Science.gov

Sample records for display technique recognizing

  1. Recognizing Words and Reading Sentences with Microsecond Flash Displays

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Strings of dots can be used to construct easily identifiable letters, and these in turn can be used to write words and sentences. Prior work found that respondents could identify individual letters when all the dots were simultaneously flashed for an ultra-brief duration. Four of the experiments reported here constructed five-letter words with these dot-letters and a fifth experiment used them to write complete sentences. Respondents were able to recognize individual words that were displayed with a single, simultaneous ultra-brief flash of all the letters. Further, sentences could be efficiently read with a sequence of simultaneous flashes at a frequency that produced perceptual fusion. One experiment determined the frequency range that would produce flicker-fusion. Two experiments established the relation of intensity to probability of recognition with single flashes and with fused-flicker frequencies. Another established the intensities at which flicker-fused and steady displays were judged to be equal in brightness. The final experiment used those flicker-fused and steady intensities to display sentences. The two display conditions were read with equal efficiency, even though the flicker-fused displays provided light stimulation only 0.003% of the time. PMID:26800027

  2. Test techniques for evaluating flight displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran A.; Newman, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid development of graphics technology allows for greater flexibility in aircraft displays, but display evaluation techniques have not kept pace. Historically, display evaluation has been based on subjective opinion and not on the actual aircraft/pilot performance. Existing electronic display specifications and evaluation techniques are reviewed. A display rating technique analogous to handling qualities ratings was developed and is recommended for future evaluations. The choice of evaluation pilots is also discussed and the use of a limited number of trained evaluators is recommended over the use of a large number of operational pilots.

  3. [Differential display technique and its progress].

    PubMed

    Chi, Yan; Li, Shan-Shan; Ma, Xi; Jin, Tao; Zhou, Dong-Po

    2005-03-01

    Differential display technique is an important method to isolate differentially expressed gene. Comparing to other methods like representational difference analysis, suppression subtractive hybridization and serial analysis of gene expression, differential display technique is used in higher frequency. Since it was established in 1992, it has overcome many disadvantages and widened its practical fields through improvements and enhancements by global researchers. In this paper the principle and the main advantages and disadvantages of differential display technique were briefly introduced. Meanwhile, the four progressed aspects in designing primer, reducing false positives, identifying differentially expressed gene and techniques derived from DD were introduced in detail. PMID:15843364

  4. Phage displayed peptide recognizing porcine aminopeptidase N is a potent small molecule inhibitor of PEDV entry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three phage-displayed peptides designated H, S and F that recognize porcine aminopeptidase N (pAPN), the cellular receptor of porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) were able to inhibit cell infection by TGEV. These same peptides had no inhibitory effects on infection of Vero cells by po...

  5. Super stereoscopy technique for comfortable and realistic 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Akşit, Kaan; Niaki, Amir Hossein Ghanbari; Ulusoy, Erdem; Urey, Hakan

    2014-12-15

    Two well-known problems of stereoscopic displays are the accommodation-convergence conflict and the lack of natural blur for defocused objects. We present a new technique that we name Super Stereoscopy (SS3D) to provide a convenient solution to these problems. Regular stereoscopic glasses are replaced by SS3D glasses which deliver at least two parallax images per eye through pinholes equipped with light selective filters. The pinholes generate blur-free retinal images so as to enable correct accommodation, while the delivery of multiple parallax images per eye creates an approximate blur effect for defocused objects. Experiments performed with cameras and human viewers indicate that the technique works as desired. In case two, pinholes equipped with color filters per eye are used; the technique can be used on a regular stereoscopic display by only uploading a new content, without requiring any change in display hardware, driver, or frame rate. Apart from some tolerable loss in display brightness and decrease in natural spatial resolution limit of the eye because of pinholes, the technique is quite promising for comfortable and realistic 3D vision, especially enabling the display of close objects that are not possible to display and comfortably view on regular 3DTV and cinema. PMID:25503026

  6. Formula Recollection through a WORLDLY recognized mnemonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunicht, Shannon

    2010-03-01

    This discovery directly resulted from this author's head injury- (19 days unconsciousness). Beginning with some essential Brain Facts to explain how this remarkable discovery was devised: Right hemisphere => Spatial/musical Left hemisphere => Language/Logic This authors education: 2 ea BA degrees (language requirement) and a hole in the head (right hemisphere) may be spied on attendance verify such. The damaged right hemisphere accentuates this author's left hemisphere coupled with 2ea BA degrees that require a language ('83 BA a/Spanish & '94 BA w/Latin). Physical survival may be attributed to US Army RANGER training who Never say die! 10-82, 11-82, & 13 83 Recovery came having to learn EVERYTHING all over again, as I was reported having displayed upon awakening from the extended unconsciousness (19 days). Studies were difficult without a memory, but simple because I had always been forced to learn EVERYTHING MYSELF by mother who was a kindergarten teacher! The residual deficit continues to plague this author: Out of Sight is truly Out of mind! Even for a student whose memory is NOT disabled, memory is difficult. The ``nut's & bolts'' of this presentation are essentially having each Vowel represent a Mathematical operation. A: multiplication => @ O: division => Over I: sUbraction => mInus U: addition => plUs E => => => Equals Most constants and variables are indeed consonants, e.g. c = speed of light z = altitude

  7. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  8. An investigation of optimization techniques for drawing computer graphics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    Techniques for reducing vector data plotting time are studied. The choice of tolerances in optimization and the application of optimization to plots produced on real time interactive display devices are discussed. All results are developed relative to plotting packages and support hardware so that results are useful in real world situations.

  9. Improved memory loading techniques for the TSRV display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, W. C.; Lynn, W. A.; Mcluer, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    A recent upgrade of the TSRV research flight system at NASA Langley Research Center retained the original monochrome display system. However, the display memory loading equipment was replaced requiring design and development of new methods of performing this task. This paper describes the new techniques developed to load memory in the display system. An outdated paper tape method for loading the BOOTSTRAP control program was replaced by EPROM storage of the characters contained on the tape. Rather than move a tape past an optical reader, a counter was implemented which steps sequentially through EPROM addresses and presents the same data to the loader circuitry. A cumbersome cassette tape method for loading the applications software was replaced with a floppy disk method using a microprocessor terminal installed as part of the upgrade. The cassette memory image was transferred to disk and a specific software loader was written for the terminal which duplicates the function of the cassette loader.

  10. The phage display technique: advantages and recent patents.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sintia Silva; Magalhães, Aryane Aparecida C; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Zurita-Turk, Meritxell; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2011-08-01

    Phage display technology has advanced considerably since its creation, and the number of research projects using this technique is constantly increasing, generating numerous antibody and antigen libraries. These libraries, besides expediting library screening, improving selection methods and allowing evaluation of novel applications, have great potential for the development of new vaccines, drugs and diagnosis tests. Consequently, patent registries for the protection of these sequences are essential. PMID:21663585

  11. Autoantibodies Recognizing the Amino Terminal 1-17 Segment of CENP-A Display Unique Specificities in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favoino, Elvira; Digiglio, Liboria; Cuomo, Giovanna; Favia, Isabella E.; Racanelli, Vito; Valentini, Gabriele; Perosa, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Centromere-associated protein A (CENP-A), a common autoimmune target in a subset of systemic sclerosis patients, appears to have no role to explain why its corresponding auto-antibodies are more frequently found in the limited than the diffuse form of systemic sclerosis. Therefore, we investigated the fine specificity of anti-CENP-A antibodies as a first step to understanding their role in systemic sclerosis pathology. We focused on the amino-terminal portion of CENP-A spanning amino acids 1 to 17 (Ap1-17), which represents, along with Ap17-30, an immunodominant epitope of the protein. Peptide Ap1-17 was used to purify antibodies from 8 patients with systemic sclerosis. Anti-Ap1-17 antibodies specifically reacted with human CENP-A but did not cross-react with CENP-B or Ap17-30. Panning of a phage display peptide library with anti-Ap1-17 antibodies from 2 patients identified two novel, partially overlapping motifs, <5Rx(st)xKP10> and <9KPxxPxR15> as the result of the alignment of specific phage clone insert sequences. Anti-Ap1-17 IgG from the 8 patients had different reactivities to isolated phage clone insert sequences. Scanning the Swiss-Prot database revealed a large number of different types of proteins containing the two Ap1-17 antigenic motifs. These data show that anti-CENP-A1-17 antibodies are generated independently from anti-CENP-B antibodies and display great heterogeneity in their specificity by recognizing different motifs within that peptide sequence. This finding, along with the widespread interspecies and human tissue distribution of the two motifs, suggests that the number of motif-expressing proteins which can be the potential target of these antibodies is markedly higher than that estimated from the peptide-based epitope spreading model. PMID:23613856

  12. Research into display sharing techniques for distributed computing environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugg, Steven B.; Fitzgerald, Paul F., Jr.; Rosson, Nina Y.; Johns, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    The X-based Display Sharing solution for distributed computing environments is described. The Display Sharing prototype includes the base functionality for telecast and display copy requirements. Since the prototype implementation is modular and the system design provided flexibility for the Mission Control Center Upgrade (MCCU) operational consideration, the prototype implementation can be the baseline for a production Display Sharing implementation. To facilitate the process the following discussions are presented: Theory of operation; System of architecture; Using the prototype; Software description; Research tools; Prototype evaluation; and Outstanding issues. The prototype is based on the concept of a dedicated central host performing the majority of the Display Sharing processing, allowing minimal impact on each individual workstation. Each workstation participating in Display Sharing hosts programs to facilitate the user's access to Display Sharing as host machine.

  13. 360-deg profilometry: new techniques for display and acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, Anand K.; Chan, Chi-Shing; Sajan, M. R.

    1994-08-01

    Two optical methods are proposed for shape measurement and defect detection of curved surfaces in the form of a complete 350-deg profile of the object. The first one is the standard structured light approach. Display of the resulting data is the emphasis of this section. The second approach uses modulated structured light with a scanning digital camera for faster and simpler data acquisition. Quantitative processing is done off-line while real-time moire produces enhanced display of the defects for qualitative analysis.

  14. Display techniques for dynamic network data in transportation GIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ganter, J.H.; Cashwell, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Interest in the characteristics of urban street networks is increasing at the same time new monitoring technologies are delivering detailed traffic data. These emerging streams of data may lead to the dilemma that airborne remote sensing has faced: how to select and access the data, and what meaning is hidden in them? computer-assisted visualization techniques are needed to portray these dynamic data. Of equal importance are controls that let the user filter, symbolize, and replay the data to reveal patterns and trends over varying time spans. We discuss a prototype software system that addresses these requirements.

  15. A computer graphics display and data compression technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, M. J.; Meyer, H. G.; Levenson, L. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The computer program discussed is intended for the graphical presentation of a general dependent variable X that is a function of two independent variables, U and V. The required input to the program is the variation of the dependent variable with one of the independent variables for various fixed values of the other. The computer program is named CRP, and the output is provided by the SD 4060 plotter. Program CRP is an extremely flexible program that offers the user a wide variety of options. The dependent variable may be presented in either a linear or a logarithmic manner. Automatic centering of the plot is provided in the ordinate direction, and the abscissa is scaled automatically for a logarithmic plot. A description of the carpet plot technique is given along with the coordinates system used in the program. Various aspects of the program logic are discussed and detailed documentation of the data card format is presented.

  16. Correction techniques for depth errors with stereo three-dimensional graphic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Russell V.; Holden, Anthony; Williams, Steven P.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D), 'real-world' pictorial displays that incorporate 'true' depth cues via stereopsis techniques have proved effective for displaying complex information in a natural way to enhance situational awareness and to improve pilot/vehicle performance. In such displays, the display designer must map the depths in the real world to the depths available with the stereo display system. However, empirical data have shown that the human subject does not perceive the information at exactly the depth at which it is mathematically placed. Head movements can also seriously distort the depth information that is embedded in stereo 3-D displays because the transformations used in mapping the visual scene to the depth-viewing volume (DVV) depend intrinsically on the viewer location. The goal of this research was to provide two correction techniques; the first technique corrects the original visual scene to the DVV mapping based on human perception errors, and the second (which is based on head-positioning sensor input data) corrects for errors induced by head movements. Empirical data are presented to validate both correction techniques. A combination of the two correction techniques effectively eliminates the distortions of depth information embedded in stereo 3-D displays.

  17. A computer graphics display technique for the examination of aircraft design data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer graphics technique has been developed for quickly sorting and interpreting large amounts of aerodynamic data. It utilizes a graphic representation rather than numbers. The geometry package represents the vehicle as a set of panels. These panels are ordered in groups of ascending values (e.g., equilibrium temperatures). The groups are then displayed successively on a CRT building up to the complete vehicle. A zoom feature allows for displaying only the panels with values between certain limits. The addition of color allows a one-time display thus eliminating the need for a display build up.

  18. Phage display--a powerful technique for immunotherapy: 1. Introduction and potential of therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Justyna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-12-01

    One of the most effective molecular diversity techniques is phage display. This technology is based on a direct linkage between phage phenotype and its encapsulated genotype, which leads to presentation of molecule libraries on the phage surface. Phage display is utilized in studying protein-ligand interactions, receptor binding sites and in improving or modifying the affinity of proteins for their binding partners. Generating monoclonal antibodies and improving their affinity, cloning antibodies from unstable hybridoma cells and identifying epitopes, mimotopes and functional or accessible sites from antigens are also important advantages of this technology. Techniques originating from phage display have been applied to transfusion medicine, neurological disorders, mapping vascular addresses and tissue homing of peptides. Phages have been applicable to immunization therapies, which may lead to development of new tools used for treating autoimmune and cancer diseases. This review describes the phage display technology and presents the recent advancements in therapeutic applications of phage display. PMID:22906939

  19. Phage display--a powerful technique for immunotherapy: 2. Vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Justyna; Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-12-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique in medical and health biotechnology. This technology has led to formation of antibody libraries and has provided techniques for fast and efficient search of these libraries. The phage display technique has been used in studying the protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions, constructing of the antibody and antibody fragments and improving the affinity of proteins to receptors. Recently phage display has been widely used to study immunization process, develop novel vaccines and investigate allergen-antibody interactions. This technology can provide new tools for protection against viral, fungal and bacterial infections. It may become a valuable tool in cancer therapies, abuse and allergies treatment. This review presents the recent advancements in diagnostic and therapeutic applications of phage display. In particular the applicability of this technology to study the immunization process, construction of new vaccines and development of safer and more efficient delivery strategies has been described. PMID:22906938

  20. Techniques for optimizing human-machine information transfer related to real-time interactive display systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the needs of ground-based researcher-analysts to access real-time engineering data in the form of processed information has expanded rapidly. Fortunately, the capacity to deliver that information has also expanded. The development of advanced display systems is essential to the success of a research test activity. Those developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR), range from simple alphanumerics to interactive mapping and graphics. These unique display systems are designed not only to meet basic information display requirements of the user, but also to take advantage of techniques for optimizing information display. Future ground-based display systems will rely heavily not only on new technologies, but also on interaction with the human user and the associated productivity with that interaction. The psychological abilities and limitations of the user will become even more important in defining the difference between a usable and a useful display system. This paper reviews the requirements for development of real-time displays; the psychological aspects of design such as the layout, color selection, real-time response rate, and interactivity of displays; and an analysis of some existing WATR displays.

  1. Techniques for increasing the update rate of real-time dynamic computer graphic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahlbaum, W. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes several techniques which may be used to increase the animation update rate of real-time computer raster graphic displays. The techniques were developed on the ADAGE RDS 3000 graphic system in support of the Advanced Concepts Simulator at the NASA Langley Research Center. The first technique involves pre-processing of the next animation frame while the previous one is being erased from the screen memory. The second technique involves the use of a parallel processor, the AGG4, for high speed character generation. The description of the AGG4 includes the Barrel Shifter which is a part of the hardware and is the key to the high speed character rendition. The final result of this total effort was a four fold increase in the update rate of an existing primary flight display from 4 to 16 frames per second.

  2. Enhanced Detection of Multivariate Outliers Using Algorithm-Based Visual Display Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Wendy B.

    This study uses an algorithm-based visual display technique (FACES) to provide enhanced detection of multivariate outliers within large-scale data sets. The FACES computer graphing algorithm (H. Chernoff, 1973) constructs a cartoon-like face, using up to 18 variables for each case. A major advantage of FACES is the ability to store and show the…

  3. Recognizing and Managing Complexity: Teaching Advanced Programming Concepts and Techniques Using the Zebra Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabtree, John; Zhang, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Teaching advanced programming can be a challenge, especially when the students are pursuing different majors with diverse analytical and problem-solving capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore the efficacy of using a particular problem as a vehicle for imparting a broad set of programming concepts and problem-solving techniques. We…

  4. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell-surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Hiroki; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well-characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a timescale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell-surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell-surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell-surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  5. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Hiroki; Komatsu, Toru; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takanari

    2014-07-15

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a time scale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule epidermal growth factor factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  6. Real-time flight test analysis and display techniques for the X-29A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, John W.; Petersen, Kevin L.

    1988-01-01

    The X-29A advanced technology demonstrator flight envelope expansion program and the subsequent flight research phase gave impetus to the development of several innovative real-time analysis and display techniques. These new techniques produced significant improvements in flight test productivity, flight research capabilities, and flight safety. These techniques include real-time measurement and display of in-flight structural loads, dynamic structural mode frequency and damping, flight control system dynamic stability and control response, aeroperformance drag polars, and aircraft specific excess power. Several of these analysis techniques also provided for direct comparisons of flight-measured results with analytical predictions. The aeroperformance technique was made possible by the concurrent development of a new simplified in-flight net thrust computation method. To achieve these levels of on-line flight test analysis, integration of ground and airborne systems was required. The capability of NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility's Western Aeronautical Test Range was a key factor in enabling implementation of these methods.

  7. Orbital thermal analysis of lattice structured spacecraft using color video display techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L.; Deryder, D. D.; Palmer, M. T.

    1983-01-01

    A color video display technique is demonstrated as a tool for rapid determination of thermal problems during the preliminary design of complex space systems. A thermal analysis is presented for the lattice-structured Earth Observation Satellite (EOS) spacecraft at 32 points in a baseline non Sun-synchronous (60 deg inclination) orbit. Large temperature variations (on the order of 150 K) were observed on the majority of the members. A gradual decrease in temperature was observed as the spacecraft traversed the Earth's shadow, followed by a sudden rise in temperature (100 K) as the spacecraft exited the shadow. Heating rate and temperature histories of selected members and color graphic displays of temperatures on the spacecraft are presented.

  8. Instrumentation techniques for the automatic alignment of large, tiled fixed matrix displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-09-01

    Modern display systems for simulation applications, be they for aviation, naval, automotive or even large visualization and educational/entertainment systems, are all using a tiled approach to achieve high resolution and large fields of view. The aviation applications are particularly demanding, as the fidelity of the matching and blending between the tiled segments needs to be of a high order for flight simulation. This paper looks at the measurement instrumentation techniques that can be used in order to align such large and critical systems. Ultimately such measurement systems allow a fully automatic alignment of color, color uniformity, blending between tiles and gamma to be made. While front- or rear-projected systems are the main references for the analysis, much, if not most, of the principles outlined can apply to tiled large flat panel displays as well.

  9. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  10. Demonstration of a High-Fidelity Predictive/Preview Display Technique for Telerobotic Servicing in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S.; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1993-01-01

    A highly effective predictive/preview display technique for telerobotic servicing in space under several seconds communication time delay has been demonstrated on a large laboratory scale in May 1993, involving the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as the simulated ground control station and, 2500 miles away, the Goddard Space Flight Center as the simulated satellite servicing set-up. The technique is based on a high-fidelity calibration procedure that enables a high-fidelity overlay of 3-D graphics robot arm and object models over given 2-D TV camera images of robot arm and objects. To generate robot arm motions, the operator can confidently interact in real time with the graphics models of the robot arm and objects overlaid on an actual camera view of the remote work site. The technique also enables the operator to generate high-fidelity synthetic TV camera views showing motion events that are hidden in a given TV camera view or for which no TV camera views are available. The positioning accuracy achieved by this technique for a zoomed-in camera setting was about +/-5 mm, well within the allowable +/-12 mm error margin at the insertion of a 45 cm long tool in the servicing task.

  11. Multipurpose panel, phase 1, study report. [display utilizing multiplexing and digital techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, W.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a multipurpose panel which provides a programmable electronic display for changeable panel nomenclature, multiplexes similar indicator display signals to the signal display, and demultiplexes command signals is examined. Topics discussed include: electronic display technology, miniaturized electronic and memory devices, and data management systems which employ digital address and multiplexing.

  12. A Survey on Large High-Resolution Display Technologies, Techniques, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Tao; Schmidt, Greg S.; Staadt, Oliver G.; Livingston, Mark A.; Ball, Robert; May, Richard A.

    2006-03-27

    Continued advances in display hardware, computing power, networking, and rendering algorithms have all converged to dramatically improve large high-resolution display capabilities. We present a survey on prior research with large high-resolution displays. In the hardware configurations section we examine systems including multi-monitor workstations, recon*gurable projector arrays, and others. Rendering and the data pipeline are addressed with an overview of current technologies. We discuss many applications for large high-resolution displays such as automotive design, scientific visualization, control centers, and others. Quantifying the effect of large high-resolution displays on human performance and other aspects is important as we look toward future advances in display technology and how it is applied in different situations. Interacting with these displays brings a different set of challenges for HCI professionals, so an overview of some of this work is provided. Finally, we present our view of the top ten greatest challenges in large high-resolution displays.

  13. Techniques for optimizing human-machine information transfer related to real-time interactive display systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements for the development of real-time displays are reviewed. Of particular interest are the psychological aspects of design such as the layout, color selection, real-time response rate, and the interactivity of displays. Some existing Western Aeronautical Test Range displays are analyzed.

  14. Galectin CvGal2 from the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) Displays Unique Specificity for ABH Blood Group Oligosaccharides and Differentially Recognizes Sympatric Perkinsus Species.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chiguang; Ghosh, Anita; Amin, Mohammed N; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Tasumi, Satoshi; Pasek, Marta; Banerjee, Aditi; Shridhar, Surekha; Wang, Lai-Xi; Bianchet, Mario A; Vasta, Gerardo R

    2015-08-01

    Galectins are highly conserved lectins that are key to multiple biological functions, including pathogen recognition and regulation of immune responses. We previously reported that CvGal1, a galectin expressed in phagocytic cells (hemocytes) of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), is hijacked by the parasite Perkinsus marinus to enter the host, where it causes systemic infection and death. Screening of an oyster hemocyte cDNA library revealed a novel galectin, which we designated CvGal2, with four tandemly arrayed carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs). Phylogentic analysis of the CvGal2 CRDs suggests close relationships with homologous CRDs from CvGal1. Glycan array analysis, however, revealed that, unlike CvGal1 which preferentially binds to the blood group A tetrasaccharide, CvGal2 recognizes both blood group A and B tetrasaccharides and related structures, suggesting that CvGal2 has broader binding specificity. Furthermore, SPR analysis demonstrated significant differences in the binding kinetics of CvGal1 and CvGal2, and structural modeling revealed substantial differences in their interactions with the oligosaccharide ligands. CvGal2 is homogeneously distributed in the hemocyte cytoplasm, is released to the extracellular space, and binds to the hemocyte surface. CvGal2 binds to P. marinus trophozoites in a dose-dependent and β-galactoside-specific manner. Strikingly, negligible binding of CvGal2 was observed for Perkinsus chesapeaki, a sympatric parasite species mostly prevalent in the clams Mya arenaria and Macoma balthica. The differential recognition of Perkinsus species by the oyster galectins is consistent with their relative prevalence in oyster and clam species and supports their role in facilitating parasite entry and infectivity in a host-preferential manner. PMID:26158802

  15. Techniques used for the analysis of oculometer eye-scanning data obtained from an air traffic control display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Daniel J.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Capron, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The methodology and techniques used to collect and analyze look-point position data from a real-time ATC display-format comparison experiment are documented. That study compared the delivery precision and controller workload of three final approach spacing aid display formats. Using an oculometer, controller lookpoint position data were collected, associated with gaze objects (e.g., moving aircraft) on the ATC display, and analyzed to determine eye-scan behavior. The equipment involved and algorithms for saving, synchronizing with the ATC simulation output, and filtering the data are described. Target (gaze object) and cross-check scanning identification algorithms are also presented. Data tables are provided of total dwell times, average dwell times, and cross-check scans. Flow charts, block diagrams, file record descriptors, and source code are included. The techniques and data presented are intended to benefit researchers in other studies that incorporate non-stationary gaze objects and oculometer equipment.

  16. Measuring the food environment: a systematic technique for characterizing food stores using display counts.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cassandra; Bodor, J Nicholas; Rose, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Marketing research has documented the influence of in-store characteristics-such as the number and placement of display stands-on consumer purchases of a product. However, little information exists on this topic for key foods of interest to those studying the influence of environmental changes on dietary behavior. This study demonstrates a method for characterizing the food environment by measuring the number of separate displays of fruits, vegetables, and energy-dense snack foods (including chips, candies, and sodas) and their proximity to cash registers in different store types. Observations in New Orleans stores (N = 172) in 2007 and 2008 revealed significantly more displays of energy-dense snacks than of fruits and vegetables within all store types, especially supermarkets. Moreover, supermarkets had an average of 20 displays of energy-dense snacks within 1 meter of their cash registers, yet none of them had even a single display of fruits or vegetables near their cash registers. Measures of the number of separate display stands of key foods and their proximity to a cash register can be used by researchers to better characterize food stores and by policymakers to address improvements to the food environment. PMID:22701497

  17. Measuring the Food Environment: A Systematic Technique for Characterizing Food Stores Using Display Counts

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cassandra; Bodor, J. Nicholas; Rose, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Marketing research has documented the influence of in-store characteristics—such as the number and placement of display stands—on consumer purchases of a product. However, little information exists on this topic for key foods of interest to those studying the influence of environmental changes on dietary behavior. This study demonstrates a method for characterizing the food environment by measuring the number of separate displays of fruits, vegetables, and energy-dense snack foods (including chips, candies, and sodas) and their proximity to cash registers in different store types. Observations in New Orleans stores (N = 172) in 2007 and 2008 revealed significantly more displays of energy-dense snacks than of fruits and vegetables within all store types, especially supermarkets. Moreover, supermarkets had an average of 20 displays of energy-dense snacks within 1 meter of their cash registers, yet none of them had even a single display of fruits or vegetables near their cash registers. Measures of the number of separate display stands of key foods and their proximity to a cash register can be used by researchers to better characterize food stores and by policymakers to address improvements to the food environment. PMID:22701497

  18. Recognizing Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Recognizing Cataracts Watch for Vision Changes as You Age As ... cause of impaired eyesight later in life is cataracts. A cataract is a clouding of the lens ...

  19. Adaptive one-dimensional dimming technique for liquid crystal displays with low power consumption and high image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Ryeol; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2015-07-01

    An adaptive one-dimensional (1-D) dimming technique for liquid crystal displays that compensates for nonuniform backlight distribution is proposed. Dimming techniques that do not consider luminance distribution may cause severe visual artifacts, such as a block artifact. However, an adaptive 1-D dimming technique that considers luminance distribution can reduce power consumption without causing any visual artifacts. Hardware implementation results verified that our method achieved lower power consumption compared to nondimming techniques and removed block artifacts from International Electrotechnical Commission 62087 standard images. The power consumption using the proposed method ranged from 85.5% to 94.7% compared to nondimming techniques. Furthermore, the contrast ratio increased by up to 231% and 165% on average compared to nondimming techniques.

  20. Multimedia Learning: Cognitive Individual Differences and Display Design Techniques Predict Transfer Learning with Multimedia Learning Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Katherine A.

    2009-01-01

    In the wake of the information explosion and rapidly progressing technology [Mayer, R. E. (2001). "Multimedia learning". Cambridge: University Press] formulated a theory that focused on human cognition, rather than technology capacity and features. By measuring the effect of cognitive individual differences and display design manipulations on…

  1. Development and usage of a false color display technique for presenting Seasat-A scatterometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    A computer generated false color program which creates digital multicolor graphics to display geophysical surface parameters measured by the Seasat-A satellite scatterometer (SASS) is described. The data is incrementally scaled over the range of acceptable values and each increment and its data points are assigned a color. The advantage of the false color display is that it visually infers cool or weak data versus hot or intense data by using the rainbow of colors. For example, with wind speeds, levels of yellow and red could be used to imply high winds while green and blue could imply calmer air. The SASS data is sorted into geographic regions and the final false color images are projected onto various world maps with superimposed land/water boundaries.

  2. Four dimensional observations of clouds from geosynchronous orbit using stereo display and measurement techniques on an interactive information processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Desjardins, M.; Shenk, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 1 km resolution visible image pairs can provide quantitative three dimensional measurements of clouds. These data have great potential for severe storms research and as a basic parameter measurement source for other areas of meteorology (e.g. climate). These stereo cloud height measurements are not subject to the errors and ambiguities caused by unknown cloud emissivity and temperature profiles that are associated with infrared techniques. This effort describes the display and measurement of stereo data using digital processing techniques.

  3. X-Ray Fingerprinting Techniques for Recognizing A Hydrological Role in the Formation of Minerals on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Ellen P.; John, R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the ability of a miniaturized XRD-XRF instrument to perform in-situ analyses without sample preparation or acquisition. Deployment of this instrument on a Martian rover will allow a large number of rapid qualitative analyses, which will maximize the diversity of samples studied and selected for possible return. As a first step in designing a decision tree for recognizing minerals in complex mixtures, d spacings were plotted against intensity for several mineral groups comprising rock and soil types inferred for the surface of Mars (weathered basalt, playa and hydrothermal deposits, clay-rich soils). In all groups, d spacings cluster in a range from about 1-4 angstroms, which can under certain circumstances obscure patterns for individual phases. However, within the silicate family, minerals containing either bound OH- or molecules of H20 (clays, micas, amphiboles, zeolites) are characterized by a shift of peaks to higher d spacings. Large d spacings (greater than about 7 angstroms) thus act as a first-order filter for distinguishing hydrous from anhydrous silicates. The ability to quickly verify the presence of silicates that have interacted with water has important implications for using mineral chemistry and structure to help decipher the hydrologic and atmospheric history of Mars. This represents a beginning for developing more sophisticated methods of pattern recognition. These will combine XRD and XRF analyses with optical data to rapidly7 discern environmentally diagnostic assemblages without the necessity of identifying every peak individual mineral phase.

  4. Permanent visual display exhibits. A supplementary instructional technique in critical care education.

    PubMed

    Halpern, N A; Alicea, M; Barchue, S

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of critical care is being challenged to provide ongoing education to the various groups of critical care health providers. Traditional modalities of instruction may not suffice as unique circumstances exist in the practice and daily delivery of patient care. These unique circumstances include a never-ending introduction of new devices, tubes, and catheters into practice. In addition, the intensive care setting features a wide variability of work experience, a high turnover rate of personnel, variable cognitive approaches to understanding technical devices, and a stressful workplace. In their surgical intensive care unit, the authors have developed a set of permanent visual display exhibits. These exhibits were designed to specifically address the above problems and serve as a supplementary mode of education for our diverse medical, nursing, and technical staff. The exhibits may provide an example for other intensive care units and educators. PMID:2704732

  5. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  6. LipStaT: The Lip Stabilization Technique- Indications and Guidelines for Case Selection and Classification of Excessive Gingival Display.

    PubMed

    Bhola, Monish; Fairbairn, Peter Jm; Kolhatkar, Shilpa; Chu, Stephen J; Morris, Tamaara; de Campos, Marinele

    2015-01-01

    Excessive gingival display (EGD) is an esthetic concern affecting a substantial portion of the population. Identification, diagnosis, and classification of all factors resulting in EGD are imperative for its appropriate management. While many authors have described these factors individually, the authors of the current study propose a simple classification, which includes major etiologies of EGD. Where EGD is associated with maxillary lip hypermobility, a proposal of a subclass 1-3 is offered. A "decision-making tree" to help guide clinicians in managing EGD is included. A detailed description of the lip stabilization technique (LipStaT), including indications, surgical guidelines, postsurgical management, and clinical cases with long-term follow-up, is presented. PMID:26133145

  7. Use of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening for treatment of excessive gingival display: A case report of multiple etiologies.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Matheus Bortoluzzi; Souza, Eduardo Clemente; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Corrêa, Giovani Oliveira; Progiante, Patrícia Saram; Silva, Cléverson Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Excessive gingival display during smile can result in compromised esthetics. This study aims to report a case of excessive gingival display with multiple etiologies treated by means of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening. A 23-year-old female patient, with 5-mm gingival display during smile caused by altered passive eruption and hypermobility of the upper lip, underwent the modified lip repositioning technique associated with gingivectomy followed by flap elevation and ostectomy/osteoplasty. Seven months after the second procedure, the patient had her esthetic complaint solved appearing stable in the observation period. The modified lip repositioning technique is an effective procedure employed to reduce gingival display and when associated with esthetic clinical crown lengthening, can appropriately treat cases of gummy smile. PMID:27041845

  8. Subjective Evaluation of a Semi-Automatic Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Display Calibration Technique.

    PubMed

    Moser, Kenneth; Itoh, Yuta; Oshima, Kohei; Swan, J Edward; Klinker, Gudrun; Sandor, Christian

    2015-04-01

    With the growing availability of optical see-through (OST) head-mounted displays (HMDs) there is a present need for robust, uncomplicated, and automatic calibration methods suited for non-expert users. This work presents the results of a user study which both objectively and subjectively examines registration accuracy produced by three OST HMD calibration methods: (1) SPAAM, (2) Degraded SPAAM, and (3) Recycled INDICA, a recently developed semi-automatic calibration method. Accuracy metrics used for evaluation include subject provided quality values and error between perceived and absolute registration coordinates. Our results show all three calibration methods produce very accurate registration in the horizontal direction but caused subjects to perceive the distance of virtual objects to be closer than intended. Surprisingly, the semi-automatic calibration method produced more accurate registration vertically and in perceived object distance overall. User assessed quality values were also the highest for Recycled INDICA, particularly when objects were shown at distance. The results of this study confirm that Recycled INDICA is capable of producing equal or superior on-screen registration compared to common OST HMD calibration methods. We also identify a potential hazard in using reprojection error as a quantitative analysis technique to predict registration accuracy. We conclude with discussing the further need for examining INDICA calibration in binocular HMD systems, and the present possibility for creation of a closed-loop continuous calibration method for OST Augmented Reality. PMID:26357099

  9. Vision-Based Finger Detection, Tracking, and Event Identification Techniques for Multi-Touch Sensing and Display Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Lin; Liang, Wen-Yew; Chiang, Chuan-Yen; Hsieh, Tung-Ju; Lee, Da-Cheng; Yuan, Shyan-Ming; Chang, Yang-Lang

    2011-01-01

    This study presents efficient vision-based finger detection, tracking, and event identification techniques and a low-cost hardware framework for multi-touch sensing and display applications. The proposed approach uses a fast bright-blob segmentation process based on automatic multilevel histogram thresholding to extract the pixels of touch blobs obtained from scattered infrared lights captured by a video camera. The advantage of this automatic multilevel thresholding approach is its robustness and adaptability when dealing with various ambient lighting conditions and spurious infrared noises. To extract the connected components of these touch blobs, a connected-component analysis procedure is applied to the bright pixels acquired by the previous stage. After extracting the touch blobs from each of the captured image frames, a blob tracking and event recognition process analyzes the spatial and temporal information of these touch blobs from consecutive frames to determine the possible touch events and actions performed by users. This process also refines the detection results and corrects for errors and occlusions caused by noise and errors during the blob extraction process. The proposed blob tracking and touch event recognition process includes two phases. First, the phase of blob tracking associates the motion correspondence of blobs in succeeding frames by analyzing their spatial and temporal features. The touch event recognition process can identify meaningful touch events based on the motion information of touch blobs, such as finger moving, rotating, pressing, hovering, and clicking actions. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed vision-based finger detection, tracking, and event identification system is feasible and effective for multi-touch sensing applications in various operational environments and conditions. PMID:22163990

  10. Time-based self-spacing techniques using cockpit display of traffic information during approach to landing in a terminal area vectoring environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A simulation study was undertaken to evaluate two time-based self-spacing techniques for in-trail following during terminal area approach. An electronic traffic display was provided in the weather radarscope location. The displayed self-spacing cues allowed the simulated aircraft to follow and to maintain spacing on another aircraft which was being vectored by air traffic control (ATC) for landing in a high-density terminal area. Separation performance data indicate the information provided on the traffic display was adequate for the test subjects to accurately follow the approach path of another aircraft without the assistance of ATC. The time-based technique with a constant-delay spacing criterion produced the most satisfactory spacing performance. Pilot comments indicate the workload associated with the self-separation task was very high and that additional spacing command information and/or aircraft autopilot functions would be desirable for operational implementational of the self-spacing task.

  11. A preliminary study of head-up display assessment techniques. 2: HUD symbology and panel information search time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guercio, J. G.; Haines, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve commercial pilots were shown 50 high-fidelity slides of a standard aircraft instrument panel with the airspeed, altitude, ADI, VSI, and RMI needles in various realistic orientations. Fifty slides showing an integrated head-up display (HUD) symbology containing an equivalent number of flight parameters as above (with flight path replacing VSI) were also shown. Each subject was told what flight parameter to search for just before each slide was exposed and was given as long as needed (12 sec maximum) to respond by verbalizing the parameter's displayed value. The results for the 100-percent correct data indicated that: there was no significant difference in mean reaction time (averaged across all five flight parameters) between the instrument panel and HUD slides; and a statistically significant difference in mean reaction time was found in responding to different flight parameters.

  12. Evaluating Peripheral Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Tara; Hsieh, Gary; Mankoff, Jennifer

    Although peripheral displays have been a domain of inquiry for over a decade now, evaluation criteria and techniques for this area are still being created. Peripheral display evaluation is an acknowledged challenge in a field setting. This chapter first describes models and methods that have been tailored specifically to evaluating peripheral displays (measuring how well they achieve their goals). Then, we present evaluation criteria used in past evaluations of peripheral displays, ranging from issues such as learnability to distraction. After explaining how these criteria have been assessed in the past, we present a case study evaluation of two e-mail peripheral displays that demonstrates the pros and cons of various evaluation techniques.

  13. Process Techniques of 15-inch Full-Color High-Resolution Liquid Crystal Displays Addressed by a-Si Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kenichi; Tanaka, Yasuo; Honda, Kouichi; Tsutsu, Hiroshi; Koseki, Hideo; Hotta, Sadayoshi

    1992-12-01

    A 15 inch-diagonal-size full-color liquid crystal display (LCD) with 1152(× 3)× 900 pixels has been fabricated which enables a portable workstation with improved display performances. The process techniques used for this development are described, with special reference to metallization and dry etching. In multilevel metallization, Cr/Al interconnection is metallurgically undesirable. By contrast, the Cr/Ti/Al metal system provides excellent properties of contact resistivity and thermodynamical stability. Dry etching processes are developed for multilayered insulating films and metallization-related bilayers, namely SiO2/TaOx/SiNx/(i/n+)a-Si and a-Si/Ti, respectively. Fine patterning and easier stepcoverage of subsequently deposited layers are achieved.

  14. Application of computer generated color graphic techniques to the processing and display of three dimensional fluid dynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.; Putt, C. W.; Giamati, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Color coding techniques used in the processing of remote sensing imagery were adapted and applied to the fluid dynamics problems associated with turbofan mixer nozzles. The computer generated color graphics were found to be useful in reconstructing the measured flow field from low resolution experimental data to give more physical meaning to this information and in scanning and interpreting the large volume of computer generated data from the three dimensional viscous computer code used in the analysis.

  15. Display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, A. W. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A situational display and a means for creating the display are disclosed. The display comprises a moving line or raster, on a cathode ray tube, which is disposed intermediate of two columns of lamps or intensifications on the cathode ray tube. The raster and lights are controlled in such a manner that pairs of lights define a line which is either tracked or chased by the raster in accordance with the relationship between the optimum and actual values of a monitored parameter.

  16. Curved computational integral imaging reconstruction technique for resolution-enhanced display of three-dimensional object images.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Joo-Bong; Hwang, Dong-Choon; Shin, Dong-Hak; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2007-11-01

    A novel curved computational integral imaging reconstruction (C-CIIR) technique for the virtually curved integral imaging (VCII) system is proposed, and its performances are analyzed. In the C-CIIR model, an additional virtual large-aperture lens is included to provide a multidirectional curving effect in the reconstruction process, and its effect is analyzed in detail by using the ABCD matrix. With this method, resolution-enhanced 3D object images can be computationally reconstructed from the picked-up elemental images of the VCII system. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed model, some experiments are carried out. Experiments revealed that the sampling rate in the VCII system could be kept at a maximum value within some range of the distance z, whereas in the conventional integral imaging system it linearly decreased as the distance z increased. It is also shown that resolutions of the object images reconstructed by the C-CIIR method have been significantly improved compared with those of the conventional CIIR method. PMID:17973014

  17. Display Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Display took a wide variety of forms ranging from students presenting their initial planning and thought processes, to displays of their finished work, and their suggestions for extending the task should they, or others, have time to return to it in the future. A variety of different media were used from traditional posters in many shapes and…

  18. Projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, George L.; Yang, Kei H.

    1998-08-01

    Projection display in today's market is dominated by cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Further progress in this mature CRT projector technology will be slow and evolutionary. Liquid crystal based projection displays have gained rapid acceptance in the business market. New technologies are being developed on several fronts: (1) active matrix built from polysilicon or single crystal silicon; (2) electro- optic materials using ferroelectric liquid crystal, polymer dispersed liquid crystals or other liquid crystal modes, (3) micromechanical-based transducers such as digital micromirror devices, and grating light valves, (4) high resolution displays to SXGA and beyond, and (5) high brightness. This article reviews the projection displays from a transducer technology perspective along with a discussion of markets and trends.

  19. Recognizing Computational Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2006-08-01

    There are prestigious international awards that recognize the role of theory and experiment in science and mathematics, but there are no awards of a similar stature that explicitly recognize the role of computational science in a scientific field. In 1945, John von Neumann noted that "many branches of both pure and applied mathematics are in great need of computing instruments to break the present stalemate created by the failure of the purely analytical approach to nonlinear problems." In the past few decades, great strides in mathematics and in the applied sciences can be linked to computational science.

  20. Comparison of Sidescan and Swath Bathymetry and Imagery Merging Various Types of Swath-Mapping Sonar Data Sets Using a Variety of Post-Processing Display Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. C.; Sterling, A.; Fryer, P.; Appelgate, B.; Tivey, M.

    2003-12-01

    Recently collected bathymetry and sidescan data from seamounts on the Mariana forearc show the potential for interpretation of geologic processes using new techniques for post-processing and display of these data. These techniques and algorithms employ freely available software packages in the public domain that are in general use in the academic community. Swath data acquired recently with the R/V Thompson EM300 and Hydrosweep systems, the R/V Melville SeaBeam system, the HMR1 sidescan sonar system, and the DSL120 sidescan sonar system show the full spectrum of application of these systems to the various tectonic provinces of a convergent margin of the Western Pacific (Pacific Plate and Mariana forearc). The HMR1 bathymetry and imagery combined with SeaBeam and Hydrosweep bathymetry provides data for the subducting plate and the deepest portions of the trench. A DSL120 survey of the abyssal plain of the Pigafetta Basin, 1800 km NE of Guam, provides the best-quality product from this upgraded sidescan system. The DSL120 and EM300 systems were both used to prepare detailed images of the summit regions of seamounts on the Mariana forearc. The EM300, Hydrosweep, and HMR1 systems provided regional survey data and detail of the deeper forearc areas. The recently upgraded DSL120 system provides both imagery and bathymetry data of the summits of the forearc seamounts. Merging data collected by these different systems, mounted on different platforms, each yielding different types of data at differing resolutions provides multiple renderings that can be used to highlight a variety of aspects of a given geologic feature. Fly-bys and 3-D stereo anaglyph renderings bring the geology into immediate contextual focus. The data manipulation techniques applied are powerful tools for interpretation, but the inexperienced researcher initially faces a steep learning curve. On-line tutorials and manuals that are constantly being updated provide the necessary first steps as well as help

  1. On recognizing ignorance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    How an expert system reasons about its own ability to deal with a particular problem is studied. Ideally, an expert system ought to rapidly recognize that a particular problem is beyond its abilities and defer to another, perhaps human, expert. This capability is extremely important in domains where expert systems may control life critical processes such as air traffic control, medicine, strategic defense, and manned space exploration. The methods used by knowledge engineers to infuse an expert system with knowledge of its own limitations is surveyed. A computability theory is employed to analyze the general problem of meta-knowledge and to give insight into the efficacy of specific solutions.

  2. Preventing and Recognizing Embezzlement.

    PubMed

    Phairas, Debra

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that approximately one in six physicians will be the victim of embezzlement at least once during his or her lifetime. This may be due to the trusting nature of physicians, a lack of business training about separating duties in transactions involving money, or employees' feeling overworked, underpaid, or underappreciated. The best protection against embezzlement is prevention. This article informs the reader of the steps to take to prevent stealing in the medical office, how to recognize if it is occurring, and how to obtain restitution or prosecution. PMID:27039633

  3. Recognizing musical text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Alastair T.; Brown, B. M.; Thorne, M. P.

    1993-08-01

    This paper reports on some recent developments in a software product that recognizes printed music notation. There are a number of computer systems available which assist in the task of printing music; however the full potential of these systems cannot be realized until the musical text has been entered into the computer. It is this problem that we address in this paper. The software we describe, which uses computationally inexpensive methods, is designed to analyze a music score, previously read by a flat bed scanner, and to extract the musical information that it contains. The paper discusses the methods used to recognize the musical text: these involve sampling the image at strategic points and using this information to estimate the musical symbol. It then discusses some hard problems that have been encountered during the course of the research; for example the recognition of chords and note clusters. It also reports on the progress that has been made in solving these problems and concludes with a discussion of work that needs to be undertaken over the next five years in order to transform this research prototype into a commercial product.

  4. Recognizing the Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott

    2016-01-01

    Solar system planetary science has traditionally focused on understanding in depth individual planets. While there have been some efforts at synergy, most studies have focused on understanding the details of individual planets. Now that we are in the era of exoplanet science, with thousands of known planets and hundreds that have been characterized to varying degrees, the systematics of planetary science are becoming apparent. This also means that, for the first time, what had previously been seen as individual quirks of solar system planets are instead being recognized as part of the normal range of planetary behavior. In my talk I will consider a number of such characteristics and explain how we are now starting to understand their true context. In particular I will discuss the atmospheric composition, clouds, hazes, and winds of giant planets, trace gasses in the atmosphere of Venus, and the presence and absence of atmospheres on various terrestrial worlds.

  5. Recognizing People in Motion.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Galit; O'Toole, Alice J

    2016-05-01

    Natural movements of the face and body, as well as voice, provide converging cues to a person's identity. To date, person recognition has been studied primarily with static images of faces. Face recognition, however, is part of a larger system, whose preeminent goal is to efficiently recognize dynamic familiar people in unconstrained environments. We present a comprehensive framework for understanding person recognition as it happens in the real world. In this framework, dynamic information plays the central role in binding multi-modal information from the face, body, and the voice to achieve robust and highly accurate recognition. The superior temporal sulcus (STS) integrates multisensory, dynamic information from the whole person for recognition, thereby complementing its role in social cognition. PMID:27016844

  6. Recognizing outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiss, Fred

    One function of any professional society is to provide an objective, informed means for recognizing outstanding achievements in its field. In AGU's Ocean Sciences section we have a variety of means for carrying out this duty. They include recognition of outstanding student presentations at our meetings, dedication of special sessions, nomination of individuals to be fellows of the Union, invitations to present Sverdrup lectures, and recommendations for Macelwane Medals, the Ocean Sciences Award, and the Ewing Medal.Since the decision to bestow these awards requires initiative and judgement by members of our section in addition to a deserving individual, it seems appropriate to review the selection process for each and to urge you to identify those deserving of recognition.

  7. 4-D display of satellite cloud images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.

    1987-01-01

    A technique has been developed to display GOES satellite cloud images in perspective over a topographical map. Cloud heights are estimated using temperatures from an infrared (IR) satellite image, surface temperature observations, and a climatological model of vertical temperature profiles. Cloud levels are discriminated from each other and from the ground using a pattern recognition algorithm based on the brightness variance technique of Coakley and Bretherton. The cloud regions found by the pattern recognizer are rendered in three-dimensional perspective over a topographical map by an efficient remap of the visible image. The visible shades are mixed with an artificial shade based on the geometry of the cloud-top surface, in order to enhance the texture of the cloud top.

  8. How legumes recognize rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    Via, Virginia Dalla; Zanetti, María Eugenia; Blanco, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legume plants have developed the capacity to establish symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria (known as rhizobia) that can convert N2 to molecular forms that are incorporated into the plant metabolism. The first step of this relationship is the recognition of bacteria by the plant, which allows to distinguish potentially harmful species from symbiotic partners. The main molecular determinant of this symbiotic interaction is the Nod Factor, a diffusible lipochitooligosaccharide molecule produced by rhizobia and perceived by LysM receptor kinases; however, other important molecules involved in the specific recognition have emerged over the years. Secreted exopolysaccharides and the lipopolysaccharides present in the bacterial cell wall have been proposed to act as signaling molecules, triggering the expression of specific genes related to the symbiotic process. In this review we will briefly discuss how transcriptomic analysis are helping to understand how multiple signaling pathways, triggered by the perception of different molecules produced by rhizobia, control the genetic programs of root nodule organogenesis and bacterial infection. This knowledge can help to understand how legumes have evolved to recognize and establish complex ecological relationships with particular species and strains of rhizobia, adjusting gene expression in response to identity determinants of bacteria. PMID:26636731

  9. Optimum Number of Display Colors and their Chromaticity Regionsfor LED Traffic Information Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Santaro; Tsuri, Shinsuke; Nakashima, Yoshio; Takamatsu, Mamoru

    Traffic information boards have a vital role in promoting safe and efficient road traffic, by providing the drivers with relevant traffic information on a real-time basis. To achieve good visibility and eye-catching quality, we must know the optimum number of display colors and their chromaticity regions so that the road users can correctly recognize displayed information in a short time. We attempted to determine an optimum number of display colors based on the categorical color (basic perceived color) technique, as well as to define the chromaticity regions for display colors so that a given color is most effectively discriminated from the others. The results showed that the optimum number of display colors is ten, and categorization of the so-defined ten display colors on the chromaticity diagram is extremely useful in designing a traffic information board.

  10. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  11. METHOD AND MEANS FOR RECOGNIZING COMPLEX PATTERNS

    DOEpatents

    Hough, P.V.C.

    1962-12-18

    This patent relates to a method and means for recognizing a complex pattern in a picture. The picture is divided into framelets, each framelet being sized so that any segment of the complex pattern therewithin is essentially a straight line. Each framelet is scanned to produce an electrical pulse for each point scanned on the segment therewithin. Each of the electrical pulses of each segment is then transformed into a separate strnight line to form a plane transform in a pictorial display. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is positioned laterally so that a point on the line midway between the top and the bottom of the pictorial display occurs at a distance from the left edge of the pictorial display equal to the distance of the generating point in the segment from the left edge of the framelet. Each line in the plane transform of a segment is inclined in the pictorial display at an angle to the vertical whose tangent is proportional to the vertical displacement of the generating point in the segment from the center of the framelet. The coordinate position of the point of intersection of the lines in the pictorial display for each segment is determined and recorded. The sum total of said recorded coordinate positions being representative of the complex pattern. (AEC)

  12. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  13. Digital holographic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Chia, Yong Poo; Singh, Vijay Raj; Asundi, A.; Khoo, Xuan Jie; Tay, Kiat Long; Zhou, Junxiang

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes how a Digital Holographic Projector is designed and implemented to project two-dimension virtual images onto the volumetric display media. In this research, we focus on the method to create 3D models, diffractive algorithm and the display media. A 3D model is generated based on the 360° view with views at every 10° interval from a 3D perspective view software. The hologram interference fringes are re-producing from the Fraunhofer algorithm. In order to make more flexible and portable, a Compact Vision System is introduced to storage multiply interference fringes. At the same time, the fringes are sent out at 30 Hz frame by frame continually to the digital micro-mirror1. With the presence of Nd: YVO4 green laser and various optical components, the 3D 360° hologram images are dynamically reconstructed and projected onto the high speed rotating diffuser forming a 3D model at any viewing angle on the volumetric display media. Both volumetric display media, wet and dry methods are demonstrated to show their feasibility and convenience. Finally, the dry volumetric technique with vertical projection mounting is adopted and as the result shown that the speckle noise is significance reduced.

  14. Digital holographic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Chia, Yong Poo; Singh, Vijay Raj; Asundi, A.; Khoo, Xuan Jie; Tay, Kiat Long; Zhou, Junxiang

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes how a Digital Holographic Projector is designed and implemented to project two-dimension virtual images onto the volumetric display media. In this research, we focus on the method to create 3D models, diffractive algorithm and the display media. A 3D model is generated based on the 360° view with views at every 10° interval from a 3D perspective view software. The hologram interference fringes are re-producing from the Fraunhofer algorithm. In order to make more flexible and portable, a Compact Vision System is introduced to storage multiply interference fringes. At the same time, the fringes are sent out at 30 Hz frame by frame continually to the digital micro-mirror1. With the presence of Nd: YVO4 green laser and various optical components, the 3D 360° hologram images are dynamically reconstructed and projected onto the high speed rotating diffuser forming a 3D model at any viewing angle on the volumetric display media. Both volumetric display media, wet and dry methods are demonstrated to show their feasibility and convenience. Finally, the dry volumetric technique with vertical projection mounting is adopted and as the result shown that the speckle noise is significance reduced.

  15. Advanced poly-LED displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Mark; Nisato, Giovanni; Fish, D.; Giraldo, Andrea; Jenkins, A. J.; Johnson, Mark T.

    2003-05-01

    Philips have been actively developing polymer OLED (poly-LED) displays as a future display technology. Their emissive nature leads to a very attractive visual appearance, with wide viewing angle, high brightness and fast response speed. Whilst the first generation of poly-LED displays are likely to be passive-matrix driven, power reduction and resolution increase will lead to the use of active-matrix poly-LED displays. Philips Research have designed, fabricated and characterized five different designs of active-matrix polymer-LED display. Each of the five displays makes use of a distinct pixel programming- or pixel drive-technique, including current programming, threshold voltage measurement and photodiode feedback. It will be shown that hte simplest voltage-programmed current-source pixel suffers from potentially unacceptable brightness non-uniformity, and that advanced pixel circuits can provide a solution to this. Optical-feedback pixel circuits will be discussed, showing that they can be used to improve uniformity and compensate for image burn-in due to polymer-LED material degradation, improving display lifetime. Philips research has also been active in developing technologies required to implement poly-LED displays on flexible substrates, including materials, processing and testing methods. The fabrication of flexible passive-matrix poly-LED displays will be presented, as well as the ongoing work to assess the suitability of processing flexible next-generation poly-LED displays.

  16. The virtual environment display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a display and control technology that can surround a person in an interactive computer generated or computer mediated virtual environment. It has evolved at NASA-Ames since 1984 to serve NASA's missions and goals. The exciting potential of this technology, sometimes called Virtual Reality, Artificial Reality, or Cyberspace, has been recognized recently by the popular media, industry, academia, and government organizations. Much research and development will be necessary to bring it to fruition.

  17. Digital retrospective motion-mode display and processing of electron beam cine-computed tomography and other cross-sectional cardiac imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Judd E.; Rumberger, John A.; Buithieu, Jean; Behrenbeck, Thomas; Breen, Jerome F.; Sheedy, Patrick F., II

    1995-05-01

    Electron beam computed tomography is unparalleled in its ability to consistently produce high quality dynamic images of the human heart. Its use in quantification of left ventricular dynamics is well established in both clinical and research applications. However, the image analysis tools supplied with the scanners offer a limited number of analysis options. They are based on embedded computer systems which have not been significantly upgraded since the scanner was introduced over a decade ago in spite of the explosive improvements in available computer power which have occured during this period. To address these shortcomings, a workstation-based ventricular analysis system has been developed at our institution. This system, which has been in use for over five years, is based on current workstation technology and therefore has benefited from the periodic upgrades in processor performance available to these systems. The dynamic image segmentation component of this system is an interactively supervised, semi-automatic surface identification and tracking system. It characterizes the endocardial and epicardial surfaces of the left ventricle as two concentric 4D hyper-space polyhedrons. Each of these polyhedrons have nearly ten thousand vertices which are deposited into a relational database. The right ventricle is also processed in a similar manner. This database is queried by other custom components which extract ventricular function parameters such as regional ejection fraction and wall stress. The interactive tool which supervises dynamic image segmentation has been enhanced with a temporal domain display. The operator interactively chooses the spatial location of the endpoints of a line segment while the corresponding space/time image is displayed. These images, with content resembling M-Mode echocardiography, benefit form electron beam computed tomography's high spatial and contrast resolution. The segmented surfaces are displayed along with the imagery. These

  18. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  19. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    PubMed

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  20. Novel autostereoscopic single-user displays with user interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, Klaus; Chojecki, Paul; Neumannn, Frank; Przewozny, David

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes recent advances in the field of autostereoscopic display development and introduces an appropriate integration of a novel user interaction technology. Beside technical aspects of the developed autostereoscopic display technology, the paper includes topics of our video-based interaction technique and introduces promising applications of autostereoscopic single user displays. Based on results of the European ATTEST project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications (HHI) has developed the Free2C 3D display technology, which provides free positioning of a single viewer. The optics of the Free2C displays is designed such that extremely low crosstalk, excellent color reproduction and high brightness are achieved. Simple and intuitive interaction is a requirement for multi-modal 3D displays. For this reason, a novel technology has been integrated into the control console that can recognize a persons' hand and its gestures. Displayed 3D objects floating in front of the screen can be rotated by simple gestures and virtual buttons can be pressed by pointing at them (virtual 3D touch screen). Several applications are currently used by customers and have been presented at trade shows, exhibitions and showrooms. Feasible applications are based on computer generated content, live video created by stereoscopic cameras and films stored on hard disk. Immersive media presentations are one promising application for attractive stereoscopic representations. The Free2C Kiosk and the 3D Media Center combine a high-resolution autostereoscopic 3D display with a video-based hand-gesture recognition device for direct manipulation of virtual 3D objects floating in front of the screen.

  1. Phage display of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kościelska, K; Kiczak, L; Kasztura, M; Wesołowska, O; Otlewski, J

    1998-01-01

    In recent years the phage display approach has become an increasingly popular method in protein research. This method enables the presentation of large peptide and protein libraries on the surface of phage particles from which molecules of desired functional property(ies) can be rapidly selected. The great advantage of this method is a direct linkage between an observed phenotype and encapsulated genotype, which allows fast determination of selected sequences. The phage display approach is a powerful tool in generating highly potent biomolecules, including: search for specific antibodies, determining enzyme specificity, exploring protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, minimizing proteins, introducing new functions into different protein scaffolds, and searching sequence space of protein folding. In this article many examples are given to illustrate that this technique can be used in different fields of protein science. The phage display has a potential of the natural evolution and its possibilities are far beyond rational prediction. Assuming that we can design the selection agents and conditions we should be able to engineer any desired protein function or feature. PMID:9918498

  2. Recognizing apathy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Alan J; Strauss, Milton; Sami, Susie A

    2007-11-01

    Apathy has been increasingly recognized as a neuropsychiatric symptom in many neurologic disorders. In this paper, we review the clinical features of apathy in Alzheimer's disease. We also review screening, the differential diagnosis including depression, medical illnesses, and mild cognitive impairment, and treating modalities and issues. It must also be recognized that apathy per se almost never occurs as an isolated syndrome, so it must be viewed in the context of an individual's entire behavioral and cognitive status. PMID:17999565

  3. Laser Optometric Assessment Of Visual Display Viewability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murch, Gerald M.

    1983-08-01

    Through the technique of laser optometry, measurements of a display user's visual accommodation and binocular convergence were used to assess the visual impact of display color, technology, contrast, and work time. The studies reported here indicate the potential of visual-function measurements as an objective means of improving the design of visual displays.

  4. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  5. Accommodation of COTS LCDs in military displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, James B.; Henz, James M.; Dodd, Sonia R.

    1998-09-01

    Commercial off the shelf (COTS) liquid crystal displays are attractive as an alternative to LCDs that are custom designed and manufactured for the military environment. Commercial displays require significant modification to accommodate their use. This paper describes specific modifications that create a thermal cocoon around a nominal 3.6 X 4.6-inch commercial industrial/automotive display. The thermal design techniques allow the display to function in the particularly challenging F-16 thermal environment without exceeding the display's operating specification. The work is extended to examine what additional design extensions are required for still larger displays.

  6. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to…

  7. Recognizing and Managing Interpersonal Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Nancy; Hovland, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Practical advice is offered, to managers and supervisors at any level, on recognizing and analyzing interpersonal conflicts, managing such conflicts and making them productive, and ensuring that performance reviews result in progress for both supervisor and employee. Conflict is seen as inevitable, an opportunity to take action, and manageable.…

  8. Do You Recognize This Parent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Edna

    1997-01-01

    Suggests effective ways to work with parents who may be permissive, busy, detached, overprotective, or negative. Recommends that child care professionals be sensitive and understanding, recognize other demands on parents' time and communicate competitively with them, use terms parents understand, accept various levels of parental involvement, be…

  9. Multiple Miniature Avionic Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rye, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Dorneich, Michael C. (Inventor); Gannon, Aaron J. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A display screen for displaying multiple sets of information is provided. In one embodiment, an aviation display screen includes a main window and a plurality of miniature windows. The main window is adapted to illustrate one set of information. Each miniature window is adapted to display a set of avionic information. The avionic display is further adapted to toggle a select set of avionic information in one of the miniature windows into the main window.

  10. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  11. Environmental data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, K. J.; Blackwell, R. J.; Mcrae, G. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Methods for using a combination of computer-generated color graphics and image processing techniques to display a large data base of environment information are described. The data source can be either field data or mathematical models, reduced to summary statistics that characterize the data field as a whole. Sharp gradients are plotted into contour plots, which can also feature shades, degree of brightness, and saturation levels for fine-tuning the image. The basic concepts of digital image processing are reviewed, including location of the pixels, intensity mapping operations, pseudocolor enhancements, neighborhood averaging, and smoothing. Sample applications are presented in terms of emissions and air quality distributions over the south coast air basin of southern California.

  12. Interference Phenomenon with Mobile Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantham, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment is presented in which the spacing and geometric pattern of pixels in mobile displays is measured. The technique is based on optical constructive interference. While the experiment is another opportunity to demonstrate wave interference from a grating-like structure, this can also be used to demonstrate concepts of solid state…

  13. Seamless tiled display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubin, Matthew B. (Inventor); Larson, Brent D. (Inventor); Kolosowsky, Aleksandra (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A modular and scalable seamless tiled display apparatus includes multiple display devices, a screen, and multiple lens assemblies. Each display device is subdivided into multiple sections, and each section is configured to display a sectional image. One of the lens assemblies is optically coupled to each of the sections of each of the display devices to project the sectional image displayed on that section onto the screen. The multiple lens assemblies are configured to merge the projected sectional images to form a single tiled image. The projected sectional images may be merged on the screen by magnifying and shifting the images in an appropriate manner. The magnification and shifting of these images eliminates any visual effect on the tiled display that may result from dead-band regions defined between each pair of adjacent sections on each display device, and due to gaps between multiple display devices.

  14. Thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of optical waveguides each including a cladding bound core for guiding internal display light between first and second opposite ends by total internal reflection. The waveguides are stacked together to define a collective display thickness. Each of the cores includes a heterogeneous portion defining a light scattering site disposed longitudinally between the first and second ends. Adjacent ones of the sites are longitudinally offset from each other for forming a longitudinal internal image display over the display thickness upon scattering of internal display light thereagainst for generating a display image. In a preferred embodiment, the waveguides and scattering sites are transparent for transmitting therethrough an external image in superposition with the display image formed by scattering the internal light off the scattering sites for defining a heads up display.

  15. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  16. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  17. Recognizing Body Dysmorphic Disorder (Dysmorphophobia)

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Anukriti; Rastogi, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Dysmorphophobia is a psychiatric condition which frequently presents in the clinics of dermatologists and plastic surgeons. This disorder (also called body dysmorphic disorder) is troublesome to the patient whilst being confusing for the doctor. This commonly undiagnosed condition can be detected by a few simple steps. Timely referral to a psychiatrist benefits most patients suffering from it. This article describes with a case vignette, how to recognize body dysmorphic disorder presenting in the dermatological or aesthetic surgery set up. Diagnostic criteria, eitiology, approach to patient, management strategy and when to refer are important learning points. The importance of recognizing this disorder timely and referring the patient to the psychiatrist for appropriate treatment is crucial. This article covers all aspects of body dysmorphic disorder relevant to dermatologists and plastic surgeons and hopes to be useful in a better understanding of this disorder. PMID:26644741

  18. Recognizing Body Dysmorphic Disorder (Dysmorphophobia).

    PubMed

    Varma, Anukriti; Rastogi, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Dysmorphophobia is a psychiatric condition which frequently presents in the clinics of dermatologists and plastic surgeons. This disorder (also called body dysmorphic disorder) is troublesome to the patient whilst being confusing for the doctor. This commonly undiagnosed condition can be detected by a few simple steps. Timely referral to a psychiatrist benefits most patients suffering from it. This article describes with a case vignette, how to recognize body dysmorphic disorder presenting in the dermatological or aesthetic surgery set up. Diagnostic criteria, eitiology, approach to patient, management strategy and when to refer are important learning points. The importance of recognizing this disorder timely and referring the patient to the psychiatrist for appropriate treatment is crucial. This article covers all aspects of body dysmorphic disorder relevant to dermatologists and plastic surgeons and hopes to be useful in a better understanding of this disorder. PMID:26644741

  19. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to meters." Similar students' mistakes were reported also by AP Chemistry readers "as in previous years, students still had difficulty converting kJ to J." While traditional teaching focuses on memorizing the symbols of prefixes, little attention is given to helping learners recognize a prefix in a given quantity. I noticed in my teaching practice that by making the processes of identifying prefixes more explicit, students make fewer mistakes on unit conversion. Thus, this paper presents an outline of a lesson that focuses on prefix recognition. It is designed for a first-year college physics class; however, its key points can be addressed to any group of physics students.

  20. Display considerations for quantitative radiology.

    PubMed

    Badano, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    The early prediction of the response to treatment using quantitative imaging holds great promise for streamlining the development, assessment, approval and personalization of new therapies. However, to realize this potential, quantitative radiology needs to develop an understanding of several limitations that might hinder the application of quantitation tools and techniques. Among these limitations, the fidelity of the display device used to interpret the image data is a significant factor that affects the accuracy and precision of quantitative visual tasks, particularly those involving large, volumetric, multi-dimensional and multi-modality image sets. This paper reviews several aspects of display performance and display image quality that are likely to contribute negatively to the robustness of quantitative imaging methods. Display characteristics that will be addressed include the grayscale and color performance of different classes of display devices, the angular distribution of the emissions of liquid crystal technologies, and the temporal response for stack mode viewing. The paper will also summarize current efforts for the metrology, standardization and image quality assessment methods for display devices.: PMID:24980719

  1. Screens and Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edstrom, Malin

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of different computer screen technologies including the possible harmful effects on health of cathode ray tube (CRT) terminals. CRT's are compared to other technologies including liquid crystal displays, plasma displays, electroluminiscence displays, and light emitting diodes. A chart comparing the different…

  2. XVD Image Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Andres, Paul M.; Mortensen, Helen B.; Parizher, Vadim; McAuley, Myche; Bartholomew, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The XVD [X-Windows VICAR (video image communication and retrieval) Display] computer program offers an interactive display of VICAR and PDS (planetary data systems) images. It is designed to efficiently display multiple-GB images and runs on Solaris, Linux, or Mac OS X systems using X-Windows.

  3. Preventing and Recognizing Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse Prescription Drug Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse To ensure proper medical care, patients should discuss ...

  4. Brandon RHA recognized for energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Waddington, Kent; Neal, Gordon

    2002-01-01

    In a recent national competition recognizing leadership in energy efficiency and greenhouse gas education, Brandon Regional Health Authority was recognized for conscientious use of resources. PMID:12357581

  5. Obstacle detection by recognizing binary expansion patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram; Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for obstacle detection, based on the expansion of the image-plane projection of a textured object, as its distance from the sensor decreases. Information is conveyed by vectors whose components represent first-order temporal and spatial derivatives of the image intensity, which are related to the time to collision through the local divergence. Such vectors may be characterized as patterns corresponding to 'safe' or 'dangerous' situations. We show that essential information is conveyed by single-bit vector components, representing the signs of the relevant derivatives. We use two recently developed, high capacity classifiers, employing neural learning techniques, to recognize the imminence of collision from such patterns.

  6. Recognizing Patterns in Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2009-01-01

    An extrasolar planet sculpts the famous debris dish around Fomalhaut; probably many other debris disks contain planets that we could locate if only we could better recognize their signatures in the dust that surrounds them. I will describe the latest 3-D models of debris dish dynamics / models that include planets, grain-grain collisions and even ISM-disk interactions. I will show why all these ingredients are needed to explain disk images--and what the images are telling us about planet formation.

  7. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F.W.; Rosenberg, A.H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest. 1 fig.

  8. Cytoplasmic bacteriophage display system

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Rosenberg, Alan H.

    1998-06-16

    Disclosed are display vectors comprising DNA encoding a portion of a structural protein from a cytoplasmic bacteriophage, joined covalently to a protein or peptide of interest. Exemplified are display vectors wherein the structural protein is the T7 bacteriophage capsid protein. More specifically, in the exemplified display vectors the C-terminal amino acid residue of the portion of the capsid protein is joined to the N-terminal residue of the protein or peptide of interest. The portion of the T7 capsid protein exemplified comprises an N-terminal portion corresponding to form 10B of the T7 capsid protein. The display vectors are useful for high copy number display or lower copy number display (with larger fusion). Compositions of the type described herein are useful in connection with methods for producing a virus displaying a protein or peptide of interest.

  9. Recognizing new medical knowledge computationally.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S. J.; Cole, W. G.; Tuttle, M. S.; Olson, N. E.; Sherertz, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Can new medical knowledge be recognized computationally? We know knowledge is changing, and our knowledge-based systems will need to accommodate that change in knowledge on a regular basis if they are to stay successful. Computational recognition of these changes seems desirable. It is unlikely that low level objects in the computational universe, bits and characters, will change much over time, higher level objects of language, where meaning begins to emerge, may show change. An analysis of ten arbitrarily selected paragraphs from the Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program of the American College of Physicians was used as a test bed for nominal phrase recognition. While there were words not known to Meta-1.2, only 8 of the 32 concepts new to the primary author were pointed to by new words. Use of a barrier word method was successful in identifying 23 of the 32 new concepts. Use of co-occurrence (in sentences) of putative nominal phrases may reduce the amount of human effort involved in recognizing the emergence of new relationships. PMID:8130505

  10. Antarctic skuas recognize individual humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Young; Han, Yeong-Deok; Lee, Sang-Im; Jablonski, Piotr G; Jung, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Recent findings report that wild animals can recognize individual humans. To explain how the animals distinguish humans, two hypotheses are proposed. The high cognitive abilities hypothesis implies that pre-existing high intelligence enabled animals to acquire such abilities. The pre-exposure to stimuli hypothesis suggests that frequent encounters with humans promote the acquisition of discriminatory abilities in these species. Here, we examine individual human recognition abilities in a wild Antarctic species, the brown skua (Stercorarius antarcticus), which lives away from typical human settlements and was only recently exposed to humans due to activities at Antarctic stations. We found that, as nest visits were repeated, the skua parents responded at further distances and were more likely to attack the nest intruder. Also, we demonstrated that seven out of seven breeding pairs of skuas selectively responded to a human nest intruder with aggression and ignored a neutral human who had not previously approached the nest. The results indicate that Antarctic skuas, a species that typically inhabited in human-free areas, are able to recognize individual humans who disturbed their nests. Our findings generally support the high cognitive abilities hypothesis, but this ability can be acquired during a relatively short period in the life of an individual as a result of interactions between individual birds and humans. PMID:26939544

  11. Alternative geographical display strategies for bivariate relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Waterhouse, J.C.; Farrell, M.P.; Strand, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The complexity of regional water management problems necessitates the summarization of water resource data in a form that is easily analyzed visually. Computer generated maps are well suited for displaying complex relationships since they are easy to create and modify and are relatively inexpensive compared to traditional techniques. Development of new display techniques creates questions about the most effective display of data used for generic assessments. Recent attempts at displaying bivariate data geographically have not been entirely successful due to numerous data categories and complex color patterns used in cross mapping techniques. This paper offers an alternate method of displaying bivariate data which uses the degree of differences between two variables (e.g., water supply and water demand) to create a scale in which shades of two primary colors are used for positive and negative differences while a third color is used for the null case (i.e., within the confidence limits of the statistical model.)

  12. Polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  13. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  14. Display innovations through glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Lori L.

    2016-03-01

    Prevailing trends in thin, lightweight, high-resolution, and added functionality, such as touch sensing, continue to drive innovation in the display market. While display volumes grow, so do consumers’ need for portability, enhanced optical performance, and mechanical reliability. Technical advancements in glass design and process have enabled display innovations in these areas while supporting industry growth. Opportunities for further innovation remain open for glass manufacturers to drive new applications, enhanced functionality, and increased demand.

  15. Displaying Data As Movies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Judith G.

    1992-01-01

    NMSB Movie computer program displays large sets of data (more than million individual values). Presentation dynamic, rapidly displaying sequential image "frames" in main "movie" window. Any sequence of two-dimensional sets of data scaled between 0 and 255 (1-byte resolution) displayed as movie. Time- or slice-wise progression of data illustrated. Originally written to present data from three-dimensional ultrasonic scans of damaged aerospace composite materials, illustrates data acquired by thermal-analysis systems measuring rates of heating and cooling of various materials. Developed on Macintosh IIx computer with 8-bit color display adapter and 8 megabytes of memory using Symantec Corporation's Think C, version 4.0.

  16. Interactive holographic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jung-Young; Lee, Beam-Ryeol; Kim, Jin-Woong; Chernyshov, Oleksii O.; Park, Min-Chul

    2014-06-01

    A holographic display which is capable of displaying floating holographic images is introduced. The display is for user interaction with the image on the display. It consists of two parts; multiplexed holographic image generation and a spherical mirror. The time multiplexed image from 2 X 10 DMD frames appeared on PDLC screen is imaged by the spherical mirror and becomes a floating image. This image is combined spatially with two layered TV images appearing behind. Since the floating holographic image has a real spatial position and depth, it allows a user to interact with the image.

  17. JAVA Stereo Display Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    This toolkit provides a common interface for displaying graphical user interface (GUI) components in stereo using either specialized stereo display hardware (e.g., liquid crystal shutter or polarized glasses) or anaglyph display (red/blue glasses) on standard workstation displays. An application using this toolkit will work without modification in either environment, allowing stereo software to reach a wider audience without sacrificing high-quality display on dedicated hardware. The toolkit is written in Java for use with the Swing GUI Toolkit and has cross-platform compatibility. It hooks into the graphics system, allowing any standard Swing component to be displayed in stereo. It uses the OpenGL graphics library to control the stereo hardware and to perform the rendering. It also supports anaglyph and special stereo hardware using the same API (application-program interface), and has the ability to simulate color stereo in anaglyph mode by combining the red band of the left image with the green/blue bands of the right image. This is a low-level toolkit that accomplishes simply the display of components (including the JadeDisplay image display component). It does not include higher-level functions such as disparity adjustment, 3D cursor, or overlays all of which can be built using this toolkit.

  18. Symbol discriminability models for improved flight displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.; Trujillo San-Martin, Maite; Gille, Jennifer

    2006-02-01

    Aviation display system designers and evaluators need to know how discriminable displayed symbols will be over a wide range of conditions to assess the adequacy and effectiveness of flight display systems. If flight display symbols are to be safely recognized by pilots, it is necessary that they can be easily discriminated from each other. Sometimes psychophysical measurements can answer this question, but computational modeling may be required to assess the numerous conditions and even help design the empirical experiments that may be needed. Here we present an image discrimination model that includes position compensation. The model takes as input the luminance values for the pixels of two symbol images, the effective viewing distance, and gives as output the discriminability in just-noticeable-differences (d') and the x and y offset in pixels needed to minimize the discriminability. The model predictions are shown to be a useful upper bound for human symbol identification performance.

  19. Display technology - Human factors concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Alan; Wickens, Christopher; Kite, Kirsten

    1990-03-01

    Recent advances in the design of aircraft cockpit displays are reviewed, with an emphasis on their applicability to automobiles. The fundamental principles of display technology are introduced, and individual chapters are devoted to selective visual attention, command and status displays, foveal and peripheral displays, navigational displays, auditory displays, color and pictorial displays, head-up displays, automated systems, and dual-task performance and pilot workload. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs of typical displays are provided.

  20. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2007-05-29

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  1. Split image optical display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2005-05-31

    A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

  2. Display and Presentation Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midgley, Thomas Keith

    The use of display and presentation boards as tools to help teachers/trainers convey messages more clearly is briefly discussed, and 24 different types of display and presentation boards are described and illustrated; i.e., chalk, paste-up, hook-n-loop, electric, flannel, scroll, communication planning, acetate pocket, slot, pin-tack, preview,…

  3. Polyplanar optical display electronics

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, L.; Biscardi, C.

    1997-07-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. The prototype ten inch display is two inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. In order to achieve a long lifetime, the new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid-state laser (10,000 hr. life) at 532 nm as its light source. To produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments. In order to use the solid-state laser as the light source and also fit within the constraints of the B-52 display, the Digital Micromirror Device (DMD{trademark}) circuit board is removed from the Texas Instruments DLP light engine assembly. Due to the compact architecture of the projection system within the display chassis, the DMD{trademark} chip is operated remotely from the Texas Instruments circuit board. The authors discuss the operation of the DMD{trademark} divorced from the light engine and the interfacing of the DMD{trademark} board with various video formats (CVBS, Y/C or S-video and RGB) including the format specific to the B-52 aircraft. A brief discussion of the electronics required to drive the laser is also presented.

  4. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  5. Recognizing Movement Injuries in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Biff; Marston, Rip

    2001-01-01

    Describes five common youth sport injuries: Little League elbow, swimmer's shoulder, shin splints, Osgood's Schlatters disease, and jumper's knee, also noting their corresponding causes, behavioral symptoms, treatment techniques, and prevention strategies. The information is intended to help teachers identify sports injuries more readily and…

  6. System status display evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1988-01-01

    The System Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the crew with an enhanced capability for monitoring and managing the aircraft systems. A flight simulation in a fixed base cockpit simulator was used to evaluate alternative design concepts for this display system. The alternative concepts included pictorial versus alphanumeric text formats, multifunction versus dedicated controls, and integration of the procedures with the system status information versus paper checklists. Twelve pilots manually flew approach patterns with the different concepts. System malfunctions occurred which required the pilots to respond to the alert by reconfiguring the system. The pictorial display, the multifunction control interfaces collocated with the system display, and the procedures integrated with the status information all had shorter event processing times and lower subjective workloads.

  7. Defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1998-09-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system (NVIS) compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 242,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within Service weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil- commercial markets.

  8. Stereoscopic surround displays using interference filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peikert, Silvio; Gerhardt, Jérémie

    2012-03-01

    To achieve stereoscopy on surround displays interference filters have some advantages over other techniques. However these filters introduce strong color differences between the projectors, which may reveal that the display is compound by multiple projectors. This article presents methods for a computationally efficient correction of the colorimetric properties of multi-projector surround displays. This correction is based on automated measurements by multiple cameras and a spectrometer. The described methods were validated by applying them to a stereoscopic dome display made up of 16 high definition projectors equipped with Infitec filters. On that display we achieved a significant improvement of the colorimetric properties compared to regular soft-edge blending. Our reference setup shows that the multi-projector approach combined with interference filters allows to build highly immersive stereoscopic surround displays fulfilling today's requirements on spatial resolution, frame rates and interaction latencies.

  9. Recognizing child maltreatment in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, N Z; Lynch, M A

    1997-08-01

    Concern is increasing in Bangladesh over child abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Children from all walks of life are being treated at the Child Development Center (CDC) Dhaka Shishu Hospital for neurodevelopmental problems resulting from abuse and neglect. Efforts to protect children from sexual harassment result in girls being isolated at home or married at an early age. Some young brides are eventually abandoned and forced into prostitution. Early marriage reflects the lack of acknowledgement of a period of adolescence and the belief that puberty is a marker of adulthood. Many girls aged 8-16 are employed as live-in domestic servants, and many suffer sexual as well as emotional abuse. Garment factories, on the other hand, offer girls an escape from extreme poverty, domestic service, and early marriage but are threatened by forces that condemn child labor. Rather than ending such opportunities, employers should be encouraged to provide employees with educational and welfare facilities. The CDC seeks to explore the extent and depth of the problem of child abuse while recognizing the special circumstances at work in Bangladesh. It is also necessary to raise awareness of these issues and of the discrepancies between the law and cultural practices. For example, the legal marriage age of 18 years for a woman and 21 years for a man is often ignored. Additional forms of abuse receiving the attention of women's organizations and human rights groups include the trafficking of children. A network of concerned organizations should be created to work against the child abuse, neglect, and exploitation that Bangladesh has pledged to overcome by signing the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. PMID:9280385

  10. Producing and recognizing analogical relations.

    PubMed

    Lipkens, Regina; Hayes, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is an important component of intelligent behavior, and a key test of any approach to human language and cognition. Only a limited amount of empirical work has been conducted from a behavior analytic point of view, most of that within Relational Frame Theory (RFT), which views analogy as a matter of deriving relations among relations. The present series of four studies expands previous work by exploring the applicability of this model of analogy to topography-based rather than merely selection-based responses and by extending the work into additional relations, including nonsymmetrical ones. In each of the four studies participants pretrained in contextual control over nonarbitrary stimulus relations of sameness and opposition, or of sameness, smaller than, and larger than, learned arbitrary stimulus relations in the presence of these relational cues and derived analogies involving directly trained relations and derived relations of mutual and combinatorial entailment, measured using a variety of productive and selection-based measures. In Experiment 1 participants successfully recognized analogies among stimulus networks containing same and opposite relations; in Experiment 2 analogy was successfully used to extend derived relations to pairs of novel stimuli; in Experiment 3 the procedure used in Experiment 1 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations; in Experiment 4 the procedure used in Experiment 2 was extended to nonsymmetrical comparative relations. Although not every participant showed the effects predicted, overall the procedures occasioned relational responses consistent with an RFT account that have not yet been demonstrated in a behavior-analytic laboratory setting, including productive responding on the basis of analogies. PMID:19230515

  11. Microlaser-based displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  12. Three-dimensional display: stereo and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, William J.; Roehrig, Hans; Allen, Daniel J.

    2008-03-01

    With the advent of large, high-quality stereo display monitors and high-volume 3-D image acquisition sources, it is time to revisit the use of 3-D display for diagnostic radiology. Stereo displays may be goggled, or goggleless. Goggleless displays are called autostereographic displays. We concentrate on autostereographic technologies. Commercial LCD flat-screen 3-D autostereographic monitors typically rely on one of two techniques: blocked perspective and integral display. On the acquisition modality side: MRI, CT and 3-D ultrasound provide 3-D data sets. However, helical/spiral CT with multi-row detectors and multiple x-ray sources provides a monsoon of data. Presenting and analyzing this large amount of potentially dynamic data will require advanced presentation techniques. We begin with a very brief review the two stereo-display technologies. These displays are evolving beyond presentation of the traditional pair of views directed to fixed positions of the eyes to multi-perspective displays; at differing head positions, the eyes are presented with the proper perspective pairs corresponding to viewing a 3-D object from that position. In addition, we will look at some of the recent developments in computer-generated holograms or CGH's. CGH technology differs from the other two technologies in that it provides a wave-optically correct reproduction of the object. We then move to examples of stereo-displayed medical images and examine some of the potential strengths and weaknesses of the displays. We have installed a commercial stereo-display in our laboratory and are in the process of generating stereo-pairs of CT data. We are examining, in particular, preprocessing of the perspective data.

  13. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  14. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  15. Map display design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretz, Anthony J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive model of a pilot's navigation task and describes an experiment comparing a visual momentum map display to the traditional track-up and north-up approaches. The data show the advantage to a track-up map is its congruence with the ego-centered forward view; however, the development of survey knowledge is hindered by the inconsistency of the rotating display. The stable alignment of a north-up map aids the acquisition of survey knowledge, but there is a cost associated with the mental rotation of the display to a track-up alignment for ego-centered tasks. The results also show that visual momentum can be used to reduce the mental rotation costs of a north-up display.

  16. Stainless steel display evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Trissell, Terry L.

    2007-04-01

    Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) technology is one candidate to become a low power alternative in some applications to the currently dominant, active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD), technology. Furthermore, fabrication of the AMOLED on stainless steel (SS) foil rather than the traditional glass substrate, while presenting a set of severe technical challenges, opens up the potential for displays that are both lighter and less breakable. Also, transition to an SS foil substrate may enable rollable displays - large when used but small for stowage within gear already worn or carried or installed. Research has been initiated on AMOLED/SS technology and the first 320 x 240 color pixel 4-in. demonstration device has been evaluated in the AFRL Display Test and Evaluation Laboratory. Results of this evaluation are reported along with a research roadmap.

  17. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  18. Raster graphics display library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsrud, Anders; Stephenson, Michael B.

    1987-01-01

    The Raster Graphics Display Library (RGDL) is a high level subroutine package that give the advanced raster graphics display capabilities needed. The RGDL uses FORTRAN source code routines to build subroutines modular enough to use as stand-alone routines in a black box type of environment. Six examples are presented which will teach the use of RGDL in the fastest, most complete way possible. Routines within the display library that are used to produce raster graphics are presented in alphabetical order, each on a separate page. Each user-callable routine is described by function and calling parameters. All common blocks that are used in the display library are listed and the use of each variable within each common block is discussed. A reference on the include files that are necessary to compile the display library is contained. Each include file and its purpose are listed. The link map for MOVIE.BYU version 6, a general purpose computer graphics display system that uses RGDL software, is also contained.

  19. Recognizing User Identity by Touch on Tabletop Displays: An Interactive Authentication Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres Peralta, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Multi-touch tablets allow users to interact with computers through intuitive, natural gestures and direct manipulation of digital objects. One advantage of these devices is that they can offer a large, collaborative space where several users can work on a task at the same time. However the lack of privacy in these situations makes standard…

  20. Lessons from Tiananmen Square: Recognizing Bias in News Reporting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Joseph A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recommends teaching students to recognize bias in news reports and how personal preferences infringe on objective judgment. Provides two class activities designed to help students understand this concept. Uses the Cinderella story from three cultures and group discussion to illustrate this technique. (NL)

  1. Progress in 3D imaging and display by integral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Cuenca, R.; Saavedra, G.; Martinez-Corral, M.; Pons, A.; Javidi, B.

    2009-05-01

    Three-dimensionality is currently considered an important added value in imaging devices, and therefore the search for an optimum 3D imaging and display technique is a hot topic that is attracting important research efforts. As main value, 3D monitors should provide the observers with different perspectives of a 3D scene by simply varying the head position. Three-dimensional imaging techniques have the potential to establish a future mass-market in the fields of entertainment and communications. Integral imaging (InI), which can capture true 3D color images, has been seen as the right technology to 3D viewing to audiences of more than one person. Due to the advanced degree of development, InI technology could be ready for commercialization in the coming years. This development is the result of a strong research effort performed along the past few years by many groups. Since Integral Imaging is still an emerging technology, the first aim of the "3D Imaging and Display Laboratory" at the University of Valencia, has been the realization of a thorough study of the principles that govern its operation. Is remarkable that some of these principles have been recognized and characterized by our group. Other contributions of our research have been addressed to overcome some of the classical limitations of InI systems, like the limited depth of field (in pickup and in display), the poor axial and lateral resolution, the pseudoscopic-to-orthoscopic conversion, the production of 3D images with continuous relief, or the limited range of viewing angles of InI monitors.

  2. Phage and Yeast Display.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jared; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the availability of antimicrobial drugs, the continued development of microbial resistance--established through escape mutations and the emergence of resistant strains--limits their clinical utility. The discovery of novel, therapeutic, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers viable clinical alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. Human mAb-based therapies are typically nontoxic in patients and demonstrate high specificity for the intended microbial target. This specificity prevents negative impacts on the patient microbiome and avoids driving the resistance of nontarget species. The in vitro selection of human antibody fragment libraries displayed on phage or yeast surfaces represents a group of well-established technologies capable of generating human mAbs. The advantage of these forms of microbial display is the large repertoire of human antibody fragments present during a single selection campaign. Furthermore, the in vitro selection environments of microbial surface display allow for the rapid isolation of antibodies--and their encoding genes--against infectious pathogens and their toxins that are impractical within in vivo systems, such as murine hybridomas. This article focuses on the technologies of phage display and yeast display, as these strategies relate to the discovery of human mAbs for the treatment and vaccine development of infectious diseases. PMID:26104550

  3. Advances in display technology V; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, January 24, 25, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlam, E.

    1985-01-01

    Display human factors, and various advanced display systems, including CRT and projection display systems, electroluminescent displays, and passive displays, are discussed. Papers are presented on the selection of the best visual system, the effects of adaptation and display luminance on CRT symbol recognition time, and minimum color differences required to recognize small objects on a color CRT. Consideration is given to such display systems as a 160 megapixels per second 2000 line display, a full color liquid crystal light valve projector, and a thin film electroluminescent display optimized for cockpit application. Papers on passive displays include those on amorphous silicon thin film transistor-driven liquid crystal displays, a display based on switchable zero-order diffraction grating valves, and a liquid crystal display system for mass audience viewing.

  4. EKG and ultrasonoscope display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system is disclosed which permits simultaneous display of an EKG waveform in real time in conjunction with a two-dimensional cross-sectional image of the heart, so that the EKG waveform can be directly compared with dimensional changes in the heart. The apparatus of the invention includes an ultrasonoscope for producing a C-scan cross-sectional image of the heart. An EKG monitor circuit along with EKG logic circuitry is combined with the ultrasonoscope circuitry to produce on the same oscilloscope screen a continuous vertical trace showing the EKG waveform simultaneously with the heart image. The logic circuitry controls the oscilloscope display such that the display of both heart and EKG waveforms occurs on a real time basis.

  5. Protein and Antibody Engineering by Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Frei, J C; Lai, J R

    2016-01-01

    Phage display is an in vitro selection technique that allows for the rapid isolation of proteins with desired properties including increased affinity, specificity, stability, and new enzymatic activity. The power of phage display relies on the phenotype-to-genotype linkage of the protein of interest displayed on the phage surface with the encoding DNA packaged within the phage particle, which allows for selective enrichment of library pools and high-throughput screening of resulting clones. As an in vitro method, the conditions of the binding selection can be tightly controlled. Due to the high-throughput nature, rapidity, and ease of use, phage display is an excellent technological platform for engineering antibody or proteins with enhanced properties. Here, we describe methods for synthesis, selection, and screening of phage libraries with particular emphasis on designing humanizing antibody libraries and combinatorial scanning mutagenesis libraries. We conclude with a brief section on troubleshooting for all stages of the phage display process. PMID:27586328

  6. Multiview synthesis for autostereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dane, Gökçe.; Bhaskaran, Vasudev

    2013-09-01

    Autostereoscopic (AS) displays spatially multiplex multiple views, providing a more immersive experience by enabling users to view the content from different angles without the need of 3D glasses. Multiple views could be captured from multiple cameras at different orientations, however this could be expensive, time consuming and not applicable to some applications. The goal of multiview synthesis in this paper is to generate multiple views from a stereo image pair and disparity map by using various video processing techniques including depth/disparity map processing, initial view interpolation, inpainting and post-processing. We specifically emphasize the need for disparity processing when there is no depth information is available that is associated with the 2D data and we propose a segmentation based disparity processing algorithm to improve disparity map. Furthermore we extend the texture based 2D inpainting algorithm to 3D and further improve the hole-filling performance of view synthesis. The benefit of each step of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated with comparison to state of the art algorithms in terms of visual quality and PSNR metric. Our system is evaluated in an end-to-end multi view synthesis framework where only stereo image pair is provided as input to the system and 8 views are outputted and displayed in 8-view Alioscopy AS display.

  7. Integrated display scanner

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2004-12-21

    A display scanner includes an optical panel having a plurality of stacked optical waveguides. The waveguides define an inlet face at one end and a screen at an opposite end, with each waveguide having a core laminated between cladding. A projector projects a scan beam of light into the panel inlet face for transmission from the screen as a scan line to scan a barcode. A light sensor at the inlet face detects a return beam reflected from the barcode into the screen. A decoder decodes the return beam detected by the sensor for reading the barcode. In an exemplary embodiment, the optical panel also displays a visual image thereon.

  8. Thin display optical projector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system (20) projects light into a planar optical display (10). The display includes laminated optical waveguides (12) defining an inlet face (14) at one end and an outlet screen (16) at an opposite end. A first mirror (26) collimates light from a light source (18) along a first axis, and distributes the light along a second axis. A second mirror (28) collimates the light from the first mirror along the second axis to illuminate the inlet face and produce an image on the screen.

  9. Christmas Light Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Arthur; Renfro, Timothy

    2012-03-01

    The Digital Electronics class at McMurry University created a Christmas light display that toggles the power of different strands of lights, according to what frequencies are played in a song, as an example of an analog to digital circuit. This was accomplished using a BA3830S IC six-band audio filter and six solid-state relays.

  10. A Plasma Display Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    A graphics terminal designed for use as a remote computer input/output terminal is described. Although the terminal is intended for use in teaching applications, it has several features which make it useful in many other computer terminal applications. These features include: a 10-inch square plasma display panel, permanent storage of information…

  11. Drivers license display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokoski, Francine J.

    1997-01-01

    Carjackings are only one of a growing class of law enforcement problems associated with increasingly violent crimes and accidents involving automobiles plays weapons, drugs and alcohol. Police traffic stops have become increasingly dangerous, with an officer having no information about a vehicle's potentially armed driver until approaching him. There are 15 million alcoholics in the US and 90 percent of them have drivers licenses. Many of them continue driving even after their licenses have ben revoked or suspended. There are thousands of unlicensed truck drivers in the country, and also thousands who routinely exceed safe operating periods without rest; often using drugs in an attempt to stay alert. MIKOS has developed the Drivers License Display Systems to reduce these and other related risks. Although every state requires the continuous display of vehicle registration information on every vehicle using public roads, no state yet requires the display of driver license information. The technology exists to provide that feature as an add-on to current vehicles for nominal cost. An initial voluntary market is expected to include: municipal, rental, and high value vehicles which are most likely to be mis-appropriated. It is anticipated that state regulations will eventually require such systems in the future, beginning with commercial vehicles, and then extending to high risk drivers and eventually all vehicles. The MIKOS system offers a dual-display approach which can be deployed now, and which will utilize all existing state licenses without requiring standardization.

  12. Document Management on Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimshaw, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Describes some of the products displayed at the United Kingdom's largest document management, imaging and workflow exhibition (Document 97, Birmingham, England, October 7-9, 1997). Includes recognition technologies; document delivery; scanning; document warehousing; document management and retrieval software; workflow systems; Internet software;…

  13. Refreshing Refreshable Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Russomanno, Alexander; O'Modhrain, Sile; Gillespie, R Brent; Rodger, Matthew W M

    2015-01-01

    The increased access to books afforded to blind people via e-publishing has given them long-sought independence for both recreational and educational reading. In most cases, blind readers access materials using speech output. For some content such as highly technical texts, music, and graphics, speech is not an appropriate access modality as it does not promote deep understanding. Therefore blind braille readers often prefer electronic braille displays. But, these are prohibitively expensive. The search is on, therefore, for a low-cost refreshable display that would go beyond current technologies and deliver graphical content as well as text. And many solutions have been proposed, some of which reduce costs by restricting the number of characters that can be displayed, even down to a single braille cell. In this paper, we demonstrate that restricting tactile cues during braille reading leads to poorer performance in a letter recognition task. In particular, we show that lack of sliding contact between the fingertip and the braille reading surface results in more errors and that the number of errors increases as a function of presentation speed. These findings suggest that single cell displays which do not incorporate sliding contact are likely to be less effective for braille reading. PMID:25879973

  14. Creative Display & Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Margaret

    This book builds a case for the importance of the learning environment as functional, inviting, and enabling for children. Chapter 1, "A pressing need: why display and environment for learning matter," introduces the book, discusses a strategy for staff development, suggests points to consider when surveying the school, and talks about involving…

  15. Digital Holography Display (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Asundi, A.; Yu, Yang; Xiao, Zhen Zhong

    This paper describes the extension work from the last Digital Holography Projector System. From the developed works shows that, some unforeseen factors have created the difficulties for the system alignment. Such factors are the DMD frame rate, light source and diffractive zero order. It is really the challenging development works to achieve the virtual 3D model display on the high speed rotation screen. The three most key factors are emphasizing: 1) The display device's frame rate; 2) The light source orientation angle; and 3) The zero order filtering optic. 1) This device's is the digital micro mirror, in short is DMD. It is the high speed switching device has developed by the most recent technology. The switching frame rate can go up as high as 291fps. At first, the 8 bits depth file must be digitalized and stored for DMD onboard Ram. The digitalized data are transmitting from the PC USB to DMD onboard Ram. Instead of the data are downloading directly from the PC to DVI or VGA during display, this downloading method cause slower down the display speed, which is the common frame rate of 30 Hz. Next, the onboard Ram data then transfer to the DMD mirror's for display, at the 8 bits 291 fps speed. At this frame rate, the display 2D image can almost cover for 10 of out of the 360 0 in 1 revolution. 2) This laser light source must be installed such that free for orientated in any arbitrary angle from 220 to 450. Which is normalized to the DMD mirrors and the brief sketch show on figure (a). The purpose of orientated the light source is ensure that multi diffractive order would be reflected straight from the mirrors. (This multi diffractive order is the phenomenon of the digital micro mirror's characteristic). This mean, the reconstruct images would be followed the DMD normalized direction reflected up to fibre conduit. Moreover, this orientated method install of the laser light source is making space for other optical lenses or device driver/controller. Because, all

  16. The Developmental Dimensions of Recognizing Racist Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Vasti

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the developmental process that occurs when racist ideas are recognized as a part of college students' thought processes. Longitudinal data were collected from 29 Latino/a college students in order to illustrate how these students made meaning of racist thoughts when they began to recognize it. The framework of…

  17. Higher-Order Neural Networks Recognize Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Ochoa, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Networks of higher order have enhanced capabilities to distinguish between different two-dimensional patterns and to recognize those patterns. Also enhanced capabilities to "learn" patterns to be recognized: "trained" with far fewer examples and, therefore, in less time than necessary to train comparable first-order neural networks.

  18. Vitrification: Machines learn to recognize glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Michele; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of a viscous liquid undergo a dramatic slowdown when it is cooled to form a solid glass. Recognizing the structural changes across such a transition remains a major challenge. Machine-learning methods, similar to those Facebook uses to recognize groups of friends, have now been applied to this problem.

  19. Teaching Students to Recognize Irony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Joseph O.; Hawkins, Robin H.; Milner, Lucy M.

    2014-01-01

    This article exposes the problem of using declarative rather than procedural knowledge to help K--12 students recognize irony in stories. It offers commonplace procedures drawn from students' everyday language experience together with more abstract irony clues to help students recognize irony in stories and increase their story comprehension.…

  20. Design for SOP AMOLED display panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Ying; Xu, Bu-Heng; Wu, Chun-Ya; Meng, Zhi-Guo; Xiong, Shao-Zhen; Zhang, Li-Zhu

    2005-07-01

    A novel full color SOP (system on panel) AMOLED display based on the MIUC polycrystalline silicon TFT technique, and a new control circuit for the panel, which can deal with both VGA and DVI input signals have been developed. To realize gray-scale a sub-frame technique has been designed and implemented by FPGA device, in which an I2C module has been inserted. Through actual circuit, the whole design has been proven and the advantages of the SOP AMOLED display panel have been confirmed.

  1. Enhancing Displays by Blurring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiana, C.; Pavel, M.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Some Enhanced Vision cockpit displays consist of synthetic imagery superimposed on a real image. The high spatial frequency components of the synthetic imagery can mislead an operator by masking features of the real image. We demonstrate that blurring the synthetic image prior to superposition reduces its masking effect in high- contrast regions of the real image, while maintaining its enhancing properties in regions of the real image where visibility is low.

  2. Text File Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrus, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    LOOK program permits user to examine text file in pseudorandom access manner. Program provides user with way of rapidly examining contents of ASCII text file. LOOK opens text file for input only and accesses it in blockwise fashion. Handles text formatting and displays text lines on screen. User moves forward or backward in file by any number of lines or blocks. Provides ability to "scroll" text at various speeds in forward or backward directions.

  3. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  4. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  5. Engine monitoring display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Mary E.

    1992-01-01

    The current study is part of a larger NASA effort to develop displays for an engine-monitoring system to enable the crew to monitor engine parameter trends more effectively. The objective was to evaluate the operational utility of adding three types of information to the basic Boeing Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System (EICAS) display formats: alphanumeric alerting messages for engine parameters whose values exceed caution or warning limits; alphanumeric messages to monitor engine parameters that deviate from expected values; and a graphic depiction of the range of expected values for current conditions. Ten training and line pilots each flew 15 simulated flight scenarios with five variants of the basic EICAS format; these variants included different combinations of the added information. The pilots detected engine problems more quickly when engine alerting messages were included in the display; adding a graphic depiction of the range of expected values did not affect detection speed. The pilots rated both types of alphanumeric messages (alert and monitor parameter) as more useful and easier to interpret than the graphic depiction. Integrating engine parameter messages into the EICAS alerting system appears to be both useful and preferred.

  6. Attention-Seeking Displays.

    PubMed

    Számadó, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Animal communication abounds with extravagant displays. These signals are usually interpreted as costly signals of quality. However, there is another important function for these signals: to call the attention of the receiver to the signaller. While there is abundant empirical evidence to show the importance of this stage, it is not yet incorporated into standard signalling theory. Here I investigate a general model of signalling - based on a basic action-response game - that incorporates this searching stage. I show that giving attention-seeking displays and searching for them can be an ESS. This is a very general result and holds regardless whether only the high quality signallers or both high and low types give them. These signals need not be costly at the equilibrium and they need not be honest signals of any quality, as their function is not to signal quality but simply to call the attention of the potential receivers. These kind of displays are probably more common than their current weight in the literature would suggest. PMID:26287489

  7. Attention-Seeking Displays

    PubMed Central

    Számadó, Szabolcs

    2015-01-01

    Animal communication abounds with extravagant displays. These signals are usually interpreted as costly signals of quality. However, there is another important function for these signals: to call the attention of the receiver to the signaller. While there is abundant empirical evidence to show the importance of this stage, it is not yet incorporated into standard signalling theory. Here I investigate a general model of signalling - based on a basic action-response game - that incorporates this searching stage. I show that giving attention-seeking displays and searching for them can be an ESS. This is a very general result and holds regardless whether only the high quality signallers or both high and low types give them. These signals need not be costly at the equilibrium and they need not be honest signals of any quality, as their function is not to signal quality but simply to call the attention of the potential receivers. These kind of displays are probably more common than their current weight in the literature would suggest. PMID:26287489

  8. Ubiquitous Displays: A Distributed Network of Active Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Aditi

    In this chapter we present our work-in-progress on developing a new display paradigm where displays are not mere carriers of information, but active members of the workspace interacting with data, user, environment and other displays. The goal is to integrate such active displays seamlessly with the environment making them ubiquitous to multiple users and data. Such ubiquitous display can be a critical component of the future collaborative workspace.

  9. Stage Cylindrical Immersive Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramyan, Lucy; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Mittman, David S.; Shams, Khawaja S.

    2011-01-01

    Panoramic images with a wide field of view intend to provide a better understanding of an environment by placing objects of the environment on one seamless image. However, understanding the sizes and relative positions of the objects in a panorama is not intuitive and prone to errors because the field of view is unnatural to human perception. Scientists are often faced with the difficult task of interpreting the sizes and relative positions of objects in an environment when viewing an image of the environment on computer monitors or prints. A panorama can display an object that appears to be to the right of the viewer when it is, in fact, behind the viewer. This misinterpretation can be very costly, especially when the environment is remote and/or only accessible by unmanned vehicles. A 270 cylindrical display has been developed that surrounds the viewer with carefully calibrated panoramic imagery that correctly engages their natural kinesthetic senses and provides a more accurate awareness of the environment. The cylindrical immersive display offers a more natural window to the environment than a standard cubic CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), and the geometry allows multiple collocated users to simultaneously view data and share important decision-making tasks. A CAVE is an immersive virtual reality environment that allows one or more users to absorb themselves in a virtual environment. A common CAVE setup is a room-sized cube where the cube sides act as projection planes. By nature, all cubic CAVEs face a problem with edge matching at edges and corners of the display. Modern immersive displays have found ways to minimize seams by creating very tight edges, and rely on the user to ignore the seam. One significant deficiency of flat-walled CAVEs is that the sense of orientation and perspective within the scene is broken across adjacent walls. On any single wall, parallel lines properly converge at their vanishing point as they should, and the sense of

  10. Monocular display unit for 3D display with correct depth perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Hosomi, Takashi

    2009-11-01

    A study of virtual-reality system has been popular and its technology has been applied to medical engineering, educational engineering, a CAD/CAM system and so on. The 3D imaging display system has two types in the presentation method; one is a 3-D display system using a special glasses and the other is the monitor system requiring no special glasses. A liquid crystal display (LCD) recently comes into common use. It is possible for this display unit to provide the same size of displaying area as the image screen on the panel. A display system requiring no special glasses is useful for a 3D TV monitor, but this system has demerit such that the size of a monitor restricts the visual field for displaying images. Thus the conventional display can show only one screen, but it is impossible to enlarge the size of a screen, for example twice. To enlarge the display area, the authors have developed an enlarging method of display area using a mirror. Our extension method enables the observers to show the virtual image plane and to enlarge a screen area twice. In the developed display unit, we made use of an image separating technique using polarized glasses, a parallax barrier or a lenticular lens screen for 3D imaging. The mirror can generate the virtual image plane and it enlarges a screen area twice. Meanwhile the 3D display system using special glasses can also display virtual images over a wide area. In this paper, we present a monocular 3D vision system with accommodation mechanism, which is useful function for perceiving depth.

  11. The display of portable infrared measuring temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yitao; Gu, Guohua; Sui, Xiubao

    2014-11-01

    In recent years based on security, quality supervision, inspection and medical for the urgent need of infrared temperature measurement and infrared display technology, coupled with embedded system to achieve rapid development, which is widely used in the electronic products and the field of intelligent instruments and industrial control, this paper has designed a kind of more comprehensive, more efficient and more intuitive infrared thermometer. Unlike previous handheld infrared thermometer, we regard an embedded Linux system as the system, with its open source code, support most mainstream hardware platforms, unified peripheral interface and can be customized, to build an embedded infrared system that has provided strong system support; the pseudocolor techniques and Qt interface display technology make the image more colorful and the picture function more diverse; With ARM microprocessor as the display and temperature measuring platform, it costs reduction and reduce volume and power consumption; the FrameBuffer interface technology and multithreading technology realize the smooth real-time display. And ultimately the display size of real-time infrared image is 640 * 480 at a speed of 25 frames / sec. What is more, display is equipped with the menu option so that thermometer can be required to complete the operation through the button. The temperature display system aims at small volume, easy to use and flexible. I believe this thermometer will have a good application prospect.

  12. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care. PMID:24584010

  13. Multiplex Holography For The Display Of Three-Dimensional Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, John; Hart, Stephen

    1987-10-01

    A system based on multiplex holography has been developed for the display and storage of three-dimensional information. Volume ('stack') multiplex holograms have been produced for viewing on a novel white light display device based on dispersion compensation. The image processing and holographic techniques developed to optimise these results are described. The demonstration of potential applications of the displays for data from medical imaging, analytical techniques such as electron microscopy and scientific data analysis is detailed.

  14. Multimodality image display station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, H. Joseph

    1990-07-01

    The Multi-modality Image Display Station (MIDS) is designed for the use of physicians outside of the radiology department. Connected to a local area network or a host computer, it provides speedy access to digitized radiology images and written diagnostics needed by attending and consulting physicians near the patient bedside. Emphasis has been placed on low cost, high performance and ease of use. The work is being done as a joint study with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and as part of a joint development effort with the Mayo Clinic. MIDS is a prototype, and should not be assumed to be an IBM product.

  15. Muscle Biopsy Data Acquisition and Display

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Alden W.; Dayhoff, Ruth E.; Ledley, Robert S.

    1983-01-01

    Contemporary analysis of human or experimental muscle biopsies includes documentation of muscle fiber size for each fiber type. A semi-automated system has been devised to classify fibers, measure diameters, and display results. Special stains convert different fiber types to specific shades of gray. The microscope image is transmitted by a TV camera to a picture-processing computer. Muscle cells are recognized, classified, and measured for their minimum diameter. Data on consecutive fibers are summed and displayed as lists, histograms, or graphs according to each fiber type. Interpretation of the results is provided by the neuropathologist based on an awareness of probabilities associated with prior comparable results. Data on all patients is accumulated in categories according to disease, sex, age, and site. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 4

  16. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  17. Automatic Target Recognizer Working Group Security Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Suzanne

    1987-09-01

    The ATRWG Security Committee participates in the development of Automatic Target Recognizers (ATRs) and image processing guidelines as related to TEMPEST requirements and policies set forth by the Department of Defense (DoD).

  18. Computer based human-centered display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, David L. (Inventor); Temme, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A human centered informational display is disclosed that can be used with vehicles (e.g. aircraft) and in other operational environments where rapid human centered comprehension of an operational environment is required. The informational display integrates all cockpit information into a single display in such a way that the pilot can clearly understand with a glance, his or her spatial orientation, flight performance, engine status and power management issues, radio aids, and the location of other air traffic, runways, weather, and terrain features. With OZ the information is presented as an integrated whole, the pilot instantaneously recognizes flight path deviations, and is instinctively drawn to the corrective maneuvers. Our laboratory studies indicate that OZ transfers to the pilot all of the integrated display information in less than 200 milliseconds. The reacquisition of scan can be accomplished just as quickly. Thus, the time constants for forming a mental model are near instantaneous. The pilot's ability to keep up with rapidly changing and threatening environments is tremendously enhanced. OZ is most easily compatible with aircraft that has flight path information coded electronically. With the correct sensors (which are currently available) OZ can be installed in essentially all current aircraft.

  19. Displays, memories, and signal processing: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Articles on electronics systems and techniques were presented. The first section is on displays and other electro-optical systems; the second section is devoted to signal processing. The third section presented several new memory devices for digital equipment, including articles on holographic memories. The latest patent information available is also given.

  20. Physics-based approach to haptic display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. Michael; Colgate, J. Edward

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the implementation of complex multiple degree of freedom virtual environments for haptic display. We suggest that a physics based approach to rigid body simulation is appropriate for hand tool simulation, but that currently available simulation techniques are not sufficient to guarantee successful implementation. We discuss the desirable features of a virtual environment simulation, specifically highlighting the importance of stability guarantees.

  1. Introduction to building projection-based tiled display systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Stevens, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago

    2000-07-01

    This tutorial introduces the concepts and technologies needed to build projector-based display systems. Tiled displays offer scalability, high resolution, and large formats for various applications. Tiled displays are an emerging technology for constructing semi-immersive visualization environments capable of presenting high-resolution images from scientific simulation. The largest impact may well arise from using large-format tiled displays as one of possibly multiple displays in building information or active spaces that surround the user with diverse ways of interacting with data and multimedia information flows. These environments may prove the ultimate successor to the desktop metaphor for information technology work. Several fundamental technological problems must be addressed to make tiled displays practical. These include: the choice of screen materials and support structures; choice of projectors, projector supports, and optional fine positioners; techniques for integrating image tiles into a seamless whole; interface devices for interaction with applications; display generators and interfaces; and the display software environment.

  2. Black optic display

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1997-01-01

    An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

  3. Three dimensional interactive display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) interactive display and method of forming the same, includes a transparent capaciflector (TC) camera formed on a transparent shield layer on the screen surface. A first dielectric layer is formed on the shield layer. A first wire layer is formed on the first dielectric layer. A second dielectric layer is formed on the first wire layer. A second wire layer is formed on the second dielectric layer. Wires on the first wire layer and second wire layer are grouped into groups of parallel wires with a turnaround at one end of each group and a sensor pad at the opposite end. An operational amplifier is connected to each of the sensor pads and the shield pad biases the pads and receives a signal from connected sensor pads in response to intrusion of a probe. The signal is proportional to probe location with respect to the monitor screen.

  4. Infants recognize the subtle happiness expression.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hiroko; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2014-01-01

    Facial movement facilitates the recognition of facial expressions. While an intense expression is expressive enough to be recognized in a still image, a subtle expression can be recognized only in motion (Ambadar, Schooler, & Cohn, 2005, Psychological Science, 16, 403-410). The present study investigated whether infants recognize a subtle expression, and whether facial movement facilitates infants' recognition of a subtle expression. In experiment 1 4- to 7-month-old infants were tested for their spontaneous preference for a happy subtle expression rather than a neutral face, but they did not show a spontaneous preference. To confirm that infants did not recognize the static subtle expression, we conducted experiment 2 using the familiarization-novelty procedure. Infants were first familiarized with a static subtle happy expression. Following familiarization, they were presented with a pair of peak expressions of happiness and anger, but showed no significant novelty preference. In experiment 3 we presented the subtle expression dynamically. Infants were familiarized with a dynamic subtle expression and were tested for their novelty preference. The 6- to 7-month-olds showed a significant novelty preference, while 4- to 5-month-olds did not. These results suggest that infants can recognize the subtle expression only in dynamic presentation and that facial movement facilitates infants' recognition of facial expression. PMID:25109015

  5. SES cupola interactive display design environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bang Q.; Kirkhoff, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Simulator, located at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, is tasked with providing a real-time simulator for developing displays and controls targeted for the Space Station Freedom. These displays and controls will exist inside an enclosed workstation located on the space station. The simulation is currently providing the engineering analysis environment for NASA and contractor personnel to design, prototype, and test alternatives for graphical presentation of data to an astronaut while he performs specified tasks. A highly desirable aspect of this environment is to have the capability to rapidly develop and bring on-line a number of different displays for use in determining the best utilization of graphics techniques in achieving maximum efficiency of the test subject fulfilling his task. The Systems Engineering Simulator now has available a tool which assists in the rapid development of displays for these graphic workstations. The Display Builder was developed in-house to provide an environment which allows easy construction and modification of displays within minutes of receiving requirements for specific tests.

  6. Autostereoscopic video display with motion parallax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Stephen P.

    1997-05-01

    Described, is the HinesLab '3DTV,' a 3-dimensional video display which provides true stereo 3-D images, without glasses. Multiple viewers can move in front of the display, seeing true stereo images with motion parallax. Applications include 3-D video arcade games, avionics, engineering workstations, scientific visualization, video phones, and 3-D television. The display is built around a single liquid crystal panel, on which multiple images are projected to a screen where they form the 3-D image. The relationships of objects are confirmed in three dimensional space as the viewer moves through the viewing positions. The HinesLab autostereoscopic technology is transparent to the user. The 3DTV display can be produced economically because it uses a single display panel and conventional optics. The primary advantage of this technique is its simplicity. CGI images are supplied to the monitor with a single video board. Three- dimensional television can be broadcast by a single unmodified television station (NTSC, PAL, SECAM, HDTV, etc.), and recorded and replayed in 3-D with a VCR. From 4 - 21 eye positions can be created, with a range of resolution and viewing angles, limited only by currently available liquid- crystal display technology.

  7. Dual redundant display in bubble canopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi, Ken; Niemczyk, James

    2010-04-01

    Today's cockpit integrator, whether for state of the art military fast jet, or piston powered general aviation, is striving to utilize all available panel space for AMLCD based displays to enhance situational awareness and increase safety. The benefits of a glass cockpit have been well studied and documented. The technology used to create these glass cockpits, however, is driven by commercial AMLCD demand which far outstrips the combined worldwide avionics requirements. In order to satisfy the wide variety of human factors and environmental requirements, large area displays have been developed to maximize the usable display area while also providing necessary redundancy in case of failure. The AMLCD has been optimized for extremely wide viewing angles driven by the flat panel TV market. In some cockpit applications, wide viewing cones are desired. In bubble canopy cockpits, however, narrow viewing cones are desired to reduce canopy reflections. American Panel Corporation has developed AMLCD displays that maximize viewing area, provide redundancy, while also providing a very narrow viewing cone even though commercial AMLCD technology is employed suitable for high performance AMLCD Displays. This paper investigates both the large area display architecture with several available options to solve redundancy as well as beam steering techniques to also limit canopy reflections.

  8. Desktop autostereoscopic display using compact LED projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Hiroki; Ohshima, Tetsuya; Ebina, Osamu; Arimoto, Akira

    2003-05-01

    A stereoscopic display using a curved directional reflection (CDR) screen and projectors is a promising approach towards realizing an immersive three-dimensional (3D) display system. The CDR screen consists of a corner reflective mirror sheet for horizontal focusing and an anisotropic diffuser sheet for vertical diffusion. The CDR 3D display can provide bright and large images without the need for special glasses. In this paper, we introduce this immersive 3D display technique onto the desktop display. To realize this concept, we have developed the compact projectors with light emitting diode (LED) light sources and a liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS). These have allowed the realization of 65 mm width projectors that are able to be put side by side at the interocular distance. The efficient optical system of an LED array as area-light-sources combined with an ultra high gain (>100) CDR screen have allowed for a desktop autostereoscopic display whose luminance is more than 100 cd/m2 with only 9 W power consumption. This system provides immersive 3D images for only the observer and keeps his privacy.

  9. Identifying the Critical Time Period for Information Extraction when Recognizing Sequences of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Jamie S.; Williams, A. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The authors attempted to determine the critical time period for information extraction when recognizing play sequences in soccer. Although efforts have been made to identify the perceptual information underpinning such decisions, no researchers have attempted to determine "when" this information may be extracted from the display. The authors…

  10. [Development and research of temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display].

    PubMed

    Fan, Shounian; Jiang, Chenxi; Cai, Yunchang; Pan, Yangzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Wu, Qiang; Zheng, Yaxi; Liu, Xiaoqiao; Li, Shiying

    2004-08-01

    A temporary demand pacemaker with electrocardiosignal display is introduced in this paper. Double way low-noise electrocardiosignal preamplifier, amplitude limiter, high and low pass filter, 50 Hz notch filter, TTL level generator and stimulating pulse formation circuit are components of the hardware electrocircuit. The demand pacing and the electrocardiosignal display are separately controlled by the software in which the double microcontrollers communications technique is used. In this study, liquid crystal display is firstly used in body surface electrocardiosignal display or intracardial electrophysiologic signal display when the temporary demand pacemaker is installed and put into use. The machine has proven clinically useful and can be of wide appliation. PMID:15357453

  11. Corridor Displays in Glass Cabinets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Lee D.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on the increased enthusiasm of college students toward physics following the development of student-activated corridor display units. Includes a listing of displays and comments on student reactions. (CP)

  12. Display Factors and Subjective Evaluation of Dynamic Text Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Joey C. Y.; Chan, Alan H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Communications technology has exploded in past decades, leading to the question of which display method is the best to deliver electronic text messages. Many of these systems employ cathode ray tubes, liquid crystal displays, gas plasma displays, or light-emitting diodes as the output device. In order to overcome the limitations of screen size of the display units, numerous means of presenting dynamic display on screens have been invented. There are many factors that affect the readability of electronic text. This paper reviews some related empirical studies concerning the various display methods of dynamic text presentation, such as text display type, character type, text display direction, and text/background color combination, highlighting method and validity of highlighting. The subjective evaluation questionnaire is also discussed. According to the readability and preference ratings of the subjects given under different conditions, the best display method and color for comprehending the delivered messages were investigated. General recommendations of displaying dynamic information are made for the large display units which have been widely used for delivering important messages.

  13. F-22 cockpit display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, David C.

    1994-06-01

    The F-22 is the first exclusively glass cockpit where all instrumentation has been replaced by displays. The F-22 Engineering and Manufacturing Development Program is implementing the display technology proven during the Advanced Tactical Fighter Demonstration and Validation program. This paper will describe how the F-22 goals have been met and some of the tradeoffs that resulted in the current display design.

  14. Developing Intepretive Soil Education Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansmeyer, T. L.; Cooper, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes several soil educational displays developed for park and nature center trails. Displays include full-scale soil monoliths displayed along the trails with explanations on why and how the soils are different, and micro-monoliths exhibiting the different soil types. (MDH)

  15. Recognizing, Confronting, and Eliminating Workplace Bullying.

    PubMed

    Berry, Peggy Ann; Gillespie, Gordon L; Fisher, Bonnie S; Gormley, Denise K

    2016-07-01

    Workplace bullying (WPB) behaviors negatively affect nurse productivity, satisfaction, and retention, and hinder safe patient care. The purpose of this article is to define WPB, differentiate between incivility and WPB, and recommend actions to prevent WPB behaviors. Informed occupational and environmental health nurses and nurse leaders must recognize, confront, and eliminate WPB in their facilities and organizations. Recognizing, confronting, and eliminating WPB behaviors in health care is a crucial first step toward sustained improvements in patient care quality and the health and safety of health care employees. PMID:27053288

  16. Equipping African American Clergy to Recognize Depression.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Jean Spann; Morris, Edith; Collins, Charles W; Watson, Albert; Williams, Jennifer E; Ferguson, Bʼnai; Ruhlman, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    Many African Americans (AAs) use clergy as their primary source of help for depression, with few being referred to mental health providers. This study used face-to-face workshops to train AA clergy to recognize the symptoms and levels of severity of depression. A pretest/posttest format was used to test knowledge (N = 42) about depression symptoms. Results showed that the participation improved the clergy's ability to recognize depression symptoms. Faith community nurses can develop workshops for clergy to improve recognition and treatment of depression. PMID:27610907

  17. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  18. Digital holography display (3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheok Peng; Zheng, Huadong; Chia, Yong Poo; Cheng, Chee Yuen; Yu, Yang; Yu, Yingjie; Asundi, Anand

    2013-06-01

    This paper is to describe a color digital holographic projector and this system is comprised of RGB lasers, 3 units of Digital Micro-Mirror Device (DMD) and high speed rotating diffuser. In this research, we focused on colorings Digital holograms and synchronized RGB digital holograms versus rotated diffuser. To achieve this phenomenon, three of the holograms optical path need to be aligned to pass through a same beam splitter and eventually combined as one colored holograms output While, this colored hologram will be reconstructed on volumetric screen (rotated diffuser) at the floating manner in free space. To obtain these result 3 key factors is investigated: 1. To configured 1 master and 2 slaves digital micro mirror illumination time 2. To reconstructed holograms orientation angle diffuser versus rotating speed. 3. To synchronize rotating diffuser speed versus DMD frame-rate Last but not least, the team built a prototype Color Digital Holography Display but more developments are required to follow up such as, enhance system's reliability, robustness, compactness and 3D realistic images floating in the free air space.

  19. 128-view autostereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junejei; Wang, Yuchang

    2015-09-01

    A 128-view auto-stereoscopic display using laser-scan and angle-magnifying screen is proposed. On the exit pupil of front projection lens, 8 spots of laser-scanning are provided. The exit pupil of the rear projection lens is doubled by two aperture-relay lenses and 8 spots of laser-scanning are doubled to 16 spots. The angle-magnifying screen comprises the main part of double-lenticular and the attaching part of micro-deflector. With the micro-deflector, angles formed by the laser scanning are deflected into eight angle ranges. With the double-lenticular, eight angle ranges incident into the screen are magnified into a large field of view for the observer. The laser scanning is realized by the vibration of Galvano-mirror that synchronizing with the frame rate of the DMD. For one cycle of vibration by the Galvo-mirror, 16 steps of reflections happen on going and returning paths. For each viewing position, 48 viewing per second are provided. The micro-deflector part comprises the (-4, +4) vertical micro-deflector and the (-1, -1, +1, +3) 45° micro-deflector. Each elements of the micro-deflector are aligned with the images of the pixels that come from the DMD. When a scanning of 16 spots passes different deflecting elements that cover 8 different pixels, the scanning is deflected to eight angle ranges and 128 partitioned viewing zones are formed in the observer plane.

  20. How Should a Speech Recognizer Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharenborg, Odette; Norris, Dennis; ten Bosch, Louis; McQueen, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Although researchers studying human speech recognition (HSR) and automatic speech recognition (ASR) share a common interest in how information processing systems (human or machine) recognize spoken language, there is little communication between the two disciplines. We suggest that this lack of communication follows largely from the fact that…

  1. Great Apes' Capacities to Recognize Relational Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Call, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing relational similarity relies on the ability to understand that defining object properties might not lie in the objects individually, but in the relations of the properties of various object to each other. This aptitude is highly relevant for many important human skills such as language, reasoning, categorization and understanding…

  2. Unique interactive projection display screen

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1997-11-01

    Projection systems continue to be the best method to produce large (1 meter and larger) displays. However, in order to produce a large display, considerable volume is typically required. The Polyplanar Optic Display (POD) is a novel type of projection display screen, which for the first time, makes it possible to produce a large projection system that is self-contained and only inches thick. In addition, this display screen is matte black in appearance allowing it to be used in high ambient light conditions. This screen is also interactive and can be remotely controlled via an infrared optical pointer resulting in mouse-like control of the display. Furthermore, this display need not be flat since it can be made curved to wrap around a viewer as well as being flexible.

  3. LED instrument approach instruction display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Crouch, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A display employing light emitting diodes (LED's) was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for presenting landing and navigation information to reduce the workload of general aviation pilots during IFR flight. The display consists of a paper tape reader, digital memory, control electronics, digital latches, and LED alphanumeric displays. A presentable digital countdown clock-timer is included as part of the system to provide a convenient means of monitoring time intervals for precise flight navigation. The system is a limited capability prototype assembled to test pilot reaction to such a device under simulated IFR operation. Pilot opinion indicates that the display is helpful in reducing the IFR pilots workload when used with a runway approach plate. However, the development of a compact, low power second generation display was recommended which could present several instructions simultaneously and provide information update capability. A microprocessor-based display could fulfill these requirements.

  4. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible andmore » are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.« less

  5. Stereo and motion in the display of 3-D scattergrams

    SciTech Connect

    Littlefield, R.J.

    1982-04-01

    A display technique is described that is useful for detecting structure in a 3-dimensional distribution of points. The technique uses a high resolution color raster display to produce a 3-D scattergram. Depth cueing is provided by motion parallax using a capture-replay mechanism. Stereo vision depth cues can also be provided. The paper discusses some general aspects of stereo scattergrams and describes their implementation as red/green anaglyphs. These techniques have been used with data sets containing over 20,000 data points. They can be implemented on relatively inexpensive hardware. (A film of the display was shown at the conference.)

  6. New portable FELIX 3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Knut; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis; Bahr, Detlef; Vogt, Carsten; Blohm, Christian; Scharschmidt, Karl-Heinz

    1998-04-01

    An improved generation of our 'FELIX 3D Display' is presented. This system is compact, light, modular and easy to transport. The created volumetric images consist of many voxels, which are generated in a half-sphere display volume. In that way a spatial object can be displayed occupying a physical space with height, width and depth. The new FELIX generation uses a screen rotating with 20 revolutions per second. This target screen is mounted by an easy to change mechanism making it possible to use appropriate screens for the specific purpose of the display. An acousto-optic deflection unit with an integrated small diode pumped laser draws the images on the spinning screen. Images can consist of up to 10,000 voxels at a refresh rate of 20 Hz. Currently two different hardware systems are investigated. The first one is based on a standard PCMCIA digital/analog converter card as an interface and is controlled by a notebook. The developed software is provided with a graphical user interface enabling several animation features. The second, new prototype is designed to display images created by standard CAD applications. It includes the development of a new high speed hardware interface suitable for state-of-the- art fast and high resolution scanning devices, which require high data rates. A true 3D volume display as described will complement the broad range of 3D visualization tools, such as volume rendering packages, stereoscopic and virtual reality techniques, which have become widely available in recent years. Potential applications for the FELIX 3D display include imaging in the field so fair traffic control, medical imaging, computer aided design, science as well as entertainment.

  7. Augmenting digital displays with computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing

    As we inevitably step deeper and deeper into a world connected via the Internet, more and more information will be exchanged digitally. Displays are the interface between digital information and each individual. Naturally, one fundamental goal of displays is to reproduce information as realistically as possible since humans still care a lot about what happens in the real world. Human eyes are the receiving end of such information exchange; therefore it is impossible to study displays without studying the human visual system. In fact, the design of displays is rather closely coupled with what human eyes are capable of perceiving. For example, we are less interested in building displays that emit light in the invisible spectrum. This dissertation explores how we can augment displays with computation, which takes both display hardware and the human visual system into consideration. Four novel projects on display technologies are included in this dissertation: First, we propose a software-based approach to driving multiview autostereoscopic displays. Our display algorithm can dynamically assign views to hardware display zones based on multiple observers' current head positions, substantially reducing crosstalk and stereo inversion. Second, we present a dense projector array that creates a seamless 3D viewing experience for multiple viewers. We smoothly interpolate the set of viewer heights and distances on a per-vertex basis across the arrays field of view, reducing image distortion, crosstalk, and artifacts from tracking errors. Third, we propose a method for high dynamic range display calibration that takes into account the variation of the chrominance error over luminance. We propose a data structure for enabling efficient representation and querying of the calibration function, which also allows user-guided balancing between memory consumption and the amount of computation. Fourth, we present user studies that demonstrate that the ˜ 60 Hz critical flicker fusion

  8. Flat panel planar optic display. Revision 4/95

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-05-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic glass sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  9. PACS displays: how to select the right display technology.

    PubMed

    Hirschorn, David S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Flynn, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    The medical imaging display is a precision instrument with many features not found in commercial-grade displays. The more one understands what these features are and their corresponding clinical value, the better one can make a purchase decision. None of these displays maintain themselves for 5 years or more without some degree of automatic or manual performance testing. Routine calibration conformance checks are beginning to be mandated by the departments of health of many states. Most manufacturers provide mechanisms to perform these checks and keep track of their results, some more easily than others. A consistent display brightness of about 400 cd/m(2) and close conformance to the DICOM curve are the key components of a successful check. Displays are typically characterized by the number of pixels they contain, usually 2, 3, or 5 megapixels, but this is the least useful determinant of image quality. What matters most is the size of the pixels and the size of the whole display, which should be selected on the basis of the typical viewing distance. The farther one's eyes are from the display, the larger the pixels and the overall display size can be while still feeding the eye as much information as it can see. Care should be taken to use the appropriate display in a given setting for the clinical purpose at hand. PMID:25467904

  10. Evolution Of Map Display Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, Alan

    1983-06-01

    It is now over 20 years since Ferranti plc introduced optically projected map displays into operational aircraft navigation systems. Then, as now, it was the function of the display to present an image of a topographical map to a pilot or navigator with his present position clearly identified. Then, as now, the map image was projected from a reduced image stored on colour micro film. Then, as now, the fundamental design problems are the same.In the exposed environment of an aircraft cockpit where brightness levels may vary from those associated with direct sunlight on the one hand, to starlight on the other, how does one design an optical system with sufficient luminance, contrast and resolution where in the daytime sunlight may fall on the display or in the pilot's eyes, and at night time the display luminance must not detract from the pilot's ability to pick up external clues? This paper traces the development of Ferranti plc optically projected map displays from the early V Bomber and the ill-fated TSR2 displays to the Harrier and Concorde displays. It then goes on to the development of combined map and electronic displays (COMED), showing how an earlier design, as fitted to Tornado, has been developed into the current COMED design which is fitted to the F-18 and Jaguar aircraft. In each of the above display systems particular features of optical design interest are identified and their impact on the design as a whole are discussed. The use of prisms both for optical rotation and translation, techniques for the maximisation of luminance, the problems associated with contrast enhancement, particularly with polarising filters in the presence of optically active materials, the use of aerial image combining systems and the impact of the pilot interface on the system parameter are all included.Perhaps the most interesting result in considering the evolution of map displays has not been so much the designer's solutions in overcoming the various design problems but

  11. MEMS tactile display: from fabrication to characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Norihisa; Kosemura, Yumi; Watanabe, Junpei; Ishikawa, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    We report fabrication and characterization of MEMS-based tactile display that can display users various tactile information, such as Braille codes and surface textures. The display consists of 9 micro-actuators that are equipped with hydraulic displacement amplification mechanism (HDAM) to achieve large enough displacement to stimulate the human tactile receptors. HDAM encapsulates incompressible liquids. We developed a liquid encapsulation process, which we termed as Bonding-in-Liquid Technique, where bonding with a UV-curable resin in glycerin is conducted in the liquid, which prevented interfusion of air bubbles and deformation of the membrane during the bonding. HDAM successfully amplified the displacement generated by piezoelectric actuators by a factor of 6. The display could virtually produce "rough" and "smooth" surfaces, by controlling the vibration frequency, displacement, and the actuation periods of an actuator until the adjacent actuator was driven. We introduced a sample comparison method to characterize the surfaces, which involves human tactile sensation. First, we prepared samples whose mechanical properties are known. We displayed a surface texture to the user by controlling the parameters and then, the user selects a sample that has the most similar surface texture. By doing so, we can correlate the parameters with the mechanical properties of the sample as well as find the sets of the parameters that can provide similar tactile information to many users. The preliminary results with respect to roughness and hardness is presented.

  12. Military display market segment: helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2004-09-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of one of its segments: helicopter displays. Parameters requiring special consideration, to include luminance ranges, contrast ratio, viewing angles, and chromaticity coordinates, are examined. Performance requirements for rotary-wing displays relative to several premier applications are summarized. Display sizes having aggregate defense applications of 5,000 units or greater and having DoD applications across 10 or more platforms, are tabulated. The issue of size commonality is addressed where distribution of active area sizes across helicopter platforms, individually, in groups of two through nine, and ten or greater, is illustrated. Rotary-wing displays are also analyzed by technology, where total quantities of such displays are broken out into CRT, LCD, AMLCD, EM, LED, Incandescent, Plasma and TFEL percentages. Custom, versus Rugged commercial, versus commercial off-the-shelf designs are contrasted. High and low information content designs are identified. Displays for several high-profile military helicopter programs are discussed, to include both technical specifications and program history. The military display market study is summarized with breakouts for the helicopter market segment. Our defense-wide study as of March 2004 has documented 1,015,494 direct view and virtual image displays distributed across 1,181 display sizes and 503 weapon systems. Helicopter displays account for 67,472 displays (just 6.6% of DoD total) and comprise 83 sizes (7.0% of total DoD) in 76 platforms (15.1% of total DoD). Some 47.6% of these rotary-wing applications involve low information content displays comprising just a few characters in one color; however, as per fixed-wing aircraft, the predominant instantiation involves higher information content units capable of showing changeable graphics, color and video.

  13. Recognizing and Nurturing Math Talent in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, M. Katherine; Firmender, Janine M.; Casa, Tutita M.

    2013-01-01

    What is math talent? Ten different educators will most likely provide 10 different answers. Researchers state that one reason mathematical talent is difficult to describe involves the different ways children manifest math talent. Children can display math talent in three different ways: (a) those who reason abstractly and have an "algebraic…

  14. Approaches to Dynamic Decluttering of Cartographic Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre; Tuttle, Mark A; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2008-01-01

    Most cartographers and map designers are familiar with the problem of congestion of symbols on maps and cartographic displays. Geographic objects are often clustered in some areas and at the same time the remaining map space is left virtually empty. One example of this problem is the representation of networks such as electric grids, transportation, or communication networks. The elements of the networks are typically clustered around highly populated areas while the rest of the map contains relatively few nodes, links, and other features. In this study we are investigating the applicability of several continuous geometric transformations to reduce the clutter on maps and cartographic displays. The techniques tested include map projections with customized parameters, perspective transformation of the map plane, fish-eye, and a diffusion-based algorithm for equalizing feature density. The map space is transformed so that a user can discern details in the areas with high density of the features while preserving the larger context and links between local and more general contexts. We use animation to provide the user with more visual clues and simplify comprehension of the transformed map. The study shows that the proposed techniques are useful for improving graphical efficiency of cartographic displays and produce visually appealing results. The choice of a specific decluttering method depends upon the purpose, geometric configuration of the portrayed objects, and display device resolution.

  15. Paradigm for expert display systems in nuclear plant and elsewhere

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, J.R.

    1986-02-01

    Display of relevant data concerning plant operation has been a concern of the nuclear industry from its beginnings. Since the incident at Three Mile Island, this matter has had much careful scrutiny. L. Beltracchi, in particular, has originated a sequence of important steps to improve the operator's ability to recognize plant states and their changes. In the early 1980's, Beltracchi (1983, 1984) proposed a display based on the Rankine cycle for light water reactors. More recently, in an unpublished work (1986b), he described an extension that includes a small, rule-based system in the display program, drawing inferences about plant operation from sensor readings, and displaying those inferences on the Rankine display. Our paper examines Beltracchi's rule-based display from the perspective of knowledge bases. Earlier (Gabriel, 1983) we noted that analytical models of system behavior are just as much a knowledge base as are the rules of a conventional expert system. The problem of finding useful displays for a complex plant is discussed from this perspective. We then present a paradigm for developing designs with properties similar to those in Beltracchi's Rankine cycle display. Finally, to clarify the issue, we give a small example from an imaginary plant.

  16. OLED displays for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Janice K.; Brown, Julie J.; Hack, Michael G.; Hewitt, Richard H.; Huffman, David C.

    2000-08-01

    Through the years, there has been a steady evolution of technology to ruggedize displays for harsh military environments. This work has spanned cathode-ray-tubes (CRTs) to present day active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Organic light emitting device (OLED) display technology has the potential to solve many of the inherent limitations of today's AMLCD technology and to provide the military system designer with a more cost effective solution. OLED technology offers bright, colorful emissive light with excellent power efficiency, wide viewing angle and video response rates; it is also demonstrating the requisite environmental robustness for a wide variety of display applications. OLED displays also have a very thin and lightweight form factor. Moreover, in full production, OLEDs are projected to be very cost-effective by comparison to AMLCDs. This paper will examine some of these advantages and the opportunities presented by the rapidly emerging OLED display technology for military applications.

  17. Defense display strategy and roadmaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.

    2002-08-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) is developing a new strategy for displays. The new displays science and technology roadmap will incorporate urgent warfighter needs as well as investment opportunities where military advantage is foreseen. Thrusts now ending include the High Definition System (HDS) program and related initiatives, like flexible displays, at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Continuing thrusts include a variety of Serviceled programs to develop micro-displays for virtual image helmet-/rifle-mounted systems for pilots and soldiers, novel displays, materials, and basic research. New thrusts are being formulated for ultra-resolution, true 3D, and intelligent displays (integration of computers and communication functions into screens). The new strategy is Service-led.

  18. Recognizing Dynamic Faces in Malaysian Chinese Participants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chrystalle B Y; Sheppard, Elizabeth; Stephen, Ian D

    2016-03-01

    High performance level in face recognition studies does not seem to be replicable in real-life situations possibly because of the artificial nature of laboratory studies. Recognizing faces in natural social situations may be a more challenging task, as it involves constant examination of dynamic facial motions that may alter facial structure vital to the recognition of unfamiliar faces. Because of the incongruences of recognition performance, the current study developed stimuli that closely represent natural social situations to yield results that more accurately reflect observers' performance in real-life settings. Naturalistic stimuli of African, East Asian, and Western Caucasian actors introducing themselves were presented to investigate Malaysian Chinese participants' recognition sensitivity and looking strategies when performing a face recognition task. When perceiving dynamic facial stimuli, participants fixated most on the nose, followed by the mouth then the eyes. Focusing on the nose may have enabled participants to gain a more holistic view of actors' facial and head movements, which proved to be beneficial in recognizing identities. Participants recognized all three races of faces equally well. The current results, which differed from a previous static face recognition study, may be a more accurate reflection of observers' recognition abilities and looking strategies. PMID:26562869

  19. Recognizing Materials using Perceptually Inspired Features

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Lavanya; Liu, Ce; Rosenholtz, Ruth; Adelson, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Our world consists not only of objects and scenes but also of materials of various kinds. Being able to recognize the materials that surround us (e.g., plastic, glass, concrete) is important for humans as well as for computer vision systems. Unfortunately, materials have received little attention in the visual recognition literature, and very few computer vision systems have been designed specifically to recognize materials. In this paper, we present a system for recognizing material categories from single images. We propose a set of low and mid-level image features that are based on studies of human material recognition, and we combine these features using an SVM classifier. Our system outperforms a state-of-the-art system [Varma and Zisserman, 2009] on a challenging database of real-world material categories [Sharan et al., 2009]. When the performance of our system is compared directly to that of human observers, humans outperform our system quite easily. However, when we account for the local nature of our image features and the surface properties they measure (e.g., color, texture, local shape), our system rivals human performance. We suggest that future progress in material recognition will come from: (1) a deeper understanding of the role of non-local surface properties (e.g., extended highlights, object identity); and (2) efforts to model such non-local surface properties in images. PMID:23914070

  20. Will true 3d display devices aid geologic interpretation. [Mirage

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.R. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    A description is given of true 3D display devices and techniques that are being evaluated in various research laboratories around the world. These advances are closely tied to the expected application of 3D display devices as interpretational tools for explorationists. 34 refs.

  1. Improving the computer-human interface: The qualitative monitor display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugh, H. W.; Zygielbaum, A. I.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for displaying the information needed by DSN operators for monitoring station performance is described. Known as a 'qualitative monitor,' it presents continuous variables in quasi-analog form on a digital cathode ray tube (CRT) display. Color changes, field reverses and blinking symbols assist the operator in identifying variables that are within acceptable limits and in performing corrective action when needed.

  2. Prototyping user displays using CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles P.; Miller, Ross; Krolak, Patrick; Vesty, Matt

    1990-01-01

    CLIPS is being used as an integral module of a rapid prototyping system. The prototyping system consists of a display manager for object browsing, a graph program for displaying line and bar charts, and a communications server for routing messages between modules. A CLIPS simulation of a physical model provides dynamic control of the user's display. Currently, a project is well underway to prototype the Advanced Automation System (AAS) for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  3. The display of tactile information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrick, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    There are a number of examples of natural tactile displays that can five us some insights about the solid geometry of touch, and recent experimental work on the subject has extended our thinking considerably. The concern of here is, however, more with synthetic or artificial displays for the production of a virtual environment. Features of synthetic displays that have enjoyed some success in one of the following two enterprises are discussed: the study of the spatio-temporal dimensions of stimuli that afford accurate and rapid processing of environmental information, or the use of displays in the design of sensory aids for disabled persons.

  4. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  5. Updated defense display market assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of principal military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. Principal military displays are defined as those occupying appreciable crewstation real-estate and/or those without which the platform could not carry out its intended mission. DoD 'office' applications are excluded from this study. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, angle, color, video capability, and night vision imaging system compatibility. Funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted crewstation modification kits, and form-fit upgrades are taken into account. This paper provides an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a necessary reference by which to meet DoD requirements for military displays in a timely and cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD installed base for direct-view and large-area military displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 313,000. Miniature displays are those which must be magnified to be viewed, involve a significantly different manufacturing paradigm and are used in helmet mounted displays and thermal weapon sight applications. Some 114,000 miniature displays are presently included within future weapon system acquisition plans. For vendor production planning purposes it is noted that foreign military sales could substantially increase these quantities. The vanishing vendor syndrome (VVS) for older display technologies continues to be a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently must leverage the more modern, especially flat panel, display technologies being developed to replace older, especially cathode ray tube, technology for civil-commercial markets. Total DoD display needs (FPD, HMD) are some 427,000.

  6. Non-Traditional Displays for Mission Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Schutte, Paul C.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in automation capability and reliability have changed the role of humans from operating and controlling processes to simply monitoring them for anomalies. However, humans are traditionally bad monitors of highly reliable systems over time. Thus, the human is assigned a task for which he is ill equipped. We believe that this has led to the dominance of human error in process control activities such as operating transportation systems (aircraft and trains), monitoring patient health in the medical industry, and controlling plant operations. Research has shown, though, that an automated monitor can assist humans in recognizing and dealing with failures. One possible solution to this predicament is to use a polar-star display that will show deviations from normal states based on parameters that are most indicative of mission health.

  7. Expression intensity, gender and facial emotion recognition: Women recognize only subtle facial emotions better than men.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Holger; Kessler, Henrik; Eppel, Tobias; Rukavina, Stefanie; Traue, Harald C

    2010-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect of expression intensity on gender differences in the recognition of facial emotions. The first experiment compared recognition accuracy between female and male participants when emotional faces were shown with full-blown (100% emotional content) or subtle expressiveness (50%). In a second experiment more finely grained analyses were applied in order to measure recognition accuracy as a function of expression intensity (40%-100%). The results show that although women were more accurate than men in recognizing subtle facial displays of emotion, there was no difference between male and female participants when recognizing highly expressive stimuli. PMID:20728864

  8. Flexible Bistable Cholesteric Reflective Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Deng-Ke

    2006-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) exhibit two stable states at zero field condition-the reflecting planar state and the nonreflecting focal conic state. ChLCs are an excellent candidate for inexpensive and rugged electronic books and papers. This paper will review the display cell structure,materials and drive schemes for flexible bistable cholesteric (Ch) reflective displays.

  9. You Be the Judge: Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeninger, Jimmy G.

    The instructional package was developed to provide the distributive education teacher-coordinator with visual materials that can be used to supplement existing textbook offerings in the area of display (visual merchandising). Designed for use with 35mm slides of retail store displays, the package allows the student to view the slides of displays…

  10. Television Data Display System (TDDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendler, K.

    1972-01-01

    A television data display system at KSC is described which displays computer processed data derived from space vehicle launch and prelaunch tests. The general system capabilities and technical features are discussed in separate sections under the headings of: (1) operational use, (2) system description, (3) computer programs, (4) computer hardware, and (5) adaptability.

  11. Displays: Entering a New Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    As display technologies prepare to welcome 3-D, the 21st-century classroom will soon bear little resemblance to anything students and teachers have ever seen. In this article, the author presents the latest innovations in the world of digital display technology. These include: (1) Touchlight, an interactive touch screen program that takes a normal…

  12. Recognizing signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Carbray, Julie A; Iennaco, Joanne DeSanto

    2015-11-01

    Psychiatric mental health nurses and advanced practice nurses play an important role in the assessment and care of patients with bipolar disorder. Using appropriate rating scales and diagnostic criteria can aid in the assessment of patients who present with a variety of symptoms. In this game-based CME activity, you will assume the role of a psychiatric mental health advanced practice nurse who must recognize the signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder and select appropriate treatment for a 20-year-old patient with suicidal thoughts. PMID:26646046

  13. Recognizing women in the archaeological record

    SciTech Connect

    Bumsted, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    Primary sexual characteristics are usually absent in the archaeological record. The recovered secondary sex markers in bone morphology or mortuary context reflect the lifelong integrated biocultural experience of the individual man or woman. Internal patterns of variability within and between sexes can be recognized but are too frequently masked by traditional descriptive and univariate analyses. Fortunately, a more detailed picture of life experience is gained by analyzing chemical composition (isotopic and elemental) of hard tissues using an analytical anthropology approach and by examining the variation in novel ways. 7 figs.

  14. Recognizing Patterns In Log-Polar Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1992-01-01

    Log-Hough transform is basis of improved method for recognition of patterns - particularly, straight lines - in noisy images. Takes advantage of rotational and scale invariance of mapping from Cartesian to log-polar coordinates, and offers economy of representation and computation. Unification of iconic and Hough domains simplifies computations in recognition and eliminates erroneous quantization of slopes attributable to finite spacing of Cartesian coordinate grid of classical Hough transform. Equally efficient recognizing curves. Log-Hough transform more amenable to massively parallel computing architectures than traditional Cartesian Hough transform. "In-place" nature makes it possible to apply local pixel-neighborhood processing.

  15. Recognizing and treating patients with envenomations.

    PubMed

    Hurt, John B; Maday, Kristopher R

    2016-07-01

    Venomous spiders and snakes are found throughout the United States, and clinicians often encounter patients with suspected spider or snakebites. Due to the significant morbidity and mortality that can be related to a particular envenomation, clinicians must be able to recognize the species of spiders and snakes that are capable of delivering a venomous bite. Through proper species identification, recognition of the specific signs and symptoms that specific venom produces, and understanding the treatment guidelines for the envenomation, clinicians can properly diagnosis, treat, and manage patients with venomous bites. PMID:27351646

  16. INFORMATION DISPLAY: CONSIDERATIONS FOR DESIGNING COMPUTER-BASED DISPLAY SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    O'HARA,J.M.; PIRUS,D.; BELTRATCCHI,L.

    2004-09-19

    This paper discussed the presentation of information in computer-based control rooms. Issues associated with the typical displays currently in use are discussed. It is concluded that these displays should be augmented with new displays designed to better meet the information needs of plant personnel and to minimize the need for interface management tasks (the activities personnel have to do to access and organize the information they need). Several approaches to information design are discussed, specifically addressing: (1) monitoring, detection, and situation assessment; (2) routine task performance; and (3) teamwork, crew coordination, collaborative work.

  17. A tactual display aid for primary flight training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    A means of flight instruction is discussed. In addition to verbal assistance, control feedback was continously presented via a nonvisual means utilizing touch. A kinesthetic-tactile (KT) display was used as a readout and tracking device for a computer generated signal of desired angle of attack during the approach and landing. Airspeed and glide path information was presented via KT or visual heads up display techniques. Performance with the heads up display of pitch information was shown to be significantly better than performance with the KT pitch display. Testing without the displays showed that novice pilots who had received tactile pitch error information performed both pitch and throttle control tasks significantly better than those who had received the same information from the visual heads up display of pitch during the test series of approaches to landing.

  18. How do infants recognize joint attention?

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Erik; Brisson, Julie; Beaulieu, Christelle; Mainville, Marc; Mailloux, Dominique; Sirois, Sylvain

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of joint attention is still a matter of vigorous debate. It involves diverse hypotheses ranging from innate modules dedicated to intention reading to more neuro-constructivist approaches. The aim of this study was to assess whether 12-month-old infants are able to recognize a "joint attention" situation when observing such a social interaction. Using a violation-of-expectation paradigm, we habituated infants to a "joint attention" video and then compared their looking time durations between "divergent attention" videos and "joint attention" ones using a 2 (familiar or novel perceptual component)×2 (familiar or novel conceptual component) factorial design. These results were enriched with measures of pupil dilation, which are considered to be reliable measures of cognitive load. Infants looked longer at test events that involved novel speaker and divergent attention but no changes in infants' pupil dilation were observed in any conditions. Although looking time data suggest that infants may appreciate discrepancies from expectations related to joint attention behavior, in the absence of clear evidence from pupillometry, the results show no demonstration of understanding of joint attention, even at a tacit level. Our results suggest that infants may be sensitive to relevant perceptual variables in joint attention situations, which would help scaffold social cognitive development. This study supports a gradual, learning interpretation of how infants come to recognize, understand, and participate in joint attention. PMID:26036712

  19. Recognizing focus in noise filled sentences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ching X.; Xu, Yi

    2003-04-01

    This study is designed to help identify the intrinsic constituents of focus. Twelve four-word Mandarin sentences were recorded by a native speaker five times, each time either with focus on one of the words, or without any focus. Then, one, two or three words in each sentence produced by the speaker were replaced by pink noise. The noise-filled sentences were presented to subjects along with the text. The subjects' task was to determine if the sentence had a focus, and if yes, on which word. Ten native Mandarin speakers participated as subjects. Their performance was compared across noise replacement conditions. It was found that, when both on-focus and post-focus words were present, focus could be recognized consistently. When only the focused word was present, focus could be recognized fairly well unless the focus position was sentence final, in which case it was not very distinct from no focus. When post-focus word(s) was(were) left intact while focused words were replaced by noise, focus could still be detected successfully, but its exact localization was sometimes judged wrong. These results seem to support the dual-component hypothesis about focus. Further implications of the findings will be discussed.

  20. Recognizing connotative meaning in military chat communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budlong, Emily R.; Walter, Sharon M.; Yilmazel, Ozgur

    2009-05-01

    Over the last five to seven years the use of chat in military contexts has expanded quite significantly, in some cases becoming a primary means of communicating time-sensitive data to decision makers and operators. For example, during humanitarian operations with Joint Task Force-Katrina, chat was used extensively to plan, task, and coordinate predeployment and ongoing operations. The informal nature of chat communications allows the relay of far more information than the technical content of messages. Unlike formal documents such as newspapers, chat is often emotive. "Reading between the lines" to understand the connotative meaning of communication exchanges is now feasible, and often important. Understanding the connotative meaning of text is necessary to enable more useful automatic intelligence exploitation. The research project described in this paper was directed at recognizing user connotations of uncertainty and urgency. The project built a matrix of speech features indicative of these categories of meaning, developed data mining software to recognize them, and evaluated the results.

  1. FELIX: a volumetric 3D laser display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Detlef; Langhans, Knut; Gerken, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis

    1996-03-01

    In this paper, an innovative approach of a true 3D image presentation in a space filling, volumetric laser display will be described. The introduced prototype system is based on a moving target screen that sweeps the display volume. Net result is the optical equivalent of a 3D array of image points illuminated to form a model of the object which occupies a physical space. Wireframe graphics are presented within the display volume which a group of people can walk around and examine simultaneously from nearly any orientation and without any visual aids. Further to the detailed vector scanning mode, a raster scanned system and a combination of both techniques are under development. The volumetric 3D laser display technology for true reproduction of spatial images can tremendously improve the viewers ability to interpret data and to reliably determine distance, shape and orientation. Possible applications for this development range from air traffic control, where moving blips of light represent individual aircrafts in a true to scale projected airspace of an airport, to various medical applications (e.g. electrocardiography, computer-tomography), to entertainment and education visualization as well as imaging in the field of engineering and Computer Aided Design.

  2. Recognition of voice commands using adaptation of foreign language speech recognizer via selection of phonetic transcriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskeliunas, Rytis; Rudzionis, Vytautas

    2011-06-01

    In recent years various commercial speech recognizers have become available. These recognizers provide the possibility to develop applications incorporating various speech recognition techniques easily and quickly. All of these commercial recognizers are typically targeted to widely spoken languages having large market potential; however, it may be possible to adapt available commercial recognizers for use in environments where less widely spoken languages are used. Since most commercial recognition engines are closed systems the single avenue for the adaptation is to try set ways for the selection of proper phonetic transcription methods between the two languages. This paper deals with the methods to find the phonetic transcriptions for Lithuanian voice commands to be recognized using English speech engines. The experimental evaluation showed that it is possible to find phonetic transcriptions that will enable the recognition of Lithuanian voice commands with recognition accuracy of over 90%.

  3. Texture-Based Correspondence Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Texture-based correspondence display is a methodology to display corresponding data elements in visual representations of complex multidimensional, multivariate data. Texture is utilized as a persistent medium to contain a visual representation model and as a means to create multiple renditions of data where color is used to identify correspondence. Corresponding data elements are displayed over a variety of visual metaphors in a normal rendering process without adding extraneous linking metadata creation and maintenance. The effectiveness of visual representation for understanding data is extended to the expression of the visual representation model in texture.

  4. Improved scattering screen for a multiplanar volumetric holographic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Kunihiko; Sato, Koki; Ohki, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    As a technique for displaying holographic three-dimensional (3D) images in the wide region with a wide viewing angle, spatial projecting technique onto the mist screen is well-known. For such purposes, other various techniques have been studied, however, it has been difficult to take a side view of 3D images. In order to overcome this problem, we have been challenged to improve a holographic 3D displaying system employing a mist screen. In this paper, we shall report a new display system which has an improved jetting mechanism compensating the characteristics of the mist screen and gives volumeful 3D images by combining the reconstructed waves from two ways. It is also shown that by the use of this system, we can better observe 3D images in the wider viewing region than before. From this, we confirmed the possibility of a holographic projecting process adopted mist screen displaying volumeful 3D holographic images.

  5. Experiments using electronic display information in the NASA terminal configured vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of research experiments concerning pilot display information requirements and visualization techniques for electronic display systems are presented. Topics deal with display related piloting tasks in flight controls for approach-to-landing, flight management for the descent from cruise, and flight operational procedures considering the display of surrounding air traffic. Planned research of advanced integrated display formats for primary flight control throughout the various phases of flight is also discussed.

  6. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.048-8 Section 160.048-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  7. 46 CFR 162.039-5 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 162.039-5 Section 162.039-5... Recognized laboratory. (a) A recognized laboratory is one which is regularly engaged in the examination... motorboats. The following laboratories are recognized, and the semiportable fire extinguishers bearing...

  8. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.048-8 Section 160.048-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  9. 46 CFR 160.048-8 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.048-8 Section 160.048-8... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...

  10. 46 CFR 160.077-9 - Recognized laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized laboratory. 160.077-9 Section 160.077-9... Recognized laboratory. (a) A manufacturer seeking Coast Guard approval of a product under this subpart shall... to a recognized independent laboratory. The following laboratories are recognized under §...