Science.gov

Sample records for disproportionately affect women

  1. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ...Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected...Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected...Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately...

  2. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ...) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... Announcement CDC-RFA-PS10-10138, ``Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately... (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations'' to make awards to state and county...

  3. Fetal programming of overweight through the microbiome: boys are disproportionately affected.

    PubMed

    Kozyrskyj, A L; Kalu, R; Koleva, P T; Bridgman, S L

    2016-02-01

    Maternal and childhood obesity in pregnancy are worrisome public health issues facing our world today. New gene sequencing methods have advanced our knowledge of the disruptive effect of birth interventions and postnatal exposures on the maturation of gut microbiota and immunity during infancy. Yet, little is known about the impact of maternal pregnancy overweight on gut microbes and related processes, and how this may affect overweight risk in offspring. To address this gap in knowledge, we surveyed human studies for evidence in children, infants and pregnant women to piece together the limited literature and generate hypotheses for future investigation. From this literature, we learned that higher Lactobacillus yet lower Bacteroides spp. colonization of gut microbiota within 3 months of birth predicted risk for infant and child overweight. The abundance of bifidobacteria and staphylococci also appeared to play a role in the association with overweight, as did infant fecal immunoglobulin A levels, glycoproteins of the gut immune system that are acquired from breast milk and produced by the infant. We proposed that pregnancy overweight influences the compositional structure of gut microbiota in infants through vertical transfer of microbiota and/or their metabolites during pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding. Finally, we brought forward emerging evidence on sex dimorphism, as well as ethnic and geographic variation, in reported associations between maternal overweight-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis and overweight risk. PMID:26118444

  4. Married Black Men’s Opinions as to Why Black Women Are Disproportionately Single: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Tera R.; McElroy, Stacey E.; Sheats, Kameron J.; Landor, Antoinette M.; Bryant, Chalandra M.

    2015-01-01

    This study’s purpose was to explore the reasons Black women are disproportionately single according to the unique viewpoint of married Black men. The sample comprised 52 married Black men who resided in northeast Georgia (mean age = 43). Qualitative interviews were conducted in 2010 as part of the Pathways to Marriage study. The authors analyzed the data in a collaborative fashion and utilized content analyses to explore the relationships in the data which were derived from qualitative interviews with the men. Findings on the reasons for the disproportionality of singlehood among Black women reflected these four themes: gender relations, marriage education and socialization, individual development, and a preference for gay/lesbian relationships. Recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:26082674

  5. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages Past Issues / ... weeks of a heart attack. For Women with Heart Disease: About 6 million American women have coronary ...

  6. [Harmful practices affecting women's health].

    PubMed

    1990-07-01

    The harmful practices discussed in this article are based on case histories form the Central Maternity in Niamey, yet these practices universally affect women throughout Africa. Nutritional taboos are aimed at certain diseases such as measles, diarrhea, dysentery, malnutrition and anemia and consumption of foods rich in proteins and lipids are forbidden. Children are forbidden from eating eggs; pregnant women are forbidden from eating fruits and vegetables because of the fear of hemorrhaging from the sugar content in the fruit; camel meat is forbidden for fear of extending the pregnancy. Female circumcision, a dangerous practice, especially during childbirth, causes many medical problems that remain permanent. Adolescent pregnancy and marriages are practiced to avoid delinquency among children; yet such practices take place because of arranged marriages for a dowry to young men or to older rich men and these forced marriages to adolescents are the causes of increases in divorce, prostitution and desertion. These young marriages have serious consequences on the health status of the mother and the infant, often leading to maternal and infant death. The high level of fertility in Niger is a response to the social structure of the family. It is a patrilineal system that encourages women to have many children, especially sons. In Niger, pregnancy is surrounded by supernatural and mysterious forces, where a child is the intervention for ancestral spirits. In Islam a child is considered a "Gift of God". A woman is expected to work until the delivery of her baby otherwise she is jeered by her neighbors. During delivery women are not expected to cry or show any pain for fear of dishonoring her family irregardless of any medical compilations she faces. Women in Africa are exploited as free labor, deteriorate and age rapidly, are generally illiterate and are not protected under any laws. PMID:12342832

  7. Social Policy Issues Affecting Women's Political Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundsen, Kirsten

    This paper reviews social science literature and trends indicated by poll data to examine the political status of women and the extent of their political participation. It is presented in four major sections. Section I summarizes research and presents statistics concerning women's (1) participation in political activities such as voting, lobbying,…

  8. Active Microbial Sulfur Disproportionation in

    E-print Network

    Kaufman, Alan Jay

    Active Microbial Sulfur Disproportionation in the Mesoproterozoic David T. Johnston,1 *. Boswell A E. Canfield5 The environmental expression of sulfur compound disproportionation has been placed sulfur isotope 33S. These measurements imply that sulfur compound disproportionation was an active part

  9. The Affective Consequences of Minimizing Women's Body Image Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosson, Jennifer K.; Pinel, Elizabeth C.; Thompson, J. Kevin

    2008-01-01

    We propose that women regularly anticipate and receive messages from others that trivialize the severity of their body image concerns. Moreover, we suggest that these minimizing messages can heighten women's negative affective reactions to body image threats, particularly if they internalize them. Two studies provided support for these ideas. In…

  10. Microvascular angina: angina that predominantly affects women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Joo; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    In women receiving evaluation for suspected ischemic symptoms, a "normal" diagnosis is five times more common than it is in men. These women are often labeled as having cardiac syndrome X, also known as microvascular angina (MVA). MVA is defined as angina pectoris caused by abnormalities of the small coronary arteries, and is characterized by effort chest pain and evidence of myocardial ischemia with a non-invasive stress test, although the coronary arteries can appear normal or near normal by angiography. MVA patients are often neglected due to the assumption of a good prognosis. However, MVA has important prognostic implications and a proper diagnosis is necessary in order to relieve the patients' symptoms and improve clinical outcomes. The coronary microvasculature cannot be directly imaged using coronary angiography, due to the small diameter of the vessels; therefore, the coronary microvascular must be assessed functionally. Treatment of MVA initially includes standard anti-ischemic drugs (?-blockers, calcium antagonists, and nitrates), although control of symptoms is often insufficient. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MVA. PMID:25750553

  11. Affective decision making in women with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    LeGris, Jeannette; Toplak, Maggie; Links, Paul S

    2014-10-01

    The affective decision making of 41 recently treated outpatient women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) was compared to 41 healthy controls using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). Non-affective executive functions (EF) of working memory, interference control, and motor inhibition were also compared. Associations among affective and non-affective EF were examined. Despite normal range intelligence, Stroop interference, motor inhibition, and working memory, women with BPD made significantly more disadvantageous IGT decisions than controls (Cohen's d = .72) that were unrelated to substance abuse history, education, psychotropic use, or attentional deficits. Correlates of EF and IGT performance varied by group. Intellect, BPD, and intact behavioral control explained 35% of the adjusted variance in net IGT performance. Disadvantageous IGT decision making was the only EF to predict BPD. IGT deficits in BPD may be separable from IQ and other EF as supported by the somatic marker hypothesis and suggest a stable, trait-like vulnerability favoring immediate reward over long-term gain in women with the disorder. PMID:24845226

  12. What Health Issues or Conditions Affect Women Differently Than Men?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chronic conditions in women: Recent findings . Retrieved August 3, 2012, from http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/factsheets/women/womheart/index.html [top] World Health Organization. (n.d.). Gender and women’s mental ...

  13. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  14. The Downside of Good Peers How Classroom Composition Differentially Affects Men's and Women's STEM Persistence

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Affects Men's and Women's STEM Persistence Guest Lecture by Stefanie Fischer 3, 2015 11:30 ­ 1:00 pm, Education 2010 Abstract: Women are significantly less likely than men to graduate college with a STEM (science

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER The Effect of Pre-Existing Affect on the SexualResponses of Women

    E-print Network

    stress disorder (PTSD) provides support for an associ- ation between trauma-related cues and negative affective res- ponses. For example, women with PTSD, as compared to womenwithnotraumaorabusehistory

  16. Has ADVANCE Affected Senior Compared to Junior Women Scientists Differently?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists to demonstrate that the NSF ADVANCE Inititiative has made a positive impact upon institutions. Since it began in 2001, ADVANCE has changed the conversation, policies, and practices in ways to remove obstacles and systemic barriers preventing success for academic women scientists and engineers. Results from ADVANCE projects on campuses have facilitated consensus nationally about policies and practices that institutions may implement to help to alleviate issues, particularly for junior women scientists.Although getting women into senior and leadership positions in STEM constituted an initial impetus for ADVANCE, less emphasis was placed upon the needs of senior women scientists. Surveys of academic women scientists indicate that the issues faced by junior and senior women scientists differ significantly. The focus of ADVANCE on junior women in many ways seemed appropriate--the senior cohort of women scinetists is fed by the junior cohort of scientists; senior women serve as mentors, role models, and leaders for the junior colleagues, while continuing to struggle to achieve full status in the profession. This presentation will center on the differences in issues faced by senior compared to junior women scientists to explore whether a next step for ADVANCE should be to address needs of senior academic women scientists.

  17. The Internet's Effect on Women's Coauthoring Rates and Academic Job Market Decisions: The Case of Political Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Daniel M.; Butler, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The late 1990s saw the introduction and spread of the Internet and email. For social scientists, these technologies lowered communication costs and made inter-department collaboration much easier. Using women in political science as a case study, we show that this change has disproportionately affected women in two ways. First, women have…

  18. Factors affecting substance abuse treatment completion for women.

    PubMed

    Kelly, P J; Blacksin, B; Mason, E

    2001-01-01

    Substance abuse by women is considered an individual pathology, and the larger social processes of recovery are seldom explored. This research study examined social factors that influenced completion of an outpatient women-centered substance abuse treatment program. The treatment records of a group of 15 women who completed the program were compared with a group who did not complete the program. More completers had previous life successes in the areas of education, job skills, and employment history. Completers also had fewer children, less involvement with child protective services, and lower levels of chaos, a construct that included the presence of two of any of the following in women's lives: child protective services, homelessness, psychiatric diagnosis, or domestic violence. Completion of substance abuse treatment seems more likely for women with personal and social resources. If programs are to be successful, adequate funding must be provided for both assessment and support of the social problems encountered by the most vulnerable women. PMID:11885213

  19. Eating Behaviors and Negative Affect in College Women’s Everyday Lives

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Kristin E.; Scott, Stacey B.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Smyth, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective A growing body of research seeks to understand the relationship between mood and eating behaviors. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) methods provide a method for assessing these processes in natural settings. We used EMA to examine the relationship between mood and eating behaviors in everyday life among women with subclinical disordered eating behaviors. Method Participants (N=127, age M=19.6, BMI M=25.5) completed 5 daily EMA reports on palmtop computers for 1 week. Assessments included measures of negative affect (NA) and eating-related behavior during eating (eating large amounts of food, loss of control over eating, restricting food intake) and non-eating episodes (skip eating to control weight/shape). Time-lagged multi-level models tested mood-eating behavior relationships. Results Higher NA did not precede any unhealthy eating and weight control behaviors. However, NA was higher when women reported eating large quantities of food, losing control over eating, and restricting food intake during their most recent eating episode, but not after skipping eating to control weight/shape. Discussion These findings elucidate processes in daily life that may influence the development and maintenance of unhealthy eating and weight control behaviors that, in turn, can inform interventions. PMID:24797029

  20. Disproportionate sex ratios of wolf pups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Males comprised 66 percent of wild wolf (Canis lupus) pups from a saturated, high-density wolf range in northeastern Minnesota, possibly reflecting disproportionate conception of males. Packs from areas of lower wolf density in other areas of Minnesota had equal sex ratios of pups or a disproportionate number of female pups. Captive wolves showed a slight preponderance of male pups.

  1. Black Women in Nursing Education Completion Programs: Issues Affecting Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lolita Chappel; Cervero, Ronald M.; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 10 black women enrolled in or graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs identified intrapersonal and cultural factors encouraging their participation. Hindrances were classified as the experience of being the "other" and the culture of racism. Findings show that individual and institutional racism is a barrier in registered…

  2. Factors Affecting Women's Response Choices to Dating and Social Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeater, Elizabeth A.; Viken, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a sexual victimization history, trait disinhibition, alcohol use history, number of lifetime sexual partners, and the contextual features of dating and social events (i.e., sexual activity and alcohol use) on women's response choices to a set of vignettes describing diverse social situations. A total of 170…

  3. Does Stereotype Threat Affect Women in Academic Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Diana Jill; Joseph, Anne; van Ryn, Michelle; Carnes, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Multiple complex factors contribute to the slow pace of women’s advancement into leadership positions in academic medicine. In this article, the authors propose that stereotype threat--under which individuals who are members of a group characterized by negative stereotypes in a particular domain perform below their actual abilities in that domain when group membership is emphasized--may play an important role in the underrepresentation of women in leadership positions in academic medicine. Research to objectively assess the impact of stereotype threat for women in academic medicine is feasible and necessary to confirm this hypothesis. Still, a number of conditions present in the academic medicine community today have been shown to trigger stereotype threat in other settings, and stereotype threat fits with existing research on gender in academic medicine. In the meantime, academic health centers should implement relatively simple measures supported by experimental evidence from other settings to reduce the risk of stereotype threat, including: (1) introducing the concept of stereotype threat to the academic medicine community; (2) engaging all stakeholders, male and female, to promote identity safety by enacting and making faculty aware of policies to monitor potential instances of discrimination, and training faculty to provide performance feedback that is free of gender bias; (3) counteracting the effects of sex segregation at academic health centers by increasing exposure to successful female leaders; (4) reducing gender stereotype priming by avoiding stereotypically male criteria for promotion, grants, and awards; and (5) building leadership efficacy among female physicians and scientists. PMID:22361794

  4. Low Socioeconomic Status Negatively Affects Sleep in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Michele L.; Tolge, Madeline; Hall, Martica

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of socioeconomic status on measures of sleep quality, continuity, and quantity in a large cohort of pregnant women. Design Prospective, longitudinal study. Participants One hundred seventy (170) pregnant women at 10-20 weeks gestation. Methods Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Sleep duration and continuity (sleep fragmentation index [SFI]) were assessed with actigraphy at 10-12, 14-16, and 18-20 weeks gestation. Since sleep did not significantly differ across time, averages across all three time points were used in analyses. Socioeconomic status (SES) was defined by self-reported annual household income. Linear regression analyses were used to model the independent associations of SES on sleep after adjusting for age, race, parity, marital status, body mass index (BMI), perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and financial strain. Results On average, women reported modestly poor sleep quality (M = 5.4, SD= 2.7), short sleep duration (391 (55.6) min) and fragmented sleep (SFI M = 33.9, SD= 10.4. A household income < $50,000/year was associated with poorer sleep quality (? = -.18, p < .05) and greater sleep fragmentation (?= -.18, p < .05) following covariate adjustment. Conclusions Low SES was associated with poorer sleep quality and fragmented sleep, even after statistical adjustments. Perceived stress and financial strain attenuated SES-sleep associations indicating that psychosocial situations preceding pregnancy are also important to consider. PMID:24617761

  5. Linking Medicaid Expansion and Cuts to Disproportionate-Share Hospitals: Will Safety Nets Survive?

    PubMed

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D; Bittle, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    The predominant mechanism by which the health care reforms of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 are to be financed is through the government's simultaneous defunding of major portions of Medicare and Medicaid, including the reduction of up to 75% of federal payments to disproportionate-share hospitals. The justification for curtailment of other public programs is that after Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act, the decrease in the proportion of uninsured among the U.S. population will render disproportionate-share hospital payments extraneous and unnecessary. Such justification was reiterated in the recent American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Committee Opinion No. 627, entitled Health Care for Unauthorized Immigrants. Herein, the soundness of the Committee Opinion's proposed policy is evaluated by reviewing available literature on the potential effect of Medicaid disproportionate-share hospital cuts with and without concomitant Medicaid expansion. Limitations of Medicaid expansion efforts before and under the Affordable Care Act, the disproportionate-share hospital payment program, and other legislation providing safety net hospitals with (some) relief of financial burdens related to uncompensated care are explicated. Findings raise concern that acceptance of cuts of up to 75% of federal disproportionate-share hospital funds on the premise that nationwide state expansion of Medicaid will offset the difference may be overly optimistic. Indeed, foregoing disproportionate-share hospital payments undercuts the otherwise laudable intent of Committee Opinion No. 627, namely to advocate for universal health care for all women, including undocumented immigrants. PMID:26241436

  6. Minorities Are Disproportionately Underrepresented in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Paul L.; Farkas, George; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Mattison, Richard; Maczuga, Steve; Li, Hui; Cook, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether minority children attending U.S. elementary and middle schools are disproportionately represented in special education. We did so using hazard modeling of multiyear longitudinal data and extensive covariate adjustment for potential child-, family-, and state-level confounds. Minority children were consistently less likely…

  7. The Experience of Women Affected by Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Qualitative Study From Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri Amiri, Fatemeh; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Montazeri, Ali; Mohammadpour Thamtan, Reza Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common chronic endocrine disorder. It has significant and diverse clinical consequences including reproductive, metabolic, and psychological morbidities as well as predisposition to malignancies. It is unclear how women with PCOS experience symptoms of this syndrome. Objectives: The aim of this study was to clarify the dimensions and components of quality of life in iranian women with PCOS. Patients and Methods: This study was a qualitative study to explore and document perceptions of women with PCOS about their disorder and quality of life. Semi-structured interviews with open ended questions were conducted with 23 women with PCOS. The interviews were continued to reach data saturation. The study was conducted in the Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. All the interviews were recorded and transcribed. Constant comparative analysis of the data was conducted manually according to the Strauss and Corbin analysis method. Results: The study revealed that the most important factors affecting quality of life in women with PCOS were the role functioning items as well as physical, mental, emotional, cognitive, and social dimensions. Conclusions: Comprehensive cares concerning various mental, emotional, cognitive, and social dimensions of quality of life should be planned for women with PCOS. PMID:24829583

  8. 42 CFR 412.320 - Disproportionate share adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disproportionate share adjustment factor. 412.320... Capital-Related Costs § 412.320 Disproportionate share adjustment factor. (a) Criteria for classification. A hospital is classified as a “disproportionate share hospital” for the purposes of...

  9. 42 CFR 412.320 - Disproportionate share adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disproportionate share adjustment factor. 412.320... Capital-Related Costs § 412.320 Disproportionate share adjustment factor. (a) Criteria for classification. A hospital is classified as a “disproportionate share hospital” for the purposes of...

  10. 42 CFR 412.320 - Disproportionate share adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disproportionate share adjustment factor. 412.320... Capital-Related Costs § 412.320 Disproportionate share adjustment factor. (a) Criteria for classification. A hospital is classified as a “disproportionate share hospital” for the purposes of...

  11. 42 CFR 412.320 - Disproportionate share adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disproportionate share adjustment factor. 412.320... Capital-Related Costs § 412.320 Disproportionate share adjustment factor. (a) Criteria for classification. A hospital is classified as a “disproportionate share hospital” for the purposes of...

  12. 42 CFR 412.320 - Disproportionate share adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disproportionate share adjustment factor. 412.320... Capital-Related Costs § 412.320 Disproportionate share adjustment factor. (a) Criteria for classification. A hospital is classified as a “disproportionate share hospital” for the purposes of...

  13. Women's Health

    MedlinePLUS

    Women have unique health issues. And some of the health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. Unique issues ... and men also have many of the same health problems. But these problems can affect women differently. ...

  14. Factors that affect the quality of life of community-dwelling elderly women with musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Takemasa, Seiichi; Nakagoshi, Ryoma; Uesugi, Masayuki; Inoue, Yuri; Gotou, Makoto; Koeda, Hideki; Naruse, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the quality of life (QOL) of community-dwelling elderly women with musculoskeletal disorders and factors that affect it. [Subjects] The subjects were 27 community-dwelling elderly women with musculoskeletal disorders (mean age: 76.3 ± 7.4?years). Their physical and psychological conditions, QOL, and other characteristics were researched. [Methods] The Japanese version of Life-Space Assessment was used to assess the subjects’ daily life activities; the Japanese version of Fall Efficacy Scale (FES), to assess their fear of falling; the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS 15), to assess their depression status; and the Life Satisfaction Index K (LSIK), to assess their QOL. [Results] The results indicated that the number of family members living together, degree of pain, fear of falling, and depression affect the LSIK scores of the community-dwelling elderly women with musculoskeletal disorders. [Conclusion] The study results suggest that the LSIK scores of community-dwelling elderly women with musculoskeletal disorders can be improved by easing their pain, improving their physical abilities to prevent falls, and improving their mobility. The results also suggest that continuing rehabilitation treatment is required. PMID:26696713

  15. Impulsive aggressiveness of pregnant women affects the development of the fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Wiebigke, Claudia; Siebel, Walter A; Stepan, Holger

    2009-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that the development of the fetus is heavily influenced by the intra-uterine milieu during pregnancy, and that such influence may have life-long consequences for the individual. The intra-uterine milieu is not only influenced by nutritional factors, but also by maternal endocrine and autonomic activity. Such activity is prone to be affected by an individual's personality, but only little is known about influences of maternal personality on the development of the fetus. We tested pregnant women for their propensity for impulsive, uncontrollable outbursts of temper (referred to here as moderate Intermittent Explosive Disorder, mIED). After the women gave birth, we measured electrocardiograms (ECGs) from their newborn infants to compare ECGs between newborns of women with and without mIED. The data show that infants of women with mIED have larger QRS complexes in the electrocardiogram, and lower heart rate variability, compared to infants of women without mIED. These results reveal effects of maternal mIED on the fetal heart development. These effects may predispose the individual to increased risk for later cardio-vascular disease. The findings open perspectives for better risk prevention models for the unborn child. PMID:19804798

  16. Anemia in postmenopausal women: dietary inadequacy or non-dietary factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postmenopausal women are disproportionately affected by anemia, and the prevalence in females > 65 years of age in the United States is approximately 10%. The manifestation of anemia in older populations is associated with dietary inadequacy, blood loss, genetics, alterations in bioavailability, ren...

  17. Suicide and Firearm Prevalence: Are Youth Disproportionately Affected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Johanna; Hemenway, David

    2001-01-01

    The effect of firearm availability on suicide may differ among age groups. Regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between suicide rates and household firearm ownership for four age groups in the nine census regions from 1979 to 1994, adjusting for regional divorce rates, education, unemployment, and urbanity. (BF)

  18. The interplay between daily affect and sleep: a 2-week study of young women.

    PubMed

    Kalmbach, David A; Pillai, Vivek; Roth, Thomas; Drake, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    Little attention has been paid to the relation between daily affect and sleep, as most prior studies have focused instead on the role of pathological mood in the context of sleep disturbance. However, understanding the transaction between normal variations in emotional experiences and sleep can shed light on the premorbid vulnerabilities that trigger the evolution of affect and sleep into more problematic states. The present study used a 2-week daily sampling approach to examine the impact of day-to-day variations in positive and negative affect on nightly self-reported sleep-onset latency, sleep duration and sleep quality in a sample of young women. Hierarchical linear modelling revealed temporal relations between positive and negative affect states and sleep parameters. Specifically, different aspects of both positive and negative affect were uniquely predictive of sleep indices, with sadness and serenity acting as the most consistent predictors. Additionally, better sleep quality was predictive of greater happiness the following day. These results highlight the importance of how our daily emotional experiences influence our nightly sleep and, in turn, how our sleep has an impact on our daily affect. Moreover, our findings may offer insight into the progression of normative levels of affect and sleep as they develop into comorbid depression, anxiety and insomnia. PMID:25082413

  19. Verbal versus Numerical Probabilities: Does Format Presentation of Probabilistic Information regarding Breast Cancer Screening Affect Women's Comprehension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vahabi, Mandana

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To test whether the format in which women receive probabilistic information about breast cancer and mammography affects their comprehension. Methods: A convenience sample of 180 women received pre-assembled randomized packages containing a breast health information brochure, with probabilities presented in either verbal or numeric…

  20. Factors Affecting Disclosure in South African HIV-Positive Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Brian W.C.; Visser, Maretha J; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Neufeld, Sharon; Jeffery, Bridget

    2008-01-01

    Abstract To provide understanding of social and psychological factors that affect disclosure of HIV status among women diagnosed HIV-positive in pregnancy, 438 HIV positive women attending antenatal clinics in Pretoria, South Africa were invited to participate in a longitudinal study. A total of 293 (62%) women were enrolled from June 2003 to December 2004. Questionnaires assessing sociodemographics and psychological measures were administered during pregnancy and at 3 months postdelivery. At enrollment, 59% had disclosed to their partners and 42% to others. This rose to 67% and 59%, respectively, by follow-up. Logistic regression analysis identified being married (adjusted odds Ratio [AOR] 2.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20–4.47), prior discussion about testing (AOR 4.19; CI 2.34–7.49), having a partner with tertiary education (AOR 2.76; CI 1.29–5.88) and less experience of violence (AOR 0.48; CI 0.24–0.97) as factors associated with having disclosed to partners prior to enrollment. Better housing (AOR 1.26; CI 1.06–1.49), less financial dependence on partners (AOR 0.46; CI 0.25–0.85), and knowing someone with HIV (AOR 2.13; CI 1.20–3.76) were associated with prior disclosure to others. Increased levels of stigma at baseline decreased the likelihood of disclosure to partners postenrollment (AOR 0.91; CI 0.84–0.98) and increased levels of avoidant coping decreased subsequent disclosure to others (AOR 0.84; CI 0.72–0.97). These results provide understanding of disclosure for women diagnosed as HIV positive in pregnancy, and identify variables that could be used to screen for women who require help. PMID:19025485

  1. Perceived Health System Causes of Obstetric Fistula from Accounts of Affected Women in Rural Tanzania: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Mselle, Lilian T; Kohi, Thecla W

    2015-03-01

    Obstetric fistula is still a major problem in low income countries. While its main cause is untreated obstructed labour, misconceptions about it still persist. This study aimed at exploring and describing perceived health system causes of obstetric fistula from women affected by it in rural Tanzania. This exploratory qualitative study included twenty-eight women affected by obstetric fistula. Semi structured interviews and focus group discussions were held and thematic analysis used to analyse perceived health system causes of obstetric fistula from women's account. Perceived health system causes of obstetric fistula fundamentally reflected the poor quality of obstetric care women received at health care facilities relating to staff unaccountability, late referral, and torture by nurses. The women's perception emphasizes the importance of improving the quality of obstetric care provided by health care providers in health care facilities. PMID:26103702

  2. Facial beauty affects implicit and explicit learning of men and women differently.

    PubMed

    Ziori, Eleni; Dienes, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The present work explores the unconscious and/or conscious nature of learning attractive faces of same and opposite sex, that is, of stimuli that experimental and neuroimaging research has shown to be rewarding and thus highly motivating. To this end, we examined performance of men and women while classifying strings of average and attractive faces for grammaticality in the experimental task of artificial grammar learning (AGL), which reflects both conscious and unconscious processes. Subjective measures were used to assess participants' conscious and unconscious knowledge. It was found that female attractiveness impaired performance in male participants. In particular, male participants demonstrated the lowest accuracy while classifying beautiful faces of women. Conversely, female attractiveness facilitated performance in female participants. The pattern was similar for conscious and unconscious knowledge. Presumably, objects with high incentive salience, as are beautiful faces, captured resources, which were used in task relevant versus task irrelevant ways by women versus men. The present findings shed light on the relation of conscious and unconscious processing with affective and reward-related stimuli, as well as on gender differences underlying this relation. PMID:26300819

  3. Facial beauty affects implicit and explicit learning of men and women differently

    PubMed Central

    Ziori, Eleni; Dienes, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The present work explores the unconscious and/or conscious nature of learning attractive faces of same and opposite sex, that is, of stimuli that experimental and neuroimaging research has shown to be rewarding and thus highly motivating. To this end, we examined performance of men and women while classifying strings of average and attractive faces for grammaticality in the experimental task of artificial grammar learning (AGL), which reflects both conscious and unconscious processes. Subjective measures were used to assess participants’ conscious and unconscious knowledge. It was found that female attractiveness impaired performance in male participants. In particular, male participants demonstrated the lowest accuracy while classifying beautiful faces of women. Conversely, female attractiveness facilitated performance in female participants. The pattern was similar for conscious and unconscious knowledge. Presumably, objects with high incentive salience, as are beautiful faces, captured resources, which were used in task relevant versus task irrelevant ways by women versus men. The present findings shed light on the relation of conscious and unconscious processing with affective and reward-related stimuli, as well as on gender differences underlying this relation. PMID:26300819

  4. Personality, social support and affective states during simulated microgravity in healthy women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Michel

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the time-course of stress and recovery states and their relations to social support and personality traits in healthy women during a long-term head-down tilt bed rest. Personality, social support and affective states were assessed in 16 women exposed to simulated microgravity for a 60-day duration involving three stages: a 20-day baseline control period (BDC), a 60-day head-down tilt bed rest (HDT) and a 20-day post-HDT ambulatory recovery period (R+). Participants were divided into two groups: an exercise (Exe, n = 8) and a control group (Ctl, n = 8). All the participants experienced significantly more stress during the HDT period. But exercise did not improve the impaired effects of simulated microgravity. The Exe group perceived more stress and less recovery than the Ctl group during the HDT period. Among the five major personality factors, only Neuroticism was related to both social and affective variables. Neuroticism was positively associated with stress and negatively associated with recovery and social support (S-SSQ). Practical implications in psychological countermeasures for better dealing with the key human factor in spaceflights are discussed.

  5. Misreporting of Dietary Intake Affects Estimated Nutrient Intakes in Low-Income Spanish-Speaking Women

    PubMed Central

    Banna, Jinan C.; Fialkowski, Marie K.; Townsend, Marilyn S.

    2015-01-01

    Misreporting of dietary intake affects the validity of data collected and conclusions drawn in studies exploring diet and health outcomes. One consequence of misreporting is biological implausibility. Little is known regarding how accounting for biological implausibility of reported intake affects nutrient intake estimates in Hispanics, a rapidly growing demographic in the United States. Our study explores the effect of accounting for plausibility on nutrient intake estimates in a sample of Mexican-American women in northern California in 2008. Nutrient intakes are compared with Dietary Reference Intake recommendations, and intakes of Mexican-American women in a national survey are presented as a reference. Eighty-two women provided three 24-hour recalls. Reported energy intakes were classified as biologically plausible or implausible using the reported energy intakes to total energy expenditure cutoff of <0.76 or >1.24, with low-active physical activity levels used to estimate total energy expenditure. Differences in the means of nutrient intakes between implausible (n=36) and plausible (n=46) reporters of energy intake were examined by bivariate linear regression. Estimated energy, protein, cholesterol, dietary fiber, and vitamin E intakes were significantly higher in plausible reporters than implausible. There was a significant difference between the proportions of plausible vs implausible reporters meeting recommendations for several nutrients, with a larger proportion of plausible reporters meeting recommendations. Further research related to misreporting in Hispanic populations is warranted to explore the causes and effects of misreporting in studies measuring dietary intake, as well as actions to be taken to prevent or account for this issue. PMID:25132121

  6. 26 CFR 1.305-3 - Disproportionate distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., 1995. For previously issued stock, see § 1.305-3(e) Example (15) (as contained in the 26 CFR part 1... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disproportionate distributions. 1.305-3 Section... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Effects on Recipients § 1.305-3 Disproportionate distributions. (a) In...

  7. 26 CFR 1.305-3 - Disproportionate distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disproportionate distributions. 1.305-3 Section 1.305-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Effects on Recipients § 1.305-3 Disproportionate distributions. (a) In general. Under section 305(b)(2), a distribution...

  8. HIV and Recent Illicit Drug Use Interact to Affect Verbal Memory in Women

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Vanessa J.; Rubin, Leah H.; Martin, Eileen; Weber, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Mardge H.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Valcour, Victor; Young, Mary A.; Crystal, Howard; Anastos, Kathryn; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Milam, Joel; Maki, Pauline M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective HIV infection and illicit drug use are each associated with diminished cognitive performance. This study examined the separate and interactive effects of HIV and recent illicit drug use on verbal memory, processing speed and executive function in the multicenter Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Methods Participants included 952 HIV-infected and 443 HIV-uninfected women (mean age=42.8, 64% African-American). Outcome measures included the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised (HVLT-R) and the Stroop test. Three drug use groups were compared: recent illicit drug users (cocaine or heroin use in past 6 months, n=140), former users (lifetime cocaine or heroin use but not in past 6 months, n=651), and non-users (no lifetime use of cocaine or heroin, n=604). Results The typical pattern of recent drug use was daily or weekly smoking of crack cocaine. HIV infection and recent illicit drug use were each associated with worse verbal learning and memory (p's<.05). Importantly, there was an interaction between HIV serostatus and recent illicit drug use such that recent illicit drug use (compared to non-use) negatively impacted verbal learning and memory only in HIV-infected women (p's <0.01). There was no interaction between HIV serostatus and illicit drug use on processing speed or executive function on the Stroop test. Conclusion The interaction between HIV serostatus and recent illicit drug use on verbal learning and memory suggests a potential synergistic neurotoxicity that may affect the neural circuitry underlying performance on these tasks. PMID:23392462

  9. Parity as a factor affecting the white-coat effect in pregnant women: the BOSHI study.

    PubMed

    Ishikuro, Mami; Obara, Taku; Metoki, Hirohito; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Iwama, Noriyuki; Katagiri, Mikiko; Nishigori, Hidekazu; Narikawa, Yoko; Yagihashi, Katsuyo; Kikuya, Masahiro; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Masakuni; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Imai, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Parity has previously been reported to affect the difference in blood pressure (BP) measured in the office and at home, also known as the white-coat effect, during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to identify possible factors that cause the white-coat effect during pregnancy, focusing on parity. In total, 530 pregnant women (31.3±4.7 years old) who delivered at a maternal clinic were eligible for the study. The association between parity and the white-coat effect (clinic BP compared with home BP) was investigated for each trimester of pregnancy by multivariate analysis of covariance adjusted for age, body mass index, family history of hypertension and smoking habits. The magnitudes of the white-coat effect for systolic BP in the first, second and third trimesters were 4.1±9.8, 3.4±7.1 and 1.8±6.0?mm?Hg, respectively and those for diastolic BP were 3.8±7.4, 1.6±5.8 and 2.4±4.9?mm?Hg, respectively. Parity was significantly and negatively associated with the white-coat effect for systolic BP in the first trimester of pregnancy (nulliparous women: 5.07±0.61?mm?Hg and multiparous women: 2.78±0.74?mm?Hg, P=0.02) as well as for diastolic BP in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Age, body mass index, family history of hypertension and smoking were not significantly associated with the white-coat effect in any trimester of pregnancy. Parity may have an influence on the white-coat effect in pregnancy; however, the observed effect, on average 1-2?mm?Hg, was small. PMID:26311165

  10. Women are more strongly affected by dizziness in static magnetic fields of magnetic resonance imaging scanners.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Angela; Szostek, Anne; Meyer, Patric; Reinhard, Iris; Gilles, Maria; Paslakis, Georgios; Rauschenberg, Jaane; Gröbner, Jens; Semmler, Wolfhard; Deuschle, Michael; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Flor, Herta; Nees, Frauke

    2014-10-01

    Increasing field strengths in MRI necessitate the examination of potential side effects. Previously reported results have been contradictory, possibly caused by imbalanced samples. We aimed to examine whether special groups of people are more prone to develop side effects that might have led to contradictory results in previous studies. We examined the occurrence of sensory side effects in static magnetic fields of MRI scanners of 1.5, 3, and 7?T and a mock scanner in 41 healthy participants. The contribution of field strength, sex, age, and attention to bodily processes, and stress hormone levels to the sensation of dizziness was examined in separate univariate analyses and in a joint analysis that included all variables. Field strength and sex were significant factors in the joint analysis (P=0.001), with women being more strongly affected than men by dizziness in higher static magnetic fields. This effect was not mediated by the other variables such as attention to bodily symptoms or stress hormones. Further research needs to elucidate the underlying factors of increased dizziness in women in static magnetic fields in MRI. We hypothesize that imbalanced samples of earlier studies might be one reason for previous contradictory results on the side effects of static magnetic fields. PMID:25089803

  11. African American women’s perspectives on “Down Low/DL” men: Implications for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Goparaju, Lakshmi; Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari

    2012-01-01

    African American women are disproportionately affected by HIV. Some research has explored if non-disclosing men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) contribute to women’s HIV risk. Popular media discourse tends to refer to these men as “Down Low” or “DL”. Six focus groups were conducted with 36 African American women in Washington D.C. to examine their knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours regarding “Down Low/DL” men. Three of the focus groups were composed of HIV positive women and three groups were composed of HIV negative women. Data analysis reveals six central subcategories related to women’s perspectives on the “DL”: awareness; suspicion; coping with partner infidelity: male vs. female; sexual health communication; empathy; and religion. No major differences were identified between the HIV positive and HIV negative focus groups. Findings from this study provide insight into African American women’s perceptions of African American male sexuality and how these perceptions serve to influence interpersonal relationship factors and women’s exposure to HIV risk. PMID:22804686

  12. 42 CFR 412.320 - Disproportionate share adjustment factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Basic Methodology for Determining the Federal Rate for Capital-Related Costs § 412.320 Disproportionate share adjustment...

  13. Structural Dissection of the Maltodextrin Disproportionation Cycle of the Arabidopsis Plastidial Disproportionating Enzyme 1 (DPE1).

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Stevenson, Clare E M; Tantanarat, Krit; Latousakis, Dimitrios; Donaldson, Matthew I; Rejzek, Martin; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Limpaseni, Tipaporn; Field, Robert A; Lawson, David M

    2015-12-11

    The degradation of transitory starch in the chloroplast to provide fuel for the plant during the night requires a suite of enzymes that generate a series of short chain linear glucans. However, glucans of less than four glucose units are no longer substrates for these enzymes, whereas export from the plastid is only possible in the form of either maltose or glucose. In order to make use of maltotriose, which would otherwise accumulate, disproportionating enzyme 1 (DPE1; a 4-?-glucanotransferase) converts two molecules of maltotriose to a molecule of maltopentaose, which can now be acted on by the degradative enzymes, and one molecule of glucose that can be exported. We have determined the structure of the Arabidopsis plastidial DPE1 (AtDPE1), and, through ligand soaking experiments, we have trapped the enzyme in a variety of conformational states. AtDPE1 forms a homodimer with a deep, long, and open-ended active site canyon contained within each subunit. The canyon is divided into donor and acceptor sites with the catalytic residues at their junction; a number of loops around the active site adopt different conformations dependent on the occupancy of these sites. The "gate" is the most dynamic loop and appears to play a role in substrate capture, in particular in the binding of the acceptor molecule. Subtle changes in the configuration of the active site residues may prevent undesirable reactions or abortive hydrolysis of the covalently bound enzyme-substrate intermediate. Together, these observations allow us to delineate the complete AtDPE1 disproportionation cycle in structural terms. PMID:26504082

  14. New Clues to How Gene Affects Women's Body Shape, Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health News on: Diabetes Type 2 Genes and Gene Therapy Women's Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Type 2 Genes and Gene Therapy Women's Health About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  15. Bargaining for Equality. A Guide to Legal and Collective Bargaining Solutions for Workplace Problems that Particularly Affect Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkin, Mary; Ross, Diane

    This is a guide to legal and collective bargaining solutions for workplace problems that particularly affect women. The first section of the guide presents a survey of legal remedies for discrimination including information on: (1) Title VII; (2) Equal Pay Act; (3) Executive Order 11246; (4) Age Discrimination in Employment Act; and (5) State Fair…

  16. Black Like Me: How Idealized Images of Caucasian Women Affect Body Esteem and Mood States of African-American Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby, Cynthia M.

    Using the theory of social comparison, the present research explores how exposure to idealized images of physically attractive Caucasian women affects and changes the self-reported esteem levels of African-American undergraduate students. Though research reveals that the number of portrayals of African-Americans in ads is growing, little if any…

  17. Redox Disproportionation of Glucose as a Major Biosynthetic Energy Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have concluded that very little if any energy is required for the microbial biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from glucose -- processes that yield almost as much ATP (adenosine triphosphate) as they consume. However, these studies did not establish the strength nor the nature of the energy source driving these biological transformations. To identify and estimate the strength of the energy source behind these processes, we calculated the free energy change due to the redox disproportionation of substrate carbon of (a) 26 redox-balanced fermentation reactions, and (b) the biosynthesis of amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides of E. coli from glucose. A plot of the negative free energy of these reactions per mmole of carbon as a function of the number of disproportionative electron transfers per mmol of carbon showed that the energy yields of these fermentations and biosyntheses were directly proportional to the degree of redox disproportionation of carbon. Since this linear relationship showed that redox disproportionation was the dominant energy source of these reactions, we were able to establish that amino acid and lipid biosynthesis obtained most of their energy from redox disproportionation (greater than 94%). In contrast nucleotide biosynthesis was not driven by redox disproportionation of carbon, and consequently depended completely on ATP for energy. This crucial and previously unrecognized role of sugars as an energy source of biosynthesis suggests that sugars were involved at the earliest stage in the origin of anabolic metabolism.

  18. Addressing the Unique Needs of African American Women in HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, Nathilee A.; Ruglass, Lesia M.; Gilbert, Louisa

    2009-01-01

    African American women continue to be disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, yet there are few effective HIV prevention interventions that are exclusively tailored to their lives and that address their risk factors. Using an ecological framework, we offer a comprehensive overview of the risk factors that are driving the HIV/AIDS epidemic among African American women and explicate the consequences of ignoring these factors in HIV prevention strategies. We also recommend ways to improve HIV prevention programs by taking into consideration the unique life experiences of adult African American women. PMID:19372518

  19. Returning to STEM: Gendered Factors Affecting Employability for Mature Women Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Clem

    2015-01-01

    This paper adds to current discourses around employability by arguing for an explicit recognition of gender, in particular in relation to women's employment in male-dominated sectors such as science, engineering and technology. This is not limited to young first-time graduates but continues and evolves throughout the life course. Mature women

  20. Factors affecting the compliance of Israeli women with screening for intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Ben Natan, Merav; Abramov, Luda; Dhokarker, Avigail; Israelov, Etery

    2013-04-01

    Violence against women has become a frequent occurrence. In Israel, some 200,000 women are subjected to various types of violence by their intimate partners annually. Routine screening for intimate partner violence is endorsed by the Ministry of Health in Israel; however, screening rates in health-care settings remain problematic. This study aimed to examine whether the model based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) succeeds in predicting women's intention to comply with screening for intimate partner violence. A questionnaire based on the literature review and research model was administered to a convenience sample of 200 married women. Although only 4.5% (n?=?9) of respondents were screened for violence at various health-care institutions over the past year, 75% (n?=?150) of women declared that they intend to cooperate with screening. A positive correlation was found between women's marriage duration, beliefs concerning violence, attitudes towards screening, family member support for compliance with screening-and women's intention to comply with screening. The TRA succeeds in partially predicting women's intention to comply with screening. PMID:23577975

  1. Factors affecting sexual function: A comparison between women with gynecological or rectal cancer and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Chun; Rew, Lynn; Chen, Lynn

    2014-11-23

    This study had two purposes: (i) to explore differences in sexual function between women with gynecological or rectal cancer after related pelvic-area treatments and women without cancer; and (ii) to investigate the relationships among body image, anxiety and depression, sexual relationship power, sexual self-schema, and female sexual function. The participants (n?=?139) were recruited through Internet cancer support groups and women's health organizations in the USA. Six structured questionnaires were mailed, and the data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that women with gynecological or rectal cancer had significantly worse sexual function than women without cancer. Having gynecological/rectal cancer and a negative sexual self-schema were significantly related to poor sexual function. Furthermore, sexual self-schema moderated the relationship between sexual relationship power and female sexual function. Healthcare providers could give more attention to sexual issues in women who have undergone treatment for gynecological or rectal cancer, especially for those with a negative sexual self-schema and high sexual relationship power, which might improve these women's quality of life. PMID:25417724

  2. The Impact of Uterine Leiomyomas: A National Survey of Affected Women

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Bijan J.; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Bradley, Linda; Stewart, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the impact of uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) in a racially diverse sample of women in the United States. Study Design A total of 968 women (573 White, 268 African-American, 127 other races) aged 29–59 with self-reported symptomatic uterine leiomyomas participated in a national survey. We assessed diagnosis, information seeking, attitudes about fertility, impact on work, and treatment preferences. Frequencies and percentages were summarized. Chi-square test was used to compare age groups. Results Women waited an average of 3.6 years before seeking treatment for leiomyomas, and 41% saw two or more healthcare providers for diagnosis. Almost a third of employed respondents (28%) reported missing work due to leiomyoma symptoms, and 24% felt that their symptoms prevented them from reaching their career potential. Women expressed desire for treatments that do not involve invasive surgery (79%), preserve the uterus (51%), and preserve fertility (43% of women under 40). Conclusions Uterine leiomyomas cause significant morbidity. When considering treatment, women are most concerned about surgical options, especially women under 40 who want to preserve fertility. PMID:23891629

  3. [Consciousness about climacteric and menopausal symptoms affects the mental health of middle-aged women].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka; Kaminaga, Moyuru; Saito, Seiichi

    2011-02-01

    Consciousness about climacteric and menopausal symptoms in relationship to menopausal stage and mental health was investigated. Midlife women (N = 407, 40-60 years old) were asked about their menstrual status, consciousness of climacteric and menopausal symptoms, self-esteem and depression. Based on their menstrual status, 222 participants were divided into three groups (pre-menopause, peri-menopause, and post-menopause). The main results are as follows. Women who were pre-menopausal had a negative consciousness about menopause, which contributed negatively to their self-esteem. Women who were perimenopausal or post-menopausal had more symptoms, which contributed negatively to their mental health. These results indicate that middle-aged women should be provided with interventions focusing on their menopausal status. PMID:21400858

  4. Strategies for Preventing Disproportionate Exclusions of African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Tary J.; Vincent, Claudia G.

    2011-01-01

    The authors studied changes in disproportionate exclusion of African American students, compared with their White peers, in relation to implementation of Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support using data from 46 schools. They measured (a) exclusion through suspension and expulsion data collected with the Schoolwide Information System; (b) Schoolwide…

  5. Medicaid program; disproportionate share hospital payments. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-12-19

    This final rule sets forth the data elements necessary to comply with the requirements of Section 1923(j) of the Social Security Act (Act) related to auditing and reporting of disproportionate share hospital payments under State Medicaid programs. These requirements were added by Section 1001(d) of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA). PMID:19143113

  6. Does perceived discrimination affect health? Longitudinal relationships between work discrimination and women's physical and emotional health.

    PubMed

    Pavalko, Eliza K; Mossakowski, Krysia N; Hamilton, Vanessa J

    2003-03-01

    This study uses longitudinal data to examine the causal relationships between perceived work discrimination and women's physical and emotional health. Using data on 1,778 employed women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, we investigate the structural and individual characteristics that predict later perceptions of discrimination and the effects of those perceptions on subsequent health. We find that perceptions of discrimination are influenced by job attitudes, prior experiences of discrimination, and work contexts, but prior health is not related to later perceptions. However, perceptions of discrimination do impact subsequent health, and these effects remain significant after controlling for prior emotional health, physical health limitations, discrimination, and job characteristics. Overall, the results provide even stronger support for the health impact of workplace discrimination and suggest a need for further longitudinal analyses of causes and consequences of perceived discrimination. PMID:12751308

  7. More than Numbers: Individual and Contextual Factors in How Gender Diversity Affects Women's Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner-Rubino, Kathi; Settles, Isis H.; Stewart, Abigail J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined factors related to workplace gender diversity in a sample of 87 college-educated White women. Specifically, we investigated the moderating effects of one individual difference variable (sensitivity to sexism) and one contextual variable (perceptions of the workplace climate) in the relationship between the gender composition at…

  8. The psychological profile and affective response of women diagnosed with unexplained infertility undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg Romano, Gabi; Ravid, Hila; Zaig, Inbar; Schreiber, Shaul; Azem, Foad; Shachar, Izhak; Bloch, Miki

    2012-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that unexplained infertility may be related to specific personality and coping styles. We studied two groups of women with explained infertility (EIF, n?=?63) and unexplained infertility (UIF, n?=?42) undergoing an in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle. Women completed personality and coping style questionnaires prior to the onset of the cycle, and state depression and anxiety scales before and at two additional time points during the cycle. Almost no in-between group differences were found at any of the measured time points in regards to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 validity and clinical scales, Illness Cognitions and Life Orientation Test, or for the situational measures. The few differences found suggest a more adaptive, better coping, and functioning defensive system in women with EIF. In conclusion, we did not find any clinically significant personality differences or differences in depression or anxiety levels between women with EIF and UIF during an IVF cycle. Minor differences found are probably a reaction to the ambiguous medical situation with its uncertain prognosis, amplifying certain traits which are not specific to one psychological structure but rather to the common experience shared by the group. The results of this study do not support the possibility that personality traits are involved in the pathophysiology of unexplained infertility. PMID:22847827

  9. Presenting Thin Media Models Affects Women's Choice of Diet or Normal Snacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahe, Barbara; Krause, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Our study explored the influence of thin- versus normal-size media models and of self-reported restrained eating behavior on women's observed snacking behavior. Fifty female undergraduates saw a set of advertisements for beauty products showing either thin or computer-altered normal-size female models, allegedly as part of a study on effective…

  10. Hepatocellular carcinoma in HIV-infected women: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Michelle L; Garg, Shikha; Chapman, Stacey; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Tashima, Karen T; Taylor, Lynn E

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and increased life expectancy among HIV-infected individuals, liver-related mortality has emerged as the leading cause of non-AIDS-related death. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a sequela of chronic liver disease, is rising among HIV-infected individuals. While women are increasingly and disproportionately affected by HIV, little is known about HCC in HIV-infected women given HCC's predilection for men. In 2007, 2 out of 398 HIV-infected women seen at a Rhode Island HIV clinic were diagnosed with HCC. Of 351 HIV-infected individuals with HCC described in the published literature, 12 (3.4%) were women. These 2 cases add to the existing literature on this topic. PMID:23638454

  11. Attitudes and stereotypes regarding older women and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Beaulaurier, Richard; Fortuna, Karen; Lind, Danielle; Emlet, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    Persons aged 50 years and over will soon disproportionately represent the future of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. It is estimated that by 2015 older adults will represent 50% of persons living with HIV in the United States. Despite the HIV/AIDS growing population among older adults, attitudes, beliefs, and stereotypes toward older adults that exist in general society have affected HIV prevention, education, and care. Specifically, ageist attitudes about the sexuality of older adults in general and older women in particular, low clinical HIV suspicion among healthcare providers, lack of knowledge about risk among older women, and differentials in power related to negotiating sexual practices all lead to heightened concerns for the prevention, identification, and treatment of HIV disease in mature women. This article examines common attitudes, beliefs, and stereotypes that exist within general society as well as health and social service providers that place older women at a disadvantage when it comes to HIV prevention, education, and treatment. PMID:25133946

  12. The effect of pre-existing affect on the sexual responses of women with and without a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Rellini, Alessandra H; Elinson, Samantha; Janssen, Erick; Meston, Cindy M

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are at greater risk for experiencing sexual problems in their adult lives. Yet, little is known about the possible role of cognitive and affective mechanisms in the development of sexual arousal difficulties in this population. This study investigated the role of pre-existing affect (affect prior to exposure to sexual stimuli) on genital responses, subjective sexual arousal, and affect elicited during the presentation of erotic film excerpts in a community sample of 25 women with and 25 women without a history of CSA. The CSA group showed greater pre-existing negative affect and smaller genital responses to the erotic film stimuli compared to the NSA group. Findings support a moderating effect of CSA, in that pre-existing negative affect was associated with strength of genital responses in the NSA but not in the CSA group. The results did not support a mediation model of pre-existing negative affect as an explanation for smaller physiological sexual responses in the CSA group. Taken together, the findings suggest that pre-existing affect may be more relevant for women with no history of CSA and call for more research on factors implicated in impaired sexual responses in women with a history of CSA. PMID:21667233

  13. Does long-term smoking affect aortic stiffness more in women than in men?

    PubMed

    Sonesson, B; Ahlgren, A R; Lazer, L; Länne, T

    1997-09-01

    Smoking is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, although understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism is incomplete. The effect of heavy smoking, for more than 20 years and of 20 cigarettes per day, on aortic stiffness was studied in women (n = 23, age range 43-61 years) and men (n = 21, age range 43-61 years) who smoked but were otherwise healthy and compared with a healthy reference population that did not smoke. Aortic stiffness (beta) was calculated from the diameter and the pulsatile diameter change determined non-invasively using an ultrasonic echo-tracking system and blood pressure obtained by the auscultatory method. The results showed that aortic diameter did not differ in smoking males (P = 0.974) or in smoking females (P = 0.361). Aortic stiffness was increased in the female (P = 0.041) but not male smokers (P = 0.222). Systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressure in the men and women who smoked did not differ from those in the healthy reference population. In conclusion, this investigation shows increased aortic stiffness in female but not in male smokers. It indicates that the aorta of women might be more vulnerable to smoking with regard to stiffening and degeneration than the aorta of men. PMID:9347193

  14. The Liposuction-Induced Effects on Adiponectin and Selected Cytokines Are Not Affected by Exercise Training in Women

    PubMed Central

    Yazigi Solis, Marina; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Montag, Eduardo; de Salles Painelli, Vitor; Saito, Fábio Lopes; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Roschel, Hamilton; Gualano, Bruno; Lancha Junior, Antonio Herbert; Benatti, Fabiana Braga

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the abrupt liposuction-induced decrease in adipose tissue could affect adipokine secretion pattern. We hypothesized that exercise training could positively impact adipokine metabolism following liposuction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of liposuction on inflammation-related adipokines in women who were either exercise-trained or remained sedentary after surgery. Thirty-six healthy normal-weight women underwent an abdominal liposuction and two months after surgery were randomly allocated into two groups: trained (TR, n = 18, four-month exercise program) and nontrained (NT, n = 18). Inflammation-related adipokine serum levels (TNF-?, IL-6, IL-10, and adiponectin) and abdominal and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) mRNA levels were assessed before (PRE) and six months after surgery (POST6). TNF-?, IL-6, and IL-10 serum levels were unchanged in both groups. In contrast, TNF-?, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels in scAT were increased, whereas adiponectin scAT mRNA and serum levels were decreased at POST6 (P < 0.05, main effect for time). No changes were observed in mRNA levels of MCP-1, CD14, and CD68 in any of the groups. In conclusion, liposuction downregulates adiponectin scAT gene expression and serum levels and upregulates scAT gene expression of inflammation-related genes six months after surgery in normal-weight women, irrespective of exercise training. PMID:24527033

  15. The liposuction-induced effects on adiponectin and selected cytokines are not affected by exercise training in women.

    PubMed

    Yazigi Solis, Marina; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Montag, Eduardo; de Salles Painelli, Vitor; Saito, Fábio Lopes; Lima, Fernanda Rodrigues; Roschel, Hamilton; Gualano, Bruno; Lancha Junior, Antonio Herbert; Benatti, Fabiana Braga

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the abrupt liposuction-induced decrease in adipose tissue could affect adipokine secretion pattern. We hypothesized that exercise training could positively impact adipokine metabolism following liposuction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of liposuction on inflammation-related adipokines in women who were either exercise-trained or remained sedentary after surgery. Thirty-six healthy normal-weight women underwent an abdominal liposuction and two months after surgery were randomly allocated into two groups: trained (TR, n = 18, four-month exercise program) and nontrained (NT, n = 18). Inflammation-related adipokine serum levels (TNF- ? , IL-6, IL-10, and adiponectin) and abdominal and thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) mRNA levels were assessed before (PRE) and six months after surgery (POST6). TNF- ? , IL-6, and IL-10 serum levels were unchanged in both groups. In contrast, TNF- ? , IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels in scAT were increased, whereas adiponectin scAT mRNA and serum levels were decreased at POST6 (P < 0.05, main effect for time). No changes were observed in mRNA levels of MCP-1, CD14, and CD68 in any of the groups. In conclusion, liposuction downregulates adiponectin scAT gene expression and serum levels and upregulates scAT gene expression of inflammation-related genes six months after surgery in normal-weight women, irrespective of exercise training. PMID:24527033

  16. A Social Ecological Model of Syndemic Risk affecting Women with and At-Risk for HIV in Impoverished Urban Communities.

    PubMed

    Batchelder, A W; Gonzalez, J S; Palma, A; Schoenbaum, E; Lounsbury, D W

    2015-12-01

    Syndemic risk is an ecological construct, defined by co-occurring interdependent socio-environmental, interpersonal and intrapersonal determinants. We posited syndemic risk to be a function of violence, substance use, perceived financial hardship, emotional distress and self-worth among women with and at-risk for HIV in an impoverished urban community. In order to better understand these interrelationships, we developed and validated a system dynamics (SD) model based upon peer-reviewed literature; secondary data analyses of a cohort dataset including women living with and at-risk of HIV in Bronx, NY (N = 620); and input from a Bronx-based community advisory board. Simulated model output revealed divergent levels and patterns of syndemic risk over time across different sample profiles. Outputs generated new insights about how to effectively explore multicomponent multi-level programs in order to strategically develop more effective services for this population. Specifically, the model indicated that effective multi-level interventions might bolster women's resilience by increasing self-worth, which may result in decreased perceived financial hardship and risk of violence. Overall, our stakeholder-informed model depicts how self-worth may be a major driver of vulnerability and a meaningful addition to syndemic theory affecting this population. PMID:26370203

  17. Physics for Women: The Last Frontier.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Sheila; Urry, Meg; Venkatesan, Aparna

    2002-01-01

    Presents issues discussed at the International Conference of Women in Physics held at UNESCO in Paris. Points out the disproportionate attrition of females going into graduate studies in physics and differences between developed and developing countries. (Author/YDS)

  18. Increases in physical activity may affect quality of life differently in men and women: The PACE project

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Stephanie Whisnant; Duncan, Glen E.; Beresford, Shirley A.A.; McTiernan, Anne; Patrick, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Obesity is associated with impaired quality of life (QoL), but less is known about physical activity. We investigated how decreases in body mass index (BMI) and increases in activity affect obesity-specific QoL and potential gender differences in associations. Methods In a large worksite-randomized trial of a multilevel intervention on diet and physical activity behaviors, we conducted a cohort analysis at two years of follow-up. Self-reported activity and Obesity and Weight-Loss Quality Of Life (OWLQOL) were analyzed for individual-level associations using linear mixed models accounting for random worksite effects. Results Gender modified the BMI-OWLQOL relationship, so analyses were conducted for males and females separately. Adjusting for demographic confounders, baseline OWLQOL, and several worksite-level variables including intervention arm, a 1.9 unit decrease in BMI (the interquartile range) was associated with an OWLQOL increase of 1.7 (95% CI: 1.2, 2.2) in males and 3.6 (95% CI: 3.2, 4.0) in females. Similarly, a 23 unit increase in physical activity score was associated with an OWLQOL increase of 0.9 (95% CI: 0.5, 1.4) in males and 1.6 (95% CI: 1.0, 2.3) in females. Physical activity associations were attenuated when adjusting for change in BMI, but remained significant for women (mean BMI 27.8 kg/m2). Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that increasing physical activity may improve obesity-specific QoL to a greater extent in women, particularly among overweight women, independent of BMI. Results may inform the design of interventions tailored to women targeting well-being through messages of increasing physical activity. PMID:23504523

  19. Personality and Psychiatric Disorders in Women Affected by Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaruffi, Elisabetta; Gambineri, Alessandra; Cattaneo, Stefania; Turra, Jenni; Vettor, Roberto; Mioni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent endocrine disorder among fertile women. Studies show reduced quality of life, anxiety, depression, body dissatisfaction, eating disorder, and sexual dysfunction, but the etiology of these disturbs remains still debated. The aim of our study is to verify whether this hyperandrogenic syndrome characterizes a strong psycho(patho)logical personality. Method: Sixty PCOS subjects (mean age 25.8?±?4.7?years) were evaluated by anthropometric, metabolic, hormonal, clinical, and psychological parameters. After the certainty of the diagnosis of PCOS, the Rorschach test, according to Exner’s comprehensive system (CS) and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) were administered to each patient. The control group, on which the comparison was carried out, was composed by 40 healthy and aged compared women who were exclusively administered the Rorschach test according to CS. Results: MCMI-III evidenced axis II DSM-IV personality disorders [4.1% schizoid, depressive, sadistic, negativistic (passive–aggressive), and masochistic, 6.1% avoiding, 12.2% dependent, 20.4% histrionic, 16.3% narcissistic, 2.0% obsessive–compulsive], and axis I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders: 10.2% anxiety, 2.0% somatoform disorder and bipolar disorder, 16.3% major depressive disorder. Finally, we found 44.9% delusional disorder and 4.1% thought disorder. Rorschach test’s results show 53.1% reduced coping abilities and social skills, 55.1% depression, 30.6% perceptual distortion and cognitive slippage, 24.5% constantly alert and worry, 8.1% at risk for suicide, and finally about 50% of our patients had chronic stress. Conclusion: PCOS women have relevant personality and psychiatric disorders, when compared with normal subjects. PMID:25429283

  20. Subtyping Women with Bulimia Nervosa Along Dietary and Negative Affect Dimensions: Further Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Bohon, Cara; Nathan Marti, C.; Fischer, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Studies have found that individuals with bulimia nervosa can be classified into dietary and dietary-negative affect subtypes and that the latter exhibit greater eating pathology, psychiatric comorbidity, functional impairment, a more protracted clinical course, and a worse treatment response. This report describes two prospective studies which found that young women with threshold (n = 48) and subthreshold (n = 83) bulimic pathology can be classified into dietary and dietary-negative affect subtypes, that two subtyping approaches produced similar results (M ? = .94), that the subtyping distinction showed 4-week test-retest reliability (? = .61), and that the dietary-negative affect subtype showed greater eating pathology, emotional distress, functional impairment, treatment seeking, and lower likelihood of recovery over 6-month and 3-year follow-ups than the dietary subtype. The dieting-negative affect subtyping distinction evidenced greater test-retest reliability and concurrent and predictive validity than did the purging-nonpurging subtyping distinction. The additional evidence for the reliability and validity of this subytping scheme, particularly the prognostic utility, suggests it is worth additional inquiry. PMID:19045970

  1. Sesame ingestion affects sex hormones, antioxidant status, and blood lipids in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Huey; Kang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Nai-Hung; Jou, Hei-Jen; Wang, Tzong-An

    2006-05-01

    Sesame ingestion has been shown to improve blood lipids in humans and antioxidative ability in animals. Sesamin, a sesame lignan, was recently reported to be converted by intestinal microflora to enterolactone, a compound with estrogenic activity and also an enterometabolite of flaxseed lignans, which are known to be phytoestrogens. Whether sesame can be a source of phytoestrogens is unknown. This study was designed to investigate the effect of sesame ingestion on blood sex hormones, lipids, tocopherol, and ex vivo LDL oxidation in postmenopausal women. Twenty-six healthy subjects attended, and 24 completed, this randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Half of them consumed 50 g sesame seed powder daily for 5 wk, followed by a 3-wk washout period, then a 5-wk 50-g rice powder placebo period. The other half received the 2 supplements in reverse order. After sesame treatment, plasma total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C, the ratio of LDL-C to HDL-C, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in oxidized LDL, and serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate decreased significantly by 5, 10, 6, 23, and 18%, respectively. The ratio of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol to TC increased significantly by 18 and 73%, respectively. All of these variables differed significantly between the 2 treatments. Serum sex hormone-binding globulin and urinary 2-hydroxyestrone (n = 8) increased significantly by 15 and 72%, respectively, after sesame treatment, and these concentrations tended to differ (P = 0.065 and P = 0.090, respectively) from those after the placebo treatment. These results suggest that sesame ingestion benefits postmenopausal women by improving blood lipids, antioxidant status, and possibly sex hormone status. PMID:16614415

  2. Milk and Protein Intake by Pregnant Women Affects Growth of Foetus

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Fatemeh; Kulkarni, Shanuak S.

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of the daily intake of milk and protein by pregnant women on foetal growth and determined the growth pattern and velocity of growth. A total of 504 ultrasound observations from 156 respondents were collected following a cross-sectional design in the last trimester of pregnancy; majority of them were in the last month of pregnancy. De facto and purposive sampling was done, and direct interviews of affluent pregnant women were conducted. Kruskal-Wallis test shows that majority of the respondents had tendency to consume 155.65 to 465.17 mL of milk per day, resulting in better and higher foetal growth. Most respondents consumed about 50-70 g of protein per day, and the foetal growth measurements, such as abdomen-circumference, femur length, biparietal diameter, and head-circumference, on an average, were higher in the same group. Quadratic regression model exhibited that all the traits of growth pattern in Model 1 (low milk and protein intake) appeared to have more mode of decline, in contrast to Model 2 (more milk and protein intake), which shows better growth. In addition, velocity of growth pattern was obtained through the first derivative of quadratic regression of growth pattern. Moreover, 95% confidence interval calculated for regression line slope of Model 1 and Model 2 showed that the estimation point (2 B2) of Model 1 does not lay into 95% CI of Model 2; so, statistical significance assorted and also the same trend conversely hold for Model 2. The rate of growth was highly influenced by maternal milk and protein intake. These findings suggest that contribution of common nutrients or other nutritional factors present in milk and protein promote the growth of foetus. PMID:24592584

  3. Factors Affecting the Management of Women Groups' Micro and Small Enterprises in Kakamega District, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawire, Nelson H. W.; Nafukho, Fredrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to highlight the main factors that affect the management of the WGs' Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) in Kakamega District and Africa in general. Design/methodology/approach: The study adopted a descriptive research design. This is because the study was concerned about a univariate question in which the…

  4. Women, e-waste, and technological solutions to climate change.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Lucy; Magee, Amanda; Hale, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that a crossover class of climate change solutions (which we term "technological solutions") may disproportionately and adversely impact some populations over others. We begin by situating our discussion in the wider climate discourse, particularly with regard to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Basel Convention. We then suggest that many of the most attractive technological solutions to climate change, such as solar energy and electric car batteries, will likely add to the rapidly growing stream of electronic waste ("e-waste"). This e-waste may have negative downstream effects on otherwise disenfranchised populations. We argue that e-waste burdens women unfairly and disproportionately, affecting their mortality/morbidity and fertility, as well as the development of their children. Building on this, we claim that these injustices are more accurately captured as problems of recognition rather than distribution, since women are often institutionally under-acknowledged both in the workplace and in the home. Without institutional support and representation, women and children are deprived of adequate safety equipment, health precautions, and health insurance. Finally, we return to the question of climate justice in the context of the human right to health and argue for greater inclusion and recognition of women waste workers and other disenfranchised groups in forging future climate agreements. PMID:25474605

  5. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of oral fluids of women affected by osteoporosis and osteopenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Héctor Jorge; Valentinuzzi, María Cecilia; Grenón, Miram; Abraham, José

    2008-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, leading to bone fragility and an increased susceptibility to fractures; the early stage of decreased bone density is called osteopenia. More than 200 million people are affected and about 50% of post-menopausic women are expected to develop the disease. Osteoporosis, osteopenia and periodontal disease have in common several risk factors, being hyperthyroidism and smoking habits the most important ones. There is scarce information in the literature about the association between periodontal disease and osteoporosis and/or osteopenia. Some works suggest that osteoporotic women are susceptible to a higher loss of periodontal insertion, alveolar bones, and teeth. Thirty adult post-menopausic women were studied; some of them were healthy (control group) and the rest of them were undergoing some stage of osteoporosis or osteopenia. All the subjects were healthy, non-smokers, not having dental implants, and with communitarian periodontal index higher than 1(CPI > 1). Samples of saliva and gingival crevice fluid were extracted with calibrated micro-capillaries and deposited on Si reflectors. Known amounts of Ga were added to the samples in order to act as internal standard for quantification by the total reflection x-ray fluorescence technique. Experimental concentrations of several elements (P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Fe, NI, Cu, and Zn) were determined. The concentration of some elements in saliva showed different behavior as compared to gingival crevice fluid. Some critical elements of bone composition, such as Ca and Zn, present very distinguishable behavior. Improvements in the statistics are required for a better assessment of a routine method and to establish some correlation with periodontal disease. TXRF seems to be a promising method to evaluate the evolution of osteoporosis.

  6. Effect of Nasal Calcitonin on the Health-Related Quality of Life in Postmenopause Women Affected With Low Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Shohrati, Majid; Bayat, Noushin; Saburi, Amin; Abbasi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical activity and mental health could be affected by osteoporosis and various therapeutic options such as calcitonin may influence Quality Of Life (QOL) of these patients with Low Bone Density (LBD). Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of nasal calcitonin on QOL in post menopause women with LBD. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial study was performed on one hundred and fifteen menopause women with LBD less than 1 SD in Bone Mineral Densitometry (BMD) referred to Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during 2009 - 2010. They were assigned to receive 200 IU calcitonin nasal spray along with calcium (1000 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU) for 6 months. Quality of life was assessed by Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire (Persian-validated version). Results: The mean age (± SD) of the participants was 58.75 ± 8.15 years. Intranasal spray of calcitonin increased QOL scores significantly (88.05 ± 15.63 vs. 92.15 ± 13.22, P value = 0.000). Bone mineral density of spine was increased from 0.834 ± 0.11 to 0.12 ± 0.852 and this difference in BMD of lumbar spine was statistically significant (P value: 0.003) but not significant in femur’s BMD (P value = 0.061). In comparison with BMD indexes, The QOL scores especially Mental Health domain changes had only a significant correlation with the changes of total T score in BMD (P = 0.031, Coefficient Correlation = 0.248). Conclusions: It seems that nasal spray of calcitonin can effectively improve QOL of women with LBD and QOL changes were not influenced by clinical or para-clinical alteration. Mental health domain must be more considered in further studies as a predicting domain for Health-Related Quality of Life (HR-QOL) changes. PMID:26421180

  7. Supplemental barley protein and casein similarly affect serum lipids in hypercholesterolemic women and men.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Srichaikul, Korbua; Wong, Julia M W; Kendall, Cyril W C; Bashyam, Balachandran; Vidgen, Edward; Lamarche, Benoicirct; Rao, A Venketeshwer; Jones, Peter J H; Josse, Robert G; Jackson, Chung-Ja C; Ng, Vivian; Leong, Tracy; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2010-09-01

    High-protein diets have been advocated for weight loss and the treatment of diabetes. Yet animal protein sources are often high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Vegetable protein sources, by contrast, are low in saturated fat and without associated cholesterol. We have therefore assessed the effect on serum lipids of raising the protein intake by 5% using a cereal protein, barley protein, as part of a standard therapeutic diet. Twenty-three hypercholesterolemic men and postmenopausal women completed a randomized crossover study comparing a bread enriched with either barley protein or calcium caseinate [30 g protein, 8374 kJ (2000 kcal)] taken separately as two 1-mo treatment phases with a minimum 2-wk washout. Body weight and diet history were collected weekly during each treatment. Fasting blood samples were obtained at wk 0, 2, and 4. Palatability, satiety, and compliance were similar for both the barley protein- and casein-enriched breads, with no differences between the treatments in effects on serum LDL cholesterol or C-reactive protein, measures of oxidative stress, or blood pressure. Nevertheless, because no adverse effects were observed on cardiovascular risk factors, barley protein remains an additional option for raising the protein content of the diet. PMID:20668250

  8. Multilevel dynamic systems affecting introduction of HIV/STI prevention innovations among Chinese women in sex work establishments.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Margaret R; Li, Jianghong; Liao, Susu; Zhang, Qingning; Dunn, Jennifer; Wang, Yanhong; Jiang, Jingmei

    2013-10-01

    Social and public health scientists are increasingly interested in applying system dynamics theory to improve understanding and to harness the forces of change within complex, multilevel systems that affect community intervention implementation, effects, and sustainability. Building a system dynamics model based on ethnographic case study has the advantage of using empirically documented contextual factors and processes of change in a real-world and real-time setting that can then be tested in the same and other settings. System dynamics modeling offers great promise for addressing persistent problems like HIV and other sexually transmitted epidemics, particularly in complex rapidly developing countries such as China. We generated a system dynamics model of a multilevel intervention we conducted to promote female condoms for HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention among Chinese women in sex work establishments. The model reflects factors and forces affecting the study's intervention, implementation, and effects. To build this conceptual model, we drew on our experiences and findings from this intensive, longitudinal mixed-ethnographic and quantitative four-town comparative case study (2007-2012) of the sex work establishments, the intervention conducted in them, and factors likely to explain variation in process and outcomes in the four towns. Multiple feedback loops in the sex work establishments, women's social networks, and the health organization responsible for implementing HIV/STI interventions in each town and at the town level directly or indirectly influenced the female condom intervention. We present the conceptual system dynamics model and discuss how further testing in this and other settings can inform future community interventions to reduce HIV and STIs. PMID:24084394

  9. Medicaid Disproportionate Share and Other Special Financing Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Leighton; Coughlin, Teresa A.

    1995-01-01

    Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH) and related programs, such as provider-specific taxes or intergovernmental transfers (IGTs), help support uncompensated care and effectively reduce State Medicaid expenditures by increasing Federal matching funds. We analyze the uses of these funds, based on a survey completed by 39 States and case studies of 6 States. We find that only a small share of these funds were available to cover the costs of uncompensated care. One method to ensure that funds are used for health care would be to reprogram funds into health insurance subsidies. An alternative to improve equity of funding across the Nation would be to create a substitute Federal grant program to directly support uncompensated care. PMID:10142580

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of HO2 and DO2 disproportionations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kircher, C. C.; Sander, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    A flash photolysis/UV abosrption technique was used to study the HO2 + HO2 and DO2 + DO2 reactions in the gas phase. Rate constants were measured at pressures between 100 and 700 torr of Ar and N2, and at temperatures between 230 and 420 K with up to 10 torr of added water vapor. The overall disproportionation rate constants for the reaction is given as the sum of pressure-independent and pressure-dependent terms. A kinetic analysis shows that both reactions have a zero-pressure bimolecular component and a termolecular component which is linearly dependent on pressure up to 700 torr. A priori estimates of the vibrational frequencies of the product of the HO2 + HO2 reaction suggest binding energies of 12-20 kcal per mol (for the initial association).

  11. Using community-based participatory research to explore social determinants of women's mental health and barriers to help-seeking in three urban, ethnically diverse, impoverished, and underserved communities.

    PubMed

    Doornbos, Mary Molewyk; Zandee, Gail Landheer; DeGroot, Joleen; De Maagd-Rodriguez, Megan

    2013-12-01

    Depression and anxiety are significant mental health issues that affect urban, ethnically diverse, impoverished women disproportionately. This study sought to identify social determinants of mental health and barriers to help-seeking for this population. Using community based participatory research and focus groups, sixty-one Black, Hispanic, and White women identified economic, family, cultural, and neighborhood issues as perceived determinants of their depression/anxiety. They identified practical, psychosocial, and cultural barriers to their help-seeking behavior. These results can promote women's health by fostering an understanding of social factors as perceived determinants of depression/anxiety and shaping practice and policy initiatives that foster positive aggregate outcomes. PMID:24238007

  12. Manganese-dependent disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide in bicarbonate buffer.

    PubMed Central

    Stadtman, E R; Berlett, B S; Chock, P B

    1990-01-01

    At physiological concentrations of HCO3- and CO2, Mn(II) catalyzes disproportionation of H2O2. This catalase-like activity is directly proportional to the concentrations of Mn(II) and H2O2, and it increases exponentially with increases in pH. The effect of increasing pH is almost completely attributable to the concomitant increase in HCO3- concentration. The rate is proportional to the third power of the HCO3- concentration, suggesting that 3 equivalents of HCO3- combine with 1 equivalent of Mn(II) to form the catalytic complex. It is presumed that the redox potential of the Mn(II) in equilibrium with Mn(III) couple in such a complex permits H2O2 to carry out facile reactions with Mn(II) comparable to those that occur with Fe(III) and Cu(II) chelate complexes, in which OH. and O2-. are established intermediates. The Mn-catalyzed disproportionation of H2O2 does not occur at physiological pH in the absence of HCO3-. Hepes, inorganic phosphate, and inorganic pyrophosphate inhibit the reaction catalyzed by the Mn/HCO3- system. These results are similar to those of Sychev et al. [Sychev, A.Y., Pfannmeller, U. & Isak, V.G. (1983) Russ. J. Phys. Chem. 57, 1690-1693]. The catalase-like activity of Mn(II)-bicarbonate complexes reported here, together with the superoxide dismutase activity of Mn complexes demonstrated by Archibald and Fridovich [Archibald, F.S. & Fridovich, I. (1982) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 214, 452-463], strengthen the proposition that Mn may play an important role in the protection of cells against oxygen radical-mediated damage. PMID:2296593

  13. Women and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and men differently — some ... nih.gov Share Science News About Women’s Mental Health Soldiers at High Suicide Risk after Hospitalization NIMH ...

  14. Stress and other environmental factors affecting fertility in men and women: overview.

    PubMed Central

    Negro-Vilar, A

    1993-01-01

    To understand how environmental factors contribute to fertility or infertility in humans, it is first necessary to define environment. A view that will guide this review is that environment represents the "external milieu," analogous to the well-defined concept of "internal milieu" first introduced by Claude Bernard. Within this context, the environment provides both positive and adverse influences on reproductive health and development. Environmental factors can then be classified into categories such as physical, chemical, biological, behavioral, and socioeconomic. In many circumstances, multiple environmental factors may contribute to adversely modify human health. It has been suspected and in some cases demonstrated that stress can adversely affect reproductive function. Both animal and human data support this contention; however, the human data are clear in extreme situations (e.g., inmates of concentration camps) but less so under less drastic conditions. In recent years many advances have been made concerning the neurochemical mechanisms that mediate the effects of stress on reproductive functions and on the identification of "stress hormones" that may not only be involved in the stress response but also serve as biochemical markers to identify and correlate stress with different fertility parameters. Nutrition also plays an important role in infertility, and undernutrition or nutrition disorders are associated with stress in infertility. Environmental factors are often invoked as contributing to many cases of unexplained infertility. However, the direct causal relationship between those factors and the ensuing infertility of the couple are seldom well established and remain largely anecdotal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8243408

  15. Endocrine disrupters and human health: could oestrogenic chemicals in body care cosmetics adversely affect breast cancer incidence in women?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W; Darbre, Philippa

    2004-01-01

    In the decade that has elapsed since the suggestion that exposure of the foetal/developing male to environmental oestrogens could be the cause of subsequent reproductive and developmental effects in men, there has been little definitive research to provide conclusions to the hypothesis. Issues of exposure and low potency of environmental oestrogens may have reduced concerns. However, the hypothesis that chemicals applied in body care cosmetics (including moisturizers, creams, sprays or lotions applied to axilla or chest or breast areas) may be affecting breast cancer incidence in women presents a different case scenario, not least in the consideration of the exposure issues. The specific cosmetic type is not relevant but the chemical ingredients in the formulations and the application to the skin is important. The most common group of body care cosmetic formulation excipients, namely p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters or parabens, have been shown recently to be oestrogenic in vitro and in vivo and now have been detected in human breast tumour tissue, indicating absorption (route and causal associations have yet to be confirmed). The hypothesis for a link between oestrogenic ingredients in underarm and body care cosmetics and breast cancer is forwarded and reviewed here in terms of: data on exposure to body care cosmetics and parabens, including dermal absorption; paraben oestrogenicity; the role of oestrogen in breast cancer; detection of parabens in breast tumours; recent epidemiology studies of underarm cosmetics use and breast cancer; the toxicology database; the current regulatory status of parabens and regulatory toxicology data uncertainties. Notwithstanding the major public health issue of the causes of the rising incidence of breast cancer in women, this call for further research may provide the first evidence that environmental factors may be adversely affecting human health by endocrine disruption, because exposure to oestrogenic chemicals through application of body care products (unlike diffuse environmental chemical exposures) should be amenable to evaluation, quantification and control. The exposure issues are clear and the exposed population is large, and these factors should provide the necessary impetus to investigate this potential issue of public health. PMID:15211609

  16. Achieving equity in Medicare disproportionate share payments to rural hospitals: an assessment of the financial impact of recent and proposed changes to the disproportionate share hospital payment formula.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Janet P; Stensland, Jeffrey; Zhao, Lan; Cheng, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the Medicare Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payment program has been less favorable to rural hospitals: eligibility thresholds were higher and the payment adjustment was smaller for rural than for urban hospitals. Although the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Benefit Improvement and Protection Act (BIPA) of 2000 established a uniform low-income threshold and increased the magnitude of the adjustment for certain small and rural hospitals as a means to promote payment equity, the DSH distribution formula continues to vary by location. This study examines how the DSH revisions mandated under BIPA are likely to affect rural hospitals' financial performance and simulates the financial impact of implementing a uniform DSH payment adjustment. Using data from the 1998 Medicare cost report and impact files, this study found that two-thirds of both rural and urban hospitals would have qualified for DSH payments following BIPA compared with only one-fifth of rural hospitals and one-half of urban hospitals prior to BIPA. Although the impact of BIPA revisions on rural hospitals' total margins were found to be modest, the financial impact of a uniform payment adjustment would be somewhat greater: rural hospitals' average total margins would have increased by 1.6 percentage points. Importantly, 20% of rural hospitals with negative total margins would have been "in the black" if rural and urban hospitals were reimbursed using the same DSH formula. These findings suggest that elimination of rural and urban disparities in DSH payment could strengthen the rural health care safety net. PMID:12380892

  17. Sexuality and Affection among Elderly German Men and Women in Long-Term Relationships: Results of a Prospective Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Britta; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Reis, Olaf; Kropp, Peter; Meyer, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Satisfaction with sexual activity i.e. sexual satisfaction and the importance of sexuality and affection were analysed using data from the German “Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study of Adult Development” (ILSE). At three measurement points, 1993–1995, 1997–1998, and 2004–2006 i.e. subjects' ages of 63, 67, and 74 years, participants' reports about their affection and sexual activity were collected. The sample of completed records used for this study consisted of 194 urban non-institutionalised participants, 68% male, all living with partners. Median levels of sexual satisfaction were reported, fluctuating between the measurement points of ages 63 to 74. Between baseline, first and second follow-up no differences were found in levels of sexual satisfaction, though at measurement points age 63 and 67 women were more satisfied than men. When measured at age 74, affection was given a higher priority than sexual activity. Although men and women reported similar priorities, sexual activity and affection were more important for men than for women. Satisfaction within the relationship can be predicted by the importance of affection, but not by that of sexual activity. Our results confirm the thesis of the ‘second language of sexuality’: for humans in their later years affection seems to be more important than for younger individuals. PMID:25369193

  18. Bacterial Disproportionation of Elemental Sulfur Inferred from a Field Study of Stable-Isotope Fractionations between Elemental Sulfur and Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardisty, D.; Pratt, L. M.; Olyphant, G. A.; Bell, J.; Johnson, A.

    2011-12-01

    Elemental sulfur (ES) is a common product of pyrite oxidation during acid mine drainage (AMD), but bacterial disproportionation of ES has not previously been inferred in acidic environments. Pore water profiles were collected seasonally within a coal-mine waste deposit, Minnehaha, in Southwest Indiana that has been abandoned for over 30 years. Geochemical characterization and modeling were used to assess how the interactions between the sulfur and iron cycle are affected by seasonally dynamic hydrologic conditions. Pore waters were collected seasonally and concentrations of Fe-species and sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfate were determined. Additionally, a sediment core was collected and used for sequential extraction and isotopic characterization of solid-phase sulfur species including elemental sulfur (?34Ses), pyrite (?34Spy), acid-volatile sulfides, water-soluble sulfates, and acid-soluble sulfates. The dominant disulfide phase was found to be pyrite through x-ray diffraction of an additional sediment core. Sulfur isotope fractionations between ?34Spy and ?34Ses (?34Ses-py) of up to -33% are inferred to indicate bacterial disproportionation of ES in the presence of a non-limiting sulfide 'scrub' Fe(III). The initial isotopic composition, following formation from pyrite oxidation, is inferred from ?34Spy, found to be ? 8.75% at the study site. Although ES has previously been found to accumulate in acidic Fe(III)-rich pore waters, ES is typically assumed to account for less than 1% of the oxidized sulfur pool and measurements of the ES isotopic composition are often neglected during field studies of acid AMD. The pore waters at Minnehaha were seasonally suboxic with sharp transitions from Fe(III)- to Fe(II)- dominated conditions near the phreatic surface. It is hypothesized that the sulfide product of ES disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6%, is immediately re-oxidized to ES near the redox gradient via reaction with Fe(III). Sulfide re-oxidation allows for the accumulation of isotopically light ES that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for ES, incorporating seasonally varying rates for pyrite oxidation, ES disproportionation, and ES oxidation, was developed in order to determine the potential and conditions necessary for extensive recycling of ES by disproportionating bacteria to produce ES enriched in 32S compared to the pyrite source. Simulations run for 32 seasonal cycles resulted in a ?34Ses-py of -16.4.% and an ES concentration of 170 ppm, which is consistent with average values obtained from the sediment core. The findings suggest that ES disproportionation is likely an important microbial process in AMD that should be considered at similar mining waste deposits experiencing seasonally varying hydrologic conditions and that ?34Ses-py can be used to estimate multiple cycles of ES disproportionation in oxic settings where the original source of ES is pyrite oxidation.

  19. Effects of personal space intrusion in affective contexts: an fMRI investigation with women suffering from borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Schienle, Anne; Wabnegger, Albert; Schöngassner, Florian; Leutgeb, Verena

    2015-10-01

    The amygdala and the parietal cortex play a key role in the neural representation of personal space. Although the concept of personal space is clinically very relevant for borderline personality disorder (BPD), especially in affective contexts, it has not been investigated thus far with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this fMRI study, 25 female BPD patients and 25 healthy women were exposed to photos of angry, disgusted and neutral facial expressions. All stimuli were once shown as still photos, and once were zoomed-in in order to simulate intrusion into one's own personal space. Approaching faces generally provoked activation of the amygdala and the somatosensory cortex. BPD patients showed an increased activation within both regions, but only toward approaching disgusted faces. Their amygdala activation in this specific condition positively correlated with self-disgust scores. Moreover, the clinical group indicated an enhanced personal distance preference, which was associated with parietal activation. The present study revealed altered personal space processing of BPD patients, especially in situations that relate to social contexts involving disgust. Future studies should focus on the temporal stability of personal space processing during the natural course of BPD as well as during therapy. PMID:25809402

  20. HIV/AIDS in the Southern USA: a disproportionate epidemic.

    PubMed

    Reif, Susan S; Whetten, Kathryn; Wilson, Elena R; McAllaster, Carolyn; Pence, Brian W; Legrand, Sara; Gong, Wenfeng

    2014-01-01

    This research synthesis examined HIV/AIDS surveillance and health care financing data and reviewed relevant research literature to describe HIV epidemiology, outcomes, funding, and contributing factors to the HIV epidemic in the Southern USA with particular focus on a group of Southern states with similar demographic and disease characteristics and comparable HIV epidemics (Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Los Angeles, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas). These states are hereafter referred to as "targeted Southern states." Eight of the 10 states with the highest HIV diagnosis rates in 2011 were in the Southern USA; six were targeted states. Forty-nine percent of HIV diagnoses were in the South in 2011, which contains only 37% of the US population. The targeted states region had the highest HIV diagnosis rate than any other US region in 2011. The South was also found to have the highest HIV-related mortality and morbidity rates in the USA. The high levels of poverty, HIV-related stigma, and STDs found in the South, particularly in the targeted Southern states, likely contribute to greater HIV incidence and mortality. The disproportionate impact of HIV in the South, particularly among targeted states, demonstrates a critical need to improve HIV prevention and care and address factors that contribute to HIV disease in this region. PMID:23944833

  1. Clinical Profiles of Premenstrual Experiences Among Women Having Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS): Affective Changes Predominate and Relate to Social and Occupational Functioning.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Katarina; Ditzen, Beate; Weise, Cornelia; Andersson, Gerhard; Hiller, Wolfgang; Kleinstäuber, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Our objective for this study was to examine symptom severity among women suffering from premenstrual syndrome as well as associations between symptom severity and impairment. In a one-cycle prospective study, various premenstrual symptoms of 91 women were assessed. Tension and irritability were the most severe symptoms. Headache, irritability, self-deprecating thoughts, and depressed mood were the symptoms that were subjectively rated as the most burdensome. Significant correlations were found between the mean premenstrual severity and functional impairment. The severity of premenstrual affective symptoms was related to social impairment. The severity of psychological symptoms was correlated with occupational impairment. These findings confirm the prominent role of premenstrual affective symptoms and support classification guidelines focusing on both affective and physical changes. PMID:25186770

  2. 78 FR 28551 - Medicaid Program; State Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... rule published on December 19, 2008 (73 FR 77904) (and herein referred to as the 2008 DSH final rule... Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotment Reductions AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS... reductions to state Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) allotments annually from fiscal year...

  3. Energy from Redox Disproportionation of Sugar Carbon Drives Biotic and Abiotic Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1997-01-01

    To identify the energy source that drives the biosynthesis of amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides from glucose, we calculated the free energy change due to redox disproportionation of the substrate carbon of: (1) 26-carbon fermentation reactions and (2) the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids of E. coli from glucose. The free energy (cal/mmol of carbon) of these reactions was plotted as a function of the degree of redox disproportionation of carbon (disproportionative electron transfers (mmol)/mmol of carbon). The zero intercept and proportionality between energy yield and degree of redox disproportionation exhibited by this plot demonstrate that redox disproportionation is the principal energy source of these redox reactions (slope of linear fit = -10.4 cal/mmol of disproportionative electron transfers). The energy and disproportionation values of E. coli amino acid and lipid biosynthesis from glucose lie near this linear curve fit with redox disproportionation accounting for 84% and 96% (and ATP only 6% and 1%) of the total energy of amino acid and lipid biosynthesis, respectively. These observations establish that redox disproportionation of carbon, and not ATP, is the primary energy source driving amino acid and lipid biosynthesis from glucose. In contrast, we found that nucleotide biosynthesis involves very little redox disproportionation, and consequently depends almost entirely on ATP for energy. The function of sugar redox disproportionation as the major source of free energy for the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids suggests that sugar disproportionation played a central role in the origin of metabolism, and probably the origin of life.

  4. Energy from Redox Disproportionation of Sugar Carbon Drives Biotic and Abiotic Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1997-01-01

    To identify the energy source that drives the biosynthesis of amino acids, lipids, and nucleotides from glucose, we calculated the free energy change due to redox disproportionation of the substrate carbon of: (1) 26-carbon fermentation reactions and (2) the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids of E. coli from glucose. The free energy (cal/mmol of carbon) of these reactions was plotted as a function of the degree of redox disproportionation of carbon (disproportionative electron transfers (mmol)/mmol of carbon). The zero intercept and proportionality between energy yield and degree of redox disproportionation exhibited by this plot demonstrate that redox disproportionation is the principal energy source of these redox reactions (slope of linear fit = -10.4 cal/mmol of disproportionative electron transfers). The energy and disproportionation values of E. coli amino acid and lipid biosynthesis from glucose lie near this linear curve fit with redox disproportionation accounting for 84% and 96% (and ATP only 6% and 1 %) of the total energy of amino acid and lipid biosynthesis, respectively. These observations establish that redox disproportionation of carbon, and not ATP, is the primary energy source driving amino acid and lipid biosynthesis from glucose. In contrast, we found that nucteotide biosynthesis involves very little redox disproportionation, and consequently depends almost entirely on ATP for energy. The function of sugar redox disproportionation as the major source of free energy for the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids suggests that sugar disproportionation played a central role in the origin of metabolism, and probably the origin of life.

  5. Examining Pregnant Women’s Hostile Attributions About Infants as a Predictor of Offspring Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Lisa J.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Reznick, J. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Importance Child maltreatment is a serious public health problem that disproportionately affects infants and toddlers. In the interest of informing prevention and intervention efforts, this study examined pregnant women’s attributions about infants as a risk factor for child maltreatment and harsh parenting during their children’s first and second years. We also provide specific methods for practitioners to assess hostile attributions. Objective To evaluate pregnant women’s hostile attributions about infants as a risk factor for early child maltreatment and harsh parenting. Design Prospective longitudinal study. Setting A small Southeastern city and its surrounding county. Participants A diverse, community-based sample of 499 pregnant women. Main Outcomes and Measures Official records of child maltreatment and mother-reported harsh parenting behaviors. Hostile attributions were examined in terms of women’s beliefs about infants’ negative intentions (eg, the extent to which infants purposefully dirty their diapers). Results Mothers’ hostile attributions increased the likelihood that their child would be maltreated by the age of 26 months (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26 [90% CI, 1.02–1.56]). Mothers who made more hostile attributions during pregnancy reported engaging in more harsh parenting behaviors when their children were toddlers (?=0.14, P<.05). Both associations were robust to the inclusion of 7 psychosocial covariates. Conclusions and Relevance A pregnant woman’s hostile attributions about infant’s intentions signal risk for maltreatment and harsh parenting of her child during the first years of life. Practitioners’ attention to women’s hostile attributions may help identify those in need of immediate practitioner input and/or referral to parenting services. PMID:23588683

  6. Climate Change Disproportionately Increases Herbivore over Plant or Parasitoid Biomass

    PubMed Central

    de Sassi, Claudio; Tylianakis, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    All living organisms are linked through trophic relationships with resources and consumers, the balance of which determines overall ecosystem stability and functioning. Ecological research has identified a multitude of mechanisms that contribute to this balance, but ecologists are now challenged with predicting responses to global environmental changes. Despite a wealth of studies highlighting likely outcomes for specific mechanisms and subsets of a system (e.g., plants, plant-herbivore or predator-prey interactions), studies comparing overall effects of changes at multiple trophic levels are rare. We used a combination of experiments in a grassland system to test how biomass at the plant, herbivore and natural enemy (parasitoid) levels responds to the interactive effects of two key global change drivers: warming and nitrogen deposition. We found that higher temperatures and elevated nitrogen generated a multitrophic community that was increasingly dominated by herbivores. Moreover, we found synergistic effects of the drivers on biomass, which differed across trophic levels. Both absolute and relative biomass of herbivores increased disproportionately to that of plants and, in particular, parasitoids, which did not show any significant response to the treatments. Reduced parasitism rates mirrored the profound biomass changes in the system. These findings carry important implications for the response of biota to environmental changes; reduced top-down regulation is likely to coincide with an increase in herbivory, which in turn is likely to cascade to other fundamental ecosystem processes. Our findings also provide multitrophic data to support the general concern of increasing herbivore pest outbreaks in a warmer world. PMID:22815763

  7. The global survey of physicists: A collaborative effort illuminates the situation of women in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivie, Rachel; Tesfaye, Casey Langer; Czujko, Roman; Chu, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    The results of the Global Survey of Physicists draw attention to the need to focus on factors other than representation when discussing the situation of women in physics. Previous studies of women in physics have mostly focused on the lack of women in the field. This study goes beyond the obvious shortage of women and shows that there are much deeper issues. For the first time, a multinational study was conducted with approximately 15,000 respondents from 130 countries, showing that problems for women in physics transcend national borders. Across all countries, women have fewer resources and opportunities and are more affected by cultural expectations concerning child care. We show that limited resources and opportunities hurt career progress, and because women have fewer opportunities and resources, their careers progress more slowly. We also show the disproportionate effects of children on women physicists' careers. Cultural expectations about home and family are difficult to change. However, for women to have successful outcomes and advance in physics, they must have equal access to resources and opportunities.

  8. A discussion of key values to inform the design and delivery of services for HIV-affected women and couples attempting pregnancy in resource-constrained settings

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Renee; Davies, Natasha; Cooke, Ian; Kaida, Angela; Mergler, Reid; van der Poel, Sheryl; Cohen, Craig R; Mmeje, Okeoma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV-affected women and couples often desire children and many accept HIV risk in order to attempt pregnancy and satisfy goals for a family. Risk reduction strategies to mitigate sexual and perinatal HIV transmission include biomedical and behavioural approaches. Current efforts to integrate HIV and reproductive health services offer prime opportunities to incorporate strategies for HIV risk reduction during pregnancy attempts. Key client and provider values about services to optimize pregnancy in the context of HIV risk provide insights for the design and implementation of large-scale “safer conception” programmes. Discussion Through our collective experience and discussions at a multi-disciplinary international World Health Organization–convened workshop to initiate the development of guidelines and an algorithm of care to support the delivery of services for HIV-affected women and couples attempting pregnancy, we identified four values that are key to the implementation of these programmes: (1) understanding fertility care and an ability to identify potential fertility problems; (2) providing equity of access to resources enabling informed decision-making about reproductive choices; (3) creating enabling environments that reduce stigma associated with HIV and infertility; and (4) creating enabling environments that encourage disclosure of HIV status and fertility status to partners. Based on these values, recommendations for programmes serving HIV-affected women and couples attempting pregnancy include the following: incorporation of comprehensive reproductive health counselling; training to support the transfer and exchange of knowledge between providers and clients; care environments that reduce the stigma of childbearing among HIV-affected women and couples; support for safe and voluntary disclosure of HIV and fertility status; and increased efforts to engage men in reproductive decision-making at times that align with women's desires. Conclusions Programmes, policies and guidelines that integrate HIV treatment and prevention, sexual and reproductive health and fertility care services in a manner responsive to user values and preferences offer opportunities to maximize demand for and use of these services. For HIV-affected women and couples attempting pregnancy, the provision of comprehensive services using available tools – and the development of new tools that are adaptable to many settings and follow consensus recommendations – is a public health imperative. The impetus now is to design and deliver value-driven inclusive programming to achieve the greatest coverage and impact to reduce HIV transmission during pregnancy attempts. PMID:26643454

  9. Prevalence of Hospitalized Live Births Affected by Alcohol and Drugs and Parturient Women Diagnosed with Substance Abuse at Liveborn Delivery: United States, 1999–2008

    PubMed Central

    Pan, I-Jen; Yi, Hsiao-ye

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe prevalence trends in hospitalized live births affected by placental transmission of alcohol and drugs, as well as prevalence trends among parturient women hospitalized for liveborn delivery and diagnosed with substance abuse problems in the United States from 1999 to 2008. Comparison of the two sets of trends helps determine whether the observed changes in neonatal problems over time were caused by shifts in maternal substance abuse problems. Methods This study independently identified hospitalized live births and maternal live born deliveries from discharge records in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, one of the largest hospital administrative databases. Substance-related diagnosis codes on the records were used to identify live births affected by alcohol and drugs and parturient women with substance abuse problems. The analysis calculated prevalence differences and percentage changes over the 10 years, with Loess curves fitted to 10-year prevalence estimates to depict trend patterns. Linear and quadratic trends in prevalence were simultaneously tested using logistic regression analyses. The study also examined data on costs, primary expected payer, and length of hospital stays. Results From 1999 to 2008, prevalence increased for narcotic- and hallucinogen-affected live births and neonatal drug withdrawal syndrome but decreased for alcohol- and cocaine-affected live births. Maternal substance abuse at delivery showed similar trends, but prevalence of alcohol abuse remained relatively stable. Substance-affected live births required longer hospital stays and higher medical expenses, mostly billable to Medicaid. Conclusions The findings highlight the urgent need for behavioral intervention and early treatment for substance-abusing pregnant women to reduce the number of substance-affected live births. PMID:22688539

  10. 42 CFR 447.294 - Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH) allotment reductions for Federal fiscal year 2014...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH... Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Disproportionate Number of Low-Income Patients § 447.294 Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH)...

  11. 42 CFR 447.294 - Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH) allotment reductions for Federal fiscal year 2014...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH... Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Disproportionate Number of Low-Income Patients § 447.294 Medicaid disproportionate share hospital (DSH)...

  12. Intermittent Explosive Disorder amongst Women in Conflict Affected Timor-Leste: Associations with Human Rights Trauma, Ongoing Violence, Poverty, and Injustice

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Susan; Silove, Derrick; Verdial, Teresa; Tam, Natalino; Savio, Elisa; Fonseca, Zulmira; Thorpe, Rosamund; Liddell, Belinda; Zwi, Anthony; Tay, Kuowei; Brooks, Robert; Steel, Zachary

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Women in conflict-affected countries are at risk of mental disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. No studies have investigated the association between experiences of abuse and injustice and explosive anger amongst women in these settings, and the impact of anger on women's health, family relationships and ability to participate in development. Methods A mixed methods study including an epidemiological survey (n?=?1513, 92.6% response) and qualitative interviews (n?=?77) was conducted in Timor-Leste. The indices measured included Intermittent Explosive Disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder; severe distress; days out of role (the number of days that the person was unable to undertake normal activities); gender-specific trauma; conflict/violence; poverty; and preoccupations with injustice. Results Women with Intermittent Explosive Disorder (n?=?184, 12.2%) were more disabled than those without the disorder (for >5 days out of role, 40.8% versus 31.5%, X2(2) ?=?12.93 p?=?0.0016). Multivariable associations with Intermittent Explosive Disorder, controlling for the presence of PTSD, psychological distress and other predictors in the model, included the sense of being sick (OR 1.73; 95% CI 1.08–2.77); victimization as a result of helping the resistance movement (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.48–3.68); war-related trauma specific to being a woman (OR 1.95, 95%, CI 1.09–3.50); ongoing family violence and community conflict (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.27–2.77); extreme poverty (OR 1.23, 95%, CI 1.08–1.39); and distressing preoccupations with injustice (relating to 2/3 historical periods, OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.35–3.28). In the qualitative study, women elaborated on the determinants of anger and its impact on their health, family and community functioning, child-rearing, and capacity to engage in development. Women reflected on the strategies that might help them overcome their anger. Conclusions Intermittent Explosive Disorder is prevalent and disabling amongst women in conflict-affected Timor-Leste, impacting on their health, child-rearing and ability to participate fully in socio-economic development. PMID:23950885

  13. HPV prevalence at enrollment and baseline results from the Carolina Women’s Care Study, a longitudinal study of HPV persistence in women of college age

    PubMed Central

    Banister, Carolyn E; Messersmith, Amy R; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Wang, Yinding; Spiryda, Lisa B; Glover, Saundra H; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer, a rare outcome of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, disproportionately affects African American women, who are about twice more likely than European American women to die of the disease. Most cervical HPV infections clear in about one year. However, in some women HPV persists, posing a greater risk for cervical dysplasia and cancer. The Carolina Women’s Care Study (CWCS) was conducted to explore the biological, genetic, and lifestyle determinants of persistent HPV infection in college-aged European American and African American women. This paper presents the initial results of the CWCS, based upon data obtained at enrollment. Methods Freshman female students attending the University of South Carolina were enrolled in the CWCS and followed until graduation with biannual visits, including two Papanicolaou tests, cervical mucus collection, and a questionnaire assessing lifestyle factors. We recruited 467 women, 293 of whom completed four or more visits for a total of 2274 visits. Results and conclusion CWCS participants were 70% European American, 24% African American, 3% Latina/Hispanic, and 3% Asian. At enrollment, 32% tested positive for any HPV. HPV16 infection was the most common (18% of infections). Together, HPV16, 66, 51, 52, and 18 accounted for 58% of all HPV infections. Sixty-four percent of all HPV-positive samples contained more than one HPV type, with an average of 2.2 HPV types per HPV-positive participant. We found differences between African American and European American women in the prevalence of HPV infection (38.1% African American, 30.7% European American) and abnormal Papanicolaou test results (9.8% African-American, 5.8% European American). While these differences did not reach statistical significance at enrollment, as the longitudinal data of this cohort are analyzed, the sample size will allow us to confirm these results and compare the natural history of HPV infection in college-aged African American and European American women. PMID:23861602

  14. African-American women's perceptions of their most serious health problems.

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Escobar, Rita Paola; Ko, Celine Marie; White, Monique; Lee, Shianti; Neal, Tiffany; Gilpin, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    African Americans experience a disproportionate burden of illness. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heart disease, cancer, cerebrovascular disease and diabetes are the most common causes of mortality among African Americans. Data were gathered from 1,055 African-American women to gain their perspectives of the most serious health problems affecting African-American women and their related knowledge, attitudes and health promoting behaviors. Women listed CDC's top four causes of mortality as their top four most serious health threats. Cancer was reported as a serious health threat by 81% of the participants, whereas heart disease, the most common cause of mortality and a disease amenable to prevention and early intervention, was mentioned by only 31% of the women. Diabetes was reported by 59% of the women and cerebrovascular disease by 52%. As the Health Belief and other theoretical models would predict, awareness of the seriousness of these four disease groups among African-American women was associated with a greater likelihood of adherence for several of the recommended behaviors. Many opportunities exist for raising women's awareness of these four diseases and linking women's growing health awareness with those health promoting behaviors known to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:15719869

  15. Women's Employment and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienzo, Barbara A.; Button, James W.; Tynes, Shannon

    2002-01-01

    Women's ability to affect their socioeconomic status (SES) has significant health consequences. Paid employment is an increasingly important factor in women's SES. This paper presents a historical overview of working women, challenges faced by women (including unique challenges for minority women), and strategies for rectifying these problems,…

  16. Concurrent sexual partnerships among African American women in Philadelphia: results from a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy; Dickman, Samuel; Cornwall, Alexandra; Kwakwa, Helena; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Rosengard, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Background African American women are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. Concurrent sexual partnerships may contribute to racial disparities in HIV infection. Little is known about attitudes and practices related to concurrency among African American women and the social, structural and behavioral factors that influence concurrency. Methods We recruited 19 heterosexual African American women engaging in concurrent sexual partnerships from a public health clinic in Philadelphia in 2009. We conducted in-depth interviews exploring social norms, attitudes and practices about concurrency, and the structural, social and behavioral factors influencing concurrent sexual partnerships. Grounded theory guided interview protocols and data analysis. Results Seventeen women reported one main and one or more non-main partners; two reported no main partners. Many women used condoms more frequently with non-main than main partners, noting they trust main partners more than non-main partners. Social factors influencing concurrency included social normalization of concurrency, inability to negotiate partners’ other concurrent partnerships, being unmarried, and not trusting main and non-main partners. Not trusting partners and the community at large were the most commonly cited reasons that women engaged in concurrent partnerships. Structural factors included economic dependence on partners, partners’ dependence on women for economic support and housing, and incarceration that interrupted partnerships. Behavioral factors including alcohol and cocaine use influenced concurrency. Conclusions Social, structural, and behavioral factors strongly influenced these African American women’s concurrent sexual partnerships. Many evidence-based interventions (EBIs) disseminated by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) focus largely on behavioral factors and may fail to address the social and structural factors influencing African American women’s sexual networks. Novel HIV prevention interventions that address the social determinants of African American women’s HIV risks in addition to conventional HIV risk- taking behaviors are urgently needed. PMID:22697147

  17. Pathways in STEM: Factors Affecting the Retention and Attrition of Talented Men and Women from the STEM Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbronner, Nancy N.

    2009-01-01

    Many men and women who are talented in science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM) choose not to pursue undergraduate majors or careers in these fields. To develop talents in STEM, educators must understand the factors that contribute to an individual's retention in STEM domains, as well as the factors that act as barriers to…

  18. The Reality of Welfare-to-Work: Employment Opportunities for Women Affected by Welfare Time Limits in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Leslie O.; King, Christopher T.

    Researchers assembled a database of current and projected information on the following: welfare recipients; other female participants in the labor market; employment, occupational availability, and job openings; and occupational characteristics. The database was used in a multistep process to project the number of women forced to leave welfare…

  19. Influence in times of crisis: how social and financial resources affect men's and women's evaluations of glass-cliff positions.

    PubMed

    Rink, Floor; Ryan, Michelle K; Stoker, Janka I

    2012-01-01

    In two scenario-based studies, we found that women and men evaluate glass-cliff positions (i.e., precarious leadership positions at organizations in crisis) differently depending on the social and financial resources available. Female and male participants evaluated a hypothetical leadership position in which they would have both social and financial resources, financial resources but no social resources, or social resources but no financial resources. Women evaluated the position without social resources most negatively, whereas men evaluated the position without financial resources most negatively. In study 2, we found that women and men considered different issues when evaluating these leadership positions. Women's evaluations and expected levels of influence as leaders depended on the degree to which they expected to be accepted by subordinates. In contrast, men's evaluations and expected levels of acceptance by subordinates depended on the degree to which they expected to be influential in the position. Our findings have implications for the understanding of the glass-cliff phenomenon and gendered leadership stereotypes. PMID:23042121

  20. Salty Taste Acuity Is Affected by the Joint Action of ?ENaC A663T Gene Polymorphism and Available Zinc Intake in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Hwayoung; Paik, Hee-Young; Kim, Jihye; Chung, Jayong

    2013-01-01

    Salty taste perception affects salt intake, of which excess amounts is a major public health concern. Gene polymorphisms in salty taste receptors, zinc status and their interaction may affect salty taste perception. In this study, we examined the relationships among the ?-epithelial sodium channel (?ENaC) A663T genotype, zinc intake, and salty taste perception including salty taste acuity and preference in healthy young adults. The ?ENaC A663T genotype was determined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 207 adults. Zinc intake was examined by one 24-h recall and a two-day dietary record. Salty taste acuity and preference were determined by measuring the salty taste recognition threshold and the preferred salinity of beansprout soup, respectively. Men had significantly higher thresholds and preferences for salty taste than women did (p < 0.05). In women, the salty taste threshold was significantly lower in the highest tertile of available zinc intake than in the lowest tertile (12.2 mM and 17.6 mM, respectively, p = 0.02). Interestingly, a significant inverse association between available zinc intake and salty taste threshold was found only in women with ?ENaC AA homozygotes (? = ?0.833, p = 0.02), and no such association was found in T663 allele carriers. The salty taste preference was not associated with the ?ENaC A663T genotype or available zinc intake in either sex. In conclusion, our data suggest that gene-nutrient interactions between the ?ENaC A663T genotype and available zinc intake play a role in determining the salty taste acuity in young women. PMID:24317554

  1. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Cognition and Mood in Recently Postmenopausal Women: Findings from the Randomized, Controlled KEEPS–Cognitive and Affective Study

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Carey E.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Wharton, Whitney; Manson, JoAnn E.; Miller, Virginia M.; Atwood, Craig S.; Brinton, Eliot A.; Cedars, Marcelle I.; Lobo, Rogerio A.; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Santoro, Nanette F.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Black, Dennis M.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Hodis, Howard N.; Naftolin, Frederick; Harman, S. Mitchell; Asthana, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) reportedly increases the risk of cognitive decline in women over age 65 y. It is unknown whether similar risks exist for recently postmenopausal women, and whether MHT affects mood in younger women. The ancillary Cognitive and Affective Study (KEEPS-Cog) of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) examined the effects of up to 4 y of MHT on cognition and mood in recently postmenopausal women. Methods and Findings KEEPS, a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial, was conducted at nine US academic centers. Of the 727 women enrolled in KEEPS, 693 (95.3%) participated in the ancillary KEEPS-Cog, with 220 women randomized to receive 4 y of 0.45 mg/d oral conjugated equine estrogens (o-CEE) plus 200 mg/d micronized progesterone (m-P) for the first 12 d of each month, 211 women randomized to receive 50 ?g/d transdermal estradiol (t-E2) plus 200 mg/d m-P for the first 12 d of each month, and 262 women randomized to receive placebo pills and patches. Primary outcomes included the Modified Mini-Mental State examination; four cognitive factors: verbal learning/memory, auditory attention/working memory, visual attention/executive function, and speeded language/mental flexibility; and a mood measure, the Profile of Mood States (POMS). MHT effects were analyzed using linear mixed-effects (LME) models, which make full use of all available data from each participant, including those with missing data. Data from those with and without full data were compared to assess for potential biases resulting from missing observations. For statistically significant results, we calculated effect sizes (ESs) to evaluate the magnitude of changes. On average, participants were 52.6 y old, and 1.4 y past their last menstrual period. By month 48, 169 (24.4%) and 158 (22.8%) of the 693 women who consented for ancillary KEEPS-Cog were lost to follow-up for cognitive assessment (3MS and cognitive factors) and mood evaluations (POMS), respectively. However, because LME models make full use all available data, including data from women with missing data, 95.5% of participants were included in the final analysis (n = 662 in cognitive analyses, and n = 661 in mood analyses). To be included in analyses, women must have provided baseline data, and data from at least one post-baseline visit. The mean length of follow-up was 2.85 y (standard deviation [SD] = 0.49) for cognitive outcomes and 2.76 (SD = 0.57) for mood outcomes. No treatment-related benefits were found on cognitive outcomes. For mood, model estimates indicated that women treated with o-CEE showed improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms over the 48 mo of treatment, compared to women on placebo. The model estimate for the depression subscale was ?5.36 × 10?2 (95% CI, ?8.27 × 10?2 to ?2.44 × 10?2; ES = 0.49, p < 0.001) and for the anxiety subscale was ?3.01 × 10?2 (95% CI, ?5.09 × 10?2 to ?9.34 × 10?3; ES = 0.26, p < 0.001). Mood outcomes for women randomized to t-E2 were similar to those for women on placebo. Importantly, the KEEPS-Cog results cannot be extrapolated to treatment longer than 4 y. Conclusions The KEEPS-Cog findings suggest that for recently postmenopausal women, MHT did not alter cognition as hypothesized. However, beneficial mood effects with small to medium ESs were noted with 4 y of o-CEE, but not with 4 y of t-E2. The generalizability of these findings is limited to recently postmenopausal women with low cardiovascular risk profiles. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00154180 and NCT00623311 PMID:26035291

  2. Pathways in STEM: Factors affecting the retention and attrition of talented men and women from the STEM pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronner, Nancy N.

    Many men and women who are talented in science, technology, engineering, and/or mathematics (STEM) choose not to pursue undergraduate majors or careers in these fields. To develop talents in STEM, educators must understand the factors that contribute to an individual's retention in STEM domains, as well as the factors that act as barriers to success, such as the role that gender plays in the underrepresentation of women in certain STEM fields (e.g., computer science and engineering) and changes in recent decades in the process of selecting STEM majors and careers. The purpose of this study was to explore the influences that guide decisions related to the selection of majors and occupations during high school, post-secondary education, and early careers. Survey methodology was used to explore the perceptions of 360 Science Talent Search (STS) semifinalists and finalists during the years 1987-1989 and 1997-1999, and quantitative procedures were used to analyze the data. A majority (74.2%) of STS participants majored in a STEM field in college, and most (68.6%) currently work in a STEM field. A greater percentage of men selected computer science, engineering, physics, and mathematics majors, and a greater percentage of women selected biological science and chemistry. Belief in one's ability to achieve in STEM was a predictor of STEM majors in college and STEM concentrations in graduate school, but differences were found between men's and women's self-efficacy in STEM during high school and in college, as women had lower self-efficacy. Sex was a predictor of STEM majors in college, but perceived quality of academic courses was not. STEM majors also reported more satisfaction with their STEM courses in high school and college than non-STEM majors. In a departure from the results of previous research, the reasons that men and women selected occupations were similar, as were the reasons they chose to leave or not to enter STEM. The most frequently cited reason for attrition was interest in another (non-STEM) field. Participants placed little importance on other reasons for leaving STEM that were identified in previous research, such as competition, social isolation, or financial considerations.

  3. Violence experiences among HIV-infected women and perceptions of male perpetrators’ roles: A concurrent mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Njie-Carr, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    HIV disproportionately affects women, which propagates the disparities gap. This study was designed to (a) explore the personal, cognitive, and psychosocial factors of intimate partner violence (IPV) among women with HIV, (b) explore the perceptions of male perpetrators’ roles in contributing to violence, and (c) determine the implications for methodological and data source triangulation. A concurrent mixed methods study design was used including 30 African American male and female participants. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Eleven themes were identified in the qualitative data from the female (n = 15) and 9 themes from the male (n = 15) participant interviews using Giorgi’s technique. Data sources and methodological approaches were triangulated with relative convergence in the results. Preliminary data generated from this study could inform gender-based feasibility research studies. These studies could focus on integrating findings from this study in HIV/IPV prevention interventions and provide clinical support for women. PMID:24503500

  4. Common Clinical Conditions – Age, Low BMI, Ritonavir Use, Mild Renal Impairment - Affect Tenofovir Pharmacokinetics in a Large Cohort of HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    BAXI, Sanjiv M.; GREENBLATT, Ruth M.; BACCHETTI, Peter; SCHERZER, Rebecca; MINKOFF, Howard; HUANG, Yong; ANASTOS, Kathryn; COHEN, Mardge; GANGE, Stephen J.; YOUNG, Mary; SHLIPAK, Michael G.; GANDHI, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tenofovir is used commonly in HIV treatment and prevention settings, but factors that correlate with tenofovir exposure in real-world setting are unknown. Design Intensive pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of tenofovir in a large, diverse cohort of HIV-infected women over 24-hours at steady-state were performed and factors that influenced exposure (assessed by areas-under-the-time-concentration curves, AUCs) identified Methods HIV-infected women (n=101) on tenofovir-based therapy underwent intensive 24-hour PK sampling. Data on race/ethnicity, age, exogenous steroid use, menstrual cycle phase, concomitant medications, recreational drugs and/or tobacco, hepatic and renal function, weight and body mass index (BMI) were collected. Multivariable models using forward stepwise selection identified factors associated with effects on AUC. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) prior to starting tenofovir were estimated by the CKD-EPI equation using both creatinine and cystatin-C measures Results The median (range) of tenofovir AUCs was 3350 (1031–13,911) ng x h/mL. Higher AUCs were associated with concomitant ritonavir use (1.33-fold increase, p 0.002), increasing age (1.21-fold increase per decade, p=0.0007) and decreasing BMI (1.04-fold increase per 10% decrease in BMI). When GFR was calculated using cystatin-C measures, mild renal insufficiency prior to tenofovir initiation was associated with higher subsequent exposure (1.35-fold increase when pre-tenofovir GFR <70mL/min, p=0.0075). Conclusions Concomitant ritonavir use, increasing age, decreasing BMI and lower GFR prior to tenofovir initiation as estimated by cystatin C were all associated with elevated tenofovir exposure in a diverse cohort of HIV-infected women. Clinicians treating HIV-infected women should be aware of common clinical conditions that affect tenofovir exposure when prescribing this medication. PMID:24275255

  5. Dietary Supplementation of Rural Gambian Women during Pregnancy Does Not Affect Body Composition in Offspring at 11–17 Years of Age12

    PubMed Central

    Hawkesworth, Sophie; Prentice, Andrew M.; Fulford, Anthony J. C.; Moore, Sophie E.

    2008-01-01

    Fetal nutrition is thought to be an important determinant of later disease risk, although evidence from randomized-controlled trials in humans is lacking. We followed children born during a protein-energy supplementation trial to investigate to what extent this maternal supplement, which improved birth weight, influenced offspring body composition in adolescence. Subjects were 1270 Gambian children (659 boys, 611 girls) aged 11–17 y whose mothers had participated in the original cluster-randomized trial and had received the supplement during pregnancy (intervention) or postpartum (control). Basic anthropometry was measured using standard techniques and fatness was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis and population-specific prediction equations. For boys, mean body fat was 12.6% for both intervention and control groups. Mean trunk fat was 11.9% in the intervention group and 12.0% in the control. Intervention girls had a mean body fat of 19.5% and trunk fat of 15.2%; for control girls, it was 19.3 and 14.8%, respectively. BMI, body fat, trunk fat, fat mass index, and fat-free mass index did not differ for either sex when analyzed with generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, maternal height, maternal parity, location, season of birth, and menarche in females. Neither infant-attained size nor the onset of menarche were affected by maternal supplementation. These findings suggest that protein-energy supplements to pregnant women, compared with lactating women, do not affect offspring body composition during adolescence. PMID:19022974

  6. Does women's education affect breast cancer risk and survival? Evidence from a population based social experiment in education.

    PubMed

    Palme, Mårten; Simeonova, Emilia

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is a notable exception to the well documented positive education gradient in health. A number of studies have found that highly educated women are more likely to be diagnosed with the disease. Breast cancer is therefore often labeled as a "welfare disease". However, it has not been established whether the strong positive correlation holds up when education is exogenously determined. We estimate the causal effect of education on the probability of being diagnosed with breast cancer by exploiting an education reform that extended compulsory schooling and was implemented as a social experiment. We find that the incidence of breast cancer increased for those exposed to the reform. PMID:25912223

  7. Positive smoking outcome expectancies mediate the association between negative affect and smoking urge among women during a quit attempt.

    PubMed

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Lam, Cho Y; Chen, Minxing; Adams, Claire E; Correa-Fernández, Virmarie; Stewart, Diana W; McClure, Jennifer B; Cinciripini, Paul M; Wetter, David W

    2014-08-01

    Ecological momentary assessment was used to examine associations between negative affect, positive smoking outcome expectancies, and smoking urge during the first 7 days of a smoking quit attempt. Participants were 302 female smokers who enrolled in an individually tailored smoking cessation treatment study. Multilevel mediation analysis was used to examine the temporal relationship among the following: (a) the effects of negative affect and positive smoking outcome expectancies at 1 assessment point (e.g., time j) on smoking urge at the subsequent time point (e.g., time j + 1) in Model 1; and, (b) the effects of negative affect and smoking urge at time j on positive smoking outcome expectancies at time j + 1 in Model 2. The results from Model 1 showed a statistically significant effect of negative affect at time j on smoking urge at time j + 1, and this effect was mediated by positive smoking outcome expectancies at time j, both within- and between-participants. In Model 2, the within-participant indirect effect of negative affect at time j on positive smoking outcome expectancies at time j + 1 through smoking urge at time j was nonsignificant. However, a statistically significant indirect between-participants effect was found in Model 2. The findings support the hypothesis that urge and positive smoking outcome expectancies increase as a function of negative affect, and suggest a stronger effect of expectancies on urge as opposed to the effect of urge on expectancies. PMID:24796849

  8. Three months aerobic training fails to affect 24-hour energy expenditure in weight-stable, post-obese women.

    PubMed

    Buemann, B; Astrup, A; Christensen, N J

    1992-10-01

    Sedentary 24 h energy expenditure (EE) in seven reduced-obese pre-menopausal women was measured in a respiration chamber before and after a three month aerobic training period. Six of the seven women showed a higher VO2max after the training period, while resting heart rate and blood pressure decreased significantly. No significant effects of training were seen in daytime, sleeping or total 24 h EE. However, change in daytime EE was positively correlated to the change in VO2max. Sleeping and 24 h respiratory quotients were slightly increased after the training period. A negative correlation was found between the change in VO2max and the change in fasting FFA. Change in postprandial glucose concentration was also negatively correlated to change in VO2max. Satiety measured 135 min after lunch was decreased after the training period. It is concluded that the moderate physical training programme was not sufficient to obtain a substantial elevation of sedentary 24 h EE. PMID:1330960

  9. Urinary protease inhibitor Serpin B3 is higher in women and is further increased in female patients affected by aldosterone producing adenoma.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Oliviero; Cecconi, Daniela; Castagna, Annalisa; Chiecchi, Laura; Guarini, Patrizia; Gunasekaran, Muthukumar; Morandini, Francesca; Brazzarola, Paolo; Zolla, Lello; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Veglio, Franco; Mulatero, Paolo; Pizzolo, Francesca

    2014-06-01

    A correct diagnosis of primary aldosteronism (PA) requires adrenal venous sampling (AVS) for the classification of subtypes (bilateral hyperplasia, BAH, or adenoma, APA). Since such testing is not easily practicable, appropriate markers for the definition of subtypes are desirable. We hypothesized that an aldosterone excess was associated with abnormalities in urinary proteome, specific for PA subtypes. The project work was divided into 3 phases: (1) screening/identification by proteomic analysis and further characterization by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of the candidate protein; (2) clinical validation by quantitative ELISA assay of 57 (33 M, 24 F) PA patients and 50 normotensive controls (21 M, 29 F); (3) analysis of adrenal tissue of 8 individuals who had undergone adrenalectomy for APA or other adrenal tumors. The proteomic analysis showed a different expression of Serpin B3 Inhibitor-SCCA1 (SB3) in APA and BAH patients. Urine SB3 concentrations in normotensive controls, quantified by ELISA assay and normalized by urinary creatinine, resulted much lower in males (6.72 ng SB3 per mg creatinine, C.I. 4.43-10.19) than in females (20.56 ng SB3 per mg creatinine, C.I. 12.43-33.99, p < 0.00001). SB3 concentrations were not significantly different in males affected by different PA subtypes (BAH, n = 19 and APA, n = 14) compared with normotensive subjects (n = 21). In contrast, in PA females, SB3 was significantly higher in APA (n = 13) than in BAH patients (n = 11) or in normotensive controls (n = 29) (P < 0.01 and <0.05, respectively). Neither messenger RNA nor SB3 protein were identified in tissue obtained from adrenal tumors and from the surrounding normal gland. In conclusion urine SB3 concentrations are physiologically much lower in males than in females. Hypertensive women, affected by APA, present urinary SB3 concentrations significantly higher than women affected by BAH. PMID:24503858

  10. Multilevel Dynamic Systems Affecting Introduction of HIV/STI Prevention Innovations among Chinese Women in Sex Work Establishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Margaret R.; Li, Jianghong; Liao, Susu; Zhang, Qingning; Dunn, Jennifer; Wang, Yanhong; Jiang, Jingmei

    2013-01-01

    Social and public health scientists are increasingly interested in applying system dynamics theory to improve understanding and to harness the forces of change within complex, multilevel systems that affect community intervention implementation, effects, and sustainability. Building a system dynamics model based on ethnographic case study has the…

  11. Subtyping Women with Bulimia Nervosa along Dietary and Negative Affect Dimensions: Further Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Bohon, Cara; Marti, C. Nathan; Fischer, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Studies have found that individuals with bulimia nervosa can be classified into dietary and dietary-negative affect subtypes and that the latter exhibit greater eating pathology, psychiatric comorbidity, and functional impairment; a more protracted clinical course; and a worse treatment response. In this report, the authors describe 2 prospective…

  12. SOME MAGNESIUM STATUS INDICATORS AND OXIDATIVE METABOLISM RESPONSES TO LOW DIETARY MAGNESIUM ARE AFFECTED BY DIETARY COPPER IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In both animals and humans, deficiencies of both magnesium and copper result in undesirable changes in lipid and reactive oxygen metabolism that can adversely affect cardiovascular and bone health. Thus, a study with human volunteers was conducted with the objective of ascertaining whether a low in...

  13. Disaster-related mental health needs of women and children.

    PubMed

    Corrarino, Jane E

    2008-01-01

    Since the events of September 11, 2001 and Hurricane Katrina, the world has become more acutely aware of disasters and their sequelae, and efforts have been made to improve preparedness-related skills of healthcare professionals. One area that requires more skill building concerns the ability to deal with mental health-related needs. Although the appearance of postdisaster psychological symptoms in adults varies, the incidence of psychopathology in women and children is high after disasters. Children are disproportionately affected by disasters, and their special needs have only recently begun to be understood and considered in disaster-related planning. Categories of psychological effects include distress symptoms, risk behaviors, and psychiatric disorders. These issues require ongoing care, not single interventions. This article describes how maternal child health nurses can develop and use the requisite skills to effectively assist families to optimize their mental health status and prevent sequelae after a disaster. PMID:18664906

  14. Disproportionate Minority Representation in General and Special Education: Patterns, Issues, and Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reschly, Daniel J.

    This monograph addresses issues concerned with the disproportionate representation of minority students, especially black students, in special education programs. It reviews the nondiscrimination legal requirements and protections as well as litigation in the federal courts. After a "warm-up exercise" in the form of a pre-test, an overview section…

  15. Disproportionation for growing copper nanowires and their controlled self-assembly facilitated by ligand exchange.

    PubMed

    Ye, Enyi; Zhang, Shuang-Yuan; Liu, Shuhua; Han, Ming-Yong

    2011-03-01

    The coating makes the wire bundle: High-quality free-standing copper nanowires have been successfully produced by disproportionation of Cu(+) in oleylamine. This provides an effective way to prepare high-quality copper nanowires, but also enriches synthetic routes to other nanostructures. These copper nanowires can self-assemble by surface ligand exchange of oleylamine with trioctylphosphine. PMID:21308814

  16. Disproportionate Representation in Placements of Preschoolers with Disabilities in Five Southern States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrier, Michael J.; Gallagher, Peggy A.

    2011-01-01

    Special education placements for more than 69,000 preschoolers with disabilities were examined within and across five southern states. Data were gathered from the 2007 December 1st Child Count reported to the U.S. Department of Education. All states examined offered state-funded prekindergarten programs. Analyses compared disproportionate

  17. 77 FR 2500 - Medicaid Program; Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments-Uninsured Definition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    .... Introduction On December 19, 2008, we published a final rule in the Federal Register (73 FR 77904) entitled... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Medicaid payment adjustments for hospitals that serve a disproportionate share of low-income patients...

  18. 77 FR 43301 - Medicaid Program; Disproportionate Share Hospital Allotments and Institutions for Mental Diseases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Disproportionate Share Hospital Limits'' notice published in the January 3, 2011 Federal Register (76 FR 148). II... in the ``Background'' section of the January 3, 2011 Federal Register (76 FR 148) notice, the... (75 FR 21314). The final FY 2011 DSH allotments being published in this notice are approximately...

  19. Disproportionate growth between the spine and pelvis in patients with thoracic adolescent scoliosis: a new look into the pattern's growth.

    PubMed

    Bao, H; Liu, Z; Yan, P; Qiu, Y; Zhu, F

    2015-12-01

    A self-control ratio, the spine-pelvis index (SPI), was proposed for the assessment of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in this study. The aim was to evaluate the disproportionate growth between the spine and pelvis in these patients using SPI. A total of 64 female patients with thoracic AIS were randomly enrolled between December 2010 and October 2012 (mean age 13 years, standard deviation (sd) 2.17; 9 to 18) and a further 73 healthy female patients with a mean age of 12.4 years (mean age 12.4 years, sd 2.24; 9 to 18), were randomly selected from a normal control database at our centre. The radiographic parameters measured included length of spine (LOS), height of spine (HOS), length of thoracic vertebrae (LOT), height of thoracic vertebrae (HOT), width of pelvis (WOP), height of pelvis (HOP) and width of thorax (WOT). SPI was defined as the ratio LOS/HOP. The SPI and LOT/HOP in patients with AIS showed a significant increase when compared with normal girls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively), implying an abnormal pattern of growth of the spine relative to the pelvis in patients with AIS. No significant difference in SPI was found in different age groups in the control group, making the SPI an age-independent parameter with a mean value of 2.219 (2.164 to 2.239). We also found that the SPI was not related to maturity in the control group. This study, for the first time, used a self-control ratio to confirm the disproportionate patterns of growth of the spine and pelvis in patients with thoracic AIS, highlighting that the SPI is not affected by age or maturity. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1668-74. PMID:26637683

  20. Facets of negative affect prior to and following binge-only, purge-only, and binge/purge events in women with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Berg, Kelly C; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Peterson, Carol B; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) data suggest that global negative affect (NA) increases prior to and decreases following episodes of binge eating and purging, providing support for the affect regulation model of BN. The current study examined whether facets of NA are differentially related to bulimic behaviors. Women with bulimia nervosa (BN; n = 133) completed a 2-week EMA protocol. Momentary assessments of 4 facets of NA (Fear, Guilt, Hostility, and Sadness) were derived from the PANAS subscales. Trajectories of the NA facets were modeled prior to and following binge-only, purge-only, and binge/purge events. Fear, Guilt, Hostility, and Sadness increased prior to and decreased following binge-only and binge/purge events. The same results were found for purge-only events, with the exception that Hostility did not increase significantly prior to purging. Notably, ratings of Guilt were higher than those of Fear, Hostility, and Sadness at the time of binge-only and binge/purge events. Furthermore, post hoc analyses demonstrate that Guilt increased prior to and decreased following the 3 behavior types, even after controlling for Fear, Hostility, and Sadness. These results provide further support for the affect regulation model of BN and also suggest that guilt may be particularly important to the pathology of BN. PMID:22985015

  1. A Systematic Review of Individual and Contextual Factors Affecting ART Initiation, Adherence, and Retention for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Ian; Plummer, Mary L.; Konopka, Sarah N.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite progress reducing maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain high, accounting, for example, for up to 24 percent of all pregnancy-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective in improving outcomes among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women, yet rates of initiation, adherence, and retention remain low. This systematic literature review synthesized evidence about individual and contextual factors affecting ART use among HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), intervention (ART), and outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. Individual and contextual enablers and barriers to ART use were extracted and organized thematically within a framework of individual, interpersonal, community, and structural categories. Results Thirty-four studies were included in the review. Individual-level factors included both those within and outside a woman’s awareness and control (e.g., commitment to child’s health or age). Individual-level barriers included poor understanding of HIV, ART, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission, and difficulty managing practical demands of ART. At an interpersonal level, disclosure to a spouse and spousal involvement in treatment were associated with improved initiation, adherence, and retention. Fear of negative consequences was a barrier to disclosure. At a community level, stigma was a major barrier. Key structural barriers and enablers were related to health system use and engagement, including access to services and health worker attitudes. Conclusions To be successful, programs seeking to expand access to and continued use of ART by integrating maternal health and HIV services must identify and address the relevant barriers and enablers in their own context that are described in this review. Further research on this population, including those who drop out of or never access health services, is needed to inform effective implementation. PMID:25372479

  2. Sowing the seeds or failing to blossom? A feasibility study of a simple ecotherapy-based intervention in women affected by breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Ceri; Butler, Carole; Cousins, Alecia; Hughes, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Engaging in nature-based activities is recognised as providing the basis for easily accessible, cost-effective interventions which can have other important physical and psychological health outcomes. The aim of the reported feasibility study was to explore the acceptability and potential psychological benefits of a simple ecotherapy-based intervention for individuals affected by cancer. A total of seven women from an existing breast cancer support group agreed to take part in the study by cultivating and customising a garden bowl for three months, maintaining a diary, and participating in a focus group at the end of the project. The analysis of the focus group data revealed four main themes that suggested that the women found engaging with the intervention to be therapeutic on a number of different levels: reflecting their cancer journey, a source of positivity, making meaning through memories, and a sense of control provided by engagement with the intervention. Engagement with the diary-writing element of the intervention, however, was not as widely endorsed by the group, as participants were even reluctant to make use of an online forum to share experiences of engaging with the intervention. Overall, the study suggests that the flexibility of level of engagement with an intervention is an important factor in developing acceptable interventions, and that the value of targeted recruitment to improve engagement with novel interventions is paramount. PMID:26715939

  3. Pregnant women's cognitive appraisal of a natural disaster affects DNA methylation in their children 13 years later: Project Ice Storm.

    PubMed

    Cao-Lei, L; Elgbeili, G; Massart, R; Laplante, D P; Szyf, M; King, S

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress (PNMS) can impact a variety of outcomes in the offspring throughout childhood and persisting into adulthood as shown in human and animal studies. Many of the effects of PNMS on offspring outcomes likely reflect the effects of epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, to the fetal genome. However, no animal or human research can determine the extent to which the effects of PNMS on DNA methylation in human offspring is the result of the objective severity of the stressor to the pregnant mother, or her negative appraisal of the stressor or her resulting degree of negative stress. We examined the genome-wide DNA methylation profile in T cells from 34 adolescents whose mothers had rated the 1998 Québec ice storm's consequences as positive or negative (that is, cognitive appraisal). The methylation levels of 2872 CGs differed significantly between adolescents in the positive and negative maternal cognitive appraisal groups. These CGs are affiliated with 1564 different genes and with 408 different biological pathways, which are prominently featured in immune function. Importantly, there was a significant overlap in the differentially methylated CGs or genes and biological pathways that are associated with cognitive appraisal and those associated with objective PNMS as we reported previously. Our study suggests that pregnant women's cognitive appraisals of an independent stressor may have widespread effects on DNA methylation across the entire genome of their unborn children, detectable during adolescence. Therefore, cognitive appraisals could be an important predictor variable to explore in PNMS research. PMID:25710121

  4. Women in astronomy: the student phase.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oey, M. S.; Fleischman, J. R.

    National data on the gender distribution of astronomy students shows large losses of women compared to men at the university levels. Examination of the astronomy department at one institution reflects the national trends. It is apparent that women actually leave doctoral programs in disproportionate numbers compared to men, a fact which can be addressed by individual departments. The authors discuss the major social factors contributing to these phenomena, termed micro-inequities, in both group and interpersonal situations.

  5. Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 PLASTIC DISPROPORTIONATE COLLAPSE AT LOST CORNER COLUMNS

    E-print Network

    Burgoyne, Chris

    , earthquake, robust building, Ronan Point, Oklahoma City, World Trade Center, lost support, lost column, 2007 147 PLASTIC DISPROPORTIONATE COLLAPSE AT LOST CORNER COLUMNS Colin GURLEY TAFE Civil Engineering- line mechanisms to address the wider problem of disproportionate collapse at lost columns in multi

  6. Behavioral risk factors for noncommunicable diseases in working and nonworking women of urban slums

    PubMed Central

    Manjrekar, Shivani S.; Sherkhane, Mayur S.; Chowti, Jayaprakash V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are an emerging public health problem, accounting for 80% of deaths in low and middle-income countries leading to a global epidemic. The increasing burden of NCDs is affecting poor and disadvantaged women population disproportionately, contributing to widening health gaps between and within countries. Globalization and urbanization have led to lifestyle changes among urban poor, which need to be understood, as the urban areas are undergoing rapid transitions. Objectives: To know prevalence and pattern of behavioral risk factors for NCDs in working and nonworking women of urban slums to initiate steps for preventive interventions. Materials and Methods: This was community based cross-sectional study conducted among women of urban slums in the age-group of 30-45 years on a voluntary basis. Data were collected by the house-to-house survey using predesigned and pretested proforma World Health Organization-Stepwise Approach to Chronic Disease Risk Factor Surveillance (WHO-STEPS 1 and 2 questionnaires). Descriptive statistics and Chi-square test were used for analysis. Results: Majority, 49% women were in the age-group of 30-35 years, with 60.5% belonging to Class IV socio-economic status. Stress was present in 38% working women as compared to 17% nonworking women (?2 = 22.12, df = 1, P < 0.0001, HS). Nonworking women (25%) were less aware about common NCDs compared to (48%) working women (?2 = 22.82, df = 1, P < 0.0001, HS). It was also found that 11% women were newly diagnosed with hypertension. Conclusion: Most of the women were not aware of the risk factors leading to NCDs. Screening and IEC activities need to be strengthened and hence that diagnosis and preventive measures can be implemented at an early stage of life. PMID:25317001

  7. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism does not affect bone mass as determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography and quantitative bone ultrasound in Spanish women

    PubMed Central

    Roncero-Martin, Raul; Calderon-Garcia, Julian F.; Santos-Vivas, Mercedes; Vera, Vicente; Martínez-Alvárez, Mariana; Rey-Sanchez, Purificación

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The results of studies examining the influence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) and levothyroxine (L-T4) replacement therapy on bone have generated considerable interest but also controversy. The present research aims to evaluate the effects of L-T4 treatment on different skeletal sites in women. Material and methods A group of 45 premenopausal (mean age: 43.62 ±6.65 years) and 180 postmenopausal (mean age: 59.51 ±7.90 years) women with SCH who were undergoing L-T4 replacement therapy for at least 6 months were compared to 58 pre- and 180 postmenopausal women with SCH (untreated) matched for age. The mean doses of L-T4 were 90.88 ±42.59 µg/day in the premenopausal women and 86.35 ±34.11 µg/day in the postmenopausal women. Bone measurements were obtained using quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) for the phalanx, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for the lumbar spine and hip, and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) for the non-dominant distal forearm. Results No differences were observed between patients and untreated controls in these bone measurements except in the bone mineral density (BMD) of the spine (p = 0.0214) in postmenopausal women, which was greater in treated women than in untreated controls. Conclusions Our results indicate that adequate metabolic control through replacement treatment with L-T4 in pre- and postmenopausal women does not affect bone mass. PMID:26528344

  8. "Disproportionately Influential?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses why the Lumina Foundation is considered so influential in higher education despite its small size and the fact that is is a relatively new foundation. Lumina approaches its 10th anniversary this month with a focused higher education funding mission targeting efforts aimed at expanding access and success beyond high school,…

  9. Postural tachycardia syndrome is associated with significant symptoms and functional impairment predominantly affecting young women: a UK perspective

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Claire; Koshi, Sharon; Busner, Lorna; Kavi, Lesley; Newton, Julia L

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine a large UK cohort of patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS), to compare demographic characteristics, symptoms and treatment of PoTS at one centre compared to the largest patient group PoTS UK and to verify if their functional limitation is similar to patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Design A cross-sectional study assessed the frequency of symptoms and their associated variables. Patients and setting Two PoTS cohorts were: (1) recruited via PoTS UK, (2) diagnosed at Newcastle Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust 2009–2012. Patients with PoTS were then compared to a matched cohort with CFS. Main outcome measures Patients’ detailed demographics, time to diagnosis, education, disability, medications, comorbidity and precipitants. Symptom assessment tools captured, Fatigue Impact Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Orthostatic Grading Scale (OGS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Results 136 patients with PoTS participated (84 members of PoTS UK (170 cohort; 50% return) and 52 (87 cohort; 60%) from Newcastle Clinics). The PoTS UK population was significantly younger than the clinic patients, with significantly fewer men (p=0.005). Over 60% had a university or postgraduate degree. Significantly more of the PoTS UK cohort were working, with hours worked being significantly higher (p=0.001). Time to diagnosis was significantly longer in the PoTS UK cohort (p=0.04). Symptom severity was comparable between cohorts. The PoTS total group was compared with a matched CFS cohort; despite comparable levels of fatigue and sleepiness, autonomic symptom burden (OGS) was statistically significantly higher. The most common treatment regime included ?-blockers. Overall, 21 treatment combinations were described. Up to 1/3 were taking no treatment. Conclusions Patients with PoTS are predominantly women, young, well educated and have significant and debilitating symptoms that impact significantly on quality of life. Despite this, there is no consistent treatment. PMID:24934205

  10. The production of 34S-depleted sulfide during bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, D. E.; Thamdrup, B.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria that disproportionate elemental sulfur fractionate sulfur isotopes such that sulfate is enriched in sulfur-34 by 12.6 to 15.3 per mil and sulfide is depleted in sulfur-34 by 7.3 to 8.6 per mil. Through a repeated cycle of sulfide oxidation to S0 and subsequent disproportionation, these bacteria can deplete sedimentary sulfides in sulfur-34. A prediction, borne out by observation, is that more extensive sulfide oxidation will lead to sulfides that are more depleted in sulfur-34. Thus, the oxidative part of the sulfur cycle creates circumstances by which sulfides become more depleted in sulfur-34 than would be possible with sulfate-reducing bacteria alone.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of disproportionating enzyme from potato

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Kayo; Matsuura, Takanori; Ye, Zhengmao; Takaha, Takeshi; Fujii, Kazutoshi; Kusunoki, Masami; Nitta, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    Disproportionating enzyme from potato was crystallized and preliminarily analyzed using X-ray diffraction. Disproportionating enzyme (D-enzyme; EC 2.4.1.25) is a 59 kDa protein that belongs to the ?-amylase family. D-enzyme catalyses intramolecular and intermolecular transglycosylation reactions of ?-1,4 glucan. A crystal of the D-enzyme from potato was obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Preliminary X-ray data showed that the crystal diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution and belongs to space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.7, b = 120.3, c = 174.2 Å.

  12. Thermochromism of the disproportionation equilibrium of pi-dimer radical anion complexes bridged by scandium ions.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Junpei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2004-03-01

    Semiquinone radical anion (Q(*-)) forms a stable pi-dimer with neutral p-benzoquinone (Q), bridged by two or three scandium ions (Sc(3+)) to afford Q(*-)-nSc(3+)-Q (n= 2,3), which is in disproportionation equilibrium with Q and hydroquinone (QH(2)). The number of binding scandium ions changes depending on temperature, causing a remarkable color change associated with the change in the ESR spectra. PMID:14985800

  13. Addressing the Disproportionate Representation of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Special Education

    E-print Network

    Klingner, Janette K.; Artiles, Alfredo J.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B.; Harry, Beth; Zion, Shelley; Tate, William; Durá n, Grace Zamora; Riley, David

    2005-01-01

    of Education David Riley, Education Development Center Citation: Klingner, J. K., Artiles, A. J., Kozleski, E., Harry, B., Zion, S., Tate, W., Durán, G. Z., & Riley, D. (2005). Addressing the disproportionate representation of culturally... Alfredo J. Artiles, Arizona State University Elizabeth Kozleski, University of Colorado at Denver Beth Harry, University of Miami Shelley Zion, University of Colorado at Denver William Tate, Washington University Grace Zamora Durán, U.S. Department...

  14. Gas-phase Boudouard disproportionation reaction between highly vibrationally excited CO molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essenhigh, Katherine A.; Utkin, Yurii G.; Bernard, Chad; Adamovich, Igor V.; William Rich, J.

    2006-11-01

    The gas-phase Boudouard disproportionation reaction between two highly vibrationally excited CO molecules in the ground electronic state has been studied in optically pumped CO. The gas temperature and the CO vibrational level populations in the reaction region, as well as the CO 2 concentration in the reaction products have been measured using FTIR emission and absorption spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that CO 2 formation in the optically pumped reactor is controlled by the high CO vibrational level populations, rather than by CO partial pressure or by flow temperature. The disproportionation reaction rate constant has been determined from the measured CO 2 and CO concentrations using the perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) approximation. The reaction activation energy, 11.6 ± 0.3 eV (close to the CO dissociation energy of 11.09 eV), was evaluated using the statistical transition state theory, by comparing the dependence of the measured CO 2 concentration and of the calculated reaction rate constant on helium partial pressure. The disproportionation reaction rate constant measured at the present conditions is kf = (9 ± 4) × 10 -18 cm 3/s. The reaction rate constants obtained from the experimental measurements and from the transition state theory are in good agreement.

  15. Hispanic/Latina Women and AIDS: A Critical Perspective. JSRI Working Paper No. 36. JSRI Research & Publications Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasini-Caceres, Lydia; Cook, Amy Beth

    Women are a rapidly growing group of people with AIDS in the United States, and Hispanic/Latina and African American women are disproportionately represented. This paper reviews the literature on the epidemiology of AIDS/HIV infection among Latina women, children, and adolescents and discusses the needs of Latinas regarding AIDS prevention…

  16. Substance Use and Partner Violence among Urban Women Seeking Emergency Care

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Louisa; El-Bassel, Nabila; Chang, Mingway; Wu, Elwin; Roy, Lolita

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests intimate partner violence (IPV) and substance misuse are co-occurring problems that disproportionately affect low income urban women seeking care in emergency departments (EDs) and represent leading causes of injuries that result in ED visits. This paper examines temporal bi-directional associations between different types of drug and alcohol use and different types of IPV in a longitudinal study of a representative sample of 241 low income, urban women receiving emergency care from an ED in the Bronx, New York. After adjusting and matching for socio-demographics and potentially confounding multi-level risk and protective covariates, women who reported using heroin in the prior six months at Wave 1 were twice as likely as non-heroin using women to indicate any physical, injurious or sexual IPV at subsequent waves and were 2.7 times more likely to indicate experiencing an injury from IPV at subsequent waves. Crack or cocaine use in the past 6 months at Wave 1 was associated with an increased likelihood of injurious IPV and severe verbal abuse at subsequent waves. Findings also suggested that sexual IPV was significantly associated with subsequent use of crack or cocaine. The multiple bidirectional associations found linking these problems underscore the need for conducting routine screening for IPV and substance misuse among women in low income, urban EDs, and for improving linkages to services that will ultimately reduce the risk of morbidity, disability, and mortality related to these co-occurring problems. PMID:22023020

  17. Efficient Identification of Low-Income Asian American Women at High Risk for Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Galen; Nguyen, Kim; Nguyen, Tung; Stewart, Susan; Davis, Sharon; Kevany, Sebastian; Marquez, Titas; Pasick, Rena

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B disproportionately affects Asian Americans. Because outreach to promote testing and vaccination can be intensive and costly, we assessed the feasibility of an efficient strategy to identify Asian Americans at risk. Prior research with California’s statewide toll-free phone service where low-income women call for free cancer screening found 50% of English- and Spanish-speaking callers were willing to participate in a study on health topics other than cancer screening. The current study ascertained whether Asian Americans could be recruited. Among 200 eligible callers, 50% agreed to take part (95% confidence interval 43%–57%), a rate comparable to our previous study. Subsequent qualitative interviews revealed that receptivity to recruitment was due to trust in the phone service and women’s need for health services and information. This was a relatively low-intensity intervention in that, on average, only five minutes additional call time was required to identify women at risk and provide a brief educational message. Underserved women from diverse backgrounds may be reached in large numbers through existing communication channels. PMID:24185165

  18. HIV risk and preventive interventions in transgender women sex workers.

    PubMed

    Poteat, Tonia; Wirtz, Andrea L; Radix, Anita; Borquez, Annick; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Deutsch, Madeline B; Khan, Sharful Islam; Winter, Sam; Operario, Don

    2015-01-17

    Worldwide, transgender women who engage in sex work have a disproportionate risk for HIV compared with natal male and female sex workers. We reviewed recent epidemiological research on HIV in transgender women and show that transgender women sex workers (TSW) face unique structural, interpersonal, and individual vulnerabilities that contribute to risk for HIV. Only six studies of evidence-based prevention interventions were identified, none of which focused exclusively on TSW. We developed a deterministic model based on findings related to HIV risks and interventions. The model examines HIV prevention approaches in TSW in two settings (Lima, Peru and San Francisco, CA, USA) to identify which interventions would probably achieve the UN goal of 50% reduction in HIV incidence in 10 years. A combination of interventions that achieves small changes in behaviour and low coverage of biomedical interventions was promising in both settings, suggesting that the expansion of prevention services in TSW would be highly effective. However, this expansion needs appropriate sustainable interventions to tackle the upstream drivers of HIV risk and successfully reach this population. Case studies of six countries show context-specific issues that should inform development and implementation of key interventions across heterogeneous settings. We summarise the evidence and knowledge gaps that affect the HIV epidemic in TSW, and propose a research agenda to improve HIV services and policies for this population. PMID:25059941

  19. 42 CFR 447.296 - Limitations on aggregate payments for disproportionate share hospitals for the period January 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...utilization rates or low-income utilization rates (as defined in section 1923 (b) of the Act) at or above the statewide arithmetic mean. (4) A methodology for disproportionate share hospital payments that was established and in effect as of...

  20. Jobs: women's double burden.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Whereas international conventions and national laws provide equal opportunities for women in employment, the reality of women's lives keeps a disproportionate number of women unemployed, underemployed, and living in poverty. The UN itself, which officially is working toward equity among its employees, has a staff composed of just 32.6% women, and women comprise only 10.5% of the top end of the hierarchy. In areas where women's labor force participation has increased dramatically, women typically earn 30-40% less than men doing the same job or else their employment is limited to "traditional female" service positions. The fact that women and girls have received an inadequate education makes it extremely difficult to break the barriers of discrimination in developing countries. The empowerment of women will break the education barrier, and, when that falls, many other barriers will follow suit. Efforts are already underway to break structural barriers caused by economic and social policies. For example, a more flexible pattern of work has been proposed which will include the voluntary assumption of flexible hours, job-sharing, and part-time work. The concept of work is also being broadened to include the important human services that women traditionally provide on a volunteer basis. This will lead to a valuation of women's contribution to society which can be added to calculations of gross domestic product. Women also need protection as they attempt to eke out a living in the informal sector which has been the traditional avenue for women to earn money. This sector is not protected by law and is subject to extortion by officials and by male competitors. A variety of measures is under consideration to increase the protection of informal sector workers. Women also need protection in the conventional work place, especially as they enter fields traditionally reserved for men. These questions are important even in the context of global unemployment because these issues must be addressed or their resolution to women's disadvantage will gain the mantle of tradition. PMID:12157784

  1. High-Intensity Resistance Exercise Promotes Postexercise Hypotension Greater than Moderate Intensity and Affects Cardiac Autonomic Responses in Women Who Are Hypertensive.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Brito, Aline; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do S; Coutinho de Oliveira, Caio V; Sarmento da Nóbrega, Thereza K; Lúcia de Moraes Forjaz, Cláudia; da Cruz Santos, Amilton

    2015-12-01

    de Freitas Brito, A, Brasileiro-Santos, MdS, Coutinho de Oliveira, CV, Sarmento da Nóbrega, TK, Lúcia de Moraes Forjaz, C, and da Cruz Santos, A. High-intensity resistance exercise promotes postexercise hypotension greater than moderate intensity and affects cardiac autonomic responses in women who are hypertensive. J Strength Cond Res 29(12): 3486-3493, 2015-The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) sessions on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), cardiac autonomic modulation, and forearm blood flow (FBF). Sixteen trained hypertensive women (n = 16, 56 ± 3 years) completed the following 3 experimental sessions: control (CS), RE at 50% (EX50%), and RE at 80% (EX80%) of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Both EX50% and EX80% comprised a set of 10 repetitions of 10 exercises, with an interval of 90 seconds between exercises. Measurements were taken preintervention and postintervention (at 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 minutes of recovery). Reductions in systolic/diastolic BP after exercise were greater in EX80% (largest declines, -29 ± 4/-14 ± 5 mm Hg) than EX50% (largest declines, -18 ± 6/-8 ± 5 mm Hg, p ? 0.05). Heart rate and cardiac sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) increased more in relation to pre-exercise values in EX80% than EX50% (largest increases 96 ± 3 vs. 90 ± 4 b·min, LF/HF = 1.77 ± 0.25 vs. 1.40 ± 0.20, respectively, p ? 0.05). Increases in FBF and hyperemia was also higher in EX80% than EX50% compared with pre-exercise (4.97 ± 0.28 vs. 4.36 ± 0.27 ml·min·100 ml and 5.90 ± 0.20 vs. 5.38 ± 0.25 ml·min·100 ml; p ? 0.05, respectively). These results suggest that RE of higher intensity promoted greater postexercise hypotension accompanied by greater increases in FBF, vasodilator response, HR, and cardiac sympathovagal balance. PMID:25992658

  2. Disproportionate emission of bubble streams with killer whale biphonic calls: perspectives on production and function.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Ann E; Grebner, Dawn M; Musser, Whitney B; Nash, Juliette S; Crance, Jessica L

    2015-02-01

    Stereotyped pulsed calls were attributed to 11 killer whales (Orcinus orca) with and without synchronous bubble streams in three datasets collected from two facilities from 1993 to 2012. Calls with and without synchronous bubble streams and divergent overlapping high frequency components ("biphonic" vs "monophonic") were compared. Subjects produced bubbles significantly more often when calls had divergent high frequency components. However, acoustic features in one biphonic call shared by five subjects provided little evidence for an acoustic effect of synchronous bubble flow. Disproportionate bubbling supported other evidence that biphonic calls form a distinct category, but suggested a function in short-range communication. PMID:25698045

  3. Developing Long-Term Physical Activity Participation: A Grounded Theory Study with African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Amy E.; Buckworth, Janet; Katz, Mira L.; Willis, Sharla K.; Odoms-Young, Angela; Heaney, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Regular physical activity is linked to a reduced risk of obesity and chronic disease. African American women bear a disproportionate burden from these conditions and many do not get the recommended amount of physical activity. Long-term success of interventions to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle among African American women has…

  4. Understanding Women's Underrepresentation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: The Role of Social Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganson, Valerie J.; Jones, Meghan P.; Major, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    Enrollment of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors is disproportionately small and declining. This study examines social coping to explain the gender gap. Women undergraduates reported using significantly more social coping than did men. Multiple regression analyses revealed that social coping was a stronger…

  5. Male Sex Roles and Epithets for Ethnic Women in American Slang.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Irving Lewis

    1984-01-01

    Research shows that derogatory names used for women of ethnic outgroups (1) are aimed disproportionately at women of racial minorities; (2) stereotype physical differences between ethnic groups; (3) make derogatory sexual allusions, often using food and animal metaphors; and (4) display the strains of traditional male sex roles in ethnic and…

  6. African American Women Principals: Heeding the Call to Serve as Conduits for Transforming Urban School Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Whitney Sherman; Niemeyer, Arielle

    2015-01-01

    African American women leaders are often found in urban schools that have been exhausted of resources and lack support. However, due to their disproportionate representation in urban schools, African American women principals have become adept at uniting and engaging stakeholders in marginalized school settings into action. The intent for this…

  7. The Relationship between the Proportion of Same-Major Friendships and Academic and Affective Outcomes for Women and Men in STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Casey Ann Eznekier

    2011-01-01

    The importance of gender equity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has continued to be an area of national concern. Research examining women's experiences in STEM has highlighted several factors, both at the student- and institutional-level, that contribute to women's continued underrepresentation in STEM, especially in…

  8. Black Women Beating the Odds from One Generation to the Next: How the Changing Dynamics of Constraint and Opportunity Affect the Process of Educational Resilience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Carla

    2002-01-01

    Used life stories of 19 black women who were first-generation college graduates from three different age cohorts (pre civil rights era, post civil rights era, and post-Reagan era) to show how structural constraints shifted from one generation to another to place the women differentially at risk for limited educational attainment. (SLD)

  9. Maternal Fetal Attachment, Locus of Control and Adherence to STI/HIV Prevention and Prenatal Care Promotion Behaviors in Urban Women

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Sara L.; Geller, Pamela A.; Epperson, C. Neill

    2015-01-01

    Young women of childbearing age are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. In particular, young women have more frequent and more serious health problems from STI or HIV infection than men, and among women, African American women have especially high rates of infection. Pregnancy is an important time for beginning or continued STI and HIV prevention behaviors as discontinuing condom use when the contraceptive motivation is gone puts women and their fetuses at risk for contraction of STIs and HIV if they remain sexually active. There are many personal attributes that predict adherence to STI risk reduction behaviors including health related locus of control. The current study surveyed a group of 100 low-income, urban dwelling minority women during their pregnancies to determine whether maternal-fetal attachment, a characteristic specific to pregnancy, favorably influences pregnant women’s health related locus of control such that women might be more inclined to engage in preventative STI/HIV risk reduction behaviors. Our findings revealed that while our sample has very high levels of MFA despite the high rate of unplanned pregnancy, condom use is not the method used to reduce the risk of contracting STIs/HIV. Rather, women are more likely to limit their number of sexual partners during pregnancy. While this is beneficial, pregnant women in non-monogamous relationships may discount the importance of condom use during pregnancy. Prenatal care providers can provide education about condom use as a beneficial prenatal care behavior similar to taking prenatal vitamins. PMID:25729776

  10. Complete genome sequence of Desulfocapsa sulfexigens, a marine deltaproteobacterium specialized in disproportionating inorganic sulfur compounds

    PubMed Central

    Finster, Kai Waldemar; Kjeldsen, Kasper Urup; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Mussmann, Marc; Amann, Rudolf; Schreiber, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Desulfocapsa sulfexigens SB164P1 (DSM 10523) belongs to the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfobulbaceae and is one of two validly described members of its genus. This strain was selected for genome sequencing, because it is the first marine bacterium reported to thrive on the disproportionation of elemental sulfur, a process with a unresolved enzymatic pathway in which elemental sulfur serves both as electron donor and electron acceptor. Furthermore, in contrast to its phylogenetically closest relatives, which are dissimilatory sulfate-reducers, D. sulfexigens is unable to grow by sulfate reduction and appears metabolically specialized in growing by disproportionating elemental sulfur, sulfite or thiosulfate with CO2 as the sole carbon source. The genome of D. sulfexigens contains the set of genes that is required for nitrogen fixation. In an acetylene assay it could be shown that the strain reduces acetylene to ethylene, which is indicative for N-fixation. The circular chromosome of D. sulfexigens SB164P1 comprises 3,986,761 bp and harbors 3,551 protein-coding genes of which 78% have a predicted function based on auto-annotation. The chromosome furthermore encodes 46 tRNA genes and 3 rRNA operons. PMID:23961312

  11. Anaerobic chemolithotrophic growth of the haloalkaliphilic bacterium strain MLMS?1 by disproportionation of monothioarsenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Planer-Friedrich, B.; Hartig, C.; Lohmayer, R.; Suess, E.; McCann, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel chemolithotrophic metabolism based on a mixed arsenic?sulfur species has been discovered for the anaerobic deltaproteobacterium, strain MLMS-1, a haloalkaliphile isolated from Mono Lake, California, U.S. Strain MLMS?1 is the first reported obligate arsenate-respiring chemoautotroph which grows by coupling arsenate reduction to arsenite with the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. In that pathway the formation of a mixed arsenic?sulfur species was reported. That species was assumed to be monothioarsenite ([H2AsIIIS?IIO2] ?), formed as an intermediate by abiotic reaction of arsenite with sulfide. We now report that this species is monothioarsenate ([HAsVS?IIO3] 2?) as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Monothioarsenate forms by abiotic reaction of arsenite with zerovalent sulfur. Monothioarsenate is kinetically stable under a wide range of pH and redox conditions. However, it was metabolized rapidly by strain MLMS-1 when incubated with arsenate. Incubations using monothioarsenate confirmed that strain MLMS-1 was able to grow (? = 0.017 h?1 ) on this substrate via a disproportionation reaction by oxidizing the thio-group-sulfur (S?II) to zerovalent sulfur or sulfate while concurrently reducing the central arsenic atom (AsV) to arsenite. Monothioarsenate disproportionation could be widespread in nature beyond the already studied arsenic and sulfide rich hot springs and soda lakes where it was discovered.

  12. Are Minority Children Disproportionately Represented in Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education?

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Paul L.; Farkas, George; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Maczuga, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether and to what extent children who are racial/ethnic minorities are disproportionately represented in early intervention and/or early childhood special education (EC/ECSE). We did so by analyzing a large sample of 48-month-olds (N=7,950) participating in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B), a nationally representative dataset of children born in the U.S. in 2001. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicate that boys (OR=1.66), children born at very low birthweight (OR=3.98) or with congenital anomalies (OR=2.17), and children engaging in externalizing problem behaviors (OR=1.10) are more likely to be represented in EI/ECSE. Children from low SES households (OR=.48), those displaying greater numeracy or receptive language knowledge (ORs=.96 and .76, respectively), and children being raised in households where a language other than English is primarily spoken (OR=.39) are less likely to be represented in EI/ECSE. Statistical control for these and an extensive set of additional factors related to cognitive and behavioral functioning indicated that 48-month-old children who are Black (OR=.24) or Asian (OR=.32) are disproportionately under-represented in EI/ECSE in the U.S. PMID:24683265

  13. Interfacial Effects on Lithium Superoxide Disproportionation in Li-O? Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Dengyun; Lau, Kah Chun; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean; Lu, Jun; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Baohua; Yang, Wenge; Gao, Jing; Indacochea, Ernesto; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2015-02-11

    During the cycling of Li-O? batteries the discharge process gives rise to dynamically evolving agglomerates composed of lithium-oxygen nanostructures; however, little is known about their composition. In this paper, we present results for a Li-O? battery based on an activated carbon cathode that indicate interfacial effects can suppress disproportionation of a LiO? component in the discharge product. High-intensity X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy measurements are first used to show that there is a LiO? component along with Li?O? in the discharge product. The stability of the discharge product was then probed by investigating the dependence of the charge potential and Raman intensity of the superoxide peak with time. The results indicate that the LiO? component can be stable for possibly up to days when an electrolyte is left on the surface of the discharged cathode. Density functional calculations on amorphous LiO? reveal that the disproportionation process will be slower at an electrolyte/LiO? interface compared to a vacuum/LiO? interface. The combined experimental and theoretical results provide new insight into how interfacial effects can stabilize LiO? and suggest that these interfacial effects may play an important role in the charge and discharge chemistries of a Li-O? battery.

  14. Knowledge of Abortion Laws and Services Among Low-Income Women in Three United States Cities.

    PubMed

    Lara, Diana; Holt, Kelsey; Peña, Melanie; Grossman, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Low-income women and women of color are disproportionately affected by unintended pregnancy. Lack of knowledge of abortion laws and services is one of several factors likely to hinder access to services, though little research has documented knowledge in this population. Survey with convenience sample of 1,262 women attending primary care or full-scope Ob/Gyn clinics serving low-income populations in three large cities and multivariable analyses with four knowledge outcomes. Among all participants, 53 % were first-generation immigrants, 25 % identified the correct gestational age limit, 41 % identified state parental consent laws, 67 % knew partner consent is not required, and 55 % knew where to obtain abortion services. In multivariable analysis, first-generation immigrants and primarily Spanish speakers were significantly less likely than higher-generation or primarily English speakers to display correct knowledge. Design and evaluation of strategies to improve knowledge about abortion, particularly among migrant women and non-primary English speakers, is needed. PMID:25488893

  15. Self-management of multiple chronic conditions among African American women with asthma: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Janevic, Mary R.; Ellis, Katrina R.; Sanders, Georgiana M.; Nelson, Belinda W.; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective African American women are disproportionately burdened by asthma morbidity and mortality, and may be more likely than asthma patients in general to have comorbid health conditions. This study sought to identify the self-management challenges faced by African American women with asthma and comorbidities, how they prioritize their conditions, and behaviors perceived as beneficial across conditions. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 25 African-American women (mean age 52 years) with persistent asthma and at least one of the following: diabetes, heart disease, or arthritis. Information was elicited on women’s experiences managing asthma and concurrent health conditions. The constant-comparison analytic method was used to develop and apply a coding scheme to interview transcripts. Key themes and subthemes were identified. Results Participants reported an average of 5.7 comorbidities. Fewer than half of the sample considered asthma their main health problem; these perceptions were influenced by beliefs about the relative controllability, predictability, and severity of their health conditions. Participants reported ways in which comorbidities affected asthma management, including that asthma sometimes took a ‘backseat’ to conditions considered more troublesome or worrisome. Mood problems, sometimes attributed to pain or functional limitations resulting from comorbidities, reduced motivation for self-management. Women described how asthma affected comorbidity management; e.g., by impeding recommended exercise. Some self-management recommendations, such as physical activity and weight control, were seen as beneficial across conditions. Conclusions Multiple chronic conditions that include asthma may interact to complicate self-management of each condition. Additional clinical attention and self-management support may help reduce multimorbidity-related challenges. PMID:24161047

  16. Neighborhood contexts experienced by young Mexican-American women: enhancing our understanding of risk for early childbearing.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Dawn M; Nuru-Jeter, Amani M

    2012-02-01

    Young Mexican-American women are disproportionately affected by teen pregnancy and early childbearing. While many of the studies that have investigated this population's high risk for early childbearing have focused predominantly on micro-level factors, a growing body of research has demonstrated the importance of neighborhood-level factors in shaping risk for this outcome. In order to elucidate the role of neighborhood context with regards to early childbearing among adolescent Mexican-American women, it is important to understand what these young women consider to be their neighborhood context and how they experience these contexts. This study utilized a mixed-methods design incorporating participatory photography, photo-elicitation, and focus groups in order to gain a more nuanced understanding of how neighborhood context is conceptualized and experienced by Mexican-American young women, and how these experiences may influence risk for early childbearing. Major findings include: (1) participants view the blocks on which they live as their neighborhood, but their exposure to neighborhood context extends beyond these blocks and includes the transient spaces they move through daily; and (2) within their neighborhood contexts, participants are influenced by experiences of discrimination and the presence of gangs and violence. These findings point to the importance of neighborhood-level factors in the lives of adolescent Mexican-American women, and may be used to inform future studies looking at the role of neighborhood context in shaping risk for early childbearing among this population. PMID:22143409

  17. Women's Health. Report of the Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report identifies a broad spectrum of issues affecting women's health and is divided into four sections: (1) social factors affecting women's health; (2) women's physical health and well-being; (3) health concerns of older women; and (4) issues related to alcohol, drug use and abuse, and the mental health of women. The Public Health Service…

  18. Intimate partner violence and risky sexual behaviors among Iranian women with substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Rimaz, Shahnaz; Korte, Jeffrey E.; Back, Sudie E.; Brady, Kathleen T.; Abad, Masoumeh; Shamsalizadeh, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) and risky sexual behaviors are serious and overlapping public health problems that disproportionately affect drug-involved women. Despite the fact that drug-using women experience extensive IPV, to date, no studies have investigated the association of IPV and risky sexual behaviors among drug-using women in Iran. Methods: Drug-using women (N =120) were recruited from a rehabilitation center in Tehran from March to October, 2009. The Revised Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS2), a standardized questionnaire, was used to collect data regarding violence. We used t-test and logistic regression models to explore the relationship between IPV domains and specific sexual risk behavior outcomes using SPSS 21. Results: The means (sd) for CTS2 domains were as follows: negotiation 4.29 (1.55), psychological violence 2.55 (1.51), sexual violence 0.37 (1.00), physical abuse 1.17 (1.49), injury 2.18 (1.97), and the mean total score was 1.69 (0.96). We found significantly higher injury scores, but lower sexual abuse scores among women with sexually-transmitted infection (STI) compared to women without STI (p-values 0.030 and <0.0001, respectively). In addition, we found that psychological abuse was positively associated with STI (p-value 0.03) and increased condom use (p = 0.010), possibly mediated through an increased likelihood of having multiple partners. Conclusion: The findings revealed that in Iran drug-involved women experience high rates of IPV and that IPV is associated with increased risky sexual behavior. Implication: Preventive interventions for violence that are integrated within drug treatment programs, as well as harm reduction programs are highly recommended. PMID:26034727

  19. Cation Ordering in Fe-bearing Silicate Perovskite (Bridgmanite) and its Role in Disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, A. S.; Caracas, R.; Asimow, P. D.; Harvey, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Previous theoretical studies have investigated the composition-dependence of the spin transition in Fe-bearing MgSiO3 perovskite, finding that the transition pressure is extremely sensitive to atomic configuration. Computational constraints limited these studies to supercell structures containing only one to a few iron atoms in a handful of configurations. Bengston (2008) handled this issue using special quasirandom structures, which approximate a randomized macroscopic sample. Umemoto (2008) considered a set of configurations in large supercells, finding that iron in perovskite prefers to cluster. Although these studies showed that the energetic differences between configurations can be as large as ~10 mHa (3000K thermal energy equivalent), none have yet attempted to fold the configuration-dependence into a thermodynamic ordering model. In this presentation, we report an adaptation of the cluster-site-approximation (Oates, 1999) that enables efficient calculation of order-dependent phase diagrams for perovskite, given a reasonable set of density functional theory calculations of modest supercell sizes. Recently, Zhang (2014) reported the occurrence of perovskite disproportionation in high P-T diamond anvil cell experiments. The studies discussed above found that intermediate iron compositions were unstable relative to endmembers, implying potential exsolution, but no experimental evidence for it existed at the time. Zhang (2014) showed that all Fe-bearing perovskite samples with 10% to 40% Fe/[Fe+Mg] underwent exsolution of a hexagonal iron-rich phase when the sample was compressed to 100 GPa prior to heating. This poses a significant apparent contradiction: most studies have found using progressive annealing that iron-bearing perovskite is stable up to the post-perovskite transition (e.g. Dorfman 2013), whereas Zhang (2014) showed that the wait-and-heat method consistently induces disproportionation. We discuss how this is a likely outcome of the ordering tendencies of perovskite and show how the development of iron-rich clusters tends to stabilize perovskite against disproportionation. Finally, we compare the different roles ordering might play under experimental conditions and deep within the Earth.

  20. Women in public life.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    The UN Division for the Advancement of Women publication has devoted an issue to the role of women in public lie based on an analysis of women's status in industrialized countries presented in Vienna, Austria, in May 1991. Women already contribute to political life and make a difference in politics, but societal institutions and government processes have not yet adapted to this fact. Women's nongovernmental organizations promote women's interests at the governmental level, but often do not have the economic or political power as do other interests groups such as trade unions. Women often participation public life via their membership in women's organizations, community action groups, voluntary organizations, and other close to home groups. They prefer to participate in activities which are problem solving rather than institution building. These activities and groups operate outside established political institutions and are not considered as part of public and political life. Society's exclusion of women from leadership positions in public life keeps it from benefiting from the special contributions that women bring to decision making. Women show a tendency to have different leadership styles than men (e.g., ability to relate to people affected by their decisions), which are most needed for the modern world. They often do not campaign just for women's issues, but, once in office, they do tend to become more involved in women's issues. Women have affected positive changes in career and child care, often on a non-Socialist agenda, in various countries (e.g. Norway). This effect is referred to as the politics of motherhood. More access to politics and public life calls for removal of structural and situational barriers including the glass ceiling, discrimination, insufficient funds, and bearing most of the responsibility for child care. The UN women's groups has drafted a platform for interregional consultation on women's role in public life and scheduled the 4th world conference on women for 1995. PMID:12317888

  1. Disproportionation of (Mg,Fe)SiO? perovskite in Earth's deep lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Meng, Yue; Yang, Wenge; Wang, Lin; Mao, Wendy L; Zeng, Qiao-Shi; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wagner, Andrew J; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Liu, Wenjun; Xu, Ruqing; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2014-05-23

    The mineralogical constitution of the Earth's mantle dictates the geophysical and geochemical properties of this region. Previous models of a perovskite-dominant lower mantle have been built on the assumption that the entire lower mantle down to the top of the D? layer contains ferromagnesian silicate [(Mg,Fe)SiO3] with nominally 10 mole percent Fe. On the basis of experiments in laser-heated diamond anvil cells, at pressures of 95 to 101 gigapascals and temperatures of 2200 to 2400 kelvin, we found that such perovskite is unstable; it loses its Fe and disproportionates to a nearly Fe-free MgSiO3 perovskite phase and an Fe-rich phase with a hexagonal structure. This observation has implications for enigmatic seismic features beyond ~2000 kilometers depth and suggests that the lower mantle may contain previously unidentified major phases. PMID:24855264

  2. Trends in Medicare disproportionate share (DSH) distribution in US hospitals: 1996-2003.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Shadi S; Callan, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Implemented in 1986, Medicare's disproportionate share (DSH) adjustment is intended to recognize hospitals' additional resource investment in caring for low-income patients. This project analyzed changes in the DSH percentage between 1996 and 2003 and examined the association between selected hospital characteristics and such changes. Results obtained revealed some interesting findings. First, minimal changes in DSH percentage occurred during the period 1996-1999 with a hike in that ratio in 2000-2001. However, even with the absence of any legislative or executive changes to the DSH threshold or formula during 2002 and 2003, significant increases occurred during 2001-2003 (11 percent increase between 2001 and 2003). Such an increase may be caused by the nation's economic situation during that timeframe (i.e., more people depending on public programs for coverage). PMID:19175241

  3. The disproportionate impact of environmental health threats on children of color

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, L.

    1995-09-01

    Children receive greater exposures to environmental pollutants present in air, food, and water because they inhale or ingest more air, food, or water on a body-weight basis than adults do. Communities of color are disproportionately exposed in hazardous wastes, dioxin, and air pollution. Existing data demonstrate that children of color are the subgroup of the population most exposed to certain pollutants, including lead, air pollution, and pesticides. Government standards do not take into account children`s differential exposures or the cumulative nature of these exposures. Federal regulations fail to protect the most highly exposed and most sensitive subgroups of the population. More often than not this group is children of color. 13 refs.

  4. Strengthening Community Capacity to Participate in Making Decisions to Reduce Disproportionate Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Manuel; Israel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Environmental exposures impose a disproportionate health burden on low-income populations and communities of color. One contributing factor may be the obstacles such communities face to full participation in making policy decisions about environmental health. This study described and analyzed the characteristics that contributed to communities' capacity to participate in making environmental decisions and suggested steps public agencies could take to achieve more meaningful participation. By strengthening community capacity, advancing authentic participation, and building democratic power, it might be possible to alter current patterns of health inequities. Strengthening participation by working with communities to develop the capacities needed to be effective in such processes is a key role for local, state, and national environmental agencies. PMID:22021323

  5. A critical test of the assumption that men prefer conformist women and women prefer nonconformist men.

    PubMed

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Wellauer, Richard; McIntyre, Jason C; Barlow, Fiona Kate

    2015-06-01

    Five studies tested the common assumption that women prefer nonconformist men as romantic partners, whereas men prefer conformist women. Studies 1 and 2 showed that both men and women preferred nonconformist romantic partners, but women overestimated the extent to which men prefer conformist partners. In Study 3, participants ostensibly in a small-group interaction showed preferences for nonconformist opposite-sex targets, a pattern that was particularly evident when men evaluated women. Dating success was greater the more nonconformist the sample was (Study 4), and perceptions of nonconformity in an ex-partner were associated with greater love and attraction toward that partner (Study 5). On the minority of occasions in which effects were moderated by gender, it was in the reverse direction to the traditional wisdom: Conformity was more associated with dating success among men. The studies contradict the notion that men disproportionately prefer conformist women. PMID:25805768

  6. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection. PMID:25083899

  7. Emotion-Oriented Coping, Avoidance Coping, and Fear of Pain as Mediators of the Relationship between Positive Affect, Negative Affect, and Pain-Related Distress among African American and Caucasian College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Wells, Anita G.; Wang, Mei-Chuan; Pietruszka, Todd; Ciftci, Ayse; Stancil, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The authors tested whether coping styles and fear of pain mediate the relationship between positive affect and negative affect on one hand and pain-related distress (PD) on the other. Among African American and Caucasian female college students, negative affect, fear of pain, and emotion-oriented coping together accounted for 34% of the variance…

  8. Impact of a women's program for science, mathematics and engineering on undergraduate women: Activity systems on the periphery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahveci, Ajda

    National reports such as National Science Foundation's highlight women's disproportionate distribution and differential treatment in the science, mathematics, and engineering (SM&E) fields, in both education and the workforce in the US. Women are less likely than men to choose a career that involves SM&E, and are more likely than men to earn bachelor's degrees in non-science and non-engineering fields. The need for support and encouragement is obvious for women already in college intending to pursue a major in a SM&E field. Comprehensive support networks can be and are established through programs for women entering college and willing to pursue careers in SM&E fields. The context of this research was the Program for Women in Science, Engineering and Mathematics (PWISEM) established in 2001 by a Southern teaching and research university in the US. I constructed a thorough theoretical lens by interweaving the theory of situated learning/legitimate peripheral participation and the cultural-historical activity theory. I explored the interactions and contradictions that affected the science identity formation of the PWISEM students, how they identified themselves as future scientists, and the key factors PWISEM involved in motivating and supporting women students in their intended SM&E majors. The design of the research was dominant-less dominant, the dominant approach being qualitative and the less-dominant being quantitative. The Program was successful in fostering the participation and retention of undergraduate women in SM&E. However, the women in the Program were more likely to internalize the status quo in the SM&E realms without actively challenging it (liberal feminist approach). To change the masculine culture embedded in SM&E, engaging in activism is essential. This research suggests that in fact, programs like PWISEM provide promising contexts for reforming the SM&E culture to be more appealing and inclusive of all. I suggest that there can be both explicit and implicit ways of transformation within such contexts and argue that the implicit approach is more powerful. This research also informs the theory of situated learning in that newcomer interactions are a key aspect and their actions should be understood to involve much more than knowledge circulation.

  9. Violence Against Women

    PubMed Central

    Fulu, Emma; Miedema, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Globalization theories have proliferated over the past two decades. However, global developments have yet to be systematically incorporated into theories around violence against women. This article proposes to add a global level to the existing ecological model framework, popularized by Lori Heise in 1998, to explore the relationships between global processes and experiences of violence against women. Data from the Maldives and Cambodia are used to assess how globalized ideologies, economic development and integration, religious fundamentalisms, and global cultural exchange, as components of a larger globalization process, have affected men and women’s experiences and perceptions of violence against women. PMID:26215287

  10. The relationships between sociodemographic characteristics of Texas school districts and the Texas Education Agency's indicators of disproportionate representation in special education programs 

    E-print Network

    Ramirez, Eleazar

    2008-10-10

    Despite considerable efforts, the disproportionate representation of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds in special education programs remains among the most persistent problems in the field of ...

  11. “They Have Already Thrown Away Their Chicken”: Barriers Affecting Participation by HIV-infected Women in Care and Treatment Programs for Their Infants in Blantyre, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Marie Collins; Dube, Queen; Dow, Anna; Umar, Eric; Van Rie, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected infants and young children are at high risk of serious illness and death. Morbidity and mortality can be greatly reduced through early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV and timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Despite global efforts to scale-up of EID and infant ART, uptake of these services in resource poor, high HIV burden countries remains low. We conducted a qualitative study of 59 HIV-infected women to identify and explore barriers women face in accessing HIV testing and care for their infants. To capture different perspectives, we included mothers whose infants were known positive (n=9) or known negative (n=14), mothers of infants with unknown HIV status (n=13), and pregnant HIV-infected women (n=20). Five important themes emerged: lack of knowledge regarding EID and infant ART, the perception of health care workers as authority figures, fear of disclosure of own and/or child’s HIV status, lack of psychosocial support, and intent to shorten the life of the child. A complex array of cultural, economic and psychosocial factors creates barriers for HIV-infected women to participate in early infant HIV testing and care programs. For optimal impact of EID and infant ART, reasons for poor uptake should be better understood and addressed in a culturally sensitive manner. PMID:22348314

  12. Understanding Social and Sexual Networks of Sexual Minority Men and Transgender Women in Guatemala City to Improve HIV Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, C.; Arandi, C. Galindo; Bolaños, J. Herbert; Paz-Bailey, G.; Barrington, C.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual minority men and transgender women are disproportionately affected by HIV in Guatemala. Innovative prevention strategies are urgently needed to address these disparities. While social network approaches are frequently used to reach sexual minorities, little is known about the unique network characteristics among sub-groups. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 13 gay-identifying men, eight non-gay-identifying men who have sex with men (MSM) and eight transgender women in Guatemala City. Using narrative and thematic coding procedures, we identified distinct patterns in the size, composition, and overlap between social and sexual networks across groups. Gay-identifying men had the largest, most supportive social networks, predominantly comprising family. For both non-gay-identifying MSM and transgender women, friends and sex clients provided more support. Transgender women reported the smallest social networks, least social support, and the most discrimination. HIV prevention efforts should be tailored to the specific sexual minority population and engage with strong ties. PMID:25418236

  13. Understanding social and sexual networks of sexual minority men and transgender women in Guatemala city to improve HIV prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Tucker, C; Arandi, C Galindo; Bolaños, J Herbert; Paz-Bailey, G; Barrington, C

    2014-11-01

    Sexual minority men and transgender women are disproportionately affected by HIV in Guatemala. Innovative prevention strategies are urgently needed to address these disparities. While social network approaches are frequently used to reach sexual minorities, little is known about the unique network characteristics among sub-groups. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 13 gay-identifying men, eight non-gay-identifying men who have sex with men (MSM) and eight transgender women in Guatemala City. Using narrative and thematic coding procedures, we identified distinct patterns in the size, composition, and overlap between social and sexual networks across groups. Gay-identifying men had the largest, most supportive social networks, predominantly comprising family. For both non-gay-identifying MSM and transgender women, friends and sex clients provided more support. Transgender women reported the smallest social networks, least social support, and the most discrimination. HIV prevention efforts should be tailored to the specific sexual minority population and engage with strong ties. PMID:25418236

  14. 42 CFR 412.106 - Special treatment: Hospitals that serve a disproportionate share of low-income patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disproportionate share of low-income patients. 412.106 Section 412.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System...

  15. 42 CFR 412.106 - Special treatment: Hospitals that serve a disproportionate share of low-income patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disproportionate share of low-income patients. 412.106 Section 412.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System...

  16. 42 CFR 412.106 - Special treatment: Hospitals that serve a disproportionate share of low-income patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disproportionate share of low-income patients. 412.106 Section 412.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System...

  17. 42 CFR 412.106 - Special treatment: Hospitals that serve a disproportionate share of low-income patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... disproportionate share of low-income patients. 412.106 Section 412.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System...

  18. 42 CFR 412.106 - Special treatment: Hospitals that serve a disproportionate share of low-income patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disproportionate share of low-income patients. 412.106 Section 412.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System...

  19. Universal Screening for Behavioral and Emotional Risk: A Promising Method for Reducing Disproportionate Placement in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raines, Tara C.; Dever, Bridget V.; Kamphaus, Randy W.; Roach, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The overrepresentation of U.S. minority students identified for emotional and behavior disorders special education programs plagues schools and challenges researchers and practitioners. Arcane methods including teacher nomination continue to guide referral processes, despite compelling evidence of their influence on disproportionate special…

  20. Differences between US Women’s and Men’s Careers in Astronomy: Results from the Longitudinal Study of Astronomy Graduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivie, Rachel; White, Susan; Chu, Raymond Y.

    2015-08-01

    The Longitudinal Study of Astronomy Graduate Students (LSAGS), a joint project of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and the American Institute of Physics (AIP), emerged from the Women in Astronomy II conference held in Pasadena, CA, USA in 2003. At the conference, concern about possible differential attrition for women arose from the relatively high percentage of female junior (student) AAS members compared to the lower representation of women among astronomy faculty members.The Committee for the Status of Women in Astronomy (CSWA) and the AAS Council concluded that a longitudinal study was needed to collect data about which variables affect career choices in astronomy and to determine whether any of these variables exert a disproportionate force on either sex. In 2007-08, the project team, under the direction of Rachel Ivie, Associate Director of AIP’s Statistical Research Center (SRC), asked all graduate students in astronomy and astrophysics in the US (~1500) to complete the first survey. The LSAGS follows this same group of students as they leave graduate school and enter their careers. In 2012-13, more than 800 responded to the second survey, and most had completed PhDs. We plan a third round of data collection in 2015.Results from the study show that there are statistically significant differences between women and men in dissertation research methods, PhD subfield, and ratings of graduate school advisors. We found that after graduate school, women were more likely than men to take a break from work of six months or longer and to have made accommodations for a partner’s career opportunities (the “two-body problem”). In turn, women were more likely to work outside the field of astronomy because they were more likely to have experienced the “two-body problem.” In addition, we found women were more likely than men to have experienced harassment or discrimination at school or work. Finally, even while controlling for employment sector and years since PhD, we found that on average, women have lower salaries than men. These findings have implications for programs seeking to increase the representation of women in astronomy and physics. Funded by National Science Foundation AST-1347723.

  1. Intimate partner violence among African American and African Caribbean women: prevalence, risk factors, and the influence of cultural attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Stockman, Jamila K.; Lucea, Marguerite B.; Bolyard, Richelle; Bertand, Desiree; Callwood, Gloria B.; Sharps, Phyllis W.; Campbell, Doris W.; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Women of African descent are disproportionately affected by intimate partner abuse; yet, limited data exist on whether the prevalence varies for women of African descent in the United States and those in the US territories. Objective In this multisite study, we estimated lifetime and 2-year prevalence of physical, sexual, and psychological intimate partner abuse (IPA) among 1,545 women of African descent in the United States and US Virgin Islands (USVI). We also examined how cultural tolerance of physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) influences abuse. Design Between 2009 and 2011, we recruited African American and African Caribbean women aged 18–55 from health clinics in Baltimore, MD, and St. Thomas and St. Croix, USVI, into a comparative case-control study. Screened and enrolled women completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview. Screening-based prevalence of IPA and IPV were stratified by study site and associations between tolerance of IPV and abuse experiences were examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Most of the 1,545 screened women were young, of low-income, and in a current intimate relationship. Lifetime prevalence of IPA was 45% in St. Thomas, 38% in St. Croix, and 37% in Baltimore. Lifetime prevalence of IPV was 38% in St. Thomas, 28% in St. Croix, and 30% in Baltimore. Past 2-year prevalence of IPV was 32% in St. Thomas, 22% in St. Croix, and 26% in Baltimore. Risk and protective factors for IPV varied by site. Community and personal acceptance of IPV were independently associated with lifetime IPA in Baltimore and St. Thomas. Conclusions Variance across sites for risk and protective factors emphasizes cultural considerations in sub-populations of women of African descent when addressing IPA and IPV in given settings. Individual-based interventions should be coupled with community/societal interventions to shape attitudes about use of violence in relationships and to promote healthy relationships. PMID:25226418

  2. Spontaneous reduction and C-H borylation of arenes mediated by uranium(III) disproportionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Polly L.; Mansell, Stephen M.; Maron, Laurent; McKay, David

    2012-08-01

    Transition-metal-arene complexes such as bis(benzene)chromium Cr(?6-C6H6)2 are historically important to d-orbital bonding theory and have modern importance in organic synthesis, catalysis and organic spintronics. In investigations of f-block chemistry, however, arenes are invariably used as solvents rather than ligands. Here, we show that simple uranium complexes UX3 (X = aryloxide, amide) spontaneously disproportionate, transferring an electron and X-ligand, allowing the resulting UX2 to bind and reduce arenes, forming inverse sandwich molecules [X2U(µ-?6:?6-arene)UX2] and a UX4 by-product. Calculations and kinetic studies suggest a ‘cooperative small-molecule activation’ mechanism involving spontaneous arene reduction as an X-ligand is transferred. These mild reaction conditions allow functionalized arenes such as arylsilanes to be incorporated. The bulky UX3 are also inert to reagents such as boranes that would react with the traditional harsh reaction conditions, allowing the development of a new in situ arene C-H bond functionalization methodology converting C-H to C-B bonds.

  3. Laser-induced charge-disproportionated metallic state in LaCoO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, M.; Karolak, M.; Trabant, C.; Holldack, K.; Föhlisch, A.; Kummer, K.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Spiwek, M.; Belozerov, A.; Poteryaev, A.; Lichtenstein, A.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the origin of the spin transition in LaCoO3 is one of the long-standing aims in condensed matter physics. Aside from its fundamental interest, a detailed description of this crossover will have a direct impact on the interpretation of the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) and the properties of the high-temperature metallic phase in this compound, which has shown to have important applications in environmentally friendly energy production. To date, the spin transition has been investigated mainly as a function of temperature in thermal equilibrium. These results have hinted at dynamical effects. In this paper, we have investigated the SMT by means of pump-probe soft x-ray reflectivity experiments at the O K , Co L , and La M edges and theoretical calculations within a DFT++ formalism. The results point towards a laser-induced metallization in which the optical transitions stabilize a metallic state with high-spin configuration and increased charge disproportionation.

  4. Disproportionation of thermoelectric bismuth telluride nanowires as a result of the annealing process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongmin; Berger, Andreas; Cagnon, Laurent; Gösele, Ulrich; Nielsch, Kornelius; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2010-12-14

    P-type thermoelectric bismuth telluride nanowires were fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition in anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes. Subsequently, the nanowires were annealed at 423, 523 and 673 K in an inert atmosphere for 4 h. With increasing temperature, it was observed that the Te compound incongruently sublimates due to its high vapor pressure, leading to disproportionation (from Bi(2)Te(3) to Bi(4)Te(3)via Bi(4)Te(5)). The crystalline structure of the nanowires was then investigated using XRD and SAED, with nanowire compositions investigated using an EDX attached to a TEM. The crystallinity of the nanowires was found to be enhanced with increased annealing temperature, and nanowires annealed at 673 K were stably maintained in the Bi(4)Te(3) phase. Additionally, the Seebeck coefficient was determined and the thermopower of nanowires annealed at a temperature of 423 K was shown to be slightly enhanced. Significantly suppressed Seebeck values for annealing temperatures of 523 K and 673 K were also observed. PMID:21046022

  5. Gas phase Boudouard disproportionation reaction between highly vibrationally excited CO molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essenhigh, Katherine; Utkin, Yurii; Bernard, Chad; Adamovich, Igor; Rich, William

    2006-10-01

    The gas-phase Boudouard disproportionation reaction (1) between highly vibrationally excited CO molecules in nonequilibrium optically excited plasma has been studied in this work. CO(v) + CO(w) -> CO2 +C The experiments were conducted in a mixture of Ar and CO at different CO partial pressures. The cw CO laser beam (14 Watt) was used to create an optically pumped plasma in a small glass reactor. The vibrational distribution function (VDF) of CO was measured in the plasma region using the fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. Carbon dioxide production rate was determined from the absorption of CO2 asymmetric stretch. Small amounts of helium was added to the mixture to alter the VDFs and change the of CO2 production rate. The activation energy Ea ˜11eV was inferred by using the transition state theory to fit the experimental data. This activation energy is very close to the CO dissociation energy of 11.09eV. Such a high activation energy suggests that both colliding particles have to be in very highly excited vibrational states for the reaction (1) to occur. The total rate constant KB for the reaction (1) was found to be 6.10-17 cm^3/sec.

  6. Disproportionation of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 Perovskite and its Implications to the Deep Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Meng, Y.; Yang, W.; Wang, L.; Mao, W. L.; Zeng, Q. C.; Jeong, J. S.; Wagner, A. J.; Mkhoyan, K. A.; Liu, W.; Xu, R.; Mao, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    Models of the Earth's deep interior have been built upon the basic assumption that the lower mantle down to the top of the D" layer mainly consists of orthorhombic perovskite (pv) with nominally 10 mol% Fe. However, seismic observations show enigmatic features in the deep lower mantle, such as, the sharp boundary on the top of the D? layer, the anticorrelations between VS and VP, the seismic anisotropy, and the existence of large low-shear-velocity provinces. The mineralogical constitution of the Earth's mantle is fundamental for understanding the geophysical and geochemical properties of this region. Our recent study using laser-heated diamond anvil cell technology coupled with synchrotron x-ray diffraction in-situ at high pressure-temperature and TEM studies of the quenched sample has demonstrated the disproportionation reaction of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 pv to a nearly Fe-free pv and an Fe-rich H-phase with a previously unknown hexagonal structure at 95 to 101 GPa and 2200 to 2400 K, thus fundamentally changing the geochemistry and geophysics of the bottom half of the lower mantle. We suggest that (Mg,Fe)SiO3 pv may not be the major silicate throughout the lower mantle down to the top of the D" layer. Instead, interpretations for key enigmatic features in the deep lower mantle require the knowledge of the three-phase P-T-x relationship of pv, ppv, and the H-phase.

  7. Disproportionation in Li-O{sub 2} Batteries Based on a Large Surface Area Carbon Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, D.; Wang, H.-H.; Yang, J.; Lau, K. C.; Li, K.; Curtiss, L. A.; Amine, K.

    2013-10-16

    In this paper we report on a kinetics study of the discharge process and its relationship to the charge overpotential in a Li-O{sub 2} cell for large surface area cathode material. The kinetics study reveals evidence for a first-order disproportionation reaction during discharge from an oxygen-rich Li{sub 2}O{sub 2} component with superoxide-like character to a Li{sub 2}O{sub 2} component. The oxygen-rich superoxide-like component has a much smaller potential during charge (3.2-3.5 V) than the Li{sub 2}O{sub 2} component (similar to 4.2 V). The formation of the superoxide-like component is likely due to the porosity of the activated carbon used in the Li-O{sub 2} cell cathode that provides a good environment for growth during discharge. The discharge product containing these two components is characterized by toroids, which are assemblies of nanoparticles. The morphologic growth and decomposition process of the toroids during the reversible discharge/charge process was observed by scanning electron microscopy and is consistent with the presence of the two components in the discharge product. The results of this study provide new insight into how growth conditions control the nature of discharge product, which can be used to achieve improved performance in Li-O{sub 2} cell.

  8. Administration of a multistrain probiotic product (VSL#3) to women in the perinatal period differentially affects breast milk beneficial microbiota in relation to mode of delivery.

    PubMed

    Mastromarino, Paola; Capobianco, Daniela; Miccheli, Alfredo; Praticò, Giulia; Campagna, Giuseppe; Laforgia, Nicola; Capursi, Teresa; Baldassarre, Maria E

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic supplementation to a mother during the perinatal period can have a positive impact on the breast milk composition. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with the probiotic VSL#3, during late pregnancy and lactation, on breast milk levels of beneficial bacteria and some functional components (oligosaccharides and lactoferrin) potentially able to have a positive influence on the microbiota. Breast milk microbiota was analyzed by conventional and quantitative real-time PCR. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, 66 women took daily either the probiotic (n=33) or a placebo (n=33). Intergroup analysis demonstrated that the amounts of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were significantly higher in the colostrum and mature milk of the mothers taking VSL#3 in comparison to those taking placebo. The analysis of bacterial strains and species present in breast milk of VSL#3 supplemented mothers indicated that the administered probiotic microorganisms did not pass from maternal gut to mammary gland. In women with vaginal delivery, significantly higher amounts of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were detected in colostrum and mature milk of probiotic treated group in comparison to placebo group, whereas no significant difference was observed between groups in women who had caesarean section, neither in colostrum nor in mature milk. Milk levels of oligosaccharides and lactoferrin were similar in placebo and probiotic supplemented groups at all timepoints and regardless of the mode of delivery. Our results indicate a probiotic-dependent modulation of breast milk microbiota in vaginally delivering women, possibly exerted through a systemic effect. PMID:25836922

  9. What Health Issues or Conditions Are Specific to Women Only?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... health issues or conditions are specific to women only? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... disorders. The health topics listed below affect women only. Some other conditions affect men too but affect ...

  10. How does acupuncture affect insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and insulin resistance? Study protocol of a prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanhua; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Ng, Ernest H Y; Li, Juan; Wu, Xiaoke; Ma, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance (IR) are key features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and metabolic syndrome. The effect of 5?weeks of acupuncture treatment has been investigated in a completed prospective pilot trial (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01457209), and acupuncture with electrical stimulation applied to insulin-resistant rats with dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS was shown to improve insulin sensitivity. Therefore, we now aim to conduct a prospective pilot study to evaluate whether using the same acupuncture treatment protocol given over a longer period of time (6?months) than in the previous pilot trial will improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS and IR. Our hypothesis is that acupuncture with combined manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation of the needles will improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS and IR. Methods/analysis This is a prospective pilot trial. A total of 112 women with PCOS and IR will be recruited and categorised according to their body mass index (BMI) as normal weight (BMI=18.5?23?kg/m2) or as overweight/obese (BMI>23?kg/m2). Acupuncture will be applied three times per week for 6?months at 30?min per treatment. The primary outcome will be the change in insulin sensitivity before and after 6?months of acupuncture treatment, as measured by an oral glucose tolerance test. Ethics/dissemination Ethical approval of this study has been granted from the ethics committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (No. 2013039). Written and informed consent will be obtained from each patient before any study procedure is performed, according to good clinical practice. The results of this trial will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. Trial registration numbers NCT02026323 and ChiCTR-OCH-13003921. PMID:25941189

  11. Supplementation with calcium and short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides affects markers of bone turnover but not bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Slevin, Mary M; Allsopp, Philip J; Magee, Pamela J; Bonham, Maxine P; Naughton, Violetta R; Strain, J J; Duffy, Maresa E; Wallace, Julie M; Mc Sorley, Emeir M

    2014-03-01

    This 24-mo randomized, double-blind, controlled trial aimed to examine whether supplementation with a natural marine-derived multi-mineral supplement rich in calcium (Ca) taken alone and in conjunction with short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (scFOSs) has a beneficial effect on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers (BTMs) in postmenopausal women. A total of 300 non-osteoporotic postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to daily supplements of 800 mg of Ca, 800 mg of Ca with 3.6 g of scFOS (CaFOS), or 9 g of maltodextrin. BMD was measured before and after intervention along with BTMs, which were also measured at 12 mo. Intention-to-treat ANCOVA identified that the change in BMD in the Ca and CaFOS groups did not differ from that in the maltodextrin group. Secondary analysis of changes to BTMs over time identified a greater decline in osteocalcin and C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) in the Ca group compared with the maltodextrin group at 12 mo. A greater decline in CTX was observed at 12 mo and a greater decline in osteocalcin was observed at 24 mo in the CaFOS group compared with the maltodextrin group. In exploratory subanalyses of each treatment group against the maltodextrin group, women classified with osteopenia and taking CaFOS had a smaller decline in total-body (P = 0.03) and spinal (P = 0.03) BMD compared with the maltodextrin group, although this effect was restricted to those with higher total-body and mean spinal BMD at baseline, respectively. Although the change in BMD observed did not differ between the groups, the greater decline in BTMs in the Ca and CaFOS groups compared with the maltodextrin group suggests a more favorable bone health profile after supplementation with Ca and CaFOS. Supplementation with CaFOS slowed the rate of total-body and spinal bone loss in postmenopausal women with osteopenia-an effect that warrants additional investigation. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN63118444. PMID:24453130

  12. Disproportionate Declines in Ground-Foraging Insectivorous Birds after Mistletoe Removal.

    PubMed

    Watson, David M

    2015-01-01

    Insectivorous birds have been recognized as disproportionately sensitive to land-use intensification and habitat loss, with those species feeding primarily on the ground exhibiting some of the most dramatic declines. Altered litter inputs and availability of epigeic arthropods have been suggested to underlie reduced abundances and shrinking distributions but direct evidence is lacking. I used a patch-scale removal experiment in southern Australia to evaluate whether ground-feeding insectivores are especially vulnerable to altered litter-fall. Building on work demonstrating the importance of mistletoe litter to nutrient dynamics, litter was reduced by removing mistletoe (Loranthaceae) from one set of eucalypt woodlands, responses of birds three years after mistletoe removal compared with otherwise similar control woodlands containing mistletoe. Despite not feeding on mistletoes directly, insectivores exhibited the greatest response to mistletoe removal. Among woodland residents, ground-foraging insectivores showed the most dramatic response; treatment woodlands losing an average of 37.4% of their pre-treatment species richness. Once these 19 species of ground-foraging insectivores were excluded, remaining woodland species showed no significant effect of mistletoe removal. This response reflects greater initial losses in treatment woodlands during the study (which coincided with a severe drought) and double the number of species returning to control woodlands (where mistletoe numbers and litter were not manipulated) post-drought. These findings support the productivity-based explanation of declining insectivores, suggesting diminished litter-fall reduced habitat quality for these birds via decreased availability of their preferred prey. In addition to altered prey availability, interactions between litter-fall and epigeic arthropods exemplify the importance of below-ground / above-ground linkages driving ecosystem function. PMID:26640895

  13. Production of electronic grade lunar silicon by disproportionation of silicon difluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1993-03-01

    Waldron has proposed to extract lunar silicon by sodium reduction of sodium fluorosilicate derived from reacting sodium fluoride with lunar silicon tetrafluoride. Silicon tetrafluoride is obtained by the action of hydrofluoric acid on lunar silicates. While these reactions are well understood, the resulting lunar silicon is not likely to meet electronic specifications of 5 nines purity. Dale and Margrave have shown that silicon difluoride can be obtained by the action of silicon tetrafluoride on elemental silicon at elevated temperatures (1100-1200 C) and low pressures (1-2 torr). The resulting silicon difluoride will then spontaneously disproportionate into hyperpure silicon and silicon tetrafluoride in vacuum at approximately 400 C. On its own merits, silicon difluoride polymerizes into a tough waxy solid in the temperature range from liquid nitrogen to about 100 C. It is the silicon analog of teflon. Silicon difluoride ignites in moist air but is stable under lunar surface conditions and may prove to be a valuable industrial material that is largely lunar derived for lunar surface applications. The most effective driver for lunar industrialization may be the prospects for industrial space solar power systems in orbit or on the moon that are built with lunar materials. Such systems would require large quantities of electronic grade silicon or compound semiconductors for photovoltaics and electronic controls. Since silicon is the most abundant semimetal in the silicate portion of any solar system rock (approximately 20 wt percent), lunar silicon production is bound to be an important process in such a solar power project. The lunar silicon extraction process is discussed.

  14. Disproportionate Declines in Ground-Foraging Insectivorous Birds after Mistletoe Removal

    PubMed Central

    Watson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Insectivorous birds have been recognized as disproportionately sensitive to land-use intensification and habitat loss, with those species feeding primarily on the ground exhibiting some of the most dramatic declines. Altered litter inputs and availability of epigeic arthropods have been suggested to underlie reduced abundances and shrinking distributions but direct evidence is lacking. I used a patch-scale removal experiment in southern Australia to evaluate whether ground-feeding insectivores are especially vulnerable to altered litter-fall. Building on work demonstrating the importance of mistletoe litter to nutrient dynamics, litter was reduced by removing mistletoe (Loranthaceae) from one set of eucalypt woodlands, responses of birds three years after mistletoe removal compared with otherwise similar control woodlands containing mistletoe. Despite not feeding on mistletoes directly, insectivores exhibited the greatest response to mistletoe removal. Among woodland residents, ground-foraging insectivores showed the most dramatic response; treatment woodlands losing an average of 37.4% of their pre-treatment species richness. Once these 19 species of ground-foraging insectivores were excluded, remaining woodland species showed no significant effect of mistletoe removal. This response reflects greater initial losses in treatment woodlands during the study (which coincided with a severe drought) and double the number of species returning to control woodlands (where mistletoe numbers and litter were not manipulated) post-drought. These findings support the productivity-based explanation of declining insectivores, suggesting diminished litter-fall reduced habitat quality for these birds via decreased availability of their preferred prey. In addition to altered prey availability, interactions between litter-fall and epigeic arthropods exemplify the importance of below-ground / above-ground linkages driving ecosystem function. PMID:26640895

  15. Immunogenicity and Safety of the Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in HIV-1–Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Erna Milunka; Kang, Minhee; Cespedes, Michelle S.; Umbleja, Triin; Godfrey, Catherine; Allen, Reena T.; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Palefsky, Joel M.; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer Y.; Saah, Alfred; Aberg, Judith A.; Cu-Uvin, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background.?Women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are disproportionately affected by human papillomavirus (HPV)–related anogenital disease, particularly with increased immunosuppression. AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5240 was a trial of 319 HIV-infected women in the United States, Brazil, and South Africa to determine immunogenicity and safety of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in 3 strata based on screening CD4 count: >350 (stratum A), 201–350 (stratum B), and ?200 cells/µL (stratum C). Methods.?Safety and serostatus of HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 were examined. HPV serological testing was performed using competitive Luminex immunoassay (HPV-4 cLIA). HPV type-specific seroconversion analysis was done for participants who were seronegative for the given type at baseline. Results.?Median age of patients was 36 years; 11% were white, 56% black, and 31% Hispanic. Median CD4 count was 310 cells/µL, and 40% had undetectable HIV-1 load. No safety issues were identified. Seroconversion proportions among women at week 28 for HPV types 6, 11,16, and 18 were 96%, 98%, 99%, and 91%, respectively, for stratum A; 100%, 98%, 98%, and 85%, respectively, for stratum B, and 84%, 92%, 93%, and 75%, respectively, for stratum C. Conclusions.?The quadrivalent HPV vaccine targeted at types 6, 11, 16, and 18 was safe and immunogenic in HIV-infected women aged 13–45 years. Women with HIV RNA load >10 000 copies/mL and/or CD4 count <200 cells/µL had lower rates of seroconversion rates. Clinical Trials Registration.?NCT00604175. PMID:24723284

  16. The Road to Poverty: A Report on the Economic Status of Midlife and Older Women in America. Mother's Day Report 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Older Women's League, Washington, DC.

    Women of all ages continue to enter the work force in greater numbers while the work force participation rate for males is declining. Women are disproportionately concentrated in low-paying, dead-end jobs. Employment discrimination continues to be a significant problem. Job interruptions necessitated by family responsibilities are a major factor…

  17. Bipolar disorder in women.

    PubMed

    Parial, Sonia

    2015-07-01

    Bipolar affective disorder in women is a challenging disorder to treat. It is unique in its presentation in women and characterized by later age of onset, seasonality, atypical presentation, and a higher degree of mixed episodes. Medical and psychiatric co-morbidity adversely affects recovery from the bipolar disorder (BD) more often in women. Co-morbidity, particularly thyroid disease, migraine, obesity, and anxiety disorders occur more frequently in women while substance use disorders are more common in men. Treatment of women during pregnancy and lactation is challenging. Pregnancy neither protects nor exacerbates BD, and many women require continuation of medication during the pregnancy. The postpartum period is a time of high risk for onset and recurrence of BD in women. Prophylaxis with mood stabilizers might be needed. Individualized risk/benefits assessments of pregnant and postpartum women with BD are required to promote the health of the women and to avoid or limit exposure of the fetus or infant to potential adverse effects of medication. PMID:26330643

  18. Bipolar disorder in women

    PubMed Central

    Parial, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder in women is a challenging disorder to treat. It is unique in its presentation in women and characterized by later age of onset, seasonality, atypical presentation, and a higher degree of mixed episodes. Medical and psychiatric co-morbidity adversely affects recovery from the bipolar disorder (BD) more often in women. Co-morbidity, particularly thyroid disease, migraine, obesity, and anxiety disorders occur more frequently in women while substance use disorders are more common in men. Treatment of women during pregnancy and lactation is challenging. Pregnancy neither protects nor exacerbates BD, and many women require continuation of medication during the pregnancy. The postpartum period is a time of high risk for onset and recurrence of BD in women. Prophylaxis with mood stabilizers might be needed. Individualized risk/benefits assessments of pregnant and postpartum women with BD are required to promote the health of the women and to avoid or limit exposure of the fetus or infant to potential adverse effects of medication. PMID:26330643

  19. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants aremore »0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.« less

  20. Bioreduction and disproportionation of cyclohex-2-enone catalyzed by ene-reductase OYE-1 in 'micro-aqueous' organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Clay, Dorina; Winkler, Christoph K; Tasnádi, Gábor; Faber, Kurt

    2014-06-01

    The bioreduction and disproportionation of cyclohex-2-enone catalyzed by Old Yellow Enzyme 1 was investigated in presence of organic (co)solvents. Whereas the NADH-dependent bioreduction activity strongly decreased at elevated co-solvent concentrations due to the insolubility of the nicotinamide-cofactor, the NADH-free disproportionation was significantly improved in water-immiscible organic co-solvents at 90 % (v/v) with near-quantitative conversion. This positive effect was attributed to removal of the inhibiting co-product, phenol, from the enzyme's active site. The best co-solvents show high lipophilicity (logP) and a high potential to solubilize phenol (Kphenol). As a predictive parameter, the ratio of logP/Kphenol should be preferably ?100. PMID:24563324

  1. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li-air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2- produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1 and 0.67 s-1 M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  2. Perinatal Antidepressant Use: Understanding Women’s Preferences and Concerns

    PubMed Central

    BATTLE, CYNTHIA L.; SALISBURY, AMY L.; SCHOFIELD, CASEY A.; ORTIZ-HERNANDEZ, SAMIA

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and linked with a host of adverse consequences for women and newborns. Rates of engagement in depression treatment are, however, strikingly low among pregnant and postpartum women, with the majority of affected women receiving no mental health treatment. Research indicates that perinatal women are extremely reluctant to take antidepressant medications, yet the nature of women’s concerns and treatment decisionmaking patterns have not been well documented. Developing a clearer understanding of women’s treatment preferences and behaviors may help identify solutions to the under-treatment of perinatal depression. In this mixed methods study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 61 pregnant women, approximately half of whom were experiencing clinical levels of depression. In addition to assessing psychiatric diagnoses, symptoms, and functional impairment, we conducted qualitative interviews addressing women’s preferences for depression treatment, concerns, and decision-making patterns. Consistent with prior reports, women were significantly more likely to voice a preference for non-pharmacologic depression treatments, as opposed to antidepressant medications. Many depressed women reported a great degree of uncertainty regarding how to treat their depression, and those with more severe depression symptoms were more likely to endorse decisional conflict. Analysis of qualitative comments yielded detailed information about the nature of women’s concerns and preferences related to use of antidepressant medications and other aspects of treatment engagement. We discuss findings in the context of improving patient-centered care for perinatal depression. PMID:24241498

  3. Social Exchange and Sexual Behavior in Young Women's Premarital Relationships in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Nancy; Goldberg, Rachel E.; Mberu, Blessing U.; Zulu, Eliya M.

    2011-01-01

    Transactional sex, or the exchange of money and gifts for sexual activities within nonmarital relationships, has been widely considered a contributing factor to the disproportionate prevalence of HIV/AIDS among young women in sub-Saharan Africa. This study applied social exchange theory to premarital relationships in order to investigate the…

  4. Prevention interventions for human immunodeficiency virus in drug-using women with a history of partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Stockman, Jamila K; Ludwig-Barron, Natasha; Hoffman, Monica A; Ulibarri, Monica D; Dyer, Typhanye V Penniman

    2012-01-01

    The intersecting epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and partner violence disproportionately affect women who use drugs. Despite accumulating evidence throughout the world linking these epidemics, HIV prevention efforts focused on these synergistic issues as well as underlying determinants that contribute to the HIV risk environment (eg, housing instability, incarceration, policing practices, survival sex) are lacking. This article highlights selected behavior change theories and biomedical approaches that have been used or could be applied in HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women with histories of partner violence and in existing HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women that have been gender-focused while integrating histories of partner violence and/or relationship power dynamics. To date, there is a paucity of HIV prevention interventions designed for drug-using women (both in and outside of drug treatment programs) with histories of partner violence. Of the few that exist, they have been theory-driven, culture-specific, and address certain aspects of gender-based inequalities (eg, gender-specific norms, relationship power and control, partner violence through assessment of personal risk and safety planning). However, no single intervention has addressed all of these issues. Moreover, HIV prevention interventions for drug-using women with histories of partner violence are not widespread and do not address multiple components of the risk environment. Efficacious interventions should target individuals, men, couples, and social networks. There is also a critical need for the development of culturally tailored combination HIV prevention interventions that not only incorporate evidence-based behavioral and biomedical approaches (eg, microbicides, pre-exposure prophylaxis, female-initiated barrier methods) but also take into account the risk environment at the physical, social, economic and political levels. Ultimately, this approach will have a significant impact on reducing HIV infections among drug-using women with histories of partner violence. PMID:24500422

  5. Alcohol Abuse, Sexual Risk Behaviors and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women in Moshi Urban District, Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremichael, Musie; Paintsil, Elijah; Larsen, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Background To assess the covariates of alcohol abuse and the association between alcohol abuse, high-risk sexual behaviors and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Methods 2,019 women aged 20–44 were randomly selected in a two-stage sampling from the Moshi urban district of northern Tanzania. Participant’s demographic and socio-economic characteristics, alcohol use, sexual behaviors and STIs were assessed. Blood and urine samples were drawn for testing of human immunodeficiency virus, herpes simplex virus, syphilis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomonas and mycoplasma genitalium infections. Results Adjusted analyses showed that a history of physical (OR=2.05; 95% CI: 1.06–3.98) and sexual violence (OR=1.63; 95% CI: 1.05–2.51) was associated with alcohol abuse. Moreover, alcohol abuse was associated with number of sexual partners (OR=1.66; 95% CI: 1.01–2.73). Women who abused alcohol were more likely to report STIs symptoms (OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.08–2.40). Women who had multiple sexual partners were more likely to have an STI (OR=2.41; 95% CI: 1.46–4.00) compared to women with one sexual partner. There was no direct association between alcohol abuse and prevalence of STIs (OR=0.86; 95% CI: 0.55–1.34). However, alcohol abuse was indirectly associated with STIs through its association with multiple sexual partners. Conclusions The findings of alcohol abuse among physically and sexually violated women as well as the association between alcohol abuse and a history of symptoms of STIs and testing positive for STIs have significant public health implications. In sub-Saharan Africa, where women are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic screening for alcohol use should be part of comprehensive STIs and HIV prevention programs. PMID:19060779

  6. Women in development.

    PubMed

    White, E H

    1980-01-01

    The author reports on travel in the Philippines, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan, and conditions she found affecting development. Development for women in the Philippines has been hampered by a dichotomy between home economics and agricultural work. Although the majority of students in agriculture are women, many village cooperatives have been formed with less than 10% women members. Malaysia has a high level of education; development projects can easily be implemented. The National Association of Women's Institutes of Peninsular Malaysia (NAWIPM) emphasizes training for rural women. Its activiti include nursuries, poultry raising, home improvement, cooperatives, and income generating projects such as catering and tailoring. As in the Philippines ther is an important Muslim minority; Muslim women lag behind other Sri Lankans in education. The Mahila Samiti is the organization which trains rural women i some 1500 chapters. The women of Pakistan have the greatest need for assistance. Less than 15% Pakistan women are literate; their enrollment in school lags far behind the boys. The All Pakistan Women's Association works on problems of development through its Nutrition Education Training Courses. The centers have begun poultry raising and gardening as parts of its program. PMID:12261905

  7. Out of the Smokescreen: does an anti-smoking advertisement affect young women's perception of smoking in movies and their intention to smoke?

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C; Harris, W; Cook, D; Bedford, K; Zuo, Y

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of an anti-smoking advertisement on young women's perceptions of smoking in movies and their intention to smoke. Subjects/setting: 2038 females aged 12–17 years attending cinemas in New South Wales, Australia. Design/intervention: Quasi-experimental study of patrons, who were surveyed after having viewed a movie at their local cinema. The control group was surveyed during week 1 and the intervention group, during week 2. Before seeing the movie in week 2, a 30 second anti-smoking advertisement was shown, which featured a well known female actor drawing attention to the prevalence of smoking in movies. Outcomes: Attitude of current smokers and non-smokers to smoking in the movies; intention of current smokers and non-smokers to be smoking in 12 months time. Results: Among non-smokers, 48.2% of the intervention subjects thought that the smoking in the movie they viewed was "not OK" compared with 28.3% of the control subjects (p < 0.0001). However, there was no difference among smokers in the intervention (26.4%) and control (16.9%) groups (p = 0.28). A higher percentage of current smokers in the intervention group indicated they were unlikely to smoke in 12 months time (47.8%) than smokers in the control condition (31.9%) (p = 0.03). For non-smokers, there was no difference in smoking intentions between conditions, with 95% saying they would be unlikely to be smoking in 12 months time. Conclusions: This "real world" study suggests that placing an anti-smoking advertisement before movies containing smoking scenes can help to "immunise" young women against the influences of film stars smoking. PMID:15333884

  8. The risk of arsenic induced skin lesions in Bangladeshi men and women is affected by arsenic metabolism and the age at first exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Anna-Lena; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie

    2008-07-01

    It is known that a high fraction of methylarsonate (MA) in urine is a risk modifying factor for several arsenic induced health effects, including skin lesions, and that men are more susceptible for developing skin lesions than women. Thus, we aimed at elucidating the interaction between gender and arsenic metabolism for the risk of developing skin lesions. This study is part of a population-based case-referent study concerning the risk for skin lesions in relation to arsenic exposure via drinking water carried out in Matlab, a rural area 53km south-east of Dhaka, Bangladesh. We randomly selected 526 from 1579 referents and all 504 cases for analysis of arsenic metabolites in urine using HPLC coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICPMS). The present study confirm previous studies, with the risk for skin lesions being almost three times higher in the highest tertile of %MA (adjusted OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.9-4.2, p < 0.001) compared to the lowest tertile. The present study is the first to show that the well documented higher risk for men to develop arsenic-related skin lesions compared to women is mainly explained by the less efficient methylation of arsenic, as defined by a higher fraction of MA and lower fraction of DMA in the urine, among men. Our previously documented lower risk for skin lesions in individuals exposed since infancy, or before, was found to be independent of the observed arsenic methylation efficiency. Thus, it can be speculated that this is due to a programming effect of arsenic in utero.

  9. Short-term, daily intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24384) does not affect colonic transit time in women.

    PubMed

    Merenstein, Daniel J; D'Amico, Frank; Palese, Caren; Hahn, Alexander; Sparenborg, Jessy; Tan, Tina; Scott, Hillary; Polzin, Kayla; Kolberg, Lore; Roberts, Robert

    2014-01-28

    The present study investigated the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24 384) (Bf-6)-supplemented yogurt on colonic transit time (CTT). A triple-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled, two-period cross-over trial was conducted with sixty-eight women with a self-reported history of straining during bowel movements or hard or lumpy stools in the past 2 years. As per regulatory requirements for probiotic studies, eligible women were generally healthy and not actively constipated at the time of enrolment. Participants consumed both Bf-6 and placebo yogurts for 14 d each in a randomised order, with a 6-week washout period between the treatments. The primary outcome, CTT, was assessed via Sitz marker X-rays. The average CTT was 42·1 h for the active period and 43·3 h for the control period (mean difference 1·2 h, 95 % CI - 4·9, 7·4). Since the statistical tests for the cross-over study implied that the mean CTT for the active and control periods in period 2 were biased, the standard protocol suggests examining the results of only period 1 as a traditional randomised controlled trial. This showed that the mean CTT was 35·2 h for the active period v. 52·9 h for the control period (P= 0·015). Bootstrapping demonstrated that both the mean and median differences remained significant (P= 0·016 and P= 0·045, respectively). Few adverse events were noted, with no differences among the active and control periods. The paired analysis showed no differences between the active and control periods during the cross-over trial. Further trials should be conducted in populations with underlying problems associated with disordered transit to determine the potential value of probiotic supplementation more accurately. PMID:24103188

  10. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission among heterosexual African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Essien, E James; Meshack, Angela F; Peters, Ronald J; Ogungbade, GO; Osemene, Nora I

    2005-01-01

    Background African-American women are disproportionately affected by HIV, accounting for 60% of all cases among women in the United States. Although their race is not a precursor for HIV, the socioeconomic and cultural disparities associated with being African American may increase their risk of infection. Prior research has shown that interventions designed to reduce HIV infection among African-American women must address the life demands and social problems they encounter. The present study used a qualitative exploratory design to elicit information about strategies to prevent HIV transmission among young, low-income African-American women. Methods Twenty five low income African American women, ages 18–29, participated in five focus groups of five women each conducted at a housing project in Houston, Texas, a large demographically diverse metropolitan area that is regarded as one of the HIV/AIDS epicenters in the United States. Each group was audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using theme and domain analysis. Results The participants revealed that they had most frequently placed themselves at risk for HIV infection through drugs and drinking and they also reported drug and alcohol use as important barriers to practicing safer sex. The women also reported that the need for money and having sex for money to buy food or drugs had placed them at risk for HIV transmission. About one-third of the participants stated that a barrier to their practicing safe sex was their belief that there was no risk based on their being in a monogamous relationship and feeling no need to use protection, but later learning that their mate was unfaithful. Other reasons given were lack of concern, being unprepared, partner's refusal to use a condom, and lack of money to buy condoms. Finally, the women stated that they were motivated to practice safe sex because of fear of contracting sexually transmitted diseases and HIV, desire not to become pregnant, and personal experience with someone who had contracted HIV. Conclusion This study offers a foundation for further research that may be used to create culturally relevant HIV prevention programs for African-American women. PMID:15774003

  11. Isotopic disproportionation during hydrogen isotopic analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nair, Sreejesh; Geilmann, Heike; Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping; Gehre, Matthias; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Brand, Willi A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale High-precision hydrogen isotope ratio analysis of nitrogen-bearing organic materials using high-temperature conversion (HTC) techniques has proven troublesome in the past. Formation of reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) has been suspected as a possible cause of incomplete H2 yield and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Methods The classical HTC reactor setup and a modified version including elemental chromium, both operated at temperatures in excess of 1400 °C, have been compared using a selection of nitrogen-bearing organic compounds, including caffeine. A focus of the experiments was to avoid or suppress hydrogen cyanide (HCN) formation and to reach quantitative H2 yields. The technique also was optimized to provide acceptable sample throughput. Results The classical HTC reaction of a number of selected compounds exhibited H2 yields from 60 to 90 %. Yields close to 100 % were measured for the experiments with the chromium-enhanced reactor. The ?2H values also were substantially different between the two types of experiments. For the majority of the compounds studied, a highly significant relationship was observed between the amount of missing H2and the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecules, suggesting the pyrolytic formation of HCN as a byproduct. A similar linear relationship was found between the amount of missing H2 and the observed hydrogen isotopic result, reflecting isotopic fractionation. Conclusions The classical HTC technique to produce H2 from organic materials using high temperatures in the presence of glassy carbon is not suitable for nitrogen-bearing compounds. Adding chromium to the reaction zone improves the yield to 100 % in most cases. The initial formation of HCN is accompanied by a strong hydrogen isotope effect, with the observed hydrogen isotope results on H2 being substantially shifted to more negative ?2H values. The reaction can be understood as an initial disproportionation leading to H2 and HCN with the HCN-hydrogen systematically enriched in 2H by more than 50 ‰. In the reaction of HCN with chromium, H2 and chromium-containing solid residues are formed quantitatively.

  12. Conditionally rare taxa disproportionately contribute to temporal changes in microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Shade, Ashley; Jones, Stuart E; Caporaso, J Gregory; Handelsman, Jo; Knight, Rob; Fierer, Noah; Gilbert, Jack A

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities typically contain many rare taxa that make up the majority of the observed membership, yet the contribution of this microbial "rare biosphere" to community dynamics is unclear. Using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of 3,237 samples from 42 time series of microbial communities from nine different ecosystems (air; marine; lake; stream; adult human skin, tongue, and gut; infant gut; and brewery wastewater treatment), we introduce a new method to detect typically rare microbial taxa that occasionally become very abundant (conditionally rare taxa [CRT]) and then quantify their contributions to temporal shifts in community structure. We discovered that CRT made up 1.5 to 28% of the community membership, represented a broad diversity of bacterial and archaeal lineages, and explained large amounts of temporal community dissimilarity (i.e., up to 97% of Bray-Curtis dissimilarity). Most of the CRT were detected at multiple time points, though we also identified "one-hit wonder" CRT that were observed at only one time point. Using a case study from a temperate lake, we gained additional insights into the ecology of CRT by comparing routine community time series to large disturbance events. Our results reveal that many rare taxa contribute a greater amount to microbial community dynamics than is apparent from their low proportional abundances. This observation was true across a wide range of ecosystems, indicating that these rare taxa are essential for understanding community changes over time. Importance: Microbial communities and their processes are the foundations of ecosystems. The ecological roles of rare microorganisms are largely unknown, but it is thought that they contribute to community stability by acting as a reservoir that can rapidly respond to environmental changes. We investigated the occurrence of typically rare taxa that very occasionally become more prominent in their communities ("conditionally rare"). We quantified conditionally rare taxa in time series from a wide variety of ecosystems and discovered that not only were conditionally rare taxa present in all of the examples, but they also contributed disproportionately to temporal changes in diversity when they were most abundant. This result indicates an important and general role for rare microbial taxa within their communities. PMID:25028427

  13. The Disproportionate and Potentially Negative Influence of Research Universities on the Quality of Geoscience Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    There is a large and growing body of research indicating that post-secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields is failing to prepare citizens for the 21st century economy. Introductory STEM courses are vital for preparing science majors for their fields of study and are the only exposure to science many college students will receive, but the quality of teaching in these courses is often not informed by research on teaching and learning. Research universities play an especially prominent role in the design of introductory courses. While research and doctoral universities account for only about 6% of all higher education institutions, they confer 32 per cent of the baccalaureate degrees, and 56 per cent of the baccalaureates earned by recent recipients of science and engineering doctorates. By assuming that larger introductory classes occur at research institutions one can estimate that a dominant number of students receiving introductory instruction in the geosciences are probably occurring at research institutions. Moreover, research universities produce the majority of tenure-track faculty who will later teach at four-year colleges, so the role of research institutions in the influence of introductory course design is expected to be disproportionately large. While introductory courses at research universities play a influential role in how such courses are designed, the teaching of introductory courses is too often viewed as an undesirable assignment for instructors at those institutions. The effort seems unrewarding with incentives for improving teaching at research institutions perceived as modest at best, if not negative. It is commonly perceived that teaching introductory courses will decrease opportunities for teaching higher-level courses to graduate students and/or to conduct research. Furthermore, even for those interested in improving their pedagogical methods, current approaches to professional development are generally difficult to scale and/or costly to institutions and outside instructors' normal workflow. This presentation reports on the results of surveys of research university instructors in an attempt to quantify the state of the introductory course. The surveys attempt to identify common barriers to improvement. Based on these surveys strategies for how to best implement systemic change in introductory courses at research universities are presented in the hope of stimulating discussion and a call to action.

  14. Disparities in Mammography Rate Among Immigrant and Native-Born Women in the U.S.: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hillemeier, Marianne M.

    2013-01-01

    Disproportionately low mammography rates among U.S. immigrants have been of persistent concern. In light of policies to increase access to screening, this study identifies differences in factors associated with screening among immigrant and native-born women in 2000 and 2008. Data from immigrant and native-born women aged 40+ years in the 2000 and 2008 National Health Interview Surveys were included in descriptive and multivariate regression analyses. Mammography rates rose from 60.2 to 65.5 % among immigrant women, remaining lower than the 68.9 % rate among native-born in 2008. Among immigrants, short length of residency and lower education were associated with lower screening rates in 2000 but not in 2008, while public insurance coverage was positively associated with screening only in 2008. In contrast to immigrants, among the native-born education and income were associated with mammography receipt in 2008, and in both groups health care access was associated with greater screening rates. Policy initiatives aimed at increasing access to mammography may be positively affecting immigrant screening disparities. Access to primary care and public insurance coverage are likely to be very important in maintaining and furthering improvements in mammography rates. PMID:23430466

  15. Smokefree Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 4 Benefits of Quitting Smoking » share 11 Harmful Effects of Smoking on Women’s Health Maybe you’ve heard that smoking causes cancer… Read full story: 11 Harmful Effects of Smoking on Women’s Health » share home about smokefree women ...

  16. Increasing Women in Leadership in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jennifer A.; Reif, Lindsey K.; Hokororo, Adolfine; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Globally, women experience a disproportionate burden of disease and death due to inequities in access to basic health care, nutrition, and education. In the face of this disparity, it is striking that leadership in the field of global health is highly skewed towards men and that global health organizations neglect the issue of gender equality in their own leadership. Randomized trials demonstrate that women in leadership positions in governmental organizations implement different policies than men and that these policies are more supportive of women and children. Other studies show that proactive interventions to increase the proportion of women in leadership positions within businesses or government can be successful. Therefore, the authors assert that increasing female leadership in global health is both feasible and a fundamental step towards addressing the problem of women’s health. In this article, the authors contrast the high proportion of young female trainees who are interested in academic global health early in their careers with the low numbers of women successfully rising to global health leadership roles. The authors subsequently explore reasons for female attrition from the field of global health and offer practical strategies for closing the gender gap in global health leadership. The authors propose solutions aimed to promote female leaders from both resource-wealthy and resource-poor countries, including leadership training grants, mentorship from female leaders in global professions, strengthening health education in resource-poor countries, research-enabling grants, and altering institutional policies to support women choosing a global health career path. PMID:24918761

  17. Women's Higher Education in Comparative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Gail P., Ed.; Slaughter, Sheila, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of essays on the effect of national policies and practices on women's access to higher education, the type of courses in which women are enrolled, women's roles as academics, and how the outcomes of higher education affect women in the academic workforce and the economy. Various countries are represented in the…

  18. Aspirin-induced increase in intestinal paracellular permeability does not affect the levels of LPS in venous blood of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Gnauck, Anne; Lentle, Roger G; Kruger, Marlena C

    2015-07-01

    The presence of subclinical levels of LPS from Gram-negative bacteria, also referred to as endotoxin, in the circulation may induce a pro-inflammatory immune response that leads to the development of obesity and insulin resistance. Recent data indicate that high-fat meals may elevate circulating levels of LPS. However, it is currently unclear how the LPS transits from the gut lumen to the general circulation. We determined whether aspirin-induced damage of the small intestinal mucosa, evidenced by an increase in the paracellular permeability, allows greater transit of LPS into the systemic circulation. The 3-h cumulative excretion of lactulose was significantly increased after the consumption of aspirin solution relative to that after the consumption of an equal volume of water in 15 healthy women (median after aspirin 0.09% of dose vs. median after water 0.03% of dose; P?=?0.004). Dosage with aspirin also significantly increased the lactulose : mannitol ratio (median after aspirin 0.014 vs. median after water 0.005; P?=?0.017). However, serum LPS levels after the consumption of the aspirin solution were not significantly different from those after consumption of the control (plain water). Further, there was no correlation between body fat content and circulating levels of LPS. PMID:25398227

  19. Flibanserin, a drug intended for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women, affects spontaneous motor activity and brain neurochemistry in female rats.

    PubMed

    Ferger, Boris; Shimasaki, Makoto; Ceci, Angelo; Ittrich, Carina; Allers, Kelly A; Sommer, Bernd

    2010-06-01

    Flibanserin, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist and 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist, is being developed for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in pre-menopausal women. Here, we investigated the effects of acute administration of flibanserin (15 and 45 mg/kg, p.o.) and the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (+)-8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg, i.p.) on neurotransmitter levels in brain areas of female rats. Specifically, levels of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) and neurotransmitter metabolites were examined in prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus and brain stem using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection. In addition, spontaneous motor activity was determined in an automated motor activity system. Flibanserin (45 mg/kg) but not (+)-8-OH-DPAT significantly reduced motor activity, when compared to vehicle controls. Specifically, the DA turnover was significantly increased (279%) in the PFC after flibanserin treatment but less pronounced (159%) after 8-OH-DPAT administration. Serotonin tissue levels were not altered in any of the investigated brain regions upon flibanserin treatment. However, flibanserin produced a significant decrease of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 5-HT turnover in the PFC, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus and brain stem similar to (+)-8-OH-DPAT. In conclusion, the present study indicates that flibanserin is able to modulate dopaminergic and serotonergic activity in distinct brain areas. The observed effects in the PFC on dopaminergic markers are different from those induced by (+)-8-OH-DPAT and may contribute to its therapeutic efficacy in HSDD. The effects of flibanserin on spontaneous motor behaviour are in agreement with its receptor profile and underscore that flibanserin is devoid of any locomotor hyperactivity inducing properties. PMID:20422156

  20. Palmitic acid in the sn-2 position of dietary triacylglycerols does not affect insulin secretion or glucose homeostasis in healthy men and women

    PubMed Central

    Filippou, A; Teng, K-T; Berry, S E; Sanders, T A B

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives: Dietary triacylglycerols containing palmitic acid in the sn-2 position might impair insulin release and increase plasma glucose. Subjects/Methods: We used a cross-over designed feeding trial in 53 healthy Asian men and women (20–50 years) to test this hypothesis by exchanging 20% energy of palm olein (PO; control) with randomly interesterified PO (IPO) or high oleic acid sunflower oil (HOS). After a 2-week run-in period on PO, participants were fed PO, IPO and HOS for 6 week consecutively in randomly allocated sequences. Fasting (midpoint and endpoint) and postprandial blood at the endpoint following a test meal (3.54 MJ, 14?g protein, 85?g carbohydrate and 50?g fat as PO) were collected for the measurement of C-peptide, insulin, glucose, plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, lipids and apolipoproteins; pre-specified primary and secondary outcomes were postprandial changes in C-peptide and plasma glucose. Results: Low density lipoprotein cholesterol was 0.3?mmol/l (95% confidence interval (95% CI)) 0.1, 0.5; P<0.001) lower on HOS than on PO or IPO as predicted, indicating good compliance to the dietary intervention. There were no significant differences (P=0.58) between diets among the 10 male and 31 female completers in the incremental area under the curve (0–2?h) for C-peptide in nmol.120?min/l: GM (95% CI) were PO 220 (196, 245), IPO 212 (190, 235) and HOS 224 (204, 244). Plasma glucose was 8% lower at 2?h on IPO vs PO and HOS (both P<0.05). Conclusion: Palmitic acid in the sn-2 position does not adversely impair insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25052227

  1. Women’s empowerment revisited: a case study from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farzana; Rottach, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the changing dimensions of women's empowerment over time in three Bangladesh villages where one of the authors has been conducting research since 1991. The article discusses theoretical issues related to the measurement of women's empowerment, and describes findings from a recent study in the villages exploring the current salience of indicators developed for a 1992 survey. In the article we discuss the types of social, economic, and political change that affect the measurement of women’s empowerment; propose and explain a new set of indicators for the rural Bangladesh setting; and discuss implications for measuring women's empowerment in other settings. PMID:20856695

  2. Charge-order melting in charge-disproportionated perovskite CeCu3Fe4O12.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ikuya; Etani, Hidenobu; Murakami, Makoto; Hayashi, Naoaki; Kawakami, Takateru; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Abe, Hideki; Liss, Klaus-Dieter; Studer, Andrew J; Ozaki, Tomoatsu; Mori, Shigeo; Takahashi, Ryoji; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    A novel quadruple perovskite oxide CeCu3Fe4O12 has been synthesized under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of 15 GPa and 1473 K. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy displays a charge disproportionation transition of 4Fe(3.5+) ? 3Fe(3+) + Fe(5+) below ?270 K, whereas hard X-ray photoemission and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements confirm that the Ce and Cu valences are retained at approximately +4 and +2, respectively, over the entire temperature range measured. Electron and X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the body-centered cubic symmetry (space group Im3?, No. 204) is retained at temperatures as low as 100 K, indicating the absence of any types of charge-ordering in the charge-disproportionated CeCu3Fe4O12 phase. The magnetic susceptibility and neutron powder diffraction data illustrate that the antiferromagnetic ordering of Fe ions is predominant in the charge-disproportionated CeCu3Fe4O12 phase. These findings suggest that CeCu3Fe4O12 undergoes a new type of electronic phase in the ACu3Fe4O12 series and that the melting of the charge-ordering in CeCu3Fe4O12 is caused by the substantial decrease in the Fe valence and the resulting large deviation from the ideal abundance ratio of Fe(3+):Fe(5+) = 1:1 for rock-salt-type charge-ordering. PMID:25334034

  3. Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence Among Transgender Women Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sevelius, Jae M.; Carrico, Adam; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2010-01-01

    Despite disproportionate rates of HIV among transgender women and evidence that medication adherence is necessary for treatment success and increased likelihood of survival, there has been little investigation into antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence issues among transgender women. This study examined rates of self-reported ART adherence among transgender women on ART (n = 35) and well-established correlates of nonadherence including depression, adherence self-efficacy, patient perceptions of interactions with their providers, and perceived adverse side effects of ART compared to other respondents (n = 2,770). Transgender women on ART were less likely to report 90% adherence rates or higher and reported less confidence in their abilities to integrate treatment regimens into their daily lives. When transgender women were compared to other respondents, regardless of the current medication regimen, they reported significantly fewer positive interactions with their health care providers. Training for providers and integration of hormone therapy into HIV care is recommended. PMID:20347342

  4. Suicide in women.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Lakshmi

    2015-07-01

    Suicide is a global public health problem. Asia accounts for 60% of the world's suicides, so at least 60 million people are affected by suicide or attempted suicide in Asia each year. The burden of female suicidal behavior, in terms of total burden of morbidity and mortality combined, is more in women than in men. Women's greater vulnerability to suicidal behavior is likely to be due to gender related vulnerability to psychopathology and to psychosocial stressors. Suicide prevention programmes should incorporate woman specific strategies. More research on suicidal behavior in women particularly in developing countries is needed. PMID:26330640

  5. Suicide in women

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a global public health problem. Asia accounts for 60% of the world's suicides, so at least 60 million people are affected by suicide or attempted suicide in Asia each year. The burden of female suicidal behavior, in terms of total burden of morbidity and mortality combined, is more in women than in men. Women's greater vulnerability to suicidal behavior is likely to be due to gender related vulnerability to psychopathology and to psychosocial stressors. Suicide prevention programmes should incorporate woman specific strategies. More research on suicidal behavior in women particularly in developing countries is needed. PMID:26330640

  6. What’s So Special about STEM? A Comparison of Women’s Retention in STEM and Professional Occupations

    PubMed Central

    Sassler, Sharon; Levitte, Yael; Michelmore, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    We follow female college graduates in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and compare the trajectories of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)-related occupations to other professional occupations. Results show that women in STEM occupations are significantly more likely to leave their occupational field than professional women, especially early in their career, while few women in either group leave jobs to exit the labor force. Family factors cannot account for the differential loss of STEM workers compared to other professional workers. Few differences in job characteristics emerge either, so these cannot account for the disproportionate loss of STEM workers. What does emerge is that investments and job rewards that generally stimulate field commitment, such as advanced training and high job satisfaction, fail to build commitment among women in STEM. PMID:25554713

  7. Social Exchange and Sexual Behavior in Young Women’s Premarital Relationships in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nancy; Goldberg, Rachel E.; Mberu, Blessing U.; Zulu, Eliya M.

    2011-01-01

    Transactional sex, or the exchange of money and gifts for sexual activities within nonmarital relationships, has been widely considered a contributing factor to the disproportionate prevalence of HIV/AIDS among young women in sub-Saharan Africa. This study applied social exchange theory to premarital relationships in order to investigate the linkages between a variety of young women’s resources—including employment and material transfers from male partners—and sexual behaviors. Data on the first month of premarital relationships (N=551 relationships) were collected from a random sample of young adult women ages 18–24 in Kisumu, Kenya, using a retrospective life history calendar. Consistent with the hypotheses, results showed that young women’s income increases the likelihood of safer sexual activities, including delaying sex and using condoms consistently. Material transfers from the male partner displayed the opposite effect, supporting the view that resources obtained from within the relationship decrease young women’s negotiating power. PMID:22180665

  8. Women in Meteorology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemone, Margaret A.; Waukau, Patricia L.

    1982-11-01

    The names of 927 women who are or have been active in meteorology or closely related fields have been obtained from various sources. Of these women, at least 500 are presently active. An estimated 4-5% of the total number of Ph.D.s in meteorology are awarded to women. About 10% of those receiving B.S. and M.S. degrees are women.The work patterns, accomplishments, and salaries of employed women meteorologists have been summarized from 330 responses to questionnaires, as functions of age, family status, part- or full-time working status, and employing institutions. It was found that women meteorologists holding Ph.D.s are more likely than their male counterparts to be employed by universities. As increasing number of women were employed in operational meteorology, although few of them were married and fewer still responsible for children. Several women were employed by private industry and some had advanced into managerial positions, although at the present time, such positions remain out of the reach of most women.The subjective and objective effects of several gender-related factors have been summarized from the comments and responses to the questionnaires. The primary obstacles to advancement were found to be part-time work and the responsibility for children. Part-time work was found to have a clearly negative effect on salary increase as a function of age. prejudicated discrimination and rules negatively affecting women remain important, especially to the older women, and affirmative action programs are generally seen as beneficial.Surprisingly, in contrast to the experience of women in other fields of science, women Ph.D.s in meteorology earn salaries comparable of their employment in government or large corporations and universities where there are strong affirmative action programs and above-average salaries. Based on the responses to the questionnaire, the small size of the meteorological community is also a factor, enabling women to become recognized quickly as individuals. It also may be partially attributed to the relative youth of the women involved. They are too young to have encountered the severe discrimination others experienced in the past, and too young to have reached the barriers that have traditionally prevented women from advancing to higher positions. No figures are available that would allow comparison between salaries of male and female holders of bachelor's and master's degrees.

  9. Sex-specific association between bipolar affective disorder in women and GPR50, an X-linked orphan G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Thomson, P A; Wray, N R; Thomson, A M; Dunbar, D R; Grassie, M A; Condie, A; Walker, M T; Smith, D J; Pulford, D J; Muir, W; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J

    2005-05-01

    GPR50 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) located on Xq28, a region previously implicated in multiple genetic studies of bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). Allele frequencies of three polymorphisms in GPR50 were compared in case-control studies between subjects with BPAD (264), major depressive disorder (MDD) (226), or schizophrenia (SCZ) (263) and ethnically matched controls (562). Significant associations were found between an insertion/deletion polymorphism in exon 2 and both BPAD (P=0.0070), and MDD (P=0.011) with increased risk associated with the deletion variant (GPR50(Delta502-505)). When the analysis was restricted to female subjects, the associations with BPAD and MDD increased in significance (P=0.00023 and P=0.0064, respectively). Two other single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tested within this gene showed associations between: the female MDD group and an SNP in exon 2 (P=0.0096); and female SCZ and an intronic SNP (P=0.0014). No association was detected in males with either MDD, BPAD or SCZ. These results suggest that GPR50(Delta502-505), or a variant in tight linkage disequilibrium with this polymorphism, is a sex-specific risk factor for susceptibility to bipolar disorder, and that other variants in the gene may be sex-specific risk factors in the development of schizophrenia. PMID:15452587

  10. Face Inversion Disproportionately Impairs the Perception of Vertical but Not Horizontal Relations between Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffaux, Valerie; Rossion, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Upside-down inversion disrupts the processing of spatial relations between the features of a face, while largely preserving local feature analysis. However, recent studies on face inversion failed to observe a clear dissociation between relational and featural processing. To resolve these discrepancies and clarify how inversion affects face…

  11. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  12. Aqueous copper-mediated living polymerization: exploiting rapid disproportionation of CuBr with Me6TREN.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Wilson, Paul; Li, Zaidong; McHale, Ronan; Godfrey, Jamie; Anastasaki, Athina; Waldron, Christopher; Haddleton, David M

    2013-05-15

    A new approach to perform single-electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) in water is described. The key step in this process is to allow full disproportionation of CuBr/Me6TREN (TREN = tris(dimethylamino)ethyl amine to Cu(0) powder and CuBr2 in water prior to addition of both monomer and initiator. This provides an extremely powerful tool for the synthesis of functional water-soluble polymers with controlled chain length and narrow molecular weight distributions (polydispersity index approximately 1.10), including poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), N,N-dimethylacrylamide, poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), and an acrylamido glyco monomer. The polymerizations are performed at or below ambient temperature with quantitative conversions attained in minutes. Polymers have high chain end fidelity capable of undergoing chain extensions to full conversion or multiblock copolymerization via iterative monomer addition after full conversion. Activator generated by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide in water was also conducted as a comparison with the SET-LRP system. This shows that the addition sequence of l-ascorbic acid is crucial in determining the onset of disproportionation, or otherwise. Finally, this robust technique was applied to polymerizations under biologically relevant conditions (PBS buffer) and a complex ethanol/water mixture (tequila). PMID:23597244

  13. Sleep and Women’s Health

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Sara; Meers, Jessica; Heimbach, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in sleep begin at a very early age and women report poorer sleep quality and have higher risk for insomnia than do men. Sleep may be affected by variation in reproductive hormones, stress, depression, aging, life/role transitions, and other factors. The menstrual cycle is associated with changes in circadian rhythms and sleep architecture. Menstruating women (even without significant menstrual-related complaints) often report poorer sleep quality and greater sleep disturbance during the premenstrual week compared to other times of her menstrual cycle. In addition to these sleep disturbances, women with severe premenstrual syndrome often report more disturbing dreams, sleepiness, fatigue, decreased alertness and concentration during the premenstrual phase. Sleep disturbances are also commonly reported during pregnancy and increase in frequency and duration as the pregnancy progresses. The precipitous decline in hormones and unpredictable sleep patterns of the newborn contribute to and/or exacerbate poor sleep and daytime sleepiness during the early postpartum period. Insomnia is also among the most common health complaints that are reported by perimenopausal women. Women are particularly vulnerable to developing insomnia disorder during these times of reproductive hormonal change. In this review, we present a discussion on the most relevant and recent publications on sleep across the woman’s lifespan, including changes in sleep related to menstruation, pregnancy, postpartum, and the menopausal transition. Treatment for sleep disturbances and insomnia disorder and special considerations for treating women will also be discussed. PMID:25688329

  14. Tailored Lay Health Worker Intervention Improves Breast Cancer Screening Outcomes in Non-Adherent Korean-American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Hae-Ra; Lee, H.; Kim, M. T.; Kim, K. B.

    2009-01-01

    Despite rapidly increasing incidence rates of breast cancer, recent immigrants such as Korean-American (KA) women report disproportionately lower utilization of screening tests compared with other ethnic groups. Early screening of breast cancer for this population may be greatly facilitated by indigenous lay health workers (LHWs). We conducted an…

  15. Testing the Feasibility of a Culturally Tailored Breast Cancer Screening Intervention with Native Hawaiian Women in Rural Churches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Park, Soon H.; Ward, Margaret E.; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on the feasibility of delivering a church-based breast cancer screening intervention tailored on the cultural strengths of rural-dwelling Hawaiians. Native Hawaiian women are burdened by disproportionately high mortality from breast cancer, which is attributed to low participation in routine mammography. Mammography is proven to…

  16. Examining Emerging Strategies to Prevent Sexual Violence: Tailoring to the Needs of Women with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Sexual violence (SV) negatively impacts women with disabilities disproportionately, especially those with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD). The 2 populations are included in this article as there are overlaps in diagnostic criteria as well as similar risk factors associated with the experience of SV. Despite lacking…

  17. Glass Ceilings and Bottomless Pits: Women's Work, Women's Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albelda, Randy; Tilly, Chris

    This book, through a review of the status of working women on bottom and on the top, refutes a set of myths about women, work, and poverty that have shaped welfare reform. Chapter 1 highlights the big changes affecting women in the U.S. economy. Chapter 2 describes who is poor in the United States and examines how poverty has come to be defined.…

  18. Carotid Endarterectomy in Women

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Mark A.; Sumner, David S.; Bohannon, W. Todd; Parra, Jose; McLafferty, Robert B.; Karch, Laura A.; Ramsey, Don E.; Hodgson, Kim J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and compare the short- and long-term outcomes in female and male patients after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Summary Background Data Randomized carotid trials have clearly shown the benefits of CEA in specific symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. However, the short- and long-term benefits in women appear to be less clear, and the role of CEA among women with carotid disease remains uncertain. Methods During a 21-year period, 1,204 CEAs were performed, 464 (39%) in women and 739 (61%) in men. Complete follow-up was available in 70% of patients. Results Women were less likely to have evidence of coronary artery disease, were more likely to be hypertensive, and had a significantly greater incidence of diabetes. The mean age at CEA was 68.5 ± 9.5 years for women and 68.0 ± 8.5 years for men. There were no significant differences in the use of shunts, patching, tacking sutures, or severity of carotid stenoses between men and women. Surgical death rates were nearly identical for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Perioperative stroke rates were similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Life-table stroke-free rates at 1, 5, and 8 years were similar for asymptomatic women and men and symptomatic women and men. Long-term survival rates at 1, 5, and 8 years were higher for asymptomatic women compared with men and for symptomatic women compared with men. As a result, stroke-free survival rates at these follow-up intervals were greater for asymptomatic women compared with men, and for symptomatic women compared to men. Conclusions The results from this study challenge the conclusions from the Asymptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Study and the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial regarding the benefits of CEA in women. Female gender did not adversely affect early or late survival, stroke-free, or stroke-free death rates after CEA. The authors conclude that CEA can be performed safely in women with asymptomatic and symptomatic carotid artery disease, and physicians should expect comparable benefits and outcomes in women and men undergoing CEA. PMID:11573037

  19. Many steps ahead, a few steps back: U.S. women in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, K.; Cunningham, B.; Freeland, E.; Hodapp, T.; Hodari, A. K.; Ivie, R.; Martínez-Miranda, L. J.; Ong, M.; Petty, S.; Seestrom, S.; Seidel, S.; Simmons, E.; Thoennessen, M.; Urry, M.; White, H.

    2013-03-01

    Over the past few years, the decades-long slow but steady increase in participation in physics by undergraduate women has stalled. As the numbers of undergraduate majors in physics increase, the numbers of women are not keeping pace. Moreover, women of color represent a disproportionately small fraction of physicists. This means that women of color, and women in general, are an undertapped pool of talent. Significant variation in the participation of women from one institution to the next suggests that local factors, such as department culture, are important, rather than differences in aptitude, motivation, or preparation. Physicists in the U.S. must redouble their efforts to make physics departments and laboratories places where women and men of all backgrounds can thrive and produce exciting science.

  20. Rare Condition Can 'Masculinize' Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be." One suspected risk factor, Wierman said, is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a fairly common disorder that affects women of childbearing age. As with hyperthecosis, PCOS involves an overproduction of androgens in the ovaries. ...

  1. Effects of socioeconomic disadvantage and women's status on women's health in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Kuate Defo, B

    1997-04-01

    Research on the effects of socioeconomic disadvantage and women's status on women's health is important for policy makers in developing countries, where limited resources make it crucial to use existing maternal and child health care resources to the best advantage. Using a community-based data set collected prospectively in Cameroon, this study attempts to understand the extent to which socioeconomic factors and women's status have influences on women's health. The most important finding is that the burden of illness rests disproportionately on the economically disadvantaged women and on those with low social status. The long-term effects of social disadvantage are apparent in the excesses of morbidity among women who are not employed at the time of their children's birth, women living in poor neighborhoods, and those living in households without modern amenities. The maternal morbidity patterns during the postpartum period indicate that the women's reports of their recovery and health status from childbirth extend far beyond the first few weeks that previous studies have focused on. From a theoretical perspective, this study has demonstrated the importance of the "intermediate" framework for the study of women's health: the operations of effects of a number of background characteristics are mediated by more proximate determinants of women's health. These results remain robust even after controlling for other measured factors and after correcting for unmeasured heterogeneity and sample selection; this helps to dismiss the potential influence of some artifacts. While this study suggests that there are opportunities within the existing health care system for meeting many of the health care needs of the socially disadvantaged, further biobehavioral and psychosocial research is needed to determine how women's status and social disadvantage influence the demand for health care services, in order to ensure equitable as well as a more effective delivery of health care services and to break the vicious circle of disadvantage. PMID:9089923

  2. Charge Disproportionation in Highly One-Dimensional Molecular Conductor TPP[Co(Pc)(CN)2]2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, N.; Masuda, K.; Kodama, K.; Matsuda, M.; Tajima, H.; Yamazaki, J.; Takigawa, M.; Yamaura, J.; Ohmichi, E.; Osada, T.; Naito, T.; Inabe, T.

    2006-10-01

    We investigated the ground state of a highly one-dimensional conductor, TPP[Co(Pc)(CN)2]2 (TPP = tetraphenylphosphonium and Pc = phthalocyanine), by the measurement of the X-ray diffraction, electron spin resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance, and magnetoresistance. An increase of the magnetic fluctuations was observed below 20 K, where no structural deformation was detected. In the 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance, we found an asymmetric broadening of the spectra owing to the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the molecular charge. We propose that the ground state is characterized by a weak charge disproportionation with antiferromagnetic fluctuations due to the high one dimensionality. A large magnetoresistance was observed under a high magnetic field. Spin effects are dominant at low fields. The anisotropic magnetoresistance suggests a change in the ground-state nature above 10 T.

  3. Breaking the glass ceiling: structural, cultural, and organizational barriers preventing women from achieving senior and executive positions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Merida L

    2013-01-01

    The business case for gender diversity in senior and executive positions is compelling. Studies show that companies that have the best records for promoting women outstrip their competition on every measure of profitability. Yet women disproportionately are failing to attain high-level positions. Reviewing current data on women in the workplace, findings of studies on the relationship between gender diversity in senior management and company performance, and the literature on gender behavioral differences and the workplace, this article explores the possible reasons for the persistent wage and gender gap between women and men in senior leadership positions and discusses possible remedies. PMID:23346029

  4. Breaking the Glass Ceiling: Structural, Cultural, and Organizational Barriers Preventing Women from Achieving Senior and Executive Positions

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Merida L.

    2013-01-01

    The business case for gender diversity in senior and executive positions is compelling. Studies show that companies that have the best records for promoting women outstrip their competition on every measure of profitability. Yet women disproportionately are failing to attain high-level positions. Reviewing current data on women in the workplace, findings of studies on the relationship between gender diversity in senior management and company performance, and the literature on gender behavioral differences and the workplace, this article explores the possible reasons for the persistent wage and gender gap between women and men in senior leadership positions and discusses possible remedies. PMID:23346029

  5. Women and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Gatali, Marene; Archibald, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue The epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in developed countries has changed from the early epidemic that affected primarily men who have sex with men, to one that increasingly affects other groups such as injecting drug users (IDU) and heterosexuals. As a result, the number and percentage of women with HIV and AIDS is increasing. Key Findings The number of women in Canada living with HIV, including those with AIDS, has increased over time. An estimated 6,800 women were living with HIV at the end of 1999, an increase of 48.0 % from the 1996 estimate of 4,600. On an annual basis, women account for a growing proportion of positive HIV test reports among adults in Canada. This proportion increased from 10.7% in the period 1985–95 to 25% in 2001. Heterosexual contact is the main risk factor for HIV infection in women, accounting for 63% of newly diagnosed cases of HIV infection in adult Canadian women in 2001; the majority of the remainder is due to IDU. Key Data Gaps and Recommendations Research is needed to address specific information gaps regarding risk behaviours, testing patterns and HIV incidence and prevalence in women. This research needs to include the broader contextual factors that influence women's lives and their risk of HIV infection. Programmes and prevention efforts must be gender and age-specific and should target not only individual behaviours, but also the social and cultural context in which these behaviours occur. PMID:15345090

  6. Discrimination and Sexual Risk Among Young Urban Pregnant Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Lisa; Earnshaw, Valerie A.; Lewis, Jessica B.; Lewis, Tené T.; Reid, Allecia E.; Stasko, Emily C.; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Ickovics, Jeannette R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Discrimination predicts increased risk for many negative health outcomes, helping explain a variety of racial and socioeconomic health disparities. Recent research suggests discrimination may play a role in disparities in HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs); however, this research has focused on risk behaviors and has yet to establish a link between discrimination and STI diagnosis specifically. This investigation tested whether discrimination predicted condom use, risky sexual partners, and self-reported STI diagnosis among a population disproportionately affected by HIV and STIs in the U.S.: young, pregnant, socioeconomically disadvantaged, women of color. Method During second and third trimesters, 885 mostly Latina and Black pregnant women, 14–21 years old, attending 14 hospitals and health centers in New York City for prenatal care, completed interviews. Results Greater discrimination during second trimester predicted greater odds of STI diagnosis and having a risky sexual partner during third trimester, but not condom use. Whether discrimination was attributed to race, identifying as Black, or identifying as Latina did not moderate effects. Conclusion This is the first investigation establishing a link between discrimination and STI diagnosis, not just risk behavior. It does so among a sample of at-risk, young, pregnant, women of color. Findings suggest implications for sexual risk during pregnancy and across the life span, and risks for the pregnancy and fetus. It is vital to reduce discrimination to eliminate disparities in HIV and STIs. Future research should continue examining the role of discrimination in sexual risk among different populations and work to uncover potential mechanisms. PMID:24417689

  7. Risk factors among handgun retailers for frequent and disproportionate sales of guns used in violent and firearm related crimes

    PubMed Central

    Wintemute, G; Cook, P; Wright, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the retailer and community level factors associated with frequent and disproportionate sales of handguns that are later used in violent and firearm related crimes (VFC handguns). Design: Cross sectional. The authors used California records to identify all handguns sold by study subjects during 1996–2000 and federal gun tracing records to determine which of these guns had been recovered by a police agency in the US or elsewhere and traced by 30 September 2003. Subjects and setting: The 421 licensed gun retailers in California selling at least 100 handguns annually during 1996–2000. Main outcome measure: The number of VFC handguns per 1000 gun years of exposure. Differences are expressed as incidence rate ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Subjects accounted for 11.7% of California retailers with handgun sales, 81.5% of handgun sales, and 85.5% of VFC handguns. Among subjects, the 3426 VFC handguns accounted for 48.0% of all traced handguns and 65.0% of those linked to a specified crime. The median VFC handgun trace rate was 0.5/1000 gun years (range 0–8.8). In multivariate analysis, this rate increased substantially for each single-point increase in the percentage of proposed sales that were denied because the purchasers were prohibited from owning guns (RR 1.43; 95% CI 1.32 to 1.56), and was increased for pawnbrokers (RR 1.26; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.55). Community level crime rates and sociodemographics had little predictive value. Conclusions: Risk factors, largely determined at the retailer level, exist for frequent and disproportionate sales of handguns that are later used in violent and firearm related crimes. Screening to identify high risk retailers could be undertaken with data that are already available. PMID:16326771

  8. Women and Smoking

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) Get the latest statistics on smoking among women, and learn about its possible effects ... secondhand smoke affect your children’s health? Kicking the smoking habit To learn ... Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  9. 1 Women's Studies WOMEN'S STUDIES

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    . A multidisciplinary examination of historical conditions, cultural norms, and social institutions that define women's Studies. 3 Credits. A multidisciplinary examination of historical conditions, cultural norms, and social institutions that define women's status in Western culture. Experiences of girls and women in various racial

  10. Disproportionate Cochlear Length in Genus Homo Shows a High Phylogenetic Signal during Apes’ Hearing Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Braga, J.; Loubes, J-M.; Descouens, D.; Dumoncel, J.; Thackeray, J. F.; Kahn, J-L.; de Beer, F.; Riberon, A.; Hoffman, K.; Balaresque, P.; Gilissen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in lifestyles and body weight affected mammal life-history evolution but little is known about how they shaped species’ sensory systems. Since auditory sensitivity impacts communication tasks and environmental acoustic awareness, it may have represented a deciding factor during mammal evolution, including apes. Here, we statistically measure the influence of phylogeny and allometry on the variation of five cochlear morphological features associated with hearing capacities across 22 living and 5 fossil catarrhine species. We find high phylogenetic signals for absolute and relative cochlear length only. Comparisons between fossil cochleae and reconstructed ape ancestral morphotypes show that Australopithecus absolute and relative cochlear lengths are explicable by phylogeny and concordant with the hypothetized ((Pan,Homo),Gorilla) and (Pan,Homo) most recent common ancestors. Conversely, deviations of the Paranthropus oval window area from these most recent common ancestors are not explicable by phylogeny and body weight alone, but suggest instead rapid evolutionary changes (directional selection) of its hearing organ. Premodern (Homo erectus) and modern human cochleae set apart from living non-human catarrhines and australopiths. They show cochlear relative lengths and oval window areas larger than expected for their body mass, two features corresponding to increased low-frequency sensitivity more recent than 2 million years ago. The uniqueness of the “hypertrophied” cochlea in the genus Homo (as opposed to the australopiths) and the significantly high phylogenetic signal of this organ among apes indicate its usefulness to identify homologies and monophyletic groups in the hominid fossil record. PMID:26083484

  11. Disproportionate Cochlear Length in Genus Homo Shows a High Phylogenetic Signal during Apes' Hearing Evolution.

    PubMed

    Braga, J; Loubes, J-M; Descouens, D; Dumoncel, J; Thackeray, J F; Kahn, J-L; de Beer, F; Riberon, A; Hoffman, K; Balaresque, P; Gilissen, E

    2015-01-01

    Changes in lifestyles and body weight affected mammal life-history evolution but little is known about how they shaped species' sensory systems. Since auditory sensitivity impacts communication tasks and environmental acoustic awareness, it may have represented a deciding factor during mammal evolution, including apes. Here, we statistically measure the influence of phylogeny and allometry on the variation of five cochlear morphological features associated with hearing capacities across 22 living and 5 fossil catarrhine species. We find high phylogenetic signals for absolute and relative cochlear length only. Comparisons between fossil cochleae and reconstructed ape ancestral morphotypes show that Australopithecus absolute and relative cochlear lengths are explicable by phylogeny and concordant with the hypothetized ((Pan,Homo),Gorilla) and (Pan,Homo) most recent common ancestors. Conversely, deviations of the Paranthropus oval window area from these most recent common ancestors are not explicable by phylogeny and body weight alone, but suggest instead rapid evolutionary changes (directional selection) of its hearing organ. Premodern (Homo erectus) and modern human cochleae set apart from living non-human catarrhines and australopiths. They show cochlear relative lengths and oval window areas larger than expected for their body mass, two features corresponding to increased low-frequency sensitivity more recent than 2 million years ago. The uniqueness of the "hypertrophied" cochlea in the genus Homo (as opposed to the australopiths) and the significantly high phylogenetic signal of this organ among apes indicate its usefulness to identify homologies and monophyletic groups in the hominid fossil record. PMID:26083484

  12. How does living with HIV impact on women's mental health? Voices from a global survey

    PubMed Central

    Orza, Luisa; Bewley, Susan; Logie, Carmen H; Crone, Elizabeth Tyler; Moroz, Svetlana; Strachan, Sophie; Vazquez, Marijo; Welbourn, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women living with HIV experience a disproportionate burden of mental health issues. To date, global guidelines contain insufficient guidance on mental health support, particularly regarding perinatal care. The aim of this article is to describe the extent and impact of mental health issues as experienced by women living with HIV on their sexual and reproductive health and human rights (SRH&HR). Methods A global, mixed-methods, user-led and designed survey on SRH&HR of women living with HIV was conducted using snowball sampling, containing an optional section exploring mental health issues. Statistical quantitative data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple linear regression analysis for the mental health responses. Thematic analysis of open free-text responses was performed for qualitative data. Results A total of 832 respondents from 94 countries participated in the online survey with 489 responses to the optional mental health section. Of the respondents, 82% reported depression symptoms and 78% rejection. One-fifth reported mental health issues before HIV diagnosis. Respondents reported experiencing a 3.5-fold higher number of mental health issues after diagnosis (8.71 vs 2.48, t[488]=23.00, p<0.001). Nearly half (n=224; 45.8%) had multiple socially disadvantaged identities (SDIs). The number of SDIs was positively correlated with experiencing mental health issues (p<0.05). Women described how mental health issues affected their ability to enjoy their right to sexual and reproductive health and to access services. These included depression, rejection and social exclusion, sleep problems, intersectional stigma, challenges with sexual and intimate relationships, substance use and sexual risk, reproductive health barriers and human rights (HR) violations. Respondents recommended that policymakers and clinicians provide psychological support and counselling, funding for peer support and interventions to challenge gender-based violence and to promote HR. Conclusions Interventions addressing intersecting stigmas and any especial impacts of diagnosis during pregnancy are required to ensure women's SRH&HR. Global policy guidelines regarding women living with HIV must incorporate mental health considerations. PMID:26643460

  13. DCCPS: TCRB: TReND: Low SES Women and Girls Project (Phase I): The Effects of Tobacco Control Policies on Low SES Women and Girl

    Cancer.gov

    Tobacco control policies, such as increases in cigarette excise taxes, worksite smoking bans, and youth-focused media campaigns show promise in reducing smoking at the population level. However, few studies have examined the effects of policies in reducing smoking prevalence and secondhand smoke exposure among disadvantaged women and girls. Those of lower socioeconomic status (SES) have higher-than-average rates of tobacco use and suffer disproportionately from the health consequences of tobacco.

  14. Concomitant Socioeconomic, Behavioral, and Biological Factors Associated with the Disproportionate HIV Infection Burden among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in 6 U.S. Cities

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; Wang, Lei; Koblin, Beryl; Mannheimer, Sharon; Magnus, Manya; del Rio, Carlos; Buchbinder, Susan; Wilton, Leo; Cummings, Vanessa; Watson, Christopher C.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Gaydos, Charlotte; Eshleman, Susan H.; Clarke, William; Liu, Ting-Yuan; Mao, Cherry; Griffith, Samuel; Wheeler, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Background American Black men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected by HIV, but the factors associated with this concentrated epidemic are not fully understood. Methods Black MSM were enrolled in 6 US cities to evaluate a multi-component prevention intervention, with the current analysis focusing on the correlates of being newly diagnosed with HIV compared to being HIV-uninfected or previously diagnosed with HIV. Results HPTN 061 enrolled 1553 Black MSM whose median age was 40; 30% self-identified exclusively as gay or homosexual, 29% exclusively as bisexual, and 3% as transgender. About 1/6th (16.2%) were previously diagnosed with HIV (PD); of 1263 participants without a prior HIV diagnosis 7.6% were newly diagnosed (ND). Compared to PD, ND Black MSM were younger (p<0.001); less likely to be living with a primary partner (p<0.001); more likely to be diagnosed with syphilis (p<0.001), rectal gonorrhea (p?=?0.011) or chlamydia (p?=?0.020). Compared to HIV-uninfected Black MSM, ND were more likely to report unprotected receptive anal intercourse (URAI) with a male partner in the last 6 months (p<0.001); and to be diagnosed with syphilis (p<0.001), rectal gonorrhea (p?=?0.004), and urethral (p?=?0.025) or rectal chlamydia (p<0.001). They were less likely to report female (p?=?0.002) or transgender partners (p?=?0.018). Multivariate logistic regression analyses found that ND Black MSM were significantly more likely than HIV-uninfected peers to be unemployed; have STIs, and engage in URAI. Almost half the men in each group were poor, had depressive symptoms, and expressed internalized homophobia. Conclusions ND HIV-infected Black MSM were more likely to be unemployed, have bacterial STIs and engage in URAI than other Black MSM. Culturally-tailored programs that address economic disenfranchisement, increase engagement in care, screen for STIs, in conjunction with safer sex prevention interventions, may help to decrease further transmission in this heavily affected community. PMID:24498067

  15. An Investigation into the Social Context of Low-Income, Urban Black and Latina Women: Implications for Adherence to Recommended Health Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Rachel C.; Goldman, Roberta E.; Emmons, Karen M.; Sorensen, Glorian; Allen, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding factors that promote or prevent adherence to recommended health behaviors is essential for developing effective health programs, particularly among lower income populations who carry a disproportionate burden of disease. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews (n = 64) with low-income Black and Latina women who shared the…

  16. The abiotic disproportionation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) produces sulfate with an oxygen isotope signature close to the isotope composition of seawater sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Inigo A.; Brunner, Benjamin; Max, Thomas; Breuer, Christian; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Thal, Janis; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Whereas the sulfur isotope effects during the abiotic disproportionation of SO2 were thoroughly investigated in the last years, data on the oxygen isotope signature of produced sulfate is scarce. To fill in this gap in knowledge, we performed laboratory experiments which simulated the abiotic SO2 disproportionation at temperatures ranging from 150°C to 320°C. In our experiments SO2 disproportionated rapidly into sulfate and elemental sulfur. The oxygen isotope fractionation between produced sulfate and water is in the range of the observed oxygen isotope offset between seawater sulfate and seawater. The isotope fractionations observed for the experiments is likely composed of an initial kinetic oxygen isotope fractionation, which is rapidly overprinted by equilibrium oxygen isotope between sulfate and water (reaching completion probably within a time frame of ½ to 1 hour. Our observations raise the questions if disproportionation of magmatic SO2 in submarine hydrothermal vent systems is an important control for today's seawater sulfate isotope composition, and if so, if marine hydrothermal SO2 disproportiantion shaped the oxygen isotope signature of marine sulfate over geological times.

  17. Explaining Disproportionately High Rates of Adverse Birth Outcomes among African Americans: The Impact of Stress, Racism, and Related Factors in Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giscombe, Cheryl L.; Lobel, Marci

    2005-01-01

    Compared with European Americans, African American infants experience disproportionately high rates of low birth weight and preterm delivery and are more than twice as likely to die during their 1st year of life. The authors examine 5 explanations for these differences in rates of adverse birth outcomes: (a) ethnic differences in health behaviors…

  18. Women's reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, A

    1993-07-01

    Beginning in the mid-1800s, the American Medical Association, antiobscenity crusaders, and even women's groups supported criminalization of abortion. By 1900, it was illegal nationwide. In the late 1960s, women, physicians, and states began questioning abortion laws, since many women had unsafe, often fatal, illegal abortions. By 1973, 4 states had legalized abortion and 15 other states had liberalized abortion laws. A mid-1960 study showed that private patients comprised about 95% of all elective abortions. Poor clinic patients did not have the power to convince 3 physicians to support their request for an abortion. IN 1965, the Supreme Court agreed that a Connecticut Planned Parenthood Affiliate had the right to distribute contraceptives. The 1973 Roe v. Wade Court decision advanced this decision, by confirming a woman's right to abortion during the first 2 semesters of pregnancy. In 1976, the US Congress passed the Hyde amendment forbidding federal funding (e.g., Medicaid) for abortions except to save a mother. 2 1980 Supreme Court decisions supported the Hyde amendment. The Hyde amendment and these court decisions showed discrimination against poor women. Since then there have been other decisions that have whittled away at Roe v. Wade. Contraceptive failure is responsible for about 50% of the 1.6 million abortions/year. About 60% of women having an abortion are under 25 years old. Thus, criminalization of abortion would adversely affect many women as well as society. Many prochoice physicians had cared for women who suffered from botched abortions. Physicians under 45 years old tend to not know how to perform a 2nd trimester abortion because most obstetrician/gynecology residency training programs do not require them to learn it, and they do not want to do them. 2nd trimester abortion should be a required part of residency training. Physicians as preservers of women's health should be advocating safe abortion and not adopt the legal vs. illegal abortion dichotomy. PMID:8333437

  19. Sexual Orientation and Smoking: Results From a Multisite Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Tonda L.; Johnson, Timothy P.; Matthews, Alicia K.

    2010-01-01

    Although lesbians are believed to be at disproportionately high risk for smoking, few published studies have focused on smoking rates in this population. We examined and compared rates and demographic correlates of smoking among 550 lesbians and 279 heterosexual women in Chicago, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and in New York City in 1994–1996 using a self-administered survey questionnaire. African-American lesbians were more likely than African-American heterosexual women or White lesbians to be current smokers. For the sample as a whole, education was the most robust predictor of both current and lifetime smoking. Racial/ethnic minority lesbians with high school education or less were most likely to report both current and lifetime cigarette smoking. The study’s limitations are noted. PMID:18649240

  20. Predicting the Timing of Women's Departure from Abusive Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panchanadeswaran, Subadra; McCloskey, Laura A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate forces that affect the timing of women's exit from violent relationships with men. Abused women were recruited from posters in the community and battered women's shelters, interviewed, and followed up for 10 years. Data for this study are based on 100 women and were analyzed using event history analysis.…

  1. On Campus with Women, Number 33, Winter 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    On Campus with Women, 1982

    1982-01-01

    News concerning developments affecting women at colleges and universities is presented. Among the issues are the following: the Graduate Women's Network at the University of Michigan; a portable campus that provides career help to rural women in Minnesota; reentry programs into the corporate world for women 35 to 45 years old; an increase in…

  2. Contextual Influences on Women's Health Concerns and Attitudes toward Menopause

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Judy R.

    2011-01-01

    Social factors that affect women's attitudes toward menopause were examined in a sample of 1,037 baby boomer women who took part in two waves of the Midlife in the United States survey. Survey data were collected in 1996 and 2005 from a nationally representative sample of women born between 1946 and 1964 residing in the United States. Women's…

  3. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 M(I) compounds often disproportionate into M(0) and M(III). Here, however, we show that the reaction of the M(I) salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [Ga(I)(C6H5F)2](+)[Al(OR(F))4](-) (R(F)=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3](2+)(•){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a Ga(II) compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [Ga(III){(bipy)3}(•)](2+) radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [(I)n(I)(C6H5F)2](+)[Al(OR(F))4](-) leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6](3+), [In3(bipy)5](3+) and [In4(bipy)6](4+) metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In-In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3](3+){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}3 and [M4](4+){[Al(OR(F))4](-)}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  4. Cationic cluster formation versus disproportionation of low-valent indium and gallium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenthaler, Martin R.; Stahl, Florian; Kratzert, Daniel; Heidinger, Lorenz; Schleicher, Erik; Hamann, Julian; Himmel, Daniel; Weber, Stefan; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Group 13 MI compounds often disproportionate into M0 and MIII. Here, however, we show that the reaction of the MI salt of the weakly coordinating alkoxyaluminate [GaI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]? (RF=C(CF3)3) with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) yields the paramagnetic and distorted octahedral [Ga(bipy)3]2+•{[Al(ORF)4]?}2 complex salt. While the latter appears to be a GaII compound, both, EPR and DFT investigations assign a ligand-centred [GaIII{(bipy)3}•]2+ radical dication. Surprisingly, the application of the heavier homologue [InI(C6H5F)2]+[Al(ORF)4]? leads to aggregation and formation of the homonuclear cationic triangular and rhombic [In3(bipy)6]3+, [In3(bipy)5]3+ and [In4(bipy)6]4+ metal atom clusters. Typically, such clusters are formed under strongly reductive conditions. Analysing the unexpected redox-neutral cationic cluster formation, DFT studies suggest a stepwise formation of the clusters, possibly via their triplet state and further investigations attribute the overall driving force of the reactions to the strong In?In bonds and the high lattice enthalpies of the resultant ligand stabilized [M3]3+{[Al(ORF)4]?}3 and [M4]4+{[Al(ORF)4]?}4 salts. PMID:26478464

  5. Highly oriented NdFeCoB nanocrystalline magnets from partially disproportionated compacts by reactive deformation under low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qing; Li, Jun; Liu, Ying Yu, Yunping; Lian, Lixian

    2014-05-07

    In the present investigation, we take advantage of the ultrafine grain size of NdFeCoB partially hydrogen-disproportionated phases, and prepare anisotropic nanocrystalline magnets with full density and homogenous microstructure and texture by reactive deformation under low pressure. Our results suggest that the pressure could properly promote an occurrence of desorption-recombination reaction due to a shorter-range rearrangement of the atoms, and the newly recombined Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains with fine grain size could undergo deformation immediately after the phase transformation, and then an obvious anisotropy and uniform alignment would be obtained. The maximum magnetic properties, (BH){sub max}?=?25.8 MGOe, Br?=?11.8 kG, H{sub cj}?=?5.5 kOe, were obtained after being treated for 5?min at 820?°C in vacuum. The present study highlights the feasibility to prepare anisotropic nanocrystalline magnets with homogeneous microstructure and a strong (00l) texture of uniform grain size under low pressure.

  6. Mentoring Women's Academic Careers: Using a Family Model to Enhance Women's Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1994-01-01

    Notes that, although they are qualified and are being hired into academic positions, women are not achieving tenure and promotion at same rate as men. Suggests that women's success can be affected by effective, purposeful mentoring and proposes framework that mentors can use to organize socialization and developmental process which women

  7. Disproportionation of Bromous Acid HOBrO by Direct OTransfer and via Anhydrides O(BrO)2 and BrO-BrO2. An Ab Initio Study of the

    E-print Network

    Glaser, Rainer

    -catalyzed bromate oxida- tion of citric acid, HOOC-C(OH)(CH2COOH)2, in aqueous sulfuric acid solution. ZhabotinskyDisproportionation of Bromous Acid HOBrO by Direct OTransfer and via Anhydrides O(BrO)2 and Br*)). The reaction energy of bromous acid disproportionation is discussed in the context of the coupled reaction

  8. Disproportionate Participation of Students from Ethnic and Cultural Minorities in Special Education Classes and Programs: Forum To Examine Current Policy. Project FORUM. Report of a Policy Forum (Alexandria, Virginia, June 3-4, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Alexandria, VA.

    A policy forum was convened on the disproportionate participation of students from ethnic and cultural minorities in special education classes and programs, to promote a constructive national dialogue. The charge to participants was to identify the issues underlying the problem of disproportionate participation of minorities and to identify…

  9. AMERICAN WOMEN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Commission on the Status of Women, Washington, DC.

    FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COMMISSION AND SEVEN COMMITTEES WHO ASSESSED THE STATUS OF WOMEN ARE REPORTED. THE COMMITTEES MADE RECOMMENDATIONS IN THE AREAS--WOMEN'S EDUCATION AND COUNSELING, HOME AND COMMUNITY SERVICES, PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT (THAT UNDER FEDERAL CONTRACTS), EMPLOYMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT, LABOR STANDARDS, FEDERAL SOCIAL…

  10. Empowering Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Aurelia

    2012-01-01

    Empowering Women is a traveling exhibition of folk art that focuses on ten cooperatives from four continents and ten countries. The exhibition is a window into the ways that cooperatives empower women to: (1) preserve and reinvigorate their country's traditional arts; (2) generate steady livelihoods for their families; (3) send their children to…

  11. A well in search of an owner : using novel assertions to assess Miriam's disproportionate elaboration among women in the Midrashim of late antiquity

    E-print Network

    Sherman, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    shoots – these are Temple, king, and high priest; and as ithigh-priests … no vessel whatever might be carried into the temple,Temple the Messiah, David’s son, and his own brother Aaron, standing erect, and dressed in the robe of the high

  12. 75 FR 27819 - Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: New Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...Number 1122-NEW] Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  13. 75 FR 42128 - Office on Violence Against Women: Agency Information Collection Activities: New Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...Number 1122-NEW] Office on Violence Against Women: Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  14. 75 FR 27818 - Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: New Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...1122--NEW] Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  15. 75 FR 28818 - Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ...Number 1122-0017] Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  16. 75 FR 42128 - Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: Extension of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...Number 1122-0017] Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  17. 75 FR 27820 - Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: New Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...Number 1122-NEW] Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  18. 75 FR 42129 - Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection Activities: New Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...Number 1122-NEW] Office on Violence Against Women; Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  19. 75 FR 42127 - Office on Violence Against Women: Agency Information Collection Activities: New Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...Number 1122-NEW] Office on Violence Against Women: Agency Information Collection...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), will be submitting...Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (4) Affected public...

  20. Disproportionate Minority Contact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex R.

    2008-01-01

    For many years, notes Alex Piquero, youth of color have been overrepresented at every stage of the U.S. juvenile justice system. As with racial disparities in a wide variety of social indicators, the causes of these disparities are not immediately apparent. Some analysts attribute the disparities to "differential involvement"--that is, to…

  1. "I felt so hurt and lonely": suicidal behavior in South Asian-Surinamese, Turkish, and Moroccan women in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Bergen, Diana D; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Smit, Johannes H; Saharso, Sawitri

    2012-02-01

    Young immigrant women in the Netherlands demonstrate disproportionate rates of suicidal behavior. This study investigated the origins of suicidal behavior in South Asian-Surinamese, Turkish, and Moroccan immigrant young women in order to identify ethnic- and gender-specific patterns of suicidal behavior. Based on life story interviews of women who had been enrolled in mental health care, we constructed five typical patterns in which social, cultural, and personal factors were interconnected. Suicidal behavior was influenced by the ability and right to act autonomously with regard to strategic life choices, as well as by the questioning of cultural values of self-sacrifice and protection of honor. PMID:22194345

  2. Expanding the Visibility of Women's Work: Policy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messias, DeAnne K. Hilfinger; Regev, Hanna; Im, Eun-Ok; Spiers, Judith A.; Van, Paulina; Meleis, Afaf Ibrahim

    1997-01-01

    Social conceptualization and media images of women's work affect health and social policy formation. Nurses can expand the visibility of women's work and promote gender-sensitive policies within and outside the profession. (SK)

  3. Susceptibility variants for waist size in relation to abdominal, visceral, and hepatic adiposity in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lim, Unhee; Ernst, Thomas; Wilkens, Lynne R; Albright, Cheryl L; Lum-Jones, Annette; Seifried, Ann; Buchthal, Steven D; Novotny, Rachel; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chang, Linda; Cheng, Iona; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2012-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified common genetic variants that can contribute specifically to the risk of abdominal adiposity, as measured by waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio. However, it is unknown whether these genetic risk factors affect relative body fat distribution in the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous compartments. The association between imaging-based abdominal fat mass and waist-size risk variants in the FTO, LEPR, LYPLAL1, MSRA, NRXN3, and TFAP2B genes was investigated. A cross-sectional sample of 60 women was selected among study participants of The Multiethnic Cohort, who were aged 60 to 65 years, of European or Japanese descent, and with a body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) between 18.5 and 40. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging scans were used to measure adiposity. After adjustments for age, ethnicity, and total fat mass, the FTO variants showed an association with less abdominal subcutaneous fat and a higher visceral-to-subcutaneous abdominal fat ratio, with the variant rs9941349 showing significant associations most consistently (P=0.003 and 0.03, respectively). Similarly, the LEPR rs1137101 variant was associated with less subcutaneous fat (P=0.01) and a greater visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio (P=0.03) and percent liver fat (P=0.007). MSRA rs545854 variant carriers had a lower percent of leg fat. Our findings provide initial evidence that some of the genetic risk factors identified for larger waist size might also contribute to disproportionately greater intra-abdominal and liver fat distribution in postmenopausal women. If replicated, these genetic variants can be incorporated with other biomarkers to predict high-risk body fat distribution. PMID:22889634

  4. Social Exchange and Sexual Behavior in Young Women's Premarital Relationships in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Luke, Nancy; Goldberg, Rachel E; Mberu, Blessing U; Zulu, Eliya M

    2011-10-01

    Transactional sex, or the exchange of money and gifts for sexual activities within nonmarital relationships, has been widely considered a contributing factor to the disproportionate prevalence of HIV/AIDS among young women in sub-Saharan Africa. This study applied social exchange theory to premarital relationships in order to investigate the linkages between a variety of young women's resources-including employment and material transfers from male partners-and sexual behaviors. Data on the first month of premarital relationships (N=551 relationships) were collected from a random sample of young adult women ages 18-24 in Kisumu, Kenya, using a retrospective life history calendar. Consistent with the hypotheses, results showed that young women's income increases the likelihood of safer sexual activities, including delaying sex and using condoms consistently. Material transfers from the male partner displayed the opposite effect, supporting the view that resources obtained from within the relationship decrease young women's negotiating power. PMID:22180665

  5. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Horrigan Conners Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, April, ... Lung Cancer in Women: The Differences in Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment Outcomes, Maria Patricia Rivera MD Expert ...

  6. Women's Health Topics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women's Health Topics Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Publications for Women Pregnancy Registries ¡Nunca Más! Novelas Women's Health Research Pink Ribbon Sunday Program Stay Informed Get ...

  7. How men can excel as mentors of women.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Janet

    2014-08-01

    Most male professionals have more experience mentoring men than they do mentoring women, and their male mentees progress further than their female mentees. Yet, in academic medicine, men have few forums in which to discuss the gender-related issues that they encounter. To address the gender-related questions that commonly arise, the author of this commentary offers perspectives and recommendations, consolidated from over 25 years of experience leading career and talent development programs, to assist men in successfully mentoring women. Her recommendations are organized around three questions: (1) How do women's and men's experiences in mentoring relationships tend to differ? (2) What interferes with the accurate evaluation of women's skills? and (3) Is the current generation of female trainees still at a gender-related disadvantage? She argues that men's ability to effectively mentor women depends to a great extent on their understanding of the challenges that women disproportionately face in developing their careers. Mentors who are skilled in adapting to the gender-related needs of mentees will contribute to women's retention and development in academic medicine, enhance the leadership capacity of their organizations and the profession, and extend their own legacies. PMID:24853197

  8. Women's Lifestyle and Health (WLHS)

    Cancer.gov

    Oral contraceptives, use of hormone replacement therapy, dietary habits, and other lifestyle factors affect the risk for cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and other chronic diseases in young women. Starting in 1991, a comprehensive questionnaire was mailed to 96,000 Swedish women aged 30 to 49 years. Approximately 50,000 completed questionnaires were returned providing detailed information on a wide range of lifestyle factors with a focus on oral contraceptive use, diet, UV light exposure, reproductive factors, and familial occurrence of cancer.

  9. Exercise has a Disproportionate Role in the Pathogenesis of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia/Cardiomyopathy in Patients Without Desmosomal Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Abhishek C.; Bhonsale, Aditya; te Riele, Anneline S. J. M.; Tichnell, Crystal; Murray, Brittney; Russell, Stuart D.; Tandri, Harikrishna; Tedford, Ryan J.; Judge, Daniel P.; Calkins, Hugh; James, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is associated with age?related penetrance and arrhythmic risk in carriers of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C)?associated desmosomal mutations; however, its role in patients without desmosomal mutations (gene?elusive) is uncertain. This study investigates whether exercise is (1) associated with onset of gene?elusive ARVD/C and (2) has a differential impact in desmosomal and gene?elusive patients. Methods and Results Eighty?two ARVD/C patients (39 desmosomal, all probands) were interviewed about regular physical activity from age 10. Participation in endurance athletics, duration (hours/year), and intensity (MET?Hours/year) of exercise prior to clinical presentation were compared between patients with desmosomal and gene?elusive ARVD/C. All gene?elusive patients were endurance athletes. Gene?elusive patients were more likely to be endurance athletes (P<0.001) and had done significantly more intense (MET?Hrs/year) exercise prior to presentation (P<0.001), particularly among cases presenting < age 25 (P=0.027). Family history was less prevalent among gene?elusive patients (9% versus 40% desmosomal, P<0.001), suggesting a greater environmental influence. Gene?elusive patients without family history did considerably more intense exercise than other ARVD/C patients (P=0.004). Gene?elusive patients who had done the most intense (top quartile MET?Hrs/year) exercise prior to presentation had a younger age of presentation (P=0.025), greater likelihood of meeting ARVD/C structural Task Force Criteria (100% versus 43%, P=0.02), and shorter survival free from a ventricular arrhythmia in follow?up (P=0.002). Conclusions Gene?elusive, non?familial ARVD/C is associated with very high intensity exercise suggesting exercise has a disproportionate role in the pathogenesis of these cases. As exercise negatively modifies cardiac structure and promotes arrhythmias, exercise restriction is warranted. PMID:25516436

  10. Attitudes about women in optometry.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, E R; Welsh, M; Mozlin, R

    1992-10-01

    A survey was conducted to examine attitudes that affect women in optometry. Most respondents felt that women have greater difficulty than men entering private practice. On the other hand, the majority felt that female optometrists do not find it more difficult to be employed by other ODs, MDs, or to work in corporate settings, HMOs/health institutions, or academic settings. Examining the results of the survey can help establish programs of professional development that will enable women to practice in the environments that they find most suitable. In addition, an open and honest discussion of these issues can raise the sensitivity of the optometric community to these issues. PMID:1430745

  11. Globalisation and women in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, M

    1999-11-01

    Globalization arrived in India through an external and internal alignment of political and economic forces that led to the opening of the country to the outside world. The five processes under globalization are: 1) commercialism wherein more services become monetized and incomes are received in money rather than in kind; 2) more capitalization; 3) foreign trade becomes important for the production and distribution process; 4) greater financialization develops; and 5) international capital moves freely. These changes affect women more than men in different ways. Capitalization results in more self-employed marginal farmers becoming wage workers, making it less possible for women to manage domestic duties alongside their productive work. In general, macro-economic policies affect women through the household, market, and gender relations. In countries like India where women suffer from serious discrimination, whatever affects the household will worsen women's position. Thus, the process of liberalization, privatization, and globalization will put the clock back for women and for the poor in general. PMID:12349429

  12. Women's health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... use at a later date Egg donation Sperm banking Counseling for couples who are dealing with infertility ... your pelvic floor. OTHER WOMEN'S HEALTH SERVICES Cosmetic surgery and skin care, including skin cancer Diet and ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality Among American Indian and Alaska Native Women, 1999–2009

    PubMed Central

    Benard, Vicki; Thomas, Cheryll; Brayboy, Annie; Paisano, Roberta; Becker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed cervical cancer incidence and mortality data in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women compared with women of other races. Methods. We improved identification of AI/AN race, cervical cancer incidence, and mortality data using Indian Health Service (IHS) patient records; our analyses focused on residents of IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) counties. Age-adjusted incidence and death rates were calculated for AI/AN and White women from 1999 to 2009. Results. AI/AN women in CHSDA counties had a death rate from cervical cancer of 4.2, which was nearly twice the rate in White women (2.0; rate ratio [RR]?=?2.11). AI/AN women also had higher incidence rates of cervical cancer compared with White women (11.0 vs 7.1; RR?=?1.55) and were more often diagnosed with later-stage disease (RR?=?1.84 for regional stage and RR?=?1.74 for distant stage). Death rates decreased for AI/AN women from 1990 to 1993 (?25.8%/year) and remained stable thereafter. Conclusions. Although rates decreased over time, AI/AN women had disproportionately higher cervical cancer incidence and mortality. The persistently higher rates among AI/AN women compared with White women require continued improvements in identifying and treating cervical cancer and precancerous lesions. PMID:24754650

  14. Breast cancer screening beliefs and behaviors among American Indian women in Kansas and Missouri: a qualitative inquiry.

    PubMed

    Daley, Christine Makosky; Kraemer-Diaz, Anne; James, Aimee S; Monteau, Darryl; Joseph, Stephanie; Pacheco, Joseph; Bull, Julia White; Cully, Angel; Choi, Won S; Greiner, K Allen

    2012-04-01

    American Indian women have rising incidence and disproportionate mortality rates due to breast cancer. Using a community-based participatory research approach, we conducted ten focus groups with American Indian women in Kansas and Missouri to understand their barriers to mammography and identify ways to intervene to improve screening rates. Focus groups were stratified by screening status, including women who were up to date with current screening mammography recommendations (mammogram within the last 2 years, N = 7 groups, 66 participants) and women who were not (N = 3 groups, 18 participants). While many similarities were identified across strata, some differences emerged, particularly descriptions of prior negative experiences with the health care system among women who were not up to date with screening recommendations. Primary areas identified by participants for intervention included culturally appropriate educational materials and interventions directed specifically at improving American Indian women's trust in Western medicine and alleviating feelings of discrimination. PMID:22351375

  15. The effects of advertisements that sexually objectify women on state body dissatisfaction and judgments of women: The moderating roles of gender and internalization.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Ross; Thompson, J Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that exposure to idealized images of women increases state body image disturbance. However, little work has experimentally examined the effects of exposure to images that sexually objectify women, especially as it relates to women and men's state body dissatisfaction and judgments of women. In the current study, 437 women and men were randomly assigned to view advertisements that sexually objectify women and portray appearance ideals, or to view non-appearance-related advertisements. Results indicated that state body dissatisfaction increased for women and men exposed to advertisements that sexually objectified women, although this effect was larger for women. Trait internalization of appearance ideals moderated this effect, indicating that women and men with higher internalization exhibited greater state body dissatisfaction after viewing women sexually objectified in advertisements. Exposure to women sexually objectified in advertisements did not affect women's or men's attractiveness or competence ratings of women in university advertisements. PMID:26363356

  16. A diet high in meat protein and potential renal acid load increases fractional Ca absorption and urinary Ca excretion, without affecting markers of bone resorption or formation in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The objective was to determine the effects of high dietary protein (mostly meat) and high potential renal acid load (PRAL) on calcium (Ca) balance and markers of bone metabolism. Methods: In a randomized crossover design, sixteen healthy postmenopausal women consumed two diets: one with l...

  17. Slum Sanitation and the Social Determinants of Women's Health in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Corburn, Jason; Hildebrand, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate urban sanitation disproportionately impacts the social determinants of women's health in informal settlements or slums. The impacts on women's health include infectious and chronic illnesses, violence, food contamination and malnutrition, economic and educational attainment, and indignity. We used household survey data to report on self-rated health and sociodemographic, housing, and infrastructure conditions in the Mathare informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya. We combined quantitative survey and mapping data with qualitative focus group information to better understand the relationships between environmental sanitation and the social determinants of women and girls' health in the Mathare slum. We find that an average of eighty-five households in Mathare share one toilet, only 15% of households have access to a private toilet, and the average distance to a public toilet is over 52 meters. Eighty-three percent of households without a private toilet report poor health. Mathare women report violence (68%), respiratory illness/cough (46%), diabetes (33%), and diarrhea (30%) as the most frequent physical burdens. Inadequate, unsafe, and unhygienic sanitation results in multiple and overlapping health, economic, and social impacts that disproportionately impact women and girls living in urban informal settlements. PMID:26060499

  18. Smoke exposure among women in Haiti: The case for improved stoves

    PubMed Central

    Hubbell, Alexander M.; Jareczek, Francis J.; Vonnahme, Laura; Hockenberry, Jason M.; Buresh, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Indoor smoke exposure is responsible for two million deaths per year and has been studied globally, but the impacts of exposure have not yet been evaluated in Haiti, the Western hemisphere’s poorest nation. This study measures the disproportionate impact of indoor smoke exposure on the women and children of Haiti. We studied 2296 clinic patients in four Haitian villages to determine the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure, using carboxyhemoglobin saturation in the blood as a proxy for overall smoke exposure. We predicted CO levels to be higher in women, who traditionally perform the majority of cooking duties, and in children who accompany their mothers. CO levels averaged 4.9% in women and 3.4% in men. Women of child-bearing age carried a minimum relative risk (RR) for CO exposure of 1.22, relative to all males and younger females. Older females carried no significant difference in risk. Children averaged the lowest CO exposure among all cohorts. These findings demonstrate the burden of indoor smoke exposure that falls disproportionately on women in these regions of Haiti. Global efforts to mitigate indoor exposure have demonstrated the health, economic, environmental and social improvements that are possible by tackling this problem. PMID:23906187

  19. Voices of Resilience: Successful Jamaican Women Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Through the use of the framework of risk and resilience in a narrative inquiry, the present study examined the protective factors affecting the academic success of 24 Jamaican women in a graduate cohort in educational administration. All but two of the women rose from poverty to become academically successful, defined as having achieved graduate…

  20. Workplace/Women's Place: An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Dana

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Paula England); "Introduction to the Study of Women and Work" (Dana Dunn); "Gender Culture and Socialization" (Rita Mae Kelly); "Parental Influence and Women's Careers" (Sue Joan Mendelson Freeman); "Shortchanging Girls: Gender Socialization in Schools" (Peggy Orenstein); "Factors Affecting Female…

  1. Soviet Women Respond to Glasnost and Perestroika.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Martha C.

    1990-01-01

    Notes that Westerners tend to think of glasnost and perestroika in global, abstract terms when in actuality, they affect individual people in many ways. Profiles five Soviet women (Moscow Intourist guide, editor of women's magazine, concert pianist, college graduate, and worker at Chernobyl) and their differing responses to the changes sweeping…

  2. Dimensions of Women's Health across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; Vamos, Sandra D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This teaching strategy provides students with an opportunity to promote women's health literacy via construction of a creative health information booklet. Students will be able to: (1) Identify health issues that affect women during one particular lifespan stage; (2) Categorize issues according to the seven dimensions of health; (3)…

  3. Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    Urinary incontinence, the involuntary leakage of urine, is caused by a variety of factors and may result in a wide range of urinary symptoms that can affect women's physical, psychological, and social well-being and sometimes can impose significant lifestyle restrictions. Identifying the etiology of each woman's urinary incontinence symptoms and developing an individualized treatment plan is essential for improving her quality of life. The purpose of this joint document of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Urogynecologic Society is to review information on the current understanding of urinary incontinence in women and to outline guidelines for diagnosis and management that are consistent with the best available scientific evidence. PMID:26506157

  4. Acne in women.

    PubMed

    Ramos-e-Silva, M; Ramos-e-Silva, S; Carneiro, S

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on the subject of acne in women, a disease that is increasingly common and that can also affect men. Adult acne differs from the type of acne that occurs in teenagers, and it may persist beyond adolescence or have its onset at an older age (adult-onset acne or late acne). Acne can have a negative impact on the quality of life of patients at any age, leading to a negative body image and decrease in self-esteem, and in older patients it can result in discrimination in the workplace and in other social environments. Acne in women must be understood as a specific problem, and here we discuss the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, psychology and treatment of this very prevalent problem. PMID:25597414

  5. Women'S issues and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Noe, Katherine H; Pack, Alison M

    2010-06-01

    Women with epilepsy (WWE) may experience changes in seizure control related to alterations in neuronal excitability mediated by estrogen and progesterone. A third or more of women will reliably note seizures that are linked to menstruation or ovulation. Reproductive hormone-related exacerbation of seizure control is also observed during perimenopause. Seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) also can adversely affect reproductive health. WWE have higher than expected rates of menstrual disorders and infertility. Enzyme-inducing AEDs interact with hormonal contraceptives, potentially limiting options for birth control. Exposure to AEDs during pregnancy increases the risk of congenital malformations and cognitive impairments in children born to WWE. Chronic AED use increases the risk of vitamin D deficiency, decreased bone quality and density, and fractures. These concerns heighten the need to taper AEDs when appropriate and to manage WWE on the simplest AED regimen that will maintain seizure freedom. PMID:22810320

  6. Women's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.; Quinn, Laura, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The articles in this focused journal issue discuss women authors and examine female images in English and American literature. The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Margaret Fuller and Charlotte Perkins Gilman: Rhetoric and the Shape of Learning" (Susan Lundvall Brodie); (2) "Feminist Psychology through Feminist…

  7. Women Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Dana M.

    2014-11-01

    I am a counter by nature. I count things as an effective way to occupy my mind. How many people are in this room? How many are women? How many are wearing glasses? How many people are using a Mac versus a PC?

  8. Sea Women

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-02-08

    . But hold on, girls. Before you book your ticket, consider what the women do to earn that bread: Deep sea diving. No scuba gear. Collecting sea treasures to sell. Still interested? There should be plenty of job openings: after 1,700 years, the end is at hand...

  9. Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Health: Does Sexism Influence Women’s Health?

    PubMed Central

    Molix, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This commentary provides a brief overview of theory and research that supports the idea that sexism may be related to the disproportionate negative cardiovascular health outcomes in women. It describes the sexism as a stressor and outlines its association with a variety of health outcomes as evidence for why sex disparities should be examined within the context of pervasive inequities. To date, population-based studies have not explicitly examined the relationship between sexism and CVD but smaller studies have yielded fairly consistent results. It is suggested that future research should aim to examine the influence of two types of sexism (i.e., hostile and benevolent) and that daily or within-day designs be employed to assess cognitive, behavioral, and physiological responses to everyday sexist experiences. PMID:25054736

  10. How poor are women in rural India?

    PubMed

    Rajuladevi, A K

    1992-07-01

    The assessment of poor women in India as dependent and exploited regardless of poverty focused strategies is reflected in this review of relevant literature. The scholarly approaches to the problems of poor women involve redirection and expansion of resources to women (increase bank credit) through policy and institutional changes, and involve improving women's welfare through changes in class and gender hierarchies; both pertain to restructuring power groups. A little ascribed to belief is that the organization of women's numbers will empower women; the constraints are stated. There is also some argument over whether to design women-specific programs or integrate women into existing programs; some examples are given of successes and difficulties. The regionalization of poverty in eastern and central India is discussed. The growth of the poor has been among the landless, wage-dependent households. 9.6% of households (7.5 million) are headed by women. Women work fewer hours and at lower wage scales and have fewer employment opportunities. Lower earnings are coupled with differentials in demand for female and male labor in agriculture and a crowded labor market. There is a concentration of women in less visible, nonmonetary subsistence production and domestic work. Women are undercounted in employment studies. Women predominate in agricultural activity. Women's status is influenced by economic status, caste, and ethnic background. Domestic work increases status for women and households. The poorer households have greater labor force participation, particularly as wage laborers rather than unpaid family workers. Regional factors affecting rural household strategies are factors affecting the economy (topography, rainfall, climate) and the degree of development, plus sociocultural variables (kinship and religious beliefs which affect the social domain of women), and the degree of dependence on hired vs. family labor. There are sharp contrasts in the value and survival of women regionally. Female labor force participation is low in all regions; the nature and distribution of agricultural laborers is discussed followed by examples from 3 different regions (east, south, and north). The gender inequalities in access to basic needs are reviewed for sex ratio, mortality, and nutrition, and education. The preference is for gender-based policies targeting women. PMID:12344615

  11. "Just Because It's Out There, People Aren't Going to Use It." HIV Self-Testing Among Young, Black MSM, and Transgender Women.

    PubMed

    Frye, Victoria; Wilton, Leo; Hirshfied, Sabina; Chiasson, Mary Ann; Usher, DaShawn; Lucy, Debbie; McCrossin, Jermaine; Greene, Emily; Kobin, Beryl

    2015-11-01

    HIV disproportionately affects young black MSM and transgender women in the US. Increasing HIV testing rates among these populations is a critical public health goal. Although HIV self-tests are commercially available, there is a need to better understand access to and uptake of HIV self-testing among this population. Here, we report results of a qualitative study of 30 young black MSM and transgender women residing in the New York City area to understand facilitators of and barriers to a range of HIV testing approaches, including self-testing. Mean age was 23.7 years (SD?=?3.4). Over half (54%) had some college or an associate's degree, yet 37% had an annual personal income of less than $10,000 per year. Most (64%) participants had tested in the past 6 months; venues included community health/free clinics, medical offices, mobile testing units, hospitals, emergency departments, and research sites. Just one participant reported ever using a commercially available HIV self-test. Facilitators of self-testing included convenience, control, and privacy, particularly as compared to venue-based testing. Barriers to self-testing included the cost of the test, anxiety regarding accessing the test, concerns around correct test operation, and lack of support if a test result is positive. Participants indicated that instruction in correct test operation and social support in the event of a positive test result may increase the likelihood that they would use the self-test. Alongside developing new approaches to HIV prevention, developing ways to increase HIV self-testing is a public health priority for young, black MSM, and transgender women. PMID:26376029

  12. "Getting tested is almost like going to the Salem witch trials": discordant discourses between Western public health messages and sociocultural expectations surrounding HIV testing among East African immigrant women.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, Maria; Carrete, Claudia; Maine, Cathleen; Nalls, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Washington, DC, has the highest AIDS diagnosis rate in the USA, and Black women are disproportionately affected. Although HIV testing is the first entryway into vital treatment services, evidence reveals that foreign-born blacks have a lower rate of recent HIV testing than US-born blacks. To date, however, there are no studies that examine the culture-specific perceptions of HIV testing among East African immigrant women (who comprise a large share of Black Africans in DC) to better understand their potential barriers to testing. Adopting the PEN-3 cultural model as our theoretical framework, the main objective of this study was to examine East African women's HIV testing perceptions and partner communication norms. Between October 2012 and March 2013, trained interviewers conducted a total of 25 interviews with East African women in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. For triangulation purposes, data collection consisted of both in-depth, semi-structured interviews and cognitive interviews, in which participants were administered a quantitative survey and assessed on how they interpreted items. Qualitative thematic analysis revealed a systematic pattern of discordant responses across participants. While they were aware of messages related to Western public health discourse surrounding HIV testing (e.g., Everyone should get tested for HIV; One should talk to one's spouse about HIV testing), divergent sociocultural expectations rooted in cultural and religious beliefs prevailed (e.g., Getting an HIV test brings shame to the person who got tested and to one's family; it implies one is engaging in immoral behavior; One should not talk with one's spouse about HIV testing; doing so breaks cultural norms). Implications of using a culture-centered model to examine the role of sociocultural expectations in HIV prevention research and to develop culturally responsive prevention strategies are discussed. PMID:25616443

  13. The time has come to make cervical cancer prevention an essential part of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services for HIV-positive women in low-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Huchko, Megan J; Maloba, May; Nakalembe, Miriam; Cohen, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV and cervical cancer are intersecting epidemics that disproportionately affect one of the most vulnerable populations in the world: women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Historically, the disparity in cervical cancer risk for women in LMICs has been due to the lack of organized screening and prevention programmes. In recent years, this risk has been augmented by the severity of the HIV epidemic in LMICs. HIV-positive women are at increased risk for developing cervical precancer and cancer, and while the introduction of antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved life expectancies among HIV-positive women it has not been shown to improve cancer-related outcomes. Therefore, an increasing number of HIV-positive women are living in LMICs with limited or no access to cervical cancer screening programmes. In this commentary, we describe the gaps in cervical cancer prevention, the state of evidence for integrating cervical cancer prevention into HIV programmes and future directions for programme implementation and research. Discussion Despite the biologic, behavioural and demographic overlap between HIV and cervical cancer, cervical cancer prevention has for the most part been left out of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services for HIV-positive women. Lower cost primary and secondary prevention strategies for cervical cancer are becoming more widely available in LMICs, with increasing evidence for their efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Going forward, cervical cancer prevention must be considered a part of the essential package of SRH services for HIV-positive women. Effective cervical cancer prevention programmes will require a coordinated response from international policymakers and funders, national governments and community leaders. Leveraging the improvements in healthcare infrastructure created by the response to the global HIV epidemic through integration of services may be an effective way to make an impact to prevent cervical cancer among HIV-positive women, but more work remains to determine optimal approaches. Conclusions Cervical cancer prevention is an essential part of comprehensive HIV care. In order to ensure maximal impact and cost-effectiveness, implementation strategies for screening programmes must be adapted and rigorously evaluated through a framework that includes equal participation with policymakers, programme planners and key stakeholders in the target communities. PMID:26643456

  14. Women and Work-Place Stress. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Bonita C.

    With North American women joining the work force in record numbers, the effect of employment on women's well-being is gaining attention. This digest examines various stressors affecting women in the work world and some actions companies can take to alleviate these stressors. While some studies show that work has detrimental effects on some…

  15. Daughters of Abya Yala: Native Women Regaining Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderete, Wara, Ed.; And Others

    This book compiles testimonies of the struggles, everyday life, and accomplishments of Indian women from Central and South America. Following an introduction to the increasing role of Indian women in international forums and indigenous organizations, the words of individual women describe the problems that affect them and their determination to…

  16. Women and the Environment in Developing Countries. Briefing Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yih, Katherine; Brower, Michael

    In much of the nonindustrialized world, women are the main providers of water, fuel, food, and other basic necessities, and thus often play the part of environmental managers. Because they are more directly connected to the environment, women are the most directly affected by environmental degradation, yet rarely have women been heard in…

  17. Association of Childhood Abuse with Homeless Women's Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Harold D., Jr.; Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Ryan, Gery W.; Zhou, Annie J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Childhood abuse has been linked to negative sequelae for women later in life including drug and alcohol use and violence as victim or perpetrator and may also affect the development of women's social networks. Childhood abuse is prevalent among at-risk populations of women (such as the homeless) and thus may have a stronger impact on…

  18. Women's Status, Autonomy, and Fertility in Transitional Egypt

    E-print Network

    Samari, Goleen

    2015-01-01

    primarily in Upper Egypt. The religion of the women is notReligion and Nationalism: A Contrapuntal Reading of the History of Female Activism and Political Change in Egypt."religion may also affect women’s status and autonomy in Egypt.

  19. Facing Women's Fear of Failure: An AWEsome Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dal Vera, Anne

    Drawing from research on fear of failure and anecdotes from personal experience with the first women's expedition to ski to the South Pole, this discussion centers on how fear of failure affects women. Fear of failure leads to procrastination and performance well below one's ability. Women generally express more fear of failure than do men, partly…

  20. Effect of an educational pamphlet on help-seeking attitudes for depression among British South Asian women.

    PubMed

    Bhugra, Dinesh; Hicks, Madelyn Hsiao-Rei

    2004-07-01

    South Asian women suffer disproportionately high rates of suicide and attempted suicide. Yet few intervention studies on this group have been done. A total of 180 British South Asian women were sampled to pilot test an educational pamphlet about depression and suicidality. After reading the pamphlet, significantly more women assessed themselves as willing to confide in their clinicians, friends, and spouses if they felt depressed or suicidal, rather than not telling anyone. Also, more women reported that they felt that antidepressants were helpful for depression after they read the pamphlet. These changes remained four to six weeks later. The pamphlet was feasible for use in primary care and community settings and highly acceptable among British South Asian women and professionals. PMID:15232026

  1. Women on Campus in the Eighties: Old Struggles, New Victories. University Women: A Series of Essays, Volume IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoboda, Marian J., Ed.; And Others

    This volume of essays focuses on the programs and people in the women's movement at the University of Wisconsin (UW) System who shaped, and were shaped by, the decade of the 1980s. The first part, "Programs," reflects the broadened concerns of the women's movement, with programs which affected women at all levels of society. The second part,…

  2. Reproductive Issues in Women with Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Folsom, Lisal J; Fuqua, John S

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities affecting female infants. The severity of clinical manifestations varies and it affects multiple organ systems. Women with Turner syndrome have a 3-fold increase in mortality, which becomes even more pronounced in pregnancy. Reproductive options include adoption or surrogacy, assisted reproductive techniques, and in rare cases spontaneous pregnancy. Risks for women with Turner syndrome during pregnancy include aortic disorders, hepatic disease, thyroid disease, type 2 diabetes, and cesarean section delivery. Providers must be familiar with the risks and recommendations in caring for women with Turner syndrome of reproductive age. PMID:26568488

  3. Affect Recognition in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Meghan; Hanford, Russell B.; Fassbender, Catherine; Duke, Marshall; Schweitzer, Julie B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study compared affect recognition abilities between adults with and without ADHD. Method: The sample consisted of 51 participants (34 men, 17 women) divided into 3 groups: ADHD-combined type (ADHD-C; n = 17), ADHD-predominantly inattentive type (ADHD-I; n = 16), and controls (n = 18). The mean age was 34 years. Affect recognition…

  4. WOMEN-S HEALTH USA 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Women's Health USA 2002, the first annual report on the health status of America's women is presented by the HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and the Office of Women's Health. This first edition of the Women's Health USA data book brings together key facts and figur...

  5. The bad taste of social ostracism: the effects of exclusion on the eating behaviors of African-American women.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Lenwood W; McIntyre, Rusty B; Abbey, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    African-American women experience disproportionately higher rates of obesity than do Caucasian women. The stress African-American women encounter from experiences of discrimination may influence their eating behaviours, which could contribute to weight gain. Emotional eating theory suggests some people increase their intake of high-calorie foods to cope with stressful experiences. We investigated the effects of social exclusion by other African-American women or by Caucasian women for African-American women's distress and food consumption using a laboratory paradigm. As hypothesised, there were main effects of ostracism and interactions between ostracism and race, although not all of the interactions took the expected form. As hypothesised, African-American women ate more potato crisps after being excluded by Caucasians than by African-Americans. Unexpectedly, African-American women who were excluded by other African-American women self-reported more emotional distress than did African-American women excluded by Caucasian women. These findings suggest that ostracism by both in-group and out-group members are disturbing, although people may respond to in-group and out-group exclusion in different ways. Directions for future research are suggested that could elucidate the circumstances under which different emotional and behavioural coping responses are employed. PMID:25403251

  6. Women and heart disease: missed opportunities.

    PubMed

    Banks, Angela D

    2008-01-01

    One woman dies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) every minute in the United States. CVD is the primary cause of mortality in US women, substantially affecting the lives of African American women compared to other ethnic groups. In a national survey conducted by the American Heart Association, 87% of women surveyed failed to cite heart disease as a major threat to their health. These misperceptions may lead women to underestimate their risk for CVD, resulting in a delay in seeking medical care, thus increasing their morbidity and mortality rates. Professional association guidelines and Internet resources for women and their health care providers are available to address the risk factors of smoking, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and physical inactivity. Unless women are informed and educated about these risk factors, they are unable to modify their lifestyles, be proactive in their health care, or reduce their cardiovascular risks. PMID:18761296

  7. Contemplating abortion: HIV-positive women’s decision to terminate pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rasanathan, Jennifer J. K.; Crawford-Roberts, Ann; Dourado, Ines; Gruskin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Research on pregnancy termination (PT) largely assumes HIV status is the only reason why HIV-positive women contemplate abortion. As antiretroviral treatment (ART) becomes increasingly available and women are living longer, healthier lives, the time has come to consider the influence of other factors on HIV-positive women’s reproductive decision-making. Because ART has been free and universally available to Brazilians for more than two decades, Brazil provides a unique context in which to explore these issues. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews exploring women’s PT decision-making were conducted with women receiving care at the Reference Centre for HIV/AIDS in Salvador, Brazil. Interviews were transcribed, translated into English, and coded for analysis. HIV played different roles in women’s decision-making. 13 HIV-positive women did not consider PT. Influential factors described by those who did consider PT included fear of HIV transmission, fear of HIV-related stigma, family size, economic constraints, partner and provider influence, as well as lack of access to such services as PT and abortifacients. For some HIV-positive women in Brazil, HIV can be the only reason to consider PT, but other factors are significant. A thorough understanding of all variables affecting reproductive decision-making is necessary for enhancing services and policies and better meeting the needs and rights of HIV-positive women. PMID:24387297

  8. Women’s well-being and reproductive health in Indian mining community: need for empowerment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a qualitative study of women’s well-being and reproductive health status among married women in mining communities in India. An exploratory qualitative research design was conducted using purposive sampling among 40 selected married women in a rural Indian mining community. Ethical permission was obtained from Goa University. A semi-structured indepth interview guide was used to gather women’s experiences and perceptions regarding well-being and reproductive health in 2010. These interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, verified, coded and then analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Early marriage, increased fertility, less birth intervals, son preference and lack of decision-making regarding reproductive health choices were found to affect women’s reproductive health. Domestic violence, gender preference, husbands drinking behaviors, and low spousal communication were common experiences considered by women as factors leading to poor quality of marital relationship. Four main themes in confronting women’s well-being are poor literacy and mobility, low employment and income generating opportunities, poor reproductive health choices and preferences and poor quality of martial relationships and communication. These determinants of physical, psychological and cultural well-being should be an essential part of nursing assessment in the primary care settings for informed actions. Nursing interventions should be directed towards participatory approach, informed decision making and empowering women towards better health and well-being in the mining community. PMID:23602071

  9. Thin or overweight women's fat talk: which is worse for other women's body satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Corning, Alexandra F; Bucchianeri, Michaela M; Pick, Cari M

    2014-01-01

    Fat talk is not merely correlated with, but appears to be one of the causes of body dissatisfaction in other women. Moderators of fat talk's deleterious effects, however, have not yet been identified. This experiment tested whether the body type of the fat-talker affects listeners' body satisfaction. Women viewed photos of either noticeably thin or overweight women making either fat talk or positive body statements. Fat talk by thin and overweight women both had a negative impact on women's body satisfaction, but dissatisfaction was highest after exposure to photos of thin women making fat talk statements. Statistically indistinguishable from this latter effect, however, was the negative effect of thin women making positive body statements. Results are considered within a social comparison framework. Theoretical implications for the thin-ideal and fat talk literatures are presented, as are clinical implications for work with clients. PMID:24320716

  10. Winning in NCAA Women?s Soccer: Does the Gender of the Coach Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brush, Brian C.; Naples, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    While women's intercollegiate soccer has grown rapidly over the past three decades, men still hold nearly two-thirds of all head coaching positions in NCAA Division I women's soccer programs. This paper explores whether the gender of the head coach affects success in winning games. After considering various reasons why gender might matter, we…

  11. Testosterone in women-the clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Davis, Susan R; Wahlin-Jacobsen, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone is an essential hormone for women, with physiological actions mediated directly or via aromatisation to oestradiol throughout the body. Despite the crucial role of testosterone and the high circulating concentrations of this hormone relative to oestradiol in women, studies of its action and the effects of testosterone deficiency and replacement in women are scarce. The primary indication for the prescription of testosterone for women is loss of sexual desire, which causes affected women substantial concern. That no formulation has been approved for this purpose has not impeded the widespread use of testosterone by women-either off-label or as compounded therapy. Observational studies indicate that testosterone has favourable cardiovascular effects measured by surrogate outcomes; however, associations between endogenous testosterone and the risk of cardiovascular disease and total mortality, particularly in older women, are yet to be established. Adverse cardiovascular effects have not been seen in studies of transdermal testosterone therapy in women. Clinical trials suggest that exogenous testosterone enhances cognitive performance and improves musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women. Unmet needs include the availability of approved testosterone formulations for women and studies to elucidate the contribution of testosterone to cardiovascular, cognitive, and musculoskeletal health and the risk of cancer. PMID:26358173

  12. Postpartum Depression Among Immigrant and Arabic Women: Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Alhasanat, Dalia; Fry-McComish, Judith

    2015-12-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major disabling mood disorder that affects women during childbearing years. The purpose of this literature review is to identify the prevalence and risk factors for PPD among immigrant women in industrialized countries and compare it with prevalence and risk factors for PPD among Arab women in their home countries. 26 studies, published between 1995 and 2013 have been included. In this review, prevalence of PPD among Arab women in their countries ranged 10-37 %, and the prevalence of PPD among immigrant women in industrialized countries ranged 11.2-60 %. Lack of social support, stressful life events, low income, and intimate partner violence were risk factors associated with development of PPD among both Arab women and immigrant women. Immigration stress and lack of access to health care services were found among immigrant women. Lack of social support was more predominant in studies on immigrant women. PMID:25644538

  13. Women's Centers: The Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Jodi

    1988-01-01

    Presents a typology of women's centers and provides an overview of state, regional, and national networks of women's centers, including the evolution of the Women's Center/Services Caucus of the National Women's Studies Association and the more recently organized National Association of Women's Centers. (NB)

  14. Graduating to a Pay Gap: The Earnings of Women and Men One Year after College Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Christianne; Hill, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Women are paid significantly less than men are in nearly every occupation. Because pay equity affects women and their families in all walks of life, it is not surprising that many women consider the issue important. For more than 130 years, the American Association of University Women (AAUW) has advocated for gender equity in education and the…

  15. Differences in Career and Life Planning between African American and Caucasian Undergraduate Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Caroline S.; Myers, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    Women, especially African American women, have traditionally been in low-paying careers. This exploratory study examined how career aspirations are affected by future career and family plans. Results revealed that African American undergraduate women had higher career aspirations than Caucasian undergraduate women and also planned for multiple…

  16. Conflict and the women of Chad.

    PubMed

    Sy, A D

    1993-06-01

    Chad was used as an example of how women and children were the most affected during national and international conflicts. The conditions of women before and during the conflict were described. Chad has been a country involved in a war provoked by psychological differences between the way of life, economic activity, and culture of Arab Muslims who are nomadic pastoralists, and Animist and Christian farmers. The important year was 1979, when the country was torn apart by civil war. Women before the conflict were part of a patriarchal society of men heading households and sole producers for the family. One decision maker controlled family matters: the man. Men also possessed all household goods. Women were biological and social producers, and value was placed on having large numbers of children. Muslim women lived in seclusion. Married women, who engaged in commercial activity, were mocked and exposed their husbands to the humiliation of not being able to provide sufficiently for the family. Between 1979 and 1982, many men were exiled to other countries nearby, which sometimes meant the abandonment of women and children. The remaining men were limited in their ability to earn money, and reverted to fishing, farming, and hunting. Gender relations changed. Survival strategies were developed, such as women working as domestics or selling products. Petty trading and agricultural and market gardening enterprises were flourishing. Women learned skills in dressmaking, embroidery, or knitting. Sometimes long distances were traveled in order to secure income. Women set up their own banking system with a system of "tontines" or savings cooperatives. The war's impact was to disrupt social and private life, which allowed women to enter the public domain and contribute to economic security. The downside of the conflict was the toll in human life and poverty for vast numbers of women and children. The physical, financial, and psychological exhaustion helped to create an awareness of women's essential role in the survival of their families and communities. PMID:12345211

  17. Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not supported by your browser. Home Osteoporosis Women Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women Publication available in: PDF (54 ... Fitness: Overtraining Risks Pregnancy, Nursing and Bone Health Osteoporosis and African American Women Osteoporosis and Asian American ...

  18. Women's Earnings: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, women's real earnings rose whereas those of men declined. Even as the gender pay gap narrowed, earnings differences between white women and black and Hispanic women continued to grow. (Author)

  19. Heart Health for Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Heart Health for Women Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... use the nutrition facts label . 2. Manage your health conditions. Common health problems like high blood pressure, ...

  20. Shanghai Women's Health Study

    Cancer.gov

    The Shanghai Women's Health Study, a collaborative study by NCI, Vanderbilt University, and the Shanghai Cancer Institute, is a prospective cohort study of approximately 75,000 women, which aims to evaluate the causes of cancer among Chinese women.

  1. Ethnoracial Variation in Women's Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    Clark, Hannah M; Galano, Maria M; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew C; Montalvo-Liendo, Nora; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A

    2016-02-01

    While intimate partner violence (IPV) has been acknowledged as a national public health concern, little research exists that directly assesses differential exposure to IPV for distinct ethnoracial groups. The current study compared the rate, severity, and type of IPV exposure across samples of White, African American, and Latina women (N = 180). Participants reported rates of exposure to violence on measures of physical assault, psychological aggression, injury, and sexual coercion; each subscale contained items denoting both mild and severe levels of violence. Multiple regression analyses indicated that women's frequency of exposure to sexual coercion, and severe and injurious violence significantly differed based on participants' ethnoracial identification, such that Latina women experienced disproportionate levels of violence relative to White and African American peers. Mothers' monthly income, level of education, general health, and relationship status also emerged as significant predictors of violence exposure. Results support the development of culturally sensitive adaptations of IPV interventions, targeting not only Latina populations but also women who are single, low-income, and educationally underserved. PMID:25392382

  2. Mode of birth and women’s psychological and physical wellbeing in the postnatal period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical and psychological problems after childbirth are common, and may have a significant negative and long-term impact on women’s wellbeing and daily functioning. The method of birth may be a particularly important factor influencing women’s health and wellbeing following birth, however, population-wide evidence is limited. This study uses data from 5,332 women who responded to a national survey of women’s experiences of maternity care in England. We examined women’s postnatal wellbeing in the first three months after birth, and whether these varied by mode of birth. Methods This is a secondary analysis of survey data using a random sample of women selected from birth registration. We used multinomial logistic regression models to examine the association between women’s self-reported psychological symptoms, health problems and mode of birth. Results Women who had forceps-assisted vaginal births and unplanned caesarean section births reported the poorest health and wellbeing, while those of women who had unassisted vaginal births and planned caesarean section births were less affected by the birth process. Most women’s physical and emotional health appeared to improve with time, however, those who had a forceps-assisted vaginal birth were more likely to report ongoing posttraumatic-type symptoms several months after the birth. Conclusions Mode of birth was associated with differences in outcomes at three months. By comparison to women who had unassisted vaginal births, the risk of reduced postnatal health and wellbeing was higher amongst the women who had forceps-assisted vaginal births but not amongst women who had ventouse-assisted vaginal births. This would suggest that it is important to differentiate the different types of instrumental birth in outcome studies. Of concern was the higher rate of posttraumatic-type symptoms among women who had forceps-assisted vaginal births relative to the other modes of birth. Women who have forceps-assisted births should be monitored carefully by health professionals in the postnatal period, and in the months after childbirth, when they could be offered the opportunity to discuss their labour and birth. PMID:23190575

  3. Factors contributing to poor physical health in incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Harner, Holly M; Riley, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    Prisons have become the primary health care provider for some of the poorest and sickest women in the United States. By virtue of both biological sex and gender, incarcerated women have health needs different from those of their male counterparts. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to understand better women's perceptions of how prison has affected their physical health. We conducted this investigation in a maximum-security women's prison in the United States using focus group methodology (12 focus groups, made up of 65 women). Women described several specific prison-based factors that affected their physical health: limited and complicated access to care; nutritional concerns; limited physical activity; and smoking in prison. We discuss these findings in relation to the gender-based health issues facing incarcerated women. PMID:23728045

  4. Evaluation of a socio-cultural intervention to reduce unprotected sex for HIV among African American/Black women.

    PubMed

    Boekeloo, B; Geiger, T; Wang, M; Ishman, N; Quinton, S; Allen, G; Ali, B; Snow, D

    2015-10-01

    African American/Black (Black) women suffer disproportionately to other women from HIV. An HIV prevention intervention combining two previous evidenced-based intervention programs; "Coping with Work and Family Stress" and "Hip Hop 2 Prevent Substance Abuse and HIV", was evaluated in a diverse sample of Black women (n = 205). Study participants at ten recruitment sites were assigned non-randomly to either the intervention or comparison group and then surveyed at baseline, immediate posttest, and 6-month follow-up. General Estimating Equation modeling revealed that participants in the comparison group reported less unprotected sex at immediate post-test and the intervention group less unprotected sex at 6-month follow-up. Despite the initial drop in reported unprotected sex in the comparison group, this study suggests that an HIV risk reduction intervention tailored to address Black women's socio-cultural stress and enhance their coping may reduce their unprotected sex at 6-months. PMID:25645327

  5. HIV Prevention and Research Considerations for Women in Sub-Saharan Africa: Moving toward Biobehavioral Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses current and emerging HIV prevention strategies for women in Sub-Saharan Africa, in light of recent trial results and ongoing research. What are the major opportunities and challenges for widespread implementation of new and emerging HIV prevention strategies? The paper discusses the major individual, social and structural factors that underpin women's disproportionate risk for HIV infection, with attention to gender, adolescents as a vulnerable population, and the need to engage men. Also, the influence of these factors on the ultimate success of both behavioral and biomedical HIV prevention technologies for women in sub-Saharan Africa is discussed. Finally, the paper examined how the new and emerging biobehavioral prevention strategies served as tools to empower women to adopt healthy HIV preventive and reproductive health behaviors. PMID:26050373

  6. The women's health movement in the United States.

    PubMed

    Norsigian, J

    1992-01-01

    The current women's health movement in the US had its origins in the late 1960s, when women's groups, health and medical providers, and others organized a country wide effort to legalize abortion. Some established women-controlled health centers, some produced women's health publications and other educational materials, and others carried out a number of women's health advocacy projects to change public policies affecting women's health. Sterilization abuse became the focus of government inquiry after activists publicized that certain women, especially women of color and Native American women, were sterilized without informed consent. During the 1970s, dozens of women-controlled health centers emerged as alternatives to the conventional delivery of health and medical care. Several years of hard work resulted in a landmark National Cancer Institute recommendation that breast biopsies be done as part of a 2-step procedure in most cases. Childbirth is another issue, Cesarean section rates averaging 1: 4 births nationwide remain unjustifiably high. Childbirth is a medicalized experience for most women, when it should be an essentially normal event. Abortion and reproductive rights are primary concerns in the women's health movement, although prochoice groups are well-organized. Some feminists argue that reproductive technologies expand women's choices, while other emphasize their potential for exploitation. The women's health movement has not yet changed the way most medical institutions are run. Thus, a new coalition with the disability rights movement, the various aging movements, and the civil rights movement will be crucial in the future. PMID:12285927

  7. Women for women's health: Uganda.

    PubMed

    Andrews, C M

    1996-01-01

    The primary health care model targets social, political, and economic environments as key determinants of health for populations, as well as for individuals. If nursing in Uganda is to make a difference in health care outcomes and in the health of all Ugandans, nurses must look broadly at situations and be educated to practice primary health care nursing. After 14 years of civil war, Uganda is finally experiencing a period of reconstruction and rehabilitation: the whole infrastructure is undergoing a face-lift. Ugandan nurses recognize that their educational preparation has stagnated for many years and that it was not only the political unrest in their country that put them behind professionally. They realize that, given the new directions set by the government, they must become prepared to implement primary health care. They are demanding a university education so they may take their place alongside other health care providers prepared at the university level. Some of the most convincing arguments for a university program for nurses came from doctors at the university who spoke about the need to raise the standards of nursing practice, the quality of teachers, and the morale of practitioners. One nurse said: "If we lose hope for a BScN program, I think all the nurses will quit and we won't have any new students going into the profession." This program is designed to improve the health and well-being of all Ugandans, especially the most vulnerable groups of women and children in rural areas, through strengthening and expanding health services by targeting the educational preparation of nurses. Health planners in Uganda envision the professional nurse as key to the implementation of the national health policy of primary health care. University-educated nurses should be able to assess problems, make clinically sound decisions, and act appropriately within the scope of nursing practice. They should be able to interact and consult collegially with other health care professionals. Placed in rural community sites, nurses should function independently as community leaders, health education facilitators, primary health care practitioners, and educators for nursing students. Such intervention in community health care by BScN nurses should improve health care utilization and decrease mortality and morbidity from preventable causes. BScN nurses should make an impact on health care policy, nursing education, and primary health care. The evaluation of this project needs to be as comprehensive as its development and implementation. It will focus on health outcomes, particularly for women and children in rural areas of Uganda. Measurement of the effects of the process of nursing education (the BScN curriculum) in terms of output (nurses educated and placed in rural practice, nursing education, or government policy posts), outcomes (change in health status of rural communities), and broader impacts (changes in the status of women and in government policy toward women, nurses, or health at the local, regional, and national levels) is planned. An element of sustainability is present, as an operations research structure will be left in place at the community level. Timing, as the saying goes, is everything, and this project has had good timing. Our belief in the efforts and the goals of the project also gave us the strength to get support from various funding agencies for "small" things. For example, we got support from churches in the United States for building schools in Uganda; we persisted with the women's income-generating project when other support was pulled; we got books for the library in Uganda and got clothes, books, and furnishings for the students who came to this country. The motivation for project personnel has been altruism. The services that the two consultants provided to their Ugandan colleagues have extended far beyond the scope of the project. PMID:8794456

  8. Women Reaching Women. Volunteer Coordinator's Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pola, Yvonne; Ihlenfeld, Gayle

    Based on the experiences of the Women Reaching Women chapters in Wisconsin, this manual provides information on beginning and implementing a volunteer program to train women to help female drug and alcohol abusers. The materials are designed for volunteer coordinators who may be paid or unpaid persons. The manual, containing four sections, is…

  9. Adenomyosis and its impact on women fertility

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Elisabetta; Audrey, Serafini; Annalisa, Inversetti; Stefano, Ferrari; Iacopo, Tandoi; Laura, Corti; Massimo, Candiani

    2015-01-01

    Adenomyosis is a widespread disease affecting the reproductive period of women’s life. In the last ten years, different pathogenetic hypotheses have been proposed to explain the initiation and development of the disease. This article aims to present and discuss the most important pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying adenomyosis development in order to clarify the relationship between adenomyosis and infertility. A PubMed search was undertaken for English language literature using the MeSH terms ‘adenomyosis’, ‘infertility’, ‘treatment’, and ‘pathogenesis’. Although the exact etiology of adenomyosis is unknown, many theories have been proposed. We analysed the most important pathogenic theories expressed and evaluated the potential consequences on women fertility. A better comprehension of the adenomyosis pathogenesis has allowed realizing that adenomyosis may affect young women and may have a great impact on their fertility through different mechanisms. The understanding of these mechanisms helps to clarify the potential usefulness of current therapies. PMID:26330846

  10. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing counseling services to women in infertility treatment centers is suggested to prevent domestic violence against infertile women. PMID:25695010

  11. Issue Paper on Physiological and Behavioral Changes in Pregnant and Lactating Women and Available Exposure Factors

    EPA Science Inventory

    This issue paper provides a summary of information from the published literature related to behavioral and physiological changes during pregnancy and lactation that may affect women’s exposure or susceptibility to environmental contaminants, provides potentially useful exposur...

  12. The Effect of Earnings Discrimination Against Women on the Economic Position of Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Albert

    1977-01-01

    The results of an examination of the 1970 census show that discrimination against women does not affect the median annual income of males, but that the greater the discrimination against women, the more equal the male earnings distribution. (Author)

  13. Live happily live in hiding (from our affect): Alexithymia Influences affect intensity and affect frequency ratings in men.

    PubMed

    Fantini-Hauwel, Carole; Luminet, Olivier; Vermeulen, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Alexithymia has been frequently studied in the context of negative affect frequency but rarely in the context of positive affect frequency or in the context of affect intensity. However, affect intensity and frequency, even if they are independent, are generally confounded due to an overlap in items wording (tapping both dimensions). The aim of the study was to examine the incremental validity of alexithymia for predicting both affect intensity and frequency, regarding positive and negative valence. Two hundred and fifty five students fulfilled measurements for alexithymia, affect intensity and affect frequency. Results showed that the factor "Difficulty identifying feelings" is related to higher positive and negative affect intensity, as well as to negative affect frequency. Men were also more sensitive to positive affect intensity and frequency if they scored higher on alexithymia. They experienced less often positive affect, but the intensity of their affect was more intense. Conversely, alexithymia did not influence women's affect intensity or affect frequency. Thus, alexithymia factors are associated with specific patterns of affect intensity and frequency, highlighting an overall deficit in the processing of emotions with contrasting patterns regarding gender. PMID:26506016

  14. The Great, Late Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Discrimination Survey.

    PubMed

    Rankine, J

    2001-01-01

    SUMMARY This 1992 New Zealand survey of discrimination against 261 lesbian and bisexual women found comparable rates of public abuse and workplace discrimination to those reported by surveys in other developed countries. The women reported higher rates of assault in public places than a random sample of New Zealand women. Indigenous Maori women reported higher rates of assault, threats, verbal abuse, and workplace discrimination than the non-Maori women surveyed. Aggression against the women was often in response to public expression of affection for another woman or to rejection of men's public sexual advances. The respondents reported hostile educational environments that coincided with peer harassment of students attracted to their own gender. Around two-thirds of the women had hidden their sexuality on some occasions at work to avoid discrimination. No significant differences between the discrimination experiences of lesbian and bisexual women emerged, although the bisexual sample was too small for statistical analysis. PMID:24807571

  15. Discrimination and pension income among aging women.

    PubMed

    Caputo, R K

    1998-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience, Mature Women's Cohort, this study examined the extent to which discrimination influenced pension receipt and levels of pension income among women aged 55-69 in 1992. It found that discrimination affected the level of pension income beyond that of demographic and human capital variables, when controlling for wage-related income, only among moderate-to-affluent near-elderly women. No relation was found between discrimination and receipt of pension income. PMID:10344936

  16. Women and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Laura

    Increases in the divorce rate, decreases in women's childbearing, and increases in women's participation in the labor force represent three major trends that have had a great impact on women and on the family as a setting in which to work, raise children, and control resources. Although women's employment is clearly related in part to their…

  17. Women as Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Nancy S.

    As increasing numbers of women make the transition from the household sector into the labor market, dramatic changes in household composition have occurred that have thrust many women into the role of provider. This new role for women has led to dramatic and rapid changes in attitudes, as well as in the institutions and laws relating to women's…

  18. NYU Women's Health Study

    Cancer.gov

    For more than 25 years, the NYU Women’s Health Study has been committed to studying the potential causes of serious diseases in women in the United States. When the study began in 1985, its goal was to identify the role of hormones and diet in the development of the most common cancers in women, especially breast cancer.

  19. Association of Genetic Ancestry with Breast Cancer in Ethnically Diverse Women from Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alem, Umaima; Rauscher, Garth; Shah, Ebony; Batai, Ken; Mahmoud, Abeer; Beisner, Erin; Silva, Abigail; Peterson, Caryn; Kittles, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-Hispanic (nH) Black and Hispanic women are disproportionately affected by early onset disease, later stage, and with more aggressive, higher grade and ER/PR negative breast cancers. The purpose of this analysis was to examine whether genetic ancestry could account for these variation in breast cancer characteristics, once data were stratified by self-reported race/ethnicity and adjusted for potential confounding by social and behavioral factors. Methods We used a panel of 100 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate individual genetic ancestry in 656 women from the “Breast Cancer Care in Chicago” study, a multi-ethnic cohort of breast cancer patients to examine the association between individual genetic ancestry and breast cancer characteristics. In addition we examined the association of individual AIMs and breast cancer to identify genes/regions that may potentially play a role in breast cancer disease disparities. Results As expected, nH Black and Hispanic patients were more likely than nH White patients to be diagnosed at later stages, with higher grade, and with ER/PR negative tumors. Higher European genetic ancestry was protective against later stage at diagnosis (OR 0.7 95%CI: 0.54–0.92) among Hispanic patients, and higher grade (OR 0.73, 95%CI: 0.56–0.95) among nH Black patients. After adjustment for multiple social and behavioral risk factors, the association with later stage remained, while the association with grade was not significant. We also found that the AIM SNP rs10954631 on chromosome 7 was associated with later stage (p?=?0.02) and higher grade (p?=?0.012) in nH Whites and later stage (p?=?0.03) in nH Blacks. Conclusion Non-European genetic ancestry was associated with later stage at diagnosis in ethnic minorities. The relation between genetic ancestry and stage at diagnosis may be due to genetic factors and/or unmeasured environmental factors that are overrepresented within certain racial/ethnic groups. PMID:25423363

  20. A Disproportionate Burden of Care: Gender Differences in Mental Health, Health-Related Quality of Life, and Social Support in Mexican Multiple Sclerosis Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Paul B; Panyavin, Ivan; Morlett Paredes, Alejandra; Aguayo, Adriana; Macias, Miguel Angel; Rabago, Brenda; Picot, Sandra J Fulton; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) rates in Latin America are increasing, and caregivers there experience reduced mental and physical health. Based on rigid gender roles in Latin America, women more often assume caregiving duties, yet the differential impact on women of these duties is unknown. Methods. This study examined gender differences in mental health (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Zarit Burden Inventory), health-related quality of life (HRQOL; Short Form-36), and social support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12) in 81 (66.7% women) Mexican MS caregivers. Results. As compared to men caregivers, women had lower mental health (p = 0.006), HRQOL (p < 0.001), and social support (p < 0.001). This was partially explained by women caregivers providing care for nearly twice as many hours/week as men (79.28 versus 48.48, p = 0.018) and for nearly three times as many months (66.31 versus 24.30, p = 0.002). Conclusions. Because gender roles in Latin America influence women to assume more substantial caregiving duties, MS caregiver interventions in Latin America-particularly for women caregivers-should address the influence of gender-role conformity on care and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26538818

  1. A Disproportionate Burden of Care: Gender Differences in Mental Health, Health-Related Quality of Life, and Social Support in Mexican Multiple Sclerosis Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Paul B.; Panyavin, Ivan; Morlett Paredes, Alejandra; Aguayo, Adriana; Macias, Miguel Angel; Rabago, Brenda; Picot, Sandra J. Fulton; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) rates in Latin America are increasing, and caregivers there experience reduced mental and physical health. Based on rigid gender roles in Latin America, women more often assume caregiving duties, yet the differential impact on women of these duties is unknown. Methods. This study examined gender differences in mental health (Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Zarit Burden Inventory), health-related quality of life (HRQOL; Short Form-36), and social support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12) in 81 (66.7% women) Mexican MS caregivers. Results. As compared to men caregivers, women had lower mental health (p = 0.006), HRQOL (p < 0.001), and social support (p < 0.001). This was partially explained by women caregivers providing care for nearly twice as many hours/week as men (79.28 versus 48.48, p = 0.018) and for nearly three times as many months (66.31 versus 24.30, p = 0.002). Conclusions. Because gender roles in Latin America influence women to assume more substantial caregiving duties, MS caregiver interventions in Latin America—particularly for women caregivers—should address the influence of gender-role conformity on care and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26538818

  2. Depression, women, and the workplace.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, J P

    1993-01-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent disorder that causes much personal distress and difficulties in functioning at home and in the workplace. In the workplace, as elsewhere, depression can manifest as a variation in normal mood, as a symptom, as a disorder, or as a disease. Occupational health professionals are more concerned with clinical depression, a term used to signify any type of depression that causes significant personal distress and/or problems in functioning. Clinical depression is manifest in the workplace and adversely affects the employee's work satisfaction and performance. For most types of depression, women are at a higher risk than men. A number of events and variables related to women and depression were reviewed. Although the effects of some of these events, such as menopause, can be manifest in the workplace, they are not associated with an increased incidence of clinical depression. Other events, such as victimization (e.g., childhood sexual abuse or battering by an intimate partner), are associated with higher risks of depression in women. Women derive substantial satisfaction from interpersonal relationships but also are at greater risk for depression when strains and conflicts in these relationships occur. In the workplace women who have no difficulty in arranging for child care and whose spouses share in the care of children show lower rates of depression. When marriages are unhappy, women are three times as likely as men to be depressed. These findings speak to the importance of relationships to women. In the workplace, when women are depressed, problems with relationships are likely to be involved. Clinically depressed women are not difficult to identify in work settings. Dejected mood and loss of interest in usual activities are noticeable, along with numerous other symptoms that accompany depression. The effective treatment of depression depends on careful diagnosis and assessment. Both drug therapy and the more structured psychotherapies, such as cognitive-behavioral and interpersonal therapy, have demonstrated effectiveness in treating depression. For mild depression, pharmacotherapy is likely to be the treatment of choice. In cases in which the depressive symptomatology is moderate to severe, a combination of drug therapy and psychotherapy is likely to be the most effective treatment and to provide the best prophylaxis. Drug therapy seems particularly effective in promoting rapid reduction of vegetative and physical symptoms. Psychotherapy enhances coping skills at home and at work and also focuses on problem-solving, relationship difficulties, and dealing with stressors. In the area of prevention, occupational health practitioners currently can have the greatest impact in secondary prevention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8303491

  3. Maternal Stress and Affect Influence Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Hawkins, Melissa; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Pressman, Eva K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated associations between maternal psychological and fetal neurobehavioral functioning with data provided at 24, 30, and 36 weeks gestation. Found that fetuses of women who were more affectively intense, appraised their lives as more stressful, and reported more pregnancy-specific hassles were more active across gestation. Fetuses of women

  4. Parity, Lactation, and Breast Cancer Subtypes in African American Women: Results from the AMBER Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Viscidi, Emma; Troester, Melissa A.; Hong, Chi-Chen; Schedin, Pepper; Bethea, Traci N.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Borges, Virginia; McKinnon, Craig; Haiman, Christopher A.; Lunetta, Kathryn; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Rosenberg, Lynn; Olshan, Andrew F.; Ambrosone, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Background African American (AA) women have a disproportionately high incidence of estrogen receptor–negative (ER-) breast cancer, a subtype with a largely unexplained etiology. Because childbearing patterns also differ by race/ethnicity, with higher parity and a lower prevalence of lactation in AA women, we investigated the relation of parity and lactation to risk of specific breast cancer subtypes. Methods Questionnaire data from two cohort and two case-control studies of breast cancer in AA women were combined and harmonized. Case patients were classified as ER+ (n = 2446), ER- (n = 1252), or triple negative (ER-, PR-, HER2-; n = 567) based on pathology data; there were 14180 control patients. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated in polytomous logistic regression analysis with adjustment for study, age, reproductive and other risk factors. Results ORs for parity relative to nulliparity was 0.92 (95% CI = 0.81 to 1.03) for ER+, 1.33 (95% CI = 1.11 to 1.59) for ER-, and 1.37 (95% CI = 1.06 to 1.70) for triple-negative breast cancer. Lactation was associated with a reduced risk of ER- (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.69 to 0.95) but not ER+ cancer. ER- cancer risk increased with each additional birth in women who had not breastfed, with an OR of 1.68 (95% CI = 1.15 to 2.44) for 4 or more births relative to one birth with lactation. Conclusions The findings suggest that parous women who have not breastfed are at increased risk of ER- and triple-negative breast cancer. Promotion of lactation may be an effective tool for reducing occurrence of the subtypes that contribute disproportionately to breast cancer mortality. PMID:25224496

  5. Sleep Patterns May Affect a Woman's Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 155523.html Sleep Patterns May Affect a Woman's Diabetes Risk Study says adding 2 or more hours ... may face an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. The study found that women ...

  6. Weight Gain Between Pregnancies May Affect Infant Survival

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 156039.html Weight Gain Between Pregnancies May Affect Infant Survival Researchers focused on women who previously had ... a first pregnancy might raise the risk of infant death and stillbirth in a second pregnancy, a ...

  7. Addressing gender inequalities to improve the sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing of women living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Avni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Globally, women constitute 50% of all persons living with HIV. Gender inequalities are a key driver of women's vulnerabilities to HIV. This paper looks at how these structural factors shape specific behaviours and outcomes related to the sexual and reproductive health of women living with HIV. Discussion There are several pathways by which gender inequalities shape the sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing of women living with HIV. First, gender norms that privilege men's control over women and violence against women inhibit women's ability to practice safer sex, make reproductive decisions based on their own fertility preferences and disclose their HIV status. Second, women's lack of property and inheritance rights and limited access to formal employment makes them disproportionately vulnerable to food insecurity and its consequences. This includes compromising their adherence to antiretroviral therapy and increasing their vulnerability to transactional sex. Third, with respect to stigma and discrimination, women are more likely to be blamed for bringing HIV into the family, as they are often tested before men. In several settings, healthcare providers violate the reproductive rights of women living with HIV in relation to family planning and in denying them care. Lastly, a number of countries have laws that criminalize HIV transmission, which specifically impact women living with HIV who may be reluctant to disclose because of fears of violence and other negative consequences. Conclusions Addressing gender inequalities is central to improving the sexual and reproductive health outcomes and more broadly the wellbeing of women living with HIV. Programmes that go beyond a narrow biomedical/clinical approach and address the social and structural context of women's lives can also maximize the benefits of HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. PMID:26643464

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  9. Ultrasound Contrast Agents Affect the Angiogenic Response

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    , DVM, William D. O'Brien Jr, PhD ardiovascular diseases affect one-quarter of men and women between. For that reason, ultrasound (US) has been explored as a new strategy formyocardialandlimbischemiaoverthepastdecade by National Institutes of Health grant R37 EB002641 and National Institutes of Health fellowship F31 HL097653

  10. A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial to Increase Breast Cancer Screening Among African American Women: The Black Cosmetologists Promoting Health Program

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Georgia Robins; Ko, Celine M.; Wu, Phillis; Alisangco, Jennifer; Castañeda, Sheila F.; Kelly, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Background African American women have disproportionately higher rates of breast cancer (BC) mortality than all other ethnic groups, thus highlighting the importance of promoting early detection. Methods African American women (N = 984) from San Diego, California participated in a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of BC education sessions offered in beauty salons. Cosmetologists received ongoing support, training, and additional culturally aligned educational materials to help them engage their clients in dialogues about the importance of BC early detection. Posters and literature about BC early detection were displayed throughout the salons and cosmetologists used synthetic breast models to show their clients how BC lumps might feel. Participants in the control group received a comparable diabetes education program. Baseline and six month follow-up surveys were administered to evaluate changes in women’s BC knowledge, attitudes and screening behaviors. Results This intervention was well received by the participants and their cosmetologists and did not interfere with, or prolong, the client’s salon visit. Women in the intervention group reported significantly higher rates of mammography compared to women in the control group. Training a single educator proved sufficient to permeate the entire salon with the health message and salon clients agreed that cosmetologists could become effective health educators. Conclusions Cosmetologists are in an ideal position to increase African American women’s BC knowledge and adherence to BC screening guidelines. PMID:22046851

  11. African American Women’s Views of Factors Impacting Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Giurgescu, Carmen; Banks, Amelia; Dancy, Barbara L.; Norr, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore pregnant African American women’s views of factors that may impact preterm birth. Study Design and Methods Qualitative descriptive exploratory cross-sectional design. A convenience sample of 22 low-risk pregnant African American women participated in focus group interviews. Women were asked questions regarding their belief about why women have preterm birth and factors impacting preterm birth. Data were analyzed using content analysis. Results Pregnant African American women encounter multiple physical, psychological, and social stressors. The four themes included knowledge of preterm birth, risk factors for preterm birth, protective factors for preterm birth, and preterm birth inevitability. The risk factors for preterm birth were health-related conditions, stressors, and unhealthy behaviors. Stressors included lack of social and financial support, interpersonal conflicts, judging, dangerous neighborhoods, racism, and pregnancy and mothering related worries. Protective factors for preterm birth included social support and positive coping/self-care. Clinical Implications Clinicians may use the results of this study to better understand women’s perceptions of factors that affect preterm birth, to educate women about risk factors for preterm birth, and to develop programs and advocate for policies that have the potential to decrease health disparities in preterm birth. PMID:23812061

  12. Working women and the menopause.

    PubMed

    Kopenhager, T; Guidozzi, F

    2015-06-01

    Women are living longer, working more and retiring later. About 45% of the over 50-year-old workforce in virtually all forms of employment are women, all of whom will experience the menopause and its symptoms, which in some women will be mild to moderate, whilst in others they may be severe and debilitating. About half of these women will find it somewhat, or fairly difficult, to cope with their work, about half will not be affected and only about 5% will be severely compromised. Poor concentration, tiredness, poor memory, depression, feeling low, lowered confidence, sleepiness and particularly hot flushes are all cited as contributing factors. As with any longstanding health-related condition, the need for support and understanding from line management is crucial and can make a major difference to how a woman will deal with the adverse impact the menopausal symptoms may have on her productivity, her job satisfaction and her efficiency. A number of plausible strategies have been proposed that can be realistically implemented in the workplace and which could certainly make a significant difference. Careful thought, planning, consideration and effort may be required but, if instituted, they will, in the final analysis, benefit both employer and employee. PMID:25830628

  13. Osteoporosis and jawbones in women.

    PubMed

    Gulsahi, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem affecting one in three women over the age of 50 and may not be detected until fractures occur. Since osteoporotic fractures are a health burden worldwide, identifying subjects with a high risk of osteoporosis and preventing osteoporosis-related mortality and morbidity are a very important health strategy. Women show an estrogen-related bone loss starting at menopause, predominantly occurring in trabecular bone. Diagnosis of osteoporosis is usually based on the bone mineral density measurement, but this is not a practical and economical technique for early detection. Therefore, investigators are interested in the possibility of detecting osteoporosis from the panoramic radiographs. Mandibular cortical bone undergoes resorptive activity in osteoporotic patients, leading to a decreased thickness and more porous inferior border. Therefore, studies have demonstrated the usefulness of cortical width and shape, determined from panoramic radiographs, in identifying elderly individuals with undetected osteoporosis, especially postmenopausal women. In conclusion, postmenopausal women with C3 category, Mental Index (MI) <3 mm, and panoramic mandibular index (PMI) <0.3 may be considered for further osteoporosis investigation. PMID:26312225

  14. Alcoholism in older women religious.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Josie; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2009-01-01

    The specific risk factors for addiction within religious community members remain poorly understood and undefined. This paper presents data on the characteristics of chemically dependent women Religious (nuns) in order to understand the etiology and treatment needs of this special group. This study contrasts a group of Roman Catholic women Religious who are in treatment for chemical dependency with a volunteer, nonalcoholic, comparison group from similar religious communities. The treatment group had higher levels of mental health symptoms and past history of childhood trauma (parental separation or divorce, early loss of mother), compared to the volunteer sample. Family history of alcoholism did not differ, however, and prevalence of sexual abuse was more common for the volunteers than for those in treatment. Women Religious in this study resemble the classification of "negative affect" alcoholism (Cloninger Type I, Babor Type A), which is characterized by lower severity, prevalence of environmental over genetic risk factors, and less severe legal or social consequences. Implications for health screening and treatment of women Religious are addressed. PMID:19347750

  15. Community structure affects behavior.

    PubMed

    Jaenson, C

    1991-06-01

    AID's prevention efforts can benefit from taking into account 5 main aspects (KEPRA) of community structure identified by anthropologists: 1) kinship patterns, 2) economics, 3) politics, 4) religion, and 5) associations. For example, in Uganda among the Basoga and paternal aunt or senga is responsible for female sex education. Such culturally determined patterns need to be targeted in order to enhance education and effectiveness. Economics can reflect differing systems of family support through sexual means. The example given involves a poor family with a teenager in Thailand who exchanges a water buffalo or basic necessity for this daughter's prostitution. Politics must be considered because every society identifies people who have the power to persuade, influence, exchange resources, coerce, or in some way get people to do what is wanted. Utilizing these resources whether its ministers of health, factory owners, or peers is exemplified in the Monterey, Mexico factor floor supervisor and canteen worker introducing to workers the hows and whys of a new AID's education program. His peer status will command more respect than the director with direct authority. Religious beliefs have explanations for causes of sickness or disease, or provide instruction in sex practices. The example given is of a health workers in Uganda discussing AIDS with rural women by saying that we all know that disease and deaths are caused by spells. "But not AIDS - slim. AIDS is different." Associations can help provide educational, economic, and emotional assistance to the AID's effort or families affected. PMID:12316890

  16. Health screening - women - ages 40 - 64

    MedlinePLUS

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 40 - 64; Physical exam - women - ages 40 - 64; Yearly exam - women - ages 40 - 64; Checkup - women - ages 40 - 64; Women’s health - ages 40 - 64; Preventive care - women - ages 40 - ...

  17. Hormones and cardiovascular health in women.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) may have their origin before birth: the combination of being small at birth and having an overly rich post-natal diet increases the likelihood of obesity and of acquiring a specific metabolic syndrome in adulthood that carries an increased risk of CVD. The incidence of CVD and mortality is very low in women of reproductive age but rises to a significant level in older women. In this article, we discuss CVD in relation to hormonal contraception, pregnancy and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) in younger women and menopause in older women. Women with PCOS have a higher risk of diabetes and hypertension, but studies to date have not shown an effect on CVD events. Use of combined hormonal contraception has only small effects on CVD because of the low baseline incidence of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) among young women. Women with existing risk factors or existing CVD, however, should consider alternative contraception. In pregnancy, CVD is rare, although, in the West, it now accounts for a significant proportion of maternal mortality as the frequency of obstetrical causes of mortality has substantially declined. The frequency of VTE is 15 per 10,000 during pregnancy and the post-partum period. In older women, menopause causes a slightly higher risk of MI after allowing for age, although there is substantial heterogeneity in the results of studies on menopause and age at menopause and MI. A larger effect might have been expected, because estrogen reduces the risk of developing atherosclerosis in premenopausal women, whereas in post-menopausal women who may have established atherosclerotic disease, estrogen increases the risk of myocardial disease through the effects on plaque stability and clot formation. Recent trial results indicate that hormone treatment in menopause does not favourably affect the risk of MI, stroke or other vascular disease. Thus, prevention of CVD should rely on diet and fitness, low-dose aspirin and treatment of hypertension, hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. PMID:16807276

  18. Choice? Factors That Influence Women’s Decision Making for Childbirth

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Mary; McElroy, Katie G.; Moore, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a mixed-methods study on factors that influence women’s decisions about birth, with the view that women’s decision making about birth can affect the use of cesarean surgery. Data was collected from focus groups and structured postpartum interviews and was analyzed using the Consensual Qualitative Research method. The findings relate specifically to the factors reported as influential in making decisions about birth including how the women categorized, prioritized, and/or favored certain types of knowledge about modes of birth. Four major information categories were identified but only stories about birth and/or attending a birth appeared to have a lasting effect on birth choices. These findings have implications for prenatal and perinatal education and nursing practice. PMID:24868129

  19. Women in Calculus: The Effects of a Supportive Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Diana F.; Levin, Amy K.; Blecksmith, Richard; Shahverdian, Jill

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a multi-faceted women's calculus course designed to retain women in advanced mathematics courses. With this research, we wanted to find out, first, in what ways students were influenced by participation in the course and, second, in what ways these influences affected their mathematics learning or…

  20. A Unique Population: Women Who Are Homeless and Mentally Ill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markos, Patricia A.; Baron, Heather Lyn; Allen, Daniel N.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a unique population within the homeless community--women who are homeless and mentally ill. Homelessness prevalence and etiology data are presented, followed by a general discussion of how mental illness affects people who are homeless. The article provides an overview of women who are homeless, focusing on those who are…

  1. Losing out on Both Counts: Disabled Women and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiara, Ravi K.; Hague, Gill; Mullender, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    The links between disability and domestic violence have been under-examined to date, leading to the marginalisation of disabled women affected by domestic violence in theory, politics, and practice. This paper draws on the findings from the first national study in the United Kingdom of the needs of disabled women experiencing domestic violence and…

  2. Grief in Separated, Divorced, and Widowed Women: Similarities and Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petiet, Carole Anne

    To systematically test previous assumptions about grief in widows and divorcing women, 410 separated, divorced, or widowed women, between the ages of 23 and 76, with at least one child, completed the Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist, the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory--Form C, the Attachment Index, and the…

  3. Portraits of Outstanding African American Women. Grades 4-8+.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Doris Hunter

    This resource book provides information and activity sheets on the achievements and contributions of exceptional African American women, past and present. The book contains six sections, thematically organized around the central issue(s) affecting the lives of the women featured. Introductory questions, biographical portraits and skill-building…

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Women's Sexual Responses to Heterosexual and Lesbian Erotica

    E-print Network

    a ``category-specific'' genital response to erotic stimuli. That is, on average, heterosexual and lesbian women that category-specificity was associated with multiple factors, including affective re- sponses to the erotic,menwhoself-identifyasheterosexualdemonstrate greater genital response to erotic stimuli depicting women than to erotic stimuli depicting men, and men

  5. Women's Health Among the Chumash

    PubMed Central

    Adams, James D.; Garcia, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Plants were, and still are, widely used for a number of conditions affecting women in California. This article discusses traditional remedies of the Chumash for dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, feminine hygiene, heavy menstruation, urinary tract infections, parturition, lactation, infant care, menopause, sexually transmitted diseases, fertility, contraception and abortions. Many plants are presented including Artemisia douglasiana, Paeonia californica, Trichostema lanatum, Salvia apiana, Ephedra viridis, Leymus condensatus, Vitis californica, Eschscholzia californica, Rosa californica, Scirpus acutus, Anemopsis californica and Phoradendron macrophyllum. By providing the specific uses of plants for specific diseases and discussing chemistry, efficacy and safety concerns for each plant, we hope that this article gives direction to women seeking to use plants in their health care. PMID:16550233

  6. The unlocked home: new women, new novels, new spaces 

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Erin Elise

    2013-02-22

    The Victorian ideology of separate spheres made an evident separation according to gender. The principle not only affected the interaction between men and women but also the spaces that they occupied. While men had access to universities and a...

  7. Islam and Women’s Rights

    E-print Network

    Anwar, Zainah

    2007-01-01

    treatment that mobilized us Muslim women. Sisters in Islamus to stand up and argue for justice and equality for MuslimMuslim scholars, women and men, many of whom have been incredibly generous with their time and scholarship in helping us

  8. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Pregnant women in malaria-endemic countries are at increased risk for adverse effects of malaria infection (for example, miscarriage, low birth weight). Women ...

  9. Women and health technologies 

    E-print Network

    Backett-Milburn, Kathryn

    As women approach midlife they become potential candidates for a range of health technologies. The study examined areas such as women's own assessments of the risks and benefits involved; the medical and informal knowledge ...

  10. Women and HIV

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Many women think AIDS is a disease of gay men. But women get HIV from heterosexual sex ... Sheets 111. Optimizing the HIV Care Environment 115. Adolescents and the HIV Care Continuum 114. Increasing retention ...

  11. Breast Pain in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Breast Pain in Women Overview Breast pain is a common problem in women who are having periods (menstrual ... to talk to your doctor about it. Diagnosis & Tests How can my doctor find the cause of ...

  12. Panic Disorder and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... top Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to us | USA.gov | Viewers and players A federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for ...

  13. Infertility and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The ovary must release an egg each month (ovulation). The egg must then be picked up by ... of women with infertility have infrequent or absent ovulation. These women usually have irregular periods or no ...

  14. Substance Use in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Women Email Facebook Twitter Revised September 2015 Sex and Gender Differences in Substance Use Women may ... care provider about all of their substance use. Sex and Gender Differences in Drug Treatment It is ...

  15. Migrant women in Australia.

    PubMed

    Misztal, B A

    1991-01-01

    The author compares the status of non-English speaking (NES) migrant women with that of their native-born counterparts in Australia. She concludes that "Australian born women and migrant women have certain experiences in common; low economic position, being the target of discriminatory practices in education and in work, and their overall marginality in the power structure. In addition their jobs have much in common: for all women are disadvantaged compared with men in terms of earnings, occupational status, and job mobility. However,...NES migrant women tend to be employed in much lower-level, lower-status, and lower-paying occupations than Australian born women.... They face circumstances unique to their ethnic groups which they share with the men of their ethnic groups. Migrant women, even more than indigenous working class women see the family as a site of solidarity and supportive alliance against a hostile or new environment...." PMID:12317297

  16. Gum Disease and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... feel tender. Menstruation Occasionally, some women experience menstruation gingivitis. Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, ... sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman's period and ...

  17. Increasing Nontraditional Career Choices in Women: Relation of Attitudes toward Women and Response to a Career Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foss, Carol J.; Slaney, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    Examined whether college women, grouped according to scores on the Attitudes Toward Women Scale (AWS) were differentially affected by a videotape career intervention. Results indicated AWS scores were related to the traditionality of the careers chosen for the subjects' hypothetical daughters and to self-efficacy. Careers chosen were more…

  18. Women: medicine, their kidneys, and nephrology.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2013-09-01

    As an act of compassion, the art of caring for the sick has always depended on women. As a practical tradition of healing skills, the "wise" and "old" women of antiquity were the original founders of what would ultimately become medicine. Throughout the subsequent millennia that it took for the gradual transformation of the healing skills from a craft to a profession, women continued to contribute to its progress and development. Unfortunately, recorded history has marginalized much of their fundamental contributions because most extant and investigated medical texts of the past were authored by men. As medicine began to embrace the basic sciences and became a university-based and regulated profession, rules excluding women from entry into the profession were made stricter and more rigorously enforced. It is only in the latter half of the 19th century that, in the footsteps of the growing feminine movement, women were admitted to medical schools, and in the 20th century that they began to contribute in earnest to the science of medicine. This article recounts this progress and highlights how it affected our knowledge of kidney disease in women and the enlarging role of women in the relatively new discipline of nephrology. PMID:23978542

  19. Gains by women reversed in economic downturn.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    The impact of globalization on women was discussed by the Women in Development Section of the Social Development Division of the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP). Feminization of work in much of the Asian region occurred in the context of overall economic growth in the 1980s and the first half of the 1990s. However, the recent economic crisis has led to a downturn in the positive aspects of this change in women's position, although gender gaps will be reduced through the worsening conditions of male workers. The current deflationary adjustment policies of reducing government expenditures will adversely affect women in the workplace and the household. Since women have been forced to earn additional income outside the home, the girl-children are expected to perform household and child care duties that would otherwise be performed by their mothers. Incidence of child labor and dropout rates among girls has increased. Many social and cultural norms also allow cuts in the food supply for women and girl-children when household per-capita access to food declines. These circumstances invite domestic violence against women. Hence, institutions such as ESCAP should assume a more active advocacy role with the governments as they confront the economic crisis and its repercussions. PMID:12295243

  20. Women in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, M

    1981-01-01

    Prior to 1974, women in Portugal were restricted by the Penal Code and had little organizational power. Women's groups were formed within the Catholic Church to teach women about cooking, child care, and home economics. There was no contact with international women's groups. The press only reported events such as bra burning. 80% of all illiterates in Portugal are women. The conditions of Portuguese women are described after the revolution of April 25, 1974. Present roles are discussed for work, health, education, religion, trade unions and political parties, and women's organizations. The Women's Liberation Movement (WLM) appeared in May 1974 among a heterogenous group of women in Lisbon who were concerned about the oppression of women. WLM made feminist issues public amid ridicule and promoted the declaration of equal rights for women in the 1976 Republic Constitution and in the Family Code. Wage discrimination became illegal in 1979. Women represent 32.8% of the labor force. Unemployment is particularly high among women and is increasing. Women's wages and levels of skill are the lowest. The Christian Democratic government is actively engaged in a campaign to keep women at home and has formed the special Ministry of Family Affairs, which encourages large families and women's home activity in order to save jobs for men. There is a crisis in education: large class sizes and limited number of schools. Child care for the working mother is expensive when available and rarely available. An obstacle to women's rights has been the role of the Catholic Church, which fought equal rights legislation, condemned the Family Code and divorce laws, forbade the practice of contraception, and supported the movement against abortion. Only 1 member of government is a women, and she is considered a token. Trade unions have a women's section, but little attention is given to the problems of women. Women's groups within larger organizations have little autonomy. Those with autonomy are restricted and organized around specific causes, such as abortion. The liberation of women is evolving slowly. PMID:12285938

  1. Osteoporosis and Asian American Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not supported by your browser. Home Osteoporosis Women Osteoporosis and Asian American Women Publication available in: PDF ( ... Fitness: Overtraining Risks Pregnancy, Nursing and Bone Health Osteoporosis and African American Women Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women ...

  2. Women's Health and Complementary Approaches

    MedlinePLUS

    ... links Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Women’s Health and Complementary Approaches Some health and wellness issues ... our disclaimer about external links Related Topics MedlinePlus Women's Health Resources NIH Office of Research on Women's Health ...

  3. Firmness Perception Influences Women’s Preferences for Vaginal Suppositories

    PubMed Central

    Zaveri, Toral; Primrose, Rachel J.; Surapaneni, Lahari; Ziegler, Gregory R.; Hayes, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbicides are being actively researched and developed as woman-initiated means to prevent HIV transmission during unprotected coitus. Along with safety and efficacy, assessing and improving compliance is a major area of research in microbicide development. We have developed carrageenan-based semisoft vaginal suppositories and have previously evaluated how physical properties such as firmness, size and shape influence women’s willingness to try them. Firmness has previously been quantified in terms of small-strain storage modulus, G’, however large-strain properties of the gels may also play a role in the firmness perception. In the current study we prepared two sets of suppositories with the same G’ but different elongation properties at four different G’ values (250, 2500, 12,500, 25,000 Pa): For convenience we refer to these as “brittle” and “elastic”, although these terms were never provided to study participants. In the first of two tests conducted to assess preference, women compared pairs of brittle and elastic suppositories and indicated their preference. We observed an interaction, as women preferred brittle suppositories at lower G’ (250, 2500 Pa) and elastic ones at a higher G’ (25,000 Pa). In the second test, women evaluated samples across different G’, rated the ease-of-insertion and willingness-to-try and ranked the samples in order of preference. Brittle suppositories at G’ of 12,500 Pa were most preferred. In vitro studies were also conducted to measure the softening of the suppositories in contact with vaginal simulant fluid (VSF). Release of antiretroviral drug tenofovir in VSF was quantified for the brittle and elastic suppositories at G’ of 12,500 Pa to determine the effect of suppository type on release. The initial rate of release was 20% slower with elastic suppositories as compared to brittle suppositories. Understanding how different physical properties simultaneously affect women’s preferences and pharmacological efficacy in terms of drug release is required for the optimization of highly acceptable and efficacious microbicides. PMID:25211123

  4. African Women's History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strobel, Margaret

    1982-01-01

    Examines how the historical experiences and documentation of the lives of African women differ from those of their American and European counterparts. The effect of these differences on the development of African womens' historiography is discussed. A college course on African women's history, including a list of resource materials, is described.…

  5. Women in Law Enforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Regina

    1991-01-01

    The lack of roles for African-American female police officers has not stopped black women from gaining momentum in law enforcement. Women still comprise less than 10 percent of all police officers, but growing numbers of black women are finding meaningful work in law enforcement. (SLD)

  6. Women in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Alan

    Women have traditionally been discriminated against in higher education in both the attainment of degrees and in employment after earning degrees. It has been felt that women are not as capable, reliable, or effective as men in administrative and classroom situations. Statistics show that even at the present time women are underemployed and…

  7. Acne in hirsute women

    PubMed Central

    Pupovci, Hatixhe Latifi; Berisha, Violeta Lokaj; Goçi, Aferdita Uka; Gerqari, Antigona

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acne and hirsutism are common manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Aim To investigate whether or not acne is present in women with hirsutism, associated with different clinical, endocrine and ultrasonographic features. Material and methods The prospective study included 135 women with hirsutism, aged 14–46 years. We measured the levels of hormones with radioimmunoassay/immunoradiometric assay methods. Results Acne were present in 63 (47.6%) women with hirsutism. Sixty women had mild forms of acne, including: whiteheads, blackheads, papules and pustules. Only 3 women had moderate to severe acne, including nodules. In a group of women with hirsutism and acne, 6 (9.5%) were obese. In our study we found a high prevalence of androgen excess among hirsute women with acne: total testosterone was increased in 79%, free testosterone in 20.6%, androstenedione in 69.8%, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) in 30.1%, 17-OH-progesterone 68.2% and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was decreased in 33.3% of women. Women with hirsutism and acne have received oral contraceptives for a year, without or in a combination with other medication. Thirty-four (53.9%) women have shown improvement in hirsutism and acne. Conclusions In this study we found a high prevalence of acne in hirsute women. The prevalence of acne was higher in polycystic ovarian syndrome. Since these women have associated endocrine changes it is important to correct them with hormonal therapy. PMID:25610349

  8. Women's Health Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) is a long-term national health study that has focused on strategies for preventing heart disease, breast and colorectal cancer, and osteoporotic fractures in postmenopausal women. These chronic diseases are the major causes of death, disability, and frailty in older women of all races and socioeconomic backgrounds.

  9. Women's and Gender Studies

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Women's and Gender Studies #12;Women's and Gender Studies at Carleton University provides you with a unique and exciting opportunity to examine the diverse ways in which gender shapes our lives and the world around us. The Pauline Jewett Institute of Women's and Gender Studies offers a stimulating

  10. Women in German Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Elke

    This course description outlines the general and specific objectives for a course on "Women in German Literature," which investigates the changing literary and social roles of women from the beginning of the 19th Century to the present: women as seen by man, by another woman and in introspection. This course description was successfully used in a…

  11. Women of California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Harry

    This publication points out the achievements of women who contributed to the development and history of California from the 16th century, when the Spanish Conquistadores moved westward into the San Francisco Bay area, to the gold rush of 1848, and during the following period when women helped stabilize society on the rugged frontier. Women not…

  12. Women into Educational Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Anne

    1996-01-01

    Using recent statistics on women in educational administration in Europe, the literature on administrator roles and characteristics, and expectations of administrators, an explanation is sought for women's underrepresentation. Sources of support for women in administration are discussed, different cultural contexts are considered, and suggestions…

  13. Women's Work in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devi, D. Radha; Ravindran, M.

    1983-01-01

    The proportion of women in paid employment in India is very low, and working women tend to be concentrated in low-wage, low-status, unskilled jobs, especially in agriculture. Even for the few women working in the modern sector, discrimination is pervasive, and change seems unlikely to occur soon. (IS)

  14. Women's Job Training Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women Work! The National Network for Women's Employment, Washington, DC.

    The Coalition on Women and Job Training has developed a women's job training agenda that focuses on nine issues related to women's full participation in training and achievement of economic self-sufficiency. The issues highlighted in the agenda are as follows: (1) the need to make long-term economic self-sufficiency the goal of all employment and…

  15. How the Budget Cuts Undercut Rural Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jane

    This study describes the status of 34 million rural women and analyzes how they and their families will be directly affected by cuts in the 1983 federal budget in the areas of legal services, vocational education, domestic violence intervention, energy assistance and alternative energy development, public housing, unemployment compensation, social…

  16. Depression, Sociocultural Factors, and African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunn, Vanessa Lynn; Craig, Carlton David

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss depression in African American women from a sociocultural perspective, including aspects of oppression and racism that affect symptom manifestation. The authors highlight John Henryism as a coping mechanism, the history and continuing role of the African American church as a safe haven, and strategies for culturally competent…

  17. On Campus with Women, Number 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    On Campus with Women, 1981

    1981-01-01

    News concerning developments affecting women at colleges and universities is presented. Among the issues are the following: a court case involving West Texas State University and six female students in which it was held that athletics was not covered by Title IX because it does not receive federal funding; a court case involving Temple University…

  18. Feminism and Black Women's Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooks, Bell

    1989-01-01

    Women's studies programs have largely ignored Black women. Until Black women's studies courses are developed, feminist scholarship on Black women will not advance, and the contributions of Black women to women's rights movements and African American literature and scholarship may be neglected. (DM)

  19. Women's status and fertility transition in China in the 1980's: integrating quantitative and qualitative approaches 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Peihang

    1996-01-01

    This thesis analyzes how women's status, and change in status, affect fertility in the 1980s across the provinces of China. Women's status in this study refers to female autonomy. The four aspects of female autonomy are examined by measuring women...

  20. What Black Women Should Know about Lupus: Ideas for Community Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Lupus is a serious health problem that mainly affects young women between the ages of 15 and 44. Although people of all races may get lupus, black women have three times higher rates of incidence, prevalence, and mortality than white women. With early detection and proper treatment, most people with lupus can lead a normal life. This kit is…

  1. Indigenous Women Facing Educational Disadvantages: The Case of the Ainu in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takayanagi, Taeko; Shimomura, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the life and educational experiences of Ainu women, using the framework of postcolonial feminist theory. It explores the extent to which two factors--gender and ethnic minority status--affect young Ainu women as they attempt to enter mainstream society. The authors analyse life history interviews from three Ainu women aged 25.…

  2. Beyond Integration: Possible Effects of the Study of Women on Journalism Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Susan

    Growing attention is being given to the part women have played in journalism history, and this paper examines some of the ways in which the methods used in studying women may affect journalism history as a whole and perhaps the ways in which all historical figures are viewed. Noting that insufficient information exists about women printers with…

  3. Exploring Gender Roles' Effects of Turkish Women Teachers on Their Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Mediha

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how gender roles of women teachers affect their practices in the classrooms. Participants in the study were 75 female teachers working in elementary schools in Adana, Turkey. Findings indicated that gender roles of women teachers have important effects on their educational practices. Women teachers…

  4. Behind the Veil: An In-Depth Exploration of Egyptian Muslim Women's Lives through Dance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toncy, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Muslim women in Arabic countries have unique experiences that are shaped in large part by their cultures' beliefs regarding the female body. Mandated behaviors and men's attitudes towards women's role in society have likewise created oppressive situations which have affected women's sense of self. Because many of those experiences are body-based,…

  5. A Randomized Trial of Individual and Couple Behavioral Alcohol Treatment for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mccrady, Barbara S.; Epstein, Elizabeth E.; Cook, Sharon; Jensen, Noelle; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Although alcohol use disorders (AUDs) adversely affect women, research on efficacious treatments for women is limited. In this randomized efficacy trial of 102 heterosexual women with AUDs, the authors compared alcohol behavioral couple therapy (ABCT) and alcohol behavioral individual therapy (ABIT) on percentage of days abstinent (PDA) and…

  6. The Role of Mentoring in the Success of Women Leaders of Color in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Natalie A.

    2014-01-01

    While numerous scholars have investigated the role of mentoring in the success of women of color in faculty positions, few have examined how mentoring affects the development of women leaders of color in higher education. Using qualitative data gathered from interviews with women leaders of color at Hispanic-serving institution, this study…

  7. Exploring Efficacy in Negotiating Support: Women Re-Entry Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipponi-Berardinelli, Josephine Oriana

    2013-01-01

    The existing literature on women re-entry students reveals that women students concurrently struggle with family, work, and sometimes health issues. Women students often do not receive adequate support from their partners or from other sources in helping manage the multiple roles that compete for their time, and often face constraints that affect

  8. American Indian Women: Mental Health Issues Which Relate to Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medicine, Beatrice

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the sparse literature concerning the mental health of American Indian and Alaska Native women. Suggests research into various sources of stress experienced by Native women and related to drug and alcohol abuse. Discusses coping mechanisms and the particular stress factors affecting professional Native women. (SV)

  9. Women's Satisfaction with Their Breast Prosthesis: What Determines a Quality Prosthesis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Patricia M.; White, Victoria M.; Roberts, Susan B.; Pritchard, Emma; Hayman, Jane; Gibbs, Anne; Hill, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine what factors constitute a quality prosthesis and ascertain which factors affect prosthesis satisfaction. Sixty-four women who received full funding for their prosthesis and 38 women who received their hospital's usual funding were recruited. Women rated the information provided about breast prostheses very…

  10. Student Financial Aid and Women: Equity Dilemma? ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 5, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Mary

    The impact of student aid policies on women is assessed. Differences in the conditions affecting men's and women's need for aid are identified, along with actions that could improve women's participation in student aid programs. Gender issues in student aid policy include: loan burden, default, and bankruptcy; the award of merit scholarships;…

  11. Carer Knowledge and Experiences with Menopause in Women with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Diane S.; Wishart, Jennifer G.; Muir, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    Overall life expectancy for women with intellectual disabilities (ID) is now significantly extended, and many will live long enough to experience menopause. Little is known about how carers support women with ID through this important stage in their lives. This study investigated carer knowledge of how menopause affects women with ID under their…

  12. A Survey on Oocyte Donation: Turkish Fertile and Infertile Women’s Opinions

    PubMed Central

    Akyuz, Aygul; Sever, Nese; Karasahin, Emre; Guvenc, Gulten; Cek, Suzan

    2014-01-01

    Background There are various treatment options for infertility, and new techniques are also being developed as it is an important healthcare problem affecting approximately 15-20% of married couples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of infor- mation of fertile and infertile Turkish women on oocyte donation in order to understand their awareness of the legal, ethical, social and religious issues regarding this technique and to compare these two groups in terms of these variables. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included infertile women being treated at the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) program of a university hos- pital and women who had presented at the gynecology outpatients department of the same university for routine check-ups and who had no previous history of infertility. After consulting with specialists in the field and searching the related literature, a data collection form having 22 questions for infertile women and 18 questions for fertile women was prepared. Results The women were asked whether they would use the oocytes of another woman if necessary. The results showed that 67.6% of the fertile women said they would never want to use this method, while 63.9% of the infertile women stated they may accept to use this method under certain conditions (two distinct answers appeared in the answers, some women stated they would prefer donated oocytes from close relatives, while others stated they would prefer oocytes from total strangers), such as from a close relative or from someone they do not know at all. Conclusion Infertile women mentioned that they could use illegal routes if necessary to have a child at much higher rates than stated by fertile women. This shows that desire to have a child is a strong source of motivation in Turkey. PMID:25379158

  13. Women in Science Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-04-01

    The L'Oréal For Women in Science program is calling for women postdoctoral scientists to submit applications for the L'Oréal USA Women in Science Fellowship. Five women scientists in a variety of fields, including life and physical/material sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics, will receive grants of up to $60,000 each. Since the program began in 1998, more than 2000 women scientists worldwide have been awarded fellowships. Application materials are available at https://lorealfwis.aaas.org/login/indexA.cfm; the deadline to apply is 19 May 2014.

  14. Violence Against Women: Globalizing the Integrated Ecological Model.

    PubMed

    Fulu, Emma; Miedema, Stephanie

    2015-12-01

    Globalization theories have proliferated over the past two decades. However, global developments have yet to be systematically incorporated into theories around violence against women. This article proposes to add a global level to the existing ecological model framework, popularized by Lori Heise in 1998, to explore the relationships between global processes and experiences of violence against women. Data from the Maldives and Cambodia are used to assess how globalized ideologies, economic development and integration, religious fundamentalisms, and global cultural exchange, as components of a larger globalization process, have affected men and women's experiences and perceptions of violence against women. PMID:26215287

  15. Women's Health Research: Road Map to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Pomeroy, Claire; Thomas, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    For more than 20 years, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) has promoted the NIH's research agenda on women's health and sex and gender issues. Important biological and behavioral differences between women and men influence health and well-being, affecting normal function as well as the manifestations, epidemiology, and response to treatment of many illnesses. This special issue is dedicated to reaching across the globe to increase awareness of the importance of women's health research and to stimulate consideration of sex and gender differences in research at institutions around the world. PMID:24416686

  16. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  17. Peripheral arterial disease in women.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Victoria J; Vavra, Ashley K; Kibbe, Melina R

    2013-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a significant portion of the United States population, and much research has been conducted on identifying populations at risk for PAD, evaluating appropriate diagnostic modalities for PAD, studying the effect of risk factor reduction on PAD progression, and determining the best method of treatment for symptomatic PAD. However, most PAD research and clinical trials have focused on whole populations, or populations consisting mostly of men. Little data exist with respect to PAD in women. The goal of this review is to highlight what is known about gender-related differences for PAD. PMID:23522713

  18. Hypertension in women

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Fadi G; Mansur, Sulaf J; Xing, Dongqi; Oparil, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in both men and women. The prevalence and severity of hypertension rise markedly with age, and blood pressure control becomes more difficult with aging in both genders, particularly in women. In addition, there are forms of hypertension that occur exclusively in women, e.g., hypertension related to menopause, oral contraceptive use, or pregnancy (e.g., chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia or eclampsia). Randomized controlled trials show that antihypertensive therapy provides similar reductions in major cardiovascular events in men and women. Therefore, gender should not influence decisions on selection of blood pressure lowering therapies, except for consideration of gender-specific side effects or contraindications for use in women who are or may become pregnant. This article reviews the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in women, as well as recent guidelines for management of hypertension in women. PMID:25028640

  19. Women and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Thara, R; Kamath, Shantha

    2015-07-01

    Women's mental health is closely linked to their status in society. This paper outlines the clinical features of women with schizophrenia and highlights the interpersonal and social ramifications on their lives. There is no significant gender difference in the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia. There is no clear trend in mortality, although suicides seem to be more in women with schizophrenia. In India, women face a lot of problems, especially in relation to marriage, pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause. Most studies have shown better premorbid functioning, and social adjustment for women compared with men. There is a great need to plan for gender-sensitive mental health services targeting the special needs of these women. Women caregivers also deserve due attention. PMID:26330642

  20. Women and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Thara, R.; Kamath, Shantha

    2015-01-01

    Women's mental health is closely linked to their status in society. This paper outlines the clinical features of women with schizophrenia and highlights the interpersonal and social ramifications on their lives. There is no significant gender difference in the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia. There is no clear trend in mortality, although suicides seem to be more in women with schizophrenia. In India, women face a lot of problems, especially in relation to marriage, pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause. Most studies have shown better premorbid functioning, and social adjustment for women compared with men. There is a great need to plan for gender-sensitive mental health services targeting the special needs of these women. Women caregivers also deserve due attention. PMID:26330642

  1. Workplace bullying influences women's engagement in the workforce.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Judith

    2012-11-01

    Workplace bullying creates hostile work environments, affects mental and physical health, and has social, economic, and career implications. Over 70% of targets of workplace bullying become unemployed either by losing their jobs or by leaving voluntarily. In a grounded theory study, we explored how experiencing workplace bullying and its health consequences affected 40 Canadian women. Further, I examined whether women stayed at or left workplaces after being bullied, how they left, and the influences on whether they stayed or left. Implications of this study are that bullied women and the organizations for which they work need to be assisted to manage this experience more effectively. PMID:23146010

  2. Psychophysiology and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom profile in pregnant African-American women with trauma exposure.

    PubMed

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Rothbaum, Alex O; Corwin, Elizabeth; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2015-08-01

    While female sex is a robust risk factor for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pregnant women are an understudied population in regards to PTSD symptom expression profiles. Because circulating hormones during pregnancy affect emotionality, we assessed whether pregnant women would have increased expression of the intermediate phenotypes of hyperarousal and fear-potentiated startle (FPS) compared to non-pregnant women. We examined PTSD symptom profiles in pregnant (n?=?207) and non-pregnant women (n?=?370). In a second study, FPS responses were assessed in 15 pregnant and 24 non-pregnant women. All participants were recruited from the obstetrics and gynecology clinic at a public hospital serving a primarily African-American, low socioeconomic status, inner-city population. Our results indicate that overall PTSD symptoms were not different between the groups of women. However, pregnant women reported being more hypervigilant (p?=?0.036) than non-pregnant women. In addition, pregnant women showed increased FPS to a safety signal compared to non-pregnant women (p?=?0.024). FPS to a safety signal in pregnant women was significantly correlated with PTSD hyperarousal symptoms (r?=?0.731, p?women (p?=?0.008), but not in pregnant women (p?=?0.895). Together, these data suggest that pregnant women show clinical and psychophysiological hyperarousal compared to non-pregnant women, and support screening for PTSD and assessment of PTSD risk in pregnant women. PMID:25278341

  3. Vaginitis: How Many Women Are Affected/at Risk?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kendrick, J., Sutton, M., et al. (2007). The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in the United States, 2001– ... journals.lww.com/stdjournal/Fulltext/2007/11000/The_Prevalence_of_Bacterial_Vaginosis_in_the.6.aspx [top] ...

  4. Charge disproportionation in La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}FeO{sub 3??} (x = 0.4 and 0.5) investigated by mechanical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z. C.; Liu, M. F.; Chen, C. C.; Ying, X. N.

    2014-03-28

    The nature of charge disproportionation in orthorhombic lanthanum orthoferrites La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}FeO{sub 3-?} (x?=?0.4 and 0.5) has been investigated by kilohertz mechanical spectroscopy. Contrast to rhombohedral La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-?} (x?=?0.5), no elastic softening was observed in La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}FeO{sub 3-?} above charge disproportionation. This different behavior of elastic modulus in La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}FeO{sub 3-?} and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-?} unveils the implicit orbital effect. Below charge disproportionation, an internal friction peak around 140?K was observed in La{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}FeO{sub 3-?}, which is similar to that in La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-?}. This peak is ascribed to an elastic manifestation of charge freezing and can be used as an indirect indication of CD in doped LaFeO{sub 3}.

  5. Dyspareunia in women.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Dean A; Baird, Drew C; Bode, David V

    2014-10-01

    Dyspareunia is recurrent or persistent pain with sexual activity that causes marked distress or interpersonal conflict. It affects approximately 10% to 20% of U.S. women. Dyspareunia can have a significant impact on a woman's mental and physical health, body image, relationships with partners, and efforts to conceive. The patient history should be taken in a nonjudgmental way and progress from a general medical history to a focused sexual history. An educational pelvic examination allows the patient to participate by holding a mirror while the physician explains normal and abnormal findings. This examination can increase the patient's perception of control, improve self-image, and clarify findings and how they relate to discomfort. The history and physical examination are usually sufficient to make a specific diagnosis. Common diagnoses include provoked vulvodynia, inadequate lubrication, postpartum dyspareunia, and vaginal atrophy. Vaginismus may be identified as a contributing factor. Treatment is directed at the underlying cause of dyspareunia. Depending on the diagnosis, pelvic floor physical therapy, lubricants, or surgical intervention may be included in the treatment plan. PMID:25369624

  6. Poisoning deaths in married women.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra

    2004-02-01

    Unnatural deaths of married women amongst the total female deaths have been an increasing trend in Indian society during the recent past years. These unnatural deaths may be suicide, homicide or even accidents. But these suicides and homicides are currently more commonly associated with the dowry disputes. In India, dowries are a continuing series of gifts endowed before and after the marriage. When dowry expectations are not met, the young bride may be killed or compelled to commit suicide, either by burning, poisoning or by some other means. Here, in the study, the main objective is to present the different epidemiological and medicolegal aspects of poisoning deaths in the married women. In a cohort of 200 married female deaths, 35 (18%) were poisoning deaths and these were analyzed from both epidemiological and medicolegal aspects. In this series, most of the women consumed organophosphorus compound and died within 10 days. The majority of the affected wives due to dowry problems were below 35 years of age. Most incidents occurred either during morning hour or during daytime. PMID:15261005

  7. Eating disorders in older women.

    PubMed

    Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Czyzyk, Adam; Katulski, Krzysztof; Smolarczyk, Roman; Grymowicz, Monika; Maciejewska-Jeske, Marzena; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2015-10-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are disturbances that seriously endanger the physical health and often the lives of sufferers and affect their psychosocial functioning. EDs are usually thought of as problems afflicting teenagers. However, the incidence in older women has increased in recent decades. These cases may represent either late-onset disease or, more likely, a continuation of a lifelong disorder. The DSM-5 classification differentiates 4 categories of eating disorder: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorders and other specified feeding and eating disorders. The weight loss and malnutrition resulting from EDs have widespread negative consequences for physical, mental and social health. The main risk factors for developing long-term consequences are the degree of weight loss and the chronicity of the illness. Most of the cardiac, neurological, pulmonary, gastric, haematological and dermatological complications of EDs are reversible with weight restoration. EDs are serious illnesses and they should never be neglected or treated only as a manifestation of the fashion for dieting or a woman's wish to achieve an imposed standard feminine figure. Additionally, EDs are associated with high risk of morbidity and mortality. The literature concerning EDs in older, postmenopausal women is very limited. The main aim of this paper is to ascertain the epidemiology and prognosis of EDs in older women, and to review their diagnosis and management. PMID:26261037

  8. Adherence to Self-Monitoring via Interactive Voice Response Technology in an eHealth Intervention Targeting Weight Gain Prevention Among Black Women: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background eHealth interventions are effective for weight control and have the potential for broad reach. Little is known about the use of interactive voice response (IVR) technology for self-monitoring in weight control interventions, particularly among populations disproportionately affected by obesity. Objective This analysis sought to examine patterns and predictors of IVR self-monitoring adherence and the association between adherence and weight change among low-income black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Methods The Shape Program was a randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-month eHealth behavioral weight gain prevention intervention to usual care among overweight and obese black women in the primary care setting. Intervention participants (n=91) used IVR technology to self-monitor behavior change goals (eg, no sugary drinks, 10,000 steps per day) via weekly IVR calls. Weight data were collected in clinic at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Self-monitoring data was stored in a study database and adherence was operationalized as the percent of weeks with a successful IVR call. Results Over 12 months, the average IVR completion rate was 71.6% (SD 28.1) and 52% (47/91) had an IVR completion rate ?80%. At 12 months, IVR call completion was significantly correlated with weight loss (r =?.22; P=.04) and participants with an IVR completion rate ?80% had significantly greater weight loss compared to those with an IVR completion rate <80% (?1.97 kg, SE 0.67 vs 0.48 kg, SE 0.69; P=.01). Similar outcomes were found for change in body mass index (BMI; mean difference ?0.94 kg, 95% CI ?1.64 to ?0.24; P=.009). Older, more educated participants were more likely to achieve high IVR call completion. Participants reported positive attitudes toward IVR self-monitoring. Conclusions Adherence to IVR self-monitoring was high among socioeconomically disadvantaged black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Higher adherence to IVR self-monitoring was also associated with greater weight change. IVR is an effective and useful tool to promote self-monitoring and has the potential for widespread use and long-term sustainability. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938535; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00938535 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6P1FFNJRs). PMID:24780934

  9. Women and HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Thirty years since the discovery of HIV, the HIV pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa accounts for more than two thirds of the world’s HIV infections. Southern Africa remains the region most severely affected by the epidemic. Women continue to bear the brunt of the epidemic with young women infected almost ten years earlier compared to their male counterparts. Epidemiological evidence suggests unacceptably high HIV prevalence and incidence rates among women. A multitude of factors increase women’s vulnerability to HIV acquisition, including, biological, behavioral, socioeconomic, cultural and structural risks. There is no magic bullet and behavior alone is unlikely to change the course of the epidemic. Considerable progress has been made in biomedical, behavioral and structural strategies for HIV prevention with attendant challenges of developing appropriate HIV prevention packages which take into consideration the socioeconomic and cultural context of women in society at large. PMID:24330537

  10. Hormone profiles in women treated for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Eby, N.L.

    1986-01-01

    Some investigators believe that the protective effect of radiotherapy is hormonally mediated. To determine whether ovarian radiation affects serum hormone levels differently from surgical removal of the ovaries, serum estradiol, estrone, testosterone and androstenedione were evaluated by radioimmunoassay in 320 women (203 irradiated and 117 nonirradiated) from six US clinics participating in a large international cohort study of women treated for cervical cancer since the 1960's. Overall, estradiol levels were similar for both treatment groups, while estrone, testosterone and androstenedione levels were somewhat lower in irradiated women than in nonirradiated women after adjustment for year of birth. Notably, among women in both groups whose treatment included bilateral oophorectomy, irradiated women consistently had lower levels of androstenedione, testosterone and estrone but similar levels of estradiol.

  11. The Burden of Uterine Fibroids for African-American Women: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Wanda K.; Bradley, Linda; Borah, Bijan J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Uterine fibroids have a disproportionate impact on African-American women. There are, however, no data to compare racial differences in symptoms, quality of life, effect on employment, and information-seeking behavior for this disease. Methods An online survey was conducted by Harris Interactive between December 1, 2011 and January 16, 2012. Participants were U.S. women aged 29–59 with symptomatic uterine fibroids. African-American women were oversampled to allow statistical comparison of this high-risk group. Bivariate comparison of continuous and categorical measures was based on the t-test and the Chi-squared test, respectively. Multivariable adjustment of risk ratios was based on log binomial regression. Results The survey was completed by 268 African-American and 573 white women. There were no differences between groups in education, employment status, or overall health status. African-American women were significantly more likely to have severe or very severe symptoms, including heavy or prolonged menses (RR=1.51, 95% CI 1.05–2.18) and anemia (RR=2.73, 95% CI 1.47–5.09). They also more often reported that fibroids interfered with physical activities (RR=1.67, 95% CI 1.20–2.32) and relationships (RR=2.27, 95% CI 1.23–4.22) and were more likely to miss days from work (RR=1.77, 95% CI 1.20–2.61). African-American women were more likely to consult friends and family (36 vs. 22%, P=0.004) and health brochures (32 vs. 18%, P<0.001) for health information. Concerns for future fertility (RR=2.65, 95% CI 1.93–3.63) and pregnancy (RR=2.89, 95% CI 2.11–3.97) following fibroid treatments were key concerns for black women. Conclusions African-American women have more severe symptoms, unique concerns, and different information-seeking behavior for fibroids. PMID:24033092

  12. Disparity in posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis among African American pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Kohn-Wood, Laura P.; McPherson, Melnee D.; Sperlich, Mickey

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether African American women expecting their first infant carry a disproportionate burden of posttraumatic stress disorder morbidity, we conducted a comparative analysis of cross-sectional data from the initial psychiatric interview in a prospective cohort study of posttraumatic stress disorder effects on childbearing outcomes. Participants were recruited from maternity clinics in three health systems in the Midwestern USA. Eligibility criteria were being 18 years or older, able to speak English, expecting a first infant, and less than 28 weeks gestation. Telephone interview data was collected from 1,581 women prior to 28 weeks gestation; four declined to answer racial identity items (n =1,577), 709 women self-identified as African American, 868 women did not. Measures included the Life Stressor Checklist, the National Women’s Study Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Module, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and the Centers for Disease Control’s Perinatal Risk Assessment Monitoring System survey. The 709 African American pregnant women had more trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and diagnosis, comorbidity and pregnancy substance use, and had less mental health treatment than 868 non-African Americans. Lifetime prevalence was 24.0% versus 17.1%, respectively (OR=1.5, p=0.001). Current prevalence was 13.4% versus 3.5% (OR=4.3, p< 0.001). Current prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was four times higher among African American women. Their risk for PTSD did not differ by sociodemographic status, but was explained by greater trauma exposure. Traumatic stress may be an additional, addressable stress factor in birth outcome disparities. PMID:21573930

  13. The Feminization of Poverty for Midlife and Older Women and Its Effects on Their Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porcino, Jane

    There are 16.4 million women over age 65 in this country, compared to 11 million men. The 41 percent of this population who live alone are the poorest of the poor in this country, with an annual median income of just over $3,000 for white women and little more than $2,000 for black women. This abject poverty affects the ability of these women to…

  14. Health screening - women - over age 65

    MedlinePLUS

    Health maintenance visit - women - over age 65; Physical exam - women - over age 65; Yearly exam - women - over age 65; Checkup - women - over age 65; Women's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - women - over ...

  15. Health screening - women - ages 18 - 39

    MedlinePLUS

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 18 - 39; Physical exam - women - ages 18 - 39; Yearly exam - women - ages 18 - 39; Checkup - women - ages 18 - 39; Women's health - ages 18 - 39; Preventive care - women - ages 18 - ...

  16. Motives for cosmetic procedures in Saudi women.

    PubMed

    Al-Natour, Sahar H

    2014-01-01

    The media-fuelled obsession with beauty in modern society has led more women to seek elective cosmetic procedures to meet the portrayed ideals of beauty in different cultures. This study gives insights into incentives and desires to undergo cosmetic procedures in a conservative society with strict religious practices where women are veiled. Questionnaire data were obtained from 509 Saudi women who responded to a survey distributed randomly to a sample of Saudi women aged 17 to 72 years. At least 1 elective cosmetic procedure was performed in 42% of the women, of whom 77.8% wore a veil. Another 33% considered having a procedure. The motives for seeking a cosmetic procedure were to improve self-esteem in 83.7%, attract a husband in 63.3%, or prevent a husband from seeking another wife in 36.2%. The decision to seek a procedure was affected by the media, with high peer influence. Motivation for elective cosmetic procedures in Saudi women is influenced by a combination of emotional and cultural factors, level of education, marital status, and religious beliefs. The veil is not an impediment for seeking such procedures. The limitation of the study was missing data analysis as some items in the questionnaire were completed inaccurately or left unanswered. PMID:25134311

  17. The Impact of Emotional and Material Social Support on Women's Drug Treatment Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Hill, Twyla J.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed how women's perceptions of emotional and material social support affect their completion of residential drug treatment. Although previous research has examined how social support affects recovery, few studies, if any, have examined both the types and the sources of social support. The study hypothesized that women's perceptions…

  18. Socio-Economic Affects of Floods on Female Teachers in Jampur (Pakistan)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzdar, Muhammad Ayub; Ali, Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Women are major affected segment of society in any disaster in under developed countries. Floods of 2010, in Pakistan, affected more than 17 million people. Ultimately, it created several social, psychological and financial problems for affected females. The current paper aimed to study the socio-economic affects of floods on female teachers of…

  19. The lived experience of Malawian women with obstetric fistula.

    PubMed

    Yeakey, Marissa Pine; Chipeta, Effie; Taulo, Frank; Tsui, Amy O

    2009-06-01

    Data on women who experience obstetric fistula paints an often tragic picture. The majority of previous research has focused on facility-based data from women receiving surgical treatment. The goal of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of the lived experience of obstetric fistula in Malawi. Forty-five women living with fistula were interviewed in their homes to learn how the condition affected them and their families on a daily basis. Findings indicate that the experiences of Malawian women with fistula were more varied than anticipated. Concerning relationships with husbands and family, we found high rates of divorce and stigma, yet these outcomes were far from universal or inevitable. Many women, in addition to their families, discussed high levels of support from those individuals closest to them. Nonetheless, many women experienced the fistula as a direct assault on their ability to fulfil social expectations of them as women, wives and mothers. Women identified fertility and continued childbearing as central concerns. The data suggest that we cannot discount the experiences of women living with fistula from continued participation in marriage, community and childbearing. Programmes for outreach and services should consider a broadened range of outcomes of women living with fistula. PMID:19444686

  20. Charge disproportionation in tetragonal La2MoO5, a small band gap semiconductor influenced by direct Mo-Mo bonding.

    PubMed

    Colabello, Diane M; Camino, Fernando E; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G

    2015-01-28

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10 dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidation state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo(5+) (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo(3+) (d(3)), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo(4+), a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. It is shown that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts. PMID:25551640

  1. Strategies for improving cardiovascular health in women with diabetes mellitus: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajesh K; Laiteerapong, Neda

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge about cardiovascular (CV) disease in women with diabetes mellitus (DM) has changed substantially over the past 20 years. Coronary artery disease, strokes, and peripheral vascular disease affect women with DM at higher rates than the general population of women. Lifestyle therapies, such as dietary changes, physical activity, and smoking cessation, offer substantial benefits to women with DM. Of the pharmacotherapies, statins offer the most significant benefits but may not be well tolerated in some women. Aspirin may also benefit high-risk women. Other pharmacotherapies, such as fibrates, ezetimibe, niacin, fish oil, and hormone replacement therapy, remain unproven and, in some cases, potentially dangerous to women with DM. To reduce CV events, risks to women with DM must be better publicized and additional research must be done. Finally, advancements in health care delivery must target high-risk women with DM to lower risk factors and effectively improve cardiovascular health. PMID:26391392

  2. Proposal to Reduce Sports Scholarships Assailed as Unfair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Douglas

    1987-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association's proposed reductions in scholarships, affecting most non-revenue sports but sparing big-time football, are widely criticized for their disproportionate effects on women and minority groups. (MSE)

  3. Contraception for midlife women.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rebecca H; Cwiak, Carrie A

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decline in fertility, women of older reproductive age who do not desire pregnancy should use contraception until menopause. Unintended pregnancy can be disruptive at any age, but in older women, pregnancy is associated with higher rates of adverse health outcomes for the mother and the fetus because of advanced age and comorbid medical conditions (eg, hypertension or diabetes). Therefore, providing appropriate contraceptive care to women of older reproductive age is critical. PMID:26671193

  4. The Influence of Climacteric Symptoms on Women’s Lives and Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bie?, Agnieszka; Rzo?ca, Ewa; Iwanowicz-Palus, Gra?yna; Pa?czyk-Szeptuch, Ma?gorzata

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we performed an analysis of the influence of climacteric symptoms on women’s lives and activities, i.e. their quality of life (QoL). The study was performed between October 2011 and February 2012. It included 148 women aged 44–62. The study used a diagnostic survey with questionnaires. The research instrument was the Blatt-Kupperman index. The respondents were asked to complete a questionnaire on socio-demographic data, quality of life, and the influence of climacteric symptoms on life and its various aspects. The respondents experiencing moderate or severe climacteric symptoms also had stronger feelings of failure (p = 0.005), feeling that opportunities are still available (p = 0.002), of losing their youth and beauty (p < 0.0001), compared to those who had slight or no symptoms. The intensity of climacteric symptoms significantly affects women’s lives and activities, i.e., their QoL. The reported intensity of climacteric symptoms is influenced by the respondents’ education, residence, marital status and professional activity. The more severe the climacteric symptoms, the lower the women’s quality of life, as evidenced for example by the feeling of failure and of losing one’s youth, beauty and opportunities. PMID:25854298

  5. Women Physicists in Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, N.; Shrestha, S.; Bhattarai, P. K.

    2009-04-01

    Women constitute more than half the total population of Nepal. They are, however, far behind men in all aspects of life. There are wide gender gaps in the social, economic, administrative, political, and legal fields. Data from 1960 to 2001 show that the proportion of female students varied inconsistently at the postgraduate level, and no women held PhD degrees. From 2002 to mid-2008, the number of female students at the MSc and PhD levels has gradually increased. It is expected that this will bring significant improvement in the education of women as a whole, and will help to promote the study of physics by women in the country.

  6. [Women's participation in science].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guzmán, María Alejandra; Corona-Vázquez, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The participation of women in higher education in Mexico took place in the late 19th and early 20th century. The rise of women's enrollment in universities known as the "feminization of enrollment" occurred in the last thirty years. In this review we analyze how the new conditions that facilitated better access to higher education are reflected in the inclusion of women in science. We include an overview of the issues associated with a change in the demographics of enrollment, segregation of academic areas between men and women and participation in post graduate degrees. We also review the proportion of women in science. While in higher education the ratio between male and women is almost 50-50 and in some areas the presence of women is even higher, in the field of scientific research women account for barely 30% of professionals. This is largely due to structural conditions that limit the access of women to higher positions of power that have been predominantly taken by men. PMID:19256415

  7. Rediscovering Women Mathematicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Karen D.

    The lives and mathematical contributions of seven famous women mathematicians are presented. They are: Hypatia, Agnesi, Sophie Germain, Mary Sommerville, Augusta Lovelace, Sofya Kovalevsky, and Emmy Noether. (MP)

  8. Nurses as working women.

    PubMed

    Letvak, S

    2001-03-01

    Women today make up nearly half of the nation's workforce. A number of these women have children at home, and women also often are responsible for providing care to older adult family members or friends. The different roles assigned to women in today's society are burdensome, particularly for nurses who deal with the stress of managed care, downsizing, the nursing shortage, caring for increasingly ill patients, long and irregular hours, and daily crises. There are ways that nurses can modify their work situation, however, to help them cope with the rigors of the workplace and the home. PMID:11253621

  9. Women's Role in Sustainable Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Leslie

    1996-01-01

    Given women's impact on resource management and consumption, we must improve our understanding of women's role in sustainable development. Women must be involved in sustainable development planning. This article examines the role of women as land stewards, and the effects of education of women on population growth in developing nations. Includes…

  10. Increasing Tobacco Quitline Calls from Pregnant African American Women: The “One Tiny Reason to Quit” Social Marketing Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Genderson, Maureen Wilson; Sepulveda, Allison L.; Garland, Sheryl L.; Wilson, Diane Baer; Stith-Singleton, Rose; Dubuque, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Pregnant African American women are at disproportionately high risk of premature birth and infant mortality, outcomes associated with cigarette smoking. Telephone-based, individual smoking cessation counseling has been shown to result in successful quit attempts in the general population and among pregnant women, but “quitlines” are underutilized. A social marketing campaign called One Tiny Reason to Quit (OTRTQ) promoted calling a quitline (1-800-QUIT-NOW) to pregnant, African American women in Richmond, Virginia, in 2009 and was replicated there 2 years later. Methods The campaign disseminated messages via radio, interior bus ads, posters, newspaper ads, and billboards. Trained volunteers also delivered messages face-to-face and distributed branded give-away reminder items. The number of calls made from pregnant women in the Richmond area during summer 2009 was contrasted with (a) the number of calls during the seasons immediately before and after the campaign, and (b) the number of calls the previous summer. The replication used the same evaluation design. Results There were statistically significant spikes in calls from pregnant women during both campaign waves for both types of contrasts. A higher proportion of the calls from pregnant women were from African Americans during the campaign. Conclusion A multimodal quitline promotion like OTRTQ should be considered for geographic areas with sizable African American populations and high rates of infant mortality. PMID:23621745

  11. The More (Women), the Merrier: Social Density and Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruback, R. Barry; Riad, Jasmin K.

    How the social density of a household affects interpersonal relations, physical health, and psychological well-being in neighborhoods with very low outside density, such as rural areas has not been examined. Two questionnaire studies of women in rural Georgia examined how social density affected respondents' interpersonal relations, physical…

  12. Indian women cry foul.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen organizations in Bombay issued a position statement on women's reproductive health and family planning as part of a national Planned Parenthood Foundation 1990's meeting on new contraception. The statement asserted that women needed to have an understanding of their bodies, wanted contraceptives that would not harm physiological functions, and desired men's and women's joint responsibility for reproduction. Women's groups voiced a concern about women gaining awareness of their ability to control their own health and contraception. The Indian government has been concerned with population control since 1952 and has stressed reducing the birth rate rather than providing for people's needs. The Indian government has followed the advice of Western nations and promoted the IUD during the 1960s, vasectomies during the 1970s, female sterilization during the 1980s, and long acting contraceptives during the 1990s. Government policy after the 1970s that focused on women's methods was viewed as coercive. Women's groups such as Stree Shakti Sanghatana, Saheli, and Chingari and the Andhra Pradesh Civil Liberties Union protested the Indian's governments promotion of injectable contraceptives such as NET-EN which were considered hazardous to women's health. Women's groups asked for legislative action, which helped to focus discussion and debate on the issues of the side effects of contraception. The concern was raised that people needed to be made aware of the issues and that the NET-EN campaign was only a dialogue among experts. Women's groups have focused on creating understanding about family planning rather than on simplistic labeling of harmful contraception. Demands should be put in a positive framework that redefines couple relationships, explores a variety of expressions of sexuality, and asserts the primacy of women's decision making about reproduction. PMID:12290478

  13. Women on the agenda.

    PubMed

    1994-03-01

    The first Symposium on Women and Health was held in Tokyo on January 14, 1994, and was sponsored by Japan's Network for Women and Health, Cairo '94. The sponsoring organization is new, has about 200 members, and intends to make certain Japanese women's views are hears at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in September, 1994. This intention was expressed at a different press conference prior to the Symposium. An active panel of the Symposium for about 100 Japanese participants was chaired by the UNFPA chief of the Women, Population, and Development branch, Katherine Pierce, WHO said that women's voices on family planning must be heard in order for reproductive health and rights to be effectively protected and provided for. A description of the ICPD was also given. The panelist Yayoi Aoki, who is a social commentator and activist, said that while other developing countries are encouraged to have fewer children, Japanese women are asked to have more children in order to raise the birth rate of 1.50. Population problems were viewed as approachable only from a reproductive health and rights context. A member of the Women's Coalition for Anti-Eugenic Protection Laws, Akiko Nagaoki, directed attention to the mass consumption and mass production patterns of the developed world as the basic cause of population problems, while population control policies usually target women as the cause. The panelist from the Japanese House of Councilors, Akiko Domoto, promoted the notion that women dominate ICPD discussion so that population policies would not have women as their object of discussion. Women need to show themselves as active in finding solutions to population problems. The idea was introduced and promoted that the world should be viewed as borderless for the next century. Social change should be spearheaded with the goals of humanity's revival and reproductive health and rights. PMID:12287754

  14. Migration of women from the Philippines: implications for healthcare delivery.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Lourdes Marie S; Fowler, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Filipinos have been an important part of the global workforce since the first half of the twentieth century. The initial migration of primarily men has shifted to an increasing numbers of women in recent decades. These changes are primarily attributed to a high demand for domestic workers, nurses and occupations that are female dominated. In 2005, about 70% of the international Labour migrants are women from the Philippines. Living in a foreign land, these women face challenges that affect their physical, emotional and social well being. Especially on their first year living abroad, these women experience significant stress which affects their health as they adjust to a new work environment, culture, social norms, diet, and weather. The emotional strain can be greater for those who have left their families behind in the Philippines and aggravated by the financial need to send money to them. Striking examples, such as the homicide rate of Filipino women married to Australian men being 5.6 times higher than that of Australian-born women, underscores the importance of supportive health care environments and appreciating socio-cultural factors. In the delivery of healthcare services to migrant women, it is critical to consider the unique socio-cultural background of women as well as health beliefs and practices. PMID:22482284

  15. Re-entry Women Involved in Women's Studies. Women's Studies Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hersh, Blanche Glassman

    This monograph is part of a series of reports focusing on women's studies in higher education. After summarizing the historical growth of continuing education for women and women's studies, this monograph describes the implementation of a study by the U.S. National Institute of Education on re-entry women and the field of women's studies.…

  16. NCI Women Scientist Advisors (WSA)

    Cancer.gov

    NIH WSA Website Women in Biomedical Careers NIH Office on Research on Women's Health AACR-Women in Cancer Research NCI Office of Workforce Development For assistance with Career Development, Managers' Toolbox, Organizational Development, Work Life Issues

  17. Financial Literacy Education for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarecke, Jodi; Taylor, Edward W.; Hira, Tahira K.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the pedagogical approaches of four women's financial literacy education programs, this chapter provides an overview of trends and needs in financial education for women and offers pedagogical strategies for teaching women about finance.

  18. Women Empowerment and Economic Development

    E-print Network

    Duflo, Esther

    Women empowerment and economic development are closely related: in one direction, development alone can play a major role in driving down inequality between men and women; in the other direction, empowering women may benefit ...

  19. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are listed ...

  20. Women in Computer Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Clare; Menninger, Sally Ann

    The keynote address of a conference that focused on the future of women in science and engineering fields and the opportunities available to them in the computer sciences is presented. Women's education in the sciences and education and entry into the job market in these fields has steadily been increasing. Excellent employment opportunities are…