RSE, Scottish government.

  6. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  7. Effects of periodic kicking on dispersion and wave packet dynamics in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Adhip; Bhattacharya, Utso; Dutta, Amit; Sen, Diptiman

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of δ -function periodic kicks on the Floquet energy-momentum dispersion in graphene. We find that a rich variety of dispersions can appear depending on the parameters of the kicking: at certain points in the Brillouin zone, the dispersion can become linear but anisotropic, linear in one direction and quadratic in the perpendicular direction, gapped with a quadratic dispersion, or completely flat (called dynamical localization). We show all these results analytically and demonstrate them numerically through the dynamics of wave packets propagating in graphene. We propose experimental methods for producing these effects.

  8. Effects Of Relative Strength Of Dispersion On The Formation Of Nonlinear Waves In Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.

    2009-07-07

    In this paper, we studied the effect of strength of dispersion on the formation of solitons and shock waves in un-magnetized dusty plasma using the reductive perturbative technique. Different relational forms of strength parameter epsilon were chosen such a way that it altered the stretching of space, x and time, t variables, thereby leading to different nonlinearities. First, we considered the form zeta = sq root(epsilon(x-v{sub 0}t)) and tau = sq root(epsilont), where v{sub 0} is the phase velocity, with 0dispersion. We obtained the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for un-modulated dust acoustic wave with solitary wave-type solution. The effect of dissipation on the wave propagation was analyzed with coordinate transformations zeta epsilon(x-v{sub 0}t) and tau = epsilon{sup 2}t, with 0wave-type solution. From this study, we concluded that when the dissipation effect is negligible in comparison with dispersion, dust charge fluctuations can only change the amplitude of solitary wave, as observed in the KdV case. However, when the system is not sufficiently dispersive, the dissipation due to dust charge fluctuations can play dominant role and eventually leads to the formation of dust-acoustic shock wave.

  9. Improving the uniqueness of shear wave velocity profiles derived from the inversion of multiple-mode surface wave dispersion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supranata, Yosep Erwin

    One of the factors, which contributes to errors in shear wave velocity profile obtained from the inversion of surface wave dispersion data is non-uniqueness due to the limited number of field dispersion data. In this research, a new procedure is developed to improve the uniqueness of the shear wave velocity profile resulting from the inversion. A new forward modeling algorithm using the smallest absolute eigenvalue as the screening parameter to generate Rayleigh wave modes from a theoretical model is developed. The theoretical model adopted in this research is the Dynamic Stiffness Matrix. The results indicate that the new technique is more reliable than the traditional method using the determinant as the screening parameter. The performance of the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno and Levenberg-Marquardt methods are evaluated in this research to determine the most suitable gradient method for surface wave inversion. Comparison of the performance of the two methods shows that the Levenberg-Marquardt method produces more accurate results than the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method. An updated inversion technique which divides the inversion process into a number of stages, with each successive stage utilizing the shear wave velocities obtained from the previous stage as its initial model, is introduced. The number of stages is the same as the highest Rayleigh wave mode number, and the kth stage of the inversion utilizes the dispersion data from the 1st through kth modes. Shear wave velocities obtained from the updated inversion technique are more accurate than those obtained from the inversion procedure using an initial model constructed from fundamental mode dispersion data.

  10. Ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey P.

    2014-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The ideal MHD model; 3. General properties of ideal MHD; 5. Equilibrium: one-dimensional configurations; 6. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations; 7. Equilibrium: three-dimensional configurations; 8. Stability: general considerations; 9. Alternate MHD models; 10. MHD stability comparison theorems; 11. Stability: one-dimensional configurations; 12. Stability: multi-dimensional configurations; Appendix A. Heuristic derivation of the kinetic equation; Appendix B. The Braginskii transport coefficients; Appendix C. Time derivatives in moving plasmas; Appendix D. The curvature vector; Appendix E. Overlap limit of the high b and Greene-Johnson stellarator models; Appendix F. General form for q(y); Appendix G. Natural boundary conditions; Appendix H. Upper and lower bounds on dQKIN.

  11. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I.; Osman, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg–de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE’s. PMID:26199750

  12. On shallow water waves in a medium with time-dependent dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Hamdy I; Osman, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we studied the progression of shallow water waves relevant to the variable coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vcKdV) equation. We investigated two kinds of cases: when the dispersion and nonlinearity coefficients are proportional, and when they are not linearly dependent. In the first case, it was shown that the progressive waves have some geometric structures as in the case of KdV equation with constant coefficients but the waves travel with time dependent speed. In the second case, the wave structure is maintained when the nonlinearity balances the dispersion. Otherwise, water waves collapse. The objectives of the study are to find a wide class of exact solutions by using the extended unified method and to present a new algorithm for treating the coupled nonlinear PDE's. PMID:26199750

  13. Wave-packet formation at the zero-dispersion point in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, A J; Johnson, E R

    2015-05-01

    The long-time effect of weak rotation on an internal solitary wave is the decay into inertia-gravity waves and the eventual emergence of a coherent, steadily propagating, nonlinear wave packet. There is currently no entirely satisfactory explanation as to why these wave packets form. Here the initial value problem is considered within the context of the Gardner-Ostrovsky, or rotation-modified extended Korteweg-de Vries, equation. The linear Gardner-Ostrovsky equation has maximum group velocity at a critical wave number, often called the zero-dispersion point. It is found here that a nonlinear splitting of the wave-number spectrum at the zero-dispersion point, where energy is shifted into the modulationally unstable regime of the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation, is responsible for the wave-packet formation. Numerical comparisons of the decay of a solitary wave in the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation and a derived nonlinear Schrödinger equation at the zero-dispersion point are used to confirm the spectral splitting. PMID:26066112

  14. Optical gyroscope with controllable dispersion in four wave mixing regime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy; Wolfe, Owen; Du, Shuangli; Rochester, Simon; Budker, Dmitry; Novikova, Irina

    2016-05-01

    We present our work towards realization of the fast-light gyroscope prototype, in which the sensitivity enhancement (compared to a regular laser gyroscopes) is achieved by adjusting the intra-cavity dispersion. We discuss schematics and underlying nonlinear effects leading to the negative dispersion in Rb vapor: level structure, optically addressed transitions, and configuration of the resonant cavity. We investigate dependence of the pulling factor (i.e., the ratio of the lasing frequency shift with the change of the cavity length to the equivalent resonance frequency shift in the empty cavity) on pump lasers detunings, power, and density of the atomic vapor. The observation of the pulling factor exceeding unity implies the gyroscope sensitivity improvement over the regular system This work is supported by Naval Air Warfare Center STTR program N68335-11-C-0428.

  15. Higher order dispersion in the propagation of a gravity wave packet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Dong, B.

    1989-01-01

    To the first order of approximation, the complex amplitude of a wave packet in an anisotropic and dispersive medium is convected with the group of velocity. However, a gravity wave is a vector wave. Its wave packet must be formed by superposition of various wave numbers with corresponding frequencies, as is the case for scalar waves, and additionally by superposing many eigenmodes which also depend on the wave number. To represent the vector wave packet self-consistently, it is found that a gradient term must be included in the expansion. For a Guassian wave packet, this gradient term is shown to have important implications on the velocity vector as represented by its hodograph. Numerical results show that the hodograph is influenced by the location of the relative position of interest from the center of a Gaussian pulse. Higher order expansion shows that an initial Gaussian wave packet will retain its Gaussian shape as it propagates, but the pulse will spread in all directions with its major axis undergoing a rotation. Numerical results indicate that these higher order dispersive effects may be marginally observable in the atmosphere.

  16. Shear wave velocity models retrieved using Rg wave dispersion data in shallow crust in some regions of southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shutian; Motazedian, Dariush; Corchete, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Many crucial tasks in seismology, such as locating seismic events and estimating focal mechanisms, need crustal velocity models. The velocity models of shallow structures are particularly important in the simulation of ground motions. In southern Ontario, Canada, many small shallow earthquakes occur, generating high-frequency Rayleigh ( Rg) waves that are sensitive to shallow structures. In this research, the dispersion of Rg waves was used to obtain shear-wave velocities in the top few kilometers of the crust in the Georgian Bay, Sudbury, and Thunder Bay areas of southern Ontario. Several shallow velocity models were obtained based on the dispersion of recorded Rg waves. The Rg waves generated by an m N 3.0 natural earthquake on the northern shore of Georgian Bay were used to obtain velocity models for the area of an earthquake swarm in 2007. The Rg waves generated by a mining induced event in the Sudbury area in 2005 were used to retrieve velocity models between Georgian Bay and the Ottawa River. The Rg waves generated by the largest event in a natural earthquake swarm near Thunder Bay in 2008 were used to obtain a velocity model in that swarm area. The basic feature of all the investigated models is that there is a top low-velocity layer with a thickness of about 0.5 km. The seismic velocities changed mainly within the top 2 km, where small earthquakes often occur.

  17. Numerical calculation of electromagnetic eigenfields and dispersion relations for slow-wave device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oslake, J.M.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Slow-wave structures support microwave amplification via electromagnetic coupling with an injected electron beam. Critical in the design of such devices is the dependence of the dispersion relation on the geometry of the guiding structure. The dispersion relation provides phase and group velocities, and the fields provide the impedance as seen by the beam. To this end, a computer model is developed which first numerically solves a wave equation in finite difference form subject to boundary conditions periodic in z and conducting elsewhere. For decades, the desired dispersion and impedance have been obtained experimentally from cold tests (no beam) on slow-wave structures by varying structure dimensions. However, the numerical approach condenses this process to a few minutes of simulation.

  18. Dispersion relations with crossing symmetry for {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, R.

    2011-04-01

    A set of once subtracted dispersion relations with imposed crossing symmetry condition for the {pi}{pi} D- and F-wave amplitudes is derived and analyzed. An example of numerical calculations in the effective two-pion mass range from the threshold to 1.1 GeV is presented. It is shown that these new dispersion relations impose quite strong constraints on the analyzed {pi}{pi} interactions and are very useful tools to test the {pi}{pi} amplitudes. One of the goals of this work is to provide a complete set of equations required for easy use. Full analytical expressions are presented. Along with the well-known dispersion relations successful in testing the {pi}{pi} S- and P-wave amplitudes, those presented here for the D and F waves give a complete set of tools for analyses of the {pi}{pi} interactions.

  19. An effective absorbing boundary condition for linear long-wave and linear dispersive-wave tsunami simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Furumura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We numerically simulated the propagation of tsunami waves with finite difference methods by using perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary conditions to effectively eliminate artificial reflections from model boundaries. The PML method damps the tsunami height and velocity of seawater only in directions perpendicular to the boundary. Although the additional terms required to implement the PML conditions make the use of the PML technique difficult for linear dispersive tsunami waves, we have proposed an empirical extension of the PML method for modeling dispersive tsunami waves. Even for heterogeneous, realistic bathymetries, numerical tests demonstrated that the PML boundary condition dramatically decreased artificial reflections from model boundaries compared to the use of traditional boundary conditions. The use of PML boundary conditions for numerical modeling of tsunamis is especially useful because it facilitates use of the later phases of tsunamis that would otherwise be compromised by artifacts caused by reflections from model boundaries.

  20. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  1. Dispersion of Lamb waves in a honeycomb composite sandwich panel.

    PubMed

    Baid, Harsh; Schaal, Christoph; Samajder, Himadri; Mal, Ajit

    2015-02-01

    Composite materials are increasingly being used in advanced aircraft and aerospace structures. Despite their many advantages, composites are often susceptible to hidden damages that may occur during manufacturing and/or service of the structure. Therefore, safe operation of composite structures requires careful monitoring of the initiation and growth of such defects. Ultrasonic methods using guided waves offer a reliable and cost effective method for defects monitoring in advanced structures due to their long propagation range and their sensitivity to defects in their propagation path. In this paper, some of the useful properties of guided Lamb type waves are investigated, using analytical, numerical and experimental methods, in an effort to provide the knowledge base required for the development of viable structural health monitoring systems for composite structures. The laboratory experiments involve a pitch-catch method in which a pair of movable transducers is placed on the outside surface of the structure for generating and recording the wave signals. The specific cases considered include an aluminum plate, a woven composite laminate and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel. The agreement between experimental, numerical and theoretical results are shown to be excellent in certain frequency ranges, providing a guidance for the design of effective inspection systems. PMID:25287973

  2. Impact of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2007-01-01

    Effect of the ring current ions in the real part of electromagnetic ion Cyclotron wave dispersion relation is studied on global scale. Recent Cluster observations by Engebretson et al. showed that although the temperature anisotropy of is energetic (> 10 keV) ring current protons was high during the entire 22 November 2003 perigee pass, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves were observed only in conjunction with intensification of the ion fluxes below 1 keV by over an order of magnitude. To study the effect of the ring current ions on the wave dispersive properties and the corresponding global wave redistribution, we use a self-consistent model of interacting ring current and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows: First, the plasma density enhancement in the night MLT sector during the main and recovery storm phases is mostly caused by injection of suprathermal plasma sheet H + (approximately < 1 keV), which dominate the thermal plasma density. Second, during the recovery storm phases, the ring current modification of the wave dispersion relation leads to a qualitative change of the wave patterns in the postmidnight-dawn sector for L > 4.75. This "new" wave activity is well organized by outward edges of dense suprathermal ring current spots, and the waves are not observed if the ring current ions are not included in the real part of dispersion relation. Third, the most intense wave-induced ring current precipitation is located in the night MLT sector and caused by modification of the wave dispersion relation. The strongest precipitating fluxes of about 8 X 10(exp 6)/ (cm(exp 2) - s X st) are found near L=5.75, MLT=2 during the early recovery phase on 4 May. Finally, the nightside precipitation is more intense than the dayside fluxes, even if there are less intense waves, because the convection field moves ring current ions into the loss cone on the nightside, but drives

  3. Grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in granular marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masao

    2014-07-01

    The author has shown that measured shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in water-saturated silica sand can be predicted by using a gap stiffness model incorporated into the Biot model (the BIMGS model) [Kimura, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 144-155 (2013)]. In this study, the grain-size dependence of shear wave speed dispersion and attenuation in four kinds of water-saturated silica sands with different grain sizes is measured and calculated. As a result, the grain-size dependence of the aspect ratio in the BIMGS model can be validated and the effects of multiple scattering for larger grain sizes are demonstrated. PMID:24993238

  4. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Sun, Ya; Chai, Jun; Jiang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dispersion varying fibres have applications in optical pulse compression techniques. We investigate Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma (KM) solitons and optical rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre based on a variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Analytical solutions in the forms of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves up to the second order of that equation are obtained via the generalised Darboux transformation and integrable constraint. The properties of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre, e.g. dispersion decreasing fibre (DDF) or a periodically distributed system (PDS), are discussed: in a DDF we observe the compression behaviours of KM solitons and rogue waves on a monotonically increasing background. The amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton increases, while the width of each peak of the KM soliton gradually decreases along the propagation distance; in a PDS, the amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton varies periodically along the propagation distance on a periodic background. Different from the KM soliton, the Akhmediev breather and rogue waves repeat their behaviours along the propagation distance without the compression.

  6. Effect of spatial dispersion on transient acoustic wave propagation in 3D.

    PubMed

    Every, A G

    2006-12-22

    Spatial dispersion is the variation of wave speed with wavelength. It sets in when the acoustic wavelength approaches the natural scale of length of the medium, which could, for example, be the lattice constant of a crystal, the repeat distance in a superlattice, or the grain size in a granular material. In centrosymmetric media, the first onset of dispersion is accommodated by the introduction of fourth order spatial derivatives into the wave equation. These lead to a correction to the phase velocity which is quadratic in the spatial frequency. This paper treats the effect of spatial dispersion on the point force elastodynamic Green's functions of solids. The effects of dispersion are shown to be most pronounced in the vicinity of wave arrivals. These lose their singular form, and are transformed into wave trains known as quasi-arrivals. The step and ramp function wave arrivals are treated, and it is shown that their unfolded quasi-arrival forms can be expressed in terms of integrals involving the Airy function. PMID:16828830

  7. Breakup of an oil slick mixed with dispersants by breaking wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Holser, Anne; Katz, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    After oil spill, coherent oil slick are entrained by breaking ocean waves together with air, which produces a complicated three-phase flow, involving a wide range of length and time scales. The oil droplet size distribution is a crucial factor affecting the physical and chemical dispersion of oil spills, but little is known about oil droplet formation mechanism and droplet size distributions during and immediately after the impact of breaking waves. In our experimental study, we investigate the breakup of an oil slick in a specialized wave tank. The widely used dispersant Coexist 9500-A at different dispersant to oil ratio is used for varying the surface tension of crude oil (MC252 surrogate) in the 10 - 1 to 10 mN/m range. The dispersant is applied either by premixing or surface spraying, the latter consistent with typical application. The results include high-speed images of the oil and bubbles' entrainment, showing the resulting formation of a series of droplet clouds during multiple ``plunges'' associated with a single propagating breaking wave. High-speed inline digital holographic cinematography is employed to quantify the oil droplet size distribution, and the impact of droplet-bubble interactions on the entrainment process for varying Weber numbers, and wave properties, from spilling to plunging breakers. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  8. Dispersion of Extensional and Torsional Waves in Porous Cylinders with Patchy Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G; Pride, S R

    2002-03-20

    Laboratory experiments on wave propagation through saturated and partially saturated porous media have often been conducted on porous cylinders that were initially fully saturated and then allowed to dry while continuing to acquire data on the wave behavior. Since it is known that drying typically progresses from the outside to the inside, a sensible physical model of this process is concentric cylinders having different saturation levels--the simplest example being a fully dry outer cylindrical shell together with a fully wet inner cylinder. We use this model to formulate the equations for wave dispersion in porous cylinders for patchy saturation (i.e., drainage) conditions. In addition to multiple modes of propagation obtained numerically from these dispersion relations, we find two distinct analytical expressions for torsional wave modes.

  9. Spatiotemporal dispersion and wave envelopes with relativistic and pseudorelativistic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Christian, J M; McDonald, G S; Hodgkinson, T F; Chamorro-Posada, P

    2012-01-20

    A generic nonparaxial model for pulse envelopes is presented. Classic Schrödinger-type descriptions of wave propagation have their origins in slowly-varying envelopes combined with a Galilean boost to the local time frame. By abandoning these two simplifications, a picture of pulse evolution emerges in which frame-of-reference considerations and space-time transformations take center stage. A wide range of effects, analogous to those in special relativity, then follows for both linear and nonlinear systems. Explicit demonstration is presented through exact bright and dark soliton pulse solutions. PMID:22400744

  10. Dispersion in Nb microstrip transmission lines at submillimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H. H. S.; Mcgrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, H. G.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the effects of dispersion on the resonant mode frequencies of open-ended Nb-SiO(x)-Nb microstrip transmission lines over a frequency range from 50 to 800 GHz. Submicron Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions were used as both voltage-controlled oscillators and detectors to sample the high order modes of the resonators. The resonator modes are equally spaced up to about 550 GHz where the mode spacing start to decrease gradually to a minimum above the gap frequency of about 700 GHz and then increases. Results are in good agreement with the expected theoretical behavior based on the Mattis-Bardeen conductivity of the superconductor line.

  11. Shear-wave velocity structure of young Atlantic Lithosphere from dispersion analysis and waveform modelling of Rayleigh waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Schippkus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The lithosphere is the outermost solid layer of the Earth and includes the brittle curst and brittle uppermost mantle. It is underlain by the asthenosphere, the weaker and hotter portion of the mantle. The boundary between the brittle lithosphere and the asthenosphere is call the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, or LAB. The oceanic lithosphere is created at spreading ridges and cools and thickens with age. Seismologists define the LAB by the presence of a low shear wave velocity zone beneath a high velocity lid. Surface waves from earthquakes occurring in young oceanic lithosphere should sample lithospheric structure when being recorded in the vicinity of a mid-ocean ridge. Here, we study group velocity and dispersion of Rayleigh waves caused by earthquakes occurring at transform faults in the Central Atlantic Ocean. Earthquakes were recorded either by a network of wide-band (up to 60 s) ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°N or at the Global Seismic Network (GSN) Station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surface waves sampling young Atlantic lithosphere indicate systematic age-dependent changes of group velocities and dispersion of Rayleigh waves. With increasing plate age maximum group velocity increases (as a function of period), indicating cooling and thickening of the lithosphere. Shear wave velocity is derived inverting the observed dispersion of Rayleigh waves. Further, models derived from the OBS records were refined using waveform modelling of vertical component broadband data at periods of 15 to 40 seconds, constraining the velocity structure of the uppermost 100 km and hence in the depth interval of the mantle where lithospheric cooling is most evident. Waveform modelling supports that the thickness of lithosphere increases with age and that velocities in the lithosphere increase, too.

  12. Demonstration and study of the dispersion of water waves with a computer-controlled ripple tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ströbel, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    The design of a ripple tank built in an undergraduate student project is described. Water waves are excited acoustically using computer programmable wave shapes. The projected wave patterns are recorded with a video camera and analyzed quantitatively. From the propagation of wave packets in distilled water at three different depths, the phase and group velocities are measured in the frequency range from 2 to 50 Hz. Good agreement with theory is found. The propagation of wave trains of different shapes is recorded and explained on the basis of the stationary phase approximation. Various types of precursors are detected. For a depth slightly above the critical depth and thus nearly dispersion-free, the solitary-like propagation of a single pulse is observed. In shallow water, the compression of a chirped pulse is demonstrated. Circular waves produced by falling water drops are recorded and analyzed.

  13. On the dispersion relations for parametric instabilities of parallel-progagating Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanti, Venku; Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1993-08-01

    We consider the dispersion relation for the parametric instabilities of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfvén waves, propagating parallel to the ambient magnetic field. A linear perturbation analysis is employed, and the perturbations are taken to propagate along the ambient field. The standard analysis which has been used previously assumes that density perturbations vary as exp[i(kz-ωt)] this defines the meaning of ω and k. However, the differential equations have periodic coefficients, implying that Floquet analysis should be used. We here present an analysis based on Floquet's theorem. The result is a hierarchy of dispersion relations. However, all the dispersion relations are found to be equivalent to the one obtained via the standard analysis; the differences between them are due only to how ω and k are defined. Thus we conclude that physically there is really only one dispersion relation, namely the ``electrostatic dispersion relation,'' which is in agreement with earlier works. However, we disagree with Viñas and Goldstein (1991b), who obtained additional dispersion relations which they have called the ``electromagnetic dispersion relations.'' Their additional dispersion relations are a consequence of first truncating the dispersion relation for obliquely propagating perturbations and then taking the limit of parallel-propagating perturbations.

  14. Are Ring Current Ions Lost in Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  15. Effect of Ring Current Ions on Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Wave Dispersion Relation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are widely observed in the inner and outer magnetosphere, at geostationary orbit, at high latitudes along the plasmapause, and at the ionospheric altitudes. Interaction of the Ring Current (RC) ions and EMIC waves causes ion scattering into the loss cone and leads to decay of the RC, especially during the main phase of storms when the RC decay times of about one hour or less are observed. The oblique EMIC waves damp due to Landau resonance with the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, and subsequent transport of the dissipating wave energy into the ionosphere below causes an ionosphere temperature enhancement. Induced scattering of these waves by the plasmaspheric thermal ions leads to ion temperature enhancement, and forms a so-called hot zone near the plasmapause where the temperature of core plasma ions can reach tens of thousands of degrees. Relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt also interact well with the EMIC waves, and during the main and/or recovery phases of the storms these electrons can easily be scattered into the loss cone over a time scale from several hours to a day. The plasma density distribution in the magnetosphere and the ion content play a critical role in EMIC wave generation and propagation, but the wave dispersion relation in the known RC-EMIC wave interaction models is assumed to be determined by the thermal plasma distribution only. In these models, the modification of the EMIC wave dispersion relation caused by the RC ions is not taken into account, and the RC ions are only treated as a source of free energy in order to generate EMIC waves. At the same time, the RC ions can dominate the thermal magnetospheric content in the night MLT sector at great L shells during the main and/or recovery storm phase. In this study, using our self-consistent RC-EMIC wave model [Khazanov et al., 2006], we simulate the May 1998 storm in order to quantify the global EMIC wave redistribution caused by

  16. Lamb Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV) Method for Quantifying Mechanical Properties of Viscoelastic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle to supply sufficient stroke volumes under normal physiological conditions and is often accompanied by stiffening of the left-ventricular myocardium. A noninvasive technique capable of quantifying viscoelasticity of the myocardium would be beneficial in clinical settings. Our group has been investigating the use of Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV), a noninvasive ultrasound based method for quantifying viscoelasticity of soft tissues. The primary motive of this study is the design and testing of viscoelastic materials suitable for validation of the Lamb wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (LDUV), an SDUV-based technique for measuring viscoelasticity of tissues with plate-like geometry. We report the results of quantifying viscoelasticity of urethane rubber and gelatin samples using LDUV and an embedded sphere method. The LDUV method was used to excite antisymmetric Lamb waves and measure the dispersion in urethane rubber and gelatin plates. An antisymmetric Lamb wave model was fitted to the wave speed dispersion data to estimate elasticity and viscosity of the materials. A finite element model of a viscoelastic plate submerged in water was used to study the appropriateness of the Lamb wave dispersion equations. An embedded sphere method was used as an independent measurement of the viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin. The FEM dispersion data were in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. Viscoelasticity of the urethane rubber and gelatin obtained using the LDUV and embedded sphere methods agreed within one standard deviation. LDUV studies on excised porcine myocardium sample were performed to investigate the feasibility of the approach in preparation for open-chest in vivo studies. The results suggest that the LDUV technique can be used to quantify mechanical properties of soft tissues with a plate-like geometry. PMID:21403186

  17. Application of particle swarm optimization to interpret Rayleigh wave dispersion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianhai; Tang, Li; Lv, Xiaochun; Fang, Hongping; Gu, Hanming

    2012-09-01

    Rayleigh waves have been used increasingly as an appealing tool to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. However, inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves is challenging for most local-search methods due to its high nonlinearity and to its multimodality. In this study, we proposed and tested a new Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion scheme based on particle swarm optimization (PSO). PSO is a global optimization strategy that simulates the social behavior observed in a flock (swarm) of birds searching for food. A simple search strategy in PSO guides the algorithm toward the best solution through constant updating of the cognitive knowledge and social behavior of the particles in the swarm. To evaluate calculation efficiency and stability of PSO to inversion of surface wave data, we first inverted three noise-free and three noise-corrupted synthetic data sets. Then, we made a comparative analysis with genetic algorithms (GA) and a Monte Carlo (MC) sampler and reconstructed a histogram of model parameters sampled on a low-misfit region less than 15% relative error to further investigate the performance of the proposed inverse procedure. Finally, we inverted a real-world example from a waste disposal site in NE Italy to examine the applicability of PSO on Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. Results from both synthetic and field data demonstrate that particle swarm optimization can be used for quantitative interpretation of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. PSO seems superior to GA and MC in terms of both reliability and computational efforts. The great advantages of PSO are fast in locating the low misfit region and easy to implement. Also there are only three parameters to tune (inertia weight or constriction factor, local and global acceleration constants). Theoretical results exist to explain how to tune these parameters.

  18. Experimental Method for Identification of Disper-Sive Three-Wave Coupling in Space Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, D.; Bates, I.; Balikhin, M. A.; Alleyne, H. St. C. K.; Dunlop, M.; Baumjohann, W.

    A statistical method used for estimating the linear and quadratic processes in laboratory plasma is adapted for dispersive waves in space plasma turbulence. This method is applied to magnetic field data obtained from AMPTE IRM and AMPTE UKS satellites in the magnetosheath just downstream of the Earth's bow shock. The results show the presence of two instabilities, presumably related to the distribution of ions.

  19. Asymptotic behavior of dispersive waves in a spiral structure at large times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the sine-Gordon integrable model for spiral magnetic structures, we investigate the behavior at large times of a weakly nonlinear dispersive wave field generated by a spatially local initial excitation of the structure. The method used is based on a direct asymptotic analysis of the corresponding matrix of the Riemann problem on the torus.

  20. Dispersion Relation and Numerical Simulation of Hydrodynamic Waves In Mar's Topside Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.-S.; Nielsen, E.

    The dispersion relation for hydrodynamic waves in an ionosphere with at most a weak magnetic field shows, hydrodynamic hybrid waves may be excited in the topside iono- sphere of Mars and Venus owing to fluctuations in the solar wind pressure. The hy- brid waves result from coupling between two different hydrodynamic wave modes: the classic acoustic-gravity wave(AGW) and the newly developed background gradi- ent wave(BGW). Numerical simulations show that these waves will cause wave-like structures in the altitude profiles of the ionospheric plasma density. The wavelength and frequency are various but their prevailing values in Martian ionosphere are about 60km and 0.001-0.0001Hz, respectively. The amplitudes of the plasma density vari- ations decrease nearly exponentially with increasing altitude, and are of the same or- der of the magnitude as the uncertainty on all the previous measurements of Mar- tian ionospheric electron densities. Radio occultation observations at Mars and Venus show electron density fluctuations in the high altitude ionosphere. The fluctuations are mainly noise, but they may in part be caused by hydrodynamic wave activity. To verify wave activity more detailed measurements are required, and may be obtained with the low frequency radar planned for the Mars Express mission.

  1. Three octave spanning supercontinuum by red-shifted dispersive wave in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mohit; Konar, S.

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a three-layer index guided lead silicate (SF57) photonic crystal fiber which simultaneously promises to yield large effective optical nonlinear coefficient and low anomalous dispersion that makes it suitable for supercontinuum (SC) generation. At an operating wavelength 1550 nm, the typical optimized value of anomalous dispersion and effective nonlinear coefficient turns out to be ~4 ps/km/nm and ~1078 W-1km-1, respectively. Through numerical simulation, it is realized that the designed fiber promises to exhibit three octave spanning SC from 900 to 7200 nm using 50 fs 'sech' optical pulses of 5 kW peak power. Due to the cross-phase modulation and four-wave mixing processes, a long range of red-shifted dispersive wave generated, which assists to achieve such large broadening. In addition, we have investigated the compatibility of SC generation with input pulse peak power increment and briefly discussed the impact of nonlinear processes on SC generation.

  2. Parametric instabilities of the circularly polarized Alfven waves including dispersion. [for solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    A class of parametric instabilities of large-amplitude, circularly polarized Alfven waves is considered in which finite frequency (dispersive) effects are included. The dispersion equation governing the instabilities is a sixth-order polynomial which is solved numerically. As a function of K identically equal to k/k-sub-0 (where k-sub-0 and k are the wave number of the 'pump' wave and unstable sound wave, respectively), there are three regionals of instability: a modulation instability at K less than 1, a decay instability at K greater than 1, and a relatively weak and narrow instability at K close to squared divided by v-sub-A squared (where c-sub-s and v-sub-A are the sound and Alfven speeds respectively), the modulational instability occurs when beta is less than 1 (more than 1) for left-hand (right-hand) pump waves, in agreement with the previous results of Sakai and Sonnerup (1983). The growth rate of the decay instability of left-hand waves is greater than the modulational instability at all values of beta. Applications to large-amplitude wave observed in the solar wind, in computer simulations, and in the vicinity of planetary and interplanetary collisionless shocks are discussed.

  3. Poroelastic model to relate seismic wave attenuation and dispersion to permeability anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.

    2000-02-01

    A transversely isotropic model with a horizontal axis of symmetry, based on the Biot and squirt-flow mechanisms, predicts seismic waves in poroelastic media. The model estimates velocity dispersion and attenuation of waves propagating in the frequency range of crosswell and high-resolution reverse vertical seismic profiling (VSP) (250--1,250 HZ) for vertical permeability value much greater than horizontal permeability parameters. The model assumes the principal axes of the stiffness constant tensor are aligned with the axes of the permeability and squirt-flow tensors. In addition, the unified Biot and squirt-flow mechanism (BISQ) model is adapted to simulate cracks in permeable media. Under these conditions, the model simulations demonstrate that the preferential direction of fluid flow in a reservoir containing fluid-filled cracks can be determined by analyzing the phase velocity and attenuation of seismic waves propagating at different azimuth and incident angles. As a result, the fast compressional wave can be related to permeability anisotropy in a reservoir. The model results demonstrate that for fast quasi-P-wave propagating perpendicular to fluid-filled cracks, the attenuation is greater than when the wave propagates parallel to the plane of the crack. Theoretical predictions and velocity dispersion of interwell seismic waves in the Kankakee Limestone Formation at the Buckhorn test site (Illinois) demonstrate that the permeable rock matrix surrounding a low-velocity heterogeneity contains vertical cracks.

  4. Parallel Implementation of Dispersive Tsunami Wave Modeling with a Nesting Algorithm for the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Toshitaka; Takahashi, Narumi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki; Ando, Kazuto; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Kato, Toshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Because of improvements in offshore tsunami observation technology, dispersion phenomena during tsunami propagation have often been observed in recent tsunamis, for example the 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis. The dispersive propagation of tsunamis can be simulated by use of the Boussinesq model, but the model demands many computational resources. However, rapid progress has been made in parallel computing technology. In this study, we investigated a parallelized approach for dispersive tsunami wave modeling. Our new parallel software solves the nonlinear Boussinesq dispersive equations in spherical coordinates. A variable nested algorithm was used to increase spatial resolution in the target region. The software can also be used to predict tsunami inundation on land. We used the dispersive tsunami model to simulate the 2011 Tohoku earthquake on the Supercomputer K. Good agreement was apparent between the dispersive wave model results and the tsunami waveforms observed offshore. The finest bathymetric grid interval was 2/9 arcsec (approx. 5 m) along longitude and latitude lines. Use of this grid simulated tsunami soliton fission near the Sendai coast. Incorporating the three-dimensional shape of buildings and structures led to improved modeling of tsunami inundation.

  5. Laser-ultrasonic surface wave dispersion measurements on surface-treated metals.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Alberto; Nagy, Peter B

    2004-04-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity spectroscopy has been long considered to be one of the leading candidates for nondestructive characterization of surface-treated metals because of its ability to probe the material properties at different penetration depths depending on the inspection frequency. We developed a high-precision laser-ultrasonic technique to study the feasibility of SAW dispersion spectroscopy for residual stress assessment on shot-peened metals. This technique is capable of measuring SAW dispersion with a relative error of 0.1% over a frequency range from 2 to 15 MHz. Our experimental results obtained from shot-peened aluminum 2024-T351 samples indicate that the dispersion of the surface wave is a superposition of different effects of surface treatment in the material, including surface roughness, compressive residual stress, and cold work. Although the surface roughness induced component is often the dominating part of the overall dispersion, the experimental results also indicate that it is feasible to observe a perceivable change in the dispersion of the SAW when the specimen is heat-treated at different temperatures, which has no perceivable effect on the surface roughness. The part of the dispersion, which changes during annealing via thermal relaxation, is due to near-surface residual stresses and the decay of texture, although at high frequencies nonuniform grain coarsening could also play a significant role. PMID:15047364

  6. Second law analysis of a plate heat exchanger with an axial dispersive wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Das, Sarit; Roetzel, Wilfried

    A second law analysis is presented for thermally dispersive flow through a plate heat exchanger. It is well known that in plate or plate fin type heat exchangers the backmixing and other deviations from plug flow contribute significantly to the inefficiency of the heat exchanger, which is of importance to heat exchangers working in the cryogenic regime. The conventional axial heat dispersion model which is used so far is found to be better than `plug flow' model but still unsatisfactory where the timescale related to heat transfer is comparable with the thermal relaxation time for the propagation of dispersion. The present work therefore considers dispersion as a wave phenomenon propagating with a finite velocity. The study discusses the nature of variation of different contributions to total exergy loss in the heat exchanger with respect to dispersion parameters of the Peclet number and propagation velocity of the dispersive wave. The practical example of the single-pass plate heat exchanger demonstrates how a second law optimization can be carried out for heat transfer equipment under such conditions.

  7. Numerical calculation of electromagnetic eigenfields and dispersion relation for slow-wave device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oslake, J.M.; Verboncoeur, J.P.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1996-12-31

    Slow-wave structures support microwave amplification via electromagnetic coupling with an injected electron beam. Critical in the design of such devices is the dependence of the dispersion relation on the geometry of the guiding structure. The dispersion relation provides phase and group velocities, and the fields provide the impedance as seen by the beam. To this end, a computer model is developed which first numerically solves a wave equation in finite difference from subject to boundary conditions periodic in z and conducting elsewhere. Here the direction of wave propagation is along the z-axis. The solution produces a sequence of eigenfrequencies and eigenfields beginning with cut-off. Fourier decomposition of each eigenfield along selected mesh lines coincident with the location of the electron beam is then performed to establish a correspondence between eigenfrequency and wave number. From this data the dispersion relation for the slow-wave structure can then be formed. An example showing the first two TM passbands and E{sub z} fields for a slotted waveguide in xz coordinates is demonstrated. The authors plan to incorporate plasma loading with space-time dependent dielectric constant.

  8. Direct analysis of dispersive wave fields from near-field pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Hörchens, Lars

    2011-10-01

    Flexural waves play a significant role for the radiation of sound from plates. The analysis of flexural wave fields enables the detection of sources and transmission paths in plate-like structures. The measurement of these wave fields can be carried out indirectly by means of near-field acoustic holography, which determines the vibrational wave field from pressure information measured in a plane close to the plate under investigation. The reconstruction of the plate vibration is usually obtained by inverting the forward radiation problem, i.e., by inversion of an integral operator. In this article, it is shown that a pressure measurement taken in the extreme near-field of a vibrating plate can directly be used for the approximate analysis of the dispersive flexural wave field. The inversion step of near-field acoustic holography is not necessarily required if such an approximate solution is sufficient. The proposed method enables fast and simple analysis of dispersion characteristics. Application of dispersion compensation to the measured field allows for visualizations of propagating wavefronts, such that sources and scatterers in the plate can be detected. The capabilities of the described approach are demonstrated on several measurements. PMID:21973358

  9. Nonlinear modulation of periodic waves in the small dispersion limit of the Benjamin-Ono equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Y.

    1998-12-01

    The Whitham modulation theory is used to construct large time asymptotic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono (BO) equation in the small dispersion limit. For a wide class of initial data, asymptotic solutions are represented by a single-phase periodic solution of the BO equation with slowly varying amplitude and wave number. The Whitham system of modulation equations for these wave parameters has a very simple structure, and it can be solved exactly under appropriate boundary conditions. It is found that the oscillating zone expands with time, and eventually evolves into a train of solitary waves. In the case of localized initial data, the number density function of solitary waves is derived in a closed form. The resulting expression coincides with the corresponding formula obtained from the asymptotic theory based on the conservation laws of the BO equation. For steplike initial data, the total number of created solitary waves increases without limit in proportion to time.

  10. Error in Estimates of Tissue Material Properties from Shear Wave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are used in elasticity imaging to find the shear elasticity and viscosity of tissue. A technique called shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) has been introduced to use the dispersive nature of shear wave velocity to locally estimate the material properties of tissue. Shear waves are created using a multifrequency ultrasound radiation force, and the propagating shear waves are measured a few millimeters away from the excitation point. The shear wave velocity is measured using a repetitive pulse-echo method and Kalman filtering to find the phase of the harmonic shear wave at 2 different locations. A viscoelastic Voigt model and the shear wave velocity measurements at different frequencies are used to find the shear elasticity (μ1) and viscosity (μ2) of the tissue. The purpose of this paper is to report the accuracy of the SDUV method over a range of different values of μ1 and μ2. A motion detection model of a vibrating scattering medium was used to analyze measurement errors of vibration phase in a scattering medium. To assess the accuracy of the SDUV method, we modeled the effects of phase errors on estimates of shear wave velocity and material properties while varying parameters such as shear stiffness and viscosity, shear wave amplitude, the distance between shear wave measurements (Δr), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ultrasound pulse-echo method, and the frequency range of the measurements. We performed an experiment in a section of porcine muscle to evaluate variation of the aforementioned parameters on the estimated shear wave velocity and material property measurements and to validate the error prediction model. The model showed that errors in the shear wave velocity and material property estimates were minimized by maximizing shear wave amplitude, pulse-echo SNR, Δr, and the bandwidth used for shear wave measurements. The experimental model showed optimum performance could be obtained for Δr = 3-6 mm

  11. ON THE DISPERSION AND SCATTERING OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES BY LONGITUDINALLY STRATIFIED FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Andries, J.; Cally, P. S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2011-12-20

    We provide a fairly general analytic theory for the dispersion and scattering of magnetohydrodynamic waves by longitudinally stratified flux tubes. The theory provides a common framework for, and synthesis of, many previous studies of flux tube oscillations that were carried out under various simplifying assumptions. The present theory focuses on making only a minimal number of assumptions. As a result it thus provides an analytical treatment of several generalizations of existing tube oscillation models. The most important practical cases are inclusion of plasma pressure and possibly buoyancy effects in models of straight non-diverging tubes as applied in coronal seismology, and relaxation of the 'thin tube' approximation in oscillation models of diverging tubes as applied both in the context of p-mode scattering and coronal seismology. In particular, it illustrates the unifying theoretical framework underlying both the description of waves scattered by flux tubes and the dispersion of waves carried along flux tubes.

  12. Generalized dispersion relation for electron Bernstein waves in a non-Maxwellian magnetized anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Deeba, F.; Ahmad, Zahoor; Murtaza, G.

    2010-10-15

    A generalized dielectric constant for the electron Bernstein waves using non-Maxwellian distribution functions is derived in a collisionless, uniform magnetized plasma. Using the Neumann series expansion for the products of Bessel functions, we can derive the dispersion relations for both kappa and the generalized (r,q) distributions in a straightforward manner. The dispersion relations now become dependent upon the spectral indices {kappa} and (r,q) for the kappa and the generalized (r,q) distribution, respectively. Our results show how the non-Maxwellian dispersion curves deviate from the Maxwellian depending upon the values of the spectral indices chosen. It may be noted that the (r,q) dispersion relation is reduced to the kappa distribution for r=0 and q={kappa}+1, which, in turn, is further reducible to the Maxwellian distribution for {kappa}{yields}{infinity}.

  13. Format transparent, wide range and independent dispersion monitoring method based on four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sheng; He, Sheng; Sun, Simin; Ke, Changjian; Liu, Deming

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we propose an improved all optical chromatic dispersion (CD) monitoring method based on highly nonlinear power transfer function (PTF) provided by four-wave mixing (FWM) in highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs). This method can be applied for various modulation formats, including on-off keying and advanced multi-level modulation formats, without necessitating any changes of the hardware or software. Furthermore, it can expand the CD monitoring range beyond the limitation of Talbot effects and is insensitive to optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) and polarization mode dispersion (PMD). These improvements are achieved by optimizing the profile of the PTF curve and utilizing a sweeping tunable dispersion compensator (TDC) in combination with an extremely simple digital signal processing (DSP) to find the zero residual dispersion point. Numerical simulations are then used to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method.

  14. Effects of waves on coastal water dispersion in a small estuarine bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpey, M. T.; Ardhuin, F.; Otheguy, P.; Jouon, A.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional wave-current model is used to investigate wave-induced circulations in a small estuarine bay and its impact on freshwater exchanges with the inner shelf, related to stratified river plume dispersion. Modeled salinity fields exhibit a lower salinity surface layer due to river outflows, with typical depth of 1 m inside the bay. The asymmetric wave forcing on the bay circulation, related to the local bathymetry, significantly impacts the river plumes. It is found that the transport initiated in the surf zone by the longshore current can oppose and thus reduce the primary outflow of freshwater through the bay inlets. Using the model to examine a high river runoff event occurring during a high-energy wave episode, waves are found to induce a 24 h delay in freshwater evacuation. At the end of the runoff event, waves have reduced the freshwater flux to the ocean by a factor 5, and the total freshwater volume inside the bay is increased by 40%. According to the model, and for this event, the effect of the surf zone current on the bay flushing is larger than that of the wind. The freshwater balance is sensitive to incident wave conditions. Maximum freshwater retention is found for intermediate offshore wave heights 1 m < Hs < 2 m. For higher-energy waves, the increase in the longshore current reduces the retention, which is two times lower for Hs = 4 m than for Hs = 2 m.

  15. Wave-speed dispersion associated with an attenuation obeying a frequency power law.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    An attenuation scaling as a power of frequency, |ω|(β), over an infinite bandwidth is neither analytic nor square-integrable, thus calling into question the application of the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations for determining the frequency dependence of the associated phase speed. In this paper, three different approaches are developed, all of which return the dispersion formula for the wavenumber, K(ω). The first analysis relies on the properties of generalized functions and the causality requirement that the impulse response, k(t), the inverse Fourier transform of -iK(ω), must vanish for t < 0. Second, a wave equation is introduced that yields the phase-speed dispersion associated with a frequency-power-law attenuation. Finally, it is shown that, with minor modification, the Kramers-Krönig dispersion relations with no subtractions (the Plemelj formulas) do in fact hold for an attenuation scaling as |ω|(β), yielding the same dispersion formula as the other two derivations. From this dispersion formula, admissible values of the exponent β are established. Physically, the inadmissible values of β, which include all the integers, correspond to attenuation-dispersion pairs whose Fourier components cannot combine in such a way as to make the impulse response, k(t), vanish for t < 0. There is no upper or lower limit on the value that β may take. PMID:26627763

  16. Hybrid dispersive media with controllable wave propagation: A new take on smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, Andrea E.; Zündel, Manuel; Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Delpero, Tommaso; Ruzzene, Massimo; Ermanni, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we report on the wave transmission characteristics of a hybrid one dimensional (1D) medium. The hybrid characteristic is the result of the coupling between a 1D mechanical waveguide in the form of an elastic beam, supporting the propagation of transverse waves and a discrete electrical transmission line, consisting of a series of inductors connected to ground through capacitors. The capacitors correspond to a periodic array of piezoelectric patches that are bonded to the beam and that couple the two waveguides. The coupling leads to a hybrid medium that is characterized by a coincidence condition for the frequency/wavenumber value corresponding to the intersection of the branches of the two waveguides. In the frequency range centered at coincidence, the hybrid medium features strong attenuation of wave motion as a result of the energy transfer towards the electrical transmission line. This energy transfer, and the ensuing attenuation of wave motion, is alike the one obtained through internal resonating units of the kind commonly used in metamaterials. However, the distinct shape of the dispersion curves suggests how this energy transfer is not the result of a resonance and is therefore fundamentally different. This paper presents the numerical investigation of the wave propagation in the considered media, it illustrates experimental evidence of wave transmission characteristics and compares the performance of the considered configuration with that of internal resonating metamaterials. In addition, the ability to conveniently tune the dispersion properties of the electrical transmission line is exploited to adapt the periodicity of the domain and to investigate diatomic periodic configurations that are characterized by a richer dispersion spectrum and broader bandwidth of wave attenuation at coincidence. The medium consisting of mechanical, piezoelectric, and analog electronic elements can be easily interfaced to digital devices to offer a novel

  17. Hybrid dispersive media with controllable wave propagation: A new take on smart materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bergamini, Andrea E.; Zündel, Manuel; Flores Parra, Edgar A.; Ermanni, Paolo; Delpero, Tommaso; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report on the wave transmission characteristics of a hybrid one dimensional (1D) medium. The hybrid characteristic is the result of the coupling between a 1D mechanical waveguide in the form of an elastic beam, supporting the propagation of transverse waves and a discrete electrical transmission line, consisting of a series of inductors connected to ground through capacitors. The capacitors correspond to a periodic array of piezoelectric patches that are bonded to the beam and that couple the two waveguides. The coupling leads to a hybrid medium that is characterized by a coincidence condition for the frequency/wavenumber value corresponding to the intersection of the branches of the two waveguides. In the frequency range centered at coincidence, the hybrid medium features strong attenuation of wave motion as a result of the energy transfer towards the electrical transmission line. This energy transfer, and the ensuing attenuation of wave motion, is alike the one obtained through internal resonating units of the kind commonly used in metamaterials. However, the distinct shape of the dispersion curves suggests how this energy transfer is not the result of a resonance and is therefore fundamentally different. This paper presents the numerical investigation of the wave propagation in the considered media, it illustrates experimental evidence of wave transmission characteristics and compares the performance of the considered configuration with that of internal resonating metamaterials. In addition, the ability to conveniently tune the dispersion properties of the electrical transmission line is exploited to adapt the periodicity of the domain and to investigate diatomic periodic configurations that are characterized by a richer dispersion spectrum and broader bandwidth of wave attenuation at coincidence. The medium consisting of mechanical, piezoelectric, and analog electronic elements can be easily interfaced to digital devices to offer a novel

  18. Full 3D dispersion curve solutions for guided waves in generally anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando Quintanilla, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Craster, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    Dispersion curves of guided waves provide valuable information about the physical and elastic properties of waves propagating within a given waveguide structure. Algorithms to accurately compute these curves are an essential tool for engineers working in non-destructive evaluation and for scientists studying wave phenomena. Dispersion curves are typically computed for low or zero attenuation and presented in two or three dimensional plots. The former do not always provide a clear and complete picture of the dispersion loci and the latter are very difficult to obtain when high values of attenuation are involved and arbitrary anisotropy is considered in single or multi-layered systems. As a consequence, drawing correct and reliable conclusions is a challenging task in the modern applications that often utilize multi-layered anisotropic viscoelastic materials. These challenges are overcome here by using a spectral collocation method (SCM) to robustly find dispersion curves in the most complicated cases of high attenuation and arbitrary anisotropy. Solutions are then plotted in three-dimensional frequency-complex wavenumber space, thus gaining much deeper insight into the nature of these problems. The cases studied range from classical examples, which validate this approach, to new ones involving materials up to the most general triclinic class for both flat and cylindrical geometry in multi-layered systems. The apparent crossing of modes within the same symmetry family in viscoelastic media is also explained and clarified by the results. Finally, the consequences of the centre of symmetry, present in every crystal class, on the solutions are discussed.

  19. Dispersion relations of short surface gravity waves over vertically sheared currents from stereo-video measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peureux, Charles; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    The stereo-video reconstuction method [Leckler et al. 2015] allows now for the full reconstruction of 3D frequency-wavenumber spectra of short waves. A new field campaign in 2013 on the Katsiveli platform (Black Sea) provided such spectra in various wind and waves conditions, and particularly a stormy event, after which very mature waves had been generated. The short waves energies are found to be mostly located around a dispersion relation of the form, () ° ----------- ω ⃗k = gktanh(kH)+ ⃗kṡ ⃗Ueff The effective advection velocity [Kirby and Chen 1989] ⃗Ueff(k) integrates contributions from both the Stokes drift and quasi-eulerian current [Groeneweg and Klopman 1998]. We find that the effective drift velocity has a very weak wavenumber dependancy, as a result the eulerian current must be vertically sheared. This shear is relevant to the breaking of small scale waves [Banner and Phillips 1974]. It is possible that in field conditions the wind drift is much less important than in the laboratory. Bibliography Banner, M. L. and Phillips, O. M., On the incipient breaking of small scale waves, J. Fluid Mech., 1974, 65, 647. Groeneweg, J. and Klopman, G., Changes of the mean velocity profiles in the combined wave-current motion described in a GLM formulation, J. Fluid Mech., 1998, 370, 271-296. Kirby, J. T. and Chen, T. M., Surface waves on vertically sheared flows : Approximate dispersion relations, J. Geophys. Res., 1989, 94, 1013. Leckler, F., Ardhuin, F., Peureux, C.,Benetazzo, A., Bergamasco, F. and Dulov, V., Analysis and interpretation of frequency-wavenumber spectra of young wind-waves, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 2015, 45, 2484-2496.

  20. Shallow Seismic Velocity Structure of the Betic Cordillera (Southern Spain) from Modelling of Rayleigh Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chourak, M.; Corchete, V.; Badal, J.; Gómez, F.; Serón, J.

    2005-07-01

    A detailed dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves generated by local earthquakes and occasionally by blasts that occurred in southern Spain, was undertaken to obtain the shear-wave velocity structure of the region at shallow depth. Our database includes seismograms generated by 35 seismic events that were recorded by 15 single-component short-period stations from 1990 to 1995. All these events have focal depths less than 10 km and body-wave magnitudes between 3.0 and 4.0, and they were all recorded at distances between 40 and 300 km from the epicentre. We analysed a total of 90 source-station Rayleigh-wave paths. The collected data were processed by standard digital filtering techniques to obtain Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion measurements. The path-averaged group velocities vary from 1.12 to 2.25 km/s within the 1.0-6.0 s period interval. Then, using a stochastic inversion approach we obtained 1-D shear-wave velocity depth models across the study area, which were resolved to a depth of circa 5 km. The inverted shear-wave velocities range approximately between 1.0 and 3.8 km/s with a standard deviation range of 0.05 0.16 km/s, and show significant variations from region to region. These results were combined to produce 3-D images via volumetric modelling and data visualization. We present images that show different shear velocity patterns for the Betic Cordillera. Looking at the velocity distribution at various depths and at vertical sections, we discuss of the study area in terms of subsurface structure and S-wave velocity distribution (low velocity channels, basement depth, etc.) at very shallow depths (0 5 km). Our results characterize the region sufficiently and lead to a correlation of shear-wave velocity with the different geological units features.

  1. Imaging ultrasonic dispersive guided wave energy in long bones using linear radon transform.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tho N H T; Nguyen, Kim-Cuong T; Sacchi, Mauricio D; Le, Lawrence H

    2014-11-01

    Multichannel analysis of dispersive ultrasonic energy requires a reliable mapping of the data from the time-distance (t-x) domain to the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) or frequency-phase velocity (f-c) domain. The mapping is usually performed with the classic 2-D Fourier transform (FT) with a subsequent substitution and interpolation via c = 2πf/k. The extracted dispersion trajectories of the guided modes lack the resolution in the transformed plane to discriminate wave modes. The resolving power associated with the FT is closely linked to the aperture of the recorded data. Here, we present a linear Radon transform (RT) to image the dispersive energies of the recorded ultrasound wave fields. The RT is posed as an inverse problem, which allows implementation of the regularization strategy to enhance the focusing power. We choose a Cauchy regularization for the high-resolution RT. Three forms of Radon transform: adjoint, damped least-squares, and high-resolution are described, and are compared with respect to robustness using simulated and cervine bone data. The RT also depends on the data aperture, but not as severely as does the FT. With the RT, the resolution of the dispersion panel could be improved up to around 300% over that of the FT. Among the Radon solutions, the high-resolution RT delineated the guided wave energy with much better imaging resolution (at least 110%) than the other two forms. The Radon operator can also accommodate unevenly spaced records. The results of the study suggest that the high-resolution RT is a valuable imaging tool to extract dispersive guided wave energies under limited aperture. PMID:25282483

  2. Dispersion and Mirage of Surface Plasmon Waves in Metallic Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Cheung Wai; Chan, Yun San; Zheng, Ming Jie; Yu, Kin Wah

    2011-03-01

    We have studied the dispersion and propagation of surface plasmon (SP) waves in a one-dimensional metallic photonic crystal composed of metal-dielectric multilayered films by a transfer matrix method. By virtue of Bloch theorem, we are able to obtain the dispersion (frequency-wavevector) relation for arbitrary oblique propagation of SP waves for various non-zero transverse wavevectors. Model calculations are performed for alternative gold and Mg F2 films to obtain the photonic band-gap structure. For a progressively decreasing gold film thickness, the band (gap) width increases (decreases), rendering a precise and feasible tunability of photonic band gaps. Moreover, by imposing a gradual variation in the thickness of dielectric along the multilayers, it is possible to alter the dispersion relation locally, allowing us to study the bending of SP wave at various incident angles. We use Hamiltonian optics approach to obtain the trajectories of propagation. As the transverse wavevector is a constant of motion for a certain incident angle, we obtain different mirage at various oblique incidence. The results are useful for achieving superbending of SP waves. Supported by the General Research Fund of the HKSAR Government.

  3. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  4. Dispersion and attenuation of acoustic guided waves in layered fluid-filled porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, J.O.; Xu, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of acoustic wave propagation in fluid-filled porous media based on Biot and homogenization theories has been adapted to calculate dispersion and attenuation of guided waves trapped in low-velocity layered media. Constitutive relations, the balance equation, and the generalized Darcy law of the modified Biot theory yield a coupled system of differential equations which governs the wave motion in each layer. The displacement and stress fields satisfy the boundary conditions of continuity of displacements and tractions across each interface, and the radiation condition at infinity. To avoid precision problems caused by the growing exponential in individual matrices for large wave numbers, the global matrix method was implemented as an alternative to the traditional propagation approach to determine the periodic equations. The complex wave numbers of the guided wave modes were determined using a combination of two-dimensional bracketing and minimization techniques. The results of this work indicate that the acoustic guided wave attenuation is sensitive to the [ital in] [ital situ] permeability. In particular, the attenuation changes significantly as the [ital in] [ital situ] permeability of the low-velocity layer is varied at the frequency corresponding to the minimum group velocity (Airy phase). Alternatively, the attenuation of the wave modes are practically unaffected by those permeability variations in the layer at the frequency corresponding to the maximum group velocity.

  5. Four-wave mixing stability in hybrid photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Sévigny, Benoit; Vanvincq, Olivier; Valentin, Constance; Chen, Na; Quiquempois, Yves; Bouwmans, Géraud

    2013-12-16

    The four-wave mixing process in optical fibers is generally sensitive to dispersion uniformity along the fiber length. However, some specific phase matching conditions show increased robustness to longitudinal fluctuations in fiber dimensions, which affect the dispersion, even for signal and idler wavelengths far from the pump. In this paper, we present the method by which this point is found, how the fiber design characteristics impact on the stable point and demonstrate the stability through propagation simulations using the non-linear Schrödinger equation. PMID:24514659

  6. Dispersion of low frequency surface acoustic waves of different polarizations in multilayered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosachev, V. V.; Shchegrov, A. V.

    1995-02-01

    Dispersion of surface acoustic waves (SAW) of sagittal and shear horizontal (SH) polarizations in a multilayered system of n isotropic layers on an isotropic substrate is investigated by the technique of effective boundary conditions in the framework of perturbation theory. The ratio of the total layer thickness to the wavelength of SAW is chosen to be a small parameter. Under such assumptions the dispersion relations for the SAW of both sagittal and SH-polarizations are derived. The results for sagittally polarized SAW derived by means of perturbation theory are compared with numerical solution for a bilayered structure. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed.

  7. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  8. Stochastic linearization of turbulent dynamics of dispersive waves in equilibrium and non-equilibrium state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shixiao W.; Lu, Haihao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-08-01

    Characterizing dispersive wave turbulence in the long time dynamics is central to understanding of many natural phenomena, e.g., in atmosphere ocean dynamics, nonlinear optics, and plasma physics. Using the β-Fermi–Pasta–Ulam nonlinear system as a prototypical example, we show that in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium steady state the turbulent state even in the strongly nonlinear regime possesses an effective linear stochastic structure in renormalized normal variables. In this framework, we can well characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics, which are dominated by long-wavelength renormalized waves. We further demonstrate that the energy flux is nearly saturated by the long-wavelength renormalized waves in non-equilibrium steady state. The scenario of such effective linear stochastic dynamics can be extended to study turbulent states in other nonlinear wave systems.

  9. Dispersion characteristics of spin-electromagnetic waves in planar multiferroic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Andrey A.; Ustinov, Alexey B.; Vitko, Vitaliy V.; Semenov, Alexander A.; Mironenko, Igor G.; Belyavskiy, Pavel Yu.; Kalinikos, Boris A.; Stashkevich, Andrey A.; Lähderanta, E.

    2015-11-14

    A method of approximate boundary conditions is used to derive dispersion relations for spin-electromagnetic waves (SEWs) propagating in thin ferrite films and in multiferroic layered structures. A high accuracy of this method is proven. It was shown that the spin-electromagnetic wave propagating in the structure composed of a thin ferrite film, a thin ferroelectric film, and a slot transmission line is formed as a result of hybridization of the surface spin wave in the ferrite film and the electromagnetic wave in the slot-line. The structure demonstrates dual electric and magnetic field tunability of the SEW spectrum. The electric field tunability is provided by the thin ferroelectric film. Its efficiency increases with an increase in the thicknesses of the ferrite and ferroelectric films and with a decrease in the slot-line gap width. The theory is confirmed by experimental data.

  10. Quantification and prediction of extreme events in a one-dimensional nonlinear dispersive wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Will; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work is the quantification and prediction of rare events characterized by extreme intensity in nonlinear waves with broad spectra. We consider a one-dimensional nonlinear model with deep-water waves dispersion relation, the Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak (MMT) model, in a dynamical regime that is characterized by a broadband spectrum and strong nonlinear energy transfers during the development of intermittent events with finite-lifetime. To understand the energy transfers that occur during the development of an extreme event we perform a spatially localized analysis of the energy distribution along different wavenumbers by means of the Gabor transform. A statistical analysis of the Gabor coefficients reveals (i) the low-dimensionality of the intermittent structures, (ii) the interplay between non-Gaussian statistical properties and nonlinear energy transfers between modes, as well as (iii) the critical scales (or critical Gabor coefficients) where a critical amount of energy can trigger the formation of an extreme event. We analyze the unstable character of these special localized modes directly through the system equation and show that these intermittent events are due to the interplay of the system nonlinearity, the wave dispersion, and the wave dissipation which mimics wave breaking. These localized instabilities are triggered by random localizations of energy in space, created by the dispersive propagation of low-amplitude waves with random phase. Based on these properties, we design low-dimensional functionals of these Gabor coefficients that allow for the prediction of the extreme event well before the nonlinear interactions begin to occur.

  11. A Variable-resolution Surface Wave Dispersion Study of Eurasia, North Africa, and Surrounding Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E

    2005-03-21

    This paper presents the results of a large-scale study of surface wave dispersion performed across Eurasia and North Africa. Improvements were made to previous surface wave work by enlarging the study region, increasing path density, improving spatial resolution, and expanding the period range. This study expands the coverage area northwards and eastwards relative to a previous dispersion analysis, which covered only North Africa and the Middle East. We have significantly increased the number of seismograms examined and group velocity measurements made. We have now made good quality dispersion measurements for about 30,000 Rayleigh wave and 20,000 Love wave paths, and have incorporated measurements from several other researchers into the study. A conjugate gradient method was employed for the group velocity tomography, which improved the inversion from the previous study by adopting a variable smoothness. This technique allows us to go to higher resolution where the data allow without producing artifacts. The current results include both Love and Rayleigh wave inversions across the region for periods from 7 to 100 seconds at 1{sup o} resolution. Short period group velocities are sensitive to slow velocities associated with large sedimentary features such as the Caspian Sea, West Siberian Platform, Mediterranean Sea, Bay of Bengal, Tarim Basin, and Persian Gulf. Intermediate periods are sensitive to differences in crustal thickness, such as those between oceanic and continental crust or along orogenic zones and continental plateaus. At longer periods, fast velocities are consistently found beneath cratons while slow upper mantle velocities occur along rift systems, subduction zones, and collision zones such as the Tethys Belt. We have compared the group velocities at various periods with features such as sediment thickness, topographic height, crustal thickness, proximity to plate boundaries, lithospheric age and lithospheric thickness, and find significant

  12. Dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  13. Propagation and Dispersion of Sausage Wave Trains in Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, R.; Ruderman, M. S.; Terradas, J.

    2015-06-01

    A localized perturbation of a magnetic flux tube produces wave trains that disperse as they propagate along the tube, where the extent of dispersion depends on the physical properties of the magnetic structure, on the length of the initial excitation, and on its nature (e.g., transverse or axisymmetric). In Oliver et al. we considered a transverse initial perturbation, whereas the temporal evolution of an axisymmetric one is examined here. In both papers we use a method based on Fourier integrals to solve the initial value problem. We find that the propagating wave train undergoes stronger attenuation for longer axisymmetric (or shorter transverse) perturbations, while the internal to external density ratio has a smaller effect on the attenuation. Moreover, for parameter values typical of coronal loops axisymmetric (transverse) wave trains travel at a speed 0.75-1 (1.2) times the Alfvén speed of the magnetic tube. In both cases, the wave train passage at a fixed position of the magnetic tube gives rise to oscillations with periods of the order of seconds, with axisymmetric disturbances causing more oscillations than transverse ones. To test the detectability of propagating transverse or axisymmetric wave packets in magnetic tubes of the solar atmosphere (e.g., coronal loops, spicules, or prominence threads) a forward modeling of the perturbations must be carried out.

  14. Differential evolution algorithm for nonlinear inversion of high-frequency Rayleigh wave dispersion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianhai; Li, Lei; Zhang, Xueqiang; Huang, Jianquan; Shi, Xinchun; Jin, Si; Bai, Yiming

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, Rayleigh waves are gaining popularity to obtain near-surface shear (S)-wave velocity profiles. However, inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves is challenging for most local-search methods due to its high nonlinearity and to its multimodality. In this study, we proposed and tested a new Rayleigh wave dispersion curve inversion scheme based on differential evolution (DE) algorithm. DE is a novel stochastic search approach that possesses several attractive advantages: (1) Capable of handling non-differentiable, non-linear and multimodal objective functions because of its stochastic search strategy; (2) Parallelizability to cope with computation intensive objective functions without being time consuming by using a vector population where the stochastic perturbation of the population vectors can be done independently; (3) Ease of use, i.e. few control variables to steer the minimization/maximization by DE's self-organizing scheme; and (4) Good convergence properties. The proposed inverse procedure was applied to nonlinear inversion of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves for near-surface S-wave velocity profiles. To evaluate calculation efficiency and stability of DE, we firstly inverted four noise-free and four noisy synthetic data sets. Secondly, we investigated effects of the number of layers on DE algorithm and made an uncertainty appraisal analysis by DE algorithm. Thirdly, we made a comparative analysis with genetic algorithms (GA) by a synthetic data set to further investigate the performance of the proposed inverse procedure. Finally, we inverted a real-world example from a waste disposal site in NE Italy to examine the applicability of DE on Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. Furthermore, we compared the performance of the proposed approach to that of GA to further evaluate scores of the inverse procedure described here. Results from both synthetic and actual field data demonstrate that differential evolution algorithm applied

  15. Dark three-sister rogue waves in normally dispersive optical fibers with random birefringence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    We investigate dark rogue wave dynamics in normally dispersive birefringent optical fibers, based on the exact rational solutions of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Analytical solutions are derived up to the second order via a nonrecursive Darboux transformation method. Vector dark "three-sister" rogue waves as well as their existence conditions are demonstrated. The robustness against small perturbations is numerically confirmed in spite of the onset of modulational instability, offering the possibility to observe such extreme events in normal optical fibers with random birefringence, or in other Manakov-type vector nonlinear media. PMID:25401907

  16. In-vitro quantification of rat liver viscoelasticity with shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-rong; Chen, Xin; Lin, Haoming; Zhang, Xinyu

    2013-01-01

    As a new imaging method for tissue mechanical properties, ultrasound elastography has always been the research focus in the field of medical ultrasound imaging ever since it has been proposed. This paper developed an ultrasound viscoelasticity measurement system based on shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV). This system applied acoustic radiation force to excite harmonic vibration in soft tissue. The propagation of the shear wave induced by the vibration was detected and the tissue viscoelasticity properties were calculated. Based on this system, rat livers were measured in vitro. The results shows that the system can measure the viscoelasticity reliably, offering a potential alternative to diagnosis of liver fibrosis. PMID:24110087

  17. Application of high-resolution linear Radon transform for Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging and mode separating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) analysis is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear-wave profile. One of the key steps in the MASW method is to generate an image of dispersive energy in the frequency-velocity domain, so dispersion curves can be determined by picking peaks of dispersion energy. In this paper, we image Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy and separate multimodes from a multichannel record by high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT). We first introduce Rayleigh-wave dispersive energy imaging by high-resolution LRT. We then show the process of Rayleigh-wave mode separation. Results of synthetic and real-world examples demonstrate that (1) compared with slant stacking algorithm, high-resolution LRT can improve the resolution of images of dispersion energy by more than 50% (2) high-resolution LRT can successfully separate multimode dispersive energy of Rayleigh waves with high resolution; and (3) multimode separation and reconstruction expand frequency ranges of higher mode dispersive energy, which not only increases the investigation depth but also provides a means to accurately determine cut-off frequencies.

  18. Measurement of dispersion curves of circumferential guided waves radiating from curved shells: Theory and numerical validation.

    PubMed

    Chekroun, Mathieu; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Prada, Claire; Laugier, Pascal; Grimal, Quentin

    2016-02-01

    A method is proposed to evaluate in a non-contact way the phase velocity dispersion curves of circumferential waves around a shell of arbitrary shape immersed in a fluid. No assumptions are made about the thickness or the material of the shell. A geometrical model is derived to describe the shape of the radiated wavefronts in the surrounding fluid, and predict the positions of its centers of curvature. Then the time-reversal principle is applied to recover these positions and to calculate the phase velocity of the circumferential waves. Numerical finite-difference simulations are performed to evaluate the method on a circular and on an elliptic thin shell. Different dispersion curves can be recovered with an error of less than 10%. PMID:26936561

  19. Laboratory Investigation of the Effect of Water-Saturation on Seismic Wave Dispersion in Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2009-12-01

    In subsurface rock, fluid content changes with time through natural causes or because of human interactions, such as extraction or sequestration of fluids. The ability to monitor, seismically, fluid migration in the subsurface requires an understanding of the effects that the degree of saturation and spatial distribution of fluids have on wave propagation in rock. In this study, we find that the seismic dispersion of a dry carbonate rock can be masked by saturating the sample. We used a laboratory mini-seismic array to monitor fluid invasion and withdrawal in a carbonate rock with fabric-controlled layering. Experiments were performed on prismatic samples of Austin Chalk measuring 50mm x 50mm x 100mm. The epoxy-sealed samples contained an inlet and an outlet port to enable fluid invasion/withdrawal along the long axis of the sample. Water was infused and withdrawn from the sample at a rate of 1ml/hr. The mini-seismic array consisted of a set of 12 piezoelectric contact transducers, each with a central frequency 1.0 MHz. Three compressional wave source-receiver pairs and three shear wave source-receiver pairs were used to probe along the length of the sample prior to invasion and during invasion and withdrawal of water from the sample. A pressure transducer was used to record the fluid pressure simultaneously with the full transmitted wave forms every 15-30 minutes. A wavelet analysis determined the effect of fluid invasion on velocity dispersion. We observed that the compressional wave dispersion was more sensitive to changes in saturation than the shear wave dispersion. When the sample was unsaturated, the high frequency components of the compressional wave (1.2MHz to 2MHz) had lower velocities (~ 2750m/s) than the low frequency components, which decrease monotonically from 2890 m/s for 0.2MHz to 1.2 MHz. As water infused the sample, the dispersion weakened. When the sample as fully saturated, the compressional wave velocity was frequency independent. The

  20. Generation of wideband frequency combs by continuous-wave seeding of multistage mixers with synthesized dispersion.

    PubMed

    Myslivets, Evgeny; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-01-30

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate efficient generation of an equalized optical comb with 150-nm bandwidth. The comb was generated by low-power, continuous-wave seeds, eliminating the need for pulsed laser sources. The new architecture relies on efficient creation of higher-order mixing tones in phase-matched nonlinear fiber stages separated by a linear compressor. Wideband generation was enabled by precise dispersion engineering of multiple-stage parametric mixers. PMID:22330571

  1. O (p6) extension of the large-NC partial wave dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. H.; Sanz-Cillero, J. J.; Zheng, H. Q.

    2008-04-01

    Continuing our previous work [Z.H. Guo, J.J. Sanz-Cillero, H.Q. Zheng, JHEP 0706 (2007) 030], large-NC techniques and partial wave dispersion relations are used to discuss ππ scattering amplitudes. We get a set of predictions for O (p6) low-energy chiral perturbation theory couplings. They are provided in terms of the masses and decay widths of scalar and vector mesons.

  2. Phononic and magnonic dispersions of surface waves on a permalloy/BARC nanostructured array

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phononic and magnonic dispersions of a linear array of periodic alternating Ni80Fe20 and bottom anti-reflective coating nanostripes on a Si substrate have been measured using Brillouin light scattering. The observed phononic gaps are considerably larger than those of laterally patterned multi-component crystals previously reported, mainly a consequence of the high elastic and density contrasts between the stripe materials. Additionally, the phonon hybridization bandgap has an unusual origin in the hybridization and avoided crossing of the zone-folded Rayleigh and pseudo-Sezawa waves. The magnonic band structure features near-dispersionless branches, with unusual vortex-like dynamic magnetization profiles, some of which lie below the highly-dispersive fundamental mode branch. Finite element calculations of the phononic and magnonic dispersions of the magphonic crystal accord well with experimental data. PMID:23452555

  3. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.; Ormachea, J.; McAleavey, S. A.; Wood, R. W.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Miller, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure.

  4. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model.

    PubMed

    Parker, K J; Ormachea, J; McAleavey, S A; Wood, R W; Carroll-Nellenback, J J; Miller, R K

    2016-07-01

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure. PMID:27280434

  5. Increased range of ultrasonic guided wave testing of overhead transmission line cables using dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Legg, Mathew; Yücel, Mehmet K; Kappatos, Vassilios; Selcuk, Cem; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2015-09-01

    Overhead Transmission Line (OVTL) cables can experience structural defects and are, therefore, inspected using Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) techniques. Ultrasonic Guided Waves (UGW) is one NDT technique that has been investigated for inspection of these cables. For practical use, it is desirable to be able to inspect as long a section of cable as possible from a single location. This paper investigates increasing the UGW inspection range on Aluminium Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cables by compensating for dispersion using dispersion curve data. For ACSR cables, it was considered to be difficult to obtain accurate dispersion curves using modelling due to the complex geometry and unknown coupling between wire strands. Group velocity dispersion curves were, therefore, measured experimentally on an untensioned, 26.5m long cable and a method of calculating theoretical dispersion curves was obtained. Attenuation and dispersion compensation were then performed for a broadband Maximum Length Sequence (MLS) excitation signal. An increase in the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of about 4-8dB compared to that of the dispersed signal was obtained. However, the main benefit was the increased ability to resolve the individual echoes from the end of the cable and an introduced defect in the form of a cut, which was 7 to at least 13dB greater than that of the dispersed signal. Five echoes were able to be clearly detected using MLS excitation signal, indicating the potential for an inspection range of up to 130m in each direction. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the longest inspection range for ACSR cables reported in the literature, where typically cables, which were only one or two meter long, have been investigated previously. Narrow band tone burst and Hann windowed tone burst excitation signal also showed increased SNR and ability to resolve closely spaced echoes. PMID:25991388

  6. A theoretical study of wave dispersion and thermal conduction for HMX/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2014-04-01

    The wave dispersion rule for non-uniform material is useful for ultrasonic inspection and engine life prediction, and also is key in achieving an understanding of the energy dissipation and thermal conduction properties of solid material. On the basis of linear response theory and molecular dynamics, we derive a set of formulas for calculating the wave dispersion rate of interface systems, and study four kinds of interfaces inside plastic bonded explosives: HMX/{HMX, TATB, F2312, F2313}. (HMX: octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine; TATB: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene; F2312, F2313: fluoropolymers). The wave dispersion rate is obtained over a wide frequency range from kHz to PHz. We find that at low frequency, the rate is proportional to the square of the frequency, and at high frequency, the rate couples with the molecular vibration modes at the interface. By using the results, the thermal conductivities of HMX/additive interfaces are derived, and a physical model is built for describing the total thermal conductivity of mixture explosives, including HMX multi-particle systems and {TATB, F2312, F2313}-coated HMX.

  7. Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/metal/PZT sandwich plate with imperfect interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, Ilkay; Akbarov, Surkay D.; Sezer, Semih

    2016-07-01

    The Lamb wave dispersion in a PZT/Metal/PZT sandwich plate is investigated by employing the exact linear equations of electro-elastic waves in piezoelectric materials within the scope of the plane-strain state. It is assumed that at the interfaces between the piezoelectric face layers and metal core layer, shear-spring and normal-spring type imperfect conditions are satisfied. The degree of this imperfectness is estimated through the corresponding shear-spring and normal-spring type parameters which appear in the contact condition characterizing the transverse and normal displacements' discontinuity. The corresponding dispersion equation is derived, and as a result of the numerical solution to this equation, the dispersion curves are constructed for the first and second lowest modes in the cases where the material of the face layers is PZT and the material of the middle layer is Steel (St). Consequently, for the PZT/St/PZT sandwich plate, the study of the influence of the problem parameters such as the piezoelectric and dielectric constants, layer thickness ratios, non-dimensional shear-spring, and normal-spring type parameters, is carried out. In particular, it is established that the imperfectness of the contact between the layers of the plate causes a decrease in the values of the wave propagation velocity.

  8. Dispersion characteristics of kinetic Alfven waves in a multi-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Chandu; Jayapal, R.; Sreekala, G.; Jose, Blesson; Savithri Devi, E.; Antony, S.

    2014-06-01

    The stability of the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) has been studied in a plasma composed of electrons, hydrogen and positively and negatively charged oxygen ions. Using the two potential theory of Hasegawa, we have derived an expression for the frequency and growth/damping rate of the KAW. The dispersion relation derived in this paper is a generalization of the dispersion relation of Hasegawa on two counts: (i) we use a more generalized distribution function and show that our relation reduces to the dispersion relation of Hasegawa in the limiting case, and (ii) it is applicable to a multi-ion plasma containing lighter ions and positively and negatively charged heavier ions. We find the growth rate of the wave increases with increasing drift velocities of the electrons. Negatively charged oxygen ions (O-) decrease the growth rate; however, the growth rate is very sensitively dependent on O- ion density, especially when its density is greater than that of the positively charged oxygen ions (O+). Interestingly, the dispersion characteristics of KAWs can be made insensitive to the presence of the heavier ions by an appropriate choice of their densities and temperatures.

  9. Few-cycle spatiotemporal soliton wave excited by filamentation of a femtosecond laser pulse in materials with anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jiansheng; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2006-10-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of 1.6-{mu}m fs laser pulses propagating in fused silica is investigated by employing a full-order dispersion model. Different from the x-wave generation in normally dispersive media, a few-cycle spatiotemporally compressed soliton wave is generated with the contrary contributions of anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD) and self-phase-modulation. However, at the tailing edge of the pulse forms a shock wave which generates separate and strong supercontinuum peaked at 670 nm. It is also the origin of conical emission formed both in time and frequency domain with the contribution of normal GVD at visible light.

  10. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Nonlinear coupling of left and right handed circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P. Sharma, Swati Gaur, Nidhi

    2014-07-15

    The nonlinear phenomena are of prominent interests in understanding the particle acceleration and transportation in the interplanetary space. The ponderomotive nonlinearity causing the filamentation of the parallel propagating circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave having a finite frequency may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the heating of the plasmas. The contribution will be different of the left (L) handed mode, the right (R) handed mode, and the mix mode. The contribution also depends upon the finite frequency of the circularly polarized waves. In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of the nonlinear coupling of the L and R circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave on the localized structures formation and the respective power spectra. The dynamical equations are derived in the presence of the ponderomotive nonlinearity of the L and R pumps and then studied semi-analytically as well as numerically. The ponderomotive nonlinearity accounts for the nonlinear coupling between both the modes. In the presence of the adiabatic response of the density fluctuations, the nonlinear dynamical equations satisfy the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The equations thus obtained are solved in solar wind regime to study the coupling effect on localization and the power spectra. The effect of coupling is also studied on Faraday rotation and ellipticity of the wave caused due to the difference in the localization of the left and the right modes with the distance of propagation.

  12. Propagation and dispersion of transverse wave trains in magnetic flux tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.; Terradas, J.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The dispersion of small-amplitude, impulsively excited wave trains propagating along a magnetic flux tube is investigated. The initial disturbance is a localized transverse displacement of the tube that excites a fast kink wave packet. The spatial and temporal evolution of the perturbed variables (density, plasma displacement, velocity, ...) is given by an analytical expression containing an integral that is computed numerically. We find that the dispersion of fast kink wave trains is more important for shorter initial disturbances (i.e., more concentrated in the longitudinal direction) and for larger density ratios (i.e., for larger contrasts of the tube density with respect to the environment density). This type of excitation generates a wave train whose signature at a fixed position along a coronal loop is a short event (duration ≅ 20 s) in which the velocity and density oscillate very rapidly with typical periods of the order of a few seconds. The oscillatory period is not constant but gradually declines during the course of this event. Peak values of the velocity are of the order of 10 km s{sup –1} and are accompanied by maximum density variations of the order of 10%-15% the unperturbed loop density.

  13. Simplified dispersion relationships for fluid-dominated axisymmetric wave motion in buried fluid-filled pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Sui, Fusheng; Muggleton, Jennifer M.; Yang, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The dispersion characteristics of axisymmetric (n=0) waves offer a way to gain physical insight into the low-frequency vibrational behaviour of underground pipe systems. Whilst these can be found in the literature, they are generally calculated numerically. Coupled equations of motion for the n=0 waves that propagate in a buried fluid-filled pipe are presented in this paper and, from this, an analytical solution is developed for the fluid-dominated (s=1) wavenumber. The effect of the frictional stress at the pipe-soil interface on the dispersion behaviour of the s=1 wave is characterised by adopting a soil loading matrix. Overall, the fluid loading has a greater effect on the propagation wavespeed compared with the soil loading: for metal pipes, the effect of soil loading is negligible; for plastic pipes, however, simply neglecting the effect of soil loading can lead to a considerable underestimation in the calculation of the wavespeed. The wave attenuation increases significantly at higher frequencies regardless of pipe material resulting from the added damping due to radiation into the soil. Theoretical predictions of the s=1 wavenumber are compared with experimental data measured on an MDPE water pipe. The degree of agreement between prediction and experiment makes clear that, although the wavespeed is only slightly affected by the presence of the frictional stress, the frictional stress at the pipe-soil interface needs to be appropriately taken into account for attenuation predictions.

  14. Reflection and refraction of acoustic waves at the interface between a gas and a disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Sarapulova, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The reflection and refraction of acoustic waves at different angles of incidence on the interface between a vapor-gas-droplet system and air are studied. From an analysis of analytical solutions, it has been found that in the case of incidence on the interface from the side of the vapor-gas-droplet medium, there is a critical angle of incidence at which the wave is completely reflected from the boundary, i.e., total internal reflection takes place. It is shown that for a certain angle of incidence on the interface both from the air side and from the mixture side and for a certain volume fraction of water in the disperse system, complete transmission of the acoustic wave through the medium is observed.

  15. A comprehensive dispersion model of surface wave phase and group velocity for the globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhitu; Masters, Guy; Laske, Gabi; Pasyanos, Michael

    2014-10-01

    A new method is developed to measure Rayleigh- and Love-wave phase velocities globally using a cluster analysis technique. This method clusters similar waveforms recorded at different stations from a single event and allows users to make measurements on hundreds of waveforms, which are filtered at a series of frequency ranges, at the same time. It also requires minimal amount of user interaction and allows easy assessment of the data quality. This method produces a large amount of phase delay measurements in a manageable time frame. Because there is a strong trade-off between the isotropic part of the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy, we include the effect of azimuthal anisotropy in our inversions in order to obtain reliable isotropic phase velocity. We use b-splines to combine these isotropic phase velocity maps with our previous group velocity maps to produce an internally consistent global surface wave dispersion model.

  16. Lithospheric shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy beneath the northern part of North China from surface wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanyuan V.; Gao, Yuan; Li, Aibing; Shi, Yutao

    2015-09-01

    Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocities in the northern part of the North China are obtained from ambient noise tomography in the period range of 8-35 s and two plane wave earthquake tomography at periods of 20-91 s using data recorded at 222 broadband seismic stations from the temporary North China Seismic Array and permanent China Digital Seismic Array. The dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love wave from 8 to 91 s are jointly inverted for the 3-D shear wave structure and radial anisotropy in the lithosphere to 140 km depth. Distinct seismic structures is observed from the Fenhe Graben and Taihang Mountain to the North China Basin. The North China Basin from the lower crust to the depth of 140 km is characterized by high-velocity anomaly, reflecting mafic intrusion and residual materials after the extraction of melt, and by strong radial anisotropy with Vsh > Vsv, implying horizontal layering of intrusion and alignment of minerals due to vigorous extensional deformation and subsequent thermal annealing. However, low-velocity anomaly and positive radial anisotropy are observed in the Fenhe Graben and Taihang Mountain, suggesting the presence of partial melt in the lithosphere due to the mantle upwelling and horizontal flow pull.

  17. MHD results from a collisionless fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. J.

    2002-11-01

    A non-conventional closure ansatz for collisionless MHD has been proposed in Ref.[1]. The truncation of the set of fluid moment equations is suggested by a comparison between the standard non-relativistic set and the non-relativistic limit of the relativistic set derived in Ref.[2]. The resulting model is a closed system of evolution equations in conservation form for the particle, momentum and energy densities, and the energy flux, allowing for pressure anisotropy and parallel heat flux. The static equilibrium condition is the same as in the Chew-Goldberger-Low theory, supplemented by the condition that the parallel energy flux be constant along the magnetic field. We study the linear perturbations about such static equilibria to derive the MHD wave dispersion relations in a homogeneous background and the perturbed potential energy associated with a stability energy principle. [1] J.J. Ramos, 2002 International Sherwood Theory Meeting, Rochester, NY, paper 1D25. [2] R.D. Hazeltine and S.M. Mahajan, Ap. J. 567, 1262 (2002).

  18. Examinations of structured dispersive features of auroral HF waves observed with sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, Christopher A.

    Earth's high latitude ionosphere, highly disturbed by particle and energy inputs and associated aurora, is the stage for plasma wave activity across a wide range of frequencies. These waves often exhibit strikingly distinct time-frequency structure which can have relatively direct explanations based on the dispersion relations of the appropriate normal modes of the plasma. Hence, they present an opportunity to confirm basic plasma physics. Moreover, once a physical explanation is proven for these emissions, it is often possible to exploit the structured waves to either measure characteristics of the local plasma or remotely sense characteristics of plasmas through which the waves have propagated. Identifying the wavemode of observed emissions is the first step in characterizing them. This thesis develops a novel technique to constrain the mode of observed emissions by taking advantage of the orientation of the electric field sensors. In addition, auroral rocket observations of two structured emissions having distinct frequency-time patterns, "swishers" and "stripes," are investigated. Ray-tracing and growth rate calculations provide effective tests of the mode identification and possible generating mechanisms of these emissions. Lastly, rocket observations of waveform statistics and spectra of short intense bursts of Langmuir waves in the polar cusp ionosphere reveal information about the modulation of these waves and the density fluctuations in which they arise. Taken together, the observations of these dispersed features and the development of new techniques to constrain their modes and identify their generation mechanisms presented in this thesis add to our existing knowledge of the auroral ionosphere and show promise in remote sensing plasma characteristics elsewhere in the Earth's magnetosphere and beyond.

  19. On an energy-latitude dispersion pattern of ion precipitation potentially associated with magnetospheric EMIC waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Ni, B.; Yue, C.; Jiang, F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-10-01

    Ion precipitation mechanisms are usually energy dependent and contingent upon magnetospheric/ionospheric locations. Therefore, the pattern of energy-latitude dependence of ion precipitation boundaries seen by low Earth orbit satellites can be implicative of the mechanism(s) underlying the precipitation. The pitch angle scattering of ions led by the field line curvature, a well-recognized mechanism of ion precipitation in the central plasma sheet (CPS), leads to one common pattern of energy-latitude dispersion, in that the ion precipitation flux diminishes at higher (lower) latitudes for protons with lower (higher) energies. In this study, we introduce one other systematically existing pattern of energy-latitude dispersion of ion precipitation, in that the lower energy ion precipitation extends to lower latitude than the higher-energy ion precipitation. Via investigating such a "reversed" energy-latitude dispersion pattern, we explore possible mechanisms of ion precipitation other than the field line curvature scattering. We demonstrate via theories and simulations that the H-band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave is capable of preferentially scattering keV protons in the CPS and potentially leads to the reversed energy-latitude dispersion of proton precipitation. We then present detailed event analyses and provide support to a linkage between the EMIC waves in the equatorial CPS and ion precipitation events with reversed energy-latitude dispersion. We also discuss the role of ion acceleration in the topside ionosphere which, together with the CPS ion population, may result in a variety of energy-latitude distributions of the overall ion precipitation.

  20. Effects of viscosity and constraints on the dispersion and dissipation of waves in large blood vessels. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E.; Anliker, M.; Chang, I.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the effects of blood viscosity on dissipation as well as dispersion of small waves in arteries and veins by means of a parametric study. A linearized analysis of axisymmetric waves in a cylindrical membrane that contains a viscous fluid indicates that there are two families of waves: a family of slow waves and one of fast waves. The faster waves are shown to be more sensitive to variations in the elastic properties of the medium surrounding the blood vessels and at high values of the frequency parameter alpha. At low values of alpha the effects of viscosity on attenuation are reversed.

  1. Gravitational-wave detection by dispersion force modulation in nanoscale parametric amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, Pinto

    2016-05-01

    Two infinite parallel plane slabs separated by a gap alter the zero-point-energy of the matter-electromagnetic field system. Generally speaking, the corresponding interaction depends on the reflection properties of the boundaries, and therefore on the dielectric functions of both the slab and gap materials, on the gap width, and on the absolute temperature of the system. Importantly, it is known experimentally that dispersion forces can be modulated in time. This can be achieved by mechanically varying the gap width so as to introduce parametric oscillations. Much more fundamentally, however, dispersion forces can be altered by acting on the dielectric functions involved as is the case in semiconductors. In the optical analogy, a gravitational wave introduces an additional time dependence of the effective gap dielectric function. These elements, already confirmed by direct experimentation or predicted from the Lifshitz theory, support the design of a novel approach to ground-based nanoscale gravitational wave detection based on parametric amplification driven by dispersion force modulation.

  2. Modeling blast waves, gas and particles dispersion in urban and hilly ground areas.

    PubMed

    Hank, S; Saurel, R; Le Métayer, O; Lapébie, E

    2014-09-15

    The numerical simulation of shock and blast waves as well as particles dispersion in highly heterogeneous media such as cities, urban places, industrial plants and part of countries is addressed. Examples of phenomena under study are chemical gas products dispersion from damaged vessels, gas dispersion in urban places under explosion conditions, shock wave propagation in urban environment. A three-dimensional simulation multiphase flow code (HI2LO) is developed in this aim. To simplify the consideration of complex geometries, a heterogeneous discrete formulation is developed. When dealing with large scale domains, such as countries, the topography is considered with the help of elevation data. Meteorological conditions are also considered, in particular regarding complex temperature and wind profiles. Heat and mass transfers on sub-scale objects, such as buildings, trees and other obstacles are considered as well. Particles motion is addressed through a new turbulence model involving a single parameter to describe accurately plumes. Validations against experiments in basic situations are presented as well as examples of industrial and environmental computations. PMID:25199503

  3. Dispersion characteristics of kinetic Alfven waves in a multi-ion cometary plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapal, R.; Abraham, Noble P.; Blesson, Jose; Antony, S.; Anilkumar, C. P.; Venugopal, Chandu

    We have studied the stability of the kinetic Alfven wave in a plasma composed of hydrogen and positively and negatively charged oxygen ions and electrons which approximates very well the plasma environment around comet Halley. In the direction parallel to the magnetic field, the electrons have been modelled by a drifting Maxwellian distribution. In the perpendicular direction, another ring simulated by a loss cone type distribution, obtained by subtracting two Maxwellians with different temperatures, model all the constituents of the plasma. The dispersion relation derived for KAWs is a generalisation of the pioneering dispersion relation of Hasegawa on two counts: it has been extended to a plasma described by a generalised distribution function and to a multi - ion plasma containing positively and negatively charged ions. We find that the dispersion characteristics of the KAW can be made independent of the heavy ion parameters by an appropriate choice of densities and temperatures. The source of free energy for the instability is the drift velocity of the electrons; the growth rate increases with increasing drift velocity of the electrons. The positively charged heavier ions enhance the instability while the negatively charged heavier ions tend to damp the wave.

  4. Bridging Three Orders of Magnitude: Multiple Scattered Waves Sense Fractal Microscopic Structures via Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon A.; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Nordsletten, David; Michler, Christian; Juge, Lauriane; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bilston, Lynne; Guzina, Bojan; Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Wave scattering provides profound insight into the structure of matter. Typically, the ability to sense microstructure is determined by the ratio of scatterer size to probing wavelength. Here, we address the question of whether macroscopic waves can report back the presence and distribution of microscopic scatterers despite several orders of magnitude difference in scale between wavelength and scatterer size. In our analysis, monosized hard scatterers 5 μ m in radius are immersed in lossless gelatin phantoms to investigate the effect of multiple reflections on the propagation of shear waves with millimeter wavelength. Steady-state monochromatic waves are imaged in situ via magnetic resonance imaging, enabling quantification of the phase velocity at a voxel size big enough to contain thousands of individual scatterers, but small enough to resolve the wavelength. We show in theory, experiments, and simulations that the resulting coherent superposition of multiple reflections gives rise to power-law dispersion at the macroscopic scale if the scatterer distribution exhibits apparent fractality over an effective length scale that is comparable to the probing wavelength. Since apparent fractality is naturally present in any random medium, microstructure can thereby leave its fingerprint on the macroscopically quantifiable power-law exponent. Our results are generic to wave phenomena and carry great potential for sensing microstructure that exhibits intrinsic fractality, such as, for instance, vasculature.

  5. Bridging Three Orders of Magnitude: Multiple Scattered Waves Sense Fractal Microscopic Structures via Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Simon A; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Nordsletten, David; Michler, Christian; Juge, Lauriane; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Bilston, Lynne; Guzina, Bojan; Holm, Sverre; Sinkus, Ralph

    2015-08-28

    Wave scattering provides profound insight into the structure of matter. Typically, the ability to sense microstructure is determined by the ratio of scatterer size to probing wavelength. Here, we address the question of whether macroscopic waves can report back the presence and distribution of microscopic scatterers despite several orders of magnitude difference in scale between wavelength and scatterer size. In our analysis, monosized hard scatterers 5  μm in radius are immersed in lossless gelatin phantoms to investigate the effect of multiple reflections on the propagation of shear waves with millimeter wavelength. Steady-state monochromatic waves are imaged in situ via magnetic resonance imaging, enabling quantification of the phase velocity at a voxel size big enough to contain thousands of individual scatterers, but small enough to resolve the wavelength. We show in theory, experiments, and simulations that the resulting coherent superposition of multiple reflections gives rise to power-law dispersion at the macroscopic scale if the scatterer distribution exhibits apparent fractality over an effective length scale that is comparable to the probing wavelength. Since apparent fractality is naturally present in any random medium, microstructure can thereby leave its fingerprint on the macroscopically quantifiable power-law exponent. Our results are generic to wave phenomena and carry great potential for sensing microstructure that exhibits intrinsic fractality, such as, for instance, vasculature. PMID:26371655

  6. Composite Materials NDE Using Enhanced Leaky Lamb Wave Dispersion Data Acquisition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu

    1999-01-01

    The leaky Lamb wave (LLW) technique is approaching a maturity level that is making it an attractive quantitative NDE tool for composites and bonded joints. Since it was first observed in 1982, the phenomenon has been studied extensively, particularly in composite materials. The wave is induced by oblique insonification using a pitch-catch arrangement and the plate wave modes are detected by identifying minima in the reflected spectra to obtain the dispersion data. The wave behavior in multi-orientation laminates has been well documented and corroborated experimentally with high accuracy. The sensitivity of the wave to the elastic constants of the material and to the boundary conditions led to the capability to measure the elastic properties of bonded joints. Recently, the authors significantly enhanced the LLW method's capability by increasing the speed of the data acquisition, the number of modes that can be identified and the accuracy of the data inversion. In spite of the theoretical and experimental progress, methods that employ oblique insonification of composites are still not being applied as standard industrial NDE methods. The authors investigated the issues that are hampering the transition of the LLW to industrial applications and identified 4 key issues. The current capability of the method and the nature of these issues are described in this paper.

  7. Dispersive Alfvén waves in a plasma with anisotropic superthermal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, Y. F.; Hu, T. P.

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion of dispersive Alfvén wave in a low β plasma with anisotropic superthermal particles modeled by a bi-nonextensive distribution is derived from a kinetic way. The effect of anisotropic temperature on inertial Alfvén wave is so small that it is negligible. However, it will play an important role on the property of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW). The numerical results reveal that the presence of superthermal electrons in the small wavenumber limit will lead the damping rate of the KAW bigger than the one with Maxwellian distribution. Whereas, the damping rate of KAW in the large wavenumber limit will decrease with the presence of superthermal electrons. When the effect of electron anisotropic temperature overwhelms the effect of finite ion gyroradius in the small wavenumber regime, the damping rate of KAW grows with the presence of electron temperature anisotropy. On the other hand, when the effects of finite ion gyroradius play a dominant role in the large wavenumber regime, the damping rate of KAW increases with the effective perpendicular and parallel electron temperatures.

  8. Fracture source location in thin plates using the wavelet transform of dispersive waves.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H; Jang, Y S

    2000-01-01

    A new signal processing approach was presented for acoustic emission source location using the dispersive waves in a thin plate. For wave propagation in dispersive media, the accuracy of source location can be improved by using the arrival times of a single frequency component in the output signals at an array of sensors. The wavelet transform (WT) was used to resolve this problem. By utilizing the time-frequency data of the WT, the frequency-dependent arrival time traveling with the group velocity was shown to be easily determined. Experiments were performed using a lead break as the simulated fracture source on the surface of an aluminum plate. Two plate modes corresponding to the S(0) and A(0) Lamb waves were identified, and their group velocities were accurately measured. The source location results based on the WT method agreed well with the true locations. The WT method was also compared with the cross correlation technique, and both methods provide similar results. PMID:18238588

  9. Frequency dispersion of love waves in a piezoelectric nanofilm bonded on a semi-infinite elastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sijia; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Hongbin; Pan, Rongying; Alamusi; Feng, Xiqiao

    2015-11-01

    Research on the propagation of elastic waves in piezoelectric nanostructures is very limited. The frequency dispersion of Love waves in layered piezoelectric nanostructures has not yet been reported when surface effects are taken into account. Based on the surface elasticity theory, the propagation of Love waves with surface effects in a structure consisting of a nanosized piezoelectric film and a semi-infinite elastic substrate is investigated focusing on the frequency dispersion curves of different modes. The results show that under the electrically-open conditions, surface effects give rise to the dependence of Love wave dispersion on the film thickness when the thickness of the piezoelectric film reduces to nanometers. For a given wave frequency, phase velocity of Love waves in all dispersion modes exhibit obvious toward shift as the film thickness decreases or the surface parameters increase. Moreover, there may exist a cut-off frequency in the first mode dispersion below which Love waves will be evanescent in the structure due to surface effects. The cut-off frequency depends on the film thickness, the surface parameters and the bulk material properties.

  10. THE BEHAVIOR OF TRANSVERSE WAVES IN NONUNIFORM SOLAR FLUX TUBES. I. COMPARISON OF IDEAL AND RESISTIVE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume; Oliver, Ramón; Goossens, Marcel

    2013-11-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitously observed in the solar atmosphere. Kink waves are a type of transverse MHD waves in magnetic flux tubes that are damped due to resonant absorption. The theoretical study of kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes is usually based on the simplification that the transverse variation of density is confined to a nonuniform layer much thinner than the radius of the tube, i.e., the so-called thin boundary approximation. Here, we develop a general analytic method to compute the dispersion relation and the eigenfunctions of ideal MHD waves in pressureless flux tubes with transversely nonuniform layers of arbitrary thickness. Results for kink waves are produced and compared with fully numerical resistive MHD eigenvalue computations in the limit of small resistivity. We find that the frequency and resonant damping rate are the same in both ideal and resistive cases. The actual results for thick nonuniform layers deviate from the behavior predicted in the thin boundary approximation and strongly depend on the shape of the nonuniform layer. The eigenfunctions in ideal MHD are very different from those in resistive MHD. The ideal eigenfunctions display a global character regardless of the thickness of the nonuniform layer, while the resistive eigenfunctions are localized around the resonance and are indistinguishable from those of ordinary resistive Alfvén modes. Consequently, the spatial distribution of wave energy in the ideal and resistive cases is dramatically different. This poses a fundamental theoretical problem with clear observational consequences.

  11. Surface wave tomography of central and northern Europe from automated inter-station dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soomro, Riaz Ahmed; Weidle, Christian; Lebedev, Sergei; Cristiano, Luigia; Behrmann, Jan; Meier, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid growth in the number of seismic stations globally, automated analysis routines are inevitable to extract seismic observables from these large data volumes. For surface wave tomography, phase velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode surface waves yield information on the isotropic as well as anisotropic structure of the crust and upper mantle. We have new developed an algorithm that enables automated, accurate measurement of inter-station phase velocity dispersion curves through cross correlation of vertical (Rayleigh wave) and transverse component (Love wave) seismograms. After testing various parameters for automation of the procedure we find that the automated selection of segments of a given phase-velocity curve requires three parameters only, namely (1) difference of the measured phase velocity curve from a background model, (2) a smoothness constraint and (3) a length criterion. Furthermore, before averaging phase velocities for one path outliers are rejected. We performed rigorous tests to optimize the selection parameters. Interestingly, rough perturbations in the phase velocity curves do not bias the average phase velocities towards larger values. This indicates a rather random perturbation of the phase velocities by noise and complicated non-plane wave propagation. We successfully applied the method to more than one hundred thousand inter station paths in central and northern Europe, involving more than one million cross correlations on 20 years of data from permanent networks. After inversion of the fundamental mode phase velocity dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves, we obtain high resolution anisotropic phase velocity maps for periods between 10 and 250 seconds with a lateral resolution between about 50 to 200 kilometers in Central Europe. At shorter periods the North-German and Polish sedimentary basins are clearly imaged. At lower crustal depth the Alpine crustal root is characterized by low velocities. At longer

  12. Rayleigh Wave Dispersion and A 1d S-velocity Model of The Fennoscandian Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funke, S.; Friederich, W.; Sstwg, The

    We derive a Rayleigh wave dispersion curve from surface wave data recorded at the SVEKALAPKO tomographic array deployed in Southern Finland from September 1998 to March 1999. After a suite of processing steps, complex spectral amplitudes of the Rayleigh wave train are determined for each available seismogram. The process- ing includes low-pass filtering, instrument correction, deconvolution using a standard earth model to compress the Rayleigh wave train, computation of Gabor matrices (sonograms) to pick group travel times, and finally estimation of complex spectral amplitudes in a Gaussian time window of frequency-dependent width centered on the group travel time. Spectral amplitude values are only accepted if the signal-to-noise ratio in the considered frequency interval is above a pre-chosen threshold and if the picked group travel time does not deviate too strongly from that predicted by a stan- dard earth model. The final dataset contains spectral amplitude values at 34 selected periods from 52 earthquakes observed at on average 25 stations. For each selected frequency, we determine a phase velocity by fitting plane waves propagating across the array with this velocity to the complex spectral amplitudes of all earthquakes and stations. Errors are estimated with a bootstrap method. We obtain reliable phase velocities in the frequency band from 8 mHz to 50 mHz. Phase veloci- ties for lower frequencies exhibit large errors due to the lack of big earthquakes during the time of deployment. The phase velocities are substantially higher than predicted by standard earth model ak135 below 20 mHz and slightly lower above 25 mHz. We have inverted the dispersion curve for a 1D shear wave velocity model down to about 400 km depth and obtain a 50 km thick crust and a fast upper mantle with a sub- Moho velocity of 4.7 km/s. Our data do not require a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle. Indeed, the dispersion curve can be explained by a nearly straight velocity profile from

  13. Evaluating Chemical Dispersant Efficacy In An Experimental Wave Tank: 1, Dispersant Effectiveness As A Function Of Energy Dissipation Rate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous laboratory test systems have been developed for the comparison of efficacy between various chemical oil dispersant formulations. However, for the assessment of chemical dispersant effectiveness under realistic sea state, test protocols are required to produce hydrodynam...

  14. Onset of dispersion in Nb microstrip transmission lines at submillimeter wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H. H. S.; Mcgrath, William R.; Bumble, B.; Leduc, Henry G.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured the dispersion in phase velocity of a Nb-SiO(x)-Nb microstrip transmission line resonator over a frequency range from 50 GHz to 800 GHz. A submicron Nb/Al-AlO(x)/Nb Josephson junction was used as a voltage-controlled oscillator to excite the high order modes in the resonator. The same junction is used as a direct detector resulting in a series of step-like structures in the DC current-voltage characteristic at the position of each mode frequency. The transmission line is dispersionless up to about 500 GHz where the phase velocity begins to decrease. This is well below the gap frequency f(sub g) approx. equals 700 GHz. Results agree qualitatively with the expected theoretical behavior near f(sub g). This onset of dispersion and loss in Nb transmission lines will have a significant impact on the design of submillimeter wave RF circuits.

  15. Exact solution of the dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves in sheared relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuperman, S.; Heristchi, D.

    1992-08-01

    The transcendental dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves propagating in the slow mode in sheared non-neutral relativistic cylindrical electron beams in strong applied magnetic fields is solved exactly. Thus, rather than truncated power series for the modified Bessel functions involved, use is made of modern algorithms able to compute such functions up to 18-digit accuracy. Consequently, new and significantly more important branches of the velocity shear instability are found. When the shear-factor and/or the geometrical parameter a/b (pipe-to-beam radius ratio) are increased, the unstable branches join, and the higher-frequency, larger-wavenumber modes are significantly enhanced. Since analytical solutions of the exact dispersion relation cannot be obtained, it is suggested that in all similar cases the methods proposed and demonstrated here should be used to carry out a rigorous stability analysis.

  16. Evanescent-wave comb spectroscopy of liquids with strongly dispersive optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; Giorgini, A.; Salza, M.; Fabian, M.; Gagliardi, G.; De Natale, P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate evanescent-wave fiber cavity-enhanced spectroscopy in the liquid phase using a near-infrared frequency comb. Exploiting strong fiber-dispersion effects, we show that liquid absorption spectra can be recorded without any external dispersive element. The fiber cavity is used both as sensor and spectrometer. The resonance modes are frequency locked to the comb teeth while the cavity photon lifetime is measured over 155 nm, from 1515 nm to 1670 nm, where absorption bands of liquid polyamines are detected as a proof of concept. Our fiber spectrometer lends itself to in situ, real-time chemical analysis in environmental monitoring, biomedical assays, and micro-opto-fluidic systems.

  17. Systematic wave-equation finite difference time domain formulations for modeling electromagnetic wave-propagation in general linear and nonlinear dispersive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Omar

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, systematic wave-equation finite difference time domain (WE-FDTD) formulations are presented for modeling electromagnetic wave-propagation in linear and nonlinear dispersive materials. In the proposed formulations, the complex conjugate pole residue (CCPR) pairs model is adopted in deriving a unified dispersive WE-FDTD algorithm that allows modeling different dispersive materials, such as Debye, Drude and Lorentz, in the same manner with the minimal additional auxiliary variables. Moreover, the proposed formulations are incorporated with the wave-equation perfectly matched layer (WE-PML) to construct a material independent mesh truncating technique that can be used for modeling general frequency-dependent open region problems. Several numerical examples involving linear and nonlinear dispersive materials are included to show the validity of the proposed formulations.

  18. Direct inversion of surface wave dispersion for three-dimensional shallow crustal structure based on ray tracing: methodology and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongjian; Yao, Huajian; Zhang, Haijiang; Huang, Yu-Chih; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a method to invert surface wave dispersion data directly for 3-D variations of shear wave speed, that is, without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps, using frequency-dependent ray tracing and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. To simplify the problem we consider quasi-stratified media with smoothly varying seismic properties. We represent the 3-D shear wave speed model by means of 1-D profiles beneath grid points, which are determined from all dispersion data simultaneously using a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic method. The wavelet coefficients of the wave speed model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm, and upon iteration the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated using the newly obtained wave speed model. To demonstrate its feasibility, we apply the method to determine the 3-D shallow crustal shear wave speed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan using short period interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation method. The results are consistent with previous studies and reveal strong shallow crustal heterogeneity that correlates with surface geology.

  19. A Steady-state Picture of Solar Wind Acceleration and Charge State Composition Derived from a Global Wave-driven MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, R.; Landi, E.; van der Holst, B.; Lepri, S. T.; Vásquez, A. M.; Nuevo, F. A.; Frazin, R.; Manchester, W.; Sokolov, I.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-06-01

    The higher charge states found in slow (<400 km s-1) solar wind streams compared to fast streams have supported the hypothesis that the slow wind originates in closed coronal loops and is released intermittently through reconnection. Here we examine whether a highly ionized slow wind can also form along steady and open magnetic field lines. We model the steady-state solar atmosphere using the Alfvén Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), a global MHD model driven by Alfvén waves, and apply an ionization code to calculate the charge state evolution along modeled open field lines. This constitutes the first charge state calculation covering all latitudes in a realistic magnetic field. The ratios {{O}+7}/{{O}+6} and {{C}+6}/{{C}+5} are compared to in situ Ulysses observations and are found to be higher in the slow wind, as observed; however, they are underpredicted in both wind types. The modeled ion fractions of S, Si, and Fe are used to calculate line-of-sight intensities, which are compared to Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations above a coronal hole. The agreement is partial and suggests that all ionization rates are underpredicted. Assuming the presence of suprathermal electrons improved the agreement with both EIS and Ulysses observations; importantly, the trend of higher ionization in the slow wind was maintained. The results suggest that there can be a sub-class of slow wind that is steady and highly ionized. Further analysis shows that it originates from coronal hole boundaries (CHBs), where the modeled electron density and temperature are higher than inside the hole, leading to faster ionization. This property of CHBs is global and observationally supported by EUV tomography.

  20. A dispersion relation in bidust acoustic wave in non uniform stratified plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Valdeblanquez, E.

    2006-12-04

    Low frequencies waves are studied in plasma with two kind of dusty grains. Also considered are stratified plasma with layers of different densities to that of the main plasma. In this analysis each dust species is treated with a simplified model of fluid equations, and electrons and ions are determined by a Boltzmann factor. Relative velocities between each species and the non uniform plasma is considered in order to study instabilities. In cases in which the speed or the density of current of the charged dust grains is zero, the dispersion equation is recovered.

  1. Effects of waves on water dispersion in a semi-enclosed estuarine bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpey, M. T.; Ardhuin, F.; Otheguy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The bay of Saint Jean de Luz - Ciboure is a touristic destination located in the south west of France on the Basque coast. This small bay is 1.5km wide for 1km long. It is semi-enclosed by breakwaters, so that the area is mostly protected from waves except in its eastern part, where wave breaking is regularly observed over a shallow rock shelf. In the rest of the area the currents are generally weak. The bay receives fresh water inflows from two rivers. During intense raining events, the rivers can introduce pollutants in the bay. The input of pollutants combined with the low level dynamic of the area can affect the water quality for several days. To study such a phenomenon, mechanisms of water dispersion in the bay are investigated. The present paper focuses on the effects of waves on bay dynamics. Several field experiments were conducted in the area, combining wave and current measurements from a set of ADCP and ADV, lagrangian difter experiments in the surfzone, salinity and temperature profile measurements. An analysis of this set of various data is provided. It reveals that the bay combines remarkable density stratification due to fresh water inflows and occasionally intense wave-induced currents in the surfzone. These currents have a strong influence on river plume dynamics when the sea state is energetic. Moreover, modifications of hydrodynamics in the bay passes are found to be remarkably correlated with sea state evolutions. This result suggests a significant impact of waves on the bay flushing. To further analyse these phenomena, a three dimensional numerical model of bay hydrodynamics is developed. The model aims at reproducing fresh water inflows combined with wind-, tide- and wave-induced currents and mixing. The model of the bay is implemented using the code MOHID , which has been modified to allow the three dimensional representation of wave-current interactions proposed by Ardhuin et al. [2008b] . The circulation is forced by the wave field modelled

  2. Impulsive dispersion of a granular layer by a weak blast wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, V.; Saurel, R.; Jourdan, G.; Houas, L.

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion of particles by blast or shock waves induces the formation of coherent structures taking the shape of particle jets. In the present study, a blast wave, issued from an open shock tube, is generated at the center of a granular ring initially confined in a Hele-Shaw cell. With the present experimental setup, solid particle jet formation is clearly observed in a quasi-two-dimensional configuration. In all instances, the jets are initially generated inside the particle ring and thereafter expelled outward. Furthermore, thanks to the two-dimensional experimental configuration, a general study of the main parameters involved in these types of flows can be performed. Among them, the particle diameter, the density of the particles, the initial size of the ring, the shape of the overpressure generated and the surface friction of the Hele-Shaw cell are investigated. Empirical relationships are deduced from experimental results.

  3. Traveling wave dielectrophoresis micropump based on the dispersion of a capacitive electrode layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, Marcin; Diesinger, Heinrich

    2009-06-01

    A traveling wave dielectrophoresis microfluid pump based on structural dispersion is demonstrated. The phase shift between medium polarization and applied propagating field, necessary to generate asynchronous propagative forces in dielectrophoresis, is generated by an RC circuit consisting of the electrode insulator and the liquid conductivity. Since the device characteristics involve only bulk properties, the micropump does not require conductivity gradient or double layers, unlike existing micropumps using electro-osmosis and electrohydrodynamic shear forces. Its frequency of maximum pumping force can be made considerably lower than the dielectric relaxation frequency of the liquid. By decomposing the traveling wave electrode array into a rudimentary RC model, coincidence is found between optimized pumping conditions and crossover of the impedance measured between electrode combs. By using impedance spectroscopy alternately with pumping, the frequency of the applied signal can be matched in real-time to the complex dielectric constant of the liquid to keep the pumping force maximized.

  4. Algorithmic Extensions of Low-Dispersion Scheme and Modeling Effects for Acoustic Wave Simulation. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaushik, Dinesh K.; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    Accurate computation of acoustic wave propagation may be more efficiently performed when their dispersion relations are considered. Consequently, computational algorithms which attempt to preserve these relations have been gaining popularity in recent years. In the present paper, the extensions to one such scheme are discussed. By solving the linearized, 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with such a method for the acoustic wave propagation, several issues were investigated. Among them were higher-order accuracy, choice of boundary conditions and differencing stencils, effects of viscosity, low-storage time integration, generalized curvilinear coordinates, periodic series, their reflections and interference patterns from a flat wall and scattering from a circular cylinder. The results were found to be promising en route to the aeroacoustic simulations of realistic engineering problems.

  5. Strong nonlocalization induced by small scale parameter on terahertz flexural wave dispersion characteristics of a monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendar, S.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the strong nonlocal scale effect on the flexural wave propagation in a monolayer graphene sheet. The graphene is modeled as an isotropic plate of one atom thick. Nonlocal governing equation of motion is derived and wave propagation analysis is performed using spectral analysis. The present analysis shows that the flexural wave dispersion in graphene obtained by local and nonlocal elasticity theories is quite different. The nonlocal elasticity calculation shows that the wavenumber escapes to infinite at certain frequency and the corresponding wave velocity tends to zero at that frequency indicating localization and stationary behavior. This behavior is captured in the spectrum and dispersion curves. The cut-off frequency of flexural wave not only depend on the axial wavenumber but also on the nonlocal scaling parameter. The effect of axial wavenumber on the wave behavior in graphene is also discussed in the present manuscript.

  6. Imaging the shallow subsurface with surface waves: dispersion curve analysis versus full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés Pérez Solano, Carlos; Donno, Daniela; Strobbia, Claudio; Chauris, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Seismic surface wave analysis is a standard tool in geotechnical engineering for imaging the shallow subsurface. Most current surface wave analysis methods assume a horizontally layered medium, and estimate the near-surface shear velocity profile from dispersion curves, which are picked on frequency-wavenumber (f-k) gathers and then inverted using 1D modelling approaches. Media containing high velocity contrasts and irregular lateral variations might be difficult to be handled with the local 1D approximation. For 2D model estimation, full waveform inversion (FWI) is an alternative and can estimate high resolution models. The classical FWI objective function consists of the least-squares misfit between observed and modelled shot gathers (Tarantola, 1986). Classical FWI needs an accurate initial model for achieving convergence. Data sets containing surface waves could be inverted, without falling into secondary minima, if the data contains sufficiently low frequencies and large offsets such that multi-scale and time windowing approaches can be applied. We propose to invert surface waves with an alternative FWI-based approach that uses a modified objective function. It is based on the least-squares misfit between the absolute value of the f-k transform of windowed shot gathers. We refer to this approach as the windowed-Amplitude Waveform Inversion (w-AWI). Some secondary minima problems are mitigated: the choice of an initial model is easier in w-AWI than in FWI. The alternative objective function is intermediary between the one used in the 1D inversion approach (dispersion curves) and classical FWI. As most of the phase information is neglected in w-AWI, we use it as a first step before classical FWI. This sequential inversion approach using w-AWI followed by classical FWI aims at estimating a high-resolution near-surface velocity model, by explaining the complete elastic wavefield, even when the initial velocity model is far from the exact one. The proposed approach

  7. Spectral-temporal description of dispersive wave emission and soliton trapping in micro-nano silicon-on-insulator waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin; Ma, Chengju; Fan, Wei; Fu, Haiwei

    2015-08-01

    We numerically investigate the dispersive wave emission and soliton trapping in the process of femtosecond soliton propagation in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide. The cross-correlation frequency resolved optical gating (X-FROG) technique is employed to analyze the spectral-temporal dynamics of the soliton at different propagation distances. The numerical results show that dispersive wave emission can be blue-shifted (around 1300 nm) or red-shifted (around 1900 nm), which is determined by the dispersion slope for the pump wavelength (1550 nm). In addition, it can be found that red-shifted dispersive wave can supply contribution to the flatness of the supercontinuum generation. Through increasing the peak power of the soliton to 100 W, the soliton trapping can be observed by the edge of dispersive wave, which can be visualized in the form of multi-peak oscillation structure in the spectrogram when not considering the two-photon absorption (TPA). This work opens up the possibility for the realization of dispersive wave emission device in highly integrated circuit.

  8. Construction of the wave operator for non-linear dispersive equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Kai Erik

    In this thesis, we will study non-linear dispersive equations. The primary focus will be on the construction of the positive-time wave operator for such equations. The positive-time wave operator problem arises in the study of the asymptotics of a partial differential equation. It is a map from a space of initial data X into itself, and is loosely defined as follows: Suppose that for a solution ψlin to the dispersive equation with no non-linearity and initial data ψ +, there exists a unique solution ψ to the non-linear equation with initial data ψ0 such that ψ behaves as ψ lin as t → infinity. Then the wave operator is the map W+ that takes ψ + to ψ0. By its definition, W+ is injective. An important additional question is whether or not the map is also surjective. If so, then every non-linear solution emanating from X behaves, in some sense, linearly as it evolves (this is known as asymptotic completeness). Thus, there is some justification for treating these solutions as their much simpler linear counterparts. The main results presented in this thesis revolve around the construction of the wave operator(s) at critical non-linearities. We will study the "semi-relativistic" Schrodinger equation as well as the Klein-Gordon-Schrodinger system on R2 . In both cases, we will impose fairly general quadratic non-linearities for which conservation laws cannot be relied upon. These non-linearities fall below the scaling required to employ such tools as the Strichartz estimates. We instead adapt the "first iteration method" of Jang, Li, and Zhang to our setting which depends crucially on the critical decay of the non-linear interaction of the linear evolution. To see the critical decay in our problem, careful analysis is needed to treat the regime where one has spatial and/or time resonance.

  9. The theory of magnetohydrodynamic wave generation by localized sources. II - Collisionless dissipation of wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, William

    1989-01-01

    The dispersion equation of Barnes (1966) is used to study the dissipation of asymptotic wave packets generated by localized periodic sources. The solutions of the equation are linear waves, damped by Landau and transit-time processes, in a collisionless warm plasma. For the case of an ideal MHD system, most of the waves emitted from a source are shown to cancel asympotically through destructive interference. The modes transporting significant flux to asymptotic distances are found to be Alfven waves and fast waves with theta (the angle between the magnetic field and the characteristics of the far-field waves) of about 0 and about pi/2.

  10. Compressional wave dispersion due to rock matrix stiffening by clay squirt flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Jing; Zhao, Jianguo; Carcione, José M.; Huang, Xingxing

    2016-06-01

    The standard Biot-Gassmann theory of poroelasticity fails to explain strong compressional wave velocity dispersion experimentally observed in 12 tight siltstone with clay-filled pores. In order to analyze and understand the results, we developed a new double-porosity model of clay squirt flow where wave-induced local fluid flow occurs between the micropores in clay aggregates and intergranular macropores. The model is validated based on the combined study of ultrasonic experiments on specimens at different saturation conditions and theoretical predictions. The presence of a sub-pore-scale structure of clay micropores contained in intergranular macropores, where the fluid does not have enough time to achieve mechanical equilibrium at ultrasonic frequencies and thus stiffens the rock matrix, provides a suitable explanation of the experimental data. Moreover, the model provides a new bound for estimating the compressional wave velocity of tight rocks saturated with two immiscible liquids. The theoretical predictions indicate that the velocity variation between gas- and liquid-saturated specimens is predominantly induced by the clay squirt stiffening effect on the rock matrix and not by fluid substitution. The effect contributes more than 90% to the variation in the porosity range of 0-5%. Thus, clay squirt flow dominates the relationships between compressional wave velocity and pore fluid in tight rocks.

  11. A Lanczos model-order reduction technique to efficiently simulate electromagnetic wave propagation in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerling, Jörn; Wei, Lei; Urbach, Paul; Remis, Rob

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a Krylov subspace model-order reduction technique for time- and frequency-domain electromagnetic wave fields in linear dispersive media. Starting point is a self-consistent first-order form of Maxwell's equations and the constitutive relation. This form is discretized on a standard staggered Yee grid, while the extension to infinity is modeled via a recently developed global complex scaling method. By applying this scaling method, the time- or frequency-domain electromagnetic wave field can be computed via a so-called stability-corrected wave function. Since this function cannot be computed directly due to the large order of the discretized Maxwell system matrix, Krylov subspace reduced-order models are constructed that approximate this wave function. We show that the system matrix exhibits a particular physics-based symmetry relation that allows us to efficiently construct the time- and frequency-domain reduced-order models via a Lanczos-type reduction algorithm. The frequency-domain models allow for frequency sweeps meaning that a single model provides field approximations for all frequencies of interest and dominant field modes can easily be determined as well. Numerical experiments for two- and three-dimensional configurations illustrate the performance of the proposed reduction method.

  12. Investigation of dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and spectral analysis methods for acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanel, Florence O.; Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    Important characteristics of the aeroacoustic wave propagation are mostly encoded in their dispersion relations. Hence, a computational aeroacoustic (CAA) algorithm, which reasonably preserves these relations, was investigated. It was derived using an optimization procedure to ensure, that the numerical derivatives preserved the wave number and angular frequency of the differential terms in the linearized, 2-D Euler equations. Then, simulations were performed to validate the scheme and a compatible set of discretized boundary conditions. The computational results were found to agree favorably with the exact solutions. The boundary conditions were transparent to the outgoing waves, except when the disturbance source was close to a boundary. The time-domain data generated by such CAA solutions were often intractable until their spectra was analyzed. Therefore, the relative merits of three different methods were included in the study. For simple, periodic waves, the periodogram method produced better estimates of the steep-sloped spectra than the Blackman-Tukey method. Also, for this problem, the Hanning window was more effective when used with the weighted-overlapped-segment-averaging and Blackman-Tukey methods gave better results than the periodogram method. Finally, it was demonstrated that the representation of time domain-data was significantly dependent on the particular spectral analysis method employed.

  13. Variation of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Group Velocity Dispersion in Iran and the Surrounding Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rham, D. J.; Preistley, K.; Tatar, M.; Paul, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present group velocity dispersion results from a study of regional fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Iran and the surrounding region. Data for these measurements comes from field deployments within Iran by the University of Cambridge (GBR) and the Universite Joseph-Fourier (FRA) in conjunction with International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (Iran), in addition to data from IRIS and Geofone. 1D path- averaged dispersion measurements have been made for ~5500 source-receiver paths using multiple filter analysis. We combine these observations in a tomographic inversion to produce group velocity images between 10 and 60 s period. Because of the dense path coverage, these images have substantially higher lateral resolution for this region than is currently available from global and regional group velocity studies. We observe variations in short-period wave group velocity which is consistent with the surface geology. Low group velocities (2.00-2.55 km/s) at short periods (10-20 s), for both Rayleigh and Love waves are observed beneath thick sedimentary deposits; The south Caspian Basin, Black Sea, the eastern Mediterranean, the Persian Gulf, the Makran, the southern Turan shield, and the Indus and Gangetic basins. Somewhat higher group velocity (2.80-3.15 km/s for Rayleigh, and 3.00-3.40 km/s for Love) at these periods occur in sediment poor regions, such as; the Turkish-Iranian plateau, the Arabian shield, and Kazakhstan. At intermediate periods (30-40 s) group velocities over most of the region are low (2.65-3.20 km/s for Rayleigh, and 2.80-3.45 km/s for love) compared to Arabia (3.40-3.70 km/s Rayleigh, 3.50-4.0 km/s Love). At longer periods (50-60 s) Love wave group velocities remain low (3.25-3.70 km/s) over most of Iran, but there are even lower velocities (2.80-3.00 km/s) still associated with the thick sediments of the south Caspian basin, the surrounding shield areas have much higher group velocities (3

  14. Crustal Structure of Iraq from Receiver Functions and Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, R; Mahdi, H; Al-Shukri, H; Rodgers, A J

    2006-08-31

    We report the crustal structure of Iraq, located in the northeastern Arabian plate, estimated by joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions and surface wave group velocity dispersion. Receiver functions were computed from teleseismic recordings at two temporary broadband seismic stations in Mosul (MSL) and Baghdad (BHD), separated by approximately 360 km. Group velocity dispersion curves at the sites were derived from continental-scale tomography of Pasyanos (2006). The inversion results show that the crustal thicknesses are 39 km at MSL and 43 km at BHD. Both sites reveal low velocity surface layers consistent with sedimentary thickness of about 3 km at station MSL and 7 km at BHD, agreeing well with the existing models. Ignoring the sediments, the crustal velocities and thicknesses are remarkably similar between the two stations, suggesting that the crustal structure of the proto-Arabian Platform in northern Iraq was uniform before subsidence and deposition of the sediments in the Cenozoic. Deeper low velocity sediments at BHD are expected to result in higher ground motions for earthquakes.

  15. MHD Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Fasoli, A; Testa, D; Sharapov, S; Berk, H L; Breizman, B; Gondhalekar, A; Mantsinen, M

    2004-03-23

    Experiments are conducted on the JET tokamak to assess the diagnostic potential of MHD active and passive spectroscopy, for the plasma bulk and its suprathermal components, using Alfv{acute e}n Eigenmodes (AEs) excited by external antennas and by energetic particles. The measurements of AE frequencies and mode numbers give information on the bulk plasma. Improved equilibrium reconstruction, in particular in terms of radial profiles of density and safety factor, is possible from the comparison between the antenna driven spectrum and that calculated theoretically. Details of the time evolution of the non-monotonic safety factor profile in advanced scenarios can be reconstructed from the frequency of ICRH-driven energetic particle modes. The plasma effective mass can be inferred from the resonant frequency of externally driven AEs in discharges with similar equilibrium profiles. The stability thresholds and the nonlinear development of the instabilities can give clues on energy and spatial distribution of the fast particle population. The presence of unstable AEs provides lower limits in the energy of ICRH generated fast ion tails. Fast ion pressure gradients and their evolution can be inferred from the stability of AEs at different plasma radial positions. Finally, the details of the AE spectrum in the nonlinear stage can be used to obtain information about the fast particle velocity space diffusion.

  16. Surface wave tomography of central and northern Europe from automated inter-station dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soomro, R. A.; Weidle, C.; Lebedev, S.; Cristiano, L.; Meier, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    With the rapid growth in the no. of seismic stations globally, manual data processing for routine analysis as well as determination of seismic observables becomes more and more impractical. Therefore, automated schemes are inevitable to handle these large data volumes. For surface wave tomography, phase velocity dispersion curves of fundamental mode surface waves yield information on the isotropic as well as anisotropic structure of the crust and upper mantle. We measure inter-station phase velocity dispersion curves through cross correlation of vertical component (Rayleigh wave) and transverse component (Love wave) seismograms. We have developed a scheme to automate this well established inter-station method, which automatically selects the smooth parts of observed phase velocity dispersion curves, and thus obtain path average phase velocity dispersion curve of each inter-station path. After testing various parameters for automation of the procedure we finally confined the method to three parameters only, namely (1) difference of the measured phase velocity curve from a background model, (2) a smoothness constraint and (3) a length criterion. We performed rigorous tests to optimize the parameters and obtained optimal values of these three parameters. We successfully applied the method to more than one hundred thousand inter station paths in central and northern Europe which involved more than one million cross correlations on 20 years of the data of the permanent networks. The method was also tested on temporary deployments e.g. TOR, PASSEQ, SVEKALPKO etc, across Europe. After inversion of the fundamental mode phase velocity dispersion curves for both Rayleigh and Love waves, we obtain high resolution anisotropic phase velocity maps for periods between 10 and 250 seconds with a lateral resolution between about 50 to 100 kilometers. Well known features of upper mantle structure in central Europe are well resolved in our phase velocity maps. Distinct differences

  17. Seismic wave attenuation and dispersion due to wave-induced fluid flow in rocks with strong permeability fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Germán Rubino, J; Monachesi, Leonardo B; Müller, Tobias M; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Oscillatory fluid movements in heterogeneous porous rocks induced by seismic waves cause dissipation of wave field energy. The resulting seismic signature depends not only on the rock compressibility distribution, but also on a statistically averaged permeability. This so-called equivalent seismic permeability does not, however, coincide with the respective equivalent flow permeability. While this issue has been analyzed for one-dimensional (1D) media, the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cases remain unexplored. In this work, this topic is analyzed for 2D random medium realizations having strong permeability fluctuations. With this objective, oscillatory compressibility simulations based on the quasi-static poroelasticity equations are performed. Numerical analysis shows that strong permeability fluctuations diminish the magnitude of attenuation and velocity dispersion due to fluid flow, while the frequency range where these effects are significant gets broader. By comparing the acoustic responses obtained using different permeability averages, it is also shown that at very low frequencies the equivalent seismic permeability is similar to the equivalent flow permeability, while for very high frequencies this parameter approaches the arithmetic average of the permeability field. These seemingly generic findings have potentially important implications with regard to the estimation of equivalent flow permeability from seismic data. PMID:25669286

  18. Analysis of dispersion and attenuation of surface waves in poroelastic media in the exploration-seismic frequency band

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Xia, J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse dispersion and attenuation of surface waves at free surfaces of possible vacuum/poroelastic media: permeable-'open pore', impermeable-'closed pore' and partially permeable boundaries, which have not been previously reported in detail by researchers, under different surface-permeable, viscous-damping, elastic and fluid-flowing conditions. Our discussion is focused on their characteristics in the exploration-seismic frequency band (a few through 200 Hz) for near-surface applications. We find two surface-wave modes exist, R1 waves for all conditions, and R2 waves for closed-pore and partially permeable conditions. For R1 waves, velocities disperse most under partially permeable conditions and least under the open-pore condition. High-coupling damping coefficients move the main dispersion frequency range to high frequencies. There is an f1 frequency dependence as a constant-Q model for attenuation at high frequencies. R1 waves for the open pore are most sensitive to elastic modulus variation, but least sensitive to tortuosities variation. R1 waves for partially permeable surface radiate as non-physical waves (Im(k) < 0) at low frequencies. For R2 waves, velocities are slightly lower than the bulk slow P2 waves. At low frequencies, both velocity and attenuation are diffusive of f1/2 frequency dependence, as P2 waves. It is found that for partially permeable surfaces, the attenuation displays -f1 frequency dependence as frequency increasing. High surface permeability, low-coupling damping coefficients, low Poisson's ratios, and low tortuosities increase the slope of the -f1 dependence. When the attenuation coefficients reach 0, R2 waves for partially permeable surface begin to radiate as non-physical waves. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  19. Computational Investigation of Extended-MHD Effects on Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jacob R.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2013-10-01

    We present studies with the extended-MHD NIMROD code of the tearing instability and edge-localized modes (ELMs). In our first study we use analytics and computations to examine tearing in a large-guide field with a nonzero pressure gradient where previous results show drift effects are stabilizing [Coppi, PoF (1964)]. Our work finds three new results: (1) At moderately large ion gyroradius the mode rotates at the electron drift velocity and there is no stabilization. (2) With collision-less drift reconnection, computations must also include electron gyroviscosity and advection. And (3) we derive a dispersion relation that exhibits diamagnetic stabilization and describes the transition between the electron-fluid-mediated regime of (1) and the semi-collisional regime [Drake and Lee, PoF (1977)]. Our second study investigates the transition from an ideal- to an extended-MHD model in an ELM unstable tokamak configuration. With the inclusion of a full generalized Ohm's law the growth rate is enhanced at intermediate wave-numbers and cut-off at large wave-numbers by diamagnetic effects consistent with analytics [Hastie et al., PoP (2003)]. Adding ion gyroviscosity to the model is stabilizing at large wave-numbers consistent with recent results [Xu et al., PoP (2013)]. Support provided by US DOE.

  20. A seismic reference model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath China from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weisen; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Kang, Dou; Kim, Younghee; Lin, Fan-Chi; Ning, Jieyuan; Wang, Weitao; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Longquan

    2016-04-01

    Using data from more than 2000 seismic stations from multiple networks arrayed throughout China (CEArray, China Array, NECESS, PASSCAL, GSN) and surrounding regions (Korean Seismic Network, F-Net, KNET) we perform ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography across the entire region and earthquake tomography across parts of South China and Northeast China. We produce isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps with uncertainty estimates from 8 to 50 sec period across the entire region of study, and extend them to 70 sec period where earthquake tomography is performed. Maps of azimuthal anisotropy are estimated simultaneously to minimize anisotropic bias in the isotropic maps, but are not discussed here. The 3D model is produced using a Bayesian Monte Carlo formalism covering all of China, extending eastward through the Korean Peninsula, into the marginal seas, to Japan. We define the final model as the mean and standard deviation of the posterior distribution at each location on a 0.5°x0.5° grid from the surface to 150 km depth. Surface wave dispersion data do not strongly constrain internal interfaces, but shear wave speeds between the discontinuities in the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle are well determined. We design the resulting model as a reference model, which is intended to be useful to other researchers as a starting model, to predict seismic wave fields and observables, and to predict other types of data (e.g., topography, gravity). The model and the data on which it is based are available for download. In addition, the model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle deserving of further focus and continued interpretation.

  1. Wave dispersion in the hybrid-Vlasov model: Verification of Vlasiator

    SciTech Connect

    Kempf, Yann; Pokhotelov, Dimitry; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Alfthan, Sebastian von; Palmroth, Minna; Vaivads, Andris

    2013-11-15

    Vlasiator is a new hybrid-Vlasov plasma simulation code aimed at simulating the entire magnetosphere of the Earth. The code treats ions (protons) kinetically through Vlasov's equation in the six-dimensional phase space while electrons are a massless charge-neutralizing fluid [M. Palmroth et al., J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 99, 41 (2013); A. Sandroos et al., Parallel Comput. 39, 306 (2013)]. For first global simulations of the magnetosphere, it is critical to verify and validate the model by established methods. Here, as part of the verification of Vlasiator, we characterize the low-β plasma wave modes described by this model and compare with the solution computed by the Waves in Homogeneous, Anisotropic Multicomponent Plasmas (WHAMP) code [K. Rönnmark, Kiruna Geophysical Institute Reports No. 179, 1982], using dispersion curves and surfaces produced with both programs. The match between the two fundamentally different approaches is excellent in the low-frequency, long wavelength range which is of interest in global magnetospheric simulations. The left-hand and right-hand polarized wave modes as well as the Bernstein modes in the Vlasiator simulations agree well with the WHAMP solutions. Vlasiator allows a direct investigation of the importance of the Hall term by including it in or excluding it from Ohm's law in simulations. This is illustrated showing examples of waves obtained using the ideal Ohm's law and Ohm's law including the Hall term. Our analysis emphasizes the role of the Hall term in Ohm's law in obtaining wave modes departing from ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the hybrid-Vlasov model.

  2. A seismic reference model for the crust and uppermost mantle beneath China from surface wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weisen; Ritzwoller, Michael H.; Kang, Dou; Kim, YoungHee; Lin, Fan-Chi; Ning, Jieyuan; Wang, Weitao; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Longquan

    2016-08-01

    Using data from more than 2000 seismic stations from multiple networks arrayed throughout China (CEArray, China Array, NECESS, PASSCAL, GSN) and surrounding regions (Korean Seismic Network, F-Net, KNET), we perform ambient noise Rayleigh wave tomography across the entire region and earthquake tomography across parts of South China and Northeast China. We produce isotropic Rayleigh wave group and phase speed maps with uncertainty estimates from 8 to 50 s period across the entire region of study, and extend them to 70 s period where earthquake tomography is performed. Maps of azimuthal anisotropy are estimated simultaneously to minimize anisotropic bias in the isotropic maps, but are not discussed here. The 3D model is produced using a Bayesian Monte Carlo formalism covering all of China, extending eastwards through the Korean Peninsula, into the marginal seas, to Japan. We define the final model as the mean and standard deviation of the posterior distribution at each location on a 0.5° × 0.5° grid from the surface to 150 km depth. Surface wave dispersion data do not strongly constrain internal interfaces, but shear wave speeds between the discontinuities in the crystalline crust and uppermost mantle are well determined. We design the resulting model as a reference model, which is intended to be useful to other researchers as a starting model, to predict seismic wave fields and observables and to predict other types of data (e.g. topography, gravity). The model and the data on which it is based are available for download. In addition, the model displays a great variety and considerable richness of geological and tectonic features in the crust and in the uppermost mantle deserving of further focus and continued interpretation.

  3. A theory for narrow-banded radio bursts at Uranus - MHD surface waves as an energy driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Curtis, S. A.; Desch, M. D.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A possible scenario for the generation of the narrow-banded radio bursts detected at Uranus by the Voyager 2 planetary radio astronomy experiment is described. In order to account for the emission burstiness which occurs on time scales of hundreds of milliseconds, it is proposed that ULF magnetic surface turbulence generated at the frontside magnetopause propagates down the open/closed field line boundary and mode-converts to kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) deep within the polar cusp. The oscillating KAW potentials then drive a transient electron stream that creates the bursty radio emission. To substantiate these ideas, Voyager 2 magnetometer measurements of enhanced ULF magnetic activity at the frontside magnetopause are shown. It is demonstrated analytically that such magnetic turbulence should mode-convert deep in the cusp at a radial distance of 3 RU.

  4. Dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in two-fluid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-04-15

    Analytical expressions for the dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in magnetized plasmas based on two-fluid model are obtained. The properties of waves propagating at different angles (to the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}) and β (the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressures) values are investigated. It is shown that two linearly polarized waves—namely, the fast and Alfvén modes in the low-β (β≪1) plasmas, the fast and slow modes in the β∼1 plasmas, and the Alfvén and slow modes in the high-β (β≫1) plasmas—become circularly polarized at the near-parallel (to B{sub 0}) propagation. The negative magnetic-helicity of the Alfvén mode occurs only at small or moderate angles in the low-β plasmas, and the ion cross-helicity of the slow mode is nearly the same as that of the Alfvén mode in the high-β plasmas. It is also shown that the electric polarization δE{sub z}/δE{sub y} decreases with the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i} for the long-wavelength waves, and the transition between left- and right-hand polarizations of the Alfvén mode in T{sub e}/T{sub i}≠0 plasmas can disappear when T{sub e}/T{sub i}=0. The approximate dispersion relations in the near-perpendicular propagation, low-β, and high-β limits can quite accurately describe the three modes.

  5. The Role of Energy Dispersion in the Genesis and Life Cycle of African Easterly Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Michael

    This dissertation uses energy dispersion and wave packet concepts to provide a better conceptual model of the genesis and life cycle of African Easterly Waves and to better understand the instability of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ). The existence of an upstream (eastward) group velocity for AEWs is shown based on single-point lag regressions using gridded reanalysis data from 1990 to 2010. The eastward energy dispersion is consistent with the direction of ageostrophic geopotential flux vectors. A local eddy kinetic energy (EKE) budget reveals that, early in the life cycle of AEWs, growth rate due to geopotential flux convergence exceeds baroclinic and barotropic growth rates. Later in the life cycle, EKE decay due to geopotential flux divergence cancels or exceeds baroclinic and barotropic growth. A potential vorticity (PV) budget is used to diagnose tendencies related to group propagation. Although both upstream and downstream group speeds are possible because of the reversal in the mean meridional PV gradient, upstream propagation associated with the positive poleward PV gradient dominates wave packet evolution. Analogous to the concept of downstream development of midlatitude baroclinic waves, new AEWs develop preferentially upstream of the older ones, thus providing a mechanism for seeding new waves. The usefulness of upstream development as a genesis mechanism for AEWs is demonstrated by performing a case study of the AEW which ultimately produced hurricane Alberto (2000). The case study uses the ERA-interim reanalysis combined with surface observations and TRMM data. Using a local EKE budget, we attribute its genesis to energy dispersion from a preceding AEW. After genesis, baroclinic and barotropic conversion dominated the energetics of this AEW. Some strengths and weaknesses of upstream development as a paradigm for AEW genesis are discussed with respect to other potential mechanisms. The stability of the AEJ is examined applying the concept of absolute

  6. Analysis of limited-diffractive and limited-dispersive X-waves generated by finite radial waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuscaldo, Walter; Pavone, Santi C.; Valerio, Guido; Galli, Alessandro; Albani, Matteo; Ettorre, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we analyze the spatial and temporal features of electromagnetic X-waves propagating in free space and generated by planar radiating apertures. The performance of ideal X-waves is discussed and compared to practical cases where the important effects related to the finiteness of the radiating aperture and the wavenumber dispersion are taken into account. In particular, a practical device consisting of a radial waveguide loaded with radiating slots aligned along a spiral path is considered for the practical case in the millimeter-wave range. A common mathematical framework is defined for a precise comparison of the spatiotemporal properties and focusing capabilities of the generated X-wave. It is clearly shown that the fractional bandwidth of the radiating aperture has a key role in the longitudinal confinement of an X-wave in both ideal and practical cases. In addition, the finiteness of the radiating aperture as well as the wavenumber dispersion clearly affect both the transverse and the longitudinal profiles of the generated radiation as it travels beyond the depth-of-field of the generated X-wave. Nevertheless, the spatiotemporal properties of the X-wave are preserved even in this "dispersive-finite" case within a defined region and duration related to the nondiffractive range and fractional bandwidth of the spectral components of the generated X-wave. The proposed analysis may open new perspectives for the efficient generation of X-waves over finite radiating apertures at millimeter waves where the dispersive behavior of realistic devices is no longer negligible.

  7. Dispersion and waves in bounded plasmas with subwavelength inhomogeneities: Genesis of MEFIB

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2014-02-11

    Bounded plasma exhibit many interesting behavior that are not found in plasmas of 'infinite' extent such as space and astrophysical plasmas. Our studies have revealed that the dispersion properties of waves in a bounded magnetoplasma deviates considerably from the predictions of the Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) model, giving rise to new regimes of wave propagation and absorption. The anisotropy of the medium dictated by the length scales of plasma nonuniformity and magnetostatic field inhomogeneity lead to rotation of the polarization axis an effect similar to the Cotton-Mouton effect in a magneto-optic medium but with distinct differences due to wave induced resonances. This article highlights some of these interesting effects observed experimentally and corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations. One of the principal outcomes of this research is the genesis of a novel multielement focused ion beam (MEFIB) system that utilizes compact bounded plasmas in a minimum – B field to provide intense focused ion beams of a variety of elements for new research in nanoscience and technology.

  8. Apparent Attenuation and Dispersion Arising in Seismic Body-Wave Velocity Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-04-01

    The fact that seismologists often make measurements, using natural seismic solicitations, of properties of the Earth on rather large scales (laterally and in terms of depth) has led to interrogations as to whether attenuation of body waves is dispersive and even significant. The present study, whose aim is to clarify these complicated issues, via a controlled thought measurement, concerns the retrieval of a single, real body wave velocity of a simple geophysical configuration (involving two homogeneous, isotropic, non-dissipative media, one occupying the layer, the other the substratum), from its simulated response to pulsed plane wave probe radiation. This inverse problem is solved, at all frequencies within the bandwidth of the pulse. Due to discordance between the models associated with the assumed and trial responses, the imaginary part of the retrieved velocity turns out to be non-nil even when both the layer and substratum are non-lossy, and, in fact, to be all the greater, the larger is the discordance. The reason for this cannot be due to intrinsic attenuation, scattering, or geometrical spreading since these phenomena are absent in the chosen thought experiment, but rather to uncertainty in the measurement model.

  9. Dispersion and transport of hypersaline gravity currents in the presence of internal waves at a pycnocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, C. A. R.; Pietrasz, V. B.; Ouellette, N. T.; Koseff, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Desalination of seawater offers a source of potable water in arid regions and during drought. However, hypersaline discharge from desalination facilities presents environmental risks, particularly to benthic organisms. The risks posed by salt levels and chemical additives, which can be toxic to local ecosystems, are typically mitigated by ensuring high levels of dilution close to the source. We report on laboratory flume experiments examining how internal waves at the pycnocline of a layered ambient density stratification influence the transport of hypersaline effluent moving as a gravity current down the slope. We found that some of the hypersaline fluid from the gravity current was diverted away from the slope into an intrusion along the pycnocline. A parametric study investigated how varying the energy of the internal wave altered the amount of dense fluid that was diverted into the pycnocline intrusion. The results are compared to an analytical framework that compares the incident energy in the internal wave to potential energy used in diluting the gravity current. These results are significant for desalination effluents because fluid diverted into the intrusion avoids the ecologically sensitive benthic layer and disperses more quickly than if it had continued to propagate along the bed.

  10. Low-Dispersion Scheme for Nonlinear Acoustic Waves in Nonuniform Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Kaushik, Dinesh K.; Idres, Moumen

    1997-01-01

    The linear dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and its boundary conditions have been extended to the nonlinear Euler equations. This allowed computing, a nonuniform flowfield and a nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in such a medium, by the same scheme. By casting all the equations, boundary conditions, and the solution scheme in generalized curvilinear coordinates, the solutions were made possible for non-Cartesian domains and, for the better deployment of the grid points, nonuniform grid step sizes could be used. It has been tested for a number of simple initial-value and periodic-source problems. A simple demonstration of the difference between a linear and nonlinear propagation was conducted. The wall boundary condition, derived from the momentum equations and implemented through a pressure at a ghost point, and the radiation boundary condition, derived from the asymptotic solution to the Euler equations, have proven to be effective for the nonlinear equations and nonuniform flows. The nonreflective characteristic boundary conditions also have shown success but limited to the nonlinear waves in no mean flow, and failed for nonlinear waves in nonuniform flow.

  11. Apparent Attenuation and Dispersion Arising in Seismic Body-Wave Velocity Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirgin, Armand

    2016-07-01

    The fact that seismologists often make measurements, using natural seismic solicitations, of properties of the Earth on rather large scales (laterally and in terms of depth) has led to interrogations as to whether attenuation of body waves is dispersive and even significant. The present study, whose aim is to clarify these complicated issues, via a controlled thought measurement, concerns the retrieval of a single, real body wave velocity of a simple geophysical configuration (involving two homogeneous, isotropic, non-dissipative media, one occupying the layer, the other the substratum), from its simulated response to pulsed plane wave probe radiation. This inverse problem is solved, at all frequencies within the bandwidth of the pulse. Due to discordance between the models associated with the assumed and trial responses, the imaginary part of the retrieved velocity turns out to be non-nil even when both the layer and substratum are non-lossy, and, in fact, to be all the greater, the larger is the discordance. The reason for this cannot be due to intrinsic attenuation, scattering, or geometrical spreading since these phenomena are absent in the chosen thought experiment, but rather to uncertainty in the measurement model.

  12. Impact of hemodialysis on P-wave amplitude, duration, and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Drighil, Abdenasser; Madias, John E; El Mosalami, Hanane; El Badaoui, Nadia; Mouine, Bahija; Fadili, Wafae; Ramdani, Beenyouness; Bennis, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent arrhythmia in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). P wave duration (PWdu) and P wave dispersion (PWdi) have been shown to be predictors of emerging AF in different clinical conditions. We sought to study the impact of HD on PWdu, PWdi, and P wave amplitude in a cohort of patients undergoing HD. Seventeen patients (8 men, 31+/-10 years) were studied. Echocardiography parameters, the sum of the amplitude of P waves in all 12 ECG leads (SP), mean PWdu, and PWdi, along with a host of other parameters (body weight, heart rate, electrolytes and hemoglobin/hematochrit) were measured 1/2h, before and after, HD. SP increased (11.8+/-3.9 vs 15.3+/-4.0 mm, p = 0.004), mean PWdu remained stable (82.7+/-11.1 vs 81.6+/-10.5 ms, p = 0.606), PWdi decreased (51.7+/-19.1 vs 41.7+/-19.1 ms, p = 0.03), and left atrial dimension decreased (37.96+/-3.90 vs 30.62+/-3.38 mm, p = 0.0001), after HD. The change in PWdi correlated with fluid removed by HD (r = -0.55, p = 0.022). Re-measurements of P-wave parameters in a random group of 11 of the 17 patients revealed augmented SP (p = 0.01), and stable mean PWdu (p = 0.36), and PWdi (p = 0.31), after HD. Fluid removed by HD leads to an increase in SP, a stable mean PWdu, and decrease (or stability on re-measurement in a subgroup of patients) in PWdi. Stability of PWdu may be due to the effects of augmentation of the P-wave amplitude and the reduction of the left atrial volume, cancelling each other. Variability of PWdi may stem from the occasional impossibility to measure PWdu (or measure it correctly) in minute P-waves in certain ECG leads, which in turn profoundly affects the PWdi. PMID:17538700

  13. SciDAC - Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with MHD -- General Atomics Support of ORNL Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Abla, G

    2012-11-09

    The Center for Simulation of Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics (SWIM) project is dedicated to conduct research on integrated multi-physics simulations. The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is a framework that was created by the SWIM team. It provides an integration infrastructure for loosely coupled component-based simulations by facilitating services for code execution coordination, computational resource management, data management, and inter-component communication. The IPS framework features improving resource utilization, implementing application-level fault tolerance, and support of the concurrent multi-tasking execution model. The General Atomics (GA) team worked closely with other team members on this contract, and conducted research in the areas of computational code monitoring, meta-data management, interactive visualization, and user interfaces. The original website to monitor SWIM activity was developed in the beginning of the project. Due to the amended requirements, the software was redesigned and a revision of the website was deployed into production in April of 2010. Throughout the duration of this project, the SWIM Monitoring Portal (http://swim.gat.com:8080/) has been a critical production tool for supporting the project's physics goals.

  14. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  15. Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion across Northern Africa, Southern Europe and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, D.E.; Walter, W.R.

    1997-07-15

    THis report presents preliminary results from a large scale study of surface wave group velocity dispersion throughout Northern Africa, the Mediterranean, Southern Europe and the Middle East. Our goal is to better define the 3D lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure within this region by improving the resolution of global surface wave tomographic studies. We hope to accomplish this goal by incorporating regional data at relatively short periods (less than 40 sec), into the regionalization of lateral velocity variation. Due to the sparse distributions of stations and earthquakes throughout the region (Figure 1) we have relied on data recorded at both teleseismic and regions; distances. Also, to date we have concentrated on Rayleigh wave group velocity measurements since valuable measurements can be made without knowledge of the source. In order to obtain Rayleigh wave group velocity throughout the region, vertical component teleseismic and regional seismograms were gathered from broadband, 3-component, digital MEDNET, GEOSCOPE and IRIS stations plus the portable PASSCAL deployment in Saudi Arabia. Figure 1 shows the distribution of earthquakes (black circles) and broadband digital seismic stations (white triangles) throughout southern Europe, the middle east and northern Africa used in this study. The most seismicly active regions of northern Africa are the Atlas mountains of Morocco and Algeria as well as the Red Sea region to the east. Significant seismicity also occurs in the Mediterranean, southern Europe and throughout the high mountains and plateaus of the middle-east. To date, over 1300 seismograms have been analyzed to determine the individual group velocities of 10-150 second Rayleigh waves. Travel times, for each period, are then inverted in a back projection tomographic method in order to determine the lateral group velocity variation throughout the region. These results are preliminary, however, Rayleigh wave group velocity maps for a range of

  16. In vivo evaluation of the elastic anisotropy of the human Achilles tendon using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brum, J.; Bernal, M.; Gennisson, J. L.; Tanter, M.

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of the Achilles tendon elastic properties may enhance diagnosis of tendon injury and the assessment of recovery treatments. Shear wave elastography has shown to be a powerful tool to estimate tissue mechanical properties. However, its applicability to quantitatively evaluate tendon stiffness is limited by the understanding of the physics on the shear wave propagation in such a complex medium. First, tendon tissue is transverse isotropic. Second, tendons are characterized by a marked stiffness in the 400 to 1300 kPa range (i.e. fast shear waves). Hence, the shear wavelengths are greater than the tendon thickness leading to guided wave propagation. Thus, to better understand shear wave propagation in tendons and consequently to properly estimate its mechanical properties, a dispersion analysis is required. In this study, shear wave velocity dispersion was measured in vivo in ten Achilles tendons parallel and perpendicular to the tendon fibre orientation. By modelling the tendon as a transverse isotropic viscoelastic plate immersed in fluid it was possible to fully describe the experimental data (deviation<1.4%). We show that parallel to fibres the shear wave velocity dispersion is not influenced by viscosity, while it is perpendicularly to fibres. Elasticity (found to be in the range from 473 to 1537 kPa) and viscosity (found to be in the range from 1.7 to 4 Pa.s) values were retrieved from the model in good agreement with reported results.

  17. Non-Adiabatic MHD Modes in Periodic Magnetic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Anil

    High-resolution satellite observations reveal that many solar features such as penumbra and plume regions possess the structures with alternating properties. So we study the joint effect of periodic alternation of magnetic slabs and thermal mechanisms on the propagation of MHD waves. We consider a perfectly conducting fluid permeated by a magnetic field having the peri-odicity along x-axis and constant direction along z-axis. We suppose that the medium consists of alternating slabs of strong and weak homogeneous magnetic field with a sharp discontinuity at the boundary. The inclusion of non-adiabatic effects modifies the energy equation in which the thermal mechanisms (radiation, heating and thermal conduction) are added. The gravi-tational effects are negligible because wavelengths are assumed to be much smaller than the gravitational scale height. The dispersion relations for the surface and body modes are derived and analyzed in the limiting cases of thin and thick slabs. The dispersion curves depend upon the Bloch's wavenumber due to the periodicity in magnetic field. We have examined the be-havior of dispersion curves for different values of slab width ratio and Bloch's wavenumber as a function of dimensionless wavelength. It is shown that the width of structures influences the propagation speed of waves. Our results might be useful in understanding the wave propagation in plume regions, photosphere and spaghetti structures in solar wind.

  18. Slow, large scales from fast, small ones in dispersive wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leslie; Waleffe, Fabian

    2000-11-01

    Dispersive wave turbulence in systems of geophysical interest (beta-plane, rotating, stratified and rotating-stratified flows) has been simulated with random, isotropic small scale forcing and hyper-viscosity. This can be thought of as a Langevin model of the small space-time scales only with potential implications for climate modeling. In all cases, slow, coherent large scales are generated after long times of 2nd order in the nonlinear time scale. These slow, large scales ultimately dominate the flows. Beta-plane and rotating flow results were reported earlier [PoF 11, 1608]. In stratified flows, the energy accumulates in a 1D vertically sheared flow at selected large scales. As the rotation rate is increased, a progressive transition toward generation of all large scale vortical zero modes (quasi-geostrophic 3D flow) is observed. For yet higher rotation rate, energy accumulates primarily in a 2D quasi-geostrophic flow (cyclonic vortices) at all large scales.

  19. Impact of spatial dispersion, evolution, and selection on Ebola Zaire Virus epidemic waves

    PubMed Central

    Azarian, Taj; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Cella, Eleonora; Rife, Brittany; Lai, Alessia; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Salemi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus Zaire (EBOV) has reemerged in Africa, emphasizing the global importance of this pathogen. Amidst the response to the current epidemic, several gaps in our knowledge of EBOV evolution are evident. Specifically, uncertainty has been raised regarding the potential emergence of more virulent viral variants through amino acid substitutions. Glycoprotein (GP), an essential component of the EBOV genome, is highly variable and a potential site for the occurrence of advantageous mutations. For this study, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of EBOV by analyzing 65 GP sequences from humans and great apes over diverse locations across epidemic waves between 1976 and 2014. We show that, although patterns of spatial dispersion throughout Africa varied, the evolution of the virus has largely been characterized by neutral genetic drift. Therefore, the radical emergence of more transmissible variants is unlikely, a positive finding, which is increasingly important on the verge of vaccine deployment. PMID:25973685

  20. Submicrojoule femtosecond erbium-doped fibre laser for the generation of dispersive waves at submicron wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, L V; Koptev, M Yu; Anashkina, E A; Muravyev, S V; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V; Bubnov, M M; Likhachev, M E; Ignat'ev, A D; Lipatov, D S; Gur'yanov, A N

    2014-05-30

    We have demonstrated a femtosecond erbium-doped fibre laser system built in the master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) approach. The final amplifier stage utilises a specially designed large mode area active fibre cladding-pumped by multimode laser diodes. The system is capable of generating submicrojoule pulses at a wavelength near 1.6 μm. We have obtained 530-fs pulses with an energy of 400 nJ. The output of the system can be converted to wavelengths shorter than 1 μm through the generation of dispersive waves in passive nonlinear fibre. We have obtained ultra-short 7-nJ pulses with a spectral width of ∼100 nm and a centre wavelength of 0.9 μm, which can be used as a seed signal in parametric amplifiers in designing petawatt laser systems. (lasers)

  1. Impact of spatial dispersion, evolution, and selection on Ebola Zaire Virus epidemic waves.

    PubMed

    Azarian, Taj; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Cella, Eleonora; Rife, Brittany; Lai, Alessia; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Salemi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus Zaire (EBOV) has reemerged in Africa, emphasizing the global importance of this pathogen. Amidst the response to the current epidemic, several gaps in our knowledge of EBOV evolution are evident. Specifically, uncertainty has been raised regarding the potential emergence of more virulent viral variants through amino acid substitutions. Glycoprotein (GP), an essential component of the EBOV genome, is highly variable and a potential site for the occurrence of advantageous mutations. For this study, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of EBOV by analyzing 65 GP sequences from humans and great apes over diverse locations across epidemic waves between 1976 and 2014. We show that, although patterns of spatial dispersion throughout Africa varied, the evolution of the virus has largely been characterized by neutral genetic drift. Therefore, the radical emergence of more transmissible variants is unlikely, a positive finding, which is increasingly important on the verge of vaccine deployment. PMID:25973685

  2. Wave-dispersed third-order nonlinear optical properties of C 60 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzar, F.; Taliani, C.; Danieli, R.; Rossini, S.; Zamboni, R.

    1994-01-01

    Results of wave-dispersed third harmonic generation measurements in sublimed C 60 thin films are reported and discussed within a three-level model. Two strong resonant enhancements in cubic susceptibility χ (3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω) are observed. The first one, occurring at a fundamental wavelength of 1.3 μm with a χ (3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω) maximum value of 6.1×10 -11 esu, is interpreted in terms of a two-photon resonance with the one-photon forbidden electronic T 1g level. The second resonance at 1.064 μm, with a maximum value of χ (3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω)=8.2×10 -11 esu is interpreted as a three-photon resonance with the lowest one-photon allowed T 1u electronic level.

  3. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of charge density waves via chemical filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yejun; Somayazulu, M. S.; Jaramillo, R.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Isaacs, E.D.; Hu Jingzhu; Mao Hokwang

    2005-06-15

    Pressure tuning of phase transitions is a powerful tool in condensed matter physics, permitting high-resolution studies while preserving fundamental symmetries. At the highest pressures, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) has been a critical method for geometrically confined diamond anvil cell experiments. We develop a chemical filter technique complementary to EDXD that permits the study of satellite peaks as weak as 10{sup -4} of the crystal Bragg diffraction. In particular, we map out the temperature dependence of the incommensurate charge density wave diffraction from single-crystal, elemental chromium. This technique provides the potential for future GPa pressure studies of many-body effects in a broad range of solid state systems.

  4. Crustal thinning between the Ethiopian and East African Plateaus from modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, M H; Nyblade, A A; Pasyanos, M E

    2006-01-17

    The East African and Ethiopian Plateaus have long been recognized to be part of a much larger topographic anomaly on the African Plate called the African Superswell. One of the few places within the African Superswell that exhibit elevations of less than 1 km is southeastern Sudan and northern Kenya, an area containing both Mesozoic and Cenozoic rift basins. Crustal structure and uppermost mantle velocities are investigated in this area by modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion. Modeling results indicate an average crustal thickness of 25 {+-} 5 km, some 10-15 km thinner than the crust beneath the adjacent East African and Ethiopian Plateaus. The low elevations can therefore be readily attributed to an isostatic response from crustal thinning. Low Sn velocities of 4.1-4.3 km/s also characterize this region.

  5. Symmetry Reduction of the (2+1)-Dimensional Modified Dispersive Water-Wave System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheng-Yi; Fei, Jin-Xi; Du, Xiao-Yang

    2015-08-01

    Using the standard truncated Painlevé expansion, the residual symmetry of the (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave system is localized in the properly prolonged system with the Lie point symmetry vector. Some different transformation invariances are derived by utilizing the obtained symmetries. The symmetries of the system are also derived through the Clarkson-Kruskal direct method, and several types of explicit reduction solutions relate to the trigonometric or the hyperbolic functions are obtained. Finally, some special solitons are depicted from one of the solutions. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11447017 and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province under Grant Nos. LY14A010005 and LQ13A010013

  6. Dispersion of Rayleigh waves in titanium alloy resulting from inhomogeneous residual stress induced by low plasticity burnishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, C.-S.; Koo, L.; Shepard, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    We explore the possibility of using the dispersion of Rayleigh waves for nondestructive inspection of the layer of inhomogeneous residual stress induced by low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on Ti-6Al-4V samples, which inherit mirror-smooth surfaces from the LPB treatment. Our findings suggest that, while the acoustoelastic effect is very small in Ti-6Al-4V, the magnitude of the stress gradient involved still leads to a measurable Rayleigh-wave dispersion, from which information on the stress present could be inferred.

  7. Bifurcation and exact traveling wave solutions of a modified nonlinearly dispersive mK (m,n,k) equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Jianming

    2013-10-01

    Bifurcation and exact solutions of the modified nonlinearly dispersive mK (m,n,k) equation with nonlinear dispersion um-1ut+a(un)x+b(uk)xxx = 0,nk≠0 are investigated in this paper. As a result, under different parameter conditions, abundant compactons, peakons and solitary solutions including not only some known results but also some new ones are obtained. We also point out the original reason of the existence of the non-smooth traveling wave solutions. The approach we used here is also suitable for the study of traveling wave solutions of some other nonlinear equations.

  8. Asymmetric coupling and dispersion of surface-plasmon-polariton waves on a periodically patterned anisotropic metal film

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Jhuma; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-07

    The morphology of a columnar thin film (CTF) of silver renders it an effectively biaxially anisotropic continuum. CTFs of silver deposited on one-dimensional gratings of photoresist showed strong blazing action and asymmetrically coupled optical radiation to surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves propagating only along one direction supported by either the CTF/photoresist or the CTF/air interfaces. Homogenization of the CTFs using the Bruggeman formalism revealed them to display hyperbolic dispersion, and the dispersion of SPP waves was adequately described thereby.

  9. Effect of higher order dispersion parameters on optical millimeter-wave generation using three parallel external optical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mandeep; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a, both experimental and theoretical, study of the influence of higher order fiber dispersion parameter on the optical mm-wave generation using 3-parallel Mach Zehnder Modulators. Both individual and combined effects of the dispersion parameters, i.e., second order- and third order- (3OD) are investigated. This research demonstrates that the 3OD is significantly affected by the optical mm-wave propagation through the International Telecommunication Union fiber of different lengths. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with those of the experiments. The Bit error rate, Q factor, optical sideband suppression ratio, radio frequency spurious ratio, and eye diagrams are given and discussed.

  10. Dispersion analysis of leaky guided waves in fluid-loaded waveguides of generic shape.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, M; Marzani, A; Bartoli, I

    2014-01-01

    A fully coupled 2.5D formulation is proposed to compute the dispersive parameters of waveguides with arbitrary cross-section immersed in infinite inviscid fluids. The discretization of the waveguide is performed by means of a Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) approach, whereas a 2.5D BEM formulation is used to model the impedance of the surrounding infinite fluid. The kernels of the boundary integrals contain the fundamental solutions of the space Fourier-transformed Helmholtz equation, which governs the wave propagation process in the fluid domain. Numerical difficulties related to the evaluation of singular integrals are avoided by using a regularization procedure. To improve the numerical stability of the discretized boundary integral equations for the external Helmholtz problem, the so called CHIEF method is used. The discrete wave equation results in a nonlinear eigenvalue problem in the complex axial wavenumbers that is solved at the frequencies of interest by means of a contour integral algorithm. In order to separate physical from non-physical solutions and to fulfill the requirement of holomorphicity of the dynamic stiffness matrix inside the complex wavenumber contour, the phase of the radial bulk wavenumber is uniquely defined by enforcing the Snell-Descartes law at the fluid-waveguide interface. Three numerical applications are presented. The computed dispersion curves for a circular bar immersed in oil are in agreement with those extracted using the Global Matrix Method. Novel results are presented for viscoelastic steel bars of square and L-shaped cross-section immersed in water. PMID:23932015

  11. Characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer in pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. J.

    2016-01-01

    As gradually wide applications of MHD fluid, transportation as well as control with pumps and valves is unavoidable, which induces MHD fluid hammer. The paper attempts to combine MHD effect and fluid hammer effect and to investigate the characteristics of laminar MHD fluid hammer. A non-dimensional fluid hammer model, based on Navier-Stocks equations, coupling with Lorentz force is numerically solved in a reservoir-pipe-valve system with uniform external magnetic field. The MHD effect is represented by the interaction number which associates with the conductivity of the MHD fluid as well as the external magnetic field and can be interpreted as the ratio of Lorentz force to Joukowsky force. The transient numerical results of pressure head, average velocity, wall shear stress, velocity profiles and shear stress profiles are provided. The additional MHD effect hinders fluid motion, weakens wave front and homogenizes velocity profiles, contributing to obvious attenuation of oscillation, strengthened line packing and weakened Richardson annular effect. Studying the characteristics of MHD laminar fluid hammer theoretically supplements the gap of knowledge of rapid-transient MHD flow and technically provides beneficial information for MHD pipeline system designers to better devise MHD systems.

  12. Dispersion retrieval from multi-level ultra-deep reactive-ion-etched microstructures for terahertz slow-wave circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, Chan-Wook Young Ahn, Ho; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Jooho; Hong, Seogwoo; Hee Choi, Jun; Kim, Sunil; Hun Lee, Sang; Min Kim, Jong; Hwang, Sungwoo; Yeon Jun, So; Yu, SeGi; Lawrence Ives, R.

    2014-01-13

    A multi-level microstructure is proposed for terahertz slow-wave circuits, with dispersion relation retrieved by scattering parameter measurements. The measured return loss shows strong resonances above the cutoff with negligible phase shifts compared with finite element analysis. Splitting the circuit into multi levels enables a low aspect ratio configuration that alleviates the loading effect of deep-reactive-ion etching on silicon wafers. This makes it easier to achieve flat-etched bottom and smooth sidewall profiles. The dispersion retrieved from the measurement, therefore, corresponds well to the theoretical estimation. The result provides a straightforward way to the precise determination of dispersions in terahertz vacuum electronics.

  13. Spreading speeds and traveling waves for a nonlocal dispersal equation with convolution-type crossing-monostable nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bao; Ma, Ruyun

    2014-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the traveling wave solutions and the spreading speeds for a nonlocal dispersal equation with convolution-type crossing-monostable nonlinearity, which is motivated by an age-structured population model with time delay. We first prove the existence of traveling wave solution with critical wave speed c = c*. By introducing two auxiliary monotone birth functions and using a fluctuation method, we further show that the number c = c* is also the spreading speed of the corresponding initial value problem with compact support. Then, the nonexistence of traveling wave solutions for c < c* is established. Finally, by means of the (technical) weighted energy method, we prove that the traveling wave with large speed is exponentially stable, when the initial perturbation around the wave is relatively small in a weighted norm.

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy beneath southern Africa from very broad-band surface-wave dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Joanne M.-C.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2012-10-01

    Seismic anisotropy within the lithosphere of cratons preserves an important record of their ancient assembly. In southern Africa, anisotropy across the Archean Kaapvaal Craton and Limpopo Belt has been detected previously by observations of SKS-wave splitting. Because SKS-splitting measurements lack vertical resolution, however, the depth distribution of anisotropy has remained uncertain. End-member interpretations invoked the dominance of either anisotropy in the lithosphere (due to the fabric formed by deformation in Archean or Palaeoproterozoic orogenies) or that in the asthenosphere (due to the fabric formed by the recent plate motion), each with significant geodynamic implications. To determine the distribution of anisotropy with depth, we measured phase velocities of seismic surface waves between stations of the Southern African Seismic Experiment. We applied two complementary measurement approaches, very broad-band cross-correlation and multimode waveform inversion. Robust, Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves were derived for four different subregions of the Archean southern Africa in a period range from 5 s to 250-400 s (Rayleigh) and 5 s to 100-250 s (Love), depending on the region. Rayleigh-wave anisotropy was determined in each region at periods from 5 s to 150-200 s, sampling from the upper crust down to the asthenosphere. The jackknife method was used to estimate uncertainties, and the F-test to verify the statistical significance of anisotropy. We detected strong anisotropy with a N-S fast-propagation azimuth in the upper crust of the Limpopo Belt. We attribute it to aligned cracks, formed by the regional, E-W extensional stress associated with the southward propagation of the East African Rift. Our results show that it is possible to estimate regional stress from short-period, surface wave anisotropy, measured in this study using broad-band array recordings of teleseismic surface waves. Rayleigh-wave anisotropy at 70-120 s periods shows that

  15. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements.

  16. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion.

    PubMed

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-03-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g. Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with shearwave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  17. Loss tangent and complex modulus estimated by acoustic radiation force creep and shear wave dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Amador, Carolina; Urban, Matthew W; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2012-01-01

    Elasticity imaging methods have been used to study tissue mechanical properties and have demonstrated that tissue elasticity changes with disease state. In current shear wave elasticity imaging methods typically only shear wave speed is measured and rheological models, e.g., Kelvin-Voigt, Maxwell and Standard Linear Solid, are used to solve for tissue mechanical properties such as the shear viscoelastic complex modulus. This paper presents a method to quantify viscoelastic material properties in a model-independent way by estimating the complex shear elastic modulus over a wide frequency range using time-dependent creep response induced by acoustic radiation force. This radiation force induced creep (RFIC) method uses a conversion formula that is the analytic solution of a constitutive equation. The proposed method in combination with Shearwave Dispersion Ultrasound Vibrometry (SDUV) is used to measure the complex modulus so that knowledge of the applied radiation force magnitude is not necessary. The conversion formula is shown to be sensitive to sampling frequency and the first reliable measure in time according to numerical simulations using the Kelvin-Voigt model creep strain and compliance. Representative model-free shear complex moduli from homogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms and one excised swine kidney were obtained. This work proposes a novel model-free ultrasound-based elasticity method that does not require a rheological model with associated fitting requirements. PMID:22345425

  18. Delamination detection in composite laminates using dispersion change based on mode conversion of Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Yoji; Fujibayashi, Keiji; Shimazaki, Mamoru; Soejima, Hideki; Ogisu, Toshimichi

    2010-11-01

    A new ultrasonic propagation system has been constructed using macrofiber composite (MFC) actuators and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The MFCs and FBGs can be integrated into composite laminates because of their small size and high fracture strain. The developed system can send and receive broadband Lamb waves. In this research, this system was used to detect delamination damage in composite laminates. First, the multiple modes of Lamb waves in a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) quasi-isotropic laminate were identified by transmitting and receiving the symmetric and antisymmetric modes separately. Then, the mode conversions at both tips of a delamination were investigated through an experiment and a two-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). A new delamination detection method was proposed on the basis of the mode conversions, and experiments were carried out on laminates with an artificial delamination. When antisymmetric modes were excited, the frequency dispersion of the received A1 mode changed, depending on the delamination length owing to the mode conversion between the A1 mode and the S0 mode. This phenomenon was confirmed through the FEA and these results prove that this new method is effective in detecting a delamination in CFRP laminates.

  19. Thickness measurements of sub-millimetre thickness foils using Lamb wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAughey, K. L.; Edwards, R. S.; Potter, M. D. G.; Dixon, S.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonic thickness measurements of sub-millimetre thickness samples are typically performed using either resonance techniques or by using delay lines with contact pulse-echo transducers. The use of a contact transducer with a delay line will change the boundary conditions of the foil, and could negatively impact the reliability of the results, thus a non-contact measurement technique must be used. The use of an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) operating at the sample resonance to determine the thickness of the sample still requires a priori knowledge of the material properties, for example the ultrasonic velocities, and any uncertainty in these values due to stress or temperature will lead to an error in the measured thickness. In order to avoid, or at least reduce, the negative effects of uncertainty in the material properties, a technique relying on the dispersion of Lamb waves is used. This technique uses an approximation which relates the velocity of long-wavelength Lamb waves of the anti-symmetric and symmetric fundamental modes (A0 and S0 respectively) to the thickness of the sample. The validity of this approximation has been examined, and thickness measurements have been performed on a number of samples. Additionally, empirical improvements have been considered to extend the range of validity of the approximation, while maintaining the requirement for minimal knowledge of the material properties of the sample.

  20. P-wave and QT dispersion in patients with conversion disorder

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Hocagil, Hilal; Izci, Servet; Izci, Vedat; Koc, Merve Iris; Acar, Rezzan Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate QT dispersion (QTd), which is the noninvasive marker of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death, and P-wave dispersion, which is the noninvasive marker of atrial arrhythmia, in patients with conversion disorder (CD). Patients and methods A total of 60 patients with no known organic disease who were admitted to outpatient emergency clinic and were diagnosed with CD after psychiatric consultation were included in this study along with 60 healthy control subjects. Beck Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Scale were administered to patients and 12-lead electrocardiogram measurements were obtained. Pd and QTd were calculated by a single blinded cardiologist. Results There was no statistically significant difference in terms of age, sex, education level, socioeconomic status, weight, height, and body mass index between CD patients and controls. Beck Anxiety Inventory scores (25.2±10.8 and 3.8±3.2, respectively, P<0.001) and Beck Depression Scale scores (11.24±6.15 and 6.58±5.69, respectively, P<0.01) were significantly higher in CD patients. P-wave dispersion measurements did not show any significant differences between conversion patients and control group (46±5.7 vs 44±5.5, respectively, P=0.156). Regarding QTc and QTd, there was a statistically significant increase in all intervals in conversion patients (416±10 vs 398±12, P<0.001, and 47±4.8 vs 20±6.1, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion A similar relation to that in literature between QTd and anxiety and somatoform disorders was also observed in CD patients. QTc and QTd were significantly increased compared to the control group in patients with CD. These results suggest a possibility of increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia resulting from QTd in CD patients. Larger samples are needed to evaluate the clinical course and prognosis in terms of arrhythmia risk in CD patients. PMID:25848293

  1. Computational studies of nonlinear dispersive plasma systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin

    Plasma systems with dispersive waves are ubiquitous. Dispersive waves have the property that their wave velocity depends on the wave number of the wave. These waves show up in weakly as well as strongly coupled plasmas, and play a significant role in the underlying plasma dynamics. Dispersive waves bring new challenges to the computer simulation of nonlinear phenomena. The goal of this thesis is to discuss two computational studies of plasma phenomena, one drawn from strongly coupled complex or dusty plasmas, and the other from weakly coupled hydrogen plasmas. In the realm of dusty plasmas, we focus on the problem of three-dimensional (3D) Mach cones which we study by means of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, assuming that the dust particles interact via a Yukawa potential. While laboratory and MD simulations have explored thoroughly the properties of Mach cones in 2D, elucidating the important role of dispersive waves in the formation of multiple cones, the simulations presented in this thesis represent the first 3D MD studies of Mach cones in strongly coupled dusty plasmas. These results have qualitative similarities with experimental observations on 3D Mach cones from the PK-3 plus project, which studies complex plasmas under microgravity conditions aboard the International Space station. In the realm of weakly coupled plasmas, we present results on the application of non-oscillatory central schemes to Hall MHD reconnection problems, in which the presence of dispersive whistler waves presents a formidable challenge for numerical algorithms that rely on explicit time-stepping schemes. In particular, we focus on the semi-discrete central formulation of Kurganov and Tadmor (2000), which has the advantage that it allow for larger time steps, and with significantly smaller numerical viscosity, than fully discrete schemes. We implement the Hall MHD equations through the CentPACK software package that implements the Kurganov-Tadmor formulation for a wide range of

  2. Italian and Alpine crustal structure imaged by ambient-noise surface-wave dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, I.; Boschi, L.; Verbeke, J.; Morelli, A.; Kissling, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    Surface-wave dispersion measurements based on seismic background signal (ambient noise) are a very effective means to image S-wave velocity at crustal and lithospheric depths. The goal of our study is to integrate new ambient noise data for central Europe with more traditional models of crustal heterogeneity and discontinuity depths. We find that the reference crustal model EPcrust (Molinari and Morelli, 2011) is in good agreement with the large database of one-year-long records of European ambient noise compiled by Verbeke et al. (2012). We use the same data to further improve EPcrust, obtaining a new three-dimensional model of Italian and Alpine crustal structure. We first conduct a linear least squares inversion of the available phase-velocity observations, resulting in a set of Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods between 5 and 37 s. At relatively short periods, these maps clearly reflect the surface geology of the region, e.g. low velocity zones at the Po Plain; longer-period maps reveal deeper structures such as Moho topography under Alps and Appennines, and lower crustal anomalies. The phase-velocity maps are next inverted via the Neighbourhood Algorithm to determine a set of one-dimensional shear-velocity models (one per phase-velocity pixel), which are in turn interpolated to build a new three-dimensional model and Moho depth. The reconstructed model shows the low velocity area beneath the Po Plain; the contrast between the low-velocity crust of the Adriatic domain and the high-velocity crust of the Tyrrhenian domain is clearly seen, as well as an almost uniform crystalline crust beneath the Alpine belt. Our results are physically consistent with the information for velocity structure and Moho depth independently obtained by other seismic methods.

  3. Assessment Of Chemical Dispersant Effectiveness In A Wave Tank Under Regular Non-Breaking And Breaking Wave Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current chemical dispersant effectiveness tests for product selection are commonly performed with bench-scale testing apparatus. However, for the assessment of oil dispersant effectiveness under real sea state conditions, test protocols are required to have hydrodynamic conditio...

  4. Imaging Lower Mantle Heterogeniety With Differential Dispersion and Attenuation of Core- Diffracted Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, G. G.; Wysession, M. E.; Huhmann, B.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate global differential travel-time dispersion and attenuation of core-diffracted phases from large, deep earthquakes. This technique aids in constraining radial velocity structure at the core-mantle interface in a manner analogous to surface wave observables constraining upper mantle structure. We confirm that there is noticeable differential dispersion and attenuation caused by diffraction on a global basis for both Pdiff and Sdiff. Variations in differential dispersion and attenuation are observed with both geographic location and between Pdiff and Sdiff along the same azimuth suggesting lateral variations in Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio in the lowermost mantle. We attempt to utilize dispersion and attenuation characteristics to put bounds on the magnitude and distribution of large-scale velocity perturbations in the lowermost mantle and draw comparisons to variations found in several 3D whole-mantle models. Our dataset consists of broadband records available from the IRIS DMC for deep (>180 km), large (>5.6 mb) teleseismic events. Preprocessing of the records includes deconvolution of the instrument response, rotation of horizontal components, filtering using a set of bandpass filters, and sample-rate decimation (5 sps). Relative arrival times and amplitudes are found by computing cross correlegrams in the frequency domain, detecting and removing poor recordings with cluster analysis, and iteratively converging on a stable low-variance solution with a weighted least-squares inversion while automatically remediating phase-skips utilizing a database of potential relative arrivals. Raypath-approximated corrections for reciever-side differences in ellipticity, mantle, and crust are applied for the derivation of phase velocites in the lowermost mantle as a function of azimuth and frequency. Following previous studies of diffracted signals, we limit our analysis to station pairs located in narrow azimuthal windows spread over a considerable distance while

  5. Finite-difference modeling and dispersion analysis of high-frequency love waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    Love-wave propagation has been a topic of interest to crustal, earthquake, and engineering seismologists for many years because it is independent of Poisson's ratio and more sensitive to shear (S)-wave velocity changes and layer thickness changes than are Rayleigh waves. It is well known that Love-wave generation requires the existence of a low S-wave velocity layer in a multilayered earth model. In order to study numerically the propagation of Love waves in a layered earth model and dispersion characteristics for near-surface applications, we simulate high-frequency (>5 Hz) Love waves by the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method. The air-earth boundary (the shear stress above the free surface) is treated using the stress-imaging technique. We use a two-layer model to demonstrate the accuracy of the staggered-grid modeling scheme. We also simulate four-layer models including a low-velocity layer (LVL) or a high-velocity layer (HVL) to analyze dispersive energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that: (1) the staggered-grid FD code and stress-imaging technique are suitable for treating the free-surface boundary conditions for Love-wave modeling, (2) Love-wave inversion should be treated with extra care when a LVL exists because of a lack of LVL information in dispersions aggravating uncertainties in the inversion procedure, and (3) energy of high modes in a low-frequency range is very weak, so that it is difficult to estimate the cutoff frequency accurately, and "mode-crossing" occurs between the second higher and third higher modes when a HVL exists. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  6. Frequency- and stress-dependent changes in shear-wave velocity dispersion in water-saturated, unconsolidated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, R.

    2009-04-01

    Anelastic processes in the earth causes dissipation of seismic energy. Because of the fundamental laws of causality, the dissipation effects demand a frequency-dependent change of elastic moduli, and therefore, dispersion in elastic wave velocities. Assessing the dispersion of seismic shear waves in the unconsolidated subsoil is important for at least 3 reasons: 1) shear-wave velocity (Vs) is a key parameter in all dynamic loading problems; the frequency of the observed shear waves in field, downhole and laboratory measurements varies widely (20 Hz - 10 kHz), and consequently an uncertainty resulting from an unknown or poorly known estimate of dispersion may translate into erroneous evaluation and potential risks, 2) generally Vs-dispersion is considered negligible for the frequency range of practical interest; it is important to check this assumption and modify the site evaluation results, if necessary, and 3) the underlying soil-physics of any observed dispersion can be useful in estimating an unknown soil physical parameter. In the present research, we have concentrated on Vs dispersion in saturated sand in laboratory, under varying vertical and horizontal stress levels that are realistic in the context of shallow subsoil investigations. We explored theoretical models to obtain insight from our experimental findings. Laboratory experiments involving array seismic measurements and accurate stress control present clear evidence of dispersive shear-wave velocity in saturated sand in the frequency range 2-16 kHz. The change of Vs as a function of frequency is clearly nonlinear. For low frequencies, as observed in the field data, our result indicates significant dispersion and, therefore, nonlinear variation of attenuation. This has important implication on site evaluation using Vs. Significantly, the data allows us to distinguish a frequency-dependence of the velocity dispersion. The relative importance of fluid motion relative to the skeleton frame (Biot theory

  7. Dispersion and absorption of longitudinal electro-kinetic wave in ion-implanted GaN semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Dilip; Sharma, Giriraj; Saxena, Ajay; Jadhav, Akhilesh

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study on propagation characteristics of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves is presented. Based on multi-fluid model of plasma, we have derived a dispersion relation for LEK waves in colloid laden GaN semiconductor plasmas. It is assumed that ions are implanted to form colloids in the GaN sample. The colloids are continuously bombarded by the plasma particles and stick on them, but they acquire a net negative charge due to relatively higher mobility of electrons. It is found from the dispersion relation that the presence of charged colloids not only modifies the existing modes but also supports new novel modes of LEKWs. It is hoped that the study would enhance understanding on dispersion and absorption of LEKWs and help in singling out the appropriate configurations in which GaN crystal would be better suited for fabrication of microwave devices.

  8. Broken Ergodicity in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence may be represented by finite Fourier series, where the inherent periodic box serves as a surrogate for a bounded astrophysical plasma. Independent Fourier coefficients form a canonical ensemble described by a Gaussian probability density function containing a Hermitian covariance matrix with positive eigenvalues. The eigenvalues at lowest wave number can be very small, resulting in a large-scale coherent structure: a turbulent dynamo. This is seen in computations and a theoretical explanation in terms of 'broken ergodicity' contains Taylor s theory of force-free states. An important problem for future work is the case of real, i.e., dissipative flows. In real flows, broken ergodicity and coherent structure are still expected to occur in MHD turbulence at the largest scale, as suggested by low resolution simulations. One challenge is to incorporate coherent structure at the largest scale into the theory of turbulent fluctuations at smaller scales.

  9. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-05-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics.

  10. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics. PMID:27198887

  11. A nonlocal finite difference scheme for simulation of wave propagation in 2D models with reduced numerical dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martowicz, A.; Ruzzene, M.; Staszewski, W. J.; Rimoli, J. J.; Uhl, T.

    2014-03-01

    The work deals with the reduction of numerical dispersion in simulations of wave propagation in solids. The phenomenon of numerical dispersion naturally results from time and spatial discretization present in a numerical model of mechanical continuum. Although discretization itself makes possible to model wave propagation in structures with complicated geometries and made of different materials, it inevitably causes simulation errors when improper time and length scales are chosen for the simulations domains. Therefore, by definition, any characteristic parameter for spatial and time resolution must create limitations on maximal wavenumber and frequency for a numerical model. It should be however noted that expected increase of the model quality and its functionality in terms of affordable wavenumbers, frequencies and speeds should not be achieved merely by denser mesh and reduced time integration step. The computational cost would be simply unacceptable. The authors present a nonlocal finite difference scheme with the coefficients calculated applying a Fourier series, which allows for considerable reduction of numerical dispersion. There are presented the results of analyses for 2D models, with isotropic and anisotropic materials, fulfilling the planar stress state. Reduced numerical dispersion is shown in the dispersion surfaces for longitudinal and shear waves propagating for different directions with respect to the mesh orientation and without dramatic increase of required number of nonlocal interactions. A case with the propagation of longitudinal wave in composite material is studied with given referential solution of the initial value problem for verification of the time-domain outcomes. The work gives a perspective of modeling of any type of real material dispersion according to measurements and with assumed accuracy.

  12. T-wave alternans and dispersion of the QT interval as risk stratification markers in patients susceptible to sustained ventricular arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armoundas, A. A.; Osaka, M.; Mela, T.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Ruskin, J. N.; Garan, H.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    T-wave alternans and QT dispersion were compared as predictors of the outcome of electrophysiologic study and arrhythmia-free survival in patients undergoing electrophysiologic evaluation. T-wave alternans was a highly significant predictor of these 2 outcome variables, whereas QT dispersion was not.

  13. Joint Imaging of the Crust Beneath the Southeastern Margin of the Tibetan Plateau Using Body Wave Travel Times and Surface Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.; Yao, H.; van der Hilst, R.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau lies between the heartland of the plateau to the west and the stable south China block to the east, spanning from western Sichuan to central Yunnan in southwest China. A channel flow model in which a weak zone exists in the mid-to-lower crust has been proposed to explain the low-gradient topographic slope and lack of large-scale young crustal shortening at the southeast plateau margin. Both seismic body wave tomography and surface wave array tomography have revealed widespread zones of low shear wave velocity at mid- or low-crustal depth. However, the spatial distribution and interconnectivity between low velocity zones are not very clear mainly due to intrinsic resolution limitation of individual methods. In this study, we aim at improving the velocity model by joint seismic imaging using seismic travel times and surface wave dispersion curves. The body wave travel times are collected from the Sichuan Provincial Seismological stations for the period of 2001-2004. The surface-wave dispersion curves for periods between 10-150 s are obtained from ambient noise and teleseismic surface-wave two-station analysis using array data from 75 broadband stations in SE Tibet. The joint inversion code is based on the double-difference seismic tomography package tomoFDD. The travel times between events and stations are calculated using the finite-difference travel time calculation method based on Eikonal equation. The imaging results using seismic travel times show that low velocity zones are bounded by or distributed along major faults. The feature appears more clearly on the Vp model. Since short and intermediate period surface-wave dispersion data provide good constraints on the crustal Vs structure and are also quite sensitive to the crustal Vp structure, we expect that the crustal Vs and Vp models will be better constrained by jointly inverting body-wave travel time and surface wave dispersion data. We hope to better characterize

  14. Nonlinear dispersion and transverse profile of intense electromagnetic waves, propagating through electron-positron-ion hot magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Javan, N. Sepehri Homami, S. H. H.

    2015-02-15

    Self-guided nonlinear propagation of intense circularly-polarized electromagnetic waves in a hot electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma is studied. Using a relativistic fluid model, a nonlinear equation is derived, which describes the interaction of the electromagnetic wave with the plasma in the quasi-neutral approximation. Transverse Eigen modes, the nonlinear dispersion relation and the group velocity are obtained. Results show that the transverse profile in the case of magnetized plasma with cylindrical symmetry has a radially damping oscillatory form. Effect of applying external magnetic fields, existence of the electron-positron pairs, changing the amplitude of the electromagnetic wave, and its polarization on the nonlinear dispersion relation and Eigen modes are studied.

  15. Variation of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion in Iran and the surrounding region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rham, D.; Priestley, K.; Tatar, M.; Paul, A.; Hatzfeld, D.; Radjaee, A.; Nowrouzi, G.; Kaviani, A.; Tiberi, C.

    2005-12-01

    We present group velocity dispersion results from a study of regional fundamental mode Rayleigh waves propagating across Iran and the surrounding region. Data for these measurements come from field deployments within Iran by the University of Cambridge (UK) and the Universite Joseph-Fourier (FRA) in conjunction with International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (Iran), within Oman by the Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris (FRA), in addition to data from IRIS and Geofone. 1D path-averaged dispersion measurements have been made for ~800 source-receiver paths using multiple filter analysis. We combine these observations in a tomographic inversion to produce group velocity images between 15 and 60~s period. Because of the dense path coverage, these images have substantially higher lateral resolution for this region than is currently available from global and regional group velocity studies. We observe variations in short-period group velocity which is consistent with the surface geology. Low group velocity (2.45-2.55~km/s) at short periods (15-20~s) is observed beneath the south Caspian Basin, northern Iran, the Persian Gulf, the Zagros, the Makran, northern Afghanistan and southern Pakistan. Somewhat higher group velocity (2.60-2.70~km/s) at these periods occurs in central Iran. At intermediate periods (30-40~s) group velocities over most of the region are low (2.90-3.10~km/s) compared to Arabia. At longer periods (50-60~s) group velocities remain low (3.35-3.45~km/s) over most of Iran but there is a suggestion of higher group velocities beneath the northern and central Zagros.

  16. Stop and Go – Waves of Tarsier Dispersal Mirror the Genesis of Sulawesi Island

    PubMed Central

    Driller, Christine; Merker, Stefan; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Sinaga, Walberto; Anggraeni, Novita; Zischler, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The Indonesian island of Sulawesi harbors a highly endemic and diverse fauna sparking fascination since long before Wallace’s contemplation of biogeographical patterns in the region. Allopatric diversification driven by geological or climatic processes has been identified as the main mechanism shaping present faunal distribution on the island. There is both consensus and conflict among range patterns of terrestrial species pointing to the different effects of vicariant events on once co-distributed taxa. Tarsiers, small nocturnal primates with possible evidence of an Eocene fossil record on the Asian mainland, are at present exclusively found in insular Southeast Asia. Sulawesi is hotspot of tarsier diversity, whereby island colonization and subsequent radiation of this old endemic primate lineage remained largely enigmatic. To resolve the phylogeographic history of Sulawesi tarsiers we analyzed an island-wide sample for a set of five approved autosomal phylogenetic markers (ABCA1, ADORA3, AXIN1, RAG1, and TTR) and the paternally inherited SRY gene. We constructed ML and Bayesian phylogenetic trees and estimated divergence times between tarsier populations. We found that their arrival at the Proto-Sulawesi archipelago coincided with initial Miocene tectonic uplift and hypothesize that tarsiers dispersed over the region in distinct waves. Intra-island diversification was spurred by land emergence and a rapid succession of glacial cycles during the Plio-Pleistocene. Some tarsier range boundaries concur with spatial limits in other taxa backing the notion of centers of faunal endemism on Sulawesi. This congruence, however, has partially been superimposed by taxon-specific dispersal patterns. PMID:26559527

  17. Stop and Go - Waves of Tarsier Dispersal Mirror the Genesis of Sulawesi Island.

    PubMed

    Driller, Christine; Merker, Stefan; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Sinaga, Walberto; Anggraeni, Novita; Zischler, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The Indonesian island of Sulawesi harbors a highly endemic and diverse fauna sparking fascination since long before Wallace's contemplation of biogeographical patterns in the region. Allopatric diversification driven by geological or climatic processes has been identified as the main mechanism shaping present faunal distribution on the island. There is both consensus and conflict among range patterns of terrestrial species pointing to the different effects of vicariant events on once co-distributed taxa. Tarsiers, small nocturnal primates with possible evidence of an Eocene fossil record on the Asian mainland, are at present exclusively found in insular Southeast Asia. Sulawesi is hotspot of tarsier diversity, whereby island colonization and subsequent radiation of this old endemic primate lineage remained largely enigmatic. To resolve the phylogeographic history of Sulawesi tarsiers we analyzed an island-wide sample for a set of five approved autosomal phylogenetic markers (ABCA1, ADORA3, AXIN1, RAG1, and TTR) and the paternally inherited SRY gene. We constructed ML and Bayesian phylogenetic trees and estimated divergence times between tarsier populations. We found that their arrival at the Proto-Sulawesi archipelago coincided with initial Miocene tectonic uplift and hypothesize that tarsiers dispersed over the region in distinct waves. Intra-island diversification was spurred by land emergence and a rapid succession of glacial cycles during the Plio-Pleistocene. Some tarsier range boundaries concur with spatial limits in other taxa backing the notion of centers of faunal endemism on Sulawesi. This congruence, however, has partially been superimposed by taxon-specific dispersal patterns. PMID:26559527

  18. Modulational stability of weakly nonlinear wave-trains in media with small- and large-scale dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenkova, S.; Singh, N.; Stepanyants, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we revisit the problem of modulation stability of quasi-monochromatic wave-trains propagating in a media with the double dispersion occurring both at small and large wavenumbers. We start with the shallow-water equations derived by Shrira [Izv., Acad. Sci., USSR, Atmos. Ocean. Phys. (Engl. Transl.) 17, 55-59 (1981)] which describes both surface and internal long waves in a rotating fluid. The small-scale (Boussinesq-type) dispersion is assumed to be weak, whereas the large-scale (Coriolis-type) dispersion is considered as without any restriction. For unidirectional waves propagating in one direction, only the considered set of equations reduces to the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation which is applicable only within a finite range of wavenumbers. We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) which describes the evolution of narrow-band wave-trains and show that within a more general bi-directional equation the wave-trains, similar to that derived from the Ostrovsky equation, are also modulationally stable at relatively small wavenumbers k < kc and unstable at k > kc, where kc is some critical wavenumber. The NLSE derived here has a wider range of applicability: it is valid for arbitrarily small wavenumbers. We present the analysis of coefficients of the NLSE for different signs of coefficients of the governing equation and compare them with those derived from the Ostrovsky equation. The analysis shows that for weakly dispersive waves in the range of parameters where the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation is valid, the cubic nonlinearity does not contribute to the nonlinear coefficient of NLSE; therefore, the NLSE can be correctly derived from the Ostrovsky equation.

  19. Modulational stability of weakly nonlinear wave-trains in media with small- and large-scale dispersions.

    PubMed

    Nikitenkova, S; Singh, N; Stepanyants, Y

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we revisit the problem of modulation stability of quasi-monochromatic wave-trains propagating in a media with the double dispersion occurring both at small and large wavenumbers. We start with the shallow-water equations derived by Shrira [Izv., Acad. Sci., USSR, Atmos. Ocean. Phys. (Engl. Transl.) 17, 55-59 (1981)] which describes both surface and internal long waves in a rotating fluid. The small-scale (Boussinesq-type) dispersion is assumed to be weak, whereas the large-scale (Coriolis-type) dispersion is considered as without any restriction. For unidirectional waves propagating in one direction, only the considered set of equations reduces to the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation which is applicable only within a finite range of wavenumbers. We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) which describes the evolution of narrow-band wave-trains and show that within a more general bi-directional equation the wave-trains, similar to that derived from the Ostrovsky equation, are also modulationally stable at relatively small wavenumbers k < kc and unstable at k > kc, where kc is some critical wavenumber. The NLSE derived here has a wider range of applicability: it is valid for arbitrarily small wavenumbers. We present the analysis of coefficients of the NLSE for different signs of coefficients of the governing equation and compare them with those derived from the Ostrovsky equation. The analysis shows that for weakly dispersive waves in the range of parameters where the Gardner-Ostrovsky equation is valid, the cubic nonlinearity does not contribute to the nonlinear coefficient of NLSE; therefore, the NLSE can be correctly derived from the Ostrovsky equation. PMID:26723152

  20. P-wave dispersion: an indicator of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in children with neurocardiogenic syncope.

    PubMed

    Köse, Melis Demir; Bağ, Özlem; Güven, Barış; Meşe, Timur; Öztürk, Aysel; Tavlı, Vedide

    2014-04-01

    Neurocardiogenic syncope is the most frequent cause of fainting in childhood and adolescence. Although head-up tilt table testing (HUTT) was previously considered as the reference standard in the diagnosis of syncope, in children with a typical history of reflex syncope, normal physical examination, and electrocardiogram (ECG) are sufficient to cease investigation; however, according to recent reports, TT is indicated in patients in whom this diagnosis cannot be proven by initial evaluation. The hypothesis of this study is that P-wave dispersion (PWD) can be a useful electrocardiographic predictor of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in children with vasovagal syncope (VVS). The study was designed prospectively and included 50 children with positive and 50 children with negative HUTT who presented with at least two previous unexplained episodes of syncope as well as 50 sex- and age-matched healthy children as the control group. All standard 12-lead ECGs were obtained in patients and controls, and the difference between maximum and minimum durations of the P wave was defined as the PWD. A total of 100 children with VVS and 50 healthy controls were evaluated for the study. The P maximum values of HUTT-positive (HUTT[+]) patients were significantly greater than those in the HUTT-negative (HUTT[-]) and control groups(p < 0.05). In addition, mean PWD values were 50.2 ± 18.5, 39.6 ± 11.2 and 32.0 ± 11.2 ms in the HUTT(+), HUTT(-), and control groups, respectively. The difference between groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). We suggest that PWD is an early sign of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in children with neurally mediated syncope and can be used as a noninvasive electrocardiographic test to evaluate orthostatic intolerance syndromes. PMID:24633236

  1. Dispersion curve veering of longitudinal guided waves propagating inside prestressed seven-wire strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treyssède, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Elastic guided waves are of interest for the non-destructive evaluation of cables. Such structures are usually helical, multiwired and highly prestressed, which greatly complicates the understanding of wave propagation from a theoretical point of view. A remarkable feature is the occurrence of a missing frequency band in experimental time-frequency diagrams, sometimes referred to as notch frequency in the literature. The central frequency of this band increases under tensile loads. Recently, a numerical model has been proposed to compute the dispersion curves of prestressed helical seven-wire waveguides. Results have shown that the notch frequency indeed corresponds to a curve veering phenomenon between two longitudinal-like modes and that the increase of the notch under tensile loads is mainly due to interwire contact mechanisms. The main goal of this paper is to highlight the origin of this curve veering phenomenon, which is still unexplained up to the author's knowledge. This paper also provides further results which allow us to clarify the accuracy of numerical solutions as well as the influence of contact assumptions. First, the static part of the model, necessary to compute the prestress state including contact effects, is checked from reference analytical solutions. Owing to the importance of contact, the accuracy of results is discussed both in statics and in dynamics. The influence of slip contact conditions is outlined. Then, some numerical tests are conducted by varying the Poisson coefficient and the helix lay angle. These tests allows us to find out that the radial displacement constraint imposed on peripheral wires by the central one in the contact regions constitutes the main source of curve veering. More precisely, it is shown that a similar curve veering does occur for an uncoupled single peripheral wire when constrained by a radially blocked motion localized in its contact zone. Indeed, such a localized boundary condition completely breaks the

  2. Lamb wave dispersion and anisotropy profiling of composite plates via non-contact air-coupled and laser ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harb, M. S.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional ultrasound inspection has been a standard non-destructive testing method for providing an in-service evaluation and noninvasive means of probing the interior of a structure. In particular, measurement of the propagation characteristics of Lamb waves allows inspection of plates that are typical components in aerospace industry. A rapid, complete non-contact hybrid approach for excitation and detection of Lamb waves is presented and applied for non-destructive evaluation of composites. An air-coupled transducer (ACT) excites ultrasonic waves on the surface of a composite plate, generating different propagating Lamb wave modes and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the out-of-plane velocity of the plate. This technology, based on direct waveform imaging, focuses on measuring dispersive curves for A0 mode in a composite laminate and its anisotropy. A two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D-FFT) is applied to out-of-plane velocity data captured experimentally using LDV to go from the time-spatial domain to frequency-wavenumber domain. The result is a 2D array of amplitudes at discrete frequencies and wavenumbers for A0 mode in a given propagation direction along the composite. The peak values of the curve are then used to construct frequency wavenumber and phase velocity dispersion curves, which are also obtained directly using Snell's law and the incident angle of the excited ultrasonic waves. A high resolution and strong correlation between numerical and experimental results are observed for dispersive curves with Snell's law method in comparison to 2D-FFT method. Dispersion curves as well as velocity curves for the composite plate along different directions of wave propagation are measured. The visual read-out of the dispersion curves at different propagation directions as well as the phase velocity curves provide profiling and measurements of the composite anisotropy. The results proved a high sensitivity of the air-coupled and laser

  3. MHD Oscillations in the Earth's Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, A. S.; Mazur, V. A.; Kozlov, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    In studies of hydromagnetic oscillations of the Earth's magnetosphere, it is often considered as a giant resonator for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. A shear flow instability on the magnetopause has long been regarded as a possible source of MHD oscillations in the Earth's magnetosphere. A most interesting phenomenon investigated for the past two decades are ultra-low-frequency oscillations with a discrete spectrum. Such oscillations are recorded usually in the midnight-morning sector of the magnetosphere at 60° to 80° latitudes. Another type of MHD oscillations typical of the magnetotail is the coupled Alfvén and slow magnetosonic waves on stretched magnetic field lines passing through the current sheet. Each of these modes can propagate along paths that almost coincide with the magnetic field lines. The recently discovered kink-like oscillations are oscillations of the current sheet itself, similar to a piece of fabric fluttering in the wind. In this regard they are called flapping modes.

  4. Numerical dispersion analysis for three-dimensional Laplace-Fourier-domain scalar wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Bo

    2016-06-01

    Based on the phase velocity and attenuation propagation velocity, a method for performing numerical dispersion analysis of three-dimensional Laplace-Fourier-domain scalar wave equation is presented. This method is applied to a 27-point average-derivative optimal scheme and a 27-point finite-element scheme. Within the relative error of 1%, the 27-point average-derivative optimal scheme requires seven grid points per wavelength and pseudo-wavelength while the 27-point finite-element scheme requires 23 grid points per wavelength and pseudo-wavelength for equal and unequal directional sampling intervals. Numerical examples show that the 27-point Laplace-Fourier-domain average-derivative optimal scheme is more accurate than the 27-point Laplace-Fourier-domain finite-element scheme for the same computational cost. By using larger directional sampling intervals while maintaining accuracy, the 27-point Laplace-Fourier-domain average-derivative optimal scheme can greatly reduce the computational cost of three-dimensional Laplace-Fourier-domain modelling.

  5. Dispersive Alfven waves and Ion-acoustic Turbulence: M-I coupling at the Smallest Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, J. L.; Zettergren, M. D.; Diaz, M.; Stromme, A.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Auroral displays exhibit coherence across multiple scales, beginning with the global auroral oval and extending down to packets of discrete arcs of <100-m width related to dispersive Alfven waves. The latter have been found to be magnetically conjugate to regions of non-thermal backscatter from the ionospheric F-region recorded by incoherent scatter radar (ISR). The phenomenological relationship between auroral morphology and ISR spectral distortions has been well established, at least in a static sense, but the theory connecting these disparate observational domains is incomplete. It is argued that considerable insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling is obtained by understanding auroral physics at these elemental scales. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide observational evidence that not all arc-related ISR distortions fit neatly into a single category (e.g., the “Naturally Enhanced Ion-Acoustic Line” or NEIAL), and (2) to provide a critical review of candidate theoretical models to simultaneously account for the time-dependent optical and radar measurements. Evidentiary support focuses on observations of a substorm onset on 23 March 2007 (11:20 UT) by a narrow-field video-rate camera and the electronically steerable Poker Flat ISR (PFISR). Examples of ISR spectra as a function of altitude. 1: thermal backscatter, 2 and 3: enhanced backscatter conjugate to discrete aurora.

  6. Wave dispersion and attenuation in viscoelastic isotropic media containing multiphase flow and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Yang, DingHui; Nie, JianXin

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce the complex modulus to express the viscoelasticity of a medium. According to the correspondence principle, the Biot-Squirt (BISQ) equations in the steady-state case are presented for the space-frequency domain described by solid displacements and fluid pressure in a homogeneous viscoelastic medium. The effective bulk modulus of a multiphase flow is computed by the Voigt formula, and the characteristic squirt-flow length is revised for the gas-included case. We then build a viscoelastic BISQ model containing a multiphase flow. Through using this model, wave dispersion and attenuation are studied in a medium with low porosity and low permeability. Furthermore, this model is applied to observed interwell seismic data. Analysis of these data reveals that the viscoelastic parameter tan δ is not a constant. Thus, we present a linear frequency-dependent function in the interwell seismic frequency range to express tan δ. This improves the fit between the observed data and theoretical results.

  7. Generalized linear transport theory in dilute neutral gases and dispersion relation of sound waves.

    PubMed

    Bendib, A; Bendib-Kalache, K; Gombert, M M; Imadouchene, N

    2006-10-01

    The transport processes in dilute neutral gases are studied by using the kinetic equation with a collision relaxation model that meets all conservation requirements. The kinetic equation is solved keeping the whole anisotropic part of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conservative laws of the collision operator are taken into account with the projection operator techniques. The generalized heat flux and stress tensor are calculated in the linear approximation, as functions of the lower moments, i.e., the density, the flow velocity and the temperature. The results obtained are valid for arbitrary collision frequency nu with the respect to kv(t) and the characteristic frequency omega, where k(-1) is the characteristic length scale of the system and v(t) is the thermal velocity. The transport coefficients constitute accurate closure relations for the generalized hydrodynamic equations. An application to the dispersion and the attenuation of sound waves in the whole collisionality regime is presented. The results obtained are in very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:17155048

  8. Linear Analysis of the m=0 Instability for a Visco-resistive Hall MHD Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    2006-01-05

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the linear dispersion relation for the axisymmetric (m=0) compressible interchange instability of Bennett equilibria in a visco-resistive, Hall MHD plasma. The full anisotropic stress tensor with Braginskii viscous coefficients is considered. The eigenvalues are obtained numerically. For small axial mode number, Hall currents enhance the growth rates, whereas in the limit of high mode number the growth rates are suppressed, eventually resulting in wave cutoff, even in the ideal limit. For the visco-resistive plasma the unstable spectra are weakly dependent on the off-diagonal elements of the stress tensor.

  9. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave–matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics. PMID:27198887

  10. Preliminary results of near-surface shear-wave velocities derived from inverting surface-wave dispersion curves in Wonju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. Y.; Jung, J.; Kim, C.; Ali, A.

    2013-12-01

    To estimate near-surface shear-wave velocities (Vs) in Wonju, Korea, active and passive surface-wave data were recorded at 4 and 6 sites, respectively, using 24 4.5-Hz vertical geophones and an engineering seismograph. An 8-kg wooden hammer was used for the active seismic source. The ground motions of 8.2 s length at each geophone location were digitized at a 2-ms sample rate. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods were used for the active and passive data to derive dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. Shear-wave profiles inverted from the dispersion curves indicate that 182 < Vs < 557 ms/ in the unconsolidated overburden layer and 375 < Vs < 1128 m/s in the consolidated rock. The basement depths are estimated at depths between 13 and 25 m. Average Vs to a 30 m depth (Vs30) were also computed using Vs values in the overburden and underlying basement layers. The estimated Vs30 are in the range of 224-602 m/s, with an average of 415 m/s. Most of the Wonju area is thus in NEHRP Site Class C ('Very dense soil and soft rock') defined by the velocity interval 360 < Vs30 < 760 m/s.

  11. High-frequency solitons in media with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves with nonuniform dispersion and nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Aseeva, N. V. Gromov, E. M.; Tyutin, V. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of high-frequency field solitons is considered using the extended nonhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves (pseudoinduced scattering). This scattering is a 3D analog of the stimulated Raman scattering from temporal spatially homogeneous damped low-frequency modes, which is well known in optics. Spatial inhomogeneities of secondorder linear dispersion and cubic nonlinearity are also taken into account. It is shown that the shift in the 3D spectrum of soliton wavenumbers toward the short-wavelength region is due to nonlinearity increasing in coordinate and to decreasing dispersion. Analytic results are confirmed by numerical calculations.

  12. Generalized three-dimensional simulation of ferruled coupled-cavity traveling-wave-tube dispersion and impedance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maruschek, Joseph W.; Kory, Carol L.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    1993-01-01

    The frequency-phase dispersion and Pierce on-axis interaction impedance of a ferruled, coupled-cavity, traveling-wave tube (TWT), slow-wave circuit were calculated using the three-dimensional simulation code Micro-SOS. The utilization of the code to reduce costly and time-consuming experimental cold tests is demonstrated by the accuracy achieved in calculating these parameters. A generalized input file was developed so that ferruled coupled-cavity TWT slow-wave circuits of arbitrary dimensions could be easily modeled. The practicality of the generalized input file was tested by applying it to the ferruled coupled-cavity slow-wave circuit of the Hughes Aircraft Company model 961HA TWT and by comparing the results with experimental results.

  13. On the diffusion-strain coupling and dispersion of surface waves in transversely isotropic laser-excited solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzade, F.

    2015-10-01

    The present paper is aimed at studying the boundary value problem in elasticity theory concerning the propagation behavior of harmonic waves and vibrations on the surface of the transversely isotropic laser-excited crystalline solids with atomic defect generation. Coupled dynamical diffusion--deformation interaction model is employed to study this problem. The frequency equations of surface waves in closed form are derived and discussed. The three motions, namely, longitudinal, transverse, and diffusion of the medium are found to be dispersive and coupled with each other due to the defect concentration changes and anisotropic effects. The phase velocity and attenuation coefficient of the surface waves get modified due-to the defect-strain coupling and anisotropic effects, and are also influenced by the defect relaxation time. A softening of frequencies of surface acoustic waves (instability of frequencies) is obtained. Relevant results of previous investigations are deduced as special and limiting cases.

  14. The discrete Alfvén wave spectrum induced by the Hall current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Hirose, Akira; Mahajan, Swadesh; Ohsaki, Shuichi

    2004-11-01

    It is shown that the discrete Alfvén wave induced by the Hall current [S. Ohsaki and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 11, 898 (2004)] is equivalent to the kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW). The Hall magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dispersion relation can be fully recovered from the electromagnetic kinetic dispersion relation provided the ion temperature is negligible and the magnetosonic perturbation is retained. Effects of a finite ion temperature on the Hall MHD have been identified in the first order of ion FLR parameter and β_i. As expected, the MHD mode equation becomes anisotropic because of the double adiabaticity in ion dynamics even when the ion temperature is isotropic.

  15. Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Arrival Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data in the Wavelet Domain Constrained by Sparsity Regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Fang, H.; Yao, H.; Maceira, M.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, Zhang et al. (2014, Pure and Appiled Geophysics) have developed a joint inversion code incorporating body-wave arrival times and surface-wave dispersion data. The joint inversion code was based on the regional-scale version of the double-difference tomography algorithm tomoDD. The surface-wave inversion part uses the propagator matrix solver in the algorithm DISPER80 (Saito, 1988) for forward calculation of dispersion curves from layered velocity models and the related sensitivities. The application of the joint inversion code to the SAFOD site in central California shows that the fault structure is better imaged in the new model, which is able to fit both the body-wave and surface-wave observations adequately. Here we present a new joint inversion method that solves the model in the wavelet domain constrained by sparsity regularization. Compared to the previous method, it has the following advantages: (1) The method is both data- and model-adaptive. For the velocity model, it can be represented by different wavelet coefficients at different scales, which are generally sparse. By constraining the model wavelet coefficients to be sparse, the inversion in the wavelet domain can inherently adapt to the data distribution so that the model has higher spatial resolution in the good data coverage zone. Fang and Zhang (2014, Geophysical Journal International) have showed the superior performance of the wavelet-based double-difference seismic tomography method compared to the conventional method. (2) For the surface wave inversion, the joint inversion code takes advantage of the recent development of direct inversion of surface wave dispersion data for 3-D variations of shear wave velocity without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps (Fang et al., 2014, Geophysical Journal International). A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. We will test the new joint

  16. Analysis of band structure, transmission properties, and dispersion behavior of THz wave in one-dimensional parabolic plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Askari, Nasim; Eslami, Esmaeil; Mirzaie, Reza

    2015-11-15

    The photonic band gap of obliquely incident terahertz electromagnetic waves in a one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is studied. The periodic structure consists of lossless dielectric and inhomogeneous plasma with a parabolic density profile. The dispersion relation and the THz wave transmittance are analyzed based on the electromagnetic equations and transfer matrix method. The dependence of effective plasma frequency and photonic band gap characteristics on dielectric and plasma thickness, plasma density, and incident angle are discussed in detail. A theoretical calculation for effective plasma frequency is presented and compared with numerical results. Results of these two methods are in good agreement.

  17. Very Broadband Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion (0.06 - 60 Hz) and Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Under Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Bilek, S. L.; Patton, H. J.; Abbott, R. E.; Stead, R.; Pancha, A.; White, R.

    2009-12-01

    Earth structure plays an important role in the generation of seismic waves for all sources. Nowhere is this more evident than at near-surface depths where man-made sources, such as explosions, are conducted. For example, short-period Rayleigh waves (Rg) are excited and propagate in the upper 2 km of Earth's crust. The importance of Rg in the generation of S waves from explosion sources through near-source scattering depends greatly on the shear-wave velocity structure at very shallow depths. Using three distinct datasets, we present a very broadband Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion curve for the Yucca Flat (YF) region of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first dataset consists of waveforms of historic NTS explosions recorded on regional seismic networks and will provide information for the lowest frequencies (0.06-0.3 Hz). The second dataset is comprised of waveforms from a non-nuclear explosion on YF recorded at near-local distances and will be used for mid-range frequencies (0.2-1.5 Hz). The third dataset contains high-frequency waveforms recorded from refraction microtremor surveys on YF. This dataset provides information between 1.5 and 60 Hz. Initial results from the high frequency dataset indicate velocities range from 0.45-0.9 km/s at 1.5 Hz and 0.25-0.45 km/s at 60 Hz. The broadband nature of the dispersion curve will allow us to invert for the shear-wave velocity structure to 10 km depth, with focus on shallow depths where nuclear tests were conducted in the YF region. The velocity model will be used by researchers as a tool to aid the development of new explosion source models that incorporate shear wave generation. The new model can also be used to help improve regional distance yield estimation and source discrimination for small events.

  18. High-Accuracy, Implicit Solution of the Extended-MHD Equations using High-Continuity Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, Stephen C.

    2004-11-01

    It has been recognized for some time that it is necessary to go beyond the simple ``resistive MHD'' description of the plasma in order to get the correct quantitative results for the growth and saturation of global dissipative modes in a fusion device. The inclusion of a more complete ``generalized Ohms law'' and the off-diagonal terms in the ion pressure tensor introduce Whistler waves, Kinetic Alfven waves, and gyro-viscous waves, all of which are dispersive and require special numerical treatment. We have developed a new numerical approach to solving these Extended-MHD equations using a compact representation that is specifically designed to yield efficient high-order-of-accuracy, implicit solutions of a general formulation of the compressible Extended-MHD equations. The representation is based on a triangular finite element with fifth order accuracy that is constructed to have continuous derivatives across element boundaries, allowing its use with systems of equations containing complex spatial derivative operators of up to 4th order. The final set of equations are solved using the parallel sparse direct solver, SuperLU, which makes linear solutions exceptionally efficient, since only a one-time LU decomposition is required. The magnetic and velocity fields are decomposed without loss of generality in in a potential, stream function form. Subsets of the full set of 6 equations describing unreduced compressible extended MHD yield (1) the two variable reduced MHD equations, and (2) the 4-field Fitzpatrick-Porcelli equations. Applications are presented in straight and toroidal geometry showing the accuracy and efficiency of the method in computing highly anisotropic heat conduction, toroidal equilibrium, and the effect of ``two-fluid'' effects on resistive instabilities.

  19. Widely tunable dispersive wave generation and soliton self-frequency shift in a tellurite microstructured optical fiber pumped near the zero dispersion wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tuan, Tong-Hoang; Liu, Lai; Gao, Wei-Qing; Kawamura, Harutaka; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2015-12-01

    Widely tunable dispersive waves (DW) and Raman solitons are generated in a tellurite microstructured optical fiber (TMOF) by pumping in the anomalous dispersion regime, close to the zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW). The DW can be generated from 1518.3 nm to 1315.5 nm, and the soliton can be shifted from the pump wavelength of 1570 nm to 1828.7 nm, by tuning the average pump power from 3 dBm to 17.5 dBm. After the average pump power is increased to 18.8 dBm, two DW peaks (centered at 1323 nm and 1260 nm) and three soliton peaks (centered at 1762 nm, 1825 nm, and 1896 nm) can be observed simultaneously. When the average pump power is greater than 23.4 dBm, a flat and broadband supercontinuum (SC) can be formed by the combined nonlinear effects of soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS), DW generation, and cross phase modulation (XPM).

  20. A model for strong attenuation and dispersion of seismic P-waves in a partially saturated fractured reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajanovski, Miroslav; Müller, Tobias M.; Parra, Jorge O.

    2010-08-01

    In this work we interpret the data showing unusually strong velocity dispersion of P-waves (up to 30%) and attenuation in a relatively narrow frequency range. The cross-hole and VSP data were measured in a reservoir, which is in the porous zone of the Silurian Kankakee Limestone Formation formed by vertical fractures within a porous matrix saturated by oil, and gas patches. Such a medium exhibits significant attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow across the interfaces between different types of inclusions (fractures, fluid patches) and background. Other models of intrinsic attenuation (in particular squirt flow models) cannot explain the amount of observed dispersion when using realistic rock properties. In order to interpret data in a satisfactory way we develop a superposition model for fractured porous rocks accounting also for the patchy saturation effect.

  1. Breakdown of electrostatic predictions for the nonlinear dispersion relation of a stimulated Raman scattering driven plasma wave

    SciTech Connect

    Benisti, Didier; Gremillet, Laurent

    2008-03-15

    The kinetic nonlinear dispersion relation, and frequency shift {delta}{omega}{sub srs}, of a plasma wave driven by stimulated Raman scattering are presented. Our theoretical calculations are fully electromagnetic, and use an adiabatic expression for the electron susceptibility which accounts for the change in phase velocity as the wave grows. When k{lambda}{sub D} > or approx. 0.35 (k being the plasma wave number and {lambda}{sub D} the Debye length), {delta}{omega}{sub srs} is significantly larger than could be inferred by assuming that the wave is freely propagating. Our theory is in excellent agreement with 1D Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell simulations when 0.3{<=}k{lambda}{sub D}{<=}0.58, and allows discussion of previously proposed mechanisms for Raman saturation. In particular, we find that no ''loss of resonance'' of the plasma wave would limit the Raman growth rate, and that saturation through a phase detuning between the plasma wave and the laser drive is mitigated by wave number shifts.

  2. A Neighbourhood Algorithm Analysis of the Constraints Provided by Surface Wave Dispersion Data on Upper Mantle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghein, C.; Lebedev, S.; van der Hilst, R.

    2005-12-01

    Interstation dispersion curves can be used to obtain regional 1D profiles of the crust and upper mantle. Unlike phase velocity maps, dispersion curves can be determined with small errors and for a broad frequency band. We want to determine what features interstation surface wave dispersion curves can constrain. Using synthetic data and the Neighbourhood Algorithm, a direct search approach that provides a full statistical assessment of model uncertainites and trade-offs, we investigate how well crustal and upper mantle structure can be recovered with fundamental Love and Rayleigh waves. We also determine how strong are the trade-offs between the different parameters and what depth resolution can we expect to achieve with the current level of precision of this type of data. Synthetic dispersion curves between approximately 7 and 340s were assigned realistic error bars, i.e. an increase of the relative uncertainty with the period but with an amplitude consistent with the one achieve in ``real'' measurements. These dispersion curves were generated by two types of isotropic model differing only by their crustal structure. One represents an oceanic region (shallow Moho) and the other corresponds to an archean continental area with a larger Moho depth. Preliminary results show that while the Moho depth, the shear-velocity structure in the transition zone, between 200 and 410km depth, and between the base of the crust and 50km depth are generally well recovered, crustal structure and Vs between between 50 and 200km depth are more difficult to constrain with Love waves or Rayleigh waves alone because of some trade-off between the two layers. When these two layers are put together, the resolution of Vs between 50 and 100km depth apperas to improve. Stucture deeper than the transition zone is not constrained by the data because of a lack of sensitivity. We explore the possibility of differentiating between an upper and lower crust as well, and we investigate whether a joint

  3. Laboratory measurement of elastic-wave velocity, associated dispersion, attenuation and particle resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molyneux, Joseph Benedict

    Laboratory velocity measurements are an integral component of solid earth seismic investigations. Typically, ultrasonic measurements from centimeter scale plug samples are used to model large sections of the crust, core and mantle. By using the laboratory determined velocities, the seismic arrival time can more accurately calibrate spatial physical properties of the solid-earth. A semi-automated picking procedure is presented which determines the velocity measured from recorded ultrasonic pulses propagated through laboratory samples. This procedure is quicker and more consistent than the standard hand picking method, allowing larger data sets to be accurately investigated. Furthermore, a series of common velocity analyses are compared to the physical properties of phase and group velocity in an attenuating medium of glycerol saturated glass bead packs (Q ˜ 3). It is found that the velocity determined from the first break of the waveform (signal velocity) is up to 13% different from group and phase velocities. This illustrates that signal velocity is unsuitable to determine rock properties in highly attenuating media. Also, greater than 81% velocity dispersion is observed when the dominant propagating wavelength is comparable to the bead size. More surprisingly, on propagation of the broad band input signal a bimodal amplitude spectrum becomes apparent. The low frequency peak is consistent with standard attenuation, whereas the high frequency peak is related to resonance of either the constituent beads or the interbead fluid cavity. Such resonance partitions energy of the main incoming signal. This phenomenon represents a new and fundamental attenuation mechanism that should be considered in many wave-propagation experiments.

  4. High-order Non-reflecting Boundary Conditions for Dispersive Waves in Cartesian, Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Joolen*, Vince; Givoli, Dan; Neta, Beny

    2003-07-01

    Among the many areas of research that Professor Kawahara has been active in is the subject of open boundaries in which linear time-dependent dispersive waves are considered in an unbounded domain. The infinite domain is truncated via an artificial boundary B on which an open boundary condition (OBC) is imposed. In this paper, Higdon OBCs and Hagstrom-Hariharan (HH) OBCs are considered. Higdon-type conditions, originally implemented as low-order OBCs, are made accessible for any desired order via a new scheme. The higher-order Higdon OBC is then reformulated using auxiliary variables and made compatible for use with finite element (FE) methods. Methodologies for selecting Higdon parameters are also proposed. The performances of these schemes are demonstrated in two numerical examples. This is followed by a discussion of the HH OBC, which is applicable to non-dispersive media on cylindrical and spherical geometries. The paper extends this OBC to the "slightly dispersive" case.

  5. The effects of oscillation period on groundwater wave dispersion in a sandy unconfined aquifer: Sand flume experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein Jazayeri; Cartwright, Nick; Nielsen, Peter; Perrochet, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a new laboratory sand flume dataset on the propagation of groundwater waves in an unconfined sandy aquifer with a vertical boundary subject to simple harmonic forcing with a wide range of oscillation period from 10.7 s to 909 s. The data is unique in that it covers a much wider range of non-dimensional aquifer depths, nωd/K (where n is the porosity, ω is the angular frequency, d is the aquifer depth and K is the hydraulic conductivity) than has been previously investigated. Both the amplitude decay rate and rate of increase in phase lag of the water table waves are observed to monotonically increase with increasing oscillation frequency (increasing nωd/K). This is in contrast to existing theoretical dispersion relations which predict: (1) zero phase lag or standing wave behaviour and (2) an asymptotic decay rate as the frequency increases. Possible influences on the experimental data including sand packing, measurement location, finite amplitude wave effects, unsaturated zone truncation and multiple wave mode effects are unable to explain the discrepancy. The data was also compared against numerical solutions of Richards' equation with and without hysteresis and in both cases, the same qualitative behaviour as the analytic solutions described above is found. The discrepancy between data and predictions remains unexplained and highlights a knowledge gap that requires further investigation. These findings relate directly to practical applications in the field of surface-groundwater interactions such as the influence of wave forcing of coastal aquifers on contaminant transport, sediment mobility and salt-water intrusion all of which are influenced by the dispersion of the groundwater wave.

  6. Right-handed circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave: Localization and turbulence in solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. P.; Sharma, Swati; Gaur, Nidhi

    2015-08-01

    The elucidation of the turbulent spectrum in the solar wind region in the dispersive range of scales is not yet completely established. The observational analysis of many spacecraft report that the fluctuations on the order of (or smaller scales) proton inertial length λi = c/ω p i show disparity with respect to the large-scale fluctuations. We present a parallel-propagating dispersive Alfvén wave that becomes dispersive as a result of the finite frequency of the wave, when subjected to transverse instability can be used to study the steepening in power spectrum around proton inertial length. The transverse density perturbations of acoustic wave can couple nonlinearly with parallel-propagating pump and the driven ponderomotive force consecutively leads to growth of perturbations. We have studied the evolution of localized structures with time and the power spectral density when the system reaches quasi steady state. The application of the results in the solar wind turbulence is also discussed.

  7. Dispersion relations of elastic waves in one-dimensional piezoelectric/piezomagnetic phononic crystal with functionally graded interlayers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao; Wei, Peijun; Lan, Man; Li, Li

    2016-08-01

    The effects of functionally graded interlayers on dispersion relations of elastic waves in a one-dimensional piezoelectric/piezomagnetic phononic crystal are studied in this paper. First, the state transfer equation of the functionally graded interlayer is derived from the motion equation by the reduction of order (from second order to first order). The transfer matrix of the functionally graded interlayer is obtained by solving the state transfer equation with the spatial-varying coefficient. Based on the transfer matrixes of the piezoelectric slab, the piezomagnetic slab and the functionally graded interlayers, the total transfer matrix of a single cell is obtained. Further, the Bloch theorem is used to obtain the resultant dispersion equations of in-plane and anti-plane Bloch waves. The dispersion equations are solved numerically and the numerical results are shown graphically. Five kinds of profiles of functionally graded interlayers between a piezoelectric slab and a piezomagnetic slab are considered. It is shown that the functionally graded interlayers have evident influences on the dispersion curves and the band gaps. PMID:27179141

  8. Computation of generalized and exact dispersion relations for longitudinal plasma waves in nonextensive statistics and the effects of the nonextensivity on the oscillation modes and damps

    SciTech Connect

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Ebrahimi, V.

    2014-03-15

    We have derived generalized dispersion relations for longitudinal waves in collisionless thermal plasma using linear Vlasov-Poisson kinetic model and nonextensive distributions for electrons. The Maxwellian limit of the dispersion relations, where the q-nonextensive parameter tends to one, is calculated. The generalized dispersion relations are reduced to polynomials for some specific values of q. The well-known modes of oscillations such as the Langmuir and electron acoustic waves have been obtained by solving the dispersion relations. Some new modes of oscillation are also found. Finally, the dependence of the oscillation modes and damps on q is discussed.

  9. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Richard J.; Pollina, Richard J.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues: sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate. The detailed correlation and analysis of data obtained from nearly all of the tests performed since 1986 has shown that the apparent leakage current flowing through the slag on the channel walls depends upon channel operating parameters in an unexpected way. A comprehensive report of the results obtained to date and a first attempt at their interpretation has been prepared and a copy is attached. The second activity has concerned the examination of electrodes (platinum anodes/tungsten cathodes) by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x ray spectroscopy of the surface degradation. Results of these examinations are reported.

  10. Surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals: Dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Degang; Liu Zhengyou; Qiu Chunyin; He Zhaojian; Cai Feiyan; Ke Manzhu

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the existence of surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals with fluid matrix, which is composed of a square array of steel cylinders put in air background. By using the supercell method, we investigate the dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes. Surface waves can be easily excited at the surface of a finite size phononic crystal by line source or Gaussian beam placed in or launched from the background medium, and they propagate along the surface with the form of 'beat.' Taking advantage of these surface modes, we can obtain a highly directional emission wave beam by introducing an appropriate corrugation layer on the surface of a waveguide exit.

  11. Surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals: Dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Liu, Zhengyou; Qiu, Chunyin; He, Zhaojian; Cai, Feiyan; Ke, Manzhu

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the existence of surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals with fluid matrix, which is composed of a square array of steel cylinders put in air background. By using the supercell method, we investigate the dispersion relation and the eigenfield distribution of surface modes. Surface waves can be easily excited at the surface of a finite size phononic crystal by line source or Gaussian beam placed in or launched from the background medium, and they propagate along the surface with the form of “beat.” Taking advantage of these surface modes, we can obtain a highly directional emission wave beam by introducing an appropriate corrugation layer on the surface of a waveguide exit.

  12. Inverse procedure for simultaneous evaluation of viscosity and density of Newtonian liquids from dispersion curves of Love waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Balcerzak, A.

    2014-07-01

    Simultaneous determination of the viscosity and density of liquids is of great importance in the monitoring of technological processes in the chemical, petroleum, and pharmaceutical industry, as well as in geophysics. In this paper, the authors present the application of Love waves for simultaneous inverse determination of the viscosity and density of liquids. The inversion procedure is based on measurements of the dispersion curves of phase velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic Love waves. The direct problem of the Love wave propagation in a layered waveguide covered by a viscous liquid was formulated and solved. Love waves propagate in an elastic layered waveguide covered on its surface with a viscous (Newtonian) liquid. The inverse problem is formulated as an optimization problem with appropriately constructed objective function that depends on the material properties of an elastic waveguide of the Love wave, material parameters of a liquid (i.e., viscosity and density), and the experimental data. The results of numerical calculations show that Love waves can be efficiently applied to determine simultaneously the physical properties of liquids (i.e., viscosity and density). Sensors based on this method can be very attractive for industrial applications to monitor on-line the parameters (density and viscosity) of process liquid during the course of technological processes, e.g., in polymer industry.

  13. Dispersive shock waves in Bose-Einstein condensates and nonlinear nano-oscillators in ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, Mark A.

    This thesis examines nonlinear wave phenomena, in two physical systems: a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and thin film ferromagnets where the magnetization dynamics are excited by the spin momentum transfer (SMT) effect. In the first system, shock waves generated by steep gradients in the BEC wavefunction are shown to be of the disperse type. Asymptotic and averaging methods are used to determine shock speeds and structure in one spatial dimension. These results are compared with multidimensional numerical simulations and experiment showing good, qualitative agreement. In the second system, a model of magnetization dynamics due to SMT is presented. Using this model, nonlinear oscillating modes---nano-oscillators---are found numerically and analytically using perturbative methods. These results compare well with experiment. A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is a quantum fluid that gives rise to interesting shock wave nonlinear dynamics. Experiments depict a BEC that exhibits behavior similar to that of a shock wave in a compressible gas, e.g. traveling fronts with steep gradients. However, the governing Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation that describes the mean field of a BEC admits no dissipation hence classical dissipative shock solutions do not explain the phenomena. Instead, wave dynamics with small dispersion is considered and it is shown that this provides a mechanism for the generation of a dispersive shock wave (DSW). Computations with the GP equation are compared to experiment with excellent agreement. A comparison between a canonical 1D dissipative and dispersive shock problem shows significant differences in shock structure and shock front speed. Numerical results associated with laboratory experiments show that three and two-dimensional approximations are in excellent agreement and one dimensional approximations are in qualitative agreement. The interaction of two DSWs is investigated analytically and numerically. Using one dimensional DSW theory it is argued

  14. P Wave Dispersion and QT Dispersion in Adult Turkish Migrants with Familial Mediterranean Fever Living in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Arnd; Örnek, Ahmet; Kurucay, Mustafa; Kara, Kaffer; Wittkowski, Helmut; Gohar, Faekah; Menge, Bjoern A.; Schmidt, Wolfgang E.; Zeidler, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Background: Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease associated with subclinical inflammation, which includes atherosclerosis arising from endothelial inflammation, which in turn increases the risk of atrial or ventricular arrhythmias. Conduction abnormalities can be detected using the electrocardiographic (ECG) indices P and QT dispersion (Pdisp and QTdisp). Currently, it is unknown whether patients with FMF are more likely to have abnormalities of these ECG indices. Moreover, existing studies were conducted in countries with higher FMF prevalence. We therefore perform the first prospective study assessing Pdisp and QTdisp in adult FMF patients in Germany, where prevalence of FMF is low. Method: Asymptomatic FMF patients (n=30) of Turkish ancestry living in Germany and age-matched healthy controls (n=37) were prospectively assessed using 12-lead ECG. Results: Patients and controls were comparable in gender and body mass index, and patients had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) compared to controls (ESR: 23.7±14.3 vs. 16.1±13,3 mm/1sth, p=0.03, CRP: 0.73±0.9 vs. 0.26±0.4 g/dl, p=0.01, SAA: 3.14±4,8 vs. 0.37±0.3 mg/dl, p<0.01). No statistically significant difference between patients and controls respectively, for Pdisp (43.7±11.9 vs. 47.1±11.2ms, p=0.23), QTdisp (65.9±12.3 vs. 67.6±12.7 ms, p=0.58) or corrected QTdisp (cQTdisp: 73.9±15.0 vs. 76.0±13.3 ms, p=0.55) was found. No correlation could be found between Pdisp or QTdisp or cQTdisp and any of the biochemical markers of inflammation. Conclusion: FMF patients living in Germany show a Pdisp and QTdisp comparable to healthy controls, with no increased risk of atrial or ventricular arrhythmias indicated. PMID:25170297

  15. Joint Inversion of Body-Wave Arrival Times and Surface-Wave Dispersion Data for Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Structure Around SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.; Maceira, M.; Roux, P.

    2013-12-01

    The crust around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at depth (SAFOD) has been the subject of many geophysical studies aimed at characterizing in detail the fault zone structure and elucidating the lithologies and physical properties of the surrounding rocks. Seismic methods in particular have revealed the complex two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the crustal volume around SAFOD and the strong velocity reduction in the fault damage zone. In this study we conduct a joint inversion using body-wave arrival times and surface-wave dispersion data to image the P-and S-wave velocity structure of the upper crust surrounding SAFOD. The two data types have complementary strengths - the body-wave data have good resolution at depth, albeit only where there are crossing rays between sources and receivers, whereas the surface waves have very good near-surface resolution and are not dependent on the earthquake source distribution because they are derived from ambient noise. The body-wave data are from local earthquakes and explosions, comprising the dataset analyzed by Zhang et al. (2009). The surface-wave data are for Love waves from ambient noise correlations, and are from Roux et al. (2011). The joint inversion code is based on the regional-scale version of the double-difference (DD) tomography algorithm tomoDD. The surface-wave inversion code that is integrated into the joint inversion algorithm is from Maceira and Ammon (2009). The propagator matrix solver in the algorithm DISPER80 (Saito, 1988) is used for the forward calculation of dispersion curves from layered velocity models. We examined how the structural models vary as we vary the relative weighting of the fit to the two data sets and in comparison to the previous separate inversion results. The joint inversion with the 'optimal' weighting shows more clearly the U-shaped local structure from the Buzzard Canyon Fault on the west side of SAF to the Gold Hill Fault on the east side.

  16. Anisotropic Seismic Structure Beneath Cratons From Interstation Surface-Wave Dispersion Measurements on GSN and Geofon Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonen, J.; Lebedev, S.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic structure of stable continental lithosphere offers insight into the origin and evolution of the tectosphere. The structure is still poorly known, especially its anisotropic components. Measurements of interstation dispersion of Rayleigh and Love surface waves can produce accurate, radially anisotropic S-velocity profiles that average between pairs of stations. A recently proposed (Lebedev and Meier, 2005) combination of station-station cross-correlation and event-station multimode waveform inversion allows to maximize the frequency band of the measured dispersion curves and yields improved structural constraints. With a view to applying the new method to large global data sets, here we make the measurements using all pairs of GSN and Geofon stations that are situated on stable continents and separated by sufficiently short interstation distances. If the distance between the two stations exceeds about 1000 km then it is difficult to make measurements at shorter periods---below 20 s or so---and trade-offs between the crustal and mantle structure cannot be resolved: in particular, nothing can be concluded on the nature or even the presence of radial anisotropy in the mantle. Limiting the scope of the study to station pairs separated by a few hundred kilometers, we make dispersion measurements using all suitably situated events and select a few pairs---all within stable tectonic blocks in Eurasia---for which broad-band dispersion curves are constrained with large amounts of data. Inverting the curves for S-velocity profiles, we find that the magnitudes of both the isotropic high-velocity anomaly and radial anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere vary strongly from one location to another. When radial anisotropy is present, it is with SH waves being faster than SV waves. We shall discuss the anisotropic seismic structures in the context of regional tectonic settings.

  17. Determining distributed source waveforms in causal, lossy, dispersive, plane-wave (CLDP) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, R. Joseph

    This thesis presents and employs novel mathematics for the inversion of linear, first-kind Fredholm integral equations (IEs) which have a time t dependent response signal, a space z dependent source waveform, and a kernel with time dependence (at each z) corresponding to the impulse response of a thickness z slab of c_ausal, l_ossy, d_ispersive, homogeneous material through which p_lanar disturbances propagate according to the wave equation. These materials are called CLDP materials; these IEs are called CLDP IEs. These novel mathematics are applicable to the PESAW (aka PEA) charge recovery method. The proposed inversion method recognizes that the (temporal) Fourier transform of a CLDP IE's response signal can be interpreted as the values of the (spatial) Laplace transform of that IE's source waveform along a Laplace plane path determined by the material's propagation wavenumber k_ (f ). Executing the Laplace transform inversion integral along this CLDP path yields an inverse CLDP IE which recovers the true source waveform provided that source waveform is real, causal, Fourier-transformable, and also satisfies the proposed k_(f )- dependent `CLDP criterion'. The forward and inverse CLDP IEs corresponding to a particular CLDP material model k_( f ) therefore comprise a particular integral transform relationship applicable to waveforms satisfying the CLDP criterion for that material. The CLDP transform relationship for a lossless/dispersionless material reduces to the (unilateral) Fourier transform. Even without noise, the `'inverse CLDP'- recovered waveform gleaned from an abruptly bandlimited CLDP response signal requires regularization-a generalized Gibbs-Dirichlet kernel dubbed `the Darrell' comes into effect. The measured (time sampled) PESAW signal is necessarily bandlimited; this thesis investigates regularization via lowpass filtering of the measured signal. Both synthetic and experimental examples are investigated. The focus is on MHz-range signals

  18. Extended-MHD modeling of diamagnetic-drift tearing instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jacob; Kruger, Scott

    2012-03-01

    We use analytics and computations with the NIMROD code to examine tearing stability in large-guide-field slab cases with a nonzero equilibrium pressure gradient. A well known result from drift-reduced MHD is the diamagnetic drift associated with the pressure gradient has a stabilizing influence were the dispersion relation becomes (γ+iφ*e)^3γ(γ+iφ*i)=γrMHD^5 [1]. Here φ*i and φ*e are the ion- and electron-diamagnetic frequencies and γrMHD is the tearing growth rate with a resistive-MHD model. Preliminary computational results with an unreduced extended-MHD model do not produce the expected drift-reduced result. For moderate values of φ*i (φ*i<=3γrMHD), the computations follow the dispersion relation that would result if the ∇pe term were not included in the drift-reduced parallel Ohm's law: (γ+iφ*e)^4(γ+iφ*i)=γrMHD^5. Analytics, guided by computational diagnostics, are used to examine the significant terms in the flux evolution equation and investigate the discrepancy with the drift-reduced result.[4pt] [1] For example Coppi, PoF 7, 1501 (1964); Biskamp, NF 18, 1059 (1978).

  19. Preliminary Results of Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Models and Seismic Site Conditions in Gangneung, Korea Using Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Kim, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    To determine the near-surface shear wave velocities (Vs) and seismic site characteristics in densely populated areas in Gangneung on the eastern coast of Korea, passive and active surface waves were recorded at 117 sites of low altitude using twelve or twenty four 4.5-Hz geophones and a 24-channel engineering seismograph during this year. An 8-kg wooden hammer was used as an active source. The seismic waves were recorded for 8 to 30 s and digitized at 125 to 500 Hz sample rates. Dispersion images of the Rayleigh waves were obtained by the extended spatial autocorrelation (ESPAC) method. At 46 recording sites, the overburden layer was too thick to investigate bedrock with this shallow geophysical method. Shear-wave velocity models were derived from the estimated dispersion curves using the damped least-squares inversion scheme. From these 1-D velocity models, estimated mean values of Vs at the top of bedrock, depth to the bedrock, average Vs of the overburden layer, and average Vs of the top 30-m depth (Vs30) are 672±37 m/s, 17±0.5 m, 253±9 m/s, and 343±15 m/s, respectively, in the 95% confidence range. The estimated values from the inverted profiles were interpolated to yield maps for the entire low altitude area. Most of the investigated areas in Gangneung belong to NEHRP site class D (58%), C (34%), E (4%), and B (4%). In downtown area, both the lower estimates of Vs30 and thick overburden layer make it more prone to significant ground amplifications. The computed correlation coefficients (r) of Vs30 with elevation and topographic gradient, on linear scales, are 0.7 and 0.6, respectively.

  20. MHD shocks in coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is the study of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced as a result of the interaction of ejected lower coronal plasma with the ambient corona. The types of shocks and nonlinear simple waves produced for representative coronal conditions and disturbance velocities were determined. The wave system and the interactions between the ejecta and ambient corona were studied using both analytic theory and numerical solutions of the time-dependent, nonlinear MHD equations. Observations from the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter provided both guidance and motivation and are used extensively in evaluating the results. As a natural consequence of the comparisons with the data, the simulations assisted in better understanding the physical interactions in coronal mass ejections (CME's).

  1. MHD waves detected by ice at distances > 28 x 10/sup 6/ km from Comet Halley: Cometary or solar wind origin

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Brinca, A.L.; Smith, E.J.; Thorne, R.M.; Scarf, F.L.; Gosling, J.T.; Ipavich, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral analyses of the high resolution magnetic field data are employed to determine if there is evidence of cometary heavy ion pickup when ICE was closest to Halley, approx.28 x 10/sup 6/ km. No evidence is found for the presence of heavy ion cyclotron waves. However, from this search, two new wave modes are discovered in the solar wind: electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and drift mirror mode waves. Both modes have scales of 10 to 60 s (1 to 6 T/sub p/) in the spacecraft frame. The possibility of wave generation by cometary hydrogen pickup is explored. Theoretical arguments and further experimental evidence indicates that cometary origin is improbable. The most likely source is plasma instabilities associated with solar wind stream-stream interactions. VLF electrostatic emissions are found to occur in field minima or at gradients of the drift mirror structures. Possible generation mechanisms of drift mirror mode waves, cyclotron waves and electrostatic waves are discussed.

  2. Temporal evolution of circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave and effect on solar wind turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Swati; Sharma, R. P.; Gaur, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Space provides a vast medium to study turbulence and is accessible to detailed in situ measurements. Alfvén waves (AW) are ubiquitous in space and a main component of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in heliosphere. The wave interaction with the density fluctuations is considered to be an important driver of nonlinear processes in space plasmas. Present study involves the nonlinear coupling, on the account of the ponderomotive nonlinearity, of the parallel propagating circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave (DAW) with the density fluctuations associated with magnetosonic wave propagating in the direction perpendicular to ambient magnetic field. The localization of DAW electric field intensity and the corresponding power spectra has been studied for the case of solar wind at 1 A.U. A breakpoint in power spectrum is seen around ion inertial length and spectra goes steeper at smaller scales which is consistent with the observations reported by CLUSTER in context of solar wind turbulence. Thus nonlinear interaction of DAW with transverse fluctuations causes the transfer of wave energy from larger scales to the smaller scales and may contribute in providing the energy needed to accelerate the solar wind.

  3. Lithospheric structure below seismic stations in Cuba from the joint inversion of Rayleigh surface waves dispersion and receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, O'Leary; Moreno, Bladimir; Romanelli, Fabio; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2012-05-01

    The joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion and receiver functions has been used to study the crust and upper mantle structure at eight seismic stations in Cuba. Receiver functions have been computed from teleseismic recordings of earthquakes at epicentral (angular) distances in the range from 30° to 90° and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion relations have been taken from earlier surface wave tomographic studies in the Caribbean area. The thickest crust (˜30 km) below Cuban stations is found at Cascorro (CCC) and Maisí (MAS) whereas the thinnest crust (˜18 km) is found at stations Río Carpintero (RCC) and Guantánamo Bay (GTBY), in the southeastern part of Cuba; this result is in agreement with the southward gradual thinning of the crust revealed by previous studies. In the crystalline crust, the S-wave velocity varies between ˜2.8 and ˜3.9 km s-1 and, at the crust-mantle transition zone, the shear wave velocity varies from ˜4.0 and ˜4.3 km s-1. The lithospheric thickness varies from ˜65 km, in the youngest lithosphere, to ˜150 km in the northeastern part of the Cuban island, below Maisí (MAS) and Moa (MOA) stations. Evidence of a subducted slab possibly belonging to the Caribbean plate is present below the stations Las Mercedes (LMG), RCC and GTBY whereas earlier subducted slabs could explain the results obtained below the Soroa (SOR), Manicaragua (MGV) and Cascorro (CCC) station.

  4. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Helfenstein-Didier, C; Andrade, R J; Brum, J; Hug, F; Tanter, M; Nordez, A; Gennisson, J-L

    2016-03-21

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear. PMID:26948399

  5. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  <  0.05). Furthermore, the technique showed a very good reproducibility (all standard error of the mean values  <10.7 kPa and all coefficient of variation (CV) values  ⩽0.05%). In addition, independently from the ankle dorsiflexion, the shear modulus was significantly higher in the proximal location compared to the more distal one. The shear modulus provided by SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  6. Noncontact, nondestructive elasticity evaluation of sound and demineralized human dental enamel using a laser ultrasonic surface wave dispersion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiao-Chuan; Fleming, Simon; Lee, Yung-Chun; Law, Susan; Swain, Michael; Xue, Jing

    2009-09-01

    Laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have been proposed to replace conventional in vivo dental clinical diagnosis tools that are either destructive or incapable of quantifying the elasticity of human dental enamel. In this work, a laser NDE system that can perform remote measurements on samples of small dimensions is presented. A focused laser line source is used to generate broadband surface acoustic wave impulses that are detected with a simplified optical fiber interferometer. The measured surface wave velocity dispersion spectrum is in turn used to characterize the elasticity of the specimen. The NDE system and the analysis technique are validated with measurements of different metal structures and then applied to evaluate human dental enamel. Artificial lesions are prepared on the samples to simulate different states of enamel elasticity. Measurement results for both sound and lesioned regions, as well as lesions of different severity, are clearly distinguishable from each other and fit well with physical expectations and theoretical value. This is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a laser-based surface wave velocity dispersion technique is successfully applied on human dental enamel, demonstrating the potential for noncontact, nondestructive in vivo detection of the development of carious lesions.

  7. Dispersion relation of longitudinal waves in liquid He-4 in the framework of quantum macroscopic equations derived from Bohm's potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Vincenzo; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-10-01

    He-4 is known to become superfluid at very low temperatures. This effect is now generally accepted to be connected with BEC (Bose-Einstein Condensation). The dispersion relation of pressure waves in superfluid He-4 has been determined at 1.1 °K by Yarnell et al., and exhibits a non monotonic behavior-with a maximum and a minimum-usually explained in terms of excitations called rotons, introduced by Landau. In the present work an attempt is made to describe the phenomenon within the Bohmian interpretation of QM. To this end, the effects of the intermolecular potential, taken to be essentially of the Lennard-Jones type modified to account for molecule finiteness, are included as a Vlasov-type self-consistent field. A dispersion relation is found, that is in quite good agreement with Yarnell's curve.

  8. Analytic studies of dispersive properties of shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chavdarovski, Ilija; Zonca, Fulvio

    2014-05-15

    The properties of the low frequency shear Alfvén and acoustic wave spectra in toroidal geometry are examined analytically and numerically considering wave particle interactions with magnetically trapped and circulating particles, using the theoretical model described in [I. Chavdarovski and F. Zonca, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 115001 (2009)] and following the framework of the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation. Effects of trapped particles as well as diamagnetic effects on the frequencies and damping rates of the beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes, kinetic ballooning modes and beta-induced Alfvén-acoustic eigenmodes are discussed and shown to be crucial to give a proper assessment of mode structure and stability conditions. Present results also demonstrate the mutual coupling of these various branches and suggest that frequency as well as mode polarization are crucial for their identification on the basis of experimental evidence.

  9. Dispersive characteristics and longitudinal resonance properties in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with the coaxial arbitrary-profile slow-wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xingjun; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang; Zhang, Jun; Fan, Yuwei; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jinliang

    2009-11-01

    The method for calculating the dispersion relations of the slow-wave structures (SWSs) with arbitrary geometrical structures is studied in detail by using the Fourier series expansion. In addition, dispersive characteristics and longitudinal resonance properties of the SWSs with the cosinusoidal, trapezoidal, and rectangular corrugations are analyzed by numerical calculation. Based on the above discussion, a comparison on an L-band coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (BWO) and an L-band coaxial BWO with a coaxial extractor is investigated in detail with particle-in-cell KARAT code (V. P. Tarakanov, Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., 1992). Furthermore, experiments are carried out at the TORCH-01 accelerator under the low guiding magnetic field. At diode voltage of 647 kV, beam current of 9.3 kA, and guiding magnetic field strength of 0.75 T, the microwave is generated with power of 1.07 GW, mode of TM01, and frequency of 1.61 GHz. That is the first experimental report of the L-band BWO.

  10. Dispersive characteristics and longitudinal resonance properties in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with the coaxial arbitrary-profile slow-wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Xingjun; Zhong Huihuang; Qian Baoliang; Zhang Jun; Fan Yuwei; Shu Ting; Liu Jinliang

    2009-11-15

    The method for calculating the dispersion relations of the slow-wave structures (SWSs) with arbitrary geometrical structures is studied in detail by using the Fourier series expansion. In addition, dispersive characteristics and longitudinal resonance properties of the SWSs with the cosinusoidal, trapezoidal, and rectangular corrugations are analyzed by numerical calculation. Based on the above discussion, a comparison on an L-band coaxial relativistic backward wave oscillator (BWO) and an L-band coaxial BWO with a coaxial extractor is investigated in detail with particle-in-cell KARAT code (V. P. Tarakanov, Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., 1992). Furthermore, experiments are carried out at the TORCH-01 accelerator under the low guiding magnetic field. At diode voltage of 647 kV, beam current of 9.3 kA, and guiding magnetic field strength of 0.75 T, the microwave is generated with power of 1.07 GW, mode of TM{sub 01}, and frequency of 1.61 GHz. That is the first experimental report of the L-band BWO.

  11. Joint analysis of Rayleigh-wave dispersion and HVSR of lunar seismic data from the Apollo 14 and 16 sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo

    2015-07-01

    Active and passive seismic data from the Apollo 14 and 16 missions are analyzed with the aim of determining robust shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles of the uppermost lunar strata. While data from the Active Seismic Experiment (ASE) allow the study of Rayleigh-wave dispersion by means of Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA), data acquired by the Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) are used to determine the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR). These two datasets are jointly analyzed according to state-of-the-art procedures in order to overcome the intrinsic limitations of both methodologies (when considered independently) and with the aim of determining a solution (i.e., the vertical VS profile) not affected by non-uniqueness of the solution and not based on any a priori assumption. Obtained results appear in general agreement with the early P-wave refraction analyses (a sharp contact between a very soft Regolith and a stiffer overlain layer is apparent) and indicate very low shear-wave velocities and very high Q values (low dissipation) also confirmed by a number of seismological studies on moonquakes and meteoroid impacts.

  12. Identification of standing MHD modes in MHD simulations of planetary magnetospheres. Application to Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griton, Léa; Pantellini, Filippo; Moncuquet, Michel

    2016-04-01

    We present 3D simulations of the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury's magnetosphere using the magnetohydrodynamic code AMRVAC. A procedure for the identification of standing MHD modes has been applied to these simulations showing that large scale standing slow mode structures may exist in Mercury's magnetosheath. The identification is mostly based on relatively simple approximate analytical solutions to the old problem of determining the family of all standing linear plane MHD waves in a flowing plasma. The question of the identification of standing slow mode structures using in situ measurements such as the future BepiColombo MMO mission to Mercury will be discussed as well.

  13. A theory of MHD instability of an inhomogeneous plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonovich, Anatoly S.

    2011-06-01

    A problem of the stability of an inhomogeneous axisymmetric plasma jet in a parallel magnetic field is solved. The jet boundary becomes, under certain conditions, unstable relative to magnetosonic oscillations (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) in the presence of a shear flow at the jet boundary. Because of its internal inhomogeneity the plasma jet has resonance surfaces, where conversion takes place between various modes of plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations. Propagating in inhomogeneous plasma, fast magnetosonic waves drive the Alfven and slow magnetosonic (SMS) oscillations, tightly localized across the magnetic shells, on the resonance surfaces. MHD oscillation energy is absorbed in the neighbourhood of these resonance surfaces. The resonance surfaces disappear for the eigenmodes of SMS waves propagating in the jet waveguide. The stability of the plasma MHD flow is determined by competition between the mechanisms of shear flow instability on the boundary and wave energy dissipation because of resonant MHD-mode coupling. The problem is solved analytically, in the Wentzel, Kramers, Brillouin (WKB) approximation, for the plasma jet with a boundary in the form of a tangential discontinuity over the radial coordinate. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability develops if plasma flow velocity in the jet exceeds the maximum Alfven speed at the boundary. The stability of the plasma jet with a smooth boundary layer is investigated numerically for the basic modes of MHD oscillations, to which the WKB approximation is inapplicable. A new 'unstable mode of MHD oscillations has been discovered which, unlike the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, exists for any, however weak, plasma flow velocities.

  14. Boussinesq equations and other systems for small-amplitude long waves in nonlinear dispersive media: II. The nonlinear theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bona, J. L.; Chen, M.; Saut, J.-C.

    2004-05-01

    In part I of this work (Bona J L, Chen M and Saut J-C 2002 Boussinesq equations and other systems for small-amplitude long waves in nonlinear dispersive media I: Derivation and the linear theory J. Nonlinear Sci. 12 283-318), a four-parameter family of Boussinesq systems was derived to describe the propagation of surface water waves. Similar systems are expected to arise in other physical settings where the dominant aspects of propagation are a balance between the nonlinear effects of convection and the linear effects of frequency dispersion. In addition to deriving these systems, we determined in part I exactly which of them are linearly well posed in various natural function classes. It was argued that linear well-posedness is a natural necessary requirement for the possible physical relevance of the model in question. In this paper, it is shown that the first-order correct models that are linearly well posed are in fact locally nonlinearly well posed. Moreover, in certain specific cases, global well-posedness is established for physically relevant initial data. In part I, higher-order correct models were also derived. A preliminary analysis of a promising subclass of these models shows them to be well posed.

  15. One-step leapfrog ADI-FDTD method for simulating electromagnetic wave propagation in general dispersive media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Hua; Yin, Wen-Yan; Chen, Zhi Zhang David

    2013-09-01

    The one-step leapfrog alternating-direction-implicit finite-difference time-domain (ADI-FDTD) method is reformulated for simulating general electrically dispersive media. It models material dispersive properties with equivalent polarization currents. These currents are then solved with the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) and then incorporated into the one-step leapfrog ADI-FDTD method. The final equations are presented in the form similar to that of the conventional FDTD method but with second-order perturbation. The adapted method is then applied to characterize (a) electromagnetic wave propagation in a rectangular waveguide loaded with a magnetized plasma slab, (b) transmission coefficient of a plane wave normally incident on a monolayer graphene sheet biased by a magnetostatic field, and (c) surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) propagation along a monolayer graphene sheet biased by an electrostatic field. The numerical results verify the stability, accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed one-step leapfrog ADI-FDTD algorithm in comparison with analytical results and the results obtained with the other methods. PMID:24103929

  16. Interstellar MHD Turbulence and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    This chapter reviews the nature of turbulence in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and its connections to the star formation (SF) process. The ISM is turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating, and is subject to heating and cooling processes that control its thermodynamic behavior, causing it to behave approximately isobarically, in spite of spanning several orders of magnitude in density and temperature. The turbulence in the warm and hot ionized components of the ISM appears to be trans- or subsonic, and thus to behave nearly incompressibly. However, the neutral warm and cold components are highly compressible, as a consequence of both thermal instability (TI) in the atomic gas and of moderately-to-strongly supersonic motions in the roughly isothermal cold atomic and molecular components. Within this context, we discuss: (1) the production and statistical distribution of turbulent density fluctuations in both isothermal and polytropic media; (2) the nature of the clumps produced by TI, noting that, contrary to classical ideas, they in general accrete mass from their environment in spite of exhibiting sharp discontinuities at their boundaries; (3) the density-magnetic field correlation (and, at low densities, lack thereof) in turbulent density fluctuations, as a consequence of the superposition of the different wave modes in the turbulent flow; (4) the evolution of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio (MFR) in density fluctuations as they are built up by dynamic compressions; (5) the formation of cold, dense clouds aided by TI, in both the hydrodynamic (HD) and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) cases; (6) the expectation that star-forming molecular clouds are likely to be undergoing global gravitational contraction, rather than being near equilibrium, as generally believed, and (7) the regulation of the star formation rate (SFR) in such gravitationally contracting clouds by stellar feedback which, rather than keeping the clouds from collapsing, evaporates and disperses

  17. Survey of MHD plant applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, J. J.; Seikel, G. R.; Cutting, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Open-cycle MHD is one of the major R&D efforts in the Department of Energy's program to meet the national goal of reducing U.S. dependence on oil through increased utilization of coal. MHD offers an effective way to use coal to produce electric power at low cost in a highly efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. Open-cycle MHD plants are categorized by the MHD combustor oxidizer, its temperature and the method of preheat. The paper discusses MHD baseline plant design, open-cycle MHD plant in the Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), early commercial MHD plants, conceptual studies of the engineering test facility, retrofit (addition of an MHD topping cycle to an existing steam plant), and other potential applications and concepts. Emphasis is placed on a survey of both completed and ongoing studies to define both commercial and pilot plant design, cost, and performance.

  18. Modeling and inversion of elastic wave velocities and electrical conductivity in clastic formations with structural and dispersed shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino-López, A.; Mousatov, A.; Markov, M.; Kazatchenko, E.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for simulating P- and S-wave velocities, and electrical conductivity in shaly-sand rocks and determining the shale spatial distribution (dispersed and/or structural shales). In this approach, we used the effective medium method and hierarchical model for clastic formations. We treat shaly-sand formations as porous natural-composite materials containing: solid grains (such as quartz, feldspars and structural shale) and pores completely filled with a mixture of hydrocarbon, water and dispersed shale. For calculating the effective elastic properties and electrical conductivity of this composite, we have applied the multi-component self-consistent effective media approximation (EMA) method. We simulate the elastic velocities and electrical conductivity for clastic formations in two steps. Firstly, we calculate the effective properties of mixture (combination of water, hydrocarbon and dispersed shale) filling the pores. Then we find the effective elastic and electrical conductivity properties of formation constituted of solid grains (quartz and structural shale) and pores with the effective properties determined in the previous step. We considered that all components are represented by ellipsoids. The aspect ratios (shapes) of grains and pores; are defined as a porosity function obtained for the model of clean sand formations. Modeling results have demonstrated that the shapes of both shale components (dispersed and structural) weakly affect the effective elastic velocities and electrical conductivity of shaly-sand formation and can be approximated by flatted ellipsoids. The model proposed has been used to determine the volumes of dispersed and structural shales for two sets of published experimental data obtained from the cores. For determining the shale distribution, we have performed the joint inversion of the following physical properties: P-, S-wave velocities, total porosity, and total shale volume. Additionally, we have

  19. Sediment and Crustal Shear Velocity Structure offshore New Zealand from Seafloor Compliance, Receiver Functions and Rayleigh Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. S.; Sheehan, A. F.; Stachnik, J. C.; Lin, F.; Collins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a joint Monte Carlo inversion of teleseismic receiver functions, seafloor compliance, and Rayleigh wave dispersion and apply it here to ocean bottom seismic (OBS) data from offshore New Zealand. With this method we estimate sediment and crustal thickness and shear velocity structure beneath the Bounty Trough and the Tasman Sea flanking the South Island of New Zealand. Teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements provide complementary constraints on shear velocity structure and interface depths beneath seismic stations. At ocean bottom seismic (OBS) stations the interpretation of these measurements is complicated by strong sediment reverberations that obscure deeper impedance contrasts such as the Moho. In principle, the seafloor's response to ocean loading from infragravity waves (seafloor compliance) can be used to determine shallow shear velocity information. This velocity information can subsequently be used to better model the receiver function reverberations, allowing deeper interfaces of tectonic interest to be resolved. Data for this study were acquired in 2009-2010 by the Marine Observations of Anisotropy Near Aotearoa (MOANA) experiment, which deployed 30 broadband OBS and differential pressure gauges (DPGs) off the South Island of New Zealand. High-frequency (5Hz) receiver functions were estimated using multitaper cross-correlation for events in a 30-90 degree epicentral distance range. Coherence-weighted stacks binned by epicentral distance were produced in the frequency domain to suppress noise. Seafloor compliance was measured using multitaper pressure and acceleration spectra averaged from 120 days of continuous data without large transient events. Seafloor compliance measurements on the order of 10-9 Pa-1 are sensitive to shear velocity structure in the uppermost 5km of the crust and sediments. Rayleigh dispersion measurements were obtained at periods of 6-27s from ambient noise cross correlation. Sediment

  20. Nonlinear Alfvén wave dynamics at a 2D magnetic null point: ponderomotive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; McLaughlin, J. A.

    2013-07-01

    Context. In the linear, β = 0 MHD regime, the transient properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the vicinity of 2D null points are well known. The waves are decoupled and accumulate at predictable parts of the magnetic topology: fast waves accumulate at the null point; whereas Alfvén waves cannot cross the separatricies. However, in nonlinear MHD mode conversion can occur at regions of inhomogeneous Alfvén speed, suggesting that the decoupled nature of waves may not extend to the nonlinear regime. Aims: We investigate the behaviour of low-amplitude Alfvén waves about a 2D magnetic null point in nonlinear, β = 0 MHD. Methods: We numerically simulate the introduction of low-amplitude Alfvén waves into the vicinity of a magnetic null point using the nonlinear LARE2D code. Results: Unlike in the linear regime, we find that the Alfvén wave sustains cospatial daughter disturbances, manifest in the transverse and longitudinal fluid velocity, owing to the action of nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients (viz. the ponderomotive force). These disturbances are dependent on the Alfvén wave and do not interact with the medium to excite magnetoacoustic waves, although the transverse daughter becomes focused at the null point. Additionally, an independently propagating fast magnetoacoustic wave is generated during the early stages, which transports some of the initial Alfvén wave energy towards the null point. Subsequently, despite undergoing dispersion and phase-mixing due to gradients in the Alfvén-speed profile (∇cA ≠ 0) there is no further nonlinear generation of fast waves. Conclusions: We find that Alfvén waves at 2D cold null points behave largely as in the linear regime, however they sustain transverse and longitudinal disturbances - effects absent in the linear regime - due to nonlinear magnetic pressure gradients.

  1. On the dispersion relation of nonlinear wave current interaction by means of the HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zeng; Lin, Zhiliang; Liao, Shijun

    2012-09-01

    The influence of exponentially sheared currents on unidirectional bichromatic waves in deep water is investigated by the HAM. The governing equations contain four coupled PDEs, including a nonlinear vorticity transport equation and two nonlinear free-surface conditions on the unknown wave elevation. No constrain is made for the primary wave amplitudes, and the current owns a exponential type profile along the vertical line. Convergent solutions are obtained with the help of convergence-control parameter. It is found that a critical characteristic current profile slope exists for each parts of phase velocity caused by nonlinear interaction, under/above which the mean flow vorticity increases/decreases the corresponding part of phase velocity. This work indicates that the HAM is a powerful tool for complicated coupled nonlinear PDEs, which deserves more attention for further development.

  2. Low-frequency electromagnetic waves in a Hall-magnetohydrodynamic plasma with charged dust macroparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P.K.; Kourakis, I.; Stenflo, L.

    2005-02-01

    A linear theory for intermediate-frequency [much smaller (larger) than the electron gyrofrequency (dust plasma and dust gyrofrequencies)], long wavelength (in comparison with the ion gyroradius and the electron skin depth) electromagnetic waves in a multicomponent, homogeneous electron-ion-dust magnetoplasma is presented. For this purpose, the generalized Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (GH-MHD) equations are derived for the case with immobile charged dust macroparticles. The GH-MHD equations in a quasineutral plasma consist of the ion continuity equation, the generalized ion momentum equation, and Faraday's law with the Hall term. The GH-MHD equations are Fourier transformed and combined to obtain a general dispersion relation. The latter is analyzed to understand the influence of immobile charged dust grains on various electromagnetic wave modes in a magnetized dusty plasma.

  3. Magnetic and nonthermal effects on the dispersion properties of ion-cyclotron surface wave in a semi-bounded generalized Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-05-15

    The magnetic field strength and the nonthermal effects on the dispersion properties of ion-cyclotron surface wave propagating along the interface of a semi-bounded Lorentzian plasma and a vacuum are kinetically investigated. The direction of external magnetic field is applied in parallel to the interface. By employing the specular reflection boundary condition, the dispersion relation of the ion-cyclotron surface wave is derived in the long wavelength limit. The result shows that the phase velocity of the ion-cyclotron surface wave decreases with an increase of the strength of magnetic field. It is found that the increase of suprathermal particle population suppresses the phase velocity of the surface wave. In addition, it is found that the wave velocity increases with increasing ion mass in a semi-bounded Lorentzian plasma.

  4. Harmonic Response of the Organ of Corti: Results for Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Michon, Guilhem; Morlier, Joseph; Gourinat, Yves

    2011-11-01

    Inner ear is a remarkable multiphysical system and its modelling is a great challenge. The approach used in this paper aims to reproduce physic with a realistic description of the radial cross section of the cochlea. A 2D-section of the organ of Corti is fully described. Wavenumbers and corresponding modes of propagation are calculated taking into account passive structural responses. The study is extended to six cross sections of the organ of Corti and a large frequency bandwidth from 100 Hz to 3 kHz. Dispersion curves reveal the influence of fluid structure interactions with a dispersive behavior at high frequencies. Longitudinal mechanical coupling provides new interacting modes of propagation.

  5. Modeling of a 1960'th Chilean tsunami in Pacific Ocean within nonlinear-dispersive theory of long waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A.; Korytko, A.; Kostenko, I.; Pelinovsky, E.; Yalciner, A.; Zaytsev, A.

    2009-04-01

    1960 Chilean centered Pacific Ocean tsunami and 2004 North West Sumatra centered Indian Ocean Tsunami are two important tsunamis of long distance propagation and impacts of tsunamis. Recent international studies on the propagation and dispersion effects of Indian Ocean tsunami showed that dispersion is one of the important parameters of numerical solutions of tsunami propagation. May 23, 1960 earthquake with the approximate magnitude 9.0 caused approximately 750km rupture and generated tsunami at offshore Chilean Coast. Tsunami has reached 15-20m height at Chilean coast. The effects of this tsunami were observed not only near Chilean Coast but also in Japan after 22 hours propagation. Chilean tsunami was also felt in Kuril Islands and tsunami height reached to 4.7m near Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island). Houses near the coast, warehouses and mooring facilities have been flooded. In Malokurilsk (Shikotan Island), the height of tsunami reached 4m, flooded the moorings facilities and some buildings, and damaged the bridge on a land. Many vessels became stranded because of broken anchors. Tsunami was also observed on all islands of the Kuril Ridge. The maximal height of rising of water was 4m at Shikotan Islands and 2.2m at on Kunashir Island, 2.5m at Iturup Island, and 1.3-1.5m at Matua Island. Tsunami entered the Sea of Okhotsk. In Magadan the height of rising of water was 2.2 m. the weak tsunami also was observed near Sakhalin Island. The dispersion effect of 1960 Chilean tsunami and its long distance effects on Kuril Ridge have not been studied yet. In this study we developed the numerical model solving the long distance propagation of 1960 Chilean tsunami in Pacific Ocean and the assessment of its far field effects at Kuril Ridge. According to the modeling efforts, we made comparisons between the results of the numerical solutions using dispersive and non-dispersive long wave equations. The dispersion effects of long distance propagation of 1960 Chilean tsunami

  6. Comparison between shear wave dispersion magneto motive ultrasound and transient elastography for measuring tissue-mimicking phantom viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Thiago W J; Sampaio, Diego R Thomaz; Bruno, Alexandre Colello; Pavan, Theo Z; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2015-12-01

    Several methods have been developed over the last several years to analyze the mechanical properties of soft tissue. Elastography, for example, was proposed to evaluate soft tissue stiffness in an attempt to reduce the need for invasive procedures, such as breast biopsies; however, its qualitative nature and the fact that it is operator-dependent have proven to be limitations of the technique. Quantitative shearwave- based techniques have been proposed to obtain information about tissue stiffness independent of the operator. This paper describes shear wave dispersion magnetomotive ultrasound (SDMMUS), a new shear-wave-based method in which a viscoelastic medium labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles is displaced by an external tone burst magnetic field. As in magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS), SDMMUS uses ultrasound to detect internal mechanical vibrations induced by the interaction between a magnetic field and magnetic nanoparticles. These vibrations generated shear waves that were evaluated to estimate the viscoelastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms. These phantoms were manufactured with different concentrations of gelatin and labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles. The elasticity and viscosity obtained with SDMMUS agreed well with the results obtained by traditional ultrasound-based transient elastography. PMID:26670853

  7. Computation of dispersion relations for axially symmetric guided waves in cylindrical structures by means of a spectral decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Christian; Prager, Jens; Gravenkamp, Hauke

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method to determine the complex dispersion relations of axially symmetric guided waves in cylindrical structures is presented as an alternative to the currently established numerical procedures. The method is based on a spectral decomposition into eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator on the cross-section of the waveguide. This translates the calculation of real or complex wave numbers at a given frequency into solving an eigenvalue problem. Cylindrical rods and plates are treated as the asymptotic cases of cylindrical structures and used to generalize the method to the case of hollow cylinders. The presented method is superior to direct root-finding algorithms in the sense that no initial guess values are needed to determine the complex wave numbers and that neither starting at low frequencies nor subsequent mode tracking is required. The results obtained with this method are shown to be reasonably close to those calculated by other means and an estimate for the achievable accuracy is given. PMID:26126952

  8. Vessel heterogeneity of TIMI frame count and its relation to P-wave dispersion in patients with coronary slow flow

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You; Bardeesi, Adham Sameer A.; Bardisi, Ekhlas Samir A.; Liao, Xinxue

    2016-01-01

    Background The vessel heterogeneity of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count (TFC) in patients with coronary slow flow (CSF) remains to be further evaluated, and the correlation between TFC heterogeneity and P-wave dispersion (PWD) has not been elucidated. We aim to investigate the vessel heterogeneity of TFC in coronary arteries, and its relation to PWD in patients with CSF and otherwise normal coronary arteries. Methods We studied 72 patients with angiographically documented CSF and 66 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The coefficient of variation (CV) and mean TFC of the three vessels were calculated. P-wave duration and PWD were measured on the standard electrocardiograms (ECGs). Results The mean TFC and CV were both significantly higher in CSF patients than in controls (P<0.001 for both comparisons). The maximum P-wave duration (Pmax) and PWD were found to be significantly higher in CSF patients than in controls (P<0.001 for both comparisons). In patients with CSF, both Pmax and PWD were mildly correlated to mean TFC (r=0.318, P=0.009; and r=0.307, P=0.010), and were more significantly correlated to CV (r=0.506, P<0.001; and r=0.579, P<0.001). Conclusions These data demonstrate that variability of TFC in three coronary arteries is increased in CSF patients, and that the vessel heterogeneity in coronary flow might be intimately associated with PWD. PMID:27076943

  9. Multidimensional guided wave dispersion recovery for locating defects in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, Joel B.; De Marchi, Luca

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a framework for characterizing anisotropic guided waves to locate damage in composite structures. Composite guided wave structural health monitoring is a significant challenge due to anisotropy. Wave velocities and attenuation vary as a function of propagation direction. Traditional localization algorithms, such as triangulation and delay-and-sum beamforming, fail for composite monitoring because they rely on isotropic velocity assumptions. Estimating the anisotropic velocities is also challenging because the inverse problem is inherently ill-posed. We cannot solve for an infinite number of directions with a finite number of measurements. This paper addresses these challenges by deriving a physics-based model for unidirectional anisotropy and integrating it with sparse recovery tools and matched field processing to characterize composite guided waves and locate an acoustic source. We validate our approach with experimental laser doppler vibrometry measurements from a glass fiber reinforced composite panel. We achieve localization accuracies of more than 290 and 49 times better, respectively, than delay-and-sum and matched field processing with isotropic assumptions.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic waves with relativistic electrons and positrons in degenerate spin-1/2 astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Maroof, R.; Ali, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-11-15

    Linear properties of high and low frequency waves are studied in an electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) dense plasma with spin and relativity effects. In a low frequency regime, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, namely, the magnetoacoustic and Alfven waves are presented in a magnetized plasma, in which the inertial ions are taken as spinless and non-degenerate, whereas the electrons and positrons are treated quantum mechanically due to their smaller mass. Quantum corrections associated with the spin magnetization and density correlations for electrons and positrons are re-considered and a generalized dispersion relation for the low frequency MHD waves is derived to account for relativistic degeneracy effects. On the basis of angles of propagation, the dispersion relations of different modes are discussed analytically in a degenerate relativistic plasma. Numerical results reveal that electron and positron relativistic degeneracy effects significantly modify the dispersive properties of MHD waves. Our present analysis should be useful for understanding the collective interactions in dense astrophysical compact objects, like, the white dwarfs and in atmosphere of neutron stars.

  11. Incorporating floating surface objects into a fully dispersive surface wave model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzech, Mark D.; Shi, Fengyan; Veeramony, Jayaram; Bateman, Samuel; Calantoni, Joseph; Kirby, James T.

    2016-06-01

    The shock-capturing, non-hydrostatic, three-dimensional (3D) finite-volume model NHWAVE was originally developed to simulate wave propagation and landslide-generated tsunamis in finite water depth (Ma, G., Shi, F., Kirby, J. T., 2012. Ocean Model. 43-44, 22-35). The model is based on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in which the z-axis is transformed to a σ-coordinate that tracks the bed and surface. As part of an ongoing effort to simulate waves in polar marginal ice zones (MIZs), the model has now been adapted to allow objects of arbitrary shape and roughness to float on or near its water surface. The shape of the underside of each floating object is mapped onto an upper σ-level slightly below the surface. In areas without floating objects, this σ-level continues to track the surface and bed as before. Along the sides of each floating object, an immersed boundary method is used to interpolate the effects of the object onto the neighboring fluid volume. Provided with the object's shape, location, and velocity over time, NHWAVE determines the fluid fluxes and pressure variations from the corresponding accelerations at neighboring cell boundaries. The system was validated by comparison with analytical solutions and a VOF model for a 2D floating box and with laboratory measurements of wave generation by a vertically oscillating sphere. A steep wave simulation illustrated the high efficiency of NHWAVE relative to a VOF model. In a more realistic MIZ simulation, the adapted model produced qualitatively reasonable results for wave attenuation, diffraction, and scattering.

  12. Modeling of electromagnetic E-layer waves before earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Claudia-Veronika; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.

    2013-04-01

    A dielectric model for electromagnetic (EM) waves in the Earth's E-layer is developed. It is assumed that these waves are driven by acoustic-type waves, which are caused by earthquake precursors. The dynamics of the plasma system and the EM waves is described using the multi-component magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The acoustic waves are introduced as neutral gas wind. The momentum transfer between the charged particles in the MHD system is mainly caused via the collisions with the neutral gas. From the MHD system, relations for the velocity fluctuations of the particles are found, which consist of products of the electric field fluctuations times coefficients α which only depend on the plasma background parameters. A quick FORTRAN program is developed, to calculate these coefficients (solution of 9x9-matrix equations). Models of the altitudinal scales of the background plasma parameters and the fluctuations of the plasma parameters and the EM field are introduced. Besides, in case of the electric wave field, a method is obtained to calculate the altitudinal scale ? of the amplitude (based on the Poisson equation and knowing the coefficients α). Finally, a general dispersion relation is found, where α, ? and the altitudinal profile of ? appear as parameters (which were found in the numerical model before). Thus, the dispersion relations of EM waves caused by acoustic-type ones during times of seismic activity may be studied numerically. Besides, an expression for the related temperature fluctuations is derived, which depends on the dispersion of the excited EM waves, α, ? and the background plasma parameters. So, heating processes in the atmosphere may be investigated.

  13. BENCHMARKING FAST-TO-ALFVEN MODE CONVERSION IN A COLD MHD PLASMA. II. HOW TO GET ALFVEN WAVES THROUGH THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Shelley C.; Cally, Paul S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2012-05-20

    Alfven waves may be difficult to excite at the photosphere due to low-ionization fraction and suffer near-total reflection at the transition region (TR). Yet they are ubiquitous in the corona and heliosphere. To overcome these difficulties, we show that they may instead be generated high in the chromosphere by conversion from reflecting fast magnetohydrodynamic waves, and that Alfvenic TR reflection is greatly reduced if the fast reflection point is within a few scale heights of the TR. The influence of mode conversion on the phase of the reflected fast wave is also explored. This phase can potentially be misinterpreted as a travel speed perturbation with implications for the practical seismic probing of active regions.

  14. MHD Generating system

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, Michael; Pierson, Edward S.; Schreiner, Felix

    1980-01-01

    According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

  15. Disk MHD generator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retallick, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    Directly-fired, separately-fired, and oxygen-augmented MHD power plants incorporating a disk geometry for the MHD generator were studied. The base parameters defined for four near-optimum-performance MHD steam power systems of various types are presented. The finally selected systems consisted of (1) two directly fired cases, one at 1920 K (2996F) preheat and the other at 1650 K (2500 F) preheat, (2) a separately-fired case where the air is preheated to the same level as the higher temperature directly-fired cases, and (3) an oxygen augmented case with the same generator inlet temperature of 2839 (4650F) as the high temperature directly-fired and separately-fired cases. Supersonic Mach numbers at the generator inlet, gas inlet swirl, and constant Hall field operation were specified based on disk generator optimization. System pressures were based on optimization of MHD net power. Supercritical reheat stream plants were used in all cases. Open and closed cycle component costs are summarized and compared.

  16. Scattering attenuation, dispersion and reflection of SH waves in two-dimensional elastic media with densely distributed cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    We compute the synthetic seismograms of multiply scattered SH waves in 2-D elastic media with densely distributed parallel cracks. We assume randomly distributed cracks in a rectangular-bounded region, which simulate a cracked zone. The crack surfaces are assumed to be stress-free. When the incident wavelength is longer than the crack size, the delay in the arrival of the primary wave is observed at stations beyond the cracked zone and the amplitude of the primary wave is amplified in the cracked zone in the synthetic seismograms. This is because the cracked zone behaves as a low velocity and soft material to the incident long-wavelength wave due to the crack distribution. When the half-wavelength of the incident wave is shorter than the crack length, the scattered waves are clearly observed in the synthetic seismograms and the amplitude of the primary wave is largely attenuated beyond the cracked zone. The calculated attenuation coefficient Q-1 of the primary wave is directly proportional to the crack density in the range of νa2 <= 0.1, where ν and a are the number density and half the length of cracks, respectively. This is consistent with that obtained by a stochastic analysis based on Foldy's approximation. A periodic distribution of cracks in a zone is considered as an utterly different model in order to investigate the effect of spatial distributions on the attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. When cracks are distributed densely, the values of Q-1 for the periodic crack distribution appear to differ from those for the random distribution of cracks in the low wavenumber range. This suggests that the effect of multiple interactions among densely distributed cracks depends on not only the density but also the spatial distribution of cracks at low wavenumbers. The calculated phase velocity of the primary wave is consistent with that from the stochastic analysis in the range of νa2 <= 0.1 and does not depend on the spatial distribution of cracks. This

  17. Photoionization-Induced Emission of Tunable Few-Cycle Midinfrared Dispersive Waves in Gas-Filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers.

    PubMed

    Novoa, D; Cassataro, M; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-07-17

    We propose a scheme for the emission of few-cycle dispersive waves in the midinfrared using hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled with noble gas. The underlying mechanism is the formation of a plasma cloud by a self-compressed, subcycle pump pulse. The resulting free-electron population modifies the fiber dispersion, allowing phase-matched access to dispersive waves at otherwise inaccessible frequencies, well into the midinfrared. Remarkably, the pulses generated turn out to have durations of the order of two optical cycles. In addition, this ultrafast emission, which occurs even in the absence of a zero dispersion point between pump and midinfrared wavelengths, is tunable over a wide frequency range simply by adjusting the gas pressure. These theoretical results pave the way to a new generation of compact, fiber-based sources of few-cycle midinfrared radiation. PMID:26230794

  18. Nonlocal dispersion anomalies of Dyakonov-like surface waves at hyperbolic media interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miret, Juan J.; Sorní, J. Aitor; Naserpour, Mahin; Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour; Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Dyakonov-like surface waves (DSWs) propagating obliquely on an anisotropic nanostructure have been theoretically proved in a few cases including 2D photonic crystals and metal-insulator (MI) layered metamaterials. Up to now, the long-wavelength approximation has been employed in order to obtain effective parameters to be introduced in the Dyakonov equation, which is largely restricted to material inhomogeneities of a few nanometers when including metallic elements. Here, we explore DSWs propagating obliquely at the interface between an insulator and a hyperbolic metamaterial, the latter consisting of a 1D MI bandgap grating using realistic slab sizes. We found unexpected favorable conditions for the existence of such surface waves. The finite element method is used to investigate the peculiarities of this new family of DSWs.

  19. Low-dispersion finite difference methods for acoustic waves in a pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1991-01-01

    A new algorithm for computing one-dimensional acoustic waves in a pipe is demonstrated by solving the acoustic equations as an initial-boundary-value problem. Conventional dissipation-free second-order finite difference methods suffer severe phase distortion for grids with less that about ten mesh points per wavelength. Using the signal generation by a piston in a duct as an example, transient acoustic computations are presented using a new compact three-point algorithm which allows about 60 percent fewer mesh points per wavelength. Both pulse and harmonic excitation are considered. Coupling of the acoustic signal with the pipe resonant modes is shown to generate a complex transient wave with rich harmonic content.

  20. MHD-model for low-frequency waves in a tokamak with toroidal plasma rotation and problem of existence of global geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Sorokina, E. A.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Konovaltseva, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    A set of reduced linear equations for the description of low-frequency perturbations in toroidally rotating plasma in axisymmetric tokamak is derived in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The model suitable for the study of global geodesic acoustic modes (GGAMs) is designed. An example of the use of the developed model for derivation of the integral conditions for GGAM existence and of the corresponding dispersion relation is presented. The paper is dedicated to the memory of academician V.D. Shafranov.

  1. MHD-model for low-frequency waves in a tokamak with toroidal plasma rotation and problem of existence of global geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lakhin, V. P.; Sorokina, E. A. E-mail: vilkiae@gmail.com; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Konovaltseva, L. V.

    2015-12-15

    A set of reduced linear equations for the description of low-frequency perturbations in toroidally rotating plasma in axisymmetric tokamak is derived in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The model suitable for the study of global geodesic acoustic modes (GGAMs) is designed. An example of the use of the developed model for derivation of the integral conditions for GGAM existence and of the corresponding dispersion relation is presented. The paper is dedicated to the memory of academician V.D. Shafranov.

  2. Remarks on nonlinear relation among phases and frequencies in modulational instabilities of parallel propagating Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyuki, Y.; Hada, T.

    2006-08-01

    Nonlinear relations among frequencies and phases in modulational instability of circularly polarized Alfvén waves are discussed, within the context of one dimensional, dissipation-less, unforced fluid system. We show that generation of phase coherence is a natural consequence of the modulational instability of Alfvén waves. Furthermore, we quantitatively evaluate intensity of wave-wave interaction by using bi-coherence, and also by computing energy flow among wave modes, and demonstrate that the energy flow is directly related to the phase coherence generation. We first discuss the modulational instability within the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation, which is a subset of the Hall-MHD system including the right- and left-hand polarized, nearly degenerate quasi-parallel Alfvén waves. The dominant nonlinear process within this model is the four wave interaction, in which a quartet of waves in resonance can exchange energy. By numerically time integrating the DNLS equation with periodic boundary conditions, and by evaluating relative phase among the quartet of waves, we show that the phase coherence is generated when the waves exchange energy among the quartet of waves. As a result, coherent structures (solitons) appear in the real space, while in the phase space of the wave frequency and the wave number, the wave power is seen to be distributed around a straight line. The slope of the line corresponds to the propagation speed of the coherent structures. Numerical time integration of the Hall-MHD system with periodic boundary conditions reveals that, wave power of transverse modes and that of longitudinal modes are aligned with a single straight line in the dispersion relation phase space, suggesting that efficient exchange of energy among transverse and longitudinal wave modes is realized in the Hall-MHD. Generation of the longitudinal wave modes violates the assumptions employed in deriving the DNLS such as the quasi-static approximation, and thus

  3. Laser-powered MHD generators for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion systems of the pulsed laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave, plasma MHD, and liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) types are assessed for their potential as space-based laser-to-electrical power converters. These systems offer several advantages as energy converters relative to the present chemical, nuclear, and solar devices, including high conversion efficiency, simple design, high-temperature operation, high power density, and high reliability. Of these systems, the Brayton cycle liquid-metal MHD system appears to be the most attractive. The LMMHD technology base is well established for terrestrial applications, particularly with regard to the generator, mixer, and other system components. However, further research is required to extend this technology base to space applications and to establish the technology required to couple the laser energy into the system most efficiently. Continued research on each of the three system types is recommended.

  4. Widely Wavelength-Tunable Blue-Shifted Dispersive Waves for Broadband Visible Wavelength Generation in a Photonic Crystal Fiber Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jin-Hui; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yu, Chong-Xiu; Shen, Xiang-Wei; Wang, Kui-Ru; Yan, Bin-Bin; Han, Ying; Zhou, Gui-Yao; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2012-10-01

    Blue-shifted dispersive waves (DWs) are efficiently generated from the red-shifted solitons by coupling the 120 fs pulses into the fundamental mode of the multi-knots of a photonic crystal fiber cladding. When the femtosecond pulses at the wavelength of 825 nm and the average power of 300 mW are coupled into knots 1-3, the conversion efficiency ηDW of 32% and bandwidth BDW of 50 nm are obtained. The ultrashort pulses generated by the DWs can be tunable over the whole visible wavelength by adjusting the wavelengths of the pump pulses coupled into different knots. It can be believed that this widely wavelength-tunable ultrashort visible pulse source has important applications in ultrafast photonics and resonant Raman scattering.

  5. Highly coherent red-shifted dispersive wave generation around 1.3 μm for efficient wavelength conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xia; Bi, Wanjun; Chen, Wei; Xue, Tianfeng; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong; Gao, Weiqing

    2015-03-14

    This research investigates the mechanism of the optical dispersive wave (DW) and proposes a scheme that can realize an efficient wavelength conversion. In an elaborately designed photonic crystal fiber, a readily available ytterbium laser operating at ∼1 μm can be transferred to the valuable 1.3 μm wavelength range. A low-order soliton is produced to concentrate the energy of the DW into the target wavelength range and improve the degree of coherence. The input chirp is demonstrated to be a factor that enhances the wavelength conversion efficiency. With a positive initial chirp, 76.6% of the pump energy in the fiber can be transferred into a spectral range between 1.24 and 1.4 μm. With the use of a grating compressor, it is possible to compress the generated coherent DW of several picoseconds into less than 90 fs.

  6. An introduction to wavelet analysis in oceanography and meteorology - With application to the dispersion of Yanai waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Steven D.; Kelly, B. G.; O'Brien, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Wavelet analysis is a relatively new technique that is an important addition to standard signal analysis methods. Unlike Fourier analysis that yields an average amplitude and phase for each harmonic in a dataset, the wavelet transform produces an instantaneous estimate or local value for the amplitude and phase of each harmonic. This allows detailed study of nonstationary spatial or time-dependent signal characteristics. The wavelet transform is discussed, examples are given, and some methods for preprocessing data for wavelet analysis are compared. By studying the dispersion of Yanai waves in a reduced gravity equatorial model, the usefulness of the transform is demonstrated. The group velocity is measured directly over a finite range of wavenumbers by examining the time evolution of the transform. The results agree well with linear theory at higher wavenumber but the measured group velocity is reduced at lower wavenumbers, possibly due to interaction with the basin boundaries.

  7. Submersible optical sensors exposed to chemically dispersed crude oil: wave tank simulations for improved oil spill monitoring.

    PubMed

    Conmy, Robyn N; Coble, Paula G; Farr, James; Wood, A Michelle; Lee, Kenneth; Pegau, W Scott; Walsh, Ian D; Koch, Corey R; Abercrombie, Mary I; Miles, M Scott; Lewis, Marlon R; Ryan, Scott A; Robinson, Brian J; King, Thomas L; Kelble, Christopher R; Lacoste, Jordanna

    2014-01-01

    In situ fluorometers were deployed during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Gulf of Mexico oil spill to track the subsea oil plume. Uncertainties regarding instrument specifications and capabilities necessitated performance testing of sensors exposed to simulated, dispersed oil plumes. Dynamic ranges of the Chelsea Technologies Group AQUAtracka, Turner Designs Cyclops, Satlantic SUNA and WET Labs, Inc. ECO, exposed to fresh and artificially weathered crude oil, were determined. Sensors were standardized against known oil volumes and total petroleum hydrocarbons and benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-xylene measurements-both collected during spills, providing oil estimates during wave tank dilution experiments. All sensors estimated oil concentrations down to 300 ppb oil, refuting previous reports. Sensor performance results assist interpretation of DWH oil spill data and formulating future protocols. PMID:24377909

  8. Symmetry, Statistics and Structure in MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2007-01-01

    Here, we examine homogeneous MHD turbulence in terms of truncated Fourier series. The ideal MHD equations and the associated statistical theory of absolute equilibrium ensembles are symmetric under P, C and T. However, the presence of invariant helicities, which are pseudoscalars under P and C, dynamically breaks this symmetry. This occurs because the surface of constant energy in phase space has disjoint parts, called components: while ensemble averages are taken over all components, a dynamical phase trajectory is confined to only one component. As the Birkhoff-Khinchin theorem tells us, ideal MHD turbulence is thus non-ergodic. This non-ergodicity manifests itself in low-wave number Fourier modes that have large mean values (while absolute ensemble theory predicts mean values of zero). Therefore, we have coherent structure in ideal MHD turbulence. The level of non-ergodicity and amount of energy contained in the associated coherent structure depends on the values of the helicities, as well as on the presence, or not, of a mean magnetic field and/or overall rotation. In addition to the well known cross and magnetic helicities, we also present a new invariant, which we call the parallel helicity, since it occurs when mean field and rotation axis are aligned. The question of applicability of these results to real (i.e., dissipative) MHD turbulence is also examined. Several long-time numerical simulations on a 64(exp 3) grid are given as examples. It is seen that coherent structure begins to form before decay dominates over nonlinearity. The connection of these results with inverse spectral cascades, selective decay, and magnetic dynamos is also discussed.

  9. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO{sub 2} coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sermeus, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sinha, R.; Vereecken, P. M.; Vanstreels, K.

    2014-07-14

    MnO{sub 2} is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO{sub 2}. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (ψ) of a 500 nm thick MnO{sub 2} coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E = 25 ± 1 GPa and ψ=42±1%, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  10. Multi-symplectic structure of fully nonlinear weakly dispersive internal gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clamond, Didier; Dutykh, Denys

    2016-08-01

    In this short communication, we present the multi-symplectic structure for the two-layer Serre–Green–Naghdi equations describing the evolution of large amplitude internal gravity water waves when both layers are shallow. We consider only a two-layer stratification with rigid bottom and lid for simplicity, generalisations to several layers being conceivable. This multi-symplectic formulation allows the application of various multi-symplectic integrators (such as Euler or Preissman box schemes) that preserve exactly the multi-symplecticity at the discrete level.

  11. Wave attenuation and mode dispersion in a waveguide coated with lossy dielectric material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. S.; Chuang, S. L.; Lee, S. W.; Lo, Y. T.

    1984-01-01

    The modal attenuation constants in a cylindrical waveguide coated with a lossy dielectric material are studied as functions of frequency, dielectric constant, and thickness of the dielectric layer. A dielectric material best suited for a large attenuation is suggested. Using Kirchhoff's approximation, the field attenuation in a coated waveguide which is illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is also studied. For a circular guide which has a diameter of two wavelengths and is coated with a thin lossy dielectric layer (omega sub r = 9.1 - j2.3, thickness = 3% of the radius), a 3 dB attenuation is achieved within 16 diameters.

  12. Characterization of near-millimeter wave materials by means of non-dispersive Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonis, G. J.; Sattler, J. P.; Worchesky, T. L.; Leavitt, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Nondispersive Fourier-transform-spectroscopic techniques are used to measure the complex indices of refraction of materials between frequencies of 120 and 550 GHz. Results are presented for crystal quartz, cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite 1422), glass-loaded polytetrafluoroethylene (Duroid 5880) and a nickel ferrite (Trans-Tech 2-111). These results are compared with other data on these materials in this frequency range. The accuracy of these measurements yields a considerable improvement in the near-millimeter-wave characterization of several of these materials. For materials other than crystal quartz, the results are the first measurements of their properties over the entire frequency range studied.

  13. Global MHD Simulations of Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Variables. I. The Importance of Spiral Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wenhua; Stone, James M.; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the first global 3D MHD simulations of accretion disks in cataclysmic variable (CV) systems in order to investigate the relative importance of angular momentum transport via turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) compared with that driven by spiral shock waves. Remarkably, we find that even with vigorous MRI turbulence, spiral shocks are an important component of the overall angular momentum budget, at least when temperatures in the disk are high (so that Mach numbers are low). In order to understand the excitation, propagation, and damping of spiral density waves in our simulations more carefully, we perform a series of 2D global hydrodynamical simulations with various equation of states, both with and without mass inflow via the Lagrangian point (L1). Compared with previous similar studies, we find the following new results. (1) The linear wave dispersion relation fits the pitch angles of spiral density waves very well. (2) We demonstrate explicitly that mass accretion is driven by the deposition of negative angular momentum carried by the waves when they dissipate in shocks. (3) Using Reynolds stress scaled by gas pressure to represent the effective angular momentum transport rate {α }{eff} is not accurate when mass accretion is driven by non-axisymmetric shocks. (4) Using the mass accretion rate measured in our simulations to directly measure α defined in standard thin-disk theory, we find 0.02≲ {α }{eff}≲ 0.05 for CV disks, consistent with observed values in quiescent states of dwarf novae. In this regime, the disk may be too cool and neutral for the MRI to operate and spiral shocks are a possible accretion mechanism. However, we caution that our simulations use unrealistically low Mach numbers in this regime and, therefore, future models with more realistic thermodynamics and non-ideal MHD are warranted.

  14. Rayleigh-wave dispersion reveals crust-mantle decoupling beneath eastern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Cédric P; Deschamps, Frédéric; Zhao, Li; Chen, Qi-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau results from the collision of the Indian and Eurasian Plates during the Cenozoic, which produced at least 2,000 km of convergence. Its tectonics is dominated by an eastward extrusion of crustal material that has been explained by models implying either a mechanical decoupling between the crust and the lithosphere, or lithospheric deformation. Discriminating between these end-member models requires constraints on crustal and lithospheric mantle deformations. Distribution of seismic anisotropy may be inferred from the mapping of azimuthal anisotropy of surface waves. Here, we use data from the CNSN to map Rayleigh-wave azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Tibet. Beneath Tibet, the anisotropic patterns at periods sampling the crust support an eastward flow up to 100°E in longitude, and a southward bend between 100°E and 104°E. At longer periods, sampling the lithospheric mantle, the anisotropic structures are consistent with the absolute plate motion. By contrast, in the Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons, the direction of fast propagation remains unchanged throughout the period range sampling the crust and lithospheric mantle. These observations suggest that the crust and lithospheric mantle are mechanically decoupled beneath eastern Tibet, and coupled beneath the Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons. PMID:26548657

  15. Rayleigh-wave dispersion reveals crust-mantle decoupling beneath eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, Cédric P.; Deschamps, Frédéric; Zhao, Li; Chen, Qi-Fu

    2015-11-01

    The Tibetan Plateau results from the collision of the Indian and Eurasian Plates during the Cenozoic, which produced at least 2,000 km of convergence. Its tectonics is dominated by an eastward extrusion of crustal material that has been explained by models implying either a mechanical decoupling between the crust and the lithosphere, or lithospheric deformation. Discriminating between these end-member models requires constraints on crustal and lithospheric mantle deformations. Distribution of seismic anisotropy may be inferred from the mapping of azimuthal anisotropy of surface waves. Here, we use data from the CNSN to map Rayleigh-wave azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Tibet. Beneath Tibet, the anisotropic patterns at periods sampling the crust support an eastward flow up to 100°E in longitude, and a southward bend between 100°E and 104°E. At longer periods, sampling the lithospheric mantle, the anisotropic structures are consistent with the absolute plate motion. By contrast, in the Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons, the direction of fast propagation remains unchanged throughout the period range sampling the crust and lithospheric mantle. These observations suggest that the crust and lithospheric mantle are mechanically decoupled beneath eastern Tibet, and coupled beneath the Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons.

  16. The dispersion characteristics of the waves propagating in a spinning single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. T.; Zhao, Yapu

    2011-10-01

    As the nano-motor becomes a mechanical reality, its prototype can be envisaged as nano-sized rotating machinery at a situation, albeit for different purposes, like that in the first half of the 20th century during which rotor dynamics has contributed to boosting machine power capacity. Accordingly, we take the benefit of hindsight to develop a classical framework of vibration analysis. Essentially, the equations of motion are formulated to cope with both the special carbon-nanotube properties and the first author's previously developed spinning beam formalism, establishing a model satisfactorily verified by some available molecular dynamics (MD) data and classical spinning beam results extracted from the literature. The model is inexpensive based on continuum mechanics as an alternative to the less-flexible MD method for simulating wave motion of the spinning single-walled carbon nanotube, yielding several interesting phenomena, including the fall-off and splitting of the wave characteristic curves and the unexpected gyroscopic phase property. Potential applications are proposed.

  17. Rayleigh-wave dispersion reveals crust-mantle decoupling beneath eastern Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Legendre, Cédric P.; Deschamps, Frédéric; Zhao, Li; Chen, Qi-Fu

    2015-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau results from the collision of the Indian and Eurasian Plates during the Cenozoic, which produced at least 2,000 km of convergence. Its tectonics is dominated by an eastward extrusion of crustal material that has been explained by models implying either a mechanical decoupling between the crust and the lithosphere, or lithospheric deformation. Discriminating between these end-member models requires constraints on crustal and lithospheric mantle deformations. Distribution of seismic anisotropy may be inferred from the mapping of azimuthal anisotropy of surface waves. Here, we use data from the CNSN to map Rayleigh-wave azimuthal anisotropy in the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Tibet. Beneath Tibet, the anisotropic patterns at periods sampling the crust support an eastward flow up to 100°E in longitude, and a southward bend between 100°E and 104°E. At longer periods, sampling the lithospheric mantle, the anisotropic structures are consistent with the absolute plate motion. By contrast, in the Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons, the direction of fast propagation remains unchanged throughout the period range sampling the crust and lithospheric mantle. These observations suggest that the crust and lithospheric mantle are mechanically decoupled beneath eastern Tibet, and coupled beneath the Sino-Korean and Yangtze cratons. PMID:26548657

  18. Boussinesq Equations and Other Systems for Small-Amplitude Long Waves in Nonlinear Dispersive Media. I: Derivation and Linear Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bona, G.; Chen, J. A.; Saut, Jing Ping

    2002-08-01

    Considered herein are a number of variants of the classical Boussinesq system and their higher-order generalizations. Such equations were first derived by Boussinesq to describe the two-way propagation of small-amplitude, long wavelength, gravity waves on the surface of water in a canal. These systems arise also when modeling the propagation of long-crested waves on large lakes or the ocean and in other contexts. Depending on the modeling of dispersion, the resulting system may or may not have a linearization about the rest state which is well posed. Even when well posed, the linearized system may exhibit a lack of conservation of energy that is at odds with its status as an approximation to the Euler equations. In the present script, we derive a four-parameter family of Boussinesq systems from the two-dimensional Euler equations for free-surface flow and formulate criteria to help decide which of these equations one might choose in a given modeling situation. The analysis of the systems according to these criteria is initiated.

  19. Equivalent circuit modeling of losses and dispersion in single and coupled lines for microwave and millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Vijai K.; Hill, Achim

    1988-02-01

    Losses and dispersion in open inhomogeneous guided-wave structures such as microstrips and other planar structures at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies and in MMICs (monolithic microwave integrated circuits) have been modeled with circuits consisting of ideal lumped elements and lossless TEM (transverse electromagnetic) lines. It is shown that, given a propagation structure for which numerical techniques to compute the propagation characteristics are available, an equivalent circuit whose terminal frequency and time-domain properties are the same as the structure can be synthesized. This is accomplished by equating the network functions of the given single or coupled line multiport with that of the model and extracting all the parameters of the equivalent circuit model by using standard parameters identification procedures. This model is valid over a desired frequency range and can be used to help design both analog and digital circuits consisting of these structures and other active and passive elements utilizing standard CAD (computer-aided design) programs. To validate the accuracy and usefulness of the models, results for a mismatched 50-ohm line in alumina and a high-impedance MMIC line stub are included.

  20. Exchange effects in Coulomb quantum plasmas: Dispersion of waves in 2D and 3D quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2014-11-15

    We describe quantum hydrodynamic equations with the Coulomb exchange interaction for three and two dimensional plasmas. Explicit form of the force densities are derived. We present non-linear Schrödinger equations (NLSEs) for the Coulomb quantum plasmas with the exchange interaction. We show contribution of the exchange interaction in the dispersion of the Langmuir, and ion-acoustic waves. We consider influence of the spin polarization ratio on strength of the Coulomb exchange interaction. This is important since exchange interaction between particles with same spin direction and particles with opposite spin directions are different. At small particle concentrations n{sub 0}≪10{sup 25}cm{sup −3} and small polarization the exchange interaction gives small decrease of the Fermi pressure. With increase of polarization role the exchange interaction becomes more important, so that it can overcome the Fermi pressure. The exchange interaction also decreases contribution of the Langmuir frequency. Ion-acoustic waves do not exist in limit of large polarization since the exchange interaction changes the sign of pressure. At large particle concentrations n{sub 0}≫10{sup 25}cm{sup −3} the Fermi pressure prevails over the exchange interaction for all polarizations. We obtain a similar picture for two dimensional quantum plasmas.