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Sample records for disrupts mitochondrial membrane

  1. Mitochondrial uncouplers act synergistically with the fumigant phosphine to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential and cause cell death.

    PubMed

    Valmas, Nicholas; Zuryn, Steven; Ebert, Paul R

    2008-10-30

    Phosphine is the most widely used fumigant for the protection of stored commodities against insect pests, especially food products such as grain. However, pest insects are developing resistance to phosphine and thereby threatening its future use. As phosphine inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and reduces the strength of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), we reasoned that mitochondrial uncouplers should act synergistically with phosphine. The mitochondrial uncouplers FCCP and PCP caused complete mortality in populations of both wild-type and phosphine-resistant lines of Caenorhabditis elegans simultaneously exposed to uncoupler and phosphine at concentrations that were individually nonlethal. Strong synergism was also observed with a third uncoupler DNP. We have also tested an alternative complex IV inhibitor, azide, with FCCP and found that this also caused a synergistic enhancement of toxicity in C. elegans. To investigate potential causes of the synergism, we measured DeltaPsi(m), ATP content, and oxidative damage (lipid hydroperoxides) in nematodes subjected to phosphine-FCCP treatment and found that neither an observed 50% depletion in ATP nor oxidative stress accounted for the synergistic effect. Instead, a synergistic reduction in DeltaPsi(m) was observed upon phosphine-FCCP co-treatment suggesting that this is directly responsible for the subsequent mortality. These results support the hypothesis that phosphine-induced mortality results from the in vivo disruption of normal mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, we have identified a novel pathway that can be targeted to overcome genetic resistance to phosphine. PMID:18755236

  2. Naja naja oxiana Cobra Venom Cytotoxins CTI and CTII Disrupt Mitochondrial Membrane Integrity: Implications for Basic Three-Fingered Cytotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gasanov, Sardar E.; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Israilov, Firuz S.; Kim, Aleksandr A.; Rylova, Kamila A.; Zhang, Boris; Dagda, Ruben K.

    2015-01-01

    Cobra venom cytotoxins are basic three-fingered, amphipathic, non-enzymatic proteins that constitute a major fraction of cobra venom. While cytotoxins cause mitochondrial dysfunction in different cell types, the mechanisms by which cytotoxins bind to mitochondria remain unknown. We analyzed the abilities of CTI and CTII, S-type and P-type cytotoxins from Naja naja oxiana respectively, to associate with isolated mitochondrial fractions or with model membranes that simulate the mitochondrial lipid environment by using a myriad of biophysical techniques. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy data suggest that both cytotoxins bind to isolated mitochondrial fractions and promote the formation of aberrant non-bilayer structures. We then hypothesized that CTI and CTII bind to cardiolipin (CL) to disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Collectively, 31P-NMR, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), proton NMR (1H-NMR), deuterium NMR (2H-NMR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and erythrosine phosphorescence assays suggest that CTI and CTII bind to CL to generate non-bilayer structures and promote the permeabilization, dehydration and fusion of large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes enriched with CL. On the other hand, CTII but not CTI caused biophysical alterations of large unilamellar PC liposomes enriched with phosphatidylserine (PS). Mechanistically, single molecule docking simulations identified putative CL, PS and PC binding sites in CTI and CTII. While the predicted binding sites for PS and PC share a high number of interactive amino acid residues in CTI and CTII, the CL biding sites in CTII and CTI are more divergent as it contains additional interactive amino acid residues. Overall, our data suggest that cytotoxins physically associate with mitochondrial membranes by binding to CL to disrupt mitochondrial structural integrity. PMID:26091109

  3. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Dian-Lothrop, Elke A; Meinecke, Michael; Kepp, Oliver; Ross, Katharina; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Harsman, Anke; Hauf, Eva; Brinkmann, Volker; Günther, Dirk; Herrmann, Ines; Hurwitz, Robert; Rassow, Joachim; Wagner, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m). The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m) loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m) is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection. PMID:19851451

  4. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Moiz A; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  5. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  6. Phenethyl isothiocyanate-induced apoptosis in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells is mediated by reactive oxygen species-dependent disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Lew, Karen L; Zeng, Yan; Xiao, Hui; Marynowski, Stanley W; Dhir, Rajiv; Singh, Shivendra V

    2006-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induction by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), which is a cancer chemopreventive constituent of cruciferous vegetables, using PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model. The PEITC-induced cell death in PC-3 cells was associated with disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria to the cytosol and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were blocked in the presence of a combined mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase (Euk134). Ectopic expression of Bcl-xL, whose protein level is reduced markedly on treatment of PC-3 cells with PEITC, conferred partial protection against PEITC-induced apoptosis only at higher drug concentrations (>10 microM). Administration of 12 micromol PEITC/day (Monday through Friday) by oral gavage significantly retarded growth of PC-3 xenografts in athymic mice. For instance, 31 days after the initiation of PEITC administration, the average tumor volume in control mice (721 +/- 153 mm3) was approximately 2-fold higher compared with mice receiving 12 micromol PEITC/day. The PEITC-mediated inhibition of PC-3 xenograft growth was associated with induction of Bax and Bid proteins. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the PEITC-induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells is mediated by ROS-dependent disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential and regulated by Bax and Bid. PMID:16774948

  7. Two Trichothecene Mycotoxins from Myrothecium roridum Induce Apoptosis of HepG-2 Cells via Caspase Activation and Disruption of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Chen, Yuchan; Li, Haohua; Zhang, Weimin; Liu, Hongxin; Sun, Zhanghua; Liu, Taomei; Li, Saini

    2016-01-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are a type of sesquiterpenoid produced by various kinds of plantpathogenic fungi. In this study, two trichothecene toxins, namely, a novel cytotoxic epiroridin acid and a known trichothecene, mytoxin B, were isolated from the endophytic fungus Myrothecium roridum derived from the medicinal plant Pogostemon cablin. The two trichothecene mytoxins were confirmed to induce the apoptosis of HepG-2 cells by cytomorphology inspection, DNA fragmentation detection, and flow cytometry assay. The cytotoxic mechanisms of the two mycotoxins were investigated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and detection of mitochondrial membrane potential. The results showed that the two trichothecene mycotoxins induced the apoptosis of cancer cell HepG-2 via activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, up-regulation of bax gene expression, down-regulation of bcl-2 gene expression, and disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential of the HepG-2 cell. This study is the first to report on the cytotoxic mechanism of trichothecene mycotoxins from M. roridum. This study provides new clues for the development of attenuated trichothecene toxins in future treatment of liver cancer. PMID:27322225

  8. Cytotoxic effects induced by interferon-ω gene lipofection through ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in feline mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Marcela Solange; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Miranda, María Victoria; Finocchiaro, Liliana María Elena; Glikin, Gerardo Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Progress in comparative oncology promises advances in clinical cancer treatments for both companion animals and humans. In this context, feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) cells have been proposed as a suitable model to study human breast cancer. Based on our previous data about the advantages of using type I interferon gene therapy over the respective recombinant DNA derived protein, the present work explored the effects of feline interferon-ω gene (fIFNω) transfer on FMC cells. Three different cell variants derived from a single spontaneous highly aggressive FMC tumor were successfully established and characterized. Lipofection of the fIFNω gene displayed a significant cytotoxic effect on the three cell variants. The extent of the response was proportional to ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and calcium uptake. Moreover, a lower sensitivity to the treatment correlated with a higher malignant phenotype. Our results suggest that fIFNω lipofection could offer an alternative approach in veterinary oncology with equal or superior outcome and with less adverse effects than recombinant fIFNω therapy. PMID:27236354

  9. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  10. Mitochondrial fusion through membrane automata.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Konstantinos; Andronikos, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that malfunctions in mitochondrial processes can be blamed for diseases. However, the mechanism behind these operations is yet not sufficiently clear. In this work we present a novel approach to describe a biomolecular model for mitochondrial fusion using notions from the membrane computing. We use a case study defined in BioAmbient calculus and we show how to translate it in terms of a P automata variant. We combine brane calculi with (mem)brane automata to produce a new scheme capable of describing simple, realistic models. We propose the further use of similar methods and the test of other biomolecular models with the same behaviour. PMID:25417022

  11. Anticancer and apoptotic activities of oleanolic acid are mediated through cell cycle arrest and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Yong; Huang, Hong-Yan; Wu, Yin-Lian

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive form of cancer, with high rates of morbidity and mortality, a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the anticancer activity of oleanolic acid in HepG2 human HCC cells. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay, following administration of various doses of oleanolic acid. The effect of oleanolic acid on cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using flow cytometry with propidium iodide and rhodamine‑123 DNA‑binding cationic fluorescent dyes. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to detect morphological changes in HepG2 cells following oleanolic acid treatment. The results revealed that oleanolic acid induced a dose‑dependent, as well as time‑dependent inhibition in the growth of HepG2 cancer cells. Following acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining, treatment with various doses (0, 5, 25 and 50 µM) of oleanolic acid induced typical morphological changes associated with apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and apoptotic body formation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that oleanolic acid induced cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells at the sub‑G1 (apoptotic) phase of the cell cycle, in a dose‑dependent manner. Staining with Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide revealed that apoptosis occurred early in these cells. Oleanolic acid treatment also resulted in fragmentation of nuclear DNA in a dose‑dependent manner, producing the typical features of DNA laddering on an agarose gel. The results also demonstrated that oleanolic acid treatment resulted in a potent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which also occurred in a dose‑dependent manner. Therefore, oleanolic acid may be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of human HCC. PMID:26151733

  12. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Laila Cigana

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:24578708

  13. Plasma membrane disruption: repair, prevention, adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Steinhardt, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    Many metazoan cells inhabit mechanically stressful environments and, consequently, their plasma membranes are frequently disrupted. Survival requires that the cell rapidly repair or reseal the disruption. Rapid resealing is an active and complex structural modification that employs endomembrane as its primary building block, and cytoskeletal and membrane fusion proteins as its catalysts. Endomembrane is delivered to the damaged plasma membrane through exocytosis, a ubiquitous Ca2+-triggered response to disruption. Tissue and cell level architecture prevent disruptions from occurring, either by shielding cells from damaging levels of force, or, when this is not possible, by promoting safe force transmission through the plasma membrane via protein-based cables and linkages. Prevention of disruption also can be a dynamic cell or tissue level adaptation triggered when a damaging level of mechanical stress is imposed. Disease results from failure of either the preventive or resealing mechanisms.

  14. Enhanced induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in human U87 malignant glioma cells by aloe emodin.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samhani; Haris, Khalilah; Abdul Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Johan, Muhammad Farid; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Aloe emodin, one of the active compounds found in Aloe vera leaves, plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and death. It has been reported to promote the anti-cancer effects in various cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism of inducing apoptosis by this agent is poorly understood in glioma cells. This research is to investigate the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest inducing by aloe emodin on U87 human malignant glioma cells. Aloe emodin showed a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of U87 cells proliferation and decreased the percentage of viable U87 cells via the induction of apoptosis. Characteristic morphological changes, such as the formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed with confocal microscope by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, supporting our viability study and flow cytometry analysis results. Our data also demonstrated that aloe emodin arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and promoted the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U87 cells that indicated the early event of the mitochondria-induced apoptotic pathway. PMID:23869465

  15. Effect of short-term exposure to diesel exhaust particles and carboxylic acids on mitochondrial membrane disruption in airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Diesel exhaust has been shown to induce adverse pulmonary health effects; however, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are still unclear. Previous studies have imlplicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the toxicity of diesel exhaust particles (DEP). DEP contain...

  16. TCA Cycle and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Are Necessary for Diverse Biological Functions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Reyes, Inmaculada; Diebold, Lauren P; Kong, Hyewon; Schieber, Michael; Huang, He; Hensley, Christopher T; Mehta, Manan M; Wang, Tianyuan; Santos, Janine H; Woychik, Richard; Dufour, Eric; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Weinberg, Samuel E; Zhao, Yingming; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2016-01-21

    Mitochondrial metabolism is necessary for the maintenance of oxidative TCA cycle function and mitochondrial membrane potential. Previous attempts to decipher whether mitochondria are necessary for biological outcomes have been hampered by genetic and pharmacologic methods that simultaneously disrupt multiple functions linked to mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we report that inducible depletion of mitochondrial DNA (ρ(ο) cells) diminished respiration, oxidative TCA cycle function, and the mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in diminished cell proliferation, hypoxic activation of HIF-1, and specific histone acetylation marks. Genetic reconstitution only of the oxidative TCA cycle function specifically in these inducible ρ(ο) cells restored metabolites, resulting in re-establishment of histone acetylation. In contrast, genetic reconstitution of the mitochondrial membrane potential restored ROS, which were necessary for hypoxic activation of HIF-1 and cell proliferation. These results indicate that distinct mitochondrial functions associated with respiration are necessary for cell proliferation, epigenetics, and HIF-1 activation. PMID:26725009

  17. Disrupting membrane raft domains by alkylphospholipids.

    PubMed

    Gomide, A B; Thomé, C H; dos Santos, G A; Ferreira, G A; Faça, V M; Rego, E M; Greene, L J; Stabeli, R G; Ciancaglini, P; Itri, R

    2013-05-01

    Using phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy we study the influence of the alkylphospholipid, ALP, 10-(octyloxy) decyl-2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl phosphate, ODPC, in giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs, composed of DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), brain sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). The results show that adding 100μM ODPC (below CMC) to the outer solution of GUVs promotes DOPC membrane disruption over a period of 1h of continuous observation. On the other hand, the presence of SM and Chol in homogeneous fluid lipid bilayers protects the membrane from disruption. Interestingly, by adding 100μM ODPC to GUVs containing DOPC:SM:Chol (1:1:1), which display liquid ordered (Lo)-liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexistence, the domains rapidly disappear in less than 1min of ODPC contact with the membrane. The lipids are subsequently redistributed to liquid domains within a time course of 14-18min, reflecting that the homogenous phase was not thermodynamically stable, followed by rupture of the GUVs. A similar mechanism of action is also observed for perifosine, although to a larger extent. Therefore, the initial stage of lipid raft disruption by both ODPC and perifosine, and maybe other ALPS, by promoting lipid mixing, may be correlated with their toxicity upon neoplastic cells, since selective (dis)association of essential proteins within lipid raft microdomains must take place in the plasma membrane. PMID:23376656

  18. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    PubMed

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, <0.9). For the first time, we have demonstrated that mitochondrial MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. PMID:26722004

  19. Membrane Disruption Mechanism by Antimicrobial Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2011-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of small (less than100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbes. To understand the mechanism of membrane disruption by AMPs, we investigated, via atomic force microscopy, topological changes in supported phospholipid bilayers induced by protegrin-1 (PG-1). We have observed that PG-1 induces structural transformations, progressing from fingerlike instabilities at bilayer edges, to the formation of sievelike nanoporous structures and finally to a network of stripelike structures in a zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) model membrane in buffer, with increasing PG-1 concentration. Our results suggest that AMPs act to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. By varying the lipid composition, temperature and using AMPs with different secondary structures, we are able to identify factors other than electrostatics that are important for the efficacy of AMPs.

  20. Fullerenol cytotoxicity in kidney cells is associated with cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Lyles, Denise N.; Peifley, Kimberly; Lockett, Stephen; Neun, Barry W.; Hansen, Matthew; Clogston, Jeffrey; Stern, Stephan T.; McNeil, Scott E.

    2010-11-01

    Water soluble fullerenes, such as the hydroxylated fullerene, fullerenol (C{sub 60}OH{sub x}), are currently under development for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications in the field of nanotechnology. These molecules have been shown to undergo urinary clearance, yet there is limited data available on their renal biocompatibility. Here we examine the biological responses of renal proximal tubule cells (LLC-PK1) exposed to fullerenol. Fullerenol was found to be cytotoxic in the millimolar range, with viability assessed by the sulforhodamine B and trypan blue assays. Fullerenol-induced cell death was associated with cytoskeleton disruption and autophagic vacuole accumulation. Interaction with the autophagy pathway was evaluated in vitro by Lysotracker Red dye uptake, LC3-II marker expression and TEM. Fullerenol treatment also resulted in coincident loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP depletion, as measured by the Mitotracker Red dye and the luciferin-luciferase assays, respectively. Fullerenol-induced ATP depletion and loss of mitochondrial potential were partially ameliorated by co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine. In vitro fullerenol treatment did not result in appreciable oxidative stress, as measured by lipid peroxide and glutathione content. Based on these data, it is hypothesized that cytoskeleton disruption may be an initiating event in fullerenol cytotoxicity, leading to subsequent autophagy dysfunction and loss of mitochondrial capacity. As nanoparticle-induced cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are commonly reported in the literature, the proposed mechanism may be relevant for a variety of nanomaterials.

  1. Wafer-scale Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Assays

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Davila, Antonio; Zand, Katayoun; Douglas, Wallace C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial metabolic and biophysical parameters are associated with degenerative diseases and the aging process. To evaluate these biochemical parameters, current technology requires several hundred milligrams of isolated mitochondria for functional assays. Here, we demonstrate manufacturable wafer-scale mitochondrial functional assay lab-on-a-chip devices, which require mitochondrial protein quantities three orders of magnitude less than current assays, integrated onto 4” standard silicon wafer with new fabrication processes and materials. Membrane potential changes of isolated mitochondria from various well-established cell lines such as human HeLa cell line (Heb7A), human osteosarcoma cell line (143b) and mouse skeletal muscle tissue were investigated and compared. This second generation integrated lab-on-a-chip system developed here shows enhanced structural durability and reproducibility while increasing the sensitivity to changes in mitochondrial membrane potential by an order of magnitude as compared to first generation technologies. We envision this system to be a great candidate to substitute current mitochondrial assay systems. PMID:22627274

  2. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  3. Inhibition of mitochondrial membrane permeability as a putative pharmacological target for cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Didier; Assaly, Rana; Paradis, Stéphanie; Berdeaux, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. To date, the only treatment of complete ischemia is to restore blood flow; thus the search for new cardioprotective approaches is absolutely necessary to reduce the mortality associated with myocardial ischemia. Ischemia has long been considered to result in necrotic tissue damage but the reduction in oxygen supply can also lead to apoptosis. Therefore, in the last few years, mitochondria have become the subject of growing interest in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion since they are strongly involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Indeed, during ischemia-reperfusion, pathological signals converge in the mitochondria to induce permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane. Two classes of mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, emerged to explain mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. The first occurs via a non-specific channel known as the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in the inner and the outer membranes causing disruption of the impermeability of the inner membrane, and ultimately complete inhibition of mitochondrial function. The second mechanism, involving only the outer membrane, induces the release of cell death effectors. Thus, drugs able to block or to limit mitochondrial membrane permeabilization may be cytoprotective during ischemia-reperfusion. The objective of this review is to examine the pharmacological strategies capable of inhibiting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization induced by myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:19835566

  4. Bax inserts into the mitochondrial outer membrane by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cartron, Pierre-François; Bellot, Grégory; Oliver, Lisa; Grandier-Vazeille, Xavier; Manon, Stephen; Vallette, François M

    2008-09-01

    Bax insertion into the mitochondrial outer membrane is essential for the implementation of apoptosis. However, little is known about the first stage of Bax integration into the mitochondrial outer membrane. We have recently shown that TOM22, a mitochondrial outer membrane receptor, is important for insertion, although other reports have suggested that only mitochondrial lipids are involved in this process. Here, we show that monomers, but not dimers, of Bax require the presence of TOM22 and TOM40 to integrate into mitochondria. In addition we show that once inserted into the membrane, Bax can act as a receptor for cytosolic Bax. PMID:18687331

  5. Mitochondrial Membrane Studies Using Impedance Spectroscopy with Parallel pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Padmaraj, Divya; Pande, Rohit; Miller, John H.; Wosik, Jarek; Zagozdzon-Wosik, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    A biological microelectromechanical system (BioMEMS) device was designed to study complementary mitochondrial parameters important in mitochondrial dysfunction studies. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to many diseases, including diabetes, obesity, heart failure and aging, as these organelles play a critical role in energy generation, cell signaling and apoptosis. The synthesis of ATP is driven by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. We have developed a tool to study the ionic activity of the mitochondria in parallel with dielectric measurements (impedance spectroscopy) to gain a better understanding of the properties of the mitochondrial membrane. This BioMEMS chip includes: 1) electrodes for impedance studies of mitochondria designed as two- and four-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range and 2) ion-sensitive field effect transistors for proton studies of the electron transport chain and for possible monitoring other ions such as sodium, potassium and calcium. We have used uncouplers to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane and disrupt the ionic balance. Dielectric spectroscopy responded with a corresponding increase in impedance values pointing at changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. An electrical model was used to describe mitochondrial sample’s complex impedance frequency dependencies and the contribution of the membrane to overall impedance changes. The results prove that dielectric spectroscopy can be used as a tool for membrane potential studies. It can be concluded that studies of the electrochemical parameters associated with mitochondrial bioenergetics may render significant information on various abnormalities attributable to these organelles. PMID:25010497

  6. Membrane Curvature-sensing and Curvature-inducing Activity of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide and Its Implications for Membrane Disruption.

    PubMed

    Kegulian, Natalie C; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Apostolidou, Melania; Jayasinghe, Sajith A; Malmstadt, Noah; Butler, Peter C; Langen, Ralf

    2015-10-23

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is a 37-amino acid amyloid protein intimately associated with pancreatic islet β-cell dysfunction and death in type II diabetes. In this study, we combine spectroscopic methods and microscopy to investigate α-helical IAPP-membrane interactions. Using light scattering and fluorescence microscopy, we observe that larger vesicles become smaller upon treatment with human or rat IAPP. Electron microscopy shows the formation of various highly curved structures such as tubules or smaller vesicles in a membrane-remodeling process, and spectrofluorometric detection of vesicle leakage shows disruption of membrane integrity. This effect is stronger for human IAPP than for the less toxic rat IAPP. From CD spectra in the presence of different-sized vesicles, we also uncover the membrane curvature-sensing ability of IAPP and find that it transitions from inducing to sensing membrane curvature when lipid negative charge is decreased. Our in vivo EM images of immunogold-labeled rat IAPP and human IAPP show both forms to localize to mitochondrial cristae, which contain not only locally curved membranes but also phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, lipids with high spontaneous negative curvature. Disruption of membrane integrity by induction of membrane curvature could apply more broadly to other amyloid proteins and be responsible for membrane damage observed in other amyloid diseases as well. PMID:26283787

  7. Role of mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system in protein biogenesis of the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Maria; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Zerbes, Ralf M.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Stroud, David A.; von der Malsburg, Karina; Müller, Judith M.; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Perschil, Inge; Warscheid, Bettina; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Daum, Günther; Wiedemann, Nils; Becker, Thomas; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria contain two membranes, the outer membrane and the inner membrane with folded cristae. The mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS) is a large protein complex required for maintaining inner membrane architecture. MINOS interacts with both preprotein transport machineries of the outer membrane, the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). It is unknown, however, whether MINOS plays a role in the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins. We have dissected the interaction of MINOS with TOM and SAM and report that MINOS binds to both translocases independently. MINOS binds to the SAM complex via the conserved polypeptide transport–associated domain of Sam50. Mitochondria lacking mitofilin, the large core subunit of MINOS, are impaired in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins of the outer membrane, whereas mutant mitochondria lacking any of the other five MINOS subunits import β-barrel proteins in a manner similar to wild-type mitochondria. We show that mitofilin is required at an early stage of β-barrel biogenesis that includes the initial translocation through the TOM complex. We conclude that MINOS interacts with TOM and SAM independently and that the core subunit mitofilin is involved in biogenesis of outer membrane β-barrel proteins. PMID:22918945

  8. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology. PMID:26813789

  9. Kinetics membrane disruption due to drug interactions of chlorpromazine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Nussio, Matthew R; Sykes, Matthew J; Miners, John O; Shapter, Joseph G

    2009-01-20

    Drug-membrane interactions assume considerable importance in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism. Here, we present the interaction of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) with supported phospholipid bilayers. It was demonstrated that CPZ binds rapidly to phospholipid bilayers, disturbing the molecular ordering of the phospholipids. These interactions were observed to follow first order kinetics, with an activation energy of approximately 420 kJ mol(-1). Time-dependent membrane disruption was also observed for the interaction with CPZ, such that holes appeared in the phospholipid bilayer after the interaction of CPZ. For this process of membrane disruption, "lag-burst" kinetics was demonstrated. PMID:19093750

  10. Proteasome Impairment Induces Recovery of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and an Alternative Pathway of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shirozu, Ryohei; Yashiroda, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital and highly dynamic organelles that continuously fuse and divide to maintain mitochondrial quality. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs cellular integrity and is known to be associated with various human diseases. However, the mechanism by which the quality of mitochondria is maintained remains largely unexplored. Here we show that impaired proteasome function recovers the growth of yeast cells lacking Fzo1, a pivotal protein for mitochondrial fusion. Decreased proteasome activity increased the mitochondrial oxidoreductase protein Mia40 and the ratio of the short isoform of mitochondrial intermembrane protein Mgm1 (s-Mgm1) to the long isoform (l-Mgm1). The increase in Mia40 restored mitochondrial membrane potential, while the increase in the s-Mgm1/l-Mgm1 ratio promoted mitochondrial fusion in an Fzo1-independent manner. Our findings demonstrate a new pathway for mitochondrial quality control that is induced by proteasome impairment. PMID:26552703

  11. Mitochondrial Structure and Function Are Disrupted by Standard Isolation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; Taivassalo, Tanja; Ritchie, Darmyn; Wright, Kathryn J.; Thomas, Melissa M.; Romestaing, Caroline; Hepple, Russell T.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria regulate critical components of cellular function via ATP production, reactive oxygen species production, Ca2+ handling and apoptotic signaling. Two classical methods exist to study mitochondrial function of skeletal muscles: isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers. Whereas mitochondrial isolation removes a portion of the mitochondria from their cellular environment, myofiber permeabilization preserves mitochondrial morphology and functional interactions with other intracellular components. Despite this, isolated mitochondria remain the most commonly used method to infer in vivo mitochondrial function. In this study, we directly compared measures of several key aspects of mitochondrial function in both isolated mitochondria and permeabilized myofibers of rat gastrocnemius muscle. Here we show that mitochondrial isolation i) induced fragmented organelle morphology; ii) dramatically sensitized the permeability transition pore sensitivity to a Ca2+ challenge; iii) differentially altered mitochondrial respiration depending upon the respiratory conditions; and iv) dramatically increased H2O2 production. These alterations are qualitatively similar to the changes in mitochondrial structure and function observed in vivo after cellular stress-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, but are generally of much greater magnitude. Furthermore, mitochondrial isolation markedly altered electron transport chain protein stoichiometry. Collectively, our results demonstrate that isolated mitochondria possess functional characteristics that differ fundamentally from those of intact mitochondria in permeabilized myofibers. Our work and that of others underscores the importance of studying mitochondrial function in tissue preparations where mitochondrial structure is preserved and all mitochondria are represented. PMID:21512578

  12. Toxicity inhibitors protect lipid membranes from disruption by Aβ42.

    PubMed

    Malishev, Ravit; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Levi-Kalisman, Yael; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Jelinek, Raz

    2015-11-18

    Although the precise molecular factors linking amyloid β-protein (Aβ) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been deciphered, interaction of Aβ with cellular membranes has an important role in the disease. However, most therapeutic strategies targeting Aβ have focused on interfering with Aβ self-assembly rather than with its membrane interactions. Here, we studied the impact of three toxicity inhibitors on membrane interactions of Aβ42, the longer form of Aβ, which is associated most strongly with AD. The inhibitors included the four-residue C-terminal fragment Aβ(39-42), the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and the lysine-specific molecular tweezer, CLR01, all of which previously were shown to disrupt different steps in Aβ42 self-assembly. Biophysical experiments revealed that incubation of Aβ42 with each of the three modulators affected membrane interactions in a distinct manner. Interestingly, EGCG and CLR01 were found to have significant interaction with membranes themselves. However, membrane bilayer disruption was reduced when the compounds were preincubated with Aβ42, suggesting that binding of the assembly modulators to the peptide attenuated their membrane interactions. Importantly, our study reveals that even though the three tested compounds affect Aβ42 assembly differently, membrane interactions were significantly inhibited upon incubation of each compound with Aβ42, suggesting that preventing the interaction of Aβ42 with the membrane contributes substantially to inhibition of its toxicity by each compound. The data suggest that interference with membrane interactions is an important factor for Aβ42 toxicity inhibitors and should be taken into account in potential therapeutic strategies, in addition to disruption or remodeling of amyloid assembly. PMID:26317327

  13. Dysfunction of Rice Mitochondrial Membrane Induced by Yb3+.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia-Ling; Wu, Man; Liu, Wen; Feng, Zhi-Jiang; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Ytterbium (Yb), a widely used rare earth element, is treated as highly toxic to human being and adverseness to plant. Mitochondria play a significant role in plant growth and development, and are proposed as a potential target for ytterbium toxicity. In this paper, the biological effect of Yb(3+) on isolated rice mitochondria was investigated. We found that Yb(3+) with high concentrations (200 ~ 600 μM) not only induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (mtMPT), but also disturbed the mitochondrial ultrastructure. Moreover, Yb(3+) caused the respiratory chain damage, ROS formation, membrane potential decrease, and mitochondrial complex II activity reverse. The results above suggested that Yb(3+) with high concentrations could induce mitochondrial membrane dysfunction. These findings will support some valuable information to the safe application of Yb-based agents. PMID:26305923

  14. Mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization and remodelling in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    Many human pathologies are associated with defects in mitochondria such as diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cancer. This tiny organelle is involved in a plethora of processes in mammalian cells, including energy production, lipid metabolism and cell death. In the so-called intrinsic apoptotic pathway, the outer mitochondrial membrane (MOM) is premeabilized by the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 members Bax and Bak, allowing the release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome c from the inter-membrane space into the cytosol. At the same time, mitochondria fragment in response to Drp-1 activation suggesting that mitochondrial fission could play a role in mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP). In this review, we will discuss the link that could exist between mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery, Bcl-2 family members and MOMP. PMID:19439192

  15. Cadmium induced inhibition of autophagy is associated with microtubule disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary rat cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Qiwen; Song, Ruilong; Zhang, Yajing; Yang, Jinlong; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Liu, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that mitochondria serve as direct targets for cadmium- (Cd-) induced neuronal toxicity, which can be attenuated by autophagy. The molecular mechanisms' underlying Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy in neurons are not known. In this study, we studied the upstream signaling pathways induced by Cd-mediated mitochondrial metabolism alterations using primary rat neuron as a model. We found that Cd induced the destruction of microtubules (MTs), and resulted in tau hyper-phosphorylation and decreased acetylated tubulin levels, which were related to a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. As a result of taxol disruption, alterations in macroautophagy, like altered cellular distribution of the autophagy-related protein light chain 3 beta (LC3B) and the expression of Atg5 were found compared with Cd group. We found for the first time that MT disruption induced by Cd reduced the levels of autophagy, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. These observations suggest new therapeutic strategies aimed to activate or ameliorate pro-survival macroautophagy. PMID:26582496

  16. Dimer ribbons of ATP synthase shape the inner mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-01-01

    ATP synthase converts the electrochemical potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane into chemical energy, producing the ATP that powers the cell. Using electron cryo-tomography we show that the ATP synthase of mammalian mitochondria is arranged in long ∼1-μm rows of dimeric supercomplexes, located at the apex of cristae membranes. The dimer ribbons enforce a strong local curvature on the membrane with a 17-nm outer radius. Calculations of the electrostatic field strength indicate a significant increase in charge density, and thus in the local pH gradient of ∼0.5 units in regions of high membrane curvature. We conclude that the mitochondrial cristae act as proton traps, and that the proton sink of the ATP synthase at the apex of the compartment favours effective ATP synthesis under proton-limited conditions. We propose that the mitochondrial ATP synthase organises itself into dimer ribbons to optimise its own performance. PMID:18323778

  17. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Indig, F E; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R; Shimmo, R

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized onto immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary, resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC (U87MG) column, and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08±0.49 and 0.0086±0.0006μM, respectively, consistent with previously reported values. Furthermore, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX, and rotenone. In addition, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC (U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  18. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  19. Ischemic Preconditioning Preserves Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Limits Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Quarrie, Ricardo; Lee, Daniel S.; Steinbaugh, Gregory; Cramer, Brandon; Erdahl, Warren; Pfeiffer, Douglas R.; Zweier, Jay L.; Crestanello, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial superoxide radical (O2•−) production increases after cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR). Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) preserves mitochondrial function and attenuates O2•− production, but the mechanism is unknown. Mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔΨ) is known to affect O2•− production; mitochondrial depolarization decreases O2•− formation. We examined the relationship between O2•− production and mΔΨ during IR and IPC. Materials/Methods Rat hearts were subjected to Control or IPC. Mitochondria were isolated at end-equilibration (End EQ), end-ischemia (End I) and end-reperfusion (End RP). mΔΨ was measured using a tetraphenylphosphonium electrode. Mitochondrial O2•− production was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) using DMPO spin trap. Cytochrome c levels were measured using high pressure liquid chromatography. Results IPC preserved mΔΨ at End I (−156±5 vs. −131±6 mV, p<0.001) and End RP (−168±2 vs. −155±2 mV, p<0.05). At End RP, IPC attenuated O2•− production (2527±221 vs. 3523±250 AU/mg protein, p<0.05). IPC preserved cytochrome c levels (351±14 vs. 269±16 picomoles/mg protein, p<0.05) at End RP, and decreased mitochondrial cristae disruption (10±4 vs. 33±7%, p<0.05) and amorphous density formation (18±4 vs. 28±1%, p<0.05). Conclusion We conclude that IPC preserves mΔΨ, possibly by limiting disruption of mitochondrial inner membrane. IPC also decreases mitochondrial O2•− production and preserves mitochondrial ultrastructure after IR. While it was previously held that slight decreases in mΔΨ decrease O2•− production, our results indicate that preservation of mΔΨ is associated with decreased O2•− and preservation of cardiac function in IPC. These findings indicate that the mechanism of IPC may not involve mΔΨ depolarization, but rather preservation of mitochondrial electrochemical potential. PMID:22763215

  20. Plant mitochondrial dynamics and the role of membrane lipids

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ronghui; Hu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that are continuously shaped by the antagonistic fission and fusion processes. The major machineries of mitochondrial fission and fusion, as well as mechanisms that regulate the function of key players in these processes have been analyzed in different experimental systems. In plants however, the mitochondrial fusion machinery is still largely unknown, and the regulatory mechanisms of the fission machinery are just beginning to be elucidated. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying plant mitochondrial dynamics and regulation of some of the key factors, especially the roles of membrane lipids such as cardiolipin. PMID:26317892

  1. Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteome of Trypanosoma brucei Reveals Novel Factors Required to Maintain Mitochondrial Morphology*

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Moritz; Wiese, Sebastian; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Jackson, Christopher; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes devastating diseases in humans and animals. It diverged from most other eukaryotes very early in evolution and, as a consequence, has an unusual mitochondrial biology. Moreover, mitochondrial functions and morphology are highly regulated throughout the life cycle of the parasite. The outer mitochondrial membrane defines the boundary of the organelle. Its properties are therefore key for understanding how the cytosol and mitochondria communicate and how the organelle is integrated into the metabolism of the whole cell. We have purified the mitochondrial outer membrane of T. brucei and characterized its proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for protein abundance profiling in combination with statistical analysis. Our results show that the trypanosomal outer membrane proteome consists of 82 proteins, two-thirds of which have never been associated with mitochondria before. 40 proteins share homology with proteins of known functions. The function of 42 proteins, 33 of which are specific to trypanosomatids, remains unknown. 11 proteins are essential for the disease-causing bloodstream form of T. brucei and therefore may be exploited as novel drug targets. A comparison with the outer membrane proteome of yeast defines a set of 17 common proteins that are likely present in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. Known factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology are virtually absent in T. brucei. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated ablation of three outer membrane proteins of unknown function resulted in a collapse of the network-like mitochondrion of procyclic cells and for the first time identified factors that control mitochondrial shape in T. brucei. PMID:23221899

  2. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T.; Eckert, Debra M.; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity. PMID:23530241

  3. A Novel DNA-Binding Protein Bound to the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane Restores the Null Mutation of Mitochondrial Histone Abf2p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Hyoung; Ha, Sang Jin; Kao, Ling Rong; Megraw, Timothy L.; Chae, Chi-Bom

    1998-01-01

    The yeast mitochondrial HMG-box protein, Abf2p, is essential for maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. To better understand the role of Abf2p in the maintenance of the mitochondrial chromosome, we have isolated a multicopy suppressor (YHM2) of the temperature-sensitive defect associated with an abf2 null mutation. The function of Yhm2p was characterized at the molecular level. Yhm2p has 314 amino acid residues, and the deduced amino acid sequence is similar to that of a family of mitochondrial carrier proteins. Yhm2p is localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane and is also associated with mitochondrial DNA in vivo. Yhm2p exhibits general DNA-binding activity in vitro. Thus, Yhm2p appears to be novel in that it is a membrane-bound DNA-binding protein. A sequence that is similar to the HMG DNA-binding domain is important for the DNA-binding activity of Yhm2p, and a mutation in this region abolishes the ability of YHM2 to suppress the temperature-sensitive defect of respiration of the abf2 null mutant. Disruption of YHM2 causes a significant growth defect in the presence of nonfermentable carbon sources such as glycerol and ethanol, and the cells have defects in respiration as determined by 2,3,5,-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Yhm2p may function as a member of the protein machinery for the mitochondrial inner membrane attachment site of mitochondrial DNA during replication and segregation of mitochondrial genomes. PMID:9742088

  4. Paraquat Induces Cell Death Through Impairing Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuen-Lin; Chao, Chih-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lu, Mei-Kuang; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Yang, Ying-Chen; Wang, Vin-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Huang, Nai-Kuei

    2016-05-01

    Paraquat (PQ) as a Parkinsonian mimetic has been demonstrated to impair dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons and is highly correlated with the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) where the death of DAergic neurons has been mainly attributed to impaired mitochondrial functioning. In this study, PQ-induced cytotoxicity focusing on mitochondrial membrane permeability (MMP), which has been implicated to play a part in neurodegeneration, was investigated. Primarily, PQ-induced cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were inhibited by an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX), indicating the toxic effect of PQ redox cycling. Further, dibucaine and cyclosporin A which respectively inhibit mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channels (MAC) and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP) were used and found to prevent PQ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, such as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased MMP, mitochondrial ROS, and pro-apoptotic factor release. Knockdown of bax and/or bak blocked PQ-induced mitochondrial clusterization of Bax and/or Bak and cytotoxicity, demonstrating the significance of MAC which is composed of Bax and/or Bak. This clusterization coincided with the release of mitochondrial apoptotic factors before there was an increase in inner MMP, indicating that MAC may precede mPTP formation. Besides, NOX inhibitor but not dibucaine attenuated the earlier PQ-induced cytosolic ROS formation or Bax and/or Bak clusterization indicating PQ redox cycling may account for MAC formation. In this model, we have resolved for the first that PQ cytotoxicity through redox cycling may sequentially result in increased outer (MAC) and inner (mPTP) MMP and suggested MMP could be implicated as a therapeutic target in treating neurodegenerative diseases like PD. PMID:25947082

  5. Ubiquilins Chaperone and Triage Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins for Degradation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Eisuke; Zavodszky, Eszter; Shao, Sichen; Wohlever, Matthew L; Keenan, Robert J; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how mitochondrial membrane proteins remain soluble in the cytosol until their delivery to mitochondria or degradation at the proteasome. We show that Ubiquilin family proteins bind transmembrane domains in the cytosol to prevent aggregation and temporarily allow opportunities for membrane targeting. Over time, Ubiquilins recruit an E3 ligase to ubiquitinate bound clients. The attached ubiquitin engages Ubiquilin's UBA domain, normally bound to an intramolecular UBL domain, and stabilizes the Ubiquilin-client complex. This conformational change precludes additional chances at membrane targeting for the client, while simultaneously freeing Ubiquilin's UBL domain for targeting to the proteasome. Loss of Ubiquilins by genetic ablation or sequestration in polyglutamine aggregates leads to accumulation of non-inserted mitochondrial membrane protein precursors. These findings define Ubiquilins as a family of chaperones for cytosolically exposed transmembrane domains and explain how they use ubiquitin to triage clients for degradation via coordinated intra- and intermolecular interactions. PMID:27345149

  6. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  7. Membrane-lipid unsaturation and mitochondrial function in Saacharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K; Houghton, R L; Bertoli, E; Griffiths, D E

    1975-01-01

    The lipid composition of yeast cells was manipulated by the use of an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a 2-3-fold decrease in the concentration of cytochromes a+a3 when the unsaturated fatty acid content of the cells was decreased from 60-70% of the total fatty acid to 20-30%. The amounts of cytochromes b and c were also decreased under these conditions, but to a lesser extent. Further lipid depletion, to proportions of less than 20% unsaturated fatty acid, led to a dramatic decrease in the content of all cytochromes, particularly cytochromes a+a3. The ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase), succinate oxidase and NADH oxidase activities of the isolated mitochondria also varied with the degree of unsaturation of the membrane lipids. The lower the percentage of unsaturated fatty acid, the lower was the enzymic activity. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATPase by oligomycin, on the other hand, was not markedly influenced by the membrane-lipid unsaturation. Npn-linear Arrenius plots of mitochondrial membrane-bound enzymes showed transition temperatures that were dependent on the degree of membrane-lipid unsaturation. The greater the degree of lipid unsaturation, the lower was the transition temperature. It was concluded that the degree of unsaturation of the membrane lipids plays an important role in determining the properties of mitochondrial membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:125585

  8. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  9. Functions of outer membrane receptors in mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiya; Kohda, Daisuke

    2002-09-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytosol as precursor proteins and are imported into mitochondria. The targeting signals for mitochondria are encoded in the presequences or in the mature parts of the precursor proteins, and are decoded by the receptor sites in the translocator complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The recently determined NMR structure of the general import receptor Tom20 in a complex with a presequence peptide reveals that, although the amphiphilicity and positive charges of the presequence is essential for the import ability of the presequence, Tom20 recognizes only the amphiphilicity, but not the positive charges. This leads to a new model that different features associated with the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the precursor protein can be recognized by the mitochondrial protein import system in different steps during the import. PMID:12191763

  10. Phosphatidylserine Decarboxylase 1 (Psd1) Promotes Mitochondrial Fusion by Regulating the Biophysical Properties of the Mitochondrial Membrane and Alternative Topogenesis of Mitochondrial Genome Maintenance Protein 1 (Mgm1)*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Eliana Y. L.; McQuibban, G. Angus

    2012-01-01

    Non–bilayer-forming lipids such as cardiolipin, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are proposed to generate negative membrane curvature, promoting membrane fusion. However, the mechanism by which lipids regulate mitochondrial fusion remains poorly understood. Here, we show that mitochondrial-localized Psd1, the key yeast enzyme that synthesizes PE, is required for proper mitochondrial morphology and fusion. Yeast cells lacking Psd1 exhibit fragmented and aggregated mitochondria with impaired mitochondrial fusion during mating. More importantly, we demonstrate that a reduction in PE reduces the rate of lipid mixing during fusion of liposomes with lipid compositions reflecting the mitochondrial membrane. This suggests that the mitochondrial fusion defect in the Δpsd1 strain could be due to the altered biophysical properties of the mitochondrial membrane, resulting in reduced fusion kinetics. The Δpsd1 strain also has impaired mitochondrial activity such as oxidative phosphorylation and reduced mitochondrial ATP levels which are due to a reduction in mitochondrial PE. The loss of Psd1 also impairs the biogenesis of s-Mgm1, a protein essential for mitochondrial fusion, further exacerbating the mitochondrial fusion defect of the Δpsd1 strain. Increasing s-Mgm1 levels in Δpsd1 cells markedly reduced mitochondrial aggregation. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial PE regulates mitochondrial fusion by regulating the biophysical properties of the mitochondrial membrane and by enhancing the biogenesis of s-Mgm1. While several proteins are required to orchestrate the intricate process of membrane fusion, we propose that specific phospholipids of the mitochondrial membrane promote fusion by enhancing lipid mixing kinetics and by regulating the action of profusion proteins. PMID:23045528

  11. Mitochondrial membrane potential is regulated by vimentin intermediate filaments

    PubMed Central

    Chernoivanenko, Ivan S.; Matveeva, Elena A.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Goldman, Robert D.; Minin, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates that the association of mitochondria with vimentin intermediate filaments (VIFs) measurably increases their membrane potential. This increase is detected by quantitatively comparing the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the membrane potential-sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine-ethyl ester (TMRE) in murine vimentin-null fibroblasts with that in the same cells expressing human vimentin (∼35% rise). When vimentin expression is silenced by small hairpin RNA (shRNA) to reduce vimentin by 90%, the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria decreases by 20%. The increase in membrane potential is caused by specific interactions between a subdomain of the non-α-helical N terminus (residues 40 to 93) of vimentin and mitochondria. In rho 0 cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and consequently missing several key proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (ρ0 cells), the membrane potential generated by an alternative anaerobic process is insensitive to the interactions between mitochondria and VIF. The results of our studies show that the close association between mitochondria and VIF is important both for determining their position in cells and their physiologic activity.—Chernoivanenko, I. S., Matveeva, E. A., Gelfand, V. I., Goldman, R. D., Minin, A. A. Mitochondrial membrane potential is regulated by vimentin intermediate filaments. PMID:25404709

  12. Topological Transitions in Mitochondrial Membranes controlled by Apoptotic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Sanders, Lori K.; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Ivashyna, Olena; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2010-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family comprises pro-apoptotic proteins, capable of permeabilizing the mitochondrial membrane, and anti-apoptotic members interacting in an antagonistic fashion to regulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). They offer potential therapeutic targets to re-engage cellular suicide in tumor cells but the extensive network of implicated protein-protein interactions has impeded full understanding of the decision pathway. We show, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, that pro-apoptotic proteins interact with mitochondrial-like model membranes to generate saddle-splay (negative Gaussian) curvature topologically required for pore formation, while anti-apoptotic proteins can deactivate curvature generation by molecules drastically different from Bcl-2 family members and offer evidence for membrane-curvature mediated interactions general enough to affect very disparate systems.

  13. Coverage and disruption of phospholipid membranes by oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pera, Harke; Nolte, Tom M; Leermakers, Frans A M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2014-12-01

    We studied the interactions of silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with phospholipid membranes and show how electrostatics plays an important role. For this, we systematically varied the charge density of both the membranes by changing their lipid composition and the oxide particles by changing the pH. For the silica nanoparticles, results from our recently presented fluorescence vesicle leakage assay are combined with data on particle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers obtained by optical reflectometry. Because of the strong tendency of the TiO2 nanoparticles to aggregate, the interaction of these particles with the bilayer was studied only in the leakage assay. Self-consistent field (SCF) modeling was applied to interpret the results on a molecular level. At low charge densities of either the silica nanoparticles or the lipid bilayers, no electrostatic barrier to adsorption exists. However, the adsorption rate and adsorbed amounts drop with increasing (negative) charge densities on particles and membranes because of electric double-layer repulsion, which is confirmed by the effect of the ionic strength. SCF calculations show that charged particles change the structure of lipid bilayers by a reorientation of a fraction of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups. This explains the affinity of the silica particles for pure PC lipid layers, even at relatively high particle charge densities. Particle adsorption does not always lead to the disruption of the membrane integrity, as is clear from a comparison of the leakage and adsorption data for the silica particles. The attraction should be strong enough, and in line with this, we found that for positively charged TiO2 particles vesicle disruption increases with increasing negative charge density on the membranes. Our results may be extrapolated to a broader range of oxide nanoparticles and ultimately may be used for establishing more accurate nanoparticle toxicity assessments and drug

  14. Bcl-xL-mediated antioxidant function abrogates the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics induced by LRRK2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Saez-Atienzar, Sara; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; da Casa, Carmen; Perez-Dolz, Laura; Blesa, Jose R; Nava, Eduardo; Galindo, Maria F; Jordan, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    We have used the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y overexpressing Bcl-xL (SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL) to clarify the effects of this mitochondrial protein on the control of mitochondrial dynamics and the autophagic processes which occur after the inhibition of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) with GSK2578215A. In wild type (SH-SY5Y/Neo) cells, GSK2578215A (1nM) caused a disruption of mitochondrial morphology and an imbalance in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as indicated by an increase in dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and 4-hydroxynonenal. However, SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells under GSK2578215A treatment, unlike the wild type, preserved a high mitochondrial membrane potential and did not exhibit apoptotical chromatins. In contrast to wild type cells, in SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, GSK2578215A did not induce mitochondrial translocation of neither dynamin related protein-1 nor the proapoptotic protein, Bax. In SH-SY5Y/Neo, but not SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, mitochondrial fragmentation elicited by GSK2578215A precedes an autophagic response. Furthermore, the overexpression of Bcl-xL protein restores the autophagic flux pathway disrupted by this inhibitor. SH-SY5Y/Neo, but not SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, responded to LRRK2 inhibition by an increase in the levels of acetylated tubulin, indicating that this was abrogated by Bcl-xL overexpression. This hyperacetylation of tubulin took place earlier than any of the above-mentioned events suggesting that it is involved in the autophagic flux interruption. Pre-treatment with tempol prevented the GSK2578215A-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, autophagy and the rise in acetylated tubulin in SH-SY5Y/Neo cells. Thus, these data support the notion that ROS act as a second messenger connexion between LRRK2 inhibition and these deleterious responses, which are markedly alleviated by the Bcl-xL-mediated ROS generation blockade. PMID:26435084

  15. Two-step mechanism of membrane disruption by Aβ through membrane fragmentation and pore formation.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Michele F M; Kotler, Samuel A; Brender, Jeffrey R; Chen, Jennifer; Lee, Dong-kuk; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-08-22

    Disruption of cell membranes by Aβ is believed to be one of the key components of Aβ toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that membrane disruption by Aβ occurs by a two-step process, with the initial formation of ion-selective pores followed by nonspecific fragmentation of the lipid membrane during amyloid fiber formation. Immediately after the addition of freshly dissolved Aβ(1-40), defects form on the membrane that share many of the properties of Aβ channels originally reported from single-channel electrical recording, such as cation selectivity and the ability to be blockaded by zinc. By contrast, subsequent amyloid fiber formation on the surface of the membrane fragments the membrane in a way that is not cation selective and cannot be stopped by zinc ions. Moreover, we observed that the presence of ganglioside enhances both the initial pore formation and the fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation process. Whereas pore formation by freshly dissolved Aβ(1-40) is weakly observed in the absence of gangliosides, fiber-dependent membrane fragmentation can only be observed in their presence. These results provide insights into the toxicity of Aβ and may aid in the design of specific compounds to alleviate the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22947931

  16. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Svarnas, P.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Clement, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-24

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  17. Atmospheric-pressure guided streamers for liposomal membrane disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svarnas, P.; Matrali, S. H.; Gazeli, K.; Aleiferis, Sp.; Clément, F.; Antimisiaris, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The potential to use liposomes (LIPs) as a cellular model in order to study interactions of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma with cells is herein investigated. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma is formed by a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. Large multilamellar vesicle liposomes, consisted of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol, are prepared by the thin film hydration technique, to encapsulate a small hydrophilic dye, i.e., calcein. The plasma-induced release of calcein from liposomes is then used as a measure of liposome membrane integrity and, consequently, interaction between the cold atmospheric plasma and lipid bilayers. Physical mechanisms leading to membrane disruption are suggested, based on the plasma characterization including gas temperature calculation.

  18. Urinary mitochondrial DNA is a biomarker of mitochondrial disruption and renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Ryan M.; Stallons, L. Jay; Kneff, Joshua E.; Alge, Joseph L.; Harmon, Jennifer L.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Arthur, John M.; Beeson, Craig C.; Chan, Sherine L.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the initiation and progression of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, no biomarkers exist linking renal injury to mitochondrial function and integrity. To this end, we evaluated urinary mitochondrial DNA (UmtDNA) as a biomarker of renal injury and function in humans with AKI following cardiac surgery. mtDNA was isolated from the urine of patients following cardiac surgery and quantified by qPCR. Patients were stratified into no AKI, stable AKI and progressive AKI groups based on Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) staging. UmtDNA was elevated in progressive AKI patients, and was associated with progression of patients with AKI at collection to higher AKIN stages. To evaluate the relationship of UmtDNA to measures of renal mitochondrial integrity in AKI, mice were subjected to sham surgery or varying degrees of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. UmtDNA increased in mice after 10-15 minutes of ischemia and positively correlated with ischemia time. Furthermore, UmtDNA was predictive of AKI in the mouse model. Finally, UmtDNA levels were negatively correlated with renal cortical mtDNA and mitochondrial gene expression. These translational studies demonstrate that UmtDNA is associated with recovery from AKI following cardiac surgery by serving as an indicator of mitochondrial integrity. Thus, UmtDNA may serve as valuable biomarker for the development of mitochondrial targeted therapies in AKI. PMID:26287315

  19. Altered Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Proteome As the Basis of Disruption of Mitochondrial Function in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Zabielski, Piotr; Lanza, Ian R; Gopala, Srinivas; Heppelmann, Carrie J Holtz; Bergen, H Robert; Dasari, Surendra; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2016-03-01

    Insulin plays pivotal role in cellular fuel metabolism in skeletal muscle. Despite being the primary site of energy metabolism, the underlying mechanism on how insulin deficiency deranges skeletal muscle mitochondrial physiology remains to be fully understood. Here we report an important link between altered skeletal muscle proteome homeostasis and mitochondrial physiology during insulin deficiency. Deprivation of insulin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice decreased mitochondrial ATP production, reduced coupling and phosphorylation efficiency, and increased oxidant emission in skeletal muscle. Proteomic survey revealed that the mitochondrial derangements during insulin deficiency were related to increased mitochondrial protein degradation and decreased protein synthesis, resulting in reduced abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and β-oxidation. However, a paradoxical upregulation of proteins involved in cellular uptake of fatty acids triggered an accumulation of incomplete fatty acid oxidation products in skeletal muscle. These data implicate a mismatch of β-oxidation and fatty acid uptake as a mechanism leading to increased oxidative stress in diabetes. This notion was supported by elevated oxidative stress in cultured myotubes exposed to palmitate in the presence of a β-oxidation inhibitor. Together, these results indicate that insulin deficiency alters the balance of proteins involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle, leading to impaired mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. PMID:26718503

  20. Bcl-2 apoptosis proteins, mitochondrial membrane curvature, and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Sanders, Lori; Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard; Ivashyna, Olena; Christenson, Eric; Schlesinger, Paul; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Santangelo, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Critical interactions between Bcl-2 family proteins permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane, a common decision point early in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway that irreversibly commits the cell to death. However, a unified picture integrating the essential non-passive role of lipid membranes with the contested dynamics of Bcl-2 regulation remains unresolved. Correlating results between synchrotron x-ray diffraction and microscopy in cell-free assays, we report activation of pro-apoptotic Bax induces strong pure negative Gaussian membrane curvature topologically necessary for pore formation and membrane remodeling events. Strikingly, Bcl-xL suppresses not only Bax-induced pore formation, but also membrane remodeling by disparate systems including cell penetrating, antimicrobial or viral fusion peptides, and bacterial toxin, none of which have BH3 allosteric domains to mediate direct binding. We propose a parallel mode of Bcl-2 pore regulation in which Bax and Bcl-xL induce antagonistic and mutually interacting Gaussian membrane curvatures. The universal nature of curvature-mediated interactions allows synergy with direct binding mechanisms, and potentially accounts for the Bcl-2 family modulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics.

  1. Declining NAD(+) induces a pseudohypoxic state disrupting nuclear-mitochondrial communication during aging.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana P; Price, Nathan L; Ling, Alvin J Y; Moslehi, Javid J; Montgomery, Magdalene K; Rajman, Luis; White, James P; Teodoro, João S; Wrann, Christiane D; Hubbard, Basil P; Mercken, Evi M; Palmeira, Carlos M; de Cabo, Rafael; Rolo, Anabela P; Turner, Nigel; Bell, Eric L; Sinclair, David A

    2013-12-19

    Ever since eukaryotes subsumed the bacterial ancestor of mitochondria, the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes have had to closely coordinate their activities, as each encode different subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, but its causes are debated. We show that, during aging, there is a specific loss of mitochondrial, but not nuclear, encoded OXPHOS subunits. We trace the cause to an alternate PGC-1α/β-independent pathway of nuclear-mitochondrial communication that is induced by a decline in nuclear NAD(+) and the accumulation of HIF-1α under normoxic conditions, with parallels to Warburg reprogramming. Deleting SIRT1 accelerates this process, whereas raising NAD(+) levels in old mice restores mitochondrial function to that of a young mouse in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Thus, a pseudohypoxic state that disrupts PGC-1α/β-independent nuclear-mitochondrial communication contributes to the decline in mitochondrial function with age, a process that is apparently reversible. PMID:24360282

  2. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative status disruption in brainstem of weaned rats: Immediate response to maternal protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Diorginis José Soares; da Silva Pedroza, Anderson Apolônio; Braz, Glauber Ruda Feitoza; da Silva-Filho, Reginaldo Correia; Lima, Talitta Arruda; Fernandes, Mariana Pinheiro; Doi, Sonia Q; Lagranha, Claudia Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction has been postulated as an important mechanism associated to a number of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. One of the hypotheses is that this is caused by the metabolic challenge generated by the mismatch between prenatal predicted and postnatal reality. Perinatal low-protein diet produces several effects that are manifested in the adult animal, including altered sympathetic tone, increased arterial blood pressure and oxidative stress in the brainstem. The majority of the studies related to nutritional programming postulates that the increased risk levels for non-communicable diseases are associated with the incompatibility between prenatal and postnatal environment. However, little is known about the immediate effects of maternal protein restriction on the offspring's brainstem. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that a maternal low-protein diet causes tissue damage immediately after exposure to the nutritional insult that can be assessed in the brainstem of weaned offspring. In this regard, a series of assays was conducted to measure the mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress biomarkers in the brainstem, which is the brain structure responsible for the autonomic cardiovascular control. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed ad libitum with normoprotein (NP; 17% casein) or low-protein (LP; 8% casein) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation periods. At weaning, the male offsprings were euthanized and the brainstem was quickly removed to assess the mitochondria function, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane electric potential (ΔΨm), oxidative biomarkers, antioxidant defense and redox status. Our data demonstrated that perinatal LP diet induces an immediate mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the protein restriction induced a marked increase in ROS production, with a decrease in antioxidant defense and redox status. Altogether, our findings suggest that LP-fed animals may be at

  3. NP04634 prevents cell damage caused by calcium overload and mitochondrial disruption in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa; del Barrio, Laura; Egea, Javier; Cañas, Noelia; Martínez, Ana; García, Antonio G; Villarroya, Mercedes; López, Manuela G

    2009-04-01

    Marine sponges are becoming a rich source of potential new medicines. NP04634 is a synthetic derivative of 11,19 dideoxyfistularin, a natural product of the Mediterranean sponge Aplysina cavernicola. We report the cytoprotective effects of this new compound in isolated bovine chromaffin cells exposed to cytotoxic stimuli that have been related to neuronal cell death, i.e. Ca(2+) overload and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cell death was achieved by: (i) causing Ca(2+) overload through voltage-dependent calcium channels by exposing the cells to 30 mM K(+), 5 mM Ca(2+) plus 0.3 microM FPL64176 (an L-type Ca(2+)-channel activator); (ii) incubating the cells with veratridine, causing cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) oscillations and mitochondrial disruption; and (iii) blocking mitochondrial complexes I and V using a combination of 30 microM rotenone and 10 microM oligomycin. At 10 microM, NP04634 caused significant protection against 30K(+)/5Ca(2+)/FPL-induced toxicity. NP04634 caused a concentration-dependent reduction in [Ca(2+)](c) induced by 70 mM K(+) in cells loaded with Fluo-4; maximum blockade was 67% at 30 microM. Veratridine caused continuous [Ca(2+)](c) oscillations that translated into 43.4+/-2% cell death. In this model, NP04634 caused 42% and 67% protection at 3 and 10 microM, respectively. NP04634 reduced [Ca(2+)](c) oscillations and mitochondrial depolarization caused by veratridine. NP04634 at 10 microM also protected against mitochondrial disruption caused by rotenone plus oligomycin. In conclusion, NP04634 is a novel compound of marine origin with cytoprotective properties that might have potential therapeutic implications under pathological circumstances involving Ca(2+) overload and mitochondrial disruption, such as in certain neurodegenerative diseases and/or stroke. PMID:19233161

  4. Selective sorting and destruction of mitochondrial membrane proteins in aged yeast.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adam L; Hughes, Casey E; Henderson, Kiersten A; Yazvenko, Nina; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, and underlies the development of many diseases. Cells maintain mitochondrial homeostasis through a number of pathways that remodel the mitochondrial proteome or alter mitochondrial content during times of stress or metabolic adaptation. Here, using yeast as a model system, we identify a new mitochondrial degradation system that remodels the mitochondrial proteome of aged cells. Unlike many common mitochondrial degradation pathways, this system selectively removes a subset of membrane proteins from the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, while leaving the remainder of the organelle intact. Selective removal of preexisting proteins is achieved by sorting into a mitochondrial-derived compartment, or MDC, followed by release through mitochondrial fission and elimination by autophagy. Formation of MDCs requires the import receptors Tom70/71, and failure to form these structures exacerbates preexisting mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the MDC pathway provides protection to mitochondria in times of stress. PMID:27097106

  5. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-02-15

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

  6. Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and Syntaphilin collaborate to modulate axonal mitochondrial anchoring.

    PubMed

    Park, Cana; Lee, Seol-Ae; Hong, Ji-Ho; Suh, Yeongjun; Park, Sung Jin; Suh, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Youngsik; Choi, Jinhyuk; Huh, Ji-Won; Kim, You-Me; Park, Sang Ki

    2016-01-01

    In neuronal axons, the ratio of motile-to-stationary mitochondria is tightly regulated by neuronal activation, thereby meeting the need for local calcium buffering and maintaining the ATP supply. However, the molecular players and detailed regulatory mechanisms behind neuronal mitochondrial movement are not completely understood. Here, we found that neuronal activation-induced mitochondrial anchoring is regulated by Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), which is accomplished by functional association with Syntaphilin (SNPH). DISC1 deficiency resulted in reduced axonal mitochondrial movement, which was partially reversed by concomitant SNPH depletion. In addition, a SNPH deletion mutant lacking the sequence for interaction with DISC1 exhibited an enhanced mitochondrial anchoring effect than wild-type SNPH. Moreover, upon neuronal activation, mitochondrial movement was preserved by DISC1 overexpression, not showing immobilized response of mitochondria. Taken together, we propose that DISC1 in association with SNPH is a component of a modulatory complex that determines mitochondrial anchoring in response to neuronal activation. PMID:27370822

  7. Quality control of mitochondrial protein synthesis is required for membrane integrity and cell fitness

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Uwe; Lahtinen, Taina; Marttinen, Paula; Suomi, Fumi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes synthesize a subset of hydrophobic proteins required for assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes. This process requires temporal and spatial coordination and regulation, so quality control of mitochondrial protein synthesis is paramount to maintain proteostasis. We show how impaired turnover of de novo mitochondrial proteins leads to aberrant protein accumulation in the mitochondrial inner membrane. This creates a stress in the inner membrane that progressively dissipates the mitochondrial membrane potential, which in turn stalls mitochondrial protein synthesis and fragments the mitochondrial network. The mitochondrial m-AAA protease subunit AFG3L2 is critical to this surveillance mechanism that we propose acts as a sensor to couple the synthesis of mitochondrial proteins with organelle fitness, thus ensuring coordinated assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes from two sets of ribosomes. PMID:26504172

  8. The oxidized phospholipid PazePC promotes permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes by Bax.

    PubMed

    Lidman, Martin; Pokorná, Šárka; Dingeldein, Artur P G; Sparrman, Tobias; Wallgren, Marcus; Šachl, Radek; Hof, Martin; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in programmed cell death via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is tightly regulated by the B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family. Intracellular oxidative stress causes the translocation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic family member, to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) where it induces membrane permeabilization. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPls) generated in the MOM during oxidative stress directly affect the onset and progression of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Here we use MOM-mimicking lipid vesicles doped with varying concentrations of 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC), an OxPl species known to significantly enhance Bax-membrane association, to investigate three key aspects of Bax's action at the MOM: 1) induction of Bax pores in membranes without additional mediator proteins, 2) existence of a threshold OxPl concentration required for Bax-membrane action and 3) mechanism by which PazePC disturbs membrane organization to facilitate Bax penetration. Fluorescence leakage studies revealed that Bax-induced leakage, especially its rate, increased with the vesicles' PazePC content without any detectable threshold neither for OxPl nor Bax. Moreover, the leakage rate correlated with the Bax to lipid ratio and the PazePC content. Solid state NMR studies and calorimetric experiments on the lipid vesicles confirmed that OxPl incorporation disrupted the membrane's organization, enabling Bax to penetrate into the membrane. In addition, 15N cross polarization (CP) and insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) MAS NMR experiments using uniformly (15)N-labeled Bax revealed dynamically restricted helical segments of Bax embedded in the membrane, while highly flexible protein segments were located outside or at the membrane surface. PMID:26947183

  9. Role of Pterocarpus santalinus against mitochondrial dysfunction and membrane lipid changes induced by ulcerogens in rat gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Shoba; Devi, R S; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-11-20

    Free radicals produced by ulcerogenic agents affect the TCA cycle enzymes located in the outer membrane of the mitochondria. Upon induction with ulcerogens, peroxidation of membrane lipids bring about alterations in the mitochondrial enzyme activity. This indicates an increase in the permeability levels of the mitochondrial membrane. The ability of PSE to scavenge the reactive oxygen species results in restoration of activities of TCA cycle enzymes. NSAIDs interfere with the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo, resulting in uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation process. This usually results in diminished cellular ATP production. The recovery of gastric mucosal barrier function through maintenance of energy metabolism results in maintenance of ATP levels, as observed in this study upon treatment with PSE. Membrane integrity altered by peroxidation is known to have a modified fatty acid composition, a disruption of permeability, a decrease in electrical resistance, and increase in flip-flopping between monolayers and inactivated cross-linked proteins. The severe depletion of arachidonic acid in ulcer induced groups was prevented upon treatment with PSE. The acid inhibitory property of the herbal extract enables the maintenance of GL activity upon treatment with PSE. The ability to prevent membrane peroxidation has been traced to the presence of active constituents in the PSE. In essence, PSE has been found to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, provide mitochondrial cell integrity, through the maintenance of lipid bilayer by its ability to provide a hydrophobic character to the gastric mucosa, further indicating its ability to reverse the action of NSAIDs and mast cell degranulators in gastric mucosa. PMID:17719569

  10. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca2+ transients which are further transduced by Ca2+ sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca2+ signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca2+ across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca2+ signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca2+ signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca2+ concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca2+ across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  11. Bidirectional fluxes of spermine across the mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Grancara, Silvia; Martinis, Pamela; Manente, Sabrina; García-Argáez, Aida Nelly; Tempera, Giampiero; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Dalla Via, Lisa; Agostinelli, Enzo; Toninello, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The polyamine spermine is transported into the mitochondrial matrix by an electrophoretic mechanism having as driving force the negative electrical membrane potential (ΔΨ). The presence of phosphate increases spermine uptake by reducing ΔpH and enhancing ΔΨ. The transport system is a specific uniporter constituted by a protein channel exhibiting two asymmetric energy barriers with the spermine binding site located in the energy well between the two barriers. Although spermine transport is electrophoretic in origin, its accumulation does not follow the Nernst equation for the presence of an efflux pathway. Spermine efflux may be induced by different agents, such as FCCP, antimycin A and mersalyl, able to completely or partially reduce the ΔΨ value and, consequently, suppress or weaken the force necessary to maintain spermine in the matrix. However this efflux may also take place in normal conditions when the electrophoretic accumulation of the polycationic polyamine induces a sufficient drop in ΔΨ able to trigger the efflux pathway. The release of the polyamine is most probably electroneutral in origin and can take place in exchange with protons or in symport with phosphate anion. The activity of both the uptake and efflux pathways induces a continuous cycling of spermine across the mitochondrial membrane, the rate of which may be prominent in imposing the concentrations of spermine in the inner and outer compartment. Thus, this event has a significant role on mitochondrial permeability transition modulation and consequently on the triggering of intrinsic apoptosis. PMID:24043461

  12. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players.

    PubMed

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca(2+) transients which are further transduced by Ca(2+) sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca(2+) signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca(2+) across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca(2+) signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca(2+) signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca(2+) concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca(2+) across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  13. Uncoupling protein-2 accumulates rapidly in the inner mitochondrial membrane during mitochondrial reactive oxygen stress in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Giardina, Tindaro M; Steer, James H; Lo, Susan Z Y; Joyce, David A

    2008-02-01

    Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) is a member of the inner mitochondrial membrane anion-carrier superfamily. Although mRNA for UCP2 is widely expressed, protein expression is detected in only a few cell types, including macrophages. UCP2 functions by an incompletely defined mechanism, to reduce reactive oxygen species production during mitochondrial electron transport. We observed that the abundance of UCP2 in macrophages increased rapidly in response to treatments (rotenone, antimycin A and diethyldithiocarbamate) that increased mitochondrial superoxide production, but not in response to superoxide produced outside the mitochondria or in response to H2O2. Increased UCP2 protein was not accompanied by increases in ucp2 gene expression or mRNA abundance, but was due to enhanced translational efficiency and possibly stabilization of UCP2 protein in the inner mitochondrial membrane. This was not dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings extend our understanding of the homeostatic function of UCP2 in regulating mitochondrial reactive oxygen production by identifying a feedback loop that senses mitochondrial reactive oxygen production and increases inner mitochondrial membrane UCP2 abundance and activity. Reactive oxygen species-induction of UCP2 may facilitate survival of macrophages and retention of function in widely variable tissue environments. PMID:18082129

  14. Isoliquiritigenin induces apoptosis by depolarizing mitochondrial membranes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae In; Lim, Soon Sung; Choi, Hyun Ju; Cho, Han Jin; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Eun Ji; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2006-10-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a simple chalcone derivative, 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone, found in licorice, shallot and bean sprouts, has been reported to have chemoprotective effects. To examine the effects of ISL on the growth of prostate cancer cells, we cultured MAT-LyLu (MLL) rat and DU145 human prostate cancer cells with various concentrations (0-20 micromol/L) of ISL. Treatment of the cells with increasing concentrations of ISL led to dose-dependent decreases in the viable cell numbers in both DU145 and MLL cells (P<.05). Hoechst 33258 dye staining of condensed nuclei and annexin V binding to surface phosphatidylserine revealed increased numbers of apoptotic cells after ISL treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that ISL increased the levels of membrane-bound Fas ligand (FasL), Fas, cleaved casapse-8, truncated Bid (tBid), Bax and Bad in DU145 cells (P<.05). Isoliquiritigenin increased the percentage of cells with depolarized mitochondrial membranes, in a concentration-dependent manner (P<.05). Isoliquiritigenin induced the release of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm (P<.05). Isoliquiritigenin dose-dependently increased the levels of cleaved caspase-9, caspase-7, caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (P<.05). The present results indicate that ISL inhibits prostate cancer cell growth by the induction of apoptosis, which is mediated through mitochondrial events, which are associated with an evident disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, and the activation of caspase-9. PMID:16517140

  15. HIV-1 Tat protein directly induces mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and inactivates cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Lecoeur, H; Borgne-Sanchez, A; Chaloin, O; El-Khoury, R; Brabant, M; Langonné, A; Porceddu, M; Brière, J-J; Buron, N; Rebouillat, D; Péchoux, C; Deniaud, A; Brenner, C; Briand, J-P; Muller, S; Rustin, P; Jacotot, E

    2012-01-01

    The Trans-activator protein (Tat) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a pleiotropic protein involved in different aspects of AIDS pathogenesis. As a number of viral proteins Tat is suspected to disturb mitochondrial function. We prepared pure synthetic full-length Tat by native chemical ligation (NCL), and Tat peptides, to evaluate their direct effects on isolated mitochondria. Submicromolar doses of synthetic Tat cause a rapid dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as well as cytochrome c release in mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, heart, and brain. Accordingly, Tat decreases substrate oxidation by mitochondria isolated from these tissues, with oxygen uptake being initially restored by adding cytochrome c. The anion-channel inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS) protects isolated mitochondria against Tat-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), whereas ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor blocker, does not. Pharmacologic inhibitors of the permeability transition pore, Bax/Bak inhibitors, and recombinant Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL proteins do not reduce Tat-induced MMP. We finally observed that Tat inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity in disrupted mitochondria isolated from liver, heart, and brain of both mouse and human samples, making it the first described viral protein to be a potential COX inhibitor. PMID:22419111

  16. Topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, F; Corstorphine, C G; Zammit, V A

    1997-01-01

    The topology of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) in the outer membrane of rat liver mitochondria was studied using several approaches. 1. The accessibility of the active site and malonyl-CoA-binding site of the enzyme from the cytosolic aspect of the membrane was investigated using preparations of octanoyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA immobilized on to agarose beads to render them impermeant through the outer membrane. Both immobilized ligands were fully able to interact effectively with CPT I. 2. The effects of proteinase K and trypsin on the activity and malonyl-CoA sensitivity of CPT I were studied using preparations of mitochondria that were either intact or had their outer membranes ruptured by hypo-osmotic swelling (OMRM). Proteinase K had a marked but similar effect on CPT I activity irrespective of whether only the cytosolic or both sides of the membrane were exposed to it. However, it affected sensitivity more rapidly in OMRM. By contrast, trypsin only reduced CPT I activity when incubated with OMRM. The sensitivity of the residual CPT I activity was unaffected by trypsin. 3. The proteolytic fragments generated by these treatments were studied by Western blotting using three anti-peptide antibodies raised against linear epitopes of CPT I. These showed that a proteinase K-sensitive site close to the N-terminus was accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane. No trypsin-sensitive sites were accessible in intact mitochondria. In OMRM, both proteinase K and trypsin acted from the inter-membrane space side of the membrane. 4. The ability of intact mitochondria and OMRM to bind to each of the three anti-peptide antibodies was used to study the accessibility of the respective epitopes on the cytosolic and inter-membrane space sides of the membrane. 5. The results of all these approaches indicate that CPT I adopts a bitopic topology within the mitochondrial outer membrane; it has two transmembrane domains, and both the N- and C-termini are exposed on the

  17. Controls and constrains of the membrane disrupting action of Aurein 1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmiri, Mahdi; Enciso, Marta; Mechler, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Aurein 1.2 is a 13 residue antimicrobial peptide secreted by the Australian tree frog Litoria Aurea. It is a surface-acting membrane disrupting peptide that permeabilizes bacterial membranes via the carpet mechanism; the molecular details of this process are mostly unknown. Here the mechanism of action of Aurein 1.2 was investigated with an emphasis on the role of membrane charge and C-terminal amidation of the peptide. Using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) fingerprinting it was found that the membrane charge correlates with membrane affinity of the peptide, however the binding and the membrane disrupting processes are not charge driven; increased membrane charge reduces the membrane disrupting activity. Coarse grain simulations revealed that phenylalanine residues act as membrane anchors. Accordingly Aurein 1.2 has the ability to bind to any membrane. Furthermore, bundling precludes membrane disruption in case of wild type peptides, while non C-terminal amidated peptides form random aggregates leading to detachment from the membrane. Hence C-terminal amidation is crucial for Aurein 1.2 action. Our results suggest that Aurein 1.2 acts via aggregation driven membrane penetration. The concomitant change in the tension of the outer leaflet imposes a spontaneous curvature on the membrane, leading to disintegration.

  18. Controls and constrains of the membrane disrupting action of Aurein 1.2

    PubMed Central

    Shahmiri, Mahdi; Enciso, Marta; Mechler, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Aurein 1.2 is a 13 residue antimicrobial peptide secreted by the Australian tree frog Litoria Aurea. It is a surface-acting membrane disrupting peptide that permeabilizes bacterial membranes via the carpet mechanism; the molecular details of this process are mostly unknown. Here the mechanism of action of Aurein 1.2 was investigated with an emphasis on the role of membrane charge and C-terminal amidation of the peptide. Using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) fingerprinting it was found that the membrane charge correlates with membrane affinity of the peptide, however the binding and the membrane disrupting processes are not charge driven; increased membrane charge reduces the membrane disrupting activity. Coarse grain simulations revealed that phenylalanine residues act as membrane anchors. Accordingly Aurein 1.2 has the ability to bind to any membrane. Furthermore, bundling precludes membrane disruption in case of wild type peptides, while non C-terminal amidated peptides form random aggregates leading to detachment from the membrane. Hence C-terminal amidation is crucial for Aurein 1.2 action. Our results suggest that Aurein 1.2 acts via aggregation driven membrane penetration. The concomitant change in the tension of the outer leaflet imposes a spontaneous curvature on the membrane, leading to disintegration. PMID:26574052

  19. Effects of thyroid hormones on inner mitochondrial membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, R; Covello, C; De Cicco, T; Bruno, R; Martino, G

    2001-01-01

    Authors studied the effects of thyroid hormones and their diasteroisomers and 3,5-diiodothyronine (LT2) on the fluidity properties of inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) by specifical fluorescent probe for the internal zone of biological membranes, the 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The studied parameters are Arrhenius and Perrin plots. The DPH shows a decreased fluorescence quenching in the presence of both T3 and T4. The maximum effect is observed with 2 nM LT2. LT2 is more effective than LT3 in the central zone. The data confirm the selective action of LT3 and LT4 on IMM fluidity. PMID:11822198

  20. OXPHOS-Dependent Cells Identify Environmental Disruptors of Mitochondrial Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with numerous chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome. Environmental chemicals can impair mitochondrial function through numerous mechanisms such as membrane disruption, complex inhibition and electron transport chain uncoupling. Curr...

  1. Bacterial Origin of a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein Translocase

    PubMed Central

    Harsman, Anke; Niemann, Moritz; Pusnik, Mascha; Schmidt, Oliver; Burmann, Björn M.; Hiller, Sebastian; Meisinger, Chris; Schneider, André; Wagner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are of bacterial ancestry and have to import most of their proteins from the cytosol. This process is mediated by Tom40, an essential protein that forms the protein-translocating pore in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Tom40 is conserved in virtually all eukaryotes, but its evolutionary origin is unclear because bacterial orthologues have not been identified so far. Recently, it was shown that the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei lacks a conventional Tom40 and instead employs the archaic translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (ATOM), a protein that shows similarities to both eukaryotic Tom40 and bacterial protein translocases of the Omp85 family. Here we present electrophysiological single channel data showing that ATOM forms a hydrophilic pore of large conductance and high open probability. Moreover, ATOM channels exhibit a preference for the passage of cationic molecules consistent with the idea that it may translocate unfolded proteins targeted by positively charged N-terminal presequences. This is further supported by the fact that the addition of a presequence peptide induces transient pore closure. An in-depth comparison of these single channel properties with those of other protein translocases reveals that ATOM closely resembles bacterial-type protein export channels rather than eukaryotic Tom40. Our results support the idea that ATOM represents an evolutionary intermediate between a bacterial Omp85-like protein export machinery and the conventional Tom40 that is found in mitochondria of other eukaryotes. PMID:22778261

  2. Ethanol influences on Bax associations with mitochondrial membrane proteins in neonatal rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra; Paiva, Michael; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Kubovec, Stacey; Coursen, Mary; Madorsky, Vladimir

    2013-02-01

    These studies investigated interactions taking place at the mitochondrial membrane in neonatal rat cerebellum following ethanol exposure and focused on interactions between proapoptotic Bax and proteins of the permeability transition pore (PTP), voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes, respectively. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to assess the role of these interactions in ethanol neurotoxicity. Analyses were made at the age of maximal cerebellar ethanol vulnerability (P4), compared to the later age of relative resistance (P7), to determine whether differential ethanol sensitivity was mirrored by differences in these molecular interactions. We found that, following ethanol exposure, Bax proapoptotic associations with both VDAC and ANT were increased, particularly at the age of greater ethanol sensitivity, and these interactions were sustained at this age for at least 2 h postexposure. Since Bax:VDAC interactions disrupt protective VDAC interactions with mitochondrial hexokinase (HXK), we also assessed VDAC:HXK associations following ethanol treatment and found such interactions were altered by ethanol treatment, but only at 2 h postexposure and only in the P4, ethanol-sensitive cerebellum. Ethanol neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal preparations was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of both VDAC and ANT interactions with Bax but not by a Bax channel blocker. Therefore, we conclude that, at this age, within the constraints of our experimental model, a primary mode of Bax-induced initiation of the apoptosis cascade following ethanol insult involves interactions with proteins of the PTP complex and not channel formation independent of PTP constituents. PMID:22767450

  3. Cationic Peptide Exposure Enhances Pulsed-Electric-Field-Mediated Membrane Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Stephen M.; Aiken, Erik J.; Beres, Kaytlyn A.; Hahn, Adam R.; Kamin, Samantha J.; Hagness, Susan C.; Booske, John H.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to irreversibly electroporate cells is a promising approach for destroying undesirable cells. This approach may gain enhanced applicability if the intensity of the PEF required to electrically disrupt cell membranes can be reduced via exposure to a molecular deliverable. This will be particularly impactful if that reduced PEF minimally influences cells that are not exposed to the deliverable. We hypothesized that the introduction of charged molecules to the cell surfaces would create regions of enhanced transmembrane electric potential in the vicinity of each charged molecule, thereby lowering the PEF intensity required to disrupt the plasma membranes. This study will therefore examine if exposure to cationic peptides can enhance a PEF’s ability to disrupt plasma membranes. Methodology/Principal Findings We exposed leukemia cells to 40 μs PEFs in media containing varying concentrations of a cationic peptide, polyarginine. We observed the internalization of a membrane integrity indicator, propidium iodide (PI), in real time. Based on an individual cell’s PI fluorescence versus time signature, we were able to determine the relative degree of membrane disruption. When using 1–2 kV/cm, exposure to >50 μg/ml of polyarginine resulted in immediate and high levels of PI uptake, indicating severe membrane disruption, whereas in the absence of peptide, cells predominantly exhibited signatures indicative of no membrane disruption. Additionally, PI entered cells through the anode-facing membrane when exposed to cationic peptide, which was theoretically expected. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to cationic peptides reduced the PEF intensity required to induce rapid and irreversible membrane disruption. Critically, peptide exposure reduced the PEF intensities required to elicit irreversible membrane disruption at normally sub-electroporation intensities. We believe that these cationic peptides, when coupled with

  4. Fate of endocrine disrupting compounds in membrane bioreactor systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Y; Chen, X; Tao, G; Kekred, K

    2007-06-01

    Yeast estrogen screen (YES) bioassay and liquid chromatography-mass spectrum-mass spectrum (LC-MS-MS) analysis were performed to investigate the fate of active and potential endocrine disrupting compounds in 3 pilot-scale and 2 lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems. Compared with the overall estrogenicities of sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents from references, the MBR systems studied have relatively good performance in the removal of estrogenicity. Estrone (E1) was removed with relatively high efficiency (80.2-91.4%), but 17beta-estradiol (E2) was removed with moderate efficiency (49.3-66.5%) by the MBRs. However, the experimental results indicated that after the treatment by MBR, substantial amounts of E1, estrone-3-sulfate (E1-3S), estrone-3-glucuronide (E1-3G), and 17beta-estradiol-glucuronides (E2-G) passed through treatment systems and entered into the aquatic environment. The reduction in the levels of overall equivalent E1 (68.4%) and that of overall equivalent E2 (80.8%) was demonstrated for the pilot-scale MBR-B. For alkylphenol compounds, bisphenol A (BPA) was removed well with a removal efficiency of 68.9 -90.1%, but 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) concentration was amplified (removal efficiency of -439.5 to -161.1%) after MBR treatment which could be caused by the transformation of its parent compounds, nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPnEOs). The amounts of adsorbed estrogens per kg dry mass was relatively low, due to short hydraulic retention time and high mixed liquor suspended solids in MBRs, compared to that in STPs. PMID:17612196

  5. ATR-101 disrupts mitochondrial functions in adrenocortical carcinoma cells and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yunhui; Kerppola, Raili Emilia; Kerppola, Tom Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) generally has poor prognosis. Existing treatments provide limited benefit for most patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors. We investigated the mechanisms for the cytotoxicity, xenograft suppression, and adrenalytic activity of ATR-101 (PD132301-02), a prospective agent for ACC treatment. Oral administration of ATR-101 inhibited the establishment and impeded the growth of ACC-derived H295R cell xenografts in mice. ATR-101 induced H295R cell apoptosis in culture and in xenografts. ATR-101 caused mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen release, and ATP depletion within hours after exposure, followed by cytochrome c release, caspase-3/7 activation, and membrane permeabilization. The increase in mitochondrial membrane potential occurred concurrently with the decrease in cellular ATP levels. When combined with ATR-101, lipophilic free radical scavengers suppressed the reactive oxygen release, and glycolytic precursors prevented the ATP depletion, abrogating ATR-101 cytotoxicity. ATR-101 directly inhibited F1F0-ATPase activity and suppressed ATP synthesis in mitochondrial fractions. ATR-101 administration to guinea pigs caused oxidized lipofuscin accumulation in thezona fasciculatalayer of the adrenal cortex, implicating reactive oxygen release in the adrenalytic effect of ATR-101. These results support the development of ATR-101 and other adrenalytic compounds for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26843528

  6. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  7. Development of a no-wash assay for mitochondrial membrane potential using the styryl dye DASPEI.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian H R; Rekling, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several diseases and may also result from drugs with unwanted side effects on mitochondrial biochemistry. The mitochondrial membrane potential is a good indicator of mitochondrial function. Here, the authors have developed a no-wash mitochondrial membrane potential assay using 2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI), a rarely used mitochondrial potentiometric probe, in a 96-well format using a fluorescent plate reader. The assay was validated using 2 protonophores (CCCP, DNP), which are known uncouplers, and the neuroleptic thioridazine, which is a suspected mitochondrial toxicant. CCCP and DNP have short-term depolarizing effects, and thioridazine has long-term hyperpolarizing effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The assay also detected changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential in CHO cells exposed to cobalt (mimicking hypoxia) and in PC12 cells exposed to amyloid β, demonstrating that the assay can be used in cellular models of hypoxia and Alzheimer's disease. The assay needs no washing steps, has a Z' value >0.5, can be used on standard fluorometers, has good post liquid-handling stability, and thus is suitable for large-scale screening efforts. In summary, the DASPEI assay is simple and rapid and may be of use in toxicological testing, drug target discovery, and mechanistic models of diseases involving mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:20713988

  8. Distinct Membrane Disruption Pathways Are Induced by 40-Residue β-Amyloid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Dennis A; Doherty, Katelynne; Cheng, Qinghui; Kim, Hyeongeun; Xu, Dawei; Dong, He; Grewer, Christof; Qiang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Cellular membrane disruption induced by β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides has been considered one of the major pathological mechanisms for Alzheimer disease. Mechanistic studies of the membrane disruption process at a high-resolution level, on the other hand, are hindered by the co-existence of multiple possible pathways, even in simplified model systems such as the phospholipid liposome. Therefore, separation of these pathways is crucial to achieve an in-depth understanding of the Aβ-induced membrane disruption process. This study, which utilized a combination of multiple biophysical techniques, shows that the peptide-to-lipid (P:L) molar ratio is an important factor that regulates the selection of dominant membrane disruption pathways in the presence of 40-residue Aβ peptides in liposomes. Three distinct pathways (fibrillation with membrane content leakage, vesicle fusion, and lipid uptake through a temporarily stable ionic channel) become dominant in model liposome systems under specific conditions. These individual systems are characterized by both the initial states of Aβ peptides and the P:L molar ratio. Our results demonstrated the possibility to generate simplified Aβ-membrane model systems with a homogeneous membrane disruption pathway, which will benefit high-resolution mechanistic studies in the future. Fundamentally, the possibility of pathway selection controlled by P:L suggests that the driving forces for Aβ aggregation and Aβ-membrane interactions may be similar at the molecular level. PMID:27056326

  9. Genetic and biochemical characterization of ISP6, a small mitochondrial outer membrane protein associated with the protein translocation complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kassenbrock, C K; Cao, W; Douglas, M G

    1993-01-01

    To search genetically for additional components of the protein translocation apparatus of mitochondria, we have used low fidelity PCR mutagenesis to generate temperature-sensitive mutants in the outer membrane translocation pore component ISP42. A high copy number suppressor of temperature-sensitive isp42 has been isolated and sequenced. This novel gene, denoted ISP6, encodes a 61 amino acid integral membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which is oriented with its amino-terminus facing the cytosol. Disruption of the ISP6 gene is without apparent effect in wild type yeast cells, but is lethal in temperature-sensitive isp42 mutants. Immunoprecipitation of the gene product, ISP42p, from mitochondria solubilized under mild conditions reveals a multi-protein complex containing ISP6p and ISP42p. Images PMID:8344244

  10. Fibrates inhibit the apoptosis of Batten disease lymphoblast cells via autophagy recovery and regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minho; Song, Ki Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Yi, SunShin; Lee, Yong Seok; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Jun, Hyun Sik; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2016-03-01

    Batten disease (BD; also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a genetic disorder inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and is characterized by blindness, seizures, cognitive decline, and early death resulting from the inherited mutation of the CLN3 gene. Mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, disrupted autophagy, and enhanced apoptosis have been suggested to play a role in BD pathogenesis. Fibrates, a class of lipid-lowering drugs that induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activation, are the most commonly used PPAR agonists. Assuming that fibrates have a neuroprotective effect, we studied the effects of fibrates, fenofibrate, bezafibrate, and gemfibrozil on apoptosis, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells. The viability of fibrate-treated BD lymphoblast cells increased to levels of normal lymphoblast cells. In addition, treatment with fibrates inhibited depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential in BD lymphoblast cells. Defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells was normalized when treated with fibrates as indicated by increased acridine orange staining. The recovery of autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells is most likely attributed to the upregulation of autophagy proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and LC3 I/II, after treatment with fibrates. This study therefore suggests that fibrates may have a therapeutic potential against BD. PMID:26659390

  11. Regulation of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion: divergent evolution with similar solutions?

    PubMed

    Wagener, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Continuous mitochondrial fusion and fission define the dynamic shape of mitochondria. One essential player of mitochondrial fusion is the conserved inner membrane dynamin-like GTPase Mgm1/OPA1. Limited proteolysis of this protein has been proposed as a mechanism to separate and subsequently eliminate dysfunctional parts from the mitochondrial network. Here, I briefly summarize our current knowledge about the underlying proteolytic processing steps in mammals, baker's yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Aspergillus fumigatus. The apparent great diversity in Mgm1/OPA1 processing among the analyzed species indicates a surprising mechanistic heterogeneity in the regulation of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion. PMID:26613727

  12. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Aditya; Cox, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu), a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1–Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1–Parkin pathway. PMID:26834020

  13. Mitochondrial membrane lipids in life and death and their molecular modulation by diet: tuning the furnace.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, João P; Morais, Catarina M; Oliveira, Paulo J; Jurado, Amália S

    2014-01-01

    The traditional view of mitochondria as cell powerhouses is a matter of common knowledge, but the overall view of these extraordinary organelles has been revolutionized in the last years. In fact, a large number of important and diverse processes take place at the mitochondrial level, which clearly surpass the energy production scope, intruding the critical fragile balance between cell life and death. The entangled biochemistry of mitochondrial membranes has been found to be dependent on specific lipid requirements, with cardiolipin holding a great part of the raised functional interest. Mitochondria contain a complex membrane system, based on a variety of lipids and exquisite asymmetries. Mitochondria lipid membrane composition depends on a tight interplay with the endoplasmic reticulum, from which some of the lipids present in the mitochondrial membranes have to be imported, at least in the form of precursors. Here, we review some external interventions resulting in alterations of mitochondrial lipid content, namely dietary interventions and genetic manipulation. Such manipulations of mitochondrial membrane lipid composition should result in physiological impact, given the importance of lipid-protein interactions within the mitochondrial membrane boundaries. We provide arguments for future experiments using the most modern chemical and biophysical approaches as well as computer simulation studies applied to appropriate biological membrane model systems, in order to identify the effects exerted by diet-induced lipid changes on membrane physical properties. PMID:24953065

  14. Human Mitochondrial DNA-Protein Complexes Attach to a Cholesterol-Rich Membrane Structure

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Joachim M.; Cansiz-Arda, Şirin; Lõhmus, Madis; Engberg, Oskar; Reyes, Aurelio; van Rennes, Helga; Sanz, Alberto; Holt, Ian J.; Cooper, Helen M.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    The helicase Twinkle is indispensable for mtDNA replication in nucleoids. Previously, we showed that Twinkle is tightly membrane-associated even in the absence of mtDNA, which suggests that Twinkle is part of a membrane-attached replication platform. Here we show that this platform is a cholesterol-rich membrane structure. We fractionated mitochondrial membrane preparations on flotation gradients and show that membrane-associated nucleoids accumulate at the top of the gradient. This fraction was shown to be highly enriched in cholesterol, a lipid that is otherwise low abundant in mitochondria. In contrast, more common mitochondrial lipids, and abundant inner-membrane associated proteins concentrated in the bottom-half of these gradients. Gene silencing of ATAD3, a protein with proposed functions related to nucleoid and mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis, modified the distribution of cholesterol and nucleoids in the gradient in an identical fashion. Both cholesterol and ATAD3 were previously shown to be enriched in ER-mitochondrial junctions, and we detect nucleoid components in biochemical isolates of these structures. Our data suggest an uncommon membrane composition that accommodates platforms for replicating mtDNA, and reconcile apparently disparate functions of ATAD3. We suggest that mtDNA replication platforms are organized in connection with ER-mitochondrial junctions, facilitated by a specialized membrane architecture involving mitochondrial cholesterol. PMID:26478270

  15. Dietary lipid quality and mitochondrial membrane composition in trout: responses of membrane enzymes and oxidative capacities.

    PubMed

    Martin, N; Bureau, D P; Marty, Y; Kraffe, E; Guderley, H

    2013-04-01

    To examine whether membrane fatty acid (FA) composition has a greater impact upon specific components of oxidative phosphorylation or on overall properties of muscle mitochondria, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed two diets differing only in FA composition. Diet 1 was enriched in 18:1n-9 and 18:2n-6 while Diet 2 was enriched in 22:6n-3. The FA composition of mitochondrial phospholipids was strongly affected by diet. 22:6n-3 levels were twice as high (49%) in mitochondrial phospholipids of fish fed Diet 2 than in those fed Diet 1. 18:2n-6 content of the phospholipids also followed the diets, whereas 18:1n-9 changed little. All n-6 FA, most notably 22:5n-6, were significantly higher in fish fed Diet 1. Nonetheless, total saturated FA, total monounsaturated FA and total polyunsaturated FA in mitochondrial phospholipids varied little. Despite a marked impact of diet on specific FA levels in mitochondrial phospholipids, only non-phosphorylating (state 4) rates were higher in fish fed Diet 2. Phosphorylating rates (state 3), oxygen consumption due to flux through the electron transport chain complexes as well as the corresponding spectrophotometric activities did not differ with diet. Body mass affected state 4 rates and cytochrome c oxidase and F 0 F 1 ATPase activities while complex I showed a diet-specific effect of body mass. Only the minor FA that were affected by body mass were correlated with functional properties. The regulated incorporation of dietary FA into phospholipids seems to allow fish to maintain critical membrane functions even when the lipid quality of their diets varies considerably, as is likely in their natural environment. PMID:23052948

  16. Selective sorting and destruction of mitochondrial membrane proteins in aged yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adam L; Hughes, Casey E; Henderson, Kiersten A; Yazvenko, Nina; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, and underlies the development of many diseases. Cells maintain mitochondrial homeostasis through a number of pathways that remodel the mitochondrial proteome or alter mitochondrial content during times of stress or metabolic adaptation. Here, using yeast as a model system, we identify a new mitochondrial degradation system that remodels the mitochondrial proteome of aged cells. Unlike many common mitochondrial degradation pathways, this system selectively removes a subset of membrane proteins from the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, while leaving the remainder of the organelle intact. Selective removal of preexisting proteins is achieved by sorting into a mitochondrial-derived compartment, or MDC, followed by release through mitochondrial fission and elimination by autophagy. Formation of MDCs requires the import receptors Tom70/71, and failure to form these structures exacerbates preexisting mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the MDC pathway provides protection to mitochondria in times of stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13943.001 PMID:27097106

  17. Interaction of MDM33 with mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klecker, Till; Wemmer, Megan; Haag, Mathias; Weig, Alfons; Böckler, Stefan; Langer, Thomas; Nunnari, Jodi; Westermann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Membrane homeostasis affects mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and function. Here we report genetic and proteomic data that reveal multiple interactions of Mdm33, a protein essential for normal mitochondrial structure, with components of phospholipid metabolism and mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. We screened for suppressors of MDM33 overexpression-induced growth arrest and isolated binding partners by immunoprecipitation of cross-linked cell extracts. These approaches revealed genetic and proteomic interactions of Mdm33 with prohibitins, Phb1 and Phb2, which are key components of mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. Lipid profiling by mass spectrometry of mitochondria isolated from Mdm33-overexpressing cells revealed that high levels of Mdm33 affect the levels of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, the two key inner membrane phospholipids. Furthermore, we show that cells lacking Mdm33 show strongly decreased mitochondrial fission activity indicating that Mdm33 is critical for mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Our data suggest that MDM33 functionally interacts with components important for inner membrane homeostasis and thereby supports mitochondrial division. PMID:26669658

  18. Disrupting mitochondrial-nuclear coevolution affects OXPHOS complex I integrity and impacts human health.

    PubMed

    Gershoni, Moran; Levin, Liron; Ovadia, Ofer; Toiw, Yasmin; Shani, Naama; Dadon, Sara; Barzilai, Nir; Bergman, Aviv; Atzmon, Gil; Wainstein, Julio; Tsur, Anat; Nijtmans, Leo; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-10-01

    The mutation rate of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is higher by an order of magnitude as compared with the nuclear genome, enforces tight mitonuclear coevolution to maintain mitochondrial activities. Interruption of such coevolution plays a role in interpopulation hybrid breakdown, speciation events, and disease susceptibility. Previously, we found an elevated amino acid replacement rate and positive selection in the nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I subunit NDUFC2, a phenomenon important for the direct interaction of NDUFC2 with the mtDNA-encoded complex I subunit ND4. This finding underlines the importance of mitonuclear coevolution to physical interactions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this interaction is important for the stability and activity of complex I. Here, we show that siRNA silencing of NDUFC2 reduced growth of human D-407 retinal pigment epithelial cells, significantly diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, and interfered with complex I integrity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of a positively selected amino acid in NDUFC2 significantly interfered with the interaction of NDUFC2 with its mtDNA-encoded partner ND4. Finally, we show that a genotype combination involving this amino acid (NDUFC2 residue 46) and the mtDNA haplogroup HV likely altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ashkenazi Jews. Therefore, mitonuclear coevolution is important for maintaining mitonuclear factor interactions, OXPHOS, and for human health. PMID:25245408

  19. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  20. The mitochondrial inner membrane GTPase, optic atrophy 1 (Opa1), restores mitochondrial morphology and promotes neuronal survival following excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jahani-Asl, Arezu; Pilon-Larose, Karine; Xu, William; MacLaurin, Jason G; Park, David S; McBride, Heidi M; Slack, Ruth S

    2011-02-11

    Mitochondrial dynamics have been extensively studied in the context of classical cell death models involving Bax-mediated cytochrome c release. Excitotoxic neuronal loss is a non-classical death signaling pathway that occurs following overactivation of glutamate receptors independent of Bax activation. Presently, the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the regulation of excitotoxicity remains largely unknown. Here, we report that NMDA-induced excitotoxicity results in defects in mitochondrial morphology as evident by the presence of excessive fragmented mitochondria, cessation of mitochondrial fusion, and cristae dilation. Up-regulation of the mitochondrial inner membrane GTPase, Opa1, is able to restore mitochondrial morphology and protect neurons against excitotoxic injury. Opa1 functions downstream of the calcium-dependent protease, calpain. Inhibition of calpain activity by calpastatin, an endogenous calpain inhibitor, significantly rescued mitochondrial defects and maintained neuronal survival. Opa1 was required for calpastatin-mediated neuroprotection because the enhanced survival found following NMDA-induced toxicity was significantly reduced upon loss of Opa1. Our results define a mechanism whereby breakdown of the mitochondrial network mediated through loss of Opa1 function contributes to neuronal death following excitotoxic neuronal injury. These studies suggest Opa1 as a potential therapeutic target to promote neuronal survival following acute brain damage and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21041314

  1. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serasinghe, Madhavika N.; Yoon, Yisang

    2008-11-15

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six {alpha}-helices ({alpha}1-{alpha}6) out of which {alpha}2-{alpha}5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the {alpha}1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that {alpha}1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the {alpha}5 helix and the linker between {alpha}3 and {alpha}4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by {alpha}1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment.

  2. Mitochondrial shape and function in trypanosomes requires the outer membrane protein, TbLOK1

    PubMed Central

    Povelones, Megan L.; Tiengwe, Calvin; Gluenz, Eva; Gull, Keith; Englund, Paul T.; Jensen, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In an RNAi library screen for loss of kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), we identified an uncharacterized Trypanosoma brucei protein, named TbLOK1, required for maintenance of mitochondrial shape and function. We found the TbLOK1 protein located in discrete patches in the mitochondrial outer membrane. Knockdown of TbLOK1 in procyclic trypanosomes caused the highly interconnected mitochondrial structure to collapse, forming an unbranched tubule remarkably similar to the streamlined organelle seen in the bloodstream form. Following RNAi, defects in mitochondrial respiration, inner membrane potential, and mitochondrial transcription were observed. At later times following TbLOK1 depletion, kDNA was lost and a more drastic alteration in mitochondrial structure was found. Our results demonstrate the close relationship between organelle structure and function in trypanosomes. PMID:23336702

  3. Oligopolyphenylenevinylene-Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte Membrane Insertion Molecules Selectively Disrupt Cell Envelopes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wee Han; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Loo, Joachim Say Chye; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Hancock, Lynn E.

    2015-01-01

    The modification of microbial membranes to achieve biotechnological strain improvement with exogenous small molecules, such as oligopolyphenylenevinylene-conjugated oligoelectrolyte (OPV-COE) membrane insertion molecules (MIMs), is an emerging biotechnological field. Little is known about the interactions of OPV-COEs with their target, the bacterial envelope. We studied the toxicity of three previously reported OPV-COEs with a selection of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and demonstrated that Gram-positive bacteria are more sensitive to OPV-COEs than Gram-negative bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that these MIMs disrupt microbial membranes and that this occurred to a much greater degree in Gram-positive organisms. We used a number of mutants to probe the nature of MIM interactions with the microbial envelope but were unable to align the membrane perturbation effects of these compounds to previously reported membrane disruption mechanisms of, for example, cationic antimicrobial peptides. Instead, the data support the notion that OPV-COEs disrupt microbial membranes through a suspected interaction with diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), a major component of Gram-positive membranes. The integrity of model membranes containing elevated amounts of DPG was disrupted to a greater extent by MIMs than those prepared from Escherichia coli total lipid extracts alone. PMID:25576607

  4. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer mitochondrial membrane via a membrane anchor domain.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Jenny D; Claypool, Steven M; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin, Taz1p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause Barth syndrome, a disease of defective cardiolipin remodeling. Taz1p is an interfacial membrane protein that localizes to both the outer and inner membranes, lining the intermembrane space. Pathogenic point mutations in Taz1p that alter import and membrane insertion result in accumulation of monolysocardiolipin. In this study, we used yeast as a model to investigate the biogenesis of Taz1p. We show that to achieve this unique topology in mitochondria, Taz1p follows a novel import pathway in which it crosses the outer membrane via the translocase of the outer membrane and then uses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex of the intermembrane space to insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taz1p is then transported to membranes of an intermediate density to reach a location in the inner membrane. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation within the membrane anchor (V224R) alters Taz1p import so that it bypasses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex and interacts with the translocase of the inner membrane, TIM23, to reach the matrix. Critical targeting information for Taz1p resides in the membrane anchor and flanking sequences, which are often mutated in Barth syndrome patients. These studies suggest that altering the mitochondrial import pathway of Taz1p may be important in understanding the molecular basis of Barth syndrome. PMID:24078306

  5. The Liver Connexin32 Interactome Is a Novel Plasma Membrane-Mitochondrial Signaling Nexus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connexins are the structural subunits of gap junctions and act as protein platforms for signaling complexes. Little is known about tissue-specific connexin signaling nexuses, given significant challenges associated with affinity-purifying endogenous channel complexes to the level required for interaction analyses. Here, we used multiple subcellular fractionation techniques to isolate connexin32-enriched membrane microdomains from murine liver. We show, for the first time, that connexin32 localizes to both the plasma membrane and inner mitochondrial membrane of hepatocytes. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation-high throughput mass spectrometry, reciprocal co-IP, and subcellular fractionation methodologies, we report a novel interactome validated using null mutant controls. Eighteen connexin32 interacting proteins were identified. The majority represent resident mitochondrial proteins, a minority represent plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, or cytoplasmic partners. In particular, connexin32 interacts with connexin26 and the mitochondrial protein, sideroflexin-1, at the plasma membrane. Connexin32 interaction enhances connexin26 stability. Converging bioinformatic, biochemical, and confocal analyses support a role for connexin32 in transiently tethering mitochondria to connexin32-enriched plasma membrane microdomains through interaction with proteins in the outer mitochondrial membrane, including sideroflexin-1. Complex formation increases the pool of sideroflexin-1 that is present at the plasma membrane. Together, these data identify a novel plasma membrane/mitochondrial signaling nexus in the connexin32 interactome. PMID:23590695

  6. Authentic In Vitro Replication of Two Tombusviruses in Isolated Mitochondrial and Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Huang, Tyng-Shyan

    2012-01-01

    Replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses takes place on membranous structures derived from various organelles in infected cells. Previous works with Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) revealed the recruitment of either peroxisomal or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes for replication. In case of Carnation Italian ringspot tombusvirus (CIRV), the mitochondrial membranes supported CIRV replication. In this study, we developed ER and mitochondrion-based in vitro tombusvirus replication assays. Using purified recombinant TBSV and CIRV replication proteins, we showed that TBSV could use the purified yeast ER and mitochondrial preparations for complete viral RNA replication, while CIRV preferentially replicated in the mitochondrial membranes. The viral RNA became partly RNase resistant after ∼40 to 60 min of incubation in the purified ER and mitochondrial preparations, suggesting that assembly of TBSV and CIRV replicases could take place in the purified ER and mitochondrial membranes in vitro. Using chimeric and heterologous combinations of replication proteins, we showed that multiple domains within the replication proteins are involved in determining the efficiency of tombusvirus replication in the two subcellular membranes. Altogether, we demonstrated that TBSV is less limited while CIRV is more restricted in utilizing various intracellular membranes for replication. Overall, the current work provides evidence that tombusvirus replication could occur in vitro in isolated subcellular membranes, suggesting that tombusviruses have the ability to utilize alternative organellar membranes during infection that could increase the chance of mixed virus replication and rapid evolution during coinfection. PMID:22973028

  7. Simultaneous evaluation of plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in bovine spermatozoa by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Chihiro; Kang, Sung-Sik; Kitade, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to develop an objective evaluation procedure to estimate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bull spermatozoa simultaneously by flow cytometry. Firstly, we used frozen-thawed semen mixed with 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100% dead spermatozoa. Semen was stained using three staining solutions: SYBR-14, propidium iodide (PI), and phycoerythrin-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PE-PNA), for the evaluation of plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Then, characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were compared. Characteristics of spermatozoa (viability and acrosomal integrity) evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were found to be similar. Secondly, we attempted to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and also mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa by flow cytometry using conventional staining with three dyes (SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA) combined with MitoTracker Deep Red (MTDR) staining (quadruple staining). The spermatozoon characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry using quadruple staining were then compared with those of staining using SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA and staining using SYBR-14 and MTDR. There were no significant differences in all characteristics (viability, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential) evaluated by quadruple staining and the other procedures. In conclusion, quadruple staining using SYBR-14, PI, PE-PNA, and MTDR for flow cytometry can be used to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bovine spermatozoa simultaneously. PMID:26369275

  8. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  9. Expression of a mitochondrial progesterone receptor in human spermatozoa correlates with a progestin-dependent increase in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Tantibhedhyangkul, J; Hawkins, K C; Dai, Q; Mu, K; Dunn, C N; Miller, S E; Price, T M

    2014-11-01

    The hyperactivation of human spermatozoa necessary for fertilization requires a substantial increase in cellular energy production. The factors responsible for increasing cellular energy remain poorly defined. This article proposes a role for a novel mitochondrial progesterone receptor (PR-M) in modulation of mitochondrial activity. Basic science studies demonstrate a 38 kDa protein with western blot analysis, consistent with PR-M; whereas imaging studies with confocal and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrate a PR on the mitochondria. Treatment with a PR-specific progestin shows increased mitochondrial membrane potential, not related to induction of an acrosome reaction. The increase in mitochondrial membrane potential was inhibited by a specific PR antagonist, but not affected by an inhibitor to the progesterone-dependent Catsper voltage-activated channel. In conclusion, these studies suggest expression of a novel mitochondrial PR in human spermatozoa with a progestin-dependent increase in mitochondrial activity. This mechanism may serve to enhance cellular energy production as the spermatozoa traverse the female genital tract being exposed to increasing concentrations of progesterone. PMID:25187426

  10. Cytochrome c release precedes mitochondrial membrane potential loss in cerebellar granule neuron apoptosis: lack of mitochondrial swelling.

    PubMed

    Wigdal, Susan S; Kirkland, Rebecca A; Franklin, James L; Haak-Frendscho, Mary

    2002-09-01

    It has been suggested that release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) from mitochondria during apoptotic death is through opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore followed by swelling-induced rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane. However, this remains controversial and may vary with cell type and model system. We determined that in mouse cerebellar granule neurons, Cyt c redistribution preceded the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during the apoptotic process, suggesting that the pore did not open prior to release. Furthermore, when mitochondria were morphologically assessed by electron microscopy, they were not obviously swollen during the period of Cyt c release. This indicates that the pore mechanism of action, if any, is not through mitochondrial outer membrane rupture. While bongkrekic acid, an inhibitor of pore opening, modestly delayed apoptotic death, it also caused a significant (p < 0.05) suppression of protein synthesis. An equivalent suppression of protein synthesis by cycloheximide had a similar delaying effect, suggesting that bongkrekic acid was acting non-specifically. These findings suggest that mitochondrial permeability transition pore is not involved in Cyt c release from mitochondria during the apoptotic death of cerebellar granule neurons. PMID:12358750

  11. Mitochondrial membrane potential regulates PINK1 import and proteolytic destabilization by PARL.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seok Min; Lazarou, Michael; Wang, Chunxin; Kane, Lesley A; Narendra, Derek P; Youle, Richard J

    2010-11-29

    PINK1 is a mitochondrial kinase mutated in some familial cases of Parkinson's disease. It has been found to work in the same pathway as the E3 ligase Parkin in the maintenance of flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and to recruit cytosolic Parkin to mitochondria to mediate mitophagy in mammalian cells. Although PINK1 has a predicted mitochondrial import sequence, its cellular and submitochondrial localization remains unclear in part because it is rapidly degraded. In this study, we report that the mitochondrial inner membrane rhomboid protease presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protein (PARL) mediates cleavage of PINK1 dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential. In the absence of PARL, the constitutive degradation of PINK1 is inhibited, stabilizing a 60-kD form inside mitochondria. When mitochondrial membrane potential is dissipated, PINK1 accumulates as a 63-kD full-length form on the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it can recruit Parkin to impaired mitochondria. Thus, differential localization to the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes appears to regulate PINK1 stability and function. PMID:21115803

  12. Mitochondrial membrane potential regulates PINK1 import and proteolytic destabilization by PARL

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seok Min; Lazarou, Michael; Wang, Chunxin; Kane, Lesley A.; Narendra, Derek P.

    2010-01-01

    PINK1 is a mitochondrial kinase mutated in some familial cases of Parkinson’s disease. It has been found to work in the same pathway as the E3 ligase Parkin in the maintenance of flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila melanogaster and to recruit cytosolic Parkin to mitochondria to mediate mitophagy in mammalian cells. Although PINK1 has a predicted mitochondrial import sequence, its cellular and submitochondrial localization remains unclear in part because it is rapidly degraded. In this study, we report that the mitochondrial inner membrane rhomboid protease presenilin-associated rhomboid-like protein (PARL) mediates cleavage of PINK1 dependent on mitochondrial membrane potential. In the absence of PARL, the constitutive degradation of PINK1 is inhibited, stabilizing a 60-kD form inside mitochondria. When mitochondrial membrane potential is dissipated, PINK1 accumulates as a 63-kD full-length form on the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it can recruit Parkin to impaired mitochondria. Thus, differential localization to the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes appears to regulate PINK1 stability and function. PMID:21115803

  13. Identification of a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that does not depolarize the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kenwood, Brandon M; Weaver, Janelle L; Bajwa, Amandeep; Poon, Ivan K; Byrne, Frances L; Murrow, Beverley A; Calderone, Joseph A; Huang, Liping; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Tomsig, Jose L; Okabe, Kohki; Lo, Ryan H; Cameron Coleman, G; Columbus, Linda; Yan, Zhen; Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Smith, Jeffrey S; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Lynch, Kevin R; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Santos, Webster L; Rogers, George W; Okusa, Mark D; Bayliss, Douglas A; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2014-04-01

    Dysregulation of oxidative phosphorylation is associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and some of the most prevalent human diseases including obesity, cancer, diabetes, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Chemical 'mitochondrial uncouplers' are lipophilic weak acids that transport protons into the mitochondrial matrix via a pathway that is independent of ATP synthase, thereby uncoupling nutrient oxidation from ATP production. Mitochondrial uncouplers also lessen the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane and thereby increase the rate of mitochondrial respiration while decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mitochondrial uncouplers are valuable chemical tools that enable the measurement of maximal mitochondrial respiration and they have been used therapeutically to decrease mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. However, the most widely used protonophore uncouplers such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol have off-target activity at other membranes that lead to a range of undesired effects including plasma membrane depolarization, mitochondrial inhibition, and cytotoxicity. These unwanted properties interfere with the measurement of mitochondrial function and result in a narrow therapeutic index that limits their usefulness in the clinic. To identify new mitochondrial uncouplers that lack off-target activity at the plasma membrane we screened a small molecule chemical library. Herein we report the identification and validation of a novel mitochondrial protonophore uncoupler (2-fluorophenyl){6-[(2-fluorophenyl)amino](1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-e]pyrazin-5-yl)}amine, named BAM15, that does not depolarize the plasma membrane. Compared to FCCP, an uncoupler of equal potency, BAM15 treatment of cultured cells stimulates a higher maximum rate of mitochondrial respiration and is less cytotoxic. Furthermore, BAM15 is bioactive in vivo and dose

  14. Daptomycin exerts rapid bactericidal activity against Bacillus anthracis without disrupting membrane integrity

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yu-hua; Wang, Wei; Dai, Su-qin; Liu, Ti-yan; Tan, Jun-jie; Qu, Guo-long; Li, Yu-xia; Ling, Yan; Liu, Gang; Fu, Xue-qi; Chen, Hui-peng

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To examine whether the novel cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin could be used to treat anthrax and to study the mechanisms underlying its bactericidal action against Bacillus anthracis. Methods: Spore-forming B anthracis AP422 was tested. MIC values of antibiotics were determined. Cell membrane potential was measured using flow cytometric assays with membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent dyes. Cell membrane integrity was detected using To-Pro-3 iodide staining and transmission electron microscopy. K+ efflux and Na+ influx were measured using the fluorescent probes PBFI and SBFI-AM, respectively. Results: Daptomycin exhibited rapid bactericidal activity against vegetative B anthracis with a MIC value of 0.78 μg/mL, which was comparable to those of ciprofloxacin and penicillin G. Furthermore, daptomycin prevented the germinated spores from growing into vegetative bacteria. Daptomycin concentration-dependently dissipated the membrane potential of B anthracis and caused K+ efflux and Na+ influx without disrupting membrane integrity. In contrast, both ciprofloxacin and penicillin G did not change the membrane potential of vegetative bacteria or spores. Penicillin G disrupted membrane integrity of B anthracis, whereas ciprofloxacin had no such effect. Conclusion: Daptomycin exerts rapid bactericidal action against B anthracis via reducing membrane potential without disrupting membrane integrity. This antibiotic can be used as an alternate therapy for B anthracis infections. PMID:24362329

  15. MAP-1 and IAP-1, two novel AAA proteases with catalytic sites on opposite membrane surfaces in mitochondrial inner membrane of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Klanner, C; Prokisch, H; Langer, T

    2001-09-01

    Eukaryotic AAA proteases form a conserved family of membrane-embedded ATP-dependent proteases but have been analyzed functionally only in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we have identified two novel members of this protein family in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, which were termed MAP-1 and IAP-1. Both proteins are localized to the inner membrane of mitochondria. They are part of two similar-sized high molecular mass complexes, but expose their catalytic sites to opposite membrane surfaces, namely, the intermembrane and the matrix space. Disruption of iap-1 by repeat-induced point mutation caused a slow growth phenotype at high temperature and stabilization of a misfolded inner membrane protein against degradation. IAP-1 could partially substitute for functions of its yeast homolog Yme1, demonstrating functional conservation. However, respiratory growth at 37 degrees C was not restored. Our results identify two components of the quality control system of the mitochondrial inner membrane in N. crassa and suggest that AAA proteases with catalytic sites exposed to opposite membrane surfaces are present in mitochondria of all eukaryotic cells. PMID:11553723

  16. Biochemical and molecular characterization of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase in Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2016-05-01

    The two predominant forms of arginase, cytosolic Arginase-I and mitochondrial Arginase-II, catalyze hydrolysis of arginine into ornithine and urea. Based on presence of arginase activity in extracts using potassium chloride (KCl), mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been suggested. However, the activity of arginase in fractions obtained after KCl-treatment may be either due to leakage of mitochondrial arginase or release of adhered cytosolic arginase to cell organelles having altered net charge. Therefore, it has been intended to analyse impact of KCl on ultra-structural properties of mitochondria, and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins and arginase of Heteropneustes fossilis. Liver of H. fossilis was used for isolating mitochondria for analysis of ultrastructural properties, preparing cytosolic, mitochondrial, and mitochondrial-membrane bound extracts after treatment of KCl. Extracts were analysed for arginase activity assay, protein profiling through SDS-PAGE and MALDI MS/MS. The KCl-mediated modulation in polypeptides and arginase were also evaluated by PANTHER, MitoProt and IPSORT servers. The effects of KCl on ultra-structural integrity of mitochondria, activity of arginase, modulation on mitochondrial proteins and enzymes including arginase were observed. The 48 kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial fraction, that showed KCl-dependent alteration matched with Myb binding protein and 30 kDa bands resembles to arginase after MALDI MS/MS analysis. Results indicate KCl-dependent ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and release of mitochondrial arginase. The proposed membrane bound mitochondrial arginase could be mitochondrial arginase-II or altered form of cytosolic arginase-I contributing to KCl-induced arginase activity in H. fossilis. PMID:26922180

  17. Deletion of the transcriptional regulator opi1p decreases cardiolipin content and disrupts mitochondrial metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Luévano-Martínez, Luis Alberto; Appolinario, Patricia; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2013-11-01

    Cardiolipin, the main anionic phospholipid in the inner mitochondrial membrane, provides shape, charge and osmotic support to this membrane due to its biophysical properties. In addition, it helps form respiratory supercomplexes and provides functionality to mitochondrial proteins. Defects in the biosynthesis or remodeling of cardiolipin have been related to severe diseases, such as Barth syndrome. Opi1p, a transcriptional repressor for most enzymes in phospholipid biosynthesis found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been demonstrated not to affect the biosynthesis of this mitochondrial phospholipid. However, we found that opi1 deletion compromises mitochondrial metabolism producing severe respiratory defects. The mechanism producing this phenotype was explored and found to be a mitochondrial cardiolipin depletion of almost 50%, resulting in low cytochrome content and high mitochondrial DNA instability. The origin of this low cardiolipin content strongly correlated with the overproduction of inositol, an intrinsic phenotype of this mutation. Overall, our results show that adequate regulation of phospholipid synthesis is essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial function. PMID:23578934

  18. How does the TOM complex mediate insertion of precursor proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane?

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Doron

    2005-01-01

    A multisubunit translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM complex) mediates both the import of mitochondrial precursor proteins into the internal compartments of the organelle and the insertion of proteins residing in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The proposed β-barrel structure of Tom40, the pore-forming component of the translocase, raises the question of how the apparent uninterrupted β-barrel topology can be compatible with a role of Tom40 in releasing membrane proteins into the lipid core of the bilayer. In this review, I discuss insertion mechanisms of proteins into the outer membrane and present alternative models based on the opening of a multisubunit β-barrel TOM structure or on the interaction of outer membrane precursors with the outer face of the Tom40 β-barrel structure. PMID:16260501

  19. The antifungal activity and membrane-disruptive action of dioscin extracted from Dioscorea nipponica.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeyong; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Juneyoung; Kim, Mi-Sun; Sohn, Ho-Yong; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-03-01

    Dioscin is a kind of steroidal saponin isolated from the root bark of wild yam Dioscorea nipponica. We investigated the antifungal effect of dioscin against different fungal strains and its antifungal mechanism(s) in Candida albicans cells. Using the propidium iodide assay and calcein-leakage measurement, we confirmed that dioscin caused fungal membrane damage. Furthermore, we evaluated the ability of dioscin to disrupt the plasma membrane potential, using 3,3'-dipropylthiadicarbocyanine iodide [DiSC(3)(5)] and bis-(1,3-dibarbituric acid)-trimethine oxanol [DiBAC(4)(3)]. Cells stained with the dyes had a significant increase in fluorescent intensity after exposure to dioscin, indicating that dioscin has an effect on the membrane potential. To visualize the effect of dioscin on the cell membrane, we synthesized rhodamine-labeled giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) mimicking the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of C. albicans. As seen in the result, the membrane disruptive action of dioscin caused morphological change and rhodamine leakage of the GUVs. In three-dimensional contour-plot analysis using flow cytometry, we observed a decrease in cell size, which is in agreement with our result from the GUV assay. These results suggest that dioscin exerts a considerable antifungal activity by disrupting the structure in membrane after invading into the fungal membrane, resulting in fungal cell death. PMID:23262192

  20. Death-associated protein kinase as a sensor of mitochondrial membrane potential: role of lysosome in mitochondrial toxin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Shang, Tiesong; Joseph, Joy; Hillard, Cecilia J; Kalyanaraman, B

    2005-10-14

    We have investigated here the mechanism of dephosphorylation and activation of death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) and the role of lysosome in neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) treated with mitochondrial toxins, such as MPP(+) and rotenone. Mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors and uncouplers decreased mitochondrial membrane potential leading to DAPK dephosphorylation and activation. The class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors attenuated DAPK dephosphorylation induced by mitochondrial toxins. Complex I inhibition by mitochondrial toxins (e.g. MPP(+)) resulted in mitochondrial swelling and lysosome reduction. Inhibition of class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase attenuated MPP(+)-induced lysosome reduction and cell death. The role of DAPK as a sensor of mitochondrial membrane potential in mitochondrial diseases was addressed. PMID:16085644

  1. Mitochondrial AAA proteases--towards a molecular understanding of membrane-bound proteolytic machines.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Florian; Tatsuta, Takashi; Langer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial AAA proteases play an important role in the maintenance of mitochondrial proteostasis. They regulate and promote biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins by acting as processing enzymes and ensuring the selective turnover of misfolded proteins. Impairment of AAA proteases causes pleiotropic defects in various organisms including neurodegeneration in humans. AAA proteases comprise ring-like hexameric complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are functionally conserved from yeast to man, but variations are evident in the subunit composition of orthologous enzymes. Recent structural and biochemical studies revealed how AAA proteases degrade their substrates in an ATP dependent manner. Intersubunit coordination of the ATP hydrolysis leads to an ordered ATP hydrolysis within the AAA ring, which ensures efficient substrate dislocation from the membrane and translocation to the proteolytic chamber. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the molecular mechanisms underlying the versatile functions of mitochondrial AAA proteases and their relevance to those of the other AAA+ machines. PMID:22001671

  2. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26348137

  3. Cationic nanoparticles induce nanoscale disruption in living cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiumei; Hessler, Jessica A; Putchakayala, Krishna; Panama, Brian K; Khan, Damian P; Hong, Seungpyo; Mullen, Douglas G; Dimaggio, Stassi C; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N; Lopatin, Anatoli N; Baker, James R; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Orr, Bradford G

    2009-08-13

    It has long been recognized that cationic nanoparticles induce cell membrane permeability. Recently, it has been found that cationic nanoparticles induce the formation and/or growth of nanoscale holes in supported lipid bilayers. In this paper, we show that noncytotoxic concentrations of cationic nanoparticles induce 30-2000 pA currents in 293A (human embryonic kidney) and KB (human epidermoid carcinoma) cells, consistent with a nanoscale defect such as a single hole or group of holes in the cell membrane ranging from 1 to 350 nm(2) in total area. Other forms of nanoscale defects, including the nanoparticle porating agents adsorbing onto or intercalating into the lipid bilayer, are also consistent; although the size of the defect must increase to account for any reduction in ion conduction, as compared to a water channel. An individual defect forming event takes 1-100 ms, while membrane resealing may occur over tens of seconds. Patch-clamp data provide direct evidence for the formation of nanoscale defects in living cell membranes. The cationic polymer data are compared and contrasted with patch-clamp data obtained for an amphiphilic phenylene ethynylene antimicrobial oligomer (AMO-3), a small molecule that is proposed to make well-defined 3.4 nm holes in lipid bilayers. Here, we observe data that are consistent with AMO-3 making approximately 3 nm holes in living cell membranes. PMID:19606833

  4. Phenotypes of gene disruptants in relation to a putative mitochondrial malate-citrate shuttle protein in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Ueda, Yuka; Hattori, Takasumi

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial citrate transport protein (CTP) functions as a malate-citrate shuttle catalyzing the exchange of citrate plus a proton for malate between mitochondria and cytosol across the inner mitochondrial membrane in higher eukaryotic organisms. In this study, for functional analysis, we cloned the gene encoding putative CTP (ctpA) of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. The gene ctpA encodes a polypeptide consisting 296 amino acids conserved active residues required for citrate transport function. Only in early-log phase, the ctpA disruptant DCTPA-1 showed growth delay, and the amount of citric acid produced by strain DCTPA-1 was smaller than that by parental strain WU-2223L. These results indicate that the CTPA affects growth and thereby citric acid metabolism of A. niger changes, especially in early-log phase, but not citric acid-producing period. This is the first report showing that disruption of ctpA causes changes of phenotypes in relation to citric acid production in A. niger. PMID:27088852

  5. Selective Membrane Disruption Mechanism of an Antibacterial γ-AApeptide Defined by EPR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Pavanjeet; Li, Yaqiong; Cai, Jianfeng; Song, Likai

    2016-04-26

    γ-AApeptides are a new class of antibacterial peptidomimetics that are not prone to antibiotic resistance and are highly resistant to protease degradation. It is not clear how γ-AApeptides interact with bacterial membranes and alter lipid assembly, but such information is essential to understanding their antimicrobial activities and guiding future design of more potent and specific antimicrobial agents. Using electron paramagnetic resonance techniques, we characterized the membrane interaction and destabilizing mechanism of a lipo-cyclic-γ-AApeptide (AA1), which has broad-spectrum antibacterial activities. The analyses revealed that AA1 binding increases the membrane permeability of POPC/POPG liposomes, which mimic negatively charged bacterial membranes. AA1 binding also inhibits membrane fluidity and reduces solvent accessibility around the lipid headgroup region. Moreover, AA1 interacts strongly with POPC/POPG liposomes, inducing significant lipid lateral-ordering and membrane thinning. In contrast, minimal membrane property changes were observed upon AA1 binding for liposomes mimicking mammalian cell membranes, which consist of neutral lipids and cholesterol. Our findings suggest that AA1 interacts and disrupts bacterial membranes through a carpet-like mechanism. The results showed that the intrinsic features of γ-AApeptides are important for their ability to disrupt bacterial membranes selectively, the implications of which extend to developing new antibacterial biomaterials. PMID:27119639

  6. Permeabilized myocardial fibers as model to detect mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis and melatonin effects without disruption of mitochondrial network.

    PubMed

    Doerrier, Carolina; García, José A; Volt, Huayqui; Díaz-Casado, María E; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial function is crucial to understand their involvement in a given disease. High-resolution respirometry of permeabilized myocardial fibers in septic mice allows the evaluation of the bioenergetic system, maintaining mitochondrial ultrastructure and intracellular interactions, which are critical for an adequate functionality. OXPHOS and electron transport system (ETS) capacities were assessed using different substrate combinations. Our findings show a severe septic-dependent impairment in OXPHOS and ETS capacities with mitochondrial uncoupling at early and late phases of sepsis. Moreover, sepsis triggers complex III (CIII)-linked alterations in supercomplexes structure, and loss of mitochondrial density. In these conditions, melatonin administration to septic mice prevented sepsis-dependent mitochondrial injury in mitochondrial respiration. Likewise, melatonin improved cytochrome b content and ameliorated the assembly of CIII in supercomplexes. These results support the use of permeabilized fibers to identify properly the respiratory deficits and specific melatonin effects in sepsis. PMID:26748191

  7. CR6-interacting factor 1 is a key regulator in Aβ-induced mitochondrial disruption and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Byun, J; Son, S M; Cha, M-Y; Shong, M; Hwang, Y J; Kim, Y; Ryu, H; Moon, M; Kim, K-S; Mook-Jung, I

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, often characterized by massive fission and other morphological abnormalities, is a well-known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). One causative mechanism underlying AD-associated mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be amyloid-β (Aβ), yet the pathways between Aβ and mitochondrial dysfunction remain elusive. In this study, we report that CR6-interacting factor 1 (Crif1), a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, is a key player in Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Specifically, we found that Crif1 levels were downregulated in the pathological regions of Tg6799 mice brains, wherein overexpressed Aβ undergoes self-aggregation. Downregulation of Crif1 was similarly observed in human AD brains as well as in SH-SY5Y cells treated with Aβ. In addition, knockdown of Crif1, using RNA interference, induced mitochondrial dysfunction with phenotypes similar to those observed in Aβ-treated cells. Conversely, Crif1 overexpression prevented Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Finally, we show that Aβ-induced downregulation of Crif1 is mediated by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent sumoylation of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1). These results identify the ROS-Sp1-Crif1 pathway to be a new mechanism underlying Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that ROS-mediated downregulation of Crif1 is a crucial event in AD pathology. We propose that Crif1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. PMID:25361083

  8. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    SciTech Connect

    Josyula, Ratnakar; Jin, Zhongmin; McCombs, Deborah; DeLucas, Lawrence; Sha, Bingdong

    2006-02-01

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  9. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-03-15

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity. PMID:24396061

  10. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity. PMID:24396061

  11. Interaction of the Intermembrane Space Domain of Tim23 Protein with Mitochondrial Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Munari, Francesca; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tim23 mediates protein translocation into mitochondria. Although inserted into the inner membrane, the dynamic association of its intermembrane space (IMS) domain with the outer membrane promotes protein import. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the IMS domain of Tim23 tightly associates with both inner and outer mitochondrial membrane-like membranes through a hydrophobic anchor at its N terminus. The structure of membrane-bound Tim23IMS is highly dynamic, allowing recognition of both the incoming presequence and other translocase components at the translocation contact. Cardiolipin enhances Tim23 membrane attachment, suggesting that cardiolipin can influence preprotein import. PMID:25349212

  12. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency disrupts endocytosis, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial protein pathways in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Harauma, Akiko; Föcking, Melanie; Wynne, Kieran; Scaife, Caitriona; Cagney, Gerard; Moriguchi, Toru; Cotter, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) deficiency is an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia, yet characterization of the consequences of deficiency at the protein level in the brain is limited. We aimed to identify the protein pathways disrupted as a consequence of chronic n-3 deficiency in the hippocampus of mice. Fatty acid analysis of the hippocampus following chronic dietary deficiency revealed a 3-fold decrease (p < 0.001) in n-3 FA levels. Label free LC-MS/MS analysis identified and profiled 1008 proteins, of which 114 were observed to be differentially expressed between n-3 deficient and control groups (n = 8 per group). The cellular processes that were most implicated were neuritogenesis, endocytosis, and exocytosis, while specific protein pathways that were most significantly dysregulated were mitochondrial dysfunction and clathrin mediated endocytosis (CME). In order to characterize whether these processes and pathways are ones influenced by antipsychotic medication, we used LC-MS/MS to test the differential expression of these 114 proteins in the hippocampus of mice chronically treated with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol. We observed 23 of the 114 proteins to be differentially expressed, 17 of which were altered in the opposite direction to that observed following n-3 deficiency. Overall, our findings point to disturbed synaptic function, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial function as a consequence of dietary deficiency in n-3 FA. This study greatly aids our understanding of the molecular mechanism by which n-3 deficiency impairs normal brain function, and provides clues as to how n-3 FA exert their therapeutic effect in early psychosis. PMID:24194745

  13. Protein complexes in bacterial and yeast mitochondrial membranes differ in their sensitivity towards dissociation by SDS.

    PubMed

    Gubbens, Jacob; Slijper, Monique; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2008-12-01

    Previously, a 2D gel electrophoresis approach was developed for the Escherichia coli inner membrane, which detects membrane protein complexes that are stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at room temperature, and dissociate under the influence of trifluoroethanol [R. E. Spelbrink et al., J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005), 28742-8]. Here, the method was applied to the evolutionarily related mitochondrial inner membrane that was isolated from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, only very few proteins were found to be dissociated by trifluoroethanol of which Lpd1p, a component of multiple protein complexes localized in the mitochondrial matrix, is the most prominent. Usage of either milder or more stringent conditions did not yield any additional proteins that were released by fluorinated alcohols. This strongly suggests that membrane protein complexes in yeast are less stable in SDS solution than their E. coli counterparts, which might be due to the overall reduced hydrophobicity of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins. PMID:18817900

  14. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  15. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  16. Loss of Prohibitin Membrane Scaffolds Impairs Mitochondrial Architecture and Leads to Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Merkwirth, Carsten; Morbin, Michela; Brönneke, Hella S.; Jordan, Sabine D.; Rugarli, Elena I.; Langer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fusion and fission of mitochondria maintain the functional integrity of mitochondria and protect against neurodegeneration, but how mitochondrial dysfunctions trigger neuronal loss remains ill-defined. Prohibitins form large ring complexes in the inner membrane that are composed of PHB1 and PHB2 subunits and are thought to function as membrane scaffolds. In Caenorhabditis elegans, prohibitin genes affect aging by moderating fat metabolism and energy production. Knockdown experiments in mammalian cells link the function of prohibitins to membrane fusion, as they were found to stabilize the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1 (optic atrophy 1), which mediates mitochondrial inner membrane fusion and cristae morphogenesis. Mutations in OPA1 are associated with dominant optic atrophy characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, highlighting the importance of OPA1 function in neurons. Here, we show that neuron-specific inactivation of Phb2 in the mouse forebrain causes extensive neurodegeneration associated with behavioral impairments and cognitive deficiencies. We observe early onset tau hyperphosphorylation and filament formation in the hippocampus, demonstrating a direct link between mitochondrial defects and tau pathology. Loss of PHB2 impairs the stability of OPA1, affects mitochondrial ultrastructure, and induces the perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in hippocampal neurons. A destabilization of the mitochondrial genome and respiratory deficiencies manifest in aged neurons only, while the appearance of mitochondrial morphology defects correlates with tau hyperphosphorylation in the absence of PHB2. These results establish an essential role of prohibitin complexes for neuronal survival in vivo and demonstrate that OPA1 stability, mitochondrial fusion, and the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome in neurons depend on these scaffolding proteins. Moreover, our findings establish prohibitin-deficient mice as a novel genetic model for tau pathologies

  17. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 muM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt{sub max} of 105 +- 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 +- 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 +- 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 +- 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 +- 1 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 +- 3 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  18. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function. PMID:24483502

  19. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between meso-scale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The 2D axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (PMF) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high PMF is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the meso-scale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function. PMID:24483502

  20. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  1. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    PubMed

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M; Romano, Fabian B; Heuck, Alejandro P; Hebert, Daniel N

    2013-06-01

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results revealed that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-3-indacene-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of 1-5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers. PMID:23651212

  2. Mitochondrial morphology, topology, and membrane interactions in skeletal muscle: a quantitative three-dimensional electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2013-01-15

    Dynamic remodeling of mitochondrial morphology through membrane dynamics are linked to changes in mitochondrial and cellular function. Although mitochondrial membrane fusion/fission events are frequent in cell culture models, whether mitochondrial membranes dynamically interact in postmitotic muscle fibers in vivo remains unclear. Furthermore, a quantitative assessment of mitochondrial morphology in intact muscle is lacking. Here, using electron microscopy (EM), we provide evidence of interacting membranes from adjacent mitochondria in intact mouse skeletal muscle. Electron-dense mitochondrial contact sites consistent with events of outer mitochondrial membrane tethering are also described. These data suggest that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo among mitochondria, possibly to induce morphology transitions, for kiss-and-run behavior, or other processes involving contact between mitochondrial membranes. Furthermore, a combination of freeze-fracture scanning EM and transmission EM in orthogonal planes was used to characterize and quantify mitochondrial morphology. Two subpopulations of mitochondria were studied: subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF), which exhibited significant differences in morphological descriptors, including form factor (means ± SD for SS: 1.41 ± 0.45 vs. IMF: 2.89 ± 1.76, P < 0.01) and aspect ratio (1.97 ± 0.83 vs. 3.63 ± 2.13, P < 0.01) and circularity (0.75 ± 0.16 vs. 0.45 ± 0.22, P < 0.01) but not size (0.28 ± 0.31 vs. 0.27 ± 0.20 μm(2)). Frequency distributions for mitochondrial size and morphological parameters were highly skewed, suggesting the presence of mechanisms to influence mitochondrial size and shape. In addition, physical continuities between SS and IMF mitochondria indicated mixing of both subpopulations. These data provide evidence that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle and that factors may be involved in regulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial morphology. PMID

  3. Nitric oxide partitioning into mitochondrial membranes and the control of respiration at cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiva, Sruti; Brookes, Paul S.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Anderson, Peter G.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2001-06-01

    An emerging and important site of action for nitric oxide (NO) within cells is the mitochondrial inner membrane, where NO binds to and inhibits members of the electron transport chain, complex III and cytochrome c oxidase. Although it is known that inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO is competitive with O2, the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon remain unclear, and the impact of both NO and O2 partitioning into biological membranes has not been considered. These properties are particularly interesting because physiological O2 tensions can vary widely, with NO having a greater inhibitory effect at low O2 tensions (<20 μM). In this study, we present evidence for a consumption of NO in mitochondrial membranes in the absence of substrate, in a nonsaturable process that is O2 dependent. This consumption modulates inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by NO and is enhanced by the addition of exogenous membranes. From these data, it is evident that the partition of NO into mitochondrial membranes has a major impact on the ability of NO to control mitochondrial respiration. The implications of this conclusion are discussed in the context of mitochondrial lipid:protein ratios and the importance of NO as a regulator of respiration in pathophysiology.

  4. Bax assembles into large ring-like structures remodeling the mitochondrial outer membrane in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Große, Lena; Wurm, Christian A; Brüser, Christian; Neumann, Daniel; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-02-15

    The Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak are essential for the execution of many apoptotic programs. During apoptosis, Bax translocates to the mitochondria and mediates the permeabilization of the outer membrane, thereby facilitating the release of pro-apoptotic proteins. Yet the mechanistic details of the Bax-induced membrane permeabilization have so far remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that activated Bax molecules, besides forming large and compact clusters, also assemble, potentially with other proteins including Bak, into ring-like structures in the mitochondrial outer membrane. STED nanoscopy indicates that the area enclosed by a Bax ring is devoid of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom22, and Sam50. This strongly supports the view that the Bax rings surround an opening required for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Even though these Bax assemblies may be necessary for MOMP, we demonstrate that at least in Drp1 knockdown cells, these assemblies are not sufficient for full cytochrome c release. Together, our super-resolution data provide direct evidence in support of large Bax-delineated pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane as being crucial for Bax-mediated MOMP in cells. PMID:26783364

  5. Structural Rearrangements in CHO Cells After Disruption of Individual Cytoskeletal Elements and Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jokhadar, Špela Zemljič; Derganc, Jure

    2015-04-01

    Cellular structural integrity is provided primarily by the cytoskeleton, which comprises microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments. The plasma membrane has been also recognized as a mediator of physical forces, yet its contribution to the structural integrity of the cell as a whole is less clear. In order to investigate the relationship between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton, we selectively disrupted the plasma membrane and each of the cytoskeletal elements in Chinese hamster ovary cells and assessed subsequent changes in cellular structural integrity. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize cytoskeletal rearrangements, and optical tweezers were utilized to quantify membrane tether extraction. We found that cholesterol depletion from the plasma membrane resulted in rearrangements of all cytoskeletal elements. Conversely, the state of the plasma membrane, as assessed by tether extraction, was affected by disruption of any of the cytoskeletal elements, including microtubules and intermediate filaments, which are located mainly in the cell interior. The results demonstrate that, besides the cytoskeleton, the plasma membrane is an important contributor to cellular integrity, possibly by acting as an essential framework for cytoskeletal anchoring. In agreement with the tensegrity model of cell mechanics, our results support the notion of the cell as a prestressed structure. PMID:25395197

  6. [HOMOCYSTEINE-INDUCED MEMBRANE CURRENTS, CALCIUM RESPONSES AND CHANGES OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS].

    PubMed

    Abushik, P A; Karelina, T V; Sibarov, D A; Stepanenko, J D; Giniatullin, R; Antonov, S M

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, exhibits neurotoxic effects and is involved in the pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to well studied excitoxicity of glutamate, the mechanism of homocysteine neurotoxicity is not clearly understood. By using whole-cell patch-clamp, calcium imaging (fluo-3) and measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123) we studied transmembrane currents, calcium signals and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by homocysteine versus responses induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured rat cortical neurons. L-homocysteine (50 µM) induced inward currents that could be completely blocked by the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors - AP-5. In contrast to NMDA-induced currents, homocysteine-induced currents had a smaller steady-state amplitude. Comparison of calcium responses to homocysteine, NMDA or glutamate demonstrated that in all cortical neurons homocysteine elicited short, oscillatory-type calcium responses, whereas NMDA or glutamate induced sustained increase of intracellular calcium. Analysis of mitochondrial changes demonstrated that in contrast to NMDA homocysteine did not cause a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential at the early stages of action. However, after its long-term action, as in the case of NMDA and glutamate, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were comparable with the full drop of respiratory chain induced by protonophore FCCP. Our data suggest that in cultured rat cortical neuron homocysteine at the first stages of action induces neurotoxic effects through activation of NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors with strong calcium influx through the channels of these receptors. The long-term action of homocysteine may lead to mitochondrial disfuction and appears as a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:26547950

  7. Does membrane fatty acid composition modulate mitochondrial functions and their thermal sensitivities?

    PubMed

    Lemieux, H; Blier, P U; Tardif, J-C

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of modifying fatty acid modification of heart mitochondrial membranes by dietary intervention on the functions and thermal sensitivity of electron transport system complexes embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Four groups of rats were fed diets differing in their fat (coconut, olive or fish oil) and antioxidant (fish oil with or without probucol) contents. After 16 weeks of feeding, the coconut and olive oil groups had lower long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids contents and a lower unsaturation index compared to both fish oil groups. These differences in fatty acid composition were not related to any differences in the mitochondrial respiration rate induced at Complexes I, II or IV, or to differences in their thermal sensitivity. The coconut oil group showed a lower mitochondrial affinity for pyruvate at 5 degrees C (k(mapp)=6.4+/-1.8) compared to any other groups (k(mapp)=3.8+/-0.5; 4.7+/-0.8; 3.6+/-1.1, for olive, fish oil and fish oil and probucol groups, respectively). At least in rat heart, our results do not support a major impact of the fatty acid composition of the mitochondrial membrane on the function of mitochondrial enzymatic complexes or on their temperature sensitivity. PMID:17993286

  8. Glucocorticoid-induced alterations in mitochondrial membrane properties and respiration in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Karin; Rainer, Johannes; Bindreither, Daniel; Ritter, Ireen; Gnaiger, Erich; Kofler, Reinhard; Oefner, Peter J; Renner, Kathrin

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria are signal-integrating organelles involved in cell death induction. Mitochondrial alterations and reduction in energy metabolism have been previously reported in the context of glucocorticoid (GC)-triggered apoptosis, although the mechanism is not yet clarified. We analyzed mitochondrial function in a GC-sensitive precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) model as well as in GC-sensitive and GC-resistant T-ALL model systems. Respiratory activity was preserved in intact GC-sensitive cells up to 24h under treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone before depression of mitochondrial respiration occurred. Severe repression of mitochondrial respiratory function was observed after permeabilization of the cell membrane and provision of exogenous substrates. Several mitochondrial metabolite and protein transporters and two subunits of the ATP synthase were downregulated in the T-ALL and in the precursor B-ALL model at the gene expression level under dexamethasone treatment. These data could partly be confirmed in ALL lymphoblasts from patients, dependent on the molecular abnormality in the ALL cells. GC-resistant cell lines did not show any of these defects after dexamethasone treatment. In conclusion, in GC-sensitive ALL cells, dexamethasone induces changes in membrane properties that together with the reduced expression of mitochondrial transporters of substrates and proteins may lead to repressed mitochondrial respiratory activity and lower ATP levels that contribute to GC-induced apoptosis. PMID:21237131

  9. Marine sponge cyclic peptide theonellamide A disrupts lipid bilayer integrity without forming distinct membrane pores.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Rafael Atillo; Cornelio, Kimberly; Kinoshita, Masanao; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Murata, Michio; Nishimura, Shinichi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2016-06-01

    Theonellamides (TNMs) are antifungal and cytotoxic bicyclic dodecapeptides derived from the marine sponge Theonella sp. These peptides specifically bind to 3β-hydroxysterols, resulting in 1,3-β-D-glucan overproduction and membrane damage in yeasts. The inclusion of cholesterol or ergosterol in phosphatidylcholine membranes significantly enhanced the membrane affinity of theonellamide A (TNM-A) because of its direct interaction with 3β-hydroxyl groups of sterols. To better understand TNM-induced membrane alterations, we investigated the effects of TNM-A on liposome morphology. (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements revealed that the premixing of TNM-A with lipids induced smaller vesicle formation. When giant unilamellar vesicles were incubated with exogenously added TNM-A, confocal micrographs showed dynamic changes in membrane morphology, which were more frequently observed in cholesterol-containing than sterol-free liposomes. In conjunction with our previous data, these results suggest that the membrane action of TNM-A proceeds in two steps: 1) TNM-A binds to the membrane surface through direct interaction with sterols and 2) accumulated TNM-A modifies the local membrane curvature in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in dramatic membrane morphological changes and membrane disruption. PMID:27003125

  10. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T. )

    1989-11-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl {beta}-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure ({sup 35}S)pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components.

  11. Human wild-type full-length tau accumulation disrupts mitochondrial dynamics and the functions via increasing mitofusins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia-Chun; Hu, Yu; Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Ye, Keqiang; Liu, Gong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of tau protein is hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, the cellular mechanism whereby tau accumulation causes neurodegeneration is poorly understood. Here we report that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed htau) disrupted mitochondrial dynamics by enhancing fusion and induced their perinuclear accumulation in HEK293 cells and rat primary hippocampal neurons. The htau accumulation at later stage inhibited mitochondrial functions shown by the decreased ATP level, the ratio of ATP/ADP and complex I activity. Simultaneously, the cell viability was decreased with retraction of the cellular/neuronal processes. Further studies demonstrated that htau accumulation increased fusion proteins, including OPA1 and mitofusins (Mfn1, Mfn2) and reduced the ubiquitination of Mfn2. Downregulation of the mitofusins by shRNA to ~45% or ~52% of the control levels attenuated the htau-enhanced mitochondrial fusion and restored the functions, while downregulation of OPA1 to ~50% of the control level did not show rescue effects. Finally, abnormal mitochondrial accumulation and dysfunction were also observed in the brains of htau transgenic mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that htau accumulation decreases cell viability and causes degeneration via enhancing mitofusin-associated mitochondrial fusion, which provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tauopathies. PMID:27099072

  12. Effect of hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorite on mitochondrial membrane potential in permeabilized rat heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, N.; Kako, K.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The chemiosmotic theory states that the proton electrochemical potential gradient across the membrane drives mitochondrial energy transduction. Mitochondria can take up Ca accumulated in the cytosol. Therefore, oxidant-induced ATP depletion and Ca overload in the cell may be the result of mitochondrial dysfunction. Consequently, the authors measured membrane potential of mitochondria in situ in isolated rat heart myocytes with {sup 3}H-triphenylmethylphosphonium. This was followed by permeabilization using digitonin and rapid centrifugation using density gradient of bromododecane. They found that the membrane potentials, 118 mV with isolated and 161 mV with in situ mitochondria, were relatively well maintained under oxidant stress. High concentrations of oxidants reduced also the cellular ATP level, whereas the matrix volume was not significantly changed. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} effect on the mitochondrial membrane potential was more pronounced when the extra-mitochondrial free Ca concentration was increased in permeabilized myocytes. These results support the view that heart mitochondria are equipped with well developed defense mechanisms against oxidants and thus the electrochemical gradient of inner membrane is affected only by a relatively large concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HOCl.

  13. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  14. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  15. KCl-Dependent Release of Mitochondrial Membrane-Bound Arginase Appears to Be a Novel Variant of Arginase-II.

    PubMed

    Suman, Mishra; Rajnikant, Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Arginase regulates arginine metabolism, ornithine-urea cycle, and immunological surveillance. Arginase-I is predominant in cytosol, and arginase-II is localised in the mitochondria. A mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been proposed to be adsorbed with outer membrane of mitochondria which gets released by 150 mM potassium chloride (KCl). It is presumed that inclusion of 150 mM KCl in the homogenization medium would not only facilitate release of arginase bound with outer membrane of mitochondria but also affect functional anatomy of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzymes, and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to characterize KCl-dependent release of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase from liver of mice. Results provide advancement in the area of arginase biology and suggest that fraction of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase contains mitochondrial arginase-II and a variant of arginase-II. PMID:27293971

  16. KCl-Dependent Release of Mitochondrial Membrane-Bound Arginase Appears to Be a Novel Variant of Arginase-II

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Mishra; Rajnikant, Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Arginase regulates arginine metabolism, ornithine-urea cycle, and immunological surveillance. Arginase-I is predominant in cytosol, and arginase-II is localised in the mitochondria. A mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been proposed to be adsorbed with outer membrane of mitochondria which gets released by 150 mM potassium chloride (KCl). It is presumed that inclusion of 150 mM KCl in the homogenization medium would not only facilitate release of arginase bound with outer membrane of mitochondria but also affect functional anatomy of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzymes, and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to characterize KCl-dependent release of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase from liver of mice. Results provide advancement in the area of arginase biology and suggest that fraction of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase contains mitochondrial arginase-II and a variant of arginase-II. PMID:27293971

  17. Induction of rat hepatic mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore opening by leaf extract of Olax subscorpioidea

    PubMed Central

    Adegbite, Oluwatobi Samuel; Akinsanya, Yetunde Ifeoma; Kukoyi, Ayobami Jahdahunsi; Iyanda-Joel, Wisdom O.; Daniel, Oluwatoyin O.; Adebayo, Abiodun Humphrey

    2015-01-01

    Background: The induction of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MMPT) pore has been implicated in the cascade of events involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death). Olax subscorpioidea is traditionally used for the treatment of several diseases and infection. However, its role on MMPT is not yet established. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of varying concentrations of the methanol leaf extract of O. subscorpioidea (MEOS) on MMPT pore opening, mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), and mitochondrial lipid peroxidation. Materials and Methods: Opening of the pore was spectrophotometrically assayed under succinate-energized conditions. Results: In the absence of triggering agent (calcium), MEOS induced MMPT pore opening by 350, 612, 827, 845% at 36, 60, 86 and 112 μg/ml, respectively. MEOS further induced MMPT pore opening in the presence of a triggering agent by 866, 905, 831, 840, 949% at 12, 36, 60, 86 and 112 μg/ml, respectively. The extract significantly induced mitochondrial membrane lipid peroxidation in all the concentration used. MEOS also significantly increased mitochondrial ATP hydrolysis by mitochondrial ATPase in all concentration of the extract used. Conclusion: It may be deduced from this results, that MEOS contains certain bioactive components that may find use in pathological conditions that require an enhanced rate of apoptosis. PMID:26109790

  18. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    PubMed Central

    Clémençon, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI) has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp) and inorganic phosphate (PiC) carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin) catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1) under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003. PMID:22408429

  19. Heinrich Wieland--prize lecture. Transport of proteins across mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Neupert, W

    1994-03-01

    The vast majority of proteins comprising the mitochondrion are encoded by nuclear genes, synthesized on ribosomes in the cytosol, and translocated into the various mitochondrial subcompartments. During this process proteins must cross the lipid membranes of the mitochondrion without interfering with the integrity or functions of the organelle. In recent years an approach combining biochemical, molecular, genetic, and morphological methodology has provided insights into various aspects of this complex process of intracellular protein sorting. In particular, a greater understanding of the molecular specificity and mechanism of targeting of mitochondrial preproteins has been reached, as a protein complex of the outer membrane which facilitates recognition and initial membrane insertion has been identified and characterized. Furthermore, pathways and components involved in the translocation of pre-proteins across the two mitochondrial membranes are being dissected and defined. The energetics of translocation and the processes of unfolding and folding of proteins during transmembrane transfer are closely linked to the function of a host of proteins known as heat-shock proteins or molecular chaperones, present both outside and inside the mitochondrion. In addition, the analysis of the process of folding of polypeptides in the mitochondrial matrix has allowed novel and unexpected insights into general pathways of protein folding assisted by folding factors. Pathways of sorting of proteins to the four different mitochondrial subcompartments--the outer membrane (OM), intermembrane space, inner membrane (IM) and matrix--are only partly understood and reveal an amazing complexity and variation. Many additional protein factors are involved in these latter processes, a few of which have been analyzed, such as cytochrome c heme lyase and cytochrome c1 heme lyase, enzymes that catalyze the covalent addition of the heme group to cytochrome c and c1 preproteins, and the

  20. Disruption of a mitochondrial MutS DNA repair enzyme homologue confers drug resistance in the parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Erin M; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2009-04-01

    MutS homologues (MSHs) are critical components of the eukaryotic mismatch repair machinery. In addition to repairing mismatched DNA, mismatch repair enzymes are known in higher eukaryotes to directly signal cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA-damaging agents. Accordingly, mammalian cells lacking certain MSHs are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, we have discovered that the disruption of TgMSH-1, an MSH in the pathogenic parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, confers drug resistance. Through a genetic selection for T. gondii mutants resistant to the antiparasitic drug monensin, we have isolated a strain that is resistant not only to monensin but also to salinomycin and the alkylating agent, methylnitrosourea. We have shown that this phenotype is due to the disruption of TgMSH-1 as the multidrug-resistance phenotype is complemented by a wild-type copy of TgMSH-1 and is recapitulated by a directed disruption of this gene in a wild-type strain. We have also shown that, unlike previously described MSHs involved in signalling, TgMSH-1 localizes to the parasite mitochondrion. These results provide the first example of a mitochondrial MSH that is involved in drug sensitivity and implicate the induction of mitochondrial stress as a mode of action of the widely used drug, monensin. PMID:19291232

  1. Disruption of a Mitochondrial MutS DNA Repair Enzyme Homolog Confers Drug Resistance in the Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Erin M.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY MutS homologs (MSHs) are critical components of the eukaryotic mismatch repair machinery. In addition to repairing mismatched DNA, mismatch repair enzymes are known in higher eukaryotes to directly signal cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damaging agents. Accordingly, mammalian cells lacking certain MSHs are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, we have discovered that the disruption of TgMSH-1, an MSH in the pathogenic parasite, T. gondii, confers drug resistance. Through a genetic selection for T. gondii mutants resistant to the antiparasitic drug monensin, we have isolated a strain that is resistant not only to monensin but also to salinomycin and the alkylating agent, methylnitrosourea. We have shown that this phenotype is due to the disruption of TgMSH-1 as the multi-drug resistance phenotype is complemented by a wild-type copy of TgMSH-1 and is recapitulated by a directed disruption of this gene in a wild-type strain. We have also shown that, unlike previously described MSHs involved in signaling, TgMSH-1 localizes to the parasite mitochondrion. These results provide the first example of a mitochondrial MutS Homolog that is involved in drug sensitivity and implicate the induction of mitochondrial stress as a mode of action of the widely used drug, monensin. PMID:19291232

  2. DLK-1, SEK-3 and PMK-3 Are Required for the Life Extension Induced by Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Disruption in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Munkácsy, Erin; Khan, Maruf H; Lane, Rebecca K; Borror, Megan B; Park, Jae H; Bokov, Alex F; Fisher, Alfred L; Link, Christopher D; Rea, Shane L

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlies numerous age-related pathologies. In an effort to uncover how the detrimental effects of mitochondrial dysfunction might be alleviated, we examined how the nematode C. elegans not only adapts to disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, but in many instances responds with extended lifespan. Studies have shown various retrograde responses are activated in these animals, including the well-studied ATFS-1-dependent mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). Such processes fall under the greater rubric of cellular surveillance mechanisms. Here we identify a novel p38 signaling cascade that is required to extend life when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is disrupted in worms, and which is blocked by disruption of the Mitochondrial-associated Degradation (MAD) pathway. This novel cascade is defined by DLK-1 (MAP3K), SEK-3 (MAP2K), PMK-3 (MAPK) and the reporter gene Ptbb-6::GFP. Inhibition of known mitochondrial retrograde responses does not alter induction of Ptbb-6::GFP, instead induction of this reporter often occurs in counterpoint to activation of SKN-1, which we show is under the control of ATFS-1. In those mitochondrial bioenergetic mutants which activate Ptbb-6::GFP, we find that dlk-1, sek-3 and pmk-3 are all required for their life extension. PMID:27420916

  3. DLK-1, SEK-3 and PMK-3 Are Required for the Life Extension Induced by Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Disruption in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Rebecca K.; Borror, Megan B.; Bokov, Alex F.; Link, Christopher D.; Rea, Shane L.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlies numerous age-related pathologies. In an effort to uncover how the detrimental effects of mitochondrial dysfunction might be alleviated, we examined how the nematode C. elegans not only adapts to disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, but in many instances responds with extended lifespan. Studies have shown various retrograde responses are activated in these animals, including the well-studied ATFS-1-dependent mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt). Such processes fall under the greater rubric of cellular surveillance mechanisms. Here we identify a novel p38 signaling cascade that is required to extend life when the mitochondrial electron transport chain is disrupted in worms, and which is blocked by disruption of the Mitochondrial-associated Degradation (MAD) pathway. This novel cascade is defined by DLK-1 (MAP3K), SEK-3 (MAP2K), PMK-3 (MAPK) and the reporter gene Ptbb-6::GFP. Inhibition of known mitochondrial retrograde responses does not alter induction of Ptbb-6::GFP, instead induction of this reporter often occurs in counterpoint to activation of SKN-1, which we show is under the control of ATFS-1. In those mitochondrial bioenergetic mutants which activate Ptbb-6::GFP, we find that dlk-1, sek-3 and pmk-3 are all required for their life extension. PMID:27420916

  4. A Rapid and Quantitative Flow Cytometry Method for the Analysis of Membrane Disruptive Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien-Simpson, Neil M.; Pantarat, Namfon; Attard, Troy J.; Walsh, Katrina A.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a microbial flow cytometry method that quantifies within 3 hours antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity, termed Minimum Membrane Disruptive Concentration (MDC). Increasing peptide concentration positively correlates with the extent of bacterial membrane disruption and the calculated MDC is equivalent to its MBC. The activity of AMPs representing three different membranolytic modes of action could be determined for a range of Gram positive and negative bacteria, including the ESKAPE pathogens, E. coli and MRSA. By using the MDC50 concentration of the parent AMP, the method provides high-throughput, quantitative screening of AMP analogues. A unique feature of the MDC assay is that it directly measures peptide/bacteria interactions and lysed cell numbers rather than bacteria survival as with MIC and MBC assays. With the threat of multi-drug resistant bacteria, this high-throughput MDC assay has the potential to aid in the development of novel antimicrobials that target bacteria with improved efficacy. PMID:26986223

  5. Coupling of lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization in trypanolysis by APOL1

    PubMed Central

    Vanwalleghem, Gilles; Fontaine, Frédéric; Lecordier, Laurence; Tebabi, Patricia; Klewe, Kristoffer; Nolan, Derek P.; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille; Kremer, Anneke; Burkard, Gabriela Schumann; Rassow, Joachim; Roditi, Isabel; Pérez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Humans resist infection by the African parasite Trypanosoma brucei owing to the trypanolytic activity of the serum apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). Following uptake by endocytosis in the parasite, APOL1 forms pores in endolysosomal membranes and triggers lysosome swelling. Here we show that APOL1 induces both lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (LMP and MMP). Trypanolysis coincides with MMP and consecutive release of the mitochondrial TbEndoG endonuclease to the nucleus. APOL1 is associated with the kinesin TbKIFC1, of which both the motor and vesicular trafficking VHS domains are required for MMP, but not for LMP. The presence of APOL1 in the mitochondrion is accompanied by mitochondrial membrane fenestration, which can be mimicked by knockdown of a mitochondrial mitofusin-like protein (TbMFNL). The BH3-like peptide of APOL1 is required for LMP, MMP and trypanolysis. Thus, trypanolysis by APOL1 is linked to apoptosis-like MMP occurring together with TbKIFC1-mediated transport of APOL1 from endolysosomal membranes to the mitochondrion. PMID:26307671

  6. Coupling of lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization in trypanolysis by APOL1.

    PubMed

    Vanwalleghem, Gilles; Fontaine, Frédéric; Lecordier, Laurence; Tebabi, Patricia; Klewe, Kristoffer; Nolan, Derek P; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille; Kremer, Anneke; Burkard, Gabriela Schumann; Rassow, Joachim; Roditi, Isabel; Pérez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Humans resist infection by the African parasite Trypanosoma brucei owing to the trypanolytic activity of the serum apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). Following uptake by endocytosis in the parasite, APOL1 forms pores in endolysosomal membranes and triggers lysosome swelling. Here we show that APOL1 induces both lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (LMP and MMP). Trypanolysis coincides with MMP and consecutive release of the mitochondrial TbEndoG endonuclease to the nucleus. APOL1 is associated with the kinesin TbKIFC1, of which both the motor and vesicular trafficking VHS domains are required for MMP, but not for LMP. The presence of APOL1 in the mitochondrion is accompanied by mitochondrial membrane fenestration, which can be mimicked by knockdown of a mitochondrial mitofusin-like protein (TbMFNL). The BH3-like peptide of APOL1 is required for LMP, MMP and trypanolysis. Thus, trypanolysis by APOL1 is linked to apoptosis-like MMP occurring together with TbKIFC1-mediated transport of APOL1 from endolysosomal membranes to the mitochondrion. PMID:26307671

  7. A biphenyl type two-photon fluorescence probe for monitoring the mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Moritomo, Hiroki; Yamada, Kengo; Kojima, Yuki; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Tani, Seiji; Kinoshita, Hazuki; Sasaki, Akira; Mikuni, Shintaro; Kinjo, Masataka; Kawamata, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe the design and synthesis of a bifunctional two-photon fluorescence probe, N,N'-‍dimethyl-4,4'-(biphenyl-2,1-ethenediyl)dipyridinium hexafluorophosphate (BP6). HeLa, Hek293, and Paramecium caudatum cells were stained with BP6. BP6 accumulated on the mitochondria of all three cell types when the mitochondrial membrane potential was high. As the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased following the addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine, BP6 moved from the mitochondria to the nucleus in a reversible manner, depending on the mitochondrial membrane potential status. The maximum value of the two-photon absorption cross-section of BP6 is 250 GM (1 GM=1×10(-50) cm(4) s molecules(-1) photon(-1)). This value is 3 and 30 times larger, respectively, than that of the conventional mitochondria selective probes, rhodamine 123 and green fluorescence protein. These results suggest that BP6 should be useful for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential by two-photon excitation. PMID:25319070

  8. Assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential using an on-chip microelectrode in a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Dávila, Antonio; Wallace, Douglas C.; Burke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential is used to generate and regulate energy in living systems, driving the conversion of ADP to ATP, regulating ion homeostasis, and controlling apoptosis, all central to human health and disease. Therefore, there is a need for tools to study its regulation in a controlled environment for potential clinical and scientific applications. For this aim, an on-chip tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) selective microelectrode sensor was constructed in a microfluidic environment. The concentration of isolated mitochondria (Heb7A) used in a membrane potential measurement was 0.3 ng μL−1, four orders of magnitude smaller than the concentration used in conventional assays (3 μg μL−1). In addition, the volume of the chamber (85 μL) is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than traditional experiments. As a demonstration, changes in the membrane potential are clearly measured in response to a barrage of well-known substrates and inhibitors of the electron transport chain. This general approach, which to date has not been demonstrated for study of mitochondrial function and bio-energetics in generally, can be instrumental in advancing the field of mitochondrial research and clinical applications by allowing high throughput studies of the regulation, dynamics, and statistical properties of the mitochondrial membrane potential in response to inhibitors and inducers of apoptosis in a controlled (microfluidic) chemical environment. PMID:20383402

  9. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  10. Mitochondrial outer membrane forms bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are double-membrane organelles that move around and change their shapes dynamically. In plants, the dynamics of the outer membrane is not well understood. We recently demonstrated that mitochondria had tubular protrusions of the outer membrane with little or no matrix, called MOPs (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs). Here we show that a MOP can form a bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana. The bridge does not appear to involve the inner membranes. Live imaging revealed stretching of the MOP bridge, demonstrating the flexibility of the outer membrane. Mitochondria frequently undergo fission and fusion. These observations raise the possibility that MOPs bridges have a role in these processes. PMID:27031262

  11. Bcl-2 and porin follow different pathways of TOM-dependent insertion into the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Motz, Christian; Martin, Heiko; Krimmer, Thomas; Rassow, Joachim

    2002-11-01

    The bcl-2 gene encodes a 26kDa protein which functions as a central regulator of apoptosis. Here we investigated the pathway of Bcl-2alpha into the mitochondrial outer membrane using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. We found that interactions of Bcl-2alpha with the mitochondrial import receptor Tom20 are dependent on two positively charged lysine residues in the immediate vicinity of the carboxy-terminal hydrophobic membrane anchor. The targeting function of these residues is independent of Tom22. Subsequent insertion of Bcl-2alpha into the mitochondrial outer membrane does not require Tom5 or Tom40, indicating that Bcl-2alpha bypasses the general import pore (GIP). Bcl-2alpha shows a unique pattern of interactions with the components of the mitochondrial TOM complex, demonstrating that at least two different pathways lead from the import receptor Tom20 into the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:12419260

  12. A yeast toxic mutant of HET-s amyloid disrupts membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Ta, Ha Phuong; Berthelot, Karine; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Castano, Sabine; Desbat, Bernard; Bonnafous, Pierre; Lambert, Olivier; Alves, Isabel; Cullin, Christophe; Lecomte, Sophie

    2012-09-01

    Many studies have pointed out the interaction between amyloids and membranes, and their potential involvement in amyloid toxicity. Previously, we generated a yeast toxic amyloid mutant (M8) from the harmless amyloid protein by changing a few residues of the Prion Forming Domain of HET-s (PFD HET-s(218-289)) and clearly demonstrated the complete different behaviors of the non-toxic Wild Type (WT) and toxic amyloid (called M8) in terms of fiber morphology, aggregation kinetics and secondary structure. In this study, we compared the interaction of both proteins (WT and M8) with membrane models, as liposomes or supported bilayers. We first demonstrated that the toxic protein (M8) induces a significant leakage of liposomes formed with negatively charged lipids and promotes the formation of microdomains inside the lipid bilayer (as potential "amyloid raft"), whereas the non-toxic amyloid (WT) only binds to the membrane without further perturbations. The secondary structure of both amyloids interacting with membrane is preserved, but the anti-symmetric PO(2)(-) vibration is strongly shifted in the presence of M8. Secondly, we established that the presence of membrane models catalyzes the amyloidogenesis of both proteins. Cryo-TEM (cryo-transmission electron microscopy) images show the formation of long HET-s fibers attached to liposomes, whereas a large aggregation of the toxic M8 seems to promote a membrane disruption. This study allows us to conclude that the toxicity of the M8 mutant could be due to its high propensity to interact and disrupt lipid membranes. PMID:22562024

  13. Cytotoxicity of bovine α-lactalbumin: oleic acid complexes correlates with the disruption of lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hanzhen; Glomm, Wilhelm R; Halskau, Oyvind

    2013-11-01

    HAMLET/BAMLET (Human/Bovine α-Lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumors) is a tumoricidal substance composed of partially unfolded human/bovine α-lactalbumin (HLA/BLA) and several oleic acid (OA) molecules. The HAMLET mechanism of interaction involves an insufficiently understood effect on the membrane or its embedded components. We examined the effect of BLAOA (bovine α-lactalbumin complexed with oleic acid, a HAMLET-like substance) and its individual components on cells and artificial lipid membranes using viability staining and metabolic dyes, fluorescence spectroscopy, leakage integrity assays and microscopy. Our results show a dose-dependency of OA used to prepare BLAOA on its ability to induce tumor cell death, and a correlation between leakage and cell death. BLAOA incorporates into the membrane, tightens the lipid packing and lowers their solvent accessibility. Fluorescence imaging reveals that giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) develop blebs and eventually collapse upon exposure to BLAOA, indicating that the lipid packing reorganization can translate into observable morphological effects. These effects are observed to be local in GUVs, and a tightly packed and solvent-shielded lipid environment is associated with leakage and GUV disruption. Furthermore, the effects of BLAOA on membrane are pH dependent, with an optimum of activity on artificial membranes near neutral pHs. While BLA alone is effective at membrane disruption at acidic pHs, OA is ineffective in a pH range of 4.5 to 9.1. Taken together, this supports a model where the lipid, fatty acid and protein components enhance each other's ability to affect the overall integrity of the membrane. PMID:23916586

  14. A pyrazole curcumin derivative restores membrane homeostasis disrupted after brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sandeep; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We have assessed potential mechanisms associated with the deleterious effects of TBI on the integrity of plasma membranes in the hippocampus, together with consequences for behavioral function. In addition, we have investigated the efficacy of a dietary intervention based on a pyrazole curcumin derivative with demonstrated bioactivity and brain absorption, to re-establish membrane integrity. We report that moderate fluid percussion injury (FPI) increases levels of 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), an intermediary for the harmful effects of lipid peroxidation on neurons. A more direct action of FPI on membrane homeostasis was evidenced by a reduction in calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) important for metabolism of membrane phospholipids such as DHA, and an increase in the fatty acid transport protein (FATP) involved in translocation of long-chain fatty acids across the membrane. A potential association between membrane disruption and neuronal function was suggested by reduced levels of the NR2B subunit of the transmembrane NMDA receptor, in association with changes in iPLA2 and syntaxin-3 (STX-3, involved in the action of membrane DHA on synaptic membrane expansion). In addition, changes in iPLA2, 4-HNE, and STX-3 were proportional to reduced performance in a spatial learning task. In turn, the dietary supplementation with the curcumin derivative counteracted all the effects of FPI, effectively restoring parameters of membrane homeostasis. Results show the potential of the curcumin derivative to promote membrane homeostasis following TBI, which may foster a new line of non-invasive therapeutic treatments for TBI patients by endogenous up-regulation of molecules important for neural repair and plasticity. PMID:20816821

  15. A novel insertion pathway of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane segments

    PubMed Central

    Otera, Hidenori; Taira, Yohsuke; Horie, Chika; Suzuki, Yurina; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Kato, Hiroki; Oka, Toshihiko; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The central channel Tom40 of the preprotein translocase of outer membrane (TOM) complex is thought to be responsible for the import of virtually all preproteins synthesized outside the mitochondria. In this study, we analyze the topogenesis of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), which integrates into the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) through five hydrophobic transmembrane segments (TMSs) and functions in cholesterol import into the inner membrane. Analyses of in vitro and in vivo import into TOM component–depleted mitochondria reveal that PBR import (1) depends on the import receptor Tom70 but requires neither the Tom20 and Tom22 import receptors nor the import channel Tom40, (2) shares the post-Tom70 pathway with the C-tail–anchored proteins, and (3) requires factors of the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Furthermore, membrane integration of mitofusins and mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase, the MOM proteins with two and four TMSs, respectively, proceeds through the same initial pathway. These findings reveal a previously unidentified pathway of the membrane integration of MOM proteins with multiple TMSs. PMID:18158327

  16. A novel insertion pathway of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane segments.

    PubMed

    Otera, Hidenori; Taira, Yohsuke; Horie, Chika; Suzuki, Yurina; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Kato, Hiroki; Oka, Toshihiko; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2007-12-31

    The central channel Tom40 of the preprotein translocase of outer membrane (TOM) complex is thought to be responsible for the import of virtually all preproteins synthesized outside the mitochondria. In this study, we analyze the topogenesis of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), which integrates into the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) through five hydrophobic transmembrane segments (TMSs) and functions in cholesterol import into the inner membrane. Analyses of in vitro and in vivo import into TOM component-depleted mitochondria reveal that PBR import (1) depends on the import receptor Tom70 but requires neither the Tom20 and Tom22 import receptors nor the import channel Tom40, (2) shares the post-Tom70 pathway with the C-tail-anchored proteins, and (3) requires factors of the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Furthermore, membrane integration of mitofusins and mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase, the MOM proteins with two and four TMSs, respectively, proceeds through the same initial pathway. These findings reveal a previously unidentified pathway of the membrane integration of MOM proteins with multiple TMSs. PMID:18158327

  17. Bioavailability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs): Liposome-water partitioning and lipid membrane permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    The bioavailability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a function of a number of parameters including the ability of the chemical to partition into organic tissue and reach receptor sites within an organism. In this dissertation, equilibrium partition coefficients between water and lipid membrane vesicles and artificial lipid membrane permeability were investigated for evaluating bioavailability of aqueous pollutants. Structurally diverse endocrine disrupting chemicals were chosen as model compounds for partitioning experiments and simple hydrophobic organic chemicals were used for the evaluation of a parallel artificial membrane device developed to mimic bioconcentration rates in fish. Hydrophobic interactions represented by octanol/water partition coefficients (KOWs) were not appropriate for estimating lipid membrane/water partition coefficients (Klipws) for the selected EDCs having a relatively large molar liquid volume (MLV) and containing polar functional groups. Correlations that include MLV and polar surface area (PSA) reduce the predicted value of log K lipw, suggesting that lipid membranes are less favorable than 1-octanol for a hydrophobic solute because of the changes in membrane fluidity and the amount of cholesterol in the lipid bilayers. These results suggested that KOW alone has limited potential for estimating K lipw, and MLV or PSA may be used as additional descriptors for developing quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). The poor correlations between KOW and Klipw observed in this research may be due to the highly organized structure of lipid bilayers. Measured thermodynamic constants demonstrated that the entropy contribution becomes more dominant for more organized liposomes having saturated lipid tails. This implies that entropy-driven partitioning process makes Klipw different from KOW especially for more saturated lipid bilayer membranes. In the parallel artificial membrane system developed, a membrane filter

  18. Preservation of Supported Lipid Membrane Integrity from Thermal Disruption: Osmotic Effect.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang; Hu, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Preservation of structural integrity under various environmental conditions is one major concern in the development of the supported lipid membrane (SLM)-based devices. It is common for SLMs to experience temperature shifts from manufacture, processing, storage, and transport to operation. In this work, we studied the thermal adaption of the supported membranes on silica substrates. Homogenous SLMs with little defects were formed through the vesicle fusion method. The mass and fluidity of the bilayers were found to deteriorate from a heating process but not a cooling process. Fluorescence characterizations showed that the membranes initially budded as a result of heating-induced lipid lateral area expansion, followed by the possible fates including maintenance, retraction, and fission, among which the last contributes to the irreversible compromise of the SLM integrity and spontaneous release of the interlipid stress accumulated. Based on the mechanism, we developed a strategy to protect SLMs from thermal disruption by increasing the solute concentration in medium. An improved preservation of the membrane mass and fluidity against the heating process was observed, accompanied by a decrease in the retraction and fission of the buds. Theoretical analysis revealed a high osmotic energy penalty for the fission, which accounts for the depressed disruption. This osmotic-based protection strategy is facile, solute nonspecific, and long-term efficient and has little impact on the original SLM properties. The results may help broaden SLM applications and sustain the robustness of SLM-based devices under multiple thermal conditions. PMID:26886864

  19. Lipopolysaccharide Disrupts Mitochondrial Physiology in Skeletal Muscle via Disparate Effects on Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Melissa E.; Simmons, Kurtis J.; Tippetts, Trevor S.; Thatcher, Mikayla O.; Saito, Rex R.; Hubbard, Sheryl T.; Trumbull, Annie M.; Parker, Brian A.; Taylor, Oliver J.; Bikman, Benjamin T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are prevalent pathogenic molecules that are found within tissues and blood. Elevated circulating LPS is a feature of obesity and sepsis, both of which are associated with mitochondrial abnormalities that are key pathological features of LPS excess. However, the mechanism of LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations remains poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate the necessity of sphingolipid accrual in mediating altered mitochondrial physiology in skeletal muscle following LPS exposure. In particular, we found LPS elicited disparate effects on the sphingolipids dihydroceramides (DhCer) and ceramides (Cer) in both cultured myotubes and in muscle of LPS-injected mice. Although LPS-treated myotubes had reduced DhCer and increased Cer as well as increased mitochondrial respiration, muscle from LPS-injected mice manifested a reverse trend, namely elevated DhCer, but reduced Cer as well as reduced mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that LPS treatment caused mitochondrial fission, likely via dynamin-related protein 1, and increased oxidative stress. However, inhibition of de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via myriocin protected normal mitochondrial function in spite of LPS, but inhibition of DhCer desaturase 1, which increases DhCer, but not Cer, exacerbated mitochondrial respiration with LPS. In an attempt to reconcile the incongruent effects of LPS in isolated muscle cells and whole muscle tissue, we incubated myotubes with conditioned medium from treated macrophages. In contrast to direct myotube LPS treatment, conditioned medium from LPS-treated macrophages reduced myotube respiration, but this was again mitigated with sphingolipid inhibition. Thus, macrophage sphingolipid production appears to be necessary for LPS-induced mitochondrial alterations in skeletal muscle tissue. PMID:26529656

  20. Control of the ornithine cycle in Neurospora crassa by the mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R H; Ristow, J L

    1983-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the mitochondrial membrane separates ornithine used in arginine biosynthesis from ornithine used in the arginine degradative pathway in the cytosol. Ornithine easily exchanges across the mitochondrial membrane under conditions appropriate for synthesis of the immediate biosynthetic product, citrulline. Neither of the two mitochondrial enzymes required for the ornithine-to-citrulline conversion is feedback inhibitable in vitro. Nevertheless, when arginine is added to cells and cytosolic ornithine increases as arginine degradation begins, the rate of citrulline synthesis drops immediately to about 20% of normal (B. J. Bowman and R. H. Davis, Bacteriol. 130:285-291, 1977). We have studied this phenomenon in citrulline-accumulating strains carrying the arg-1 mutation. Citrulline accumulation is blocked when arginine is added to an arg-1 strain but not to an arg-1 strain carrying a mutation conferring insensitivity of intramitochondrial ornithine synthesis to arginine. Thus, ornithine is evidently unable to enter mitochondria in normal (feedback-sensitive) cells. Other experiments show that cytosolic ornithine enters mitochondria readily except when arginine or other basic amino acids are present at high levels in the cells. We conclude that in N. crassa, the mitochondrial membrane has evolved as a secondary site of feedback inhibition in arginine synthesis and that this prevents a wasteful cycling of catabolic ornithine back through the anabolic pathway. This is compared to the quite different mechanism by which the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents a futile ornithine cycle. PMID:6222031

  1. Making heads or tails of mitochondrial membranes in longevity and aging: a role for comparative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play vital roles in metabolic energy transduction, intermediate molecule metabolism, metal ion homeostasis, programmed cell death and regulation of the production of reactive oxygen species. As a result of their broad range of functions, mitochondria have been strongly implicated in aging and longevity. Numerous studies show that aging and decreased lifespan are also associated with high reactive oxygen species production by mitochondria, increased mitochondrial DNA and protein damage, and with changes in the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. It is possible that the extent of fatty acid unsaturation of the mitochondrial membrane determines susceptibility to lipid oxidative damage and downstream protein and genome toxicity, thereby acting as a determinant of aging and lifespan. Reviewing the vast number of comparative studies on mitochondrial membrane composition, metabolism and lifespan reveals some evidence that lipid unsaturation ratios may correlate with lifespan. However, we caution against simply relating these two traits. They may be correlative but have no functional relation. We discuss an important methodology for body mass and phylogenetic correction in comparative studies. PMID:24588808

  2. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p < 0.05]. More than 11% of the structural clusters that constitute the Tox21 library (76 of 651 clusters) were significantly enriched for compounds that decreased the MMP. Conclusions: Our multiplexed qHTS approach allowed us to generate a robust and reliable data set to evaluate the ability of thousands of drugs and environmental compounds to decrease MMP. The use of structure-based clustering analysis allowed us to identify molecular features that are likely responsible for the observed activity. Citation: Attene-Ramos MS, Huang R, Michael S, Witt KL, Richard A, Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox

  3. Defining the membrane disruption mechanism of kalata B1 via coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nawae, Wanapinun; Hannongbua, Supa; Ruengjitchatchawalya, Marasri

    2014-01-01

    Kalata B1 has been demonstrated to have bioactivity relating to membrane disruption. In this study, we conducted coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to gain further insight into kB1 bioactivity. The simulations were performed at various concentrations of kB1 to capture the overall progression of its activity. Two configurations of kB1 oligomers, termed tower-like and wall-like clusters, were detected. The conjugation between the wall-like oligomers resulted in the formation of a ring-like hollow in the kB1 cluster on the membrane surface. Our results indicated that the molecules of kB1 were trapped at the membrane-water interface. The interfacial membrane binding of kB1 induced a positive membrane curvature, and the lipids were eventually extracted from the membrane through the kB1 ring-like hollow into the space inside the kB1 cluster. These findings provide an alternative view of the mechanism of kB1 bioactivity that corresponds with the concept of an interfacial bioactivity model. PMID:24492660

  4. Gene disruption of dematin causes precipitous loss of erythrocyte membrane stability and severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunzhe; Hanada, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Yuko; Nwankwo, Jennifer O; Wieschhaus, Adam J; Hartwig, John; Huang, Sha; Han, Jongyoon; Chishti, Athar H

    2016-07-01

    Dematin is a relatively low abundance actin binding and bundling protein associated with the spectrin-actin junctions of mature erythrocytes. Primary structure of dematin includes a loosely folded core domain and a compact headpiece domain that was originally identified in villin. Dematin's actin binding properties are regulated by phosphorylation of its headpiece domain by cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. Here, we used a novel gene disruption strategy to generate the whole body dematin gene knockout mouse model (FLKO). FLKO mice, while born at a normal Mendelian ratio, developed severe anemia and exhibited profound aberrations of erythrocyte morphology and membrane stability. Having no apparent effect on primitive erythropoiesis, FLKO mice show significant enhancement of erythroblast enucleation during definitive erythropoiesis. Using membrane protein analysis, domain mapping, electron microscopy, and dynamic deformability measurements, we investigated the mechanism of membrane instability in FLKO erythrocytes. Although many membrane and cytoskeletal proteins remained at their normal levels, the major peripheral membrane proteins spectrin, adducin, and actin were greatly reduced in FLKO erythrocytes. Our results demonstrate that dematin plays a critical role in maintaining the fundamental properties of the membrane cytoskeleton complex. PMID:27073223

  5. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    SciTech Connect

    Moepert, Kristin; Hajek, Petr; Frank, Stephan; Chen, Christiane; Kaufmann, Joerg; Santel, Ansgar

    2009-08-01

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  6. Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 form a complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Console, Lara; Giangregorio, Nicola; Indiveri, Cesare; Tonazzi, Annamaria

    2014-09-01

    Carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 are members of the carnitine system, which are responsible of the regulation of the mitochondrial CoA/acyl-CoA ratio and of supplying substrates for the ß-oxidation to mitochondria. This study, using cross-Linking reagent, Blue native electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation followed by detection with immunoblotting, shows conclusive evidence about the interaction between carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase supporting the channeling of acylcarnitines and carnitine at level of the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:24898781

  7. Simultaneous monitoring of ionophore- and inhibitor-mediated plasma and mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, David G

    2006-05-26

    Although natural and synthetic ionophores are widely exploited in cell studies, for example, to influence cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations and to depolarize in situ mitochondria, their inherent lack of membrane selectivity means that they affect the ion permeability of both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. A similar ambiguity affects the interpretation of signals from fluorescent membrane-permeant cations (usually termed "mitochondrial membrane potential indicators"), because the accumulation of these probes is influenced by both plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials. To resolve some of these problems a technique is developed to allow simultaneous monitoring of plasma and mitochondrial membrane potentials at single-cell resolution using a cationic and anionic fluorescent probe. A computer program is described that transforms the fluorescence changes into dynamic estimates of changes in plasma and mitochondrial potentials. Exploiting this technique, primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons display a concentration-dependent response to ionomycin: low concentrations mimic nigericin by hyperpolarizing the mitochondria while slowly depolarizing the plasma membrane and maintaining a stable elevated cytoplasmic calcium. Higher ionomycin concentrations induce a stochastic failure of calcium homeostasis that precedes both mitochondrial depolarization and an enhanced rate of plasma membrane depolarization. In addition, the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone only selectively depolarizes mitochondria at submicromolar concentrations. ATP synthase reversal following respiratory chain inhibition depolarizes the mitochondria by 26 mV. PMID:16551630

  8. Top Down Proteomics of Human Membrane Proteins from Enriched Mitochondrial Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Catherman, Adam D.; Li, Mingxi; Tran, John C.; Durbin, Kenneth R.; Compton, Philip D.; Early, Bryan P.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2013-01-01

    The interrogation of intact integral membrane proteins has long been a challenge for biological mass spectrometry. Here, we demonstrate the application of Top Down mass spectrometry to whole membrane proteins below 60 kDa with up to 8 transmembrane helices. Analysis of enriched mitochondrial membrane preparations from human cells yielded identification of 83 integral membrane proteins, along with 163 membrane-associated or soluble proteins, with a median q value of 3 × 10−10. An analysis of matching fragment ions demonstrated that significantly more fragment ions were found within transmembrane domains than would be expected based upon the observed protein sequence. Forty-six proteins from the complexes of oxidative phosphorylation were identified which exemplifies the increasing ability of Top Down Proteomics to provide extensive coverage in a biological network. PMID:23305238

  9. Fibrillation of β amyloid peptides in the presence of phospholipid bilayers and the consequent membrane disruption.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Schulte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillation of β amyloid (Aβ) peptides and the accumulation of amyloid plaques are considered as an important clinical hallmark to identify Alzheimer's disease (AD). The physiological connection between Aβ plaques and the disruption of neuronal cells has not been clearly understood. One hypothesis to explain the Aβ neurotoxicity is that the fibrillation process induces disruption to the cellular membrane. We studied the Aβ fibrillation process in two biologically relevant conditions with the peptide either pre-incorporated into or externally added to the synthetic phospholipid bilayers. These two sample preparation conditions mimic the physiological membrane proximities of Aβ peptides before and after the enzymatic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Using thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we were able to monitor the kinetics and morphological evolution of fibril formation, which was highly sensitive to the two sample preparation protocols. While the external addition protocol generates long and mature fibrils through normal fibrillation process, the pre-incubation protocol was found to stabilize the immature protofibrils. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies with doubly-labeled phospholipids indicated that there may be a lipid uptake process associated with the fibril formation. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provided evidence for high resolution structural variations in fibrils formed with different protocols, and in particular the stabilization of long-range contact between N- and C-terminal β strands. In addition, disruption of phospholipid bilayers was supported by measurements with ³¹P chemical shifts and relaxation time constants. PMID:24769158

  10. The mitochondrial morphology protein Mdm10 functions in assembly of the preprotein translocase of the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Meisinger, Chris; Rissler, Michael; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Szklarz, Luiza K Sanjuán; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kozjak, Vera; Schönfisch, Birgit; Lohaus, Christiane; Meyer, Helmut E; Yaffe, Michael P; Guiard, Bernard; Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2004-07-01

    The biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins involves the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). The two known subunits of the SAM complex, Mas37 and Sam50, are required for assembly of the abundant outer membrane proteins porin and Tom40. We have identified an unexpected subunit of the SAM complex, Mdm10, which is involved in maintenance of mitochondrial morphology. Mitochondria lacking Mdm10 are selectively impaired in the final steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40, including the association of Tom40 with the receptor Tom22 and small Tom proteins, while the biogenesis of porin is not affected. Yeast mutants of TOM40, MAS37, and SAM50 also show aberrant mitochondrial morphology. We conclude that Mdm10 plays a specific role in the biogenesis of the TOM complex, indicating a connection between the mitochondrial protein assembly apparatus and the machinery for maintenance of mitochondrial morphology. PMID:15239954

  11. Ergosterol content specifies targeting of tail-anchored proteins to mitochondrial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Katrin; Frumkin, Idan; Herzig, Yonatan; Rimon, Nitzan; Özbalci, Cagakan; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Schuldiner, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins have a single C-terminal transmembrane domain, making their biogenesis dependent on posttranslational translocation. Despite their importance, no dedicated insertion machinery has been uncovered for mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) TA proteins. To decipher the molecular mechanisms guiding MOM TA protein insertion, we performed two independent systematic microscopic screens in which we visualized the localization of model MOM TA proteins on the background of mutants in all yeast genes. We could find no mutant in which insertion was completely blocked. However, both screens demonstrated that MOM TA proteins were partially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in ∆spf1 cells. Spf1, an ER ATPase with unknown function, is the first protein shown to affect MOM TA protein insertion. We found that ER membranes in ∆spf1 cells become similar in their ergosterol content to mitochondrial membranes. Indeed, when we visualized MOM TA protein distribution in yeast strains with reduced ergosterol content, they phenocopied the loss of Spf1. We therefore suggest that the inherent differences in membrane composition between organelle membranes are sufficient to determine membrane integration specificity in a eukaryotic cell. PMID:22918956

  12. Polyhydroxybutyrate Targets Mammalian Mitochondria and Increases Permeability of Plasmalemmal and Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Elustondo, Pia A.; Angelova, Plamena R.; Kawalec, Michał; Michalak, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Pavlov, Evgeny V.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a polyester of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (HB) that is ubiquitously present in all organisms. In higher eukaryotes PHB is found in the length of 10 to 100 HB units and can be present in free form as well as in association with proteins and inorganic polyphosphate. It has been proposed that PHB can mediate ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes. We investigated the ability of PHB to interact with living cells and isolated mitochondria and the effects of these interactions on membrane ion transport. We performed experiments using a fluorescein derivative of PHB (fluo-PHB). We found that fluo-PHB preferentially accumulated inside the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Accumulation of fluo-PHB induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization. This membrane depolarization was significantly delayed by the inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore - Cyclosporin A. Further experiments using intact cells as well as isolated mitochondria confirmed that the effects of PHB directly linked to its ability to facilitate ion transport, including calcium, across the membranes. We conclude that PHB demonstrates ionophoretic properties in biological membranes and this effect is most profound in mitochondria due to the selective accumulation of the polymer in this organelle. PMID:24086638

  13. Polyhydroxybutyrate targets mammalian mitochondria and increases permeability of plasmalemmal and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Elustondo, Pia A; Angelova, Plamena R; Kawalec, Michał; Michalak, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Abramov, Andrey Y; Pavlov, Evgeny V

    2013-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a polyester of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (HB) that is ubiquitously present in all organisms. In higher eukaryotes PHB is found in the length of 10 to 100 HB units and can be present in free form as well as in association with proteins and inorganic polyphosphate. It has been proposed that PHB can mediate ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes. We investigated the ability of PHB to interact with living cells and isolated mitochondria and the effects of these interactions on membrane ion transport. We performed experiments using a fluorescein derivative of PHB (fluo-PHB). We found that fluo-PHB preferentially accumulated inside the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Accumulation of fluo-PHB induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization. This membrane depolarization was significantly delayed by the inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore - Cyclosporin A. Further experiments using intact cells as well as isolated mitochondria confirmed that the effects of PHB directly linked to its ability to facilitate ion transport, including calcium, across the membranes. We conclude that PHB demonstrates ionophoretic properties in biological membranes and this effect is most profound in mitochondria due to the selective accumulation of the polymer in this organelle. PMID:24086638

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of creatine kinase and adenine nucleotide translocase in mitochondrial membrane patch.

    PubMed

    Karo, Jaanus; Peterson, Pearu; Vendelin, Marko

    2012-03-01

    Interaction between mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) can play an important role in determining energy transfer pathways in the cell. Although the functional coupling between MtCK and ANT has been demonstrated, the precise mechanism of the coupling is not clear. To study the details of the coupling, we turned to molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce a new coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of a patch of the mitochondrial inner membrane containing a transmembrane ANT and an MtCK above the membrane. The membrane model consists of three major types of lipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cardiolipin) in a roughly 2:1:1 molar ratio. A thermodynamics-based coarse-grained force field, termed MARTINI, has been used together with the GROMACS molecular dynamics package for all simulated systems in this work. Several physical properties of the system are reproduced by the model and are in agreement with known data. This includes membrane thickness, dimension of the proteins, and diffusion constants. We have studied the binding of MtCK to the membrane and demonstrated the effect of cardiolipin on the stabilization of the binding. In addition, our simulations predict which part of the MtCK protein sequence interacts with the membrane. Taken together, the model has been verified by dynamical and structural data and can be used as the basis for further studies. PMID:22241474

  15. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Nuñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Tudella, Valeria G; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Rodrigues, Fernando P; Pestana, Cezar R; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Leopoldino, Andreia M; Alberici, Luciane C; Curti, Carlos

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 μM) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca²⁺ efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP+ transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. PMID:21549140

  16. Mature DIABLO/Smac Is Produced by the IMP Protease Complex on the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Lena; Strahm, Yvan; Hawkins, Christine J.; Gentle, Ian E.; Puryer, Michelle A.; Verhagen, Anne; Callus, Bernard; Vaux, David; Lithgow, Trevor

    2005-01-01

    DIABLO/Smac is a mitochondrial protein that can promote apoptosis by promoting the release and activation of caspases. To do so, DIABLO/Smac must first be processed by a mitochondrial protease and then released into the cytosol, and we show this in an intact cellular system. We propose that the precursor form of DIABLO/Smac enters the mitochondria through a stop-transfer pathway and is processed to its active form by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) complex. Catalytic subunits of the mammalian IMP complex were identified based on sequence conservation and functional complementation, and the novel sequence motif RX5P in Imp1 and NX5S in Imp2 distinguish the two catalytic subunits. DIABLO/Smac is one of only a few specific proteins identified as substrates for the IMP complex in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. PMID:15814844

  17. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in primary disorders of ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Vojtísková, Alena; Jesina, Pavel; Kalous, Martin; Kaplanová, Vilma; Houstek, Josef; Tesarová, Markéta; Fornůsková, Daniela; Zeman, Jirí; Dubot, Audrey; Godinot, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Studies of fibroblasts with primary defects in mitochondrial ATP synthase (ATPase) due to heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations in the ATP6 gene, affecting protonophoric function or synthesis of subunit a, show that at high mutation loads, mitochondrial membrane potential DeltaPsi(m) at state 4 is normal, but ADP-induced discharge of DeltaPsi(m) is impaired and ATP synthesis at state 3-ADP is decreased. Increased DeltaPsi(m) and low ATP synthesis is also found when the ATPase content is diminished by altered biogenesis of the enzyme complex. Irrespective of the different pathogenic mechanisms, elevated DeltaPsi(m) in primary ATPase disorders could increase mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and decrease energy provision. PMID:20021115

  18. σ-1 Receptor at the Mitochondrial-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Is Responsible for Mitochondrial Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Karla-Sue C.; Prasad, Manoj; Thapliyal, Veena

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM) is a small section of the outer mitochondrial membrane tethered to the ER by lipid and protein filaments. One such MAM protein is the σ-1 receptor, which contributes to multiple signaling pathways. We found that short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of σ-1 reduced pregnenolone synthesis by 95% without affecting expression of the inner mitochondrial membrane resident enzyme, 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2. To explore the underlying mechanism of this effect, we generated a series of σ-receptor ligands: 5,6-dimethoxy-3-methyl-N-phenyl-N-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propyl)benzofuran-2-carboxamide (KSCM-1), 3-methyl-N-phenyl-N-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propyl)benzofuran-2-carboxamide (KSCM-5), and 6-methoxy-3-methyl-N-phenyl-N-(3-(piperidin-1-yl) propyl)benzofuran-2-carboxamide (KSCM-11) specifically bound to σ-1 in the nanomolar range, whereas KSCM-5 and KSCM-11 also bound to σ-2. Treatment of cells with the KSCM ligands led to decreased cell viability, with KSCM-5 having the most potent effect followed by KSCM-11. KSCM-1 increased σ-1 expression by 4-fold and progesterone synthesis, whereas the other compounds decreased progesterone synthesis. These differences probably are caused by ligand molecular structure. For example, KSCM-1 has two methoxy substituents at C-5 and C-6 of the benzofuran ring, whereas KSCM-11 has one at C-6. KSCM ligands or σ-1 knockdown did not alter the expression of ER resident enzymes that synthesize steroids. However, coimmunoprecipitation of the σ-1 receptor pulled down voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2), whose expression was enhanced by KSCM-1. VDAC2 plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria, suggesting that the σ-1 receptor at the MAM coordinates with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein for cholesterol trafficking into the mitochondria for metabolic regulation. PMID:22923735

  19. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Yingfei; Frydenlund, Didrik S; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos) plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor), but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders. PMID:19863494

  20. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  1. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L.; Tudella, Valeria G.

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions

  2. Incorporation in lipid bilayers of a large conductance cationic channel from mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Thieffry, M; Chich, J F; Goldschmidt, D; Henry, J P

    1988-01-01

    Membranes from subcellular fractions of adrenal medulla were incorporated in phospholipid bilayers formed at the tip of microelectrodes. Current fluctuations recorded in the presence of a transmembrane potential revealed the existence of a voltage-dependent channel of large conductance. This channel is characterized by fast kinetics and four conductance levels separated by jumps of 100, 220 and 220 pS in 150 mM NaCl. It is permeant to Na+,K+, tetraethylammonium, Cl- and acetate and has some cation selectivity. Exposure to trypsin or pronase abolished the voltage-dependence. Upon subcellular fractionation, the activity was found to be associated with mitochondria. A similar activity was observed in mitochondrial fractions from other organs. By its kinetics, its selectivity and its potential-dependence, this channel differs from the voltage-dependent anion channel of outer mitochondrial membranes. Images PMID:2457497

  3. Bongkrekic acid and atractyloside inhibits chloride channels from mitochondrial membranes of rat heart.

    PubMed

    Malekova, Lubica; Kominkova, Viera; Ferko, Miroslav; Stefanik, Peter; Krizanova, Olga; Ziegelhöffer, Attila; Szewczyk, Adam; Ondrias, Karol

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the effect of bongkrekic acid (BKA), atractyloside (ATR) and carboxyatractyloside (CAT) on single channel properties of chloride channels from mitochondria. Mitochondrial membranes isolated from a rat heart muscle were incorporated into a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) and single chloride channel currents were measured in 250/50 mM KCl cis/trans solutions. BKA (1-100 microM), ATR and CAT (5-100 microM) inhibited the chloride channels in dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of the BKA, ATR and CAT was pronounced from the trans side of a BLM and it increased with time and at negative voltages (trans-cis). These compounds did not influence the single channel amplitude, but decreased open dwell time of channels. The inhibitory effect of BKA, ATR and CAT on the mitochondrial chloride channel may help to explain some of their cellular and/or subcellular effects. PMID:17123460

  4. Fluctuations of the proton-electromotive force across the inner mitochondrial membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Joaquim; Fornés, José A.

    1997-05-01

    The intermembrane mitochondrial space (IMMS) is delimited by the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes and defines a region of molecular dimension where fluctuations of the number of free protons and of transmembrane voltage can give rise to fluctuations in the proton-electromotive force EPMF across the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). We have applied the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistor Rm in parallel with a capacitor Cm representing the passive electrical properties of the IMM, in series with another capacitor Cb representing the proton-buffering power of the IMMS fluid. An access resistance Ra was defined as a link between the capacitor Cb and the membrane. Average EPMF fluctuations across the IMM were calculated for different assumptions concerning the intermembrane space dimensions. The calculated average EPMF fluctuations were in the vicinity of 100 mV for relaxation times in the few-microseconds range. The corresponding fluctuational protonic free energy is about 10 kJ/mole, which is comparable to the binding energy for protons in different transporters. This suggests that fluctuations in EPMF can be of relevance in the universe of forces influencing the molecular machinery embedded in the IMM.

  5. Covalent binding and anchoring of cytochrome c to mitochondrial mimetic membranes promoted by cholesterol carboxyaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Appolinário, Patricia P; Mugnol, Katia C U; Bloch, Carlos; Nantes, Iseli L; Di Mascio, Paolo; Miyamoto, Sayuri

    2013-10-21

    Mitochondrial cholesterol has been reported to be increased under specific pathological conditions associated with enhanced oxidative stress parameters. In this scenario, cholesterol oxidation would be increased, leading to the production of reactive aldehydes, including cholesterol carboxyaldehyde (ChAld). By using SDS micelles as a mitochondrial mimetic model, we have demonstrated that ChAld covalently modifies cytochrome c (cytc), a protein known to participate in electron transport and apoptosis signaling. This mimetic model induces changes in cytc structure in the same way as mitochondrial membranes do. Tryptic digestion of the cytc-ChAld adduct followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses revealed that modifications occur at Lys residues (K22) localized at cytc site L, a site involved in protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. Interestingly, ChAld ligation prevented cytc detachment from liposomes even under high ionic strength conditions. Overall, it can be concluded that ChAld ligation to Lys residues at site L creates a hydrophobic tail at cytc, which promotes cytc anchoring to the membrane. Although not investigated in detail in this study, cytc adduction to cholesterol derived aldehydes could have implications in cytc release from mitochondria under apoptotic stimuli. PMID:24059586

  6. Toxicity and Loss of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Induced by Alkyl Gallates in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Andréo, Rogério; Regasini, Luís Octávio; Petrônio, Maicon Segalla; Chiari-Andréo, Bruna Galdorfini; Tansini, Aline; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Cicarelli, Regina Maria Barretto

    2015-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease is a debilitating disease representing an important social problem that affects, approximately, 10 million people in the world. The main aggravating factor of this situation is the lack of an effective drug to treat the different stages of this disease. In this context, the search for trypanocidal substances isolated from plants, synthetic or semi synthetic molecules, is an important strategy. Here, the trypanocidal potential of gallates was assayed in epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi and also, the interference of these substances on the mitochondrial membrane potential of the parasites was assessed, allowing the study of the mechanism of action of the gallates in the T. cruzi organisms. Regarding the preliminary structure-activity relationships, the side chain length of gallates plays crucial role for activity. Nonyl, decyl, undecyl, and dodecyl gallates showed potent antitrypanosomal effect (IC50 from 1.46 to 2.90 μM) in contrast with benznidazole (IC50 = 34.0 μM). Heptyl gallate showed a strong synergistic activity with benznidazole, reducing by 105-fold the IC50 of benznidazole. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by these esters was revealed. Tetradecyl gallate induced a loss of 53% of the mitochondrial membrane potential, at IC50 value.

  7. Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins Assist Bid in Bax-mediated Lipidic Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Blanca; Quispe, Joel; Choudhary, Vineet; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Ajero, Teddy G.; Du, Han; Schneiter, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is a critical step in apoptosis and is regulated by Bcl-2 family proteins. In vitro systems using cardiolipin-containing liposomes have demonstrated the key features of MOMP induced by Bax and cleaved Bid; however, the nature of the “pores” and how they are formed remain obscure. We found that mitochondrial outer membranes contained very little cardiolipin, far less than that required for liposome permeabilization, despite their responsiveness to Bcl-2 family proteins. Strikingly, the incorporation of isolated mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins into liposomes lacking cardiolipin conferred responsiveness to cleaved Bid and Bax. Cardiolipin dependence was observed only when permeabilization was induced with cleaved Bid but not with Bid or Bim BH3 peptide or oligomerized Bax. Therefore, we conclude that MOM proteins specifically assist cleaved Bid in Bax-mediated permeabilization. Cryoelectron microscopy of cardiolipin-liposomes revealed that cleaved Bid and Bax produced large round holes with diameters of 25–100 nm, suggestive of lipidic pores. In sum, we propose that activated Bax induces lipidic pore formation and that MOM proteins assist cleaved Bid in this process in the absence of cardiolipin. PMID:19244344

  8. Large Plasma Membrane Disruptions Are Rapidly Resealed by Ca2+-dependent Vesicle–Vesicle Fusion Events

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    1997-01-01

    A microneedle puncture of the fibroblast or sea urchin egg surface rapidly evokes a localized exocytotic reaction that may be required for the rapid resealing that follows this breach in plasma membrane integrity (Steinhardt, R.A,. G. Bi, and J.M. Alderton. 1994. Science (Wash. DC). 263:390–393). How this exocytotic reaction facilitates the resealing process is unknown. We found that starfish oocytes and sea urchin eggs rapidly reseal much larger disruptions than those produced with a microneedle. When an ∼40 by 10 μm surface patch was torn off, entry of fluorescein stachyose (FS; 1,000 mol wt) or fluorescein dextran (FDx; 10,000 mol wt) from extracellular sea water (SW) was not detected by confocal microscopy. Moreover, only a brief (∼5–10 s) rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was detected at the wound site. Several lines of evidence indicate that intracellular membranes are the primary source of the membrane recruited for this massive resealing event. When we injected FS-containing SW deep into the cells, a vesicle formed immediately, entrapping within its confines most of the FS. DiI staining and EM confirmed that the barrier delimiting injected SW was a membrane bilayer. The threshold for vesicle formation was ∼3 mM Ca2+ (SW is ∼10 mM Ca2+). The capacity of intracellular membranes for sealing off SW was further demonstrated by extruding egg cytoplasm from a micropipet into SW. A boundary immediately formed around such cytoplasm, entrapping FDx or FS dissolved in it. This entrapment did not occur in Ca2+-free SW (CFSW). When egg cytoplasm stratified by centrifugation was exposed to SW, only the yolk platelet–rich domain formed a membrane, suggesting that the yolk platelet is a critical element in this response and that the ER is not required. We propose that plasma membrane disruption evokes Ca2+ regulated vesicle–vesicle (including endocytic compartments but possibly excluding ER) fusion reactions. The function in resealing of this cytoplasmic fusion

  9. Interactive HIV-1 Tat and Morphine-Induced Synaptodendritic Injury Is Triggered through Focal Disruptions in Na+ Influx, Mitochondrial Instability, and Ca2+ Overload

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Pamela E.; Zou, Shiping; Marks, William D.; Bowers, M. Scott; Akbarali, Hamid I.; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptodendritic injury is thought to underlie HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and contributes to exaggerated inflammation and cognitive impairment seen in opioid abusers with HIV-1. To examine events triggering combined transactivator of transcription (Tat)- and morphine-induced synaptodendritic injury systematically, striatal neuron imaging studies were conducted in vitro. These studies demonstrated nearly identical pathologic increases in dendritic varicosities as seen in Tat transgenic mice in vivo. Tat caused significant focal increases in intracellular sodium ([Na+]i) and calcium ([Ca2+]i) in dendrites that were accompanied by the emergence of dendritic varicosities. These effects were largely, but not entirely, attenuated by the NMDA and AMPA receptor antagonists MK-801 and CNQX, respectively. Concurrent morphine treatment accelerated Tat-induced focal varicosities, which were accompanied by localized increases in [Ca2+]i and exaggerated instability in mitochondrial inner membrane potential. Importantly, morphine's effects were prevented by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP and were not observed in neurons cultured from μ-opioid receptor knock-out mice. Combined Tat- and morphine-induced initial losses in ion homeostasis and increases in [Ca2+]i were attenuated by the ryanodine receptor inhibitor ryanodine, as well as pyruvate. In summary, Tat induced increases in [Na+]i, mitochondrial instability, excessive Ca2+ influx through glutamatergic receptors, and swelling along dendrites. Morphine, acting via μ-opioid receptors, exacerbates these excitotoxic Tat effects at the same subcellular locations by mobilizing additional [Ca2+]i and by further disrupting [Ca2+]i homeostasis. We hypothesize that the spatiotemporal relationship of μ-opioid and aberrant AMPA/NMDA glutamate receptor signaling is critical in defining the location and degree to which opiates exacerbate the synaptodendritic injury commonly observed in neuroAIDS. PMID:25232120

  10. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge. PMID:27375200

  11. Depletion of phytosterols from the plant plasma membrane provides evidence for disruption of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Roche, Yann; Gerbeau-Pissot, Patricia; Buhot, Blandine; Thomas, Dominique; Bonneau, Laurent; Gresti, Joseph; Mongrand, Sébastien; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Simon-Plas, Françoise

    2008-11-01

    Involvement of sterols in membrane structural properties has been extensively studied in model systems but rarely assessed in natural membranes and never investigated for the plant plasma membrane (PM). Here, we address the question of the role of phytosterols in the organization of the plant PM. The sterol composition of tobacco BY-2 cell PM was determined by gas chromatography. The cyclic oligosaccharide methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, commonly used in animal cells to decrease cholesterol levels, caused a drastic reduction (50%) in the PM total free sterol content of the plant material, without modification in amounts of steryl-conjugates. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments using DPH, TMA-DPH, Laurdan, and di-4-ANEPPDHQ indicated that such a depletion in sterol content increased lipid acyl chain disorder and reduced the overall liquid-phase heterogeneity in correlation with the disruption of phytosterol-rich domains. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin also prevented isolation of a PM fraction resistant to solubilization by nonionic detergents, previously characterized in tobacco, and induced redistribution of the proteic marker of this fraction, NtrbohD, within the membrane. Altogether, our results support the role of phytosterols in the lateral structuring of the PM of higher plant cells and suggest that they are key compounds for the formation of plant PM microdomains. PMID:18676403

  12. Cholesterol Modifies Huntingtin Binding to, Disruption of, and Aggregation on Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Campbell, Warren A; Chaibva, Maxmore; Jain, Pranav; Leslie, Ashley E; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-01-12

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by abnormally long CAG-repeats in the huntingtin gene that encode an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ domains are directly correlated to disease-related htt aggregation. Htt is found highly associated with a variety of cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominantly comprised of lipids. Since cholesterol homeostasis is altered in HD, we investigated how varying cholesterol content modifies the interactions between htt and lipid membranes. A combination of Langmuir trough monolayer techniques, vesicle permeability and binding assays, and in situ atomic force microscopy were used to directly monitor the interaction of a model, synthetic htt peptide and a full-length htt-exon1 recombinant protein with model membranes comprised of total brain lipid extract (TBLE) and varying amounts of exogenously added cholesterol. As the cholesterol content of the membrane increased, the extent of htt insertion decreased. Vesicles containing extra cholesterol were resistant to htt-induced permeabilization. Morphological and mechanical changes in the bilayer associated with exposure to htt were also drastically altered by the presence of cholesterol. Disrupted regions of pure TBLE bilayers were grainy in appearance and associated with a large number of globular aggregates. In contrast, morphological changes induced by htt in bilayers enriched in cholesterol were plateau-like with a smooth appearance. Collectively, these observations suggest that the presence and amount of cholesterol in lipid membranes play a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes. PMID:26652744

  13. Interactions of Graphene Oxide with Model Cell Membranes: Probing Nanoparticle Attachment and Lipid Bilayer Disruption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitong; Chen, Kai Loon

    2015-11-10

    With the rapid growth in the application of graphene oxide (GO) in diverse fields, the toxicity of GO toward bacterial and mammalian cells has recently attracted extensive research attention. While several mechanisms have been proposed for the cytotoxicity of GO, the attachment of GO to cell membranes is expected to be the key initial process that precedes these mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the propensity for GO to attach to and disrupt model cell membranes using supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and supported vesicular layers (SVLs) that are composed of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). The deposition kinetics of GO on SLBs were determined using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and were observed to increase with increasing electrolyte (NaCl and CaCl2) concentrations, indicating that GO attachment to SLBs was controlled by electrostatic interactions. The GO deposition kinetics measured at elevated electrolyte concentrations were lower than mass-transfer-limited kinetics, likely due to the presence of hydration forces between GO and SLBs. Upon the attachment of GO to supported vesicles that were encapsulated with a fluorescent dye, dye leakage was detected, thus indicating that the lipid vesicles were disrupted. When the exposure of the SVL to the GO suspension was terminated, the leakage of dye decreased significantly, demonstrating that the pores on the lipid bilayers have a self-healing ability. PMID:26466194

  14. High fat diet-induced modifications in membrane lipid and mitochondrial-membrane protein signatures precede the development of hepatic insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, M.; Schäfer, A.; Seelig, A.; Schultheiß, J.; Wu, M.; Aichler, M.; Leonhardt, J.; Rathkolb, B.; Rozman, J.; Sarioglu, H.; Hauck, S.M.; Ueffing, M.; Wolf, E.; Kastenmueller, G.; Adamski, J.; Walch, A.; Hrabé de Angelis, M.; Neschen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Excess lipid intake has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatosteatosis and hepatic insulin resistance. Lipids constitute approximately 50% of the cell membrane mass, define membrane properties, and create microenvironments for membrane-proteins. In this study we aimed to resolve temporal alterations in membrane metabolite and protein signatures during high-fat diet (HF)-mediated development of hepatic insulin resistance. Methods We induced hepatosteatosis by feeding C3HeB/FeJ male mice an HF enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 fatty acids for 7, 14, or 21 days. Longitudinal changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity were assessed via the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, in membrane lipids via t-metabolomics- and membrane proteins via quantitative proteomics-analyses, and in hepatocyte morphology via electron microscopy. Data were compared to those of age- and litter-matched controls maintained on a low-fat diet. Results Excess long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 intake for 7 days did not compromise hepatic insulin sensitivity, however, induced hepatosteatosis and modified major membrane lipid constituent signatures in liver, e.g. increased total unsaturated, long-chain fatty acid-containing acyl-carnitine or membrane-associated diacylglycerol moieties and decreased total short-chain acyl-carnitines, glycerophosphocholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, or sphingolipids. Hepatic insulin sensitivity tended to decrease within 14 days HF-exposure. Overt hepatic insulin resistance developed until day 21 of HF-intervention and was accompanied by morphological mitochondrial abnormalities and indications for oxidative stress in liver. HF-feeding progressively decreased the abundance of protein-components of all mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, inner and outer mitochondrial membrane substrate transporters independent from the hepatocellular mitochondrial volume in liver. Conclusions We assume HF-induced modifications in membrane lipid

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL POTENTIAL OF THE INNER MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANE AND Ca2+ HOMEOSTASIS OF MYOMETRIUM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Danylovych, Yu V; Karakhim, S A; Danylovych, H V; Kolomiets, O V; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated using Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent probe, mitochondria binding dyes, and confocal laser scanning microscopy, that elimination of electrochemical potential of uterus myocytes' inner mitochondrial membrane by aprotonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (10 μM), and by a respiratory chain complex IV inhibitor sodium azide (1 mM) is associated with substantial increase of Ca2+ concentration in myoplasm in the case of the protonophore effect only, but not in the case of the azide effect. In particular, with the use of nonyl acridine orange, a mitochondria-specific dye, and 9-aminoacridine, an agent that binds to membrane compartments in the presence of proton gradient, we showed that both the protonophore and the respiratory chain inhibitor cause the proton gradient on mitochondrial inner membrane to dissipate when introduced into incubation medium. We also proved with the help of 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine, a potential-sensitive carbocyanine-derived fluorescent probe, that the application of these substances results in dissipation of the membrane's electrical potential. The elimination of mitochondrial electrochemical potential by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone causes substantial increase in fluorescence of Ca(2+)-sensitive Fluo-4 AM dye in myoplasm of smooth muscle cells. The results obtained were qualitatively confirmed with flow cytometry of mitochondria isolated through differential centrifugation and loaded with Fluo-4 AM. Particularly, Ca2+ matrix influx induced by addition of the exogenous cation is totally inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. Therefore, using two independent fluorometric methods, namely confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry, with Ca(2+)-sensitive Fluo-4 AM fluorescent probe, we proved on the models of freshly isolated myocytes and uterus smooth muscle mitochondria isolated by differential centrifugation sedimentation that the electrochemical gradient of inner membrane

  16. Mitochondrial-dependent Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy of IgG4-related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buelli, Simona; Perico, Luca; Galbusera, Miriam; Abbate, Mauro; Morigi, Marina; Novelli, Rubina; Gagliardini, Elena; Tentori, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Sabadini, Ettore; Saito, Takao; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of glomerular lesions of membranous nephropathy (MN), including seldom-reported IgG4-related disease, is still elusive. Unlike in idiopathic MN where IgG4 prevails, in this patient IgG3 was predominant in glomerular deposits in the absence of circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies, suggesting a distinct pathologic process. Here we documented that IgG4 retrieved from the serum of our propositus reacted against carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) at the podocyte surface. In patient's biopsy, glomerular CAII staining increased and co-localized with subepithelial IgG4 deposits along the capillary walls. Patient's IgG4 caused a drop in cell pH followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, excessive ROS production and cytoskeletal reorganization in cultured podocytes. These events promoted mitochondrial superoxide-dismutase-2 (SOD2) externalization on the plasma membrane, becoming recognizable by complement-binding IgG3 anti-SOD2. Among patients with IgG4-related disease only sera of those with IgG4 anti-CAII antibodies caused low intracellular pH and mitochondrial alterations underlying SOD2 externalization. Circulating IgG4 anti-CAII can cause podocyte injury through processes of intracellular acidification, mitochondrial oxidative stress and neoantigen induction in patients with IgG4 related disease. The onset of MN in a subset of patients could be due to IgG4 antibodies recognizing CAII with consequent exposure of mitochondrial neoantigen in the context of multifactorial pathogenesis of disease. PMID:26137589

  17. Mitochondrial energy-dissipation pathway and cellular redox disruption compromises Arabidopsis resistance to turnip crinkle virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Ya-Nan; Wei, Li-Jie; Xi, De-Hui; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-04-29

    Members of the plant mitochondrial energy-dissipation pathway (MEDP) coordinate cellular energy metabolism, redox homeostasis and the balance of ROS production. However, the roles of MEDP members, particularly uncoupling protein (UCP), in resistance to turnip crinkle virus infection (TCV) are poorly understood. Here, we showed that disrupting some MEDP genes compromises plant resistance to TCV viral infection and this is partly associated with damaged photosynthetic characteristics, altered cellular redox and increased ROS production. Experiments using mutant plants with impaired cellular compartment redox poising further demonstrated that impaired chloroplast/mitochondria and cystosol redox increases the susceptibility of plants to viral infection. Our results illustrate a mechanism by which MEDP and cellular compartment redox act in concert to regulate plant resistance to viral infections. PMID:26987718

  18. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death. PMID:24412217

  19. The Mitochondrial ADP/ATP Carrier Associates with the Inner Membrane Presequence Translocase in a Stoichiometric Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Carola S.; Rampelt, Heike; Gebert, Michael; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schrempp, Sandra G.; Kochbeck, Lioba; Guiard, Bernard; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are synthesized with amino-terminal signal sequences. The presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex) mediates the import of these preproteins. The essential TIM23 core complex closely cooperates with partner protein complexes like the presequence translocase-associated import motor and the respiratory chain. The inner mitochondrial membrane also contains a large number of metabolite carriers, but their association with preprotein translocases has been controversial. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the TIM23 interactome based on stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture. Subsequent biochemical studies on identified partner proteins showed that the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier associates with the membrane-embedded core of the TIM23 complex in a stoichiometric manner, revealing an unexpected connection of mitochondrial protein biogenesis to metabolite transport. Our data indicate that direct TIM23-AAC coupling may support preprotein import into mitochondria when respiratory activity is low. PMID:25124039

  20. The Self-Interaction of a Nodavirus Replicase Is Enhanced by Mitochondrial Membrane Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Han, Yajuan; Miao, Meng; Qi, Nan; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-01-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the protein-protein interactions among viral replicases and the association of viral replicases with intracellular membranes. Protein A from Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV), which closely associate with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for viral RNA replication. Here, we studied the direct effects of mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) on WhNV protein A activity in vitro. Our investigations revealed the self-interaction of WhNV protein A is accomplished via two different patterns (i.e., homotypic and heterotypic self-interactions via different interfaces). MMLs stimulated the protein A self-interaction, and this stimulation exhibited selectivity for specific phospholipids. Moreover, we found that specific phospholipids differently favor the two self-interaction patterns. Furthermore, manipulating specific phospholipid metabolism affected protein A self-interaction and the activity of protein A to replicate RNA in cells. Taken together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on a nodaviral RNA replicase. PMID:24586921

  1. Aspirin, acetaminophen and proton transport through phospholipid bilayers and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, J

    1992-09-01

    Mechanisms of proton transport were investigated in planar phospholipid bilayer membranes exposed to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), acetaminophen (4-acetamidophenol), benzoic acid and three aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid and salicyluric acid). The objectives were to characterize the conductances and permeabilities of these weak acids in lipid bilayer membranes and then predict their effects on mitochondrial membranes. Of the compounds tested only aspirin, benzoate and salicylate caused significant increases in membrane conductance. The conductance was due mainly to proton current at low pH and to weak acid anion current at neutral pH. Analysis of the concentration and pH dependence suggests that these weak acids act as HA-2-type proton carriers when pH approximately pK and as lipid soluble anions at neutral pH. Salicylate is much more potent than aspirin and benzoate because salicylate contains an internal hydrogen bond which delocalizes the negative charge and increases the permeability of the anion. Model calculations for mitochondria suggest that salicylate causes net H+ uptake by a cyclic process of HA influx and A- efflux. This model can explain the salicylate-induced uncoupling and swelling observed in isolated mitochondria. Since ingested aspirin breaks down rapidly to form salicylate, these results may clarify the mechanisms of aspirin toxicity in humans. The results may also help to explain why the ingestion of aspirin but not acetaminophen is associated with Reye's syndrome, a disease characterized by impaired energy metabolism and mitochondrial swelling. PMID:1334228

  2. The transport machinery for the import of preproteins across the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M T; Wagner, R; Pfanner, N

    2000-01-01

    In order for proteins to be imported into subcellular compartments, they must first traverse the organellar membranes. In mitochondria, hydrophilic protein channels in both the outer and inner membranes serve such a purpose. Recently, the channel protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane was identified to be Tom40. Tom40 is found in a high molecular weight complex termed the general import pore (GIP) complex where it is tightly associated with the receptor protein Tom22 along with Tom7, Tom6 and Tom5. Tom7 and Tom6 seem to modulate the dynamics of the GIP complex while Tom5 is involved in preprotein transfer from receptors to Tom40. The receptor proteins Tom70 and Tom20 associate with this complex in a weaker manner where they are involved in the initial recognition of preproteins. This review focuses on the identification and characterisation of the transport machinery of the outer mitochondrial membrane and how they are involved in the co-ordination and regulation of events required for the translocation of preproteins into mitochondria. PMID:10661891

  3. Apoptotic pore formation is associated with in-plane insertion of Bak or Bax central helices into the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Dana; Dewson, Grant; Menard, Marie; Frederick, Paul; Iyer, Sweta; Bartolo, Ray; Gibson, Leonie; Czabotar, Peter E; Smith, Brian J; Adams, Jerry M; Kluck, Ruth M

    2014-09-30

    The pivotal step on the mitochondrial pathway to apoptosis is permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) by oligomers of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members Bak or Bax. However, how they disrupt MOM integrity is unknown. A longstanding model is that activated Bak and Bax insert two α-helices, α5 and α6, as a hairpin across the MOM, but recent insights on the oligomer structures question this model. We have clarified how these helices contribute to MOM perforation by determining that, in the oligomers, Bak α5 (like Bax α5) remains part of the protein core and that a membrane-impermeable cysteine reagent can label cysteines placed at many positions in α5 and α6 of both Bak and Bax. The results are inconsistent with the hairpin insertion model but support an in-plane model in which α5 and α6 collapse onto the membrane and insert shallowly to drive formation of proteolipidic pores. PMID:25228770

  4. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R.; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; DeVay, Rachel M.; Lackner, Laura L.; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya

    2011-01-01

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane–associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria. PMID:21987634

  5. A multisubunit complex of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane protein translocases stabilized in vivo by translocation intermediates.

    PubMed

    Schülke, N; Sepuri, N B; Gordon, D M; Saxena, S; Dancis, A; Pain, D

    1999-08-01

    Translocation of nuclear encoded preproteins into the mitochondrial matrix requires the coordinated action of two translocases: one (Tom) located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and the other (Tim) located in the inner membrane. These translocases reversibly cooperate during protein import. We have previously constructed a chimeric precursor (pPGPrA) consisting of an authentic mitochondrial precursor at the N terminus (Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, pPut) linked, through glutathione S-transferase, to protein A. When pPGPrA is expressed in yeast, it becomes irreversibly arrested during translocation across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. Consequently, the two membranes of mitochondria become progressively "zippered" together, forming long stretches in which they are in close contact (Schülke, N., Sepuri, N. B. V., and Pain, D. (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 94, 7314-7319). We now demonstrate that trapped PGPrA intermediates hold the import channels stably together and inhibit mitochondrial protein import and cell growth. Using IgG-Sepharose affinity chromatography of solubilized zippered membranes, we have isolated a multisubunit complex that contains all Tom and Tim components known to be essential for import of matrix-targeted proteins, namely Tom40, Tom22, Tim17, Tim23, Tim44, and matrix-localized Hsp70. Further characterization of this complex may shed light on structural features of the complete mitochondrial import machinery. PMID:10428870

  6. Mammea E/BB, An Isoprenylated Dihydroxycoumarin Protonophore that Potently Uncouples Mitochondrial Electron Transport Disrupts Hypoxic Signaling in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The mammea-type coumarin mammea E/BB (1) was found to inhibit both hypoxia-induced and iron chelator-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in human breast tumor T47D cells with IC50 values of 0.96 and 0.89 µM, respectively. Compound 1 suppressed the hypoxic induction of secreted VEGF protein (T47D cells) and inhibited cell viability/proliferation in four human tumor cell lines. Compound 1 (at 5 and 20 µM) inhibited human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cell migration. While the mechanisms that underlay their biological activities have remained unknown, prenylated mammea coumarins have been shown to be cytotoxic to human tumor cells, suppress tumor growth in animal models, and display a wide variety of antimicrobial effects. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 appears to exert an assemblage of cellular effects by functioning as an anionic protonophore that potently uncouples mitochondrial electron transport and disrupts mitochondrial signaling in human tumor cell lines. PMID:20929261

  7. High-fat Diet Accelerates Intestinal Tumorigenesis Through Disrupting Intestinal Cell Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Young; Kim, Min Young; Seo, Young Rok; Kim, Jong-Sang; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excess energy supply induces chronic low-grade inflammation in association with oxidative stress in various tissues including intestinal epithelium. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on intestinal cell membrane integrity and intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. Methods: Mice were fed with either normal diet (ND) or HFD for 12 weeks. The number of intestinal tumors were counted and biomarkers of endotoxemia, oxidative stress, and inflammation were determined. Changes in intestinal integrity was measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran penetration and membrane gap junction protein expression. Results: HFD group had significantly higher number of tumors compared to ND group (P < 0.05). Blood total antioxidant capacity was lower in HFD group, while colonic 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine level, a marker of oxidative damage, was higher in HFD group compared to that of ND group (P < 0.05). The penetration of FITC-dextran was substantially increased in HFD group (P < 0.05) while the expressions of membrane gap junction proteins including zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin were lower in HFD group (P < 0.05) compared to those in ND group. Serum concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor (CD14) and colonic toll-like receptor 4 (a LPS receptor) mRNA expression were significantly higher in HFD group than in ND group (P < 0.05), suggesting that significant endotoxemia may occur in HFD group due to the increased membrane permeability. Serum interleukin-6 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were also higher in HFD group compared to those of ND group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: HFD increases oxidative stress disrupting intestinal gap junction proteins, thereby accelerating membrane permeability endotoxemia, inflammation, and intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:27390738

  8. Plasma membrane oxidoreductase activity in cultured cells in relation to mitochondrial function and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Deleonardi, Giulia; Biondi, Annalisa; D'Aurelio, Marilena; Pich, Milena Merlo; Stankov, Karmen; Falasca, Anna; Formiggini, Gabriella; Bovina, Carla; Romeo, Giovanni; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    Dichlorophenol indophenol (DCIP) reduction by intracellualr pyridine nucleotides was investigated in two different lines of cultured cells characterized by enhanced production of reacive oxygen species (ROS) with respect to suitable controls. The first line denominated XTC-UC1 was derived from a metastasis of an oxyphilic thyroid tumor characterized by mitochondrial hyperplasia and compared with a line (B-CPAP) derived from a papillary thyroid carcinoma with normal mitochondrial mass. The second line (170 MN) was a cybrid line derived from rho0 cells from an osteosarcoma line (143B) fused with platelets from a patient with a nucleotide 9957 mutation in mitochondrial DNA (encoding for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III) in comparison with the parent 143B line. The experimental lines had no major decreases of electron transfer activities with respect to the controls; both of them, however, exhibited an increased peroxide production. The XTC-UC1 cell line exhibited enhanced activity with respect to control of dicoumarol-sensitive DCIP reduction, identified with membrane bound DT-diaphorase, whereas dicoumarol insensitive DCIP reduction was not significantly changed. On the other hand the mtDNA mutated cybrids exhibited a strong increase of both dicoumarol sensitive and insensitive DCIP reduction. The results suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and not deficient respiratory activity per se is the stimulus triggering over-expression of plasma membrane oxidative enzymes. PMID:15706061

  9. TSPO, a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein, Controls Ethanol-Related Behaviors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ran; Rittenhouse, Danielle; Sweeney, Katelyn; Potluri, Prasanth; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The heavy consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs) which impact patients, their families, and societies. Yet the genetic and physiological factors that predispose humans to AUDs remain unclear. One hypothesis is that alterations in mitochondrial function modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol exposure. Using Drosophila genetics we report that inactivation of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, affects ethanol sedation and tolerance in male flies. Knockdown of dTSPO in adult male neurons results in increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation, and this effect requires the dTSPO depletion-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of caspase activity in fly heads. Systemic loss of dTSPO in male flies blocks the development of tolerance to repeated ethanol exposures, an effect that is not seen when dTSPO is only inactivated in neurons. Female flies are naturally more sensitive to ethanol than males, and female fly heads have strikingly lower levels of dTSPO mRNA than males. Hence, mitochondrial TSPO function plays an important role in ethanol sensitivity and tolerance. Since a large array of benzodiazepine analogues have been developed that interact with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, the mitochondrial TSPO might provide an important new target for treating AUDs. PMID:26241038

  10. Mechanics of membrane bulging during cell-wall disruption in Gram-negative bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Kristopher E.; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2011-04-01

    The bacterial cell wall is a network of sugar strands crosslinked by peptides that serve as the primary structure for bearing osmotic stress. Despite its importance in cellular survival, the robustness of the cell wall to network defects has been relatively unexplored. Treatment of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli with the antibiotic vancomycin, which disrupts the crosslinking of new material during growth, leads to the development of pronounced bulges and eventually of cell lysis. Here, we model the mechanics of the bulging of the cytoplasmic membrane through pores in the cell wall. We find that the membrane undergoes a transition between a nearly flat state and a spherical bulge at a critical pore radius of ~20 nm. This critical pore size is large compared to the typical distance between neighboring peptides and glycan strands, and hence pore size acts as a constraint on network integrity. We also discuss the general implications of our model to membrane deformations in eukaryotic blebbing and vesiculation in red blood cells.

  11. Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Iain P; Al Shahrani, Mesfer; Wainwright, Luke; Heales, Simon J R

    2016-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and ATP synthase (complex V) play an essential role in cellular energy production by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. In addition to inborn errors of metabolism, as well as secondary causes from disease pathophysiology, an impairment of oxidative phosphorylation can result from drug toxicity. These 'off-target' pharmacological effects can occur from a direct inhibition of MRC enzyme activity, an induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress, an uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, an impairment of mitochondrial membrane structure or a disruption in the replication of mitochondrial DNA. The purpose of this review is to focus on the off-target mitochondrial toxicity associated with both commonly used pharmacotherapies and a topical 'weight loss' agent. The mechanisms of drug-induced mitochondrial impairment will be discussed together with putative therapeutic strategies to counteract the adverse effects of the pharmacotherapy. PMID:26992920

  12. Consequences of defective vitamin A transportation on mitochondrial membrane integrity during protein depletion.

    PubMed

    Olowookere, J O

    1986-01-01

    The relationships between the structural integrity and functionality of rat liver mitochondrial membranes, and different levels of dietary protein and vitamin A transportation during protein depletion in animals have been investigated. Although the vitamin A content of the protein-depleted diet was 1680 +/- 35 IU/kg diet, and that of the control diet was 1,650 +/- 30 IU/kg diet, the vitamin A content of the liver of depleted rats was reduced to 16.7% of controls. The hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet showed excessive passive swelling (about 3-fold of controls) in isotonic solutions. Whereas a seemingly inverse relationship existed between the vitamin A content of the liver and the osmotic behaviour of hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet, there is a direct relationship between their hepatic mitochondrial vitamin A and the respiratory control ratio. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:3717896

  13. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1. PMID:26950402

  14. Hexokinase inhibits flux of fluorescently labeled ATP through mitochondrial outer membrane porin.

    PubMed

    Perevoshchikova, Irina V; Zorov, Savva D; Kotova, Elena A; Zorov, Dmitry B; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2010-06-01

    Mitochondrial function requires maintaining metabolite fluxes across the mitochondrial outer membrane, which is mediated primarily by the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC). We applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study regulation of the VDAC functional state by monitoring distribution of fluorescently labeled ATP (BODIPY-FL-ATP) in isolated intact rat liver and heart mitochondria. Addition of mitochondria to BODIPY-FL-ATP solution resulted in accumulation of the fluorescent probe in these organelles. The addition of hexokinase II (HKII) isolated from rat heart led to a decrease in the BODIPY-FL-ATP accumulation, while a 15-residue peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of hexokinase did not produce this effect. Therefore, the hexokinase-induced inhibition of the ATP flow mediated by VDAC was revealed in isolated mitochondria. PMID:20412805

  15. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes. PMID:18251508

  16. Targeting and insertion of the cholesterol-binding translocator protein into the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Rone, Malena B; Liu, Jun; Blonder, Josip; Ye, Xiaoying; Veenstra, Timothy D; Young, Jason C; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2009-07-28

    Translocator protein (18 kDa, TSPO), previously known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) protein necessary for cholesterol import and steroid production. We reconstituted the mitochondrial targeting and insertion of TSPO into the OMM to analyze the signals and mechanisms required for this process. Initial studies indicated the formation of a mitochondrial 66 kDa complex through Blue Native-PAGE analysis. The formation of this complex was found to be dependent on the presence of ATP and the cytosolic chaperone Hsp90. Through mutational analysis we identified two areas necessary for TSPO targeting, import, and function: amino acids 103-108 (Schellman motif), which provide the necessary structural orientation for import, and the cholesterol-binding C-terminus required for insertion. Although the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) complex proteins Tom22 and Tom40 were present in the OMM, the TOM complex did not interact with TSPO. In search of proteins involved in TSPO import, we analyzed complexes known to interact with TSPO by mass spectrometry. Formation of the 66 kDa complex was found to be dependent on an identified protein, Metaxin 1, for formation and TSPO import. The level of import of TSPO into steroidogenic cell mitochondria was increased following treatment of the cells with cAMP. These findings suggest that the initial targeting of TSPO to mitochondria is dependent upon the presence of cytosolic chaperones interacting with the import receptor Tom70. The C-terminus plays an important role in targeting TSPO to mitochondria, whereas its import into the OMM is dependent upon the presence of the Schellman motif. Final integration of TSPO into the OMM occurs via its interaction with Metaxin 1. Import of TSPO into steroidogenic cell mitochondria is regulated by cAMP. PMID:19552401

  17. Circulating IgM Requires Plasma Membrane Disruption to Bind Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Nucleated Cells and Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Emily E.; Dransfield, Ian; Kluth, David C.; Hughes, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. IgM deficient mice exhibit an autoimmune phenotype consistent with a role for circulating IgM antibodies in apoptotic cell clearance. We have extensively characterised IgM binding to non-apoptotic and apoptotic mouse thymocytes and human Jurkat cells using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We demonstrate strong specific IgM binding to a subset of Annexin-V (AnnV)+PI (Propidium Iodide)+ apoptotic cells with disrupted cell membranes. Electron microscopy studies indicated that IgM+AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells exhibited morphologically advanced apoptosis with marked plasma membrane disruption compared to IgM-AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells, suggesting that access to intracellular epitopes is required for IgM to bind. Strong and comparable binding of IgM to permeabilised non-apoptotic and apoptotic cells suggests that IgM bound epitopes are 'apoptosis independent' such that IgM may bind any cell with profound disruption of cell plasma membrane integrity. In addition, permeabilised erythrocytes exhibited significant IgM binding thus supporting the importance of cell membrane epitopes. These data suggest that IgM may recognize and tag damaged nucleated cells or erythrocytes that exhibit significant cell membrane disruption. The role of IgM in vivo in conditions characterized by severe cell damage such as ischemic injury, sepsis and thrombotic microangiopathies merits further exploration. PMID:26121639

  18. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy Induces Rapid Cytoskeletal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), an established enzyme-biomarker for prostate cancer, has attracted considerable attention as a target for imaging and therapeutic applications. We aimed to determine the effects of PSMA-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) on cytoskeletal networks in prostate cancer cells. PSMA-targeted PDT resulted in rapid disruption of microtubules (α-/β-tubulin), microfilaments (actin), and intermediate filaments (cytokeratin 8/18) in the cytoplasm of LNCaP cells. The collapse of cytoplasmic microtubules and the later nuclear translocation of α-/β-tubulin were the most dramatic alternation. It is likely that these early changes of cytoskeletal networks are partly involved in the initiation of cell death. PMID:20452720

  19. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  20. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) and low mitochondrial membrane potential are specific for Barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karkucinska-Wieckowska, Agnieszka; Trubicka, Joanna; Werner, Bozena; Kokoszynska, Katarzyna; Pajdowska, Magdalena; Pronicki, Maciej; Czarnowska, Elzbieta; Lebiedzinska, Magdalena; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Ziolkowska, Lidia; Jaron, Weronika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Ciara, Elzbieta; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Pronicka, Ewa

    2013-11-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked mitochondrial defect characterised by dilated cardiomyopathy, neutropaenia and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria (3-MGCA). We report on two affected brothers with c.646G > A (p.G216R) TAZ gene mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutation, as indicated by the structure-based functional analyses, was further confirmed by abnormal monolysocardiolipin/cardiolipin ratio in dry blood spots of the patients as well as the occurrence of this mutation in another reported BTHS proband. In both brothers, 2D-echocardiography revealed some features of left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) despite marked differences in the course of the disease; the eldest child presented with isolated cardiomyopathy from late infancy, whereas the youngest showed severe lactic acidosis without 3-MGCA during the neonatal period. An examination of the patients' fibroblast cultures revealed that extremely low mitochondrial membrane potentials (mtΔΨ about 50 % of the control value) dominated other unspecific mitochondrial changes detected (respiratory chain dysfunction, abnormal ROS production and depressed antioxidant defense). 1) Our studies confirm generalised mitochondrial dysfunction in the skeletal muscle and the fibroblasts of BTHS patients, especially a severe impairment in the mtΔΨ and the inhibition of complex V activity. It can be hypothesised that impaired mtΔΨ and mitochondrial ATP synthase activity may contribute to episodes of cardiac arrhythmia that occurred unexpectedly in BTHS patients. 2) Severe lactic acidosis without 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in male neonates as well as an asymptomatic mild left ventricular noncompaction may characterise the ranges of natural history of Barth syndrome. PMID:23361305

  1. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  2. The Role of Nanoparticle Surface Functionality in the Disruption of Model Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Babak Y.; Hou, Wen-Che; Corredor, Charlie; Westerhoff, Paul; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid bilayers are biomembranes common to cellular life and constitute a continuous barrier between cells and their environment. Understanding the interaction of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) with lipid bilayers is an important step toward predicting subsequent biological effects. In this study, we assess the effect of varying the surface functionality and concentration of 10 nm-diameter gold (Au) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) ENMs on the disruption of negatively charged lipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes) using a dye leakage assay. Our findings show that Au ENMs having both positive and negative surface charge induce leakage that reaches a steady state after several hours. Positively charged particles with identical surface functionality and different core composition show similar leakage effects and result in faster and greater leakage than negatively charged particles, which suggests that surface functionality, not particle core composition, is a critical factor in determining the interaction between ENMs and lipid bilayers. The results suggest that particles permanently adsorb to bilayers and that only one positively charged particle is required to disrupt a liposome and trigger leakage of its entire contents in contrast to mellitin molecules, the most widely studied membrane lytic peptide, which requires hundred of molecules to generate leakage. PMID:22921268

  3. Peroxynitrite-mediated nitrosative stress decreases motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Uribe, P; Boguen, R; Treulen, F; Sánchez, R; Villegas, J V

    2015-03-01

    Nitrosative stress is produced by high levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The RNS include peroxynitrite, a highly reactive free radical produced from a diffusion-controlled reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide anion. Peroxynitrite causes nitration and oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA, and is thus considered an important pathogenic mechanism in various diseases. Although high levels of peroxynitrite are associated with astenozoospermia, few reports exist regarding the in vitro effect of high levels of this RNS on human sperm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of nitrosative stress caused by peroxynitrite on the viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of human spermatozoa. To do this, human spermatozoa from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a molecule that generates peroxynitrite. Incubations were done at 37°C for up to 4 h with SIN-1 concentrations between 0.2 and 1.0 mmol/l. Generation of peroxynitrite was confirmed using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) by spectrophotometry and flow cytometry. Sperm viability was assessed by propidium iodide staining; sperm motility was analyzed by CASA, and the state of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by JC-1 staining. Viability and ΔΨm were measured by flow cytometry. The results showed an increase in DHR oxidation, demonstrating the generation of peroxynitrite through SIN-1. Peroxynitrite decreased progressive and total motility, as well as some sperm kinetic parameters. Mitochondrial membrane potential also decreased. These alterations occurred with no decrease in sperm viability. In conclusion, peroxynitrite-induced nitrosative stress impairs vital functions in the male gamete, possibly contributing to male infertility. PMID:25425609

  4. β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibril-Induced Membrane Disruption Is Enhanced by Endosomal Lipids and Acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Sophia C.; Sheynis, Tania; Thompson, Rebecca; Tipping, Kevin W.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Ranson, Neil A.; Beales, Paul A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of amyloidoses are not well understood, the interaction between amyloid proteins and cell membranes is thought to play a role in several amyloid diseases. Amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), have been shown to cause disruption of anionic lipid bilayers in vitro. However, the effect of lipid composition and the chemical environment in which β2m-lipid interactions occur have not been investigated previously. Here we examine membrane damage resulting from the interaction of β2m monomers and fibrils with lipid bilayers. Using dye release, tryptophan fluorescence quenching and fluorescence confocal microscopy assays we investigate the effect of anionic lipid composition and pH on the susceptibility of liposomes to fibril-induced membrane damage. We show that β2m fibril-induced membrane disruption is modulated by anionic lipid composition and is enhanced by acidic pH. Most strikingly, the greatest degree of membrane disruption is observed for liposomes containing bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) at acidic pH, conditions likely to reflect those encountered in the endocytic pathway. The results suggest that the interaction between β2m fibrils and membranes of endosomal origin may play a role in the molecular mechanism of β2m amyloid-associated osteoarticular tissue destruction in DRA. PMID:25100247

  5. Anti-Candida activity of geraniol involves disruption of cell membrane integrity and function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Y; Khan, L A; Manzoor, N

    2016-09-01

    Candidiasis is a major problem in immunocompromised patients. Candida, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, is a major health concern today as conventional drugs are highly toxic with undesirable side effects. Their fungistatic nature is responsible for drug resistance in continuously evolving strains. Geraniol, an acyclic monoterpene alcohol, is a component of several plant essential oils. In the present study, an attempt has been made to understand the antifungal activity of geraniol at the cell membrane level in three Candida species. With an MIC of 30-130μg/mL, this natural compound was fungicidal at concentrations 2×MIC. There was complete suppression of fungal growth at MIC values (growth curves) and encouragingly geraniol is non-toxic even at the concentrations approaching 5×MIC (hemolysis assay). Exposed cells showed altered morphology, wherein the cells appeared either broken or shrivelled up (SEM studies). Significant reduction was seen in ergosterol levels at sub-MIC and glucose-induced H(+) efflux at concentrations>MIC values. Our results suggest that geraniol disrupts cell membrane integrity by interfering with ergosterol biosynthesis and inhibiting the very crucial PM-ATPase. It may hence be used in the management and treatment of both superficial and invasive candidiasis but further studies are required to elaborate its mode of action. PMID:27554866

  6. Removal of typical endocrine disrupting chemicals by membrane bioreactor: in comparison with sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingjun; Huang, Xia; Zhou, Haidong; Chen, Jianhua; Xue, Wenchao

    2011-01-01

    The removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by a laboratory-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) fed with synthetic sewage was evaluated and moreover, compared with that by a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operated under same conditions in parallel. Eight kinds of typical EDCs, including 17β-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), 17α-ethynilestradiol (EE2), 4-octylphenol (4-OP), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPnEO), were spiked into the feed. Their concentrations in influent, effluent and supernatant were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The overall estrogenecity was evaluated as 17β-estradiol equivalent quantity (EEQ), determined via yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. E2, E3, BPA and 4-OP were well removed by both MBR and SBR, with removal rates more than 95% and no significant differences between the two reactors. However, with regard to the other four EDCs, of which the removal rates were lower, MBR performed better. Comparison between supernatant and effluent of the two reactors indicated that membrane separation of sludge and effluent, compared with sedimentation, can relatively improve elimination of target EDCs and total estrogenecity. By applying different solids retention times (SRTs) (5, 10, 20 and 40 d) to the MBR, 10 and 5 d were found to be the lower critical SRTs for efficient target EDCs and EEQ removal, respectively. PMID:22105134

  7. Correlation between the rate of proteolysis of mitochondrial translation products and fluidity of the mitochondrial inner membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast. Alteration of the rate of proteolysis under glucose repression.

    PubMed Central

    Luzikov, V N; Novikova, L A; Tikhonov, A N; Zubatov, A S

    1983-01-01

    Our previous results [Kalnov, Novikova, Zubatov & Luzikov (1979) FEBS Lett. 101, 355-358; Biochem. J. 182, 195-202] suggested that in yeast the mitochondrial translation products localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane are rapidly broken down by a proteolytic system inherent in the membrane. In the present work, it is demonstrated that, on glucose repression in undividing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there is no proteolysis of the mitochondrial translation products. This effect is not likely to be associated with lower activity of the proteolytic system of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Nor is the cessation of proteolysis due to qualitative changes in the composition of mitochondrial translation products. What repression does cause is a considerable alteration in the physical state (i.e. structure of the lipid bilayer) of the mitochondrial inner membrane; this was established by experiments involving lipid-soluble spin probes. The conclusion is reached that the rate of proteolysis of mitochondrial translation products in the mitochondrial inner membrane depends on the physical state of the membrane, which in its turn is controlled by the relative content of unsaturated fatty acid chains in the mitochondrial phospholipids. PMID:6354177

  8. The reaction pathway of membrane-bound rat liver mitochondrial monoamine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Houslay, Miles D.; Tipton, Keith F.

    1973-01-01

    1. A preparation of a partly purified mitochondrial outer-membrane fraction suitable for kinetic investigations of monoamine oxidase is described. 2. An apparatus suitable for varying the O2 concentration in a spectrophotometer cuvette is described. 3. The reaction catalysed by the membrane-bound enzyme is shown to proceed by a double-displacement (Ping Pong) mechanism, and a formal mechanism is proposed. 4. KCN, NaN3, benzyl cyanide and 4-cyanophenol are shown to be reversible inhibitors of the enzyme. 5. The non-linear reciprocal plot obtained with impure preparations of benzylamine, which is typical of high substrate inhibition, is shown to be due to aldehyde contamination of the substrate. PMID:4778271

  9. Characterization of the insertase for β-barrel proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Astrid; Israel, Lars; Lackey, Sebastian W.K.; Nargang, Frank E.; Imhof, Axel; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The TOB–SAM complex is an essential component of the mitochondrial outer membrane that mediates the insertion of β-barrel precursor proteins into the membrane. We report here its isolation and determine its size, composition, and structural organization. The complex from Neurospora crassa was composed of Tob55–Sam50, Tob38–Sam35, and Tob37–Sam37 in a stoichiometry of 1:1:1 and had a molecular mass of 140 kD. A very minor fraction of the purified complex was associated with one Mdm10 protein. Using molecular homology modeling for Tob55 and cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of the TOB complex, we present a model of the TOB–SAM complex that integrates biochemical and structural data. We discuss our results and the structural model in the context of a possible mechanism of the TOB insertase. PMID:23128244

  10. Interaction of fullerene nanoparticles with biomembranes: from the partition in lipid membranes to effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra M; Dinis, Augusto M; Peixoto, Francisco; Ferreira, Lino; Jurado, Amália S; Videira, Romeu A

    2014-03-01

    Partition and localization of C60 and its derivative C60(OH)18-22 in lipid membranes and their impact on mitochondrial activity were studied, attempting to correlate those events with fullerene characteristics (size, surface chemistry, and surface charge). Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that C60(OH)18-22 preferentially populated the outer regions of the bilayer, whereas C60 preferred to localize in deeper regions of the bilayer. Partition coefficient values indicated that C60 exhibited higher affinity for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and mitochondrial membranes than C60(OH)18-22. Both fullerenes affected the mitochondrial function, but the inhibitory effects promoted by C60 were more pronounced than those induced by C60(OH)18-22 (up to 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein). State 3 and p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone-uncoupled respirations are inhibited by both fullerenes when glutamate/malate or succinate was used as substrate. Phosphorylation system and electron transport chain of mitochondria are affected by both fullerenes, but only C60 increased the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability to protons, suggesting perturbations in the structure and dynamics of that membrane. At concentrations of C60(OH)18-22 above 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, the activity of FoF1-ATP synthase was also decreased. The evaluation of transmembrane potential showed that the mitochondria phosphorylation cycle decreased upon adenosine diphosphate addition with increasing fullerenes concentration and the time of the repolarization phase increased as a function of C60(OH)18-22 concentration. Our results suggest that the balance between hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity resulting from the surface chemistry of fullerene nanoparticles, rather than the cluster size or the surface charge acquired by fullerenes in water, influences their membrane interactions and consequently their effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:24361870