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Sample records for distal malignant biliary

  1. Multicenter study of endoscopic preoperative biliary drainage for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sasahira, Naoki; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Togawa, Osamu; Yamamoto, Ryuichi; Iwai, Tomohisa; Tamada, Kiichi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Kenji; Koike, Takero; Yoshida, Yu; Sugimori, Kazuya; Ryozawa, Shomei; Kakimoto, Toshiharu; Nishikawa, Ko; Kitamura, Katsuya; Imamura, Tsunao; Mizuide, Masafumi; Toda, Nobuo; Maetani, Iruru; Sakai, Yuji; Itoi, Takao; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the optimal method of endoscopic preoperative biliary drainage for malignant distal biliary obstruction. METHODS: Multicenter retrospective study was conducted in patients who underwent plastic stent (PS) or nasobiliary catheter (NBC) placement for resectable malignant distal biliary obstruction followed by surgery between January 2010 and March 2012. Procedure-related adverse events, stent/catheter dysfunction (occlusion or migration of PS/NBC, development of cholangitis, or other conditions that required repeat endoscopic biliary intervention), and jaundice resolution (bilirubin level < 3.0 mg/dL) were evaluated. Cumulative incidence of jaundice resolution and dysfunction of PS/NBC were estimated using competing risk analysis. Patient characteristics and preoperative biliary drainage were also evaluated for association with the time to jaundice resolution and PS/NBC dysfunction using competing risk regression analysis. RESULTS: In total, 419 patients were included in the study (PS, 253 and NBC, 166). Primary cancers included pancreatic cancer in 194 patients (46%), bile duct cancer in 172 (41%), gallbladder cancer in three (1%), and ampullary cancer in 50 (12%). The median serum total bilirubin was 7.8 mg/dL and 324 patients (77%) had ≥ 3.0 mg/dL. During the median time to surgery of 29 d [interquartile range (IQR), 30-39 d]. PS/NBC dysfunction rate was 35% for PS and 18% for NBC [Subdistribution hazard ratio (SHR) = 4.76; 95%CI: 2.44-10.0, P < 0.001]; the pig-tailed tip was a risk factor for PS dysfunction. Jaundice resolution was achieved in 85% of patients and did not depend on the drainage method (PS or NBC). CONCLUSION: PS has insufficient patency for preoperative biliary drainage. Given the drawbacks of external drainage via NBC, an alternative method of internal drainage should be explored. PMID:27076764

  2. Antireflux metal stent with an antimigration system for distal malignant biliary obstruction: a feasibility pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Togawa, Osamu; Kogure, Hirofumi; Takahara, Naminatsu; Mohri, Dai; Sasaki, Takashi; Matsubara, Saburo; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-06-01

    An antireflux metal stent (ARMS) for distal malignant biliary obstruction has been reported to be useful, but the effectiveness of a flared-end structure to prevent migration on ARMS remains unclear. To evaluate the feasibility of a newly designed ARMS with both ends flared, 8 patients with covered metal stent occlusion due to sludge or food impaction were enrolled. ARMS were placed successfully after endoscopic removal of the occluded stents in all patients, and no procedure-related complication was observed. The median time to recurrent biliary obstruction was 71 days. ARMS occlusion occurred in 3 (38%) patients (sludge in 2 patients and hemobilia in 1). ARMS migration occurred in 1 (13%) patient. As a late complication, cholecystitis occurred in 1 (13%) patient. In conclusion, our newly designed ARMS with an antimigration system was technically feasible and safe, and a further investigation is warranted to evaluate the effectiveness of the current antimigration system. PMID:25856131

  3. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsauo Jiaywei Li Xiao Li Hongcui Wei Bo Luo Xuefeng Zhang Chunle Tang Chengwei; Wang Weiping

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients' medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 {mu}mol/L (range 203.4-369.3) to 146.2 {mu}mol/L (range 95.8-223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 {mu}mol/L (range 29.5-240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9-5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  4. Prospective international multicenter study on endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage for patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Kunda, Rastislav; El Zein, Mohamad H.; Teoh, Anthony Y.; Marson, Fernando P.; Fabbri, Carlo; Tarantino, Ilaria; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Modayil, Rani J.; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Peñas, Irene; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Kumbhari, Vivek; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shah, Raj; Kalloo, Anthony N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Artifon, Everson L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has emerged as an alternative to traditional radiologic and surgical drainage procedures after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, prospective multicenter data are lacking. The aims of this study were to prospectively assess the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of EUS-BD in patients with malignant distal biliary obstruction. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients at 12 tertiary centers (5 US, 5 European, 1 Asian, 1 South American) with malignant distal biliary obstruction and failed ERCP underwent EUS-BD. Technical success was defined as successful stent placement in the desired position. Clinical success was defined as a reduction in bilirubin by 50 % at 2 weeks or to below 3 mg/dL at 4 weeks. Adverse events were prospectively tracked and graded according to the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) lexicon’s severity grading system. Overall survival and duration of stent patency were calculated using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients (mean age 66 years, female 45 %, pancreatic cancer 55 %) underwent EUS-BD. Stent placement (technical success) was achieved in 92 (95.8 %) patients (metallic stent 84, plastic stent 8). Mean procedure time was 40 minutes. Clinical success was achieved in 86 (89.5 %) patients. A total of 10 (10.5 %) adverse events occurred: pneumoperitoneum (n = 2), sheared wire (n = 1), bleeding (n = 1), bile leak (n = 3), cholangitis (n = 2), and unintentional perforation (n = 1); 4 graded as mild, 4 moderate, 1 severe, and 1 fatal (due to perforation). A total of 38 (44 %) patients died of disease progression during the study period. The median patient survival was 167 days (95 %CI 112 – 221) days. The 6-month stent patency rate was 95 % (95 %CI 94.94 – 95.06 %) and the 1-year stent patency was 86 % (95 %CI 85.74 – 86

  5. Covered versus Uncovered Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Managing Malignant Distal Biliary Obstruction: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping; Yu, Qihong; Wang, Kun; Chang, Weilong; Song, Zifang; Zheng, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare the efficacy of using covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMSs) and uncovered self-expandable metal stents (UCSEMSs) to treat objective jaundice caused by an unresectable malignant tumor. Methods We performed a comprehensive electronic search from 1980 to May 2015. All randomized controlled trials comparing the use of CSEMSs and UCSEMSs to treat malignant distal biliary obstruction were included. Results The analysis included 1417 patients enrolled in 14 trials. We did not detect significant differences between the UCSEMS group and the CSEMS group in terms of cumulative stent patency (hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19–4.53; p = 0.93, I2 = 0%), patient survival (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.05–10.87; p = 0.85, I2 = 0%), overall stent dysfunction (relative ratio (RR) 0.85, M-H, random, 95% CI 0.57–1.25; p = 0.83, I2 = 63%), the overall complication rate (RR 1.26, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 0.94–1.68; p = 0.12, I2 = 0%) or the change in serum bilirubin (weighted mean difference (WMD) -0.13, IV fixed, 95% CI 0.56–0.3; p = 0.55, I2 = 0%). However, we did detect a significant difference in the main causes of stent dysfunction between the two groups. In particular, the CSEMS group exhibited a lower rate of tumor ingrowth (RR 0.25, M-H, random, 95% CI 0.12–0.52; p = 0.002, I2 = 40%) but a higher rate of tumor overgrowth (RR 1.76, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 1.03–3.02; p = 0.04, I2 = 0%). Patients with CSEMSs also exhibited a higher migration rate (RR 9.33, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 2.54–34.24; p = 0.008, I2 = 0%) and a higher rate of sludge formation (RR 2.47, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 1.36–4.50; p = 0.003, I2 = 0%). Conclusions Our meta-analysis indicates that there is no significant difference in primary stent patency and stent dysfunction between CSEMSs and UCSEMSs during the period from primary stent insertion to primary stent dysfunction or patient death. However, when taking further management for occluded stents into consideration, CSEMSs is a

  6. [Malignant biliary obstruction].

    PubMed

    Hucl, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma are the most common causes of malignant biliary obstruction. They are diseases of increasing incidence and unfavorable prognosis. Only patients with localized disease indicated for surgery have a chance of long-term survival. These patients represent less than 20 % of all patients, despite the progress in our diagnostic abilities.Locally advanced and metastatic tumors are treated with palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy; the results of such treatments are unsatisfactory. The average survival of patients with unresectable disease is 6 months and only 5-10 % of patients survive 5 years.Biliary drainage is an integral part of palliative treatment. Endoscopically or percutaneosly placed stents improve quality of life, decrease cholestasis and pruritus, but do not significantly improve survival. Biliary stents get occluded over time, possibly resulting in acute cholangitis and require repeated replacement.Photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation, locally active endoscopic methods, have been increasingly used in recent years in palliative treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. In photodynamic therapy, photosensitizer accumulates in tumor tissue and is activated 48 hours later by light of a specific wave length. Application of low voltage high frequency current during radiofrequency ablation results in tissue destruction by heat. Local ablation techniques can have a significant impact in a large group of patients with malignant biliary obstruction, leading to improved prognosis, quality of life and stent patency. PMID:26898789

  7. Stenting in Malignant Biliary Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Almadi, Majid A; Barkun, Jeffrey S; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-10-01

    Decompression of the biliary system in patients with malignant biliary obstruction has been widely accepted and implemented as part of the care. Despite a wealth of literature, there remains a significant amount of uncertainty as to which approach would be most appropriate in different clinical settings. This review covers stenting of the biliary system in cases of resectable or palliative malignant biliary obstruction, potential candidates for biliary drainage, technical aspects of the procedure, as well as management of biliary stent dysfunction. Furthermore, periprocedural considerations including proper mapping of the location of obstruction and the use of antibiotics are addressed. PMID:26431598

  8. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  9. Radiological interventions in malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Srivastava, Deep Narayan; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-05-28

    Malignant biliary obstruction is commonly caused by gall bladder carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic nodes. Percutaneous interventions play an important role in managing these patients. Biliary drainage, which forms the major bulk of radiological interventions, can be palliative in inoperable patients or pre-operative to improve liver function prior to surgery. Other interventions include cholecystostomy and radiofrequency ablation. We present here the indications, contraindications, technique and complications of the radiological interventions performed in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27247718

  10. Endoscopic stenting for malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, E C; Lo, C M; Liu, C L

    2001-10-01

    Use of endoscopic stents to manage patients with malignant obstructive jaundice is a well accepted measure. Interpretation of the results of endoscopic stenting must be made with reference to the level of the bile duct obstruction. Results were generally unsatisfactory for hilar lesions, especially when the intrahepatic ducts were segregated into multiple isolated systems. After deployment, stent dysfunction due to clogging by biliary sludge is apparently an inevitable process for the conventional plastic stent. Considerable efforts had been made to prolong the stent patency by changing its physical configuration, coating the inner lumen, and the choice of material but with little success. The development of a self-expandable metal stent is a major advance, but the benefits derived from a larger stent lumen are compromised by the initial expense and the tumor ingrowth through the wires for all models available commercially. Current data failed to substantiate the value of routine preoperative biliary decompression, as there is no reduction in the morbidity and mortality rates after surgery. Although biased patient selection may have resulted in the negative observations made, repeated clinical trials should probably focus on patients with distal bile duct tumors who are preparing for a major pancreatic resection. As a definitive palliative measure, endoscopic stenting is a more cost-effective option than surgery for patients with limited life expectancy based on data regarding plastic stents. The recommendations are evolving however, as there is progressive refinement of laparoscopic surgery techniques and designs of endoscopic stents. PMID:11596892

  11. Endoscopic palliation of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Sanjay M; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Malignant biliary strictures often present late after the window for curative resection has elapsed. In such patients, the goal of therapy is typically focused on palliation. While historically, palliative measures were performed surgically, the advent of endoscopic intervention offers minimally invasive options to provide relief of symptoms, improve quality of life, and in some cases, increase survival of these patients. Some of these therapies, such as endoscopic biliary decompression, have become mainstays of treatment for decades, whereas newer modalities, including radiofrequency ablation, and photodynamic therapy offer additional options for patients with incurable biliary malignancies. PMID:26989459

  12. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin; Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B.

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  13. Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation for malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    WANG, FEI; LI, QUANPENG; ZHANG, XIUHUA; JIANG, GUOBING; GE, XIANXIU; YU, HONG; NIE, JUNJIE; JI, GUOZHONG; MIAO, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a novel palliation therapy for malignant biliary stricture; however, its feasibility and safety has not yet been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic RFA for the treatment of malignant biliary strictures. A total of 12 patients treated by endoscopic RFA between December 2011 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Adverse events within 30 days post-intervention, stricture diameters prior to and following RFA, stent patency and survival time were investigated. A total of 12 patients underwent 20 RFA procedures as a treatment for malignant biliary strictures. Two patients required repeated elective RFA (4 and 6 times, respectively). All 20 RFA procedures were successfully performed without technical problems. During a 30 day period following each RFA procedure, two patients experienced fever (38.2 and 38.9°C, respectively) and another patient exhibited post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. The 30- and 90-day mortality rates were 0 and 8.3%, respectively. Mean stricture diameter prior to RFA was 5.3 mm (standard deviation (SD), 0.9 mm; range, 5–8 mm), and the mean diameter following RFA was 12.6 mm (SD, 3.1 mm; range, 8–15 mm). There was a significant increase of 7.3 mm in the bile duct diameter following RFA in comparison with prior to RFA (t=8.6; P≤0.001). Of the 11 patients with stents inserted following RFA, the median stent patency was 125.0 days [95% confidence interval (CI), 94.7–155.3 days]. Extrapolated median survival following the first RFA was 232 days (95% CI, 94.3–369.7 days). In conclusion, RFA appears to be an efficient and safe treatment strategy for the palliation of unresectable malignant biliary strictures. PMID:27284336

  14. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  15. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-06-15

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  16. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords “PBD”, “pancreaticoduodenectomy”, and “obstructive jaundice”. Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  17. Current status of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Sakai, Yuji; Mikata, Rintaro; Yasui, Shin; Watanabe, Yuto; Sakamoto, Dai; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Senoo, Jun-Ichi; Kusakabe, Yuko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-08-28

    Preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) was developed to improve obstructive jaundice, which affects a number of organs and physiological mechanisms in patients waiting for surgery. However, its role in patients who will undergo pancreaticoduodenectomy for biliary obstruction remains controversial. This article aims to review the current status of the use of preoperative drainage for distal biliary obstruction. Relevant articles published from 1980 to 2015 were identified by searching MEDLINE and PubMed using the keywords "PBD", "pancreaticoduodenectomy", and "obstructive jaundice". Additional papers were identified by a manual search of the references from key articles. Current studies have demonstrated that PBD should not be routinely performed because of the postoperative complications. PBD should only be considered in carefully selected patients, particularly in cases where surgery had to be delayed. PBD may be needed in patients with severe jaundice, concomitant cholangitis, or severe malnutrition. The optimal method of biliary drainage has yet to be confirmed. PBD should be performed by endoscopic routes rather than by percutaneous routes to avoid metastatic tumor seeding. Endoscopic stenting or nasobiliary drainage can be selected. Although more expensive, the use of metallic stents remains a viable option to achieve effective drainage without cholangitis and reintervention. PMID:26328029

  18. Impact of Preoperative Biliary Drainage on Surgical Outcomes in Periampullary and Hilar Malignancy: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukiko; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Tsujino, Takeshi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Umefune, Gyotane; Akiyama, Dai; Takagi, Kaoru; Takamoto, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Takuya; Nakata, Ryo; Koike, Kazuhiko; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    The role of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) for periampullary and hilar malignancy is still controversial. We retrospectively studied consecutive 144 patients (92 periampullary and 52 hilar malignancy) undergoing surgical resection to evaluate the effects of PBD on surgical outcomes. The rate of PBD was 59% and 56%, and postoperative complications developed in 27% and 19% in periampullary and hilar malignancy, respectively. Risk factors for postoperative complications were overweight [odds ratio (OR), 7.6] and depression (OR, 8.5) in distal malignancy and American society of anesthesiologists score of 3 (OR, 6.6), depression (OR, 13.8), and portal vein embolization (OR, 6.1) in hilar malignancy. PBD was not associated with postoperative complications but reinterventions for PBD were necessary in 43% and 27% in distal and hilar biliary obstruction. In conclusion, PBD in pancreatobiliary surgery was not associated with postoperative complications, but the improvement of PBD is necessary given the high rate of reinterventions. PMID:26841320

  19. Imaging of malignancies of the biliary tract- an update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malignancies of the biliary tract include cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancers and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. Biliary tract adenocarcinomas are the second most common primary hepatobiliary cancer. Due to their slow growing nature, non-specific and late symptomatology, these malignancies are often diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis. Apart from incidental discovery of gall bladder carcinoma upon cholecystectomy, early stage biliary tract cancers are now detected with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Accurate characterization and staging of these indolent cancers will determine outcome as majority of the patients’ are inoperable at the time of presentation. Ultrasound is useful for initial evaluation of the biliary tract and gallbladder masses and in determining the next suitable modality for further evaluation. Multimodality imaging plays an integral role in the management of the biliary tract malignancies. The imaging techniques most useful are MRI with MRCP, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review we will discuss epidemiology and the role of imaging in detection, characterization and management of the biliary tract malignancies under the three broad categories of cholangiocarcinomas (intra- and extrahepatic), gallbladder cancers and ampullary carcinomas. PMID:25608662

  20. Updated Management of Malignant Biliary Tract Tumors: An Illustrative Review.

    PubMed

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Santoni, Mariangela; Gazzetti, Marianna; Maher, Ben; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The management of malignant biliary tumors (MBTs) is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Guidelines and methods of staging for biliary tumors have recently been released by main international societies, altering the clinical and radiologic approach to this pathologic condition. The aim of the present review is to detail the updated role of imaging in preoperative staging and follow-up and to illustrate clinical/therapeutic pathways. In addition, future perspectives on imaging and targeted/embolization therapies are outlined. PMID:27107982

  1. Drug-eluting stent in malignant biliary obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Ki; Jang, Sung Ill

    2012-10-01

    Endoscopic stent insertion is the treatment of choice for patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, conventional stents enable only mechanical palliation of the obstruction, without any anti-tumor effects. Drugeluting stent (DES), which was first introduced in coronary artery disease, are currently under investigation for sustaining stent patency and prolonging patient survival by inhibiting tumor ingrowth in malignant biliary obstruction. Many factors affecting efficient drug delivery have been studied to determine how drugs with antitumor effects suppress tumor ingrowth, including the specific drugs incorporated, means of incorporating the drugs, mode of drug release, and stent structure. Advances have resulted in the construction of more effective non-vascular DES and ongoing clinical research. Non-vascular DES is expected to play a vital role in prolonging the survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.

  2. Choledochoduodenostomy for benign and malignant biliary tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Birkenfeld, S; Serour, F; Levi, S; Abulafia, A; Balassiano, M; Krispin, M

    1988-04-01

    Although nonsurgical alternative treatments for primary or retained common bile duct stones--such as dissolution of gallstones with deoxycholic acids and, especially endoscopic papillotomy--have become available, choledochoduodenostomy (CDS) has been used with increasing frequency over the past decade, with extension of the indications for its use. We report our experience with side-to-side CDS in 116 patients with benign (65 patients) and malignant (46 patients) biliary diseases. Even though the mean age of our patients with benign disease--patients who underwent urgent operations because of obstructive jaundice (74%), liver damage (approximately 60%), and other biliary complications--was 66.8 years, the perioperative mortality was 3.07% and the long-term follow-up results were excellent with no biliary complications. In regard to the controversy about the use of CDS in malignant biliary obstructions, our experience shows that none of the 42 patients had any complication due to malignant invasion of the stoma, and only one patient had ascending cholangitis; the perioperative mortality in this group was 8.6%. In our opinion, CDS is a relatively safe, definitive procedure for treatment of benign and malignant biliary diseases, with good long-term results in high-risk, aged patients. PMID:3353854

  3. Palliation double stenting for malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LIANG; XU, HAITAO; ZHANG, YUBAO

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of patients with malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction is complex. Tumor excision is no longer possible in the majority of patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal dual stent placement in malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction. In total, 20 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction, including 6 with pancreatic carcinoma, 11 with cholangiocarcinoma, 1 with duodenal carcinoma and 2 with abdominal lymph node metastasis, were treated with intraluminal stent placement. Bile duct obstruction with late occurrence of duodenal obstruction was observed in 16 cases, and duodenal obstruction followed by a late occurrence of bile duct obstruction was observed in 3 cases, while, in 1 case, bile duct obstruction and duodenal obstruction occurred simultaneously. After X-ray fluoroscopy revealed obstruction in the bile duct and duodenum, stents were placed into the respective lumens. Percutaneous transhepatic placement was employed for the biliary stent, while the duodenal stent was placed perioraly. The clinical outcomes, including complications associated with the procedures and patency of the stents, were evaluated. The biliary and duodenal stents were successfully implanted in 18 patients and the technical success rate was 90% (18/20). A total of 39 stents were implanted in 20 patients. In 2 cases, duodenal stent placement failed following biliary stent placement. Duodenal obstruction remitted in 15 patients, and 1 patient succumbed to aspiration pneumonia 5 days after the procedure. No severe complications were observed in any other patient. The survival time of the 18 patients was 5–21 months (median, 9.6 months), and 6 of those patients survived for >12 months. The present study suggests that X-ray fluoroscopy-guided intraluminal stent implantation is an effective procedure for the treatment of malignant

  4. Contrast-free endoscopic stent insertion in malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Giovanni D; Lombardi, Giovanni; Rega, Maria; Simeoli, Immacolata; Masone, Stefania; Siciliano, Saverio; Maione, Francesco; Salvatori, Francesca; Balzano, Antonio; Persico, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To present a case series of MRCP-guided endoscopic biliary stent placement, performed entirely without contrast injection. METHODS: Contrast-free endoscopic biliary drainage was attempted in 20 patients with malignant obstruction, unsuitable for resection on the basis of tumor extent or medical illness. MRCP images were used to confirm the diagnosis of tumor, to exclude other biliary diseases and to demonstrate the stenoses as well as dilation of proximal liver segments. The procedure was carried out under conscious sedation. Patients were placed in the left lateral decubitus position. The endoscope was inserted, the papilla identified and cannulated by a papillotome. A guide wire was inserted and guided deeply into the biliary tree, above the stenosis, by fluoroscopy. A papillotomy approximately 1 cm. long was performed and the papillotome was exchanged with a guiding-catheter. A 10 Fr, Amsterdam-type plastic stent, 7 to 15 cm long, was finally inserted over the guide wire/guiding catheter by a pusher tube system. RESULTS: Successful stent insertion was achieved in all patients. There were no major complications. Successful drainage, with substantial reduction in bilirubin levels, was achieved in all patients. CONCLUSION: This new method of contrast-free endoscopic stenting in malignant biliary obstruction is a safe and effective method of palliation. However, a larger, randomized study comparing this new approach with the standard procedure is needed to confirm the findings of the present study. PMID:17663512

  5. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice.

    PubMed

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  6. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  7. Malignant biliary obstruction: the current role of interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Tsetis, Dimitrios; Krokidis, Μiltiadis; Negru, Dragos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic head cancer are still linked with extremely high 5-year mortality in the western world. The management of such patients is complex and typically requires a multidisciplinary approach in a tertiary care center. Interventional radiology offers minimally invasive, image-guided treatment for a variety of diseases and conditions. Regarding patients with malignant biliary obstruction, IR options are considered for more than two decades as a valid management tool for both operable and non-operable cases. The options include placement of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drains, preoperative embolization of the portal vein and deployment of covered and uncovered biliary stents. The purpose of this review is to describe the current evidence in this continuously evolving field. PMID:26752947

  8. Malignant biliary obstruction: the current role of interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Tsetis, Dimitrios; Krokidis, Μiltiadis; Negru, Dragos; Prassopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic head cancer are still linked with extremely high 5-year mortality in the western world. The management of such patients is complex and typically requires a multidisciplinary approach in a tertiary care center. Interventional radiology offers minimally invasive, image-guided treatment for a variety of diseases and conditions. Regarding patients with malignant biliary obstruction, IR options are considered for more than two decades as a valid management tool for both operable and non-operable cases. The options include placement of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drains, preoperative embolization of the portal vein and deployment of covered and uncovered biliary stents. The purpose of this review is to describe the current evidence in this continuously evolving field. PMID:26752947

  9. Endoscopic Ultrasonograpy for Choledocholithiasis and Biliary Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Moparty, Bhavani; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2005-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a valuable tool in gastrointestinal endoscopy, with various applications such as diagnosis, staging, and evaluation of the pancreaticobiliary system. EUS has comparable sensitivity to magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for detection of choledocholithiasis. EUS may be considered for evaluation for choledocholithiasis as prelude to ERCP when there is a low to intermediate suspicion for common bile duct stones or when there is an increased risk for complications from ERCP. Endosonography may also be useful in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma. Intraductal ultrasound within the bile duct may help differentiate malignant from benign strictures. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration can be helpful in the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma, especially in the region of the hilum. PMID:15769435

  10. [Treatment of malignant biliary obstructions via the percutaneous approach].

    PubMed

    Radeleff, B A; López-Benítez, R; Hallscheidt, P; Grenacher, L; Libicher, M; Richter, G M; Kauffmann, G W

    2005-11-01

    This paper gives an overview of experience and success of percutaneous transhepatic interventions in malignant biliary obstruction. Even after exhaustion of surgical and endoscopic therapy options, the percutaneously inserted stents provide effective palliation. The palliative treatment of malignant jaundice using a stent is an established procedure in clinical practice, particularly whenever the endoscopic, transpapillary approach is not possible due to high obstructions or previous surgery. The technical success rate is very high (about 95-100%), and the complication rate is about 10-30%. Since the patency rate of stents is higher than that of plastic endoprostheses, their primary use is justified despite higher costs, provided the patients are adequately selected. PMID:16240139

  11. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-08-14

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  12. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  13. Prospective study of outcomes after percutaneous biliary drainage for malignant biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Robson, P. C.; Heffernan, N.; Gonen, M.; Thornton, R.; Brody, L. A.; Holmes, R.; Brown, K. T.; Covey, A. M.; Fleischer, D.; Getrajdman, G. I.; Jarnagin, W.; Sofocleous, C.; Blumgart, L.; D’Angelica, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) is used to relieve malignant bile duct obstruction (MBO) when endoscopic drainage is not feasible. Little is known about the effects of PBD on the quality of life (QoL) in patients with MBO. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in QoL and pruritus after PBD and to explore the variables that impact these changes. Patients and Methods Eligible patients reported their QoL and pruritus before and after PBD using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – Hepatobiliary instrument (FACT-HS) and the Visual Analog Scale for Pruritus (VASP). Instruments were completed pre-procedure and at one and four weeks following PBD. Results One hundred and nine (60 male/49 female) patients enrolled, 102 (94%) had unresectable disease. PBD was technically successful (hepatic ducts cannulated at the conclusion of procedure) in all patients. There were two procedure-related deaths. All-cause mortality was 10% (N=11) at 4 weeks and 28% (N=31) at 8 weeks post PBD with a median survival of 4.74 months. The mean FACT-HS scores declined significantly (P<.01) over time (101.3, 94.8, 94.7 at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, respectively). The VASP scores showed significant improvement at 1 week with continued improvement at 4 weeks (P<.01). Conclusion PBD improves pruritus but not QoL in patients with MBO and advanced malignancy. There is high early mortality in this population. PMID:20358300

  14. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation Combined with Biliary Stent Placement for Nonresectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction Improves Stent Patency but not Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zhao, Lizhen; Zhou, Chuanguo; Gao, Kun; Huang, Qiang; Wei, Baojie; Gao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although radiofrequency (RF) ablation has been accepted as a curative treatment modality for solid organ tumors, intraductal RF ablation for malignant biliary obstruction has not been widely described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy (in terms of stent patency and survival) of intraductal RF ablation combined with biliary stent placement for nonresectable malignant biliary obstruction. A search of the nonresectable malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction database (179 patients) identified 18 consecutive patients who were treated with biliary intraluminal RF ablation during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage and inner stent placement (RF ablation group) and 18 patients who underwent inner stent placement without biliary intraluminal RF ablation (control group). The patients were matched for tumor type, location of obstruction, tumor stage, and Child–Pugh class status. Primary endpoints included safety, stent patency time, and survival rates. The secondary endpoint was effectiveness of the technique. The RF ablation and control groups were closely matched in terms of age, diagnosis, presence of metastases, presence of locally advanced tumor, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, and chemotherapy regimen (all P > 0.05). The technical success rate for both groups was 100%. The median time of stent patency in the RF ablation and control groups were 5.8 (2.8–11.5) months and 4.5 (2.4–8.0) months, respectively (Kaplan–Meier analysis: P = 0.03). The median survival times in the RF ablation and control groups were 6.1 (4.8–15.2) months and 5.8 (4.2–16.5) months, with no significant difference according to Kaplan–Meier analysis (P = 0.45). In univariate and multivariate analyses, poorer overall survival was associated with advanced age and presence of metastases (P < 0.05). Intraductal RF ablation combined with biliary stent placement for nonresectable malignant

  15. EUS-guided biliary drainage with placement of a new partially covered biliary stent for palliation of malignant biliary obstruction: a case series.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Fuccio, L; Polifemo, A M; Ferrara, F; Ghersi, S; Bassi, M; Billi, P; Maimone, A; Cennamo, V; Masetti, M; Jovine, E; D'Imperio, N

    2011-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) has been developed as an alternative drainage technique in patients with obstructive jaundice where endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has failed. Between July 2008 and December 2009, 16 patients (9 men; median age 79 years) with biliopancreatic malignancy, who were candidates for alternative techniques of biliary decompression because ERCP had been unsuccessful, underwent EUS-BD with placement of a transmural or transpapillary partially covered nitinol self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). EUS-assisted cholangiography was successful in all patients, with definition of the relevant anatomy, but biliary drainage was successfully performed in only 12 (75 %) of the 16 patients (9 choledochoduodenostomies with SEMS placement and 3 biliary rendezvous procedures with papillary SEMS placement), with regression of the cholestasis. No major complications and no procedure-related deaths occurred. There was one case of pneumoperitoneum which was managed conservatively. The median follow-up was 170 days. During the follow-up, eight patients of the 12 patients in whom biliary draining was successful died; four are currently alive. None of the patients required endoscopic reintervention. This series demonstrated that EUS-BD with a partially covered SEMS has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates, and could represent an alternative choice for biliary decompression. PMID:21271507

  16. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Pai, Madhava Xi Feng; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Ao Guokun; Kyriakides, Charis; Dickinson, Robert; Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  17. Covered Stents versus Uncovered Stents for Unresectable Malignant Biliary Strictures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Yu; Lin, Jia-Wei; Zhu, He-Pan; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Guang-Yi; Yan, Pei-Jian; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To summarize the covered or uncovered SEMS for treatment of unresectable malignant distal biliary obstruction, comparing the stent patency, patient survival, and incidence of adverse events between the two SEMSs. Methods. The meta-analysis search was performed independently by two of the authors, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, OVID, and Cochrane databases on all studies between 2010 and 2015. Pooled effect was calculated using either the fixed or the random effects model. Results. Statistics shows that there is no difference between SEMSs in the hazard ratio for patient survival (HR 1.04; 95% CI, 0.92–1.17; P = 0.55) and stent patency (HR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.58 to 1.30, P = 0.5). However, incidence of adverse events (OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.57 to 0.97, P = 0.03) showed significant different results in the covered SEMS, with dysfunctions events (OR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.00, P = 0.05) playing a more important role than complications (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.58 to 1.30, P = 0.50). Conclusions. Covered SEMS group had lower incidence of adverse events. There is no significant difference in dysfunctions, but covered SEMS trends to be better, with no difference in stent patency, patient survival, and complications. PMID:27051667

  18. Polyurethane-Covered Nitinol Strecker Stents as Primary Palliative Treatment of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira; Kane, Teruyuki; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyurethane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n = 5), pancreatic cancer (n = 6), gallbladder cancer (n = 4), metastatic lymph nodes (n = 2), and tumor of the papilla (n 1).Results: The mean patency period of the stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  19. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-15

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  20. Bile Culture and Susceptibility Testing of Malignant Biliary Obstruction via PTBD

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Haipeng; Guo Zhi Xing Wenge; Guo Xiuying; Liu Fang; Li Baoguo

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the information obtained by bile culture and susceptibility testing for malignant biliary obstruction by a retrospective one-center study. Methods: A total of 694 patients with malignant biliary obstruction received percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during the period July 2003 to September 2010, and subsequently, bile specimens were collected during the procedure. Among the 694 patients, 485 were men and 209 were women, ranging in age from 38 to 78 years (mean age 62 years). Results: A total of 42.9% patients had a positive bile culture (298 of 694). Further, 57 species of microorganisms and 342 strains were identified; gram-positive bacteria accounted for 50.9% (174 of 342) and gram-negative bacteria accounted for 41.5% (142 of 342) of these strains. No anaerobes were obtained by culture during this study. The most common microorganisms were Enterococcus faecalis (41 of 342, 11.9%), Escherichia coli (34 of 342, 9.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (28 of 342, 8.2%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (19 of 342, 5.5%), Enterococcus (18 of 342, 5.3%), and Enterobacter cloacae (16 of 342, 4.7%). The percentage of {beta}-lactamase-producing gram-positive bacteria was 27.6% (48 of 174), and the percentage of gram-negative bacteria was 19.7% (28 of 142). The percentage of enzyme-producing Escherichia coli was 61.7% (21 of 34). Conclusion: The bile cultures in malignant biliary obstruction are different from those in the Tokyo Guidelines and other benign biliary obstruction researches, which indicates that a different antibacterial therapy should be applied. Thus, knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibility data could aid in the better use of antibiotics for the empirical therapy of biliary infection combined with malignant biliary obstruction.

  1. Bile proteomics for differentiation of malignant from benign biliary strictures: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Lourdusamy, Vennisvasanth; GK Venkatesh, Preethi; Willard, Belinda; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R; Parsi, Mansour A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Determining the etiology of biliary strictures is challenging, and the sensitivities of the current tests to diagnose them are low. Protein biomarkers in bile, in combination with other tests, may improve sensitivity in diagnosing biliary strictures. Objective: To analyse the differential abundance of proteins in benign and malignant biliary strictures through proteomic analysis of bile. Methods: In this prospective, cross-sectional study, bile was aspirated in 24 patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) including six patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), three with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), ten with pancreatic cancer, and five with benign biliary conditions. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to examine the bile for differential abundance of protein biomarkers. The relative abundance of various proteins was compared in the malignant vs. benign groups and in CCA vs. PSC. Results: The majority of the proteins identified in bile were similar to those of the plasma (plasma proteins) and certain proteins were differentially expressed among the different groups (CCA, pancreatic cancer, PSC or benign). A total of 18 proteins were identified as being more abundant in the malignant group (CCA and pancreatic cancer) than in the benign strictures group, including myeloperoxidase, complement C3, inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, apolipoprotein B-100, and kininogen-1 isoform 2. A total of 30 proteins were identified to be less abundant in the malignant group than in the benign group, including trefoil factor 2, superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn], kallikrein-1, carboxypeptidase B and trefoil factor 1. Conclusions: Protein biomarkers in bile may differentiate malignant from benign biliary strictures. Larger studies are warranted to validate these observations. PMID:25304323

  2. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents for treatment of malignant and benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Samie, Ahmed; Dette, Stephan; Vöhringer, Ulrich; Stumpf, Michael; Kopischke, Karolin; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To present a series of covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS) placed for different indications and to evaluate the effectiveness, complications and extractability of these devices. METHODS: We therefore retrospectively reviewed the courses of patients who received CSEMS due to malignant as well as benign biliary strictures and post-sphincterotomy bleeding in our endoscopic unit between January 2010 and October 2011. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients received 28 stents due to different indications (20 stents due to malignant biliary strictures, six stents due to benign biliary strictures and two stents due to post-sphincterotomy bleeding). Biliary obstruction was relieved in all cases, regardless of the underlying cause. Hemostasis could be achieved in the two patients who received the stents for this purpose. Complications occurred in five patients (18%). Two patients (7%) developed cholecystitis, stents dislocated/migrated in other two patients (7%), and in one patient (3.6%) stent occlusion was documented during the study period. Seven stents were extracted endoscopically. Removal of stents was easily possible in all cases in which it was desired using standard forceps. Twelve patients underwent surgery with pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy. In all patients stents could be removed during the operation without difficulties. CONCLUSION: Despite the higher costs of these devices, fully covered self-expanding metal stents may be suitable to relief biliary obstruction due to bile duct stenosis, regardless of the underlying cause. CSEMS may also represent an effective treatment strategy of severe post-sphincterotomy bleeding, not controlled by other measures. PMID:23125898

  3. Preoperative drainage for malignant biliary strictures: is it time for self-expanding metallic stents?

    PubMed

    Roque, Jason; Ho, Shiaw-Hooi; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Palliation of jaundice improves the general health of the patient and, therefore, surgical outcomes. Because of the complexity and location of strictures, especially proximally, drainage has been accompanied by increased morbidity due to sepsis. Another concern is the provocation of an inflammatory and fibrotic reaction around the area of stent placement. Preoperative biliary drainage with self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) insertion can be achieved via a percutaneous method or through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A recently published multicenter randomized Dutch study has shown increased morbidity with preoperative biliary drainage. A Cochrane meta-analysis has also shown a significantly increased complication rate with preoperative drainage. However, few of these studies have used a SEMS, which allows better biliary drainage. No randomized controlled trials have compared preoperative deployment of SEMS versus conventional plastic stents. The outcomes of biliary drainage also depend on the location of the obstruction, namely the difficulty with proximal compared to distal strictures. Pathophysiologically, palliation of jaundice will benefit all patients awaiting surgery. However, preoperative drainage often results in increased morbidity because of procedure-related sepsis. The use of SEMS may change the outcome of preoperative biliary drainage dramatically. PMID:25674520

  4. Endoscopic removal and trimming of distal self-expandable metallic biliary stents

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Itoi, Takao; Sofuni, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Kurihara, Toshio; Tsuji, Shujiro; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Umeda, Junko; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic removal and trimming of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS). METHODS: All SEMS had been placed for distal biliary strictures. Twenty-seven endoscopic procedures were performed in 19 patients in whom SEMS (one uncovered and 18 covered) removal had been attempted, and 8 patients in whom stent trimming using argon plasma coagulation (APC) had been attempted at Tokyo Medical University Hospital. The APC settings were: voltage 60-80 W and gas flow at 1.5 L/min. RESULTS: The mean stent indwelling period for all patients in whom stent removal had been attempted was 113.7 ± 77.6 d (range, 8-280 d). Of the 19 patients in whom removal of the SEMS had been attempted, the procedure was successful in 14 (73.7%) without procedure-related adverse events. The indwelling period in the stent removable group was shorter than that in the unremovable group (94.9 ± 71.5 d vs 166.2 ± 76.2 d, P = 0.08). Stent trimming was successful for all patients with one minor adverse event consisting of self-limited hemorrhage. Trimming time ranged from 11 to 16 min. CONCLUSION: Although further investigations on larger numbers of cases are necessary to accumulate evidence, the present data suggested that stent removal and stent trimming is feasible and effective for stent-related complications. PMID:21677835

  5. Future developments in biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  6. Anatomy-shaped design of a fully-covered, biliary, self-expandable metal stent for treatment of benign distal biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Weigt, Jochen; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The treatment success of benign biliary strictures with fully covered metal stents (CSEMS) is altered by high stent dislocation rates. We aimed to evaluate a new stent design to prevent dislocation. Patients and methods: Patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with a newly designed double-coned stent (dcSEMS). Mechanical analysis of the new stent was performed and it was compared with a cylindrical stent. Results: A total of 13 dcCSEMS were implanted in 11 patients (2 female, 9 male, median age 47, range 33 – 71). All patients had distal biliary strictures due to chronic pancreatitis. No stent migration occurred. In all but one patient the stents were removed. One patient refused stent extraction and was lost to follow up. Stent occlusion occurred twice leading to cholangitis in both cases. The duration of stent treatment was 170 days (range 61 – 254). After extraction only one patient had early recurrent stricture and received the same stent again. Three stents showed minimal tissue granulation at the papilla. One stent presented ingrowth at the proximal end and was removed after implantation of a second fully covered stent. Mechanical examination revealed significantly lower radial expansion force of the new stent as compared to the cylindrical stent. Conclusions: The new stent design has a low rate of migration. Biomechanical properties may explain this effect. PMID:26793789

  7. Improved endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brush increases diagnostic yield of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Frederick K; Luong-Player, Adelina; Khara, Harshit S; Liu, Haiyan; Lin, Fan; Shellenberger, Matthew J; Johal, Amitpal S; Diehl, David L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine if a new brush design could improve the diagnostic yield of biliary stricture brushings. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was performed of all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures with malignant biliary stricture brushing between January 2008 and October 2012. A standard wire-guided cytology brush was used prior to protocol implementation in July 2011, after which, a new 9 French wire-guided cytology brush (Infinity sampling device, US Endoscopy, Mentor, OH) was used for all cases. All specimens were reviewed by blinded pathologists who determined whether the sample was positive or negative for malignancy. Cellular yield was quantified by describing the number of cell clusters seen. RESULTS: Thirty-two new brush cases were compared to 46 historical controls. Twenty-five of 32 (78%) cases in the new brush group showed abnormal cellular findings consistent with malignancy as compared to 17 of 46 (37%) in the historical control group (P = 0.0003). There was also a significant increase in the average number of cell clusters of all sizes (21.1 vs 9.9 clusters, P = 0.0007) in the new brush group compared to historical controls. CONCLUSION: The use of a new brush design for brush cytology of biliary strictures shows increased diagnostic accuracy, likely due to improved cellular yield, as evidenced by an increase in number of cellular clusters obtained. PMID:25031790

  8. Prognostic relevance of circulating CK19 mRNA in advanced malignant biliary tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leelawat, Kawin; Narong, Siriluck; Udomchaiprasertkul, Wandee; Wannaprasert, Jerasak; Treepongkaruna, Sa-ard; Subwongcharoen, Somboon; Ratanashu-ek, Tawee

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in prediction of the overall survival of patients with advanced malignant biliary tract obstruction. METHODS: We investigated the prognostic value of CTCs by examining two markers, cytokeratin (CK) 19 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA, in 40 patients diagnosed with advanced malignant biliary tract diseases. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect CK19 and hTERT mRNA in the peripheral blood of these patients. Overall survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling. RESULTS: Positive CK19 and hTERT mRNA expression was detected in 45% and 60%, respectively, of the 40 patients. Univariable analysis indicated that positive CK19 mRNA expression was significantly associated with worse overall survival (P = 0.009). Multivariable analysis determined that positive CK19 mRNA expression, patient’s age and serum bilirubin were each independently associated with overall survival. CONCLUSION: CK19 mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood appear to provide a valuable marker to predict the overall survival of patients with advanced malignant biliary tract obstruction. PMID:22253524

  9. Polyorethaoe-covered nitinol strecker stents as primary palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira; Kane, Teruyuki; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyure-thane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n=5), pancreatic Cancer (n=6), gallbladder Cancer (n=4), metastatic lymph nodes (n=2), and tumor of the papilla (n=1).Resulrs: The mean patency period of the Stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  10. Polyurethane-Covered Self-expandable Nitinol Stent for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min; Hwang, Seung-Bae; Lee, Soo-Teik; Lee, Jeong-Min; Chung, Gyung-Ho

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the immediate and long-term results in ten patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a polyurethane-covered, self-expandable nitinol stent.Methods: A nitinol stent, fully covered with high-elasticity polyurethane, with an unconstrained diameter of 10 mm and a total length of 60-80 mm, was placed transhepatically under fluoroscopic guidance in ten patients. The length of the biliary obstruction varied between 30-50 mm. The follow-up examination included a clinical assessment, serum bilirubin measurement, and ultrasound examinations at one-month intervals in all patients. Results: Initial stent deployment was successful in eight patients. Two patients experienced proximal migration,which was solved by insertion of two, uncovered Wallstents. One patient had the stent removed after two weeks because of severe nausea and vomiting. One patient had delayed migration of the covered stent after 40 weeks. The follow-up duration was 3-40 weeks (Mean: 16.9 weeks). Seven patients died(3-26 weeks) and three patients survived (24-40 weeks). The bilirubin measurements in all patients had significantly decreased one week after stent insertion. The levels of amylase and lipase had did not increase after stent insertion. Conclusions: Apolyurethane-covered, self-expandable nitinol stent can be used effectively and safely in the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. The preliminary results are favorable, but there is a need for further large studies to determine both long-term survival and patency.

  11. Metal or plastic stent for malignant biliary obstruction: what's got the most bang for your buck?

    PubMed

    Moparty, Bhavani; Carr-Locke, David L

    2007-12-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction is most commonly managed by the endoscopist. Various plastic and metal stents are currently available. It is important to be aware of the pros and cons of each. The identifying factors that determine the prognosis for the patient might also help determine which type of stent to place. This month's article by Moss et al., is a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials analyzing the cost-effectiveness of plastic and metal stents. This meta-analysis helps guide the endoscopist in deciding what type of stent would be most beneficial and cost effective for their patients. PMID:17998825

  12. Late Migration of Two Covered Biliary Stents Through a Spontaneous Bilioenteric Fistula in a Patient with Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis E.; Hatzidakis, Adam A. Manousaki, Eirini G.; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-15

    We report a case of simultaneous late migration of two ePTFE-FEP covered biliary endoprostheses (Viabil, W.L. Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA) that were percutaneously implanted for the treatment of malignant obstructive jaundice. The first Viabil covered stent was placed successfully without any evidence of dislocation or other complication during follow-up. Occlusion of the stent occurred 4 months later and was treated with the placement of a second stent of the same type. Thirteen months later the patient became symptomatic. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) revealed the presence of a choledocho-duodenal fistula and the disappearance of the two endoprostheses previously implanted. A third metallic stent was then percutaneously positioned through the bilioenteric fistula. The computed tomography scan that followed for the detection of the metallic bodies did not reveal the dislocated metallic stents. Stent migration is a well-known complication of uncovered metallic stents, though Viabil stent migration is assumed to be most unlikely to happen due to the stent's anchoring barbs. Furthermore, the stent had already been tightly fixed by tumor over- and ingrowth, as recognized in previous imaging. This is a very unusual case, describing the disappearance of two metallic foreign bodies encapsulated by tumor.

  13. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation for Clearance of Occluded Metal Stent in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Madhava; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Doros, Attila; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Habib, Nagy

    2013-07-11

    PurposeThe major complication occurring with biliary stents is stent occlusion, frequently seen because of tumour in-growth, epithelial hyperplasia, and sludge deposits, resulting in recurrent jaundice and cholangitis. We report a prospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) ablation to clear the blocked metal stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a novel bipolar RF catheter.MethodsNine patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary RF ablation through the blocked metal stent following external biliary decompression with an internal–external biliary drainage.ResultsAll nine patients had their stent patency restored successfully without the use of secondary stents. Following this intervention, there was no 30-day mortality, haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the nine patients, six are alive and three patients are dead with a median follow-up of 122 (range 50–488) days and a median stent patency of 102.5 (range 50–321) days. Six patients had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. Three patients with stent blockage at 321, 290, and 65 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and repeat ablation.ConclusionsIn this selective group of patients, it appears that this new approach is safe and feasible. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  14. Endoscopic stenting for inoperable malignant biliary obstruction: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zorrón Pu, Leonardo; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Baracat, Felipe Iankelevich; Mendonça, Ernesto Quaresma; Kondo, André; Luz, Gustavo Oliveira; Furuya Júnior, Carlos Kiyoshi; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze through meta-analyses the benefits of two types of stents in the inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. METHODS: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCT) was conducted, with the last update on March 2015, using EMBASE, CINAHL (EBSCO), MEDLINE, LILACS/CENTRAL (BVS), SCOPUS, CAPES (Brazil), and gray literature. Information of the selected studies was extracted in sight of six outcomes: primarily regarding dysfunction, complication and re-intervention rates; and secondarily costs, survival, and patency time. The data about characteristics of trial participants, inclusion and exclusion criteria and types of stents were also extracted. The bias was mainly assessed through the JADAD scale. This meta-analysis was registered in the PROSPERO database by the number CRD42014015078. The analysis of the absolute risk of the outcomes was performed using the software RevMan, by computing risk differences (RD) of dichotomous variables and mean differences (MD) of continuous variables. Data on RD and MD for each primary outcome were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel test and inconsistency was qualified and reported in χ2 and the Higgins method (I2). Sensitivity analysis was performed when heterogeneity was higher than 50%, a subsequent assay was done and other findings were compiled. Student’s t-test was used for the comparison of weighted arithmetic means regarding secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Initial searching identified 3660 studies; 3539 were excluded through title, repetition, and/or abstract, while 121 studies were fully assessed and were excluded mainly because they did not compare self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) and plastic stents (PS), leading to thirteen RCT selected, with 13 articles and 1133 subjects meta-analyzed. The mean age was 69.5 years old, that were affected mostly by bile duct (proximal) and pancreatic tumors (distal). The preferred SEMS diameter used was the 10 mm (30 Fr) and the preferred PS diameter used was 10 Fr

  15. Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation Followed by Locoregional Tumor Treatments for Treating Occluded Biliary Stents in Non-Resectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Single-Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yan-Li; Han, Xin-Wei; Ren, Jian-Zhuang; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Hao; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the safety and feasibility of intraductal radiofrequency ablation (RFA) followed by locoregional tumor treatments in patients with non-resectable malignant biliary obstruction and stent re-occlusion. Methods Fourteen patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were studied retrospectively. All had intraductal RFA followed by locoregional tumor treatments and were monitored clinically and radiologically. The practicality, safety, postoperative complications, jaundice remission, stent patency and survival time were analyzed. Results Combination treatment was successful for all patients. There were no severe complications during RFA or local treatments. All patients had stent patency restored, with a decline in serum bilirubin. Three patients had recurrent jaundice by 195, 237 and 357 days; two patients underwent repeat intraductal RFA; and one required an internal-external biliary drain. The average stent patency time was 234 days (range 187-544 days). With a median follow-up of 384 days (range 187-544 days), six patients were alive, while eight had died. There was no mortality at 30 days. The 3, 6, 12 and 18 month survival rates were 100%, 100%, 64.3% and 42.9%, respectively. Conclusion Intraductal RFA followed by locoregional tumor treatments for occluded metal stents is safe and practically feasible and potential increase stent patency and survival times. PMID:26244367

  16. Randomized trial in malignant biliary obstruction: Plastic vs partially covered metal stents

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Peter L; AlNaamani, Khalid M; Barkun, Alan N; Gordon, Stuart R; Mitty, Roger D; Branch, M Stanley; Kowalski, Thomas E; Martel, Myriam; Adam, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare efficacy and complications of partially covered self-expandable metal stent (pcSEMS) to plastic stent (PS) in patients treated for malignant, infrahilar biliary obstruction. METHODS: Multicenter prospective randomized clinical trial with treatment allocation to a pcWallstent® (SEMS) or a 10 French PS. Palliative patients aged ≥ 18, for infrahilar malignant biliary obstruction and a Karnofsky performance scale index > 60% from 6 participating North American university centers. Primary endpoint was time to stent failure, with secondary outcomes of death, adverse events, Karnofsky performance score and short-form-36 scale administered on a three-monthly basis for up to 2 years. Survival analyses were performed for stent failure and death, with Cox proportional hazards regression models to determine significant predictive characteristics. RESULTS: Eighty-five patients were accrued over 37 mo, 42 were randomized to the SEMS group and 83 patients were available for analyses. Time to stent failure was 385.3 ± 52.5 d in the SEMS and 153.3 ± 19.8 d in the PS group, P = 0.006. Time to death did not differ between groups (192.3 ± 23.4 d for SEMS vs 211.5 ± 28.0 d for PS, P = 0.70). The only significant predictor was treatment allocation, relating to the time to stent failure (P = 0.01). Amongst other measured outcomes, only cholangitis differed, being more common in the PS group (4.9% vs 24.5%, P = 0.029). The small number of patients in follow-up limits longitudinal assessments of performance and quality of life. From an initially planned 120 patients, only 85 patients were recruited. CONCLUSION: Partially covered SEMS result in a longer duration till stent failure without increased complication rates, yet without accompanying measurable benefits in survival, performance, or quality of life. PMID:24379581

  17. A Newly Designed Stent for Management of Malignant Distal Duodenal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei-Zhong Yang, Zheng-Qiang Liu, Sheng Zhou, Chun-Gao Xia, Jin-Guo Zhao, Lin-Bo Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a newly designed stent for the treatment of malignant distal duodenal stenosis.MethodsFrom March 2011 to May 2013, six patients with malignant duodenal stenosis underwent fluoroscopically guided placement of the new duodenal stent consisting of braided, nested stent wires, and a delivery system with a metallic mesh inner layer. Primary diseases were pancreatic cancer in three patients, gastric cancer in two patients, and endometrial stromal sarcoma in one patient. Duodenal obstructions were located in the horizontal part in two patients, the ascending part in two patients, and the duodenojejunal flexure in two patients. Technical success, defined as the successful stent deployment, clinical symptoms before and after the procedure, and complications were evaluated.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all patients. No major complications were observed. Before treatment, two patients could not take any food and the gastric outlet obstruction scoring system (GOOSS) score was 0; the other four patients could take only liquids orally (GOOSS score = 1). After treatment, five patients could take soft food (GOOSS score = 2) and one patient could take a full diet (GOOSS score = 3). The mean duration of primary stent patency was 115.7 days.ConclusionsThe newly designed stent is associated with a high degree of technical success and good clinical outcome and may be clinically effective in the management of malignant distal duodenal obstruction.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tang, T; Binmoeller, K F; Sanchez-Yague, A; Shah, J N

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant obstruction may not be possible in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage methods may be useful in this setting. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement across malignant strictures in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Over a 2-year period, procedural and outcomes data on all patients undergoing EUS-guided anterograde SEMS drainage after failed ERCP were prospectively entered into a database and reviewed. Five patients underwent EUS-guided anterograde SEMS. Indications included: advanced pancreatic cancer (n = 3), metastatic cancer (n = 1), and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). The biliary orifice could not be reached endoscopically due to duodenal stricture (n = 4) or inaccessible hepaticojejunostomy (n = 1). EUS-guided punctures were performed transgastrically into left intrahepatic ducts (n = 4) or transbulbar into the common bile duct (n = 1). Guide wires were passed and SEMS were successfully deployed across strictures in an anterograde fashion in all patients. Jaundice resolved and serum bilirubin levels decreased in all cases. No procedure-related complications were noted during a mean follow-up of 9.2 months. EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement appears to be a safe and efficient technique for palliation of biliary obstruction in patients with an endoscopically inaccessible biliary orifice. The procedure can be performed at the time of failed standard ERCP, and provides an alternative drainage option to percutaneous or surgical decompression and to EUS-guided creation of bilioenteric fistulae. PMID:20119894

  19. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Prashant; Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@nhs.net

    2015-08-15

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree.

  20. Percutaneous “Y” biliary stent placement in palliative treatment of type 4 malignant hilar stricture

    PubMed Central

    Centore, Luca; Soreca, Emilio; Corvino, Antonio; Farbo, Vincenzo; Bencivenga, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the technical and clinical efficacy of percutaneous bilateral biliary stent-in-stent (SIS) deployment technique with a “Y” configuration using open-cell-design stents in type 4 Klatskin tumor patients. Methods Retrospective evaluation ten patients with type IV Bismuth malignant hilar stricture (MHS) treated with percutaneous bilateral “Y” SIS deployment technique placement followed in our institution between March of 2012 and November of 2014. Results Bilateral SIS deployment was technically successful in all patients. One patient (10%) had major complications (episode of cholangitis); one patient (10%) had minor complications, including self-limiting hemobilia. Successful internal drainage was achieved in nine (90%) patients. Stent occlusion by tumor overgrowth and sludge formation occurred in two patient (20%). The median survival and stent patency time were 298 and 315 days respectively. Conclusions Percutaneous bilateral metal stenting using a Y-stent is a valid option for the palliative treatment of type 4 Bismuth MHS, improving quality patient’ life. PMID:27034794

  1. Air cholangiography in endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Sang Hyub; Jang, Dong Kee; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Park, Jin Myung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jun Kyu; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent (SIS) placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is one of the major palliative treatments for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) cholangitis can occur frequently due to inadequate drainage, especially after contrast injection into the biliary tree. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of air cholangiography-assisted stenting. Methods: This study included 47 patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic bilateral SEMS placement using the SIS technique. They were divided into two groups, air (n = 23) or iodine contrast (n = 24) cholangiography. We retrospectively compared comprehensive clinical and laboratory data of both groups. Results: There were no significant differences found between the two groups with respect to technical success (87% versus 87.5%, air versus contrast group, respectively), functional success (95% versus 95.2%), 30-day mortality (8.3% versus 8.7%) and stent patency. Post-ERCP adverse events occurred in 5 (21.7%) of the patients in the air group and 8 (33.3%) of the patients in the contrast group. Among these, the rate of cholangitis was significantly lower in the air group (4.8% versus 29.2%, p = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, air cholangiography, technical success and a shorter procedure time were significantly associated with a lower incidence of post-ERCP cholangitis. Conclusions: Air cholangiography-assisted stenting can be a safe and effective method for endoscopic bilateral SIS placement of SEMS in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. PMID:26929781

  2. Percutaneous Unilateral Biliary Metallic Stent Placement in Patients with Malignant Obstruction of the Biliary Hila and Contralateral Portal Vein Steno-Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Son, Rak Chae; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Ko, Gi-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the outcomes of percutaneous unilateral metallic stent placement in patients with a malignant obstruction of the biliary hila and a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion. Materials and Methods Sixty patients with a malignant hilar obstruction and unilobar portal vein steno-occlusion caused by tumor invasion or preoperative portal vein embolization were enrolled in this retrospective study from October 2010 to October 2013. All patients were treated with percutaneous placement of a biliary metallic stent, including expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-covered stents in 27 patients and uncovered stents in 33 patients. Results A total of 70 stents were successfully placed in 60 patients. Procedural-related minor complications, including self-limiting hemobilia (n = 2) and cholangitis (n = 4) occurred in six (10%) patients. Acute cholecystitis occurred in two patients. Successful internal drainage was achieved in 54 (90%) of the 60 patients. According to a Kaplan-Meier analysis, median survival time was 210 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 135-284 days), and median stent patency time was 133 days (95% CI, 94-171 days). No significant difference in stent patency was observed between covered and uncovered stents (p = 0.646). Stent dysfunction occurred in 16 (29.6%) of 54 patients after a mean of 159 days (range, 65-321 days). Conclusion Unilateral placement of ePTFE-covered and uncovered stents in the hepatic lobe with a patent portal vein is a safe and effective method for palliative treatment of patients with a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion caused by an advanced hilar malignancy or portal vein embolization. No significant difference in stent patency was detected between covered and uncovered metallic stents. PMID:25995688

  3. Partially covered self-expandable metal stents versus polyethylene stents for malignant biliary obstruction: A cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barkun, Alan N; Adam, Viviane; Martel, Myriam; AlNaamani, Khalid; Moses, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Partially covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) and polyethylene stents (PES) are both commonly used in the palliation of malignant biliary obstruction. Although SEMS are significantly more expensive, they are more efficacious than PES. Accordingly, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. METHODS: A cost-effectiveness analysis compared the approach of initial placement of PES versus SEMS for the study population. Patients with malignant biliary obstruction underwent an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography to insert the initial stent. If the insertion failed, a percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram was performed. If stent occlusion occurred, a PES was inserted at repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, either in an outpatient setting or after admission to hospital if cholangitis was present. A third-party payer perspective was adopted. Effectiveness was expressed as the likelihood of no occlusion over the one-year adopted time horizon. Probabilities were based on a contemporary randomized clinical trial, and costs were issued from national references. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS: A PES-first strategy was both more expensive and less efficacious than an SEMS-first approach. The mean per-patient costs were US$6,701 for initial SEMS and US$20,671 for initial PES, which were associated with effectiveness probabilities of 65.6% and 13.9%, respectively. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results. CONCLUSION: At the time of initial endoscopic drainage for patients with malignant biliary obstruction undergoing palliative stenting, an initial SEMS insertion approach was both more effective and less costly than a PES-first strategy. PMID:26125107

  4. Bile analysis using high-throughput FTIR spectroscopy for the diagnosis of malignant biliary strictures: a pilot study in 57 patients.

    PubMed

    Untereiner, Valérie; Sockalingum, Ganesh Dhruvananda; Garnotel, Roselyne; Gobinet, Cyril; Ramaholimihaso, Fidy; Ehrhard, Florent; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Thiéfin, Gérard

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed at determining whether FTIR spectroscopy is able to distinguish bile samples from patients with and without malignant biliary strictures. Bile samples were collected in 19 patients with malignant biliary strictures and 38 with benign biliary diseases during endoscopic procedures. FTIR spectra were acquired on dried drops of whole bile, aqueous and organic phases obtained after lipid extraction. Data were analyzed by principal component analysis and by the support vector machine classification using a leave-n-out cross validation procedure. This was applied to the whole set of spectra and the mean and median spectra of each patient. By leaving one patient out, the classifier allowed discriminating patients with and without malignant biliary strictures with a sensitivity between 82% and 95% and a specificity between 85% and 100%. Using a randomized leave-n -out cross-validation with n = 2, 5 and 10 patients, the sensitivity decreased slightly by about 5 to 10% while the specificity remained stable, suggesting the robustness of the classifier. FTIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics therefore shows potential to differentiate bile from patients with and without malignant biliary strictures. Although promising, the results of this pilot study cannot be generalized and needs to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:24677747

  5. Diagnosis of Cancer Spread Using Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Cholangioscopy-guided Ultrasonography for Malignant Bile Duct Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of sites of intramural cancer spread were examined by comparing the intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) and wall thickening findings at sites of intramural cancer spread and non-spread, in patients with malignant bile duct stenosis who had undergone percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). The subjects were ten patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer, two with pancreatic cancer, one with cancer of the gallbladder, and one with cancer of the papilla of Vater who underwent preoperative IDUS. From these patients, 50 IDUS slices were examined with a congruent relationship with the histologic section of resected tissue. The maximum thickening, minimum thickening, maximum/minimum thickening ratio, and form factor of the medial and lateral margins of the medial hypoechoic layer were determined using diagnostic imaging, and the results were compared at sites of cancer spread and non-spread. Twelve slices were obtained from the site of stenosis, 14 from sites of cancer spread, and 24 from non-spread sites. The maximum thickening, minimum thickening, and maximum/minimum thickening ratio differed significantly between the sites of spread and the non-spread. The absolute values for wall thickening are useful for diagnosing the presence of intramural spread in patients with malignant biliary duct stenosis. PMID:18493560

  6. Distal splenorenal shunt

    MedlinePlus

    ... shunt procedure; Renal - splenic venous shunt; Warren shunt; Cirrhosis - distal splenorenal; Liver failure - distal splenorenal ... hepatitis Blood clots Certain congenital disorders Primary biliary cirrhosis When blood cannot flow normally through the portal ...

  7. Successful endoscopic ultrasound-guided overstenting biliary drainage through a pre-existing proximal migrated metal biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Artifon, E L A; Takada, J; Okawa, L; Ferreira, F; Santos, M; Moura, E G H; Otoch, J P; Sakai, P

    2011-01-01

    Biliary endoscopic drainage using metallic self-expanded stents has become a well-established method for palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. However, its occlusion, mainly by tumor overgrowth, is still the main complication without a standard treatment. We here describe a new method of treatment for biliary metallic stent occlusion, through the echo guided biliary drainage. We present a 68-year-old patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer previously treated for jaundice with ERCP and self-expandable metallic stent insertion. Four weeks later, the patient developed jaundice and symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction. A new ERCP confirmed obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum, due to diffuse tumor growth. EUS was performed, and the previous metal biliary stent was seen occluded at the distal portion in the common bile duct. A EUS-guided choledocododenostomy was performed and then, an overlapping self-expanding metal enteral stent was placed through the malignant obstruction. There were no early complications and the procedure was also clinically effective in relieving jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. If ERCP fails in the management of occluded biliary metallic stents, EUS biliary drain can provide effective biliary decompression and should be considered an alternative to other endoscopic techniques. PMID:22041320

  8. Ultrasonography-guided endoscopic stent placement for malignant biliary obstruction: a preliminary report of four cases.

    PubMed

    De Palma, G D; Puzziello, A; Rega, M; Mastantuono, L; Persico, F; Patrone, F; Persico, G

    2004-04-01

    We present a new combination of transabdominal ultrasound (US) and biliary endoscopy, with endoscopic stent placement carried out under US guidance. Four patients (two men, two women; average age 66.2 years) underwent US-guided stent placement for palliation of ampullary carcinoma (n = 3) or pancreatic cancer (n = 1). A guide wire and a guiding catheter were endoscopically introduced and identified, by US in the common bile duct across the stricture. Hydromer-coated polyurethane angled stents (10 Fr) were finally inserted over the guide wire/guiding catheter by a pusher tube system. Successful drainage, with substantial reduction in bilirubin level, was achieved in all patients (14.2 +/- 9.5 vs. 4.2 +/- 2.9 mg/dl at 1 week). The present case series shows that endoscopic stent placement performed under US guidance is safe and effective. Further studies of larger series, including more proximal strictures, are warranted. PMID:15057684

  9. Serial insertion of bilateral uncovered metal stents for malignant hilar obstruction using an 8 Fr biliary system: a case series of 17 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jennifer; Thosani, Amar; Grunwald, Matthew; Nagula, Satish; Bucobo, Juan Carlos; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Controversy exists over the need for unilateral versus bilateral stent placement in patients with malignant obstruction at the biliary hilum. Placement of bilateral uncovered self-expanding metal stent (UCSEMS) at this location is technically challenging, and generally associated with lower rates of procedural success. Serial insertion of side-by-side UCSEMS may be especially difficult when simultaneous deployment is not possible using larger stent delivery catheters. In this single-center, retrospective case series of all patients who underwent bilateral placement of uncovered Wallflex(TM) biliary stents between July 2008 and July 2014, we evaluate the feasibility, technical success, and safety of patients undergoing serial insertion of bilateral UCSEMS using the 8 Fr Wallflex(TM) biliary system for malignant hilar obstruction. A total of 17 patients were included. Primary cholangiocarcinoma, Bismuth IV, was the most common diagnosis. Mean procedure time was 54.4 minutes. Overall procedural technical success was achieved in 17/17 patients. Stricture dilation was necessary prior to Wallflex(TM) insertion in 8/17 patients (47.1%). Transpapillary extension of two stents was performed in all patients. There were no cases of stent deployment malfunction, or inability to insert or deploy the 2(nd) stent. Nine of 17 patients (52.9%) required inpatient hospitalization following ERCP; the most common indications were abdominal pain and need for IV antibiotics. There was one case of ERCP-related cholangitis otherwise; there were no other major complications. Bilateral, serial insertion of UCSEMS using the 8 Fr Wallflex(TM) biliary system in malignant hilar obstruction is feasible with an excellent technical success profile. Using this device for side-by-side deployment of UCSEMS appears to be safe in the majority of patients. PMID:26605283

  10. MICROBIAL DRIVEN TLR5-DEPENDENT SIGNALING GOVERNS DISTAL MALIGNANT PROGRESSION THROUGH TUMOR-PROMOTING INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Stephen, Tom L.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Tesone, Amelia J.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Brencicova, Eva; Escovar-Fadul, Ximena; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Cadungog, Mark G.; Zhang, Rugang; Salatino, Mariana; Tchou, Julia; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    The dominant TLR5R392X polymorphism abrogates flagellin responses in >7% of humans. We report that TLR5-dependent commensal bacteria drive malignant progression at extra-mucosal locations by increasing systemic IL-6, which drives mobilization of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Mechanistically, expanded granulocytic MDSCs cause γδ lymphocytes in TLR5-responsive tumors to secrete galectin-1, dampening anti-tumor immunity and accelerating malignant progression. In contrast, IL-17 is consistently up-regulated in TLR5-unresponsive tumor-bearing mice, but only accelerates malignant progression in IL-6-unresponsive tumors. Importantly, depletion of commensal bacteria abrogates TLR5-dependent differences in tumor growth. Contrasting differences in inflammatory cytokines and malignant evolution are recapitulated in TLR5-responsive/unresponsive ovarian and breast cancer patients. Therefore, inflammation, anti-tumor immunity and the clinical outcome of cancer patients are influenced by a common TLR5 polymorphism. PMID:25533336

  11. Microbially driven TLR5-dependent signaling governs distal malignant progression through tumor-promoting inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Stephen, Tom L; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Allegrezza, Michael J; Tesone, Amelia J; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Brencicova, Eva; Escovar-Fadul, Ximena; Nguyen, Jenny M; Cadungog, Mark G; Zhang, Rugang; Salatino, Mariana; Tchou, Julia; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-12

    The dominant TLR5(R392X) polymorphism abrogates flagellin responses in >7% of humans. We report that TLR5-dependent commensal bacteria drive malignant progression at extramucosal locations by increasing systemic IL-6, which drives mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Mechanistically, expanded granulocytic MDSCs cause γδ lymphocytes in TLR5-responsive tumors to secrete galectin-1, dampening antitumor immunity and accelerating malignant progression. In contrast, IL-17 is consistently upregulated in TLR5-unresponsive tumor-bearing mice but only accelerates malignant progression in IL-6-unresponsive tumors. Importantly, depletion of commensal bacteria abrogates TLR5-dependent differences in tumor growth. Contrasting differences in inflammatory cytokines and malignant evolution are recapitulated in TLR5-responsive/unresponsive ovarian and breast cancer patients. Therefore, inflammation, antitumor immunity, and the clinical outcome of cancer patients are influenced by a common TLR5 polymorphism. PMID:25533336

  12. Percutaneous Placement of Metallic Stents in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: One-Stage or Two-Stage Procedure? Pre-Dilate or Not?

    SciTech Connect

    Inal, Mehmet; Aksungur, Erol; Akguel, Erol; Oguz, Mahmut; Seydaoglu, Guelsah

    2003-02-15

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the necessity of percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation procedures performed before stent insertion. One hundred and twenty-six patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction underwent palliative therapy by means of percutaneous transhepatic placement of 183 metallic biliary endoprotheses. Forty-four (35%) patients underwent metallic stent insertion in a one-stage procedure and 82(65%) had undergone percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage before stent insertion. Balloon dilation of the stenosis before stent placement (pre-dilation) was performed in 53 (42%) of 126 patients. The rate of the 30-day mortality was 11%, with no procedure-related deaths. The total rate of early complications was 29%, and 84% of these complications were due to percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and pre-dilation procedures. Percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and pre-dilation had no clinical or statistically significant effect on the patients' survival and stent patency rate. Percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation increased the cost of stent placement 18% and 19%, respectively. Palliation of malignant biliary obstruction with percutaneous transhepatic stent insertion should be done directly, in the simplest way, without performing percutaneous transhepatic catheter drainage and balloon dilation before stent placement. It is more useful, safe, and cost-effective.

  13. Pediatric Biliary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Atchie, Benjamin; Kalva, Sanjeeva; Josephs, Shellie

    2015-12-01

    An interventional radiologist is frequently called to evaluate and treat biliary diseases in children; a tailored approach specific to this population is required. Imaging with an emphasis on minimizing ionizing radiation is used not only in the initial workup but also to guide interventions. The most common form of intervention generally consists of transhepatic biliary drainage to treat either biliary obstruction or bile leakage, a scenario frequently encountered after pediatric liver transplantation. Other pathologies referred for evaluation and management include biliary atresia and, rarely, symptomatic choledochal cysts. Biliary complications caused by an underlying malignancy are not a frequently encountered problem in the pediatric population. The initial evaluation, role of preprocedural imaging, and interventional management with an emphasis on technique are discussed regarding these common biliary pathologies in children. PMID:26615168

  14. Endoscopic removal of a spontaneously fractured biliary uncovered self-expandable metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Tsujino, Takeshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Sasahira, Naoki; Kogure, Hirofumi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nagano, Rie; Miyabayashi, Kouji; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Mohri, Dai; Sasaki, Takashi; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are widely used for the palliative treatment of unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. However, the long-term durability of SEMSs in biliary strictures is not clear. We describe a case of endoscopic removal of spontaneously fractured uncovered biliary SEMS. A 59-year-old woman presented to our institution with a 1-year history of recurrent cholangitis. Her medical history included a proctectomy for rectal cancer and right hemihepatectomy for liver metastasis 10 years earlier. Five years after these operations, she developed a benign hilar stricture and had an uncovered SEMS placed in another hospital. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated that the SEMS was torn in half and the distal part of the stent was floating in the dilated common bile duct. The papillary orifice was dilated by endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation (EPLBD) using a 15-mm wire-guided balloon catheter. Subsequently, we inserted biopsy forceps into the bile duct and grasped the distal end of the broken SEMS under fluoroscopy. We successfully removed the fragment of the SEMS from the bile duct, along with the endoscope. The patient was discharged without complications. Placement of an uncovered biliary SEMS is not the preferred treatment for benign biliary strictures. Spontaneous fracture of an uncovered biliary SEMS is an extremely rare complication. We should be aware that stent fracture can occur when placing uncovered biliary SEMSs in patients with a long life expectancy. EPLBD is very useful for retrieving the fractured fragment of SEMS. PMID:22507093

  15. Preoperative biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Payal; Kumbhari, Vivek; Zein, Mohamad E L; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    The role of preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with distal or proximal biliary obstruction secondary to resectable tumors has been a matter for debate. A review of the literature using Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases was undertaken for studies evaluating routes of drainage (endoscopic or percutaneous) and stent types (plastic or metal) in patients with resectable disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is indicated for relief of symptomatic jaundice, cholangitis, patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy or those patients where surgery may be delayed. Endoscopic methods are preferred over percutaneous methods because of lower complication rates. In patients with proximal biliary obstruction, PBD should be guided by imaging studies to aid in selective biliary cannulation for unilateral drainage in order to reduce the risk of cholangitis in undrained liver segments. PMID:25293587

  16. Placement of multiple metal stents for malignant intrahepatic biliary obstruction via an endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy fistula.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Dai; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Kaoru; Mizuno, Suguru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) using a fully-covered self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) is increasingly used as an alternative to failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. An EUS-CDS fistula can provide endoscopists with a new approach route for intrahepatic bile ducts. Here, we present successful placement of multiple SEMS for intrahepatic biliary obstruction via an EUS-CDS fistula. PMID:26462843

  17. Adenomas involving the extrahepatic biliary tree are rare but have an aggressive clinical course.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kah Poh; Nautsch, Deborah; Mueller, James; Desilets, David; Mehendiratta, Vaibhav

    2016-02-01

    Biliary adenomas that are usually found in surgically removed gallbladders are rare, but can also occur in the extrahepatic biliary tree. We present a case series of extrahepatic bile duct adenomas at our institution, along with a review of the literature. All three patients with extrahepatic biliary adenomas (two in the common bile ducts, one in the hepatic duct) were female with a mean age of 74 years. On initial presentation, none of the patients had obstructive jaundice but two of the three patients had symptoms of biliary origin. Case 1 is an 85-year-old woman with an incidental biliary dilation seen on chest imaging; endoscopic ultrasound revealed a sessile adenomatous polyp in the distal bile duct. The patient refused surgery and presented with occlusive biliary stricture and jaundice 5 months after initial presentation, with cytology confirming malignant progression. Case 2 is a 78-year-old woman with a history of primary sclerosing cholangitis and who presented with cholangitis, and Gram-negative sepsis. A polypoid lesion was seen on imaging in the common hepatic duct and direct cholangioscopy with biopsies confirmed the presence of adenoma with high grade dysplasia. The patient underwent successful total bile duct resection and hepaticojejunostomy but represented 1 year later with diffuse metastatic disease to the bone, liver, and peritoneum. Case 3 is a 61-year-old woman who presented with symptoms suggestive of gallbladder pathology and was found to have a polypoid bile duct lesion on intraoperative cholangiogram. Endoscopic retrograde cholangioscopy showed an adenomatous polyp with high grade dysplasia involving the distal common bile duct. The patient underwent distal bile duct resection with choledochojejunostomy but presented with jaundice 4 years after surgery. She was found to have adenocarcinoma involving the small bowel in the Roux limb of jejunum and transverse colon. All three patients in our series presented with interval gastrointestinal

  18. Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphy in segmental biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Gold, J.A.; Gluck, L.; Caride, V.J.; Burrell, M.; Hoffer, P.B.

    1981-05-01

    Segmental biliary obstruction as a result of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy has been reported with increasing frequency. For two representative patients, the clinical and Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphic findings in segmental biliary obstruction are described. The presence of photon-deficient dilated bile ducts in one segment of the biliary tree is highly suggestive of localized biliary obstruction and should be considered in the patient with suspected or proven hepatic malignancy despite the absence of jaundice.

  19. Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphy in segmental biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Gold, J.A.; Gluck, L.; Caride, V.J.; Burrell, M.; Hoffer, P.B.

    1981-05-01

    Segmental biliary obstruction as a result of primary or secondary hepatic malignancy has been reported with increasing frequency. For two representative patients, the clinical and Tc-99m HIDA scintigraphic findings in segmetal biliary obstruction are described. The presence of photon-deficient dilated bile ducts in one segment of the biliary tree is highly suggestive of localized biliary obstruction and should be considered in the patient with suspected or proven hepatic malignancy despite the absence of jaundice.

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage of hilar biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Do Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Only 20-30% of patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) are candidates for potentially curative resection. However, even after curative (R0) resection, these patients have a disease recurrence rate of up to 76%. The prognosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is limited by tumor spread along the biliary tree leading to obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, and liver failure. Therefore, palliative biliary drainage may be a major goal for patients with hilar CC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with stent placement is an established method for palliation of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. However, there are patients for whom endoscopic stent placement is not possible because of failed biliary cannulation or tumor infiltration that limits transpapillary access. In this situation, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an alternative method. However, PTBD has a relatively high rate of complications and is frequently associated with patient discomfort related to external drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage has therefore been introduced as an alternative to PTBD in cases of biliary obstruction when ERCP is unsuccessful. In this review, the indications, technical tips, outcomes, and the future role of EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage, such as hepaticogastrostomy or hepaticoduodenostomy, for hilar biliary obstruction will be summarized. PMID:26178753

  1. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Metal Stent for Malignant Hilar Obstruction: Results and Predictive Factors for Efficacy in 159 Patients from a Single Center

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingwu Bai, Ming Qi, Xingshun Li, Kai Yin, Zhanxin; Wang, Jianhong; Wu, Wenbing Zhen, Luanluan He, Chuangye; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Zhuoli; Han, Guohong E-mail: Hangh@fmmu.edu.cn

    2015-06-15

    AimTo investigate and compare the efficacy and safety of percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (PTBS) using a one- or two-stage procedure and determine the predictive factors for the efficacious treatment of malignant hilar obstruction (MHO).Methods159 consecutive patients with MHO who underwent PTBS were enrolled between January 2010 and June 2013. Patients were classified into one- or two-stage groups. Independent predictors of therapeutic success were evaluated using a logistic regression model.Results108 patients were treated with one-stage PTBS and 51 patients were treated with two-stage PTBS. The stents were technically successful in all patients. Successful drainage was achieved in 114 patients (71.4 %). A total of 42 early major complications were observed. Re-interventions were attempted in 23 patients during follow-up. The cumulative primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 88, 71, and 48 %, respectively. Stent placement using a one- or two-stage procedure did not significantly affect therapeutic success, early major complications, median stent patency, or survival. A stent placed across the duodenal papilla was an independent predictor of therapeutic success (odds ratio = 0.262, 95 % confidence interval [0.107–0.642]). Patients with stents across papilla had a lower rate of cholangitis compared with patients who had a stent above papilla (7.1 vs. 20.3 %, respectively, p = 0.03).ConclusionsThe majority of patients with MHO who underwent one-stage PTBS showed similar efficacy and safety outcomes compared with those who underwent two-stage PTBS. Stent placement across the duodenal papilla was associated with a higher therapeutic success rate.

  2. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. PMID:26615161

  3. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-03-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  4. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  5. [Atypical biliary stenting in patient with obstructive biliary jaundice].

    PubMed

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Kurcz, Jacek; Guziński, Maciej; Janczak, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive biliary jaundice is a common complication in patients with malignancies which infiltrate biliary ducts. If untreated efficiently the jaundice is fatal a short period of time. We present a case of 60-year-old male patient who had undergone Whipple procedure in the past and presented with local recurrence treated successfully by percutaneous stenting of obstructed biliary duct. When passing through the obstruction we observed a contrast-bile leakage at the level of occluded segment and instability of implanted stent which was a complication that extorted atypical approach. We applied a covered stent in association with oversized nitinol stent which allowed to form a funnel-like construction efficiently decompressing biliary tree. Thanks to this management we also avoided further complications. PMID:23276050

  6. Biliary stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a gallstone in the bile duct Pancreatitis Primary sclerosing cholangitis Risk factors include: Gallstones Injury to ... Inflammation and narrowing of the biliary duct may return in some ... remain for a long period can lead to liver damage ( cirrhosis ).

  7. Biliary stricture

    MedlinePlus

    ... help reveal a problem with the biliary system . Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is higher than normal. Bilirubin level ... the small intestine. In some cases, a tiny metal or plastic mesh tube ( stent ) is placed across ...

  8. Biliary cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, P D

    1975-01-01

    This review brings the total number of biliary cysts reported in the world literature to 955. Eighty-one per cent of patients are females and 61% were discovered before age ten. The classical triad of right upper quadrant pain, right upper quandrant mass, and juandice is present in 38% of cases. The duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis ranged from less than one week to more than 40 years. The etiology is multifaceted and evidence of the existence of both acquired and congenital cysts is presented. The most useful diagnostic tool is fiberoptic endoscopy with retrograde contrast injection of the common bile duct and pancreatic duct. The incidence of biliary carcinoma in patients with biliary cysts is found to be 2.5%; 24 cases have been reported. Considerable controversy has existed concerning the best operative procedure for biliary cysts; no treatment or medical treatment yielding a 97% mortality rate. In an analysis of 235 patients presented since 1968 with an average followup of 5.2 years, the best procedure appears to be excision with either choledochocholedocostomy or Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. The operative mortality for all procedures is now 3 to 4%. PMID:1103760

  9. Biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Chardot, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare disease characterised by a biliary obstruction of unknown origin that presents in the neonatal period. It is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in this age group. BA occurs in approximately 1/18,000 live births in Western Europe. In the world, the reported incidence varies from 5/100,000 to 32/100,000 live births, and is highest in Asia and the Pacific region. Females are affected slightly more often than males. The common histopathological picture is one of inflammatory damage to the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts with sclerosis and narrowing or even obliteration of the biliary tree. Untreated, this condition leads to cirrhosis and death within the first years of life. BA is not known to be a hereditary condition. No primary medical treatment is relevant for the management of BA. Once BA suspected, surgical intervention (Kasai portoenterostomy) should be performed as soon as possible as operations performed early in life is more likely to be successful. Liver transplantation may be needed later if the Kasai operation fails to restore the biliary flow or if cirrhotic complications occur. At present, approximately 90% of BA patients survive and the majority have normal quality of life. PMID:16872500

  10. Eosinophilic Cholangitis—A Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Biliary Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Fragulidis, Georgios Panagiotis; Vezakis, Antonios I.; Kontis, Elissaios A.; Pantiora, Eirini V.; Stefanidis, Gerasimos G.; Politi, Aikaterini N.; Koutoulidis, Vasilios K.; Mela, Maria K.; Polydorou, Andreas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract When confronting a biliary stricture, both benign and malignant etiologies must be carefully considered as a variety of benign biliary strictures can masquerade as hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Therefore, patients could undergo a major surgery despite the possibility of a benign biliary disease. Approximately 15% to 24% of patients undergoing surgical resection for suspected biliary malignancy will have benign pathology. Eosinophilic cholangitis (EC) is a rare benign disorder of the biliary tract, which can cause obstructive jaundice and can pose a difficult diagnostic task. We present a rare case of a young woman who was referred to our hospital with obstructive painless jaundice due to a biliary stricture at the confluence of the hepatic bile ducts, with a provisional diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Though, during her work up she was found to have EC, an extremely rare benign cause of biliary stricture, which is characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltration of the biliary tree causing stricturing, fibrosis, and obstruction and which is reversible with short-term high-dose steroids. Despite its rarity, EC should be taken into consideration when imaging modalities demonstrate a biliary stricture, especially if preoperative diagnosis of malignancy cannot be made, in the setting of peripheral eosinophilia and the absence of cardinal symptoms of malignancy. PMID:26735539

  11. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  12. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  13. The Role of Biliary Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cellular Adhesion Molecule 6 (CEACAM6) as a Biomarker in Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rose, J. Bart; Correa-Gallego, Camilo; Li, Yu; Nelson, James; Alseidi, Adnan; Helton, W. Scott; Allen, Peter J.; D’Angelica, Michael I.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Fong, Yuman; Kingham, T. Peter; Kowdley, Kris V.; Jarnagin, William R.; Rocha, Flavio G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study is to determine if CEACAM6 can be detected in the bile of patients with biliary cancer and can serve as a diagnostic biomarker for cholangiocarcinoma. Summary Background Data Distinguishing bile duct carcinoma from other diagnoses is often difficult using endoscopic or percutaneous techniques. The cell surface protein CEACAM6 is over-expressed in many gastrointestinal cancers and may be selectively elevated in biliary adenocarcinoma. Methods Bile from patients with benign biliary disease and cholangiocarcinoma (hilar, intrahepatic and distal) was collected at the time of index operation. The concentration of CEACAM6 was quantified by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and correlated to pathologic diagnosis. Diagnostic capability of CEACAM6 was evaluated by Wilcoxon rank-sum, linear regression, multiple regression, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results Bile from 83 patients was analyzed: 42 with benign disease and 41 with cholangiocarcinoma. Patients in the benign cohort were younger, predominantly female, and had lower median biliary CEACAM6 levels than patients in the malignant cohort (7.5 ng/ml vs. 40 ng/ml; p = <.001). ROC curve analysis determined CEACAM6 to be a positive predictor cholangiocarcinoma with a CEACAM6 level >14 ng/ml associated with 87.5% sensitivity, 69.1% specificity, and a likelihood ratio of 2.8 (AUC 0.74). Multiple regression analysis suggested elevated alkaline phosphatase and the presence of biliary endoprostheses may influence CEACAM6 levels. Conclusion Biliary CEACAM6 can identify patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with a high degree of sensitivity and should be investigated further as a potential screening tool. PMID:26974538

  14. Successive breaks in biliary stents.

    PubMed

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; Guerra, María

    2016-04-01

    A 64 year-old male, was diagnosed with obstructive jaundice due to a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with liver metastases. The patient underwent endoscopic placement of covered self-expanding biliary stent (10x60 mm, Hanaro) by ERCP. He was admitted with cholangitis one year later. The following ERCP revealed a fractured stent with loss of the distal end (duodenal) and partial migration of the remaining stent to the common bile duct. The fragmented stent was removed from the common bile duct and a new, similar one was inserted. Four months later the patient was admitted with cholangitis. A new ERCP was done and biliary stent was also fragmented. It was removed and an uncovered stent (Wallflex) was inserted. PMID:27065248

  15. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  16. Association between Helicobacter spp. infections and hepatobiliary malignancies: a review.

    PubMed

    Segura-López, Fany Karina; Güitrón-Cantú, Alfredo; Torres, Javier

    2015-02-01

    Hepatobiliary cancers are highly lethal cancers that comprise a spectrum of invasive carcinomas originating in the liver hepatocellular carcinoma, the bile ducts intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, the gallbladder and the ampulla of Vater (collectively known as biliary tract cancers). These tumors account for approximately 13% of all annual cancer-related deaths worldwide and for 10%-20% of deaths from hepatobiliary malignancies. Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease that displays a poor survival rate for which few therapeutic options are available. Population genetics, geographical and environmental factors, cholelithiasis, obesity, parity, and endemic infection with liver flukes have been identified as risk factors that influence the development of biliary tract tumors. Other important factors affecting the carcinogenesis of these tumors include chronic inflammation, obstruction of the bile ducts, and impaired bile flow. It has been suggested that CCA is caused by infection with Helicobacter species, such as Helicobacter bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus, in a manner that is similar to the reported role of Helicobacter pylori in distal gastric cancer. Due to the difficulty in culturing these Helicobacter species, molecular methods, such as polymerase chain reaction and sequencing, or immunologic assays have become the methods of choice for diagnosis. However, clinical studies of benign or malignant biliary tract diseases revealed remarkable variability in the methods and the findings, and the use of uniform and validated techniques is needed. PMID:25663761

  17. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  18. Biliary tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, E K; Vauthey, J N

    2001-09-01

    Advances in cellular and molecular biology of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder adenocarcinoma are providing innovative means for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary tract cancer. Similarly, refinements in noninvasive studies--including helical computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasonography--are enabling more accurate diagnosis, staging, and treatment planning for these tumors. Complete resection remains the only means for cure, and recent reports from major hepatobiliary centers support aggressive wide resection for bile duct and gallbladder cancer. Palliation of malignant strictures has improved with advanced endoscopic techniques, newer polyurethane-covered stents, endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy, and radiofrequency intraluminal endohyperthermia. The preliminary data on such minimally invasive techniques suggest an improvement in quality of life and survival for selected patients. PMID:17031200

  19. Risk and Surveillance of Cancers in Primary Biliary Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hrad, Valery; Abebe, Yoftahe; Ali, Syed Haris; Velgersdyk, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary diseases have been associated in several studies with various malignancies. Understanding the risk and optimizing surveillance strategy of these malignancies in this specific subset of patients are an important facet of clinical care. For instance, primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with an increased risk for cholangiocarcinoma (which is very challenging to diagnose) and when IBD is present for colorectal cancer. On the other hand, primary biliary cirrhosis patients with cirrhosis or not responding to 12 months of ursodeoxycholic acid therapy are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review we will discuss in detail the risks and optimal surveillance strategies for patients with primary biliary diseases. PMID:27413366

  20. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the bile ducts of the liver. This blocks the flow ... ducts in the liver is not known. However, primary biliary cirrhosis is an autoimmune disorder. That means your body's ...

  1. Irradiation of biliary carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Herskovic, A.; Heaston, D.; Engler, M.J.; Fishburn, R.I.; Jones, R.S.; Noell, K.T.

    1981-04-01

    External and interstitial irradiation have effected the disappearance of biliary lesions. The use of indwelling catheters in the biliary tract makes the technique more appealing. Iridium 192 implants were used.

  2. Double Sigmoid colon perforation due to migration of a biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Malgras, B; Pierret, C; Tourtier, J-P; Olagui, G; Nizou, C; Duverger, V

    2011-10-01

    Migration of pancreatico-biliary stents is a rare event, usually benign, but which can lead to severe complications such as digestive tube perforation. We report the case of a patient with double sigmoid perforation due to distal migration of a biliary stent placed to decompress a pancreatic head carcinoma. PMID:22075561

  3. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-07-10

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  4. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  5. Advanced endoscopic imaging of indeterminate biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Tabibian, James H; Visrodia, Kavel H; Levy, Michael J; Gostout, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures (IDBSs) has evolved considerably since the development of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography pancreatography (ERCP) was introduced nearly a decade later and has since become the mainstay of therapy for relieving obstruction of the biliary tract. However, longstanding methods of ERCP-guided tissue acquisition (i.e., biliary brushings for cytology and intraductal forceps biopsy for histology) have demonstrated disappointing performance characteristics in distinguishing malignant from benign etiologies of IDBSs. The limitations of these methods have thus helped drive the search for novel techniques to enhance the evaluation of IDBSs and thereby improve diagnosis and clinical care. These modalities include, but are not limited to, endoscopic ultrasound, intraductal ultrasound, cholangioscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography. In this review, we discuss established and emerging options in the evaluation of IDBSs. PMID:26675379

  6. Recent advances of biliary stent management.

    PubMed

    Kida, Mitsuhiro; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Ikeda, Hiroko; Takezawa, Miyoko; Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Watanabe, Maya; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in chemotherapy has prolonged the survival of patients with malignant biliary strictures, leading to increased rates of stent occlusion. Even we employed metallic stents which contributed to higher rates and longer durations of patency, and occlusion of covered metallic stents now occurs in about half of all patients during their survival. We investigated the complication and patency rate for the removal of covered metallic stents, and found that the durations were similar for initial stent placement and re-intervention. In order to preserve patient quality of life, we currently recommend the use of covered metallic stents for patients with malignant biliary obstruction because of their removability and longest patency duration, even though uncovered metallic stents have similar patency durations. PMID:22563289

  7. Adenocarcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary tree.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. B.; Cooper, M. J.; Williamson, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing survival rates for carcinoma of the biliary tree could reflect the selection of patients for referral to a specialist centre as well as modern improvements in diagnosis and treatment. To determine the true incidence and outcome of biliary cancer, the records of 243 unselected Bristol patients were reviewed retrospectively over a 15-year period. Mean age was 64 years. Gallstones were associated in 38% of cases. Sixty-nine of 87 patients with gallbladder carcinoma were submitted to laparotomy. The operative (30-day) mortality rate was 56% and the one-year survival rate was 7%; one patient with an unexpected carcinoma is alive 7 years after cholecystectomy (1% five-year survival rate). Among 31 patients with carcinoma of the ampulla the operative mortality rate was 27%; one-year and five-year survival rates were 46% and 15%. Bile duct cancers (n = 125) arose proximal to the entry of the cystic duct (n = 63), distal to that point (n = 46) or diffusely (n = 16). For proximal cholangiocarcinoma the operative mortality rate was 38% and 1-year survival rate 17%; no patient lived for 2 years. For distal cholangiocarcinoma the operative mortality rate was 45% and one-year survival rate 26%; no patient lived for 3 years. Only palliative procedures were undertaken for diffuse cholangiocarcinoma; 2 patients survived 1 year (13%). Overall 5 patients with carcinoma of the extrahepatic biliary tree appear to have been cured (2%). PMID:2988399

  8. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  9. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  10. Patella dislocation following distal femoral replacement after bone tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Toru; Kanda, Shotaro; Maeda, Akinori; Endo, Minoru; Saita, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old girl with patella dislocation following distal femur replacement for a malignant tumour. We performed a medial plication and lateral release procedure to treat her persistent patellar dislocation after distal femur replacement following malignant tumour resection. This treatment improved the patient's gait ability dramatically. A distal femur reconstruction with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) system for tumour resection is a frequently performed procedure. The reported incidence of patella dislocation following distal femur reconstruction with a TKA is 2.3%. However, treatment procedures for patella dislocation following a distal femur replacement after malignant tumour resection have not been studied extensively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first English case report about patella dislocation following distal femoral replacement focusing on surgical treatment. Our experience suggests that treatment for patella dislocation following distal femur reconstruction with a TKA should be considered positively. PMID:25073529

  11. History of biliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Spirou, Yannos; Yannos, Spirou; Petrou, Athanasios; Athanasios, Petrou; Christoforides, Christos; Christos, Christoforides; Felekouras, Evangelos; Evangelos, Felekouras

    2013-05-01

    Since ancient times biliary surgery has been one of the major interests of doctors and other scientists around the world. From the ancient Greeks and Egyptians to the greatest scientists of modern times biliary surgery has advanced remarkably. Especially during the last century huge progress has been made in this field. Minimally invasive surgical techniques have been developed and combined with general anesthesia and antisepsis that have made biliary surgery particularly safe for every patient and have made cholecystectomy one of the most common operations in the world today. PMID:23430002

  12. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  13. Drug eluting biliary stents to decrease stent failure rates: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shatzel, Joseph; Kim, Jisoo; Sampath, Kartik; Syed, Sharjeel; Saad, Jennifer; Hussain, Zilla H; Mody, Kabir; Pipas, J Marc; Gordon, Stuart; Gardner, Timothy; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-01-25

    Biliary stenting is clinically effective in relieving both malignant and non-malignant obstructions. However, there are high failure rates associated with tumor ingrowth and epithelial overgrowth as well as internally from biofilm development and subsequent clogging. Within the last decade, the use of prophylactic drug eluting stents as a means to reduce stent failure has been investigated. In this review we provide an overview of the current research on drug eluting biliary stents. While there is limited human trial data regarding the clinical benefit of drug eluting biliary stents in preventing stent obstruction, recent research suggests promise regarding their safety and potential efficacy. PMID:26839648

  14. [Digestive endoscopy: biliary tract and pancreas].

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Guido

    2016-06-01

    New technological developments in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound, both for diagnosis and treatment of biliary and pancreatic diseases, have opened up new scenarios in the recent years. For instance, removal of large bile duct stones with endoscopic sphincterotomy followed by large balloon dilation has been proven to be a safe and effective technique. Also cholangioscopy evolved in terms of better imaging, tissue acquisition and stones management. Self-expandable metal stents are used mostly for malignant diseases, but their role in benign diseases has also been deeply investigated in the last years. The rapid evolution in the field of radiofrequency brought new devices for safer ablation and palliation of biliary tumours. Self-expandable metal stents are also used for ultrasound-guided drainage of walled off pancreatic necrosis and for choledocoduodenostomy and cholecystogastrostomy. PMID:27362720

  15. A novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles prolongs the unobstructed period and survival via anti-bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuchun; Ren, Zhigang; Chai, Qinming; Cui, Guangying; Jiang, Li; Chen, Hanjian; Feng, Zhiying; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic biliary stricture causes life-threatening complications, such as jaundice, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are gaining acceptance for treatments of benign biliary stricture and palliative management of malignant biliary obstructions. However, the high rate of FCSEMS obstruction limits their clinic use. In this study, we developed a novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and investigated its efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We first identified properties of the AgNP complex using ultraviolet detection. The AgNP complex was stable without AgNP agglomeration, and Ag abundance was correspondingly increased with an increased bilayer number. The AgNP biliary stent demonstrated good performance in the spin-assembly method based on topographic observation. The AgNP biliary stent also exhibited a long-term anti-coagulation effect and a slow process of Ag(+) release. In vitro anti-bacteria experiments indicated that the AgNP biliary stent exhibited high-efficiency anti-bacterial activity for both short- and long-term periods. Importantly, application of the AgNP biliary stent significantly prolonged the unobstructed period of the biliary system and improved survival in preclinical studies as a result of its anti-microbial activity and decreased granular tissue formation on the surface of the anastomotic biliary, providing a novel and effective treatment strategy for symptomatic biliary strictures. PMID:26883081

  16. A novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles prolongs the unobstructed period and survival via anti-bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fuchun; Ren, Zhigang; Chai, Qinming; Cui, Guangying; Jiang, Li; Chen, Hanjian; Feng, Zhiying; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Jian; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Symptomatic biliary stricture causes life-threatening complications, such as jaundice, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are gaining acceptance for treatments of benign biliary stricture and palliative management of malignant biliary obstructions. However, the high rate of FCSEMS obstruction limits their clinic use. In this study, we developed a novel biliary stent coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and investigated its efficacy both in vitro and in vivo. We first identified properties of the AgNP complex using ultraviolet detection. The AgNP complex was stable without AgNP agglomeration, and Ag abundance was correspondingly increased with an increased bilayer number. The AgNP biliary stent demonstrated good performance in the spin-assembly method based on topographic observation. The AgNP biliary stent also exhibited a long-term anti-coagulation effect and a slow process of Ag+ release. In vitro anti-bacteria experiments indicated that the AgNP biliary stent exhibited high-efficiency anti-bacterial activity for both short- and long-term periods. Importantly, application of the AgNP biliary stent significantly prolonged the unobstructed period of the biliary system and improved survival in preclinical studies as a result of its anti-microbial activity and decreased granular tissue formation on the surface of the anastomotic biliary, providing a novel and effective treatment strategy for symptomatic biliary strictures. PMID:26883081

  17. Biliary pressure: manometric and perfusion studies at percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and percutaneous biliary drainage

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Neff, C.C.; Mueller, P.R.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.

    1983-07-01

    Manometric pressure recordings were attempted during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) in 203 cases. Successful readings were achieved at PTC in 85% (104/122) of patients. Pressure measurements were also obtained through 56 biliary drainage catheters, and controlled perfusion challenges were performed in 12 patients (on 18 occasions). Documentation of the occasionally poor correlation between the caliber of ducts and the degree of obstruction (i.e., pressure) was shown, and it was suggested that very high pressures may be predictive of a bile leak after PTC. Adequacy of percutaneous drainage and stricture dilatation were further assessed with these manometric techniques. Pressure and perfusion data aided in detecting and determining the significance of the nondilated obstructed duct, the dilated nonobstructed ductal system, and subtle distal ductal strictures. The knowledge obtained from percutaneous pressure recordings may help to determine appropriate therapy.

  18. International multicenter comparative trial of transluminal EUS-guided biliary drainage via hepatogastrostomy vs. choledochoduodenostomy approaches

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Messallam, Ahmed A.; Penas, Irene; Nakai, Yousuke; Modayil, Rani J.; De la Serna, Carlos; Hara, Kazuo; El Zein, Mohamad; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Kumbhari, Vivek; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Dhir, Vinay K.; Park, Do Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) can be performed entirely transgastrically (hepatogastrostomy/EUS-HG) or transduodenally (choledochoduodenostomy/EUS-CDS). It is unknown how both techniques compare. The aims of this study were to compare efficacy and safety of both techniques and identify predictors of adverse events. Patients and methods: Consecutive jaundiced patients with distal malignant biliary obstruction who underwent EUS-BD at multiple international centers were included. Technical/clinical success, adverse events, stent complications, and survival were assessed. Results: A total of 121 patients underwent EUS-BD (CDS 60, HG 61). Technical success was achieved in 112 (92.56 %) patients (EUS-CDS 93.3 %, EUS-HG 91.8 %, P = 0.75). Clinical success was attained in 85.5 % of patients who underwent EUS-CDS group as compared to 82.1 % of patients who underwent EUS-HG (P = 0.64). Adverse events occurred more commonly in the EUS-HG group (19.67 % vs. 13.3 %, P = 0.37). Both plastic stenting (OR 4.95, 95 %CI 1.41 – 17.38, P = 0.01) and use of non-coaxial electrocautery (OR 3.95, 95 %CI 1.16 – 13.40, P = 0.03) were independently associated with adverse events. Length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the CDS group (5.6 days vs. 12.7 days, P < 0.001). Mean follow-up duration was 151 ± 159 days. The 1-year stent patency probability was greater in the EUS-CDS group [0.98 (95 %CI 0.76 – 0.96) vs 0.60 (95 %CI 0.35 – 0.78)] but overall patency was not significantly different. There was no difference in median survival times between the groups (P = 0.36) Conclusions: Both EUS-CDS and EUS-HG are effective and safe techniques for the treatment of distal biliary obstruction after failed ERCP. However, CDS is associated with shorter hospital stay, improved stent patency, and fewer procedure- and stent-related complications. Metallic stents

  19. Robotic distal pancreatectomy: a valid option?

    PubMed

    Jung, M K; Buchs, N C; Azagury, D E; Hagen, M E; Morel, P

    2013-10-01

    Although reported in the literature, conventional laparoscopic approach for distal pancreatectomy is still lacking widespread acceptance. This might be due to two-dimensional vision and decreased range of motion to reach and safely dissect this highly vascularized retroperitoneal organ by laparoscopy. However, interest in minimally invasive access is growing ever since and the robotic system could certainly help overcome limitations of the laparoscopic approach in the challenging domain of pancreatic resection, notably in distal pancreatectomy. Robotic distal pancreatectomy with and without spleen preservation has been reported with encouraging outcomes for benign and borderline malignant disease. As a result of upgraded endowristed manipulation and three-dimensional visualization, improved outcome might be expected with the launch of the robotic system in the procedure of distal pancreatectomy. Our aim was thus to extensively review the current literature of robot-assisted surgery for distal pancreatectomy and to evaluate advantages and possible limitations of the robotic approach. PMID:24101006

  20. Early biliary complications following pancreaticoduodenectomy: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Malgras, Brice; Duron, Sandrine; Gaujoux, Sébastien; Dokmak, Safi; Aussilhou, Béatrice; Rebours, Vinciane; Palazzo, Maxime; Belghiti, Jacques; Sauvanet, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background Early biliary complications (EBC) following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly known. This study aimed to assess incidence, predictive factors, and treatment of EBC including bilio-enteric stricture, transient jaundice, biliary leak, and cholangitis. Method From 2007 to 2011, 352 patients underwent PD. Statistical analysis including logistic regression was performed to determine EBC predictive factors. Results 49 patients (14%) developed 51 EBC, including 7(2%) bilio-enteric strictures, 15(4%) transient jaundices, 9(3%) biliary leaks, and 20(6%) cholangitis with no mortality and a 18% reoperation rate. In multivariate analysis, male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and common bile duct (CBD) diameter ≤5 mm were predictive of EBC. Of the 7 strictures, all were associated with CBD ≤5 mm and 5(71%) required reoperation. Transient jaundice resolved spontaneously in all 15 cases. Among 8 patients with serum bilirubin level >50 μmol/L (3 mg/dL) at POD3, 7(88%) developed bilio-enteric stricture. Biliary leak resolved spontaneously in 5(56%); otherwise, it required reoperation. Cholangitis recurred after antibiotics discontinuation in 5(25%). Conclusions EBC following PD do not increase mortality. EBC are more frequent with male gender, benign disease, malignancy with preoperative chemoradiation, and CBD ≤5 mm. Transient jaundice or cholangitis has a favorable outcome, whereas bilio-enteric stricture or biliary leak can require reintervention. PMID:27037207

  1. Utility of Stent-Grafts in Treatment of Porto-Biliary Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-12-15

    A porto-biliary fistula causing hemobilia is a known complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). We present two patients with hemobilia secondary to porto-biliary fistula, treated successfully by percutaneous placement of stent-grafts. In one case, the stent-graft was placed in the bile duct, and in the other case, it was placed in the intrahepatic portal vein branch. Hemobilia stopped and there were no complications except a small area of hepatic infarction, distal to the stent-graft in the portal vein.

  2. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-03-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  3. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  4. [The biliary intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Demetrashvili, Z M; Asatiani, G A; Nemsadze, G Sh; Kenchadze, G Z

    2012-01-01

    The successful experience of treatment of 3 patients with biliary intestinal obstruction is depicted. The most informative means of diagnostics was the multispiral computed tomography. Authors state, that the volume of the operation should include only the liquidation of the intestinal obstruction. The simultaneous biliodigestive fistulae closure should be performed only in rare situations. PMID:22678540

  5. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cancer every 6 to 12 months. Health care providers use blood tests, ultrasound, or both to check for signs of ... the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A health care provider uses the test selectively when he or she is concerned that ...

  6. Endoscopic Extraction of Biliary Fascioliasis Diagnosed Using Intraductal Ultrasonography in a Patient with Acute Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Ji Su; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Yun Nah; Tae, Jae Woong; Choi, Moon Han; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection may result in biliary obstruction with or without cholangitis in the chronic biliary phase. Because clinical symptoms and signs of F. hepatica are similar to other biliary diseases that cause bile duct obstruction, such as stones or bile duct malignancies, that are, in fact, more common, this condition may not be suspected and diagnosis may be overlooked and delayed. Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography for the evaluation of bile duct obstruction may be incidentally detected with the worm, and diagnosis can be confirmed by extraction of the leaf-like trematode from the bile duct. Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of the bile duct, and is useful in evaluating indeterminate biliary diseases. We present a case of biliary fascioliasis that was diagnosed using IDUS and managed endoscopically in a patient with acute cholangitis. PMID:26668810

  7. Endoscopic Extraction of Biliary Fascioliasis Diagnosed Using Intraductal Ultrasonography in a Patient with Acute Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ji Su; Choi, Hyun Jong; Moon, Jong Ho; Lee, Yun Nah; Tae, Jae Woong; Choi, Moon Han; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection may result in biliary obstruction with or without cholangitis in the chronic biliary phase. Because clinical symptoms and signs of F. hepatica are similar to other biliary diseases that cause bile duct obstruction, such as stones or bile duct malignancies, that are, in fact, more common, this condition may not be suspected and diagnosis may be overlooked and delayed. Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography for the evaluation of bile duct obstruction may be incidentally detected with the worm, and diagnosis can be confirmed by extraction of the leaf-like trematode from the bile duct. Intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of the bile duct, and is useful in evaluating indeterminate biliary diseases. We present a case of biliary fascioliasis that was diagnosed using IDUS and managed endoscopically in a patient with acute cholangitis. PMID:26668810

  8. Rare biliary cystic tumors: a case series of biliary cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhirup; Shah, Sudeep R; Singh, Abhiyutthan; Joshi, Anand; Desai, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the liver are common and a major proportion is formed by parasitic cysts and simple cysts. Biliary cystic tumors (BCTs), namely biliary cystadenoma (BCA) and biliary cystadenocarcinoma (BCAC), are rare tumors which usually arise from the intrahepatic biliary tree. BCAs have malignant potential and are difficult to differentiate from BCAC pre-operatively on radiological imaging. Here we have presented 4 patients with BCTs and reviewed the literature pertaining to them.The data of four patients with BCA/BCAC diagnosed and treated at our institute were retrieved from our database and records were reviewed for age, sex, history, imaging, surgery, pathology and follow-up. Mean age of the patients was 53.5 years (range 30-71 years). Two male and two female patients presented with abdominal pain, of which one male patient had pancreatitis at diagnosis. Characteristic features were seen on pre-operative imaging (cystic lesions with internal septations) and biliary communication was identified in the patient with pancreatitis. Three patients were diagnosed with a BCA on final histology, while one patient had a BCAC. Following surgical resection, all the patients are asymptomatic and disease free with a mean follow-up of 24 months (range 10-40 months). In conclusion, BCTs should be suspected in the presence of a well-encapsulated, cystic hepatic lesion with internal septations. Although pre-operative distinction between BCA and BCAC is difficult, the lesion, whenever possible, should be completely resected as long-term outcomes are good, especially with BCA. PMID:27049501

  9. Biliary Ascariasis Mimicking Colonic Tumor Infiltration of the Biliary System.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Mittal, Gyanendra; Kumar, Sushil; Manjunath, Suraj; Sharma, Navneet; Gupta, Mahesh

    2015-09-01

    Ascariasis is a common problem in developing countries with poor hygiene and sanitation. It is endemic in India and usually seen in the northern states. Biliary ascariasis is an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice. We present a case of carcinoma of hepatic flexure of colon in which the patient developed biliary ascariasis and posed a diagnostic challenge as it mimicked tumor infiltration of the biliary system. PMID:27217679

  10. Distal Convoluted Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule is the nephron segment that lies immediately downstream of the macula densa. Although short in length, the distal convoluted tubule plays a critical role in sodium, potassium, and divalent cation homeostasis. Recent genetic and physiologic studies have greatly expanded our understanding of how the distal convoluted tubule regulates these processes at the molecular level. This article provides an update on the distal convoluted tubule, highlighting concepts and pathophysiology relevant to clinical practice. PMID:24855283

  11. Biliary tract perforation following percutaneous endobiliary radiofrequency ablation: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, CHUANGUO; WEI, BAOJIE; GAO, KUN; ZHAI, RENYOU

    2016-01-01

    Endobiliary radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has recently been recognized as a beneficial treatment option for malignant biliary obstruction using percutaneous or endoscopic approaches. The feasibility and safety of this method has been demonstrated in clinical studies, with pain, cholangitis and asymptomatic biochemical pancreatitis reported as relatively common complications. By contrast, hepatic coma, newly diagnosed left bundle branch block and partial liver infarction have been reported as uncommon complications. Biliary tract perforation is a serious potential complication of percutaneous intraductal RFA, which may result in severe infection, peritonitis or even mortality, and which has not been previously reported in clinical research. The current study presents the first reports of biliary tract perforation in two patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction following percutaneous intraductal RFA. Although the patient in case 1 succumbed 12 days after RFA, the minor biliary tract perforation in case 2 was successfully treated by the deployment of a self-expanding metal stent. This study demonstrates that biliary tract perforation should be recognized as a serious potential complication of endobiliary RFA, and that metal stent deployment should be considered as a treatment option for minor biliary tract perforation. PMID:27313699

  12. Biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Manouras, Andreas; Markogiannakis, Haridimos; Lagoudianakis, Emmanuel; Katergiannakis, Vangelogiannis

    2006-01-01

    Biliary cystadenomas are rare, cystic neoplasms of the biliary ductal system that usually occur in middle-aged women. They cannot be safely differentiated from cystadenocarcinomas before operation and should always be considered for resection. Cystadenomas have a strong tendency to recur, particularly following incomplete excision, and a potential of malignant transformation. Therefore, complete resection is the therapy of choice and thorough histopathologic evaluation is imperative. A case of benign biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma is presented along with a review of the relative literature addressing the clinical presentation, histology, histogenesis, differential diagnosis, imaging features, treatment and prognosis of this interesting and rare entity. PMID:17009411

  13. Biliary ascariasis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sarihan, H; Gürkök, S; Sari, A

    1995-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a worldwide intestinal infestation that may cause various complications. Biliary ascariasis, however, is a rare condition. We describe a child with biliary ascariasis. The patient's clinical symptoms were pain, vomiting and abdominal tenderness, and she was thought to have acute appendicitis. However, laboratory examination revealed high serum alkaline phosphatase and amylase levels, and ultrasonography and percutaneous cholangiography demonstrated biliary ascariasis. The patient was successfully treated with mebendazole and antispasmolytic drugs. PMID:8560608

  14. Biliary Mucosal Barrier and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Julien; Luedde, Tom; Sellge, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Background The biliary system is in continuous contact with the complex microbiota of the intestine. Microbial products have recently been proposed as potential triggers for biliary diseases. Methods The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the current knowledge regarding the role of the biliary and intestinal microbiome in biliary inflammatory diseases. Results Previously, it was suggested that the healthy biliary system is a sterile organ, while acute cholangitis and cholecystitis may occur from ascending infections. Although non-inflammatory biliary colonization by certain bacteria such as Salmonella spp. has been already recognized since several decades, human and animal studies indicated only very recently that the gallbladder harbors a complex microbiota also under non-pathologic conditions. Novel findings suggested that – similar to the situation in the intestine – the biliary mucosa features a chemical, mechanical, and immunological barrier, ensuring immunological tolerance against commensals. However, microbial triggers might influence acute and chronic inflammatory disease of the biliary system and the whole liver. Conclusion Although yet undefined, dysbiosis of the biliary or intestinal microbiota rather than a single microorganism may influence disease progression. PMID:26468308

  15. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  16. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  17. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  18. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  19. Distal Myopathies: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz

    2016-08-01

    About 15% of myopathies present with distal weakness. Lack of sensory deficit, and preservation of sensory responses and deep tendon reflexes, favors a myopathic cause for distal weakness. Electromyogram confirms this diagnosis. Profuse spontaneous discharges are common in inflammatory, metabolic, and myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). If the clinical picture indicates a specific disease such as facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), genetic testing provides the quickest diagnosis. Otherwise, muscle biopsy can distinguish specific features. The common causes of myopathic distal weakness are FSHD, myotonic dystrophy, and inclusion body myositis. Other causes include MFM, distal muscular dystrophies, metabolic myopathies, and congenital myopathies. PMID:27445241

  20. Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Jora, Charu; Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma most commonly originates from the skin; other less common extra cutaneous sites include squamous mucous membranes, uvea, retina, leptomeninges, genitourinary tract, digestive tract, biliary tract, and upper respiratory tract. Primary melanoma of the gastrointestinal tract is exceedingly rare. We are reporting a histo-pathologically proven rare case of primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus and its findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography. PMID:25829739

  1. Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Jora, Charu; Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma most commonly originates from the skin; other less common extra cutaneous sites include squamous mucous membranes, uvea, retina, leptomeninges, genitourinary tract, digestive tract, biliary tract, and upper respiratory tract. Primary melanoma of the gastrointestinal tract is exceedingly rare. We are reporting a histo-pathologically proven rare case of primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus and its findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography. PMID:25829739

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage as an alternative to percutaneous drainage and surgical bypass.

    PubMed

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-16

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography had been a treatment modality of choice for both benign and malignant biliary tract obstruction for more than half century, with a very high clinical success rate and low complications. But in certain circumstances, such as advanced and locally advanced pancreatobiliary malignancies (pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ampullary tumor) and tight benign strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) fails. Up to this point, the only alternative interventions for these conditions were percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventions was introduced for a couple decades with the better visualization and achievement of the pancreatobiliary tract. And it's still in the process of ongoing development. The inventions of new techniques and accessories lead to more feasibility of high-ended procedures. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage was a novel treatment modality for the patient who failed ERCP with the less invasive technique comparing to surgical bypass. The technical and clinical success was high with acceptable complications. Regarded the ability to drain the biliary tract internally without an exploratory laparotomy, this treatment modality became a very interesting procedures for many endosonographers, worldwide, in a short period. We have reviewed the literature and suggest that endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage is also an option, and one with a high probability of success, for biliary drainage in the patients who failed conventional endoscopic drainage. PMID:25610532

  3. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kasper S.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child’s native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States. PMID:26620065

  4. Biliary repair and carcinogenesis are mediated by IL-33–dependent cholangiocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Razumilava, Nataliya; Gores, Gregory J.; Walters, Stephanie; Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Mourya, Reena; Bessho, Kazuhiko; Wang, Yui-Hsi; Glaser, Shannon S.; Shivakumar, Pranavkumar; Bezerra, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the biliary epithelium triggers inflammation and fibrosis, which can result in severe liver diseases and may progress to malignancy. Development of a type 1 immune response has been linked to biliary injury pathogenesis; however, a subset of patients with biliary atresia, the most common childhood cholangiopathy, exhibit increased levels of Th2-promoting cytokines. The relationship among different inflammatory drivers, epithelial repair, and carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here, we determined that the Th2-activating cytokine IL-33 is elevated in biliary atresia patient serum and in the livers and bile ducts of mice with experimental biliary atresia. Administration of IL-33 to WT mice markedly increased cholangiocyte proliferation and promoted sustained cell growth, resulting in dramatic and rapid enlargement of extrahepatic bile ducts. The IL-33–dependent proliferative response was mediated by an increase in the number of type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), which released high levels of IL-13 that in turn promoted cholangiocyte hyperplasia. Induction of the IL-33/ILC2/IL-13 circuit in a murine biliary injury model promoted epithelial repair; however, induction of this circuit in mice with constitutive activation of AKT and YAP in bile ducts induced cholangiocarcinoma with liver metastases. These findings reveal that IL-33 mediates epithelial proliferation and suggest that activation of IL-33/ILC2/IL-13 may improve biliary repair and disruption of the circuit may block progression of carcinogenesis. PMID:24892809

  5. Targeted therapy for biliary tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Faris, Jason E; Zhu, Andrew X

    2012-07-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies, with a historically poor prognosis as a whole. Until recently, the development of effective therapeutics was hampered by the relatively low incidence, heterogeneity in patients and tumors, and correspondingly poor clinical trial enrollments. With the publication of the landmark phase III ABC-02 trial demonstrating the superiority of gemcitabine and cisplatin combination chemotherapy, the landscape changed for the development of new agents. Despite this progress, there are currently no approved targeted agents for BTC. This review will focus on recent developments in targeted therapeutics, directed against several key signaling pathways in BTC, including epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Data from recent phase I and II trials will be discussed, along with a preview of upcoming trials involving targeted therapies. PMID:22318523

  6. Biliary Adenofibroma with Invasive Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Godambe, Anjali; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Fulling, Keith H; Reza Kermanshahi, Taher

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of biliary adenofibroma with an invasive carcinoma in a 71-year-old female who presented with bilateral upper abdominal pain. Imaging revealed a 6.3 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left lateral segment of the liver. Histologically, the adenofibroma showed the characteristic components as previously described of biliary adenofibromata, namely, cystic and tubular structures lined by cuboidal to low columnar biliary type epithelium and a dense fibrous stroma composed of spindled cells. Intimately admixed with the adenofibroma was a distinct tumor composed of malignant clear cells which demonstrated stromal and vascular invasion. Although mitotic figures were inconspicuous, Ki67 was brisk and p53 demonstrated 25-50% positivity. Sections also showed a von Meyenberg complex located adjacent to the tumor. This case expands the understanding of this rare tumor and proves two important assertions from previous case reports. First, the presence of an associated von Meyenberg complex with similar morphology and immunohistochemical staining pattern suggests that biliary adenofibromata and von Meyenberg complexes may share related histogenesis. Second, biliary adenofibromata harbor malignant potential and may show malignant transformation. Furthermore, this case highlights the need for these rare tumors to be followed aggressively, as their biological behavior is poorly understood. PMID:26885426

  7. Biliary Adenofibroma with Invasive Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Godambe, Anjali; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Fulling, Keith H.; Reza Kermanshahi, Taher

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of biliary adenofibroma with an invasive carcinoma in a 71-year-old female who presented with bilateral upper abdominal pain. Imaging revealed a 6.3 cm heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left lateral segment of the liver. Histologically, the adenofibroma showed the characteristic components as previously described of biliary adenofibromata, namely, cystic and tubular structures lined by cuboidal to low columnar biliary type epithelium and a dense fibrous stroma composed of spindled cells. Intimately admixed with the adenofibroma was a distinct tumor composed of malignant clear cells which demonstrated stromal and vascular invasion. Although mitotic figures were inconspicuous, Ki67 was brisk and p53 demonstrated 25–50% positivity. Sections also showed a von Meyenberg complex located adjacent to the tumor. This case expands the understanding of this rare tumor and proves two important assertions from previous case reports. First, the presence of an associated von Meyenberg complex with similar morphology and immunohistochemical staining pattern suggests that biliary adenofibromata and von Meyenberg complexes may share related histogenesis. Second, biliary adenofibromata harbor malignant potential and may show malignant transformation. Furthermore, this case highlights the need for these rare tumors to be followed aggressively, as their biological behavior is poorly understood. PMID:26885426

  8. Role of HIDA scanning in the assessment of external biliary fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, G.A.; Collier, N.A.; Lavender, J.P.; Blumgart, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    Three patients with postoperative external biliary fistula are described. In each, radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc HIDA was used to define the anatomy of the fistula. The extent of the fistula and the presence of distal obstruction to bile flow could also be determined. This information was used to predict the likelihood of spontaneous fistula closure. HIDA scanning is a useful noninvasive alternative to other investigations, such as fistulography and cholangiography, which do not always provide useful information. The results of HIDA scanning can aid the clinical decision on the need for surgical intervention to correct an external biliary fistula.

  9. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2010-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the aetiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month's duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15 mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  10. Biliary Cystadenoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeyasingh, Suresh Durai; Kalyanaraman, Shantaraman

    2016-01-01

    Biliary cystadenoma is a rare cystic neoplasms of liver that usually occurs in middle-aged women characterized by multiloculated cysts with internal septae and mural nodules. Unilocular biliary cystadenomas are rare and are difficult to differentiate from other cysts by radiology. Biliary cystadenomas are slow growing benign lesions that are easily resectable with a reported recurrence rate of 90% when the resection is incomplete. We present a case of 65-year-old male with unilocular biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma who presented with abdominal pain and distension. Laparotomy followed by cystectomy was done and postoperative period was uneventful with no abnormal biochemical, heamatological or imaging findings. Preoperative radio-imaging techniques may not always be helpful in arriving at a specific diagnosis in such cases. Hence thorough sampling and a careful histopathological examination is considered gold standard for specific diagnosis. PMID:27042478

  11. Current status of peroral cholangioscopy in biliary tract diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ghersi, Stefania; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Bassi, Marco; Fabbri, Carlo; Cennamo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Peroral cholangioscopy (POC) is an important tool for the management of a selected group of biliary diseases. Because of its direct visualization, POC allows targeted diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. POC can be performed using a dedicated cholangioscope that is advanced through the accessory channel of a duodenoscope or via the insertion of a small-diameter endoscope directly into the bile duct. POC was first described in the 1970s, but the use of earlier generation devices was substantially limited by the cumbersome equipment setup and high repair costs. For nearly ten years, several technical improvements, including the single-operator system, high-quality images, the development of dedicated accessories and the increased size of the working channel, have led to increased diagnostic accuracy, thus assisting in the differentiation of benign and malignant intraductal lesions, targeting biopsies and the precise delineation of intraductal tumor spread before surgery. Furthermore, lithotripsy of difficult bile duct stones, ablative therapies for biliary malignancies and direct biliary drainage can be performed under POC control. Recent developments of new types of conventional POCs allow feasible, safe and effective procedures at reasonable costs. In the current review, we provide an updated overview of POC, focusing our attention on the main current clinical applications and on areas for future research. PMID:25992189

  12. Surgical Management of Benign Biliary Stricture in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Ghatak, Supriyo; Das, Khaunish; Dasgupta, Jayanta; Ray, Sujay; Khamrui, Sujan; Sonar, Pankaj Kumar; Das, Somak

    2015-12-01

    Biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is not uncommon. Previously, all cases were managed by surgery. Nowadays, three important modes of treatment in these patients are observation, endoscopic therapy, and surgery. In the modern era, surgery is recommended only in a subset of patients who develop biliary symptoms or those who have asymptomatic biliary stricture and require surgery for intractable abdominal pain. We want to report on our experience regarding surgical management of CP-induced benign biliary stricture. Over a period of 5 years, we have managed 340 cases of CP at our institution. Bile duct stricture was found in 62 patients. But, surgical intervention was required in 44 patients, and the remaining 18 patients were managed conservatively. Demographic data, operative procedures, postoperative complications, and follow-up parameters of these patients were collected from our prospective database. A total 44 patients were operated for biliary obstruction in the background of CP. Three patients were excluded, so the final analysis was based on 41 patients. The indication for surgery was symptomatic biliary stricture in 27 patients and asymptomatic biliary stricture with intractable abdominal pain in 14 patients. The most commonly performed operation was Frey's procedure. There was no inhospital mortality. Thirty-five patients were well at a mean follow-up of 24.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Surgery is still the best option for CP-induced benign biliary stricture, and Frey's procedure is a versatile operation unless you suspect malignancy as the cause of biliary obstruction. PMID:26730073

  13. Endoscopic ultrasonography guided biliary drainage: Summary of consortium meeting, May 7th, 2011, Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Kahaleh, Michel; Artifon, Everson LA; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Gupta, Kapil; Itoi, Takao; Binmoeller, Kenneth F; Giovannini, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become the preferred procedure for biliary or pancreatic drainage in various pancreatico-biliary disorders. With a success rate of more than 90%, ERCP may not achieve biliary or pancreatic drainage in cases with altered anatomy or with tumors obstructing access to the duodenum. In the past those failures were typically managed exclusively by percutaneous approaches by interventional radiologists or surgical intervention. The morbidity associated was significant especially in those patients with advanced malignancy, seeking minimally invasive interventions and improved quality of life. With the advent of biliary drainage via endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance, EUS guided biliary drainage has been used more frequently within the last decade in different countries. As with any novel advanced endoscopic procedure that encompasses various approaches, advanced endoscopists all over the world have innovated and adopted diverse EUS guided biliary and pancreatic drainage techniques. This diversity has resulted in variations and improvements in EUS Guided biliary and pancreatic drainage; and over the years has led to an extensive nomenclature. The diversity of techniques, nomenclature and recent progress in our intrumentation has led to a dedicated meeting on May 7th, 2011 during Digestive Disease Week 2011. More than 40 advanced endoscopists from United States, Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia, Italy, France, Austria, Germany, Spain, Japan, China, South Korea and India attended this pivotal meeting. The meeting covered improved EUS guided biliary access and drainage procedures, terminology, nomenclature, training and credentialing; as well as emerging devices for EUS guided biliary drainage. This paper summarizes the meeting’s agenda and the conclusions generated by the creation of this consortium group. PMID:23538784

  14. Minimally invasive surgical approach to pancreatic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Annecchiarico, Mario; Farsi, Marco; Bartolini, Ilenia; Mirasolo, Vita; Guerra, Francesco; Coratti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery for malignancy is recognized as challenging for the surgeons and risky for the patients due to consistent perioperative morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, the oncological long-term results are largely disappointing, even for those patients who experience an uneventfully hospital stay. Nevertheless, surgery still remains the cornerstone of a multidisciplinary treatment for pancreatic cancer. In order to maximize the benefits of surgery, the advent of both laparoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat pancreatic cancers with these new methodologies. The reduction of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and pain, together with a shorter interval between surgery and the beginning of adjuvant chemotherapy, represent the potential advantages over conventional surgery. Lastly, a better cosmetic result, although not crucial in any cancerous patient, could also play a role by improving overall well-being and patient self-perception. The laparoscopic approach to pancreatic surgery is, however, difficult in inexperienced hands and requires a dedicated training in both advanced laparoscopy and pancreatic surgery. The recent large diffusion of the da Vinci® robotic platform seems to facilitate many of the technical maneuvers, such as anastomotic biliary and pancreatic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomy, and vascular sutures. The two main pancreatic operations, distal pancreatectomy and pancreaticoduodenectomy, are approachable by a minimally invasive path, but more limited interventions such as enucleation are also feasible. Nevertheless, a word of caution should be taken into account when considering the increasing costs of these newest technologies because the main concerns regarding these are the maintenance of all oncological standards and the lack of long-term follow-up. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the use of minimally invasive surgery in pancreatic cancer (and less aggressive tumors

  15. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle. PMID:27049206

  16. Giant distal humeral geode.

    PubMed

    Maher, M M; Kennedy, J; Hynes, D; Murray, J G; O'Connell, D

    2000-03-01

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. PMID:10794554

  17. Unilobar Versus Bilobar Biliary Drainage: Effect on Quality of Life and Bilirubin Level Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Singh, Tejbir; Sharma, Raju; Srivastava, Deep N; Dash, Nihar Ranjan; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous biliary drainage is an accepted palliative treatment for malignant biliary obstruction. Purpose: To assess the effect on quality of life (QOL) and bilirubin level reduction in patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction treated by unilobar or bilobar percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Materials and Methods: Over a period of 2 years, 49 patients (age range, 22–75 years) of inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were treated by PTBD. Technical and clinical success rates, QOL, patency rates, survival rates, and complications were recorded. Clinical success rates, QOL, and bilirubin reduction were compared in patients treated with complete (n = 21) versus partial (n = 28) liver parenchyma drainage. QOL before and 1 month after biliary drainage were analyzed retrospectively between these two groups. Results: Biliary drainage was successful in all 49 patients, with an overall significant reduction of the postintervention bilirubin levels (P < 0.001) resulting in overall clinical success rate of 89.97%. Clinical success rates were similar in patients treated with whole-liver drainage versus partial-liver drainage. Mean serum bilirubin level before PTBD was 19.85 mg/dl and after the procedure at 1 month was 6.02 mg/dl. The mean baseline functional score was 39.35, symptom scale score was 59.55, and global health score was 27.45. At 1 month, mean functional score was 61.25, symptom scale score was 36.0 4, and global health score was 56.33, with overall significant improvement in QOL (<0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the improvement of the QOL scores (P = 0.002), among patients who achieved clinical success, compared with those patients who did not achieve clinical success at 1 month. We did not find any significant difference in the QOL scores in patients according to the amount of liver drained (unilateral or bilateral drainage), the type of internalization used (ring biliary or stent

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage using a lumen-apposing self-expanding metal stent: a case series.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Stefan; Arlt, Alexander; Hampe, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) might be an alternative to percutaneous or transpapillary biliary drainage in unresectable pancreatic or biliary cancer. A lumen-apposing, fully covered, self-expanding metal stent, which creates a sealed transluminal conduit between the biliary and gastrointestinal tract may offer advantages over conventional plastic and metal stents. In this retrospective, observational, open-label case study, five patients underwent EUS-BD for obstructive jaundice in pancreatic cancer (n = 4) or distal cholangiocarcinoma (n = 1). Technical and functional success was achieved in all patients without complications. The development of specialized stent and delivery systems may render EUS-BD an effective and safe alternative to percutaneous or transpapillary approaches. PMID:26021309

  19. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Douglas L.; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the etiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month’s duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  20. Hepatic and Biliary Ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anup K

    2014-01-01

    Ascariasis mainly contributes to the global helminthic burden by infesting a large number of children in the tropical countries. Hepato-biliary ascariasis (HBA) is becoming a common entity now than in the past owing to the frequent usage of ultrasonograms and endoscopic diagnostic procedures in the clinical practice. There are a variety of manifestations in HBA and diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion in endemic areas coupled with subsequent confirmation by sonographic or endoscopic demonstration of the worm. Most of them present with acute abdomen and jaundice. Oriental or recurrent pyogenic cholangiopathy is possibly the result of HBA, commonly encountered in South-East Asian countries. Conservative treatment with anthelminthic agents is used in the majority. Failure to respond to medical therapy usually indicates the need for endoscopic or surgical interventions. Overall, mortality is low and prognosis is good, but many epidemiological and immunological aspects of Ascaris infection are unclear, meaning our understanding the disease and infection still remains incomplete. Therefore, it is difficult to definitely put down a fixed modality of treatment for HBA. This underscores the need for further studies as ascariasis has the potential to adversely affect the national socio-economy by compromising the health of children and adults alike with its sheer number. PMID:24926166

  1. Evaluation of biliary disease by scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, M.D.; Hagihara, P.F.; Kim, E.E.; Coupal, J.; Griffen, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    The value of biliary scintigraphy was studied in 180 patients with suspected biliary tract disease. Most of the patients were investigated additionally by conventional techniques such as cholecystography, cholangiography and ultrasonography. It is concluded that biliary scintigraphy is a simple and safe technique for visualization of the biliary tract. It is particularly useful in the evaluation of acute cholecystitis, in patients with iodine sensitivity obstructive from nonobstructive jaundice.

  2. Biliary atresia and neonatal hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wynchank, S.; Guillet, J.; Leccia, F.; Soubiran, G.; Blanquet, P.

    1984-03-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m diethyl IDA was performed on 14 jaundiced neonates. It aided greatly the differential diagnosis between neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia. Limitations in the interpretation of the results are described, as neonatal hepatitis may be accompanied by biliary excretion ranging from zero to normal. Also both biliary atresia (intra- and extrahepatic) and neonatal hepatitis may show no biliary excretion within 24 hours.

  3. Biliary scintigraphy: comparison with other modern techniques for evaluation of biliary tract disease

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.

    1982-10-01

    The recent availability of iminodiacetic acid analogues labeled with technetium Tc 99m provides a safe and accurate noninvasive test of biliary function. Biliary scintigraphy is a simple and rapid method of detecting acute cholecystitis in particular but also of distinguishing acute biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis, of evaluating the patency of the common duct in early obstruction, of assessing possible postcholecystectomy syndrome, of evaluating the patency of a biliary enteric bypass, and of detecting postoperative biliary leaks.

  4. Endocoil placement after endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage may prevent a bile leak

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Schalk Willem; Omoshoro-Jones, Jones; Sanyika, Charles

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To further reduce the risk of bleeding or bile leakage. METHODS: We performed endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage in 6 patients in whom endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) had failed. Biliary access of a dilated segment 2 or 3 duct was achieved from the stomach using a 19G needle. After radiologically confirming access a guide wire was placed, a transhepatic tract created using a 6 Fr cystotome followed by balloon dilation of the stricture and antegrade metallic stent placement across the malignant obstruction. This was followed by placement of an endocoil in the transhepatic tract. RESULTS: Dilated segmental ducts were observed in all patients with the linear endoscopic ultrasound scope from the proximal stomach. Transgastric biliary access was obtained using a 19G needle in all patients. Biliary drainage was achieved in all patients. Placement of an endocoil was possible in 5/6 patients. All patients responded to biliary drainage and no complications occurred. CONCLUSION: We show that placing endocoils at the time of endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary stenting is feasible and may reduce the risk of bleeding or bile leakage. PMID:23678378

  5. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the biliary system: Potential uses and indications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Xiong

    2009-12-31

    Conventional ultrasound (US) is the first-line imaging investigation for biliary diseases. However, it is lack of the ability to depict the microcirculation of some lesions which may lead to failure in diagnosis for some biliary diseases. The use of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) has reached the field of bile duct disease in recent years and promising results have been achieved. In this review, the methodology, image interpretation, enhancement pattern, clinical usefulness, and indications for CEUS in the biliary system are summarized. CEUS may be indicated in the biliary system under the following circumstances: (1) Where there is a need to make a characterization of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC); (2) For differentiation diagnosis between ICC and other tumors (i.e. hepatocellular carcinoma or liver metastasis) or infectious diseases; (3) For differentiation diagnosis between biliary cystadenoma and biliary cystadenocarcinoma; (4) To detect malignant change in Caroli's disease; (5) To depict the extent of Klatskin's tumor with greater clarity; (6) To make a distinction between gallbladder cholesterol polyp, adenoma and polypoid cancer; (7) To make a distinction between chronic cholecystitis with thickened wall and gallbladder cancer; (8) For differentiation diagnosis between motionless sludge and gallbladder cancer; (9) For differentiation diagnosis between common bile duct cancer and sludge or stone without acoustic shadowing; and (10) In patients who are suspected of having a drop of their percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage tube, US contrast agent can be administered to through the tube detect the site of the tube. PMID:21160719

  6. [Biliary pathology. Key aspects of the problem].

    PubMed

    Il'chenko, A A

    2011-01-01

    Based on the clinical experience gained in the Department of Pathology biliary tract, Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology, were reviewed key aspects of biliary pathology on the issues of classification, diagnosis, treatment, and tactics for management of patients with various diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:21560643

  7. Biliary complications of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S; Keogan, M; Casey, M; Duffy, G; McErlean, D; Fitzgerald, M X; Hegarty, J E

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and four adult patients with cystic fibrosis were evaluated for the presence of liver disease as defined by abnormal liver function tests of six months' duration, histological evidence of fibrosis or cirrhosis, or the presence of portal hypertension, or both. Twenty patients fulfilled these criteria and were evaluated further for the presence of biliary tract abnormalities with biliary scintigraphy using 99Tc diisopropylphenyl-carboxymethyl iminodiacetic acid (DISIDA) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. Clearance of 99Tc DISIDA from the liver and biliary tree was diminished at 45 (E45) and 60 (E60) minutes in the patients with liver disease compared with those without liver disease; E45 = 37.8% and 65.8%, p less than 0.01; E60 = 48.2% and 77.5%, p less than 0.01 respectively. Serial analogue images of the extrahepatic biliary tree were consistent with common bile duct obstruction with retention of DISIDA and tapering of the common bile duct in seven of 18 patients with and two of 10 patients without liver disease. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography showed changes consistent with sclerosing cholangitis, with beading and stricturing of the intrahepatic ducts in 12 of the 14 patients. In all 14 patients, including those in whom biliary scintigraphy had suggested obstruction, no abnormality of the common bile duct was identified. These results indicate that abnormalities of the bile ducts in patients with cystic fibrosis related liver disease are confined to the intrahepatic biliary tree and that common bile duct strictures do not contribute to either the progression or development of liver disease in these patients. Images Figure 2 PMID:1568661

  8. Outcome following Resection of Biliary Cystadenoma: A Single Centre Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Pitchaimuthu, M.; Aidoo-Micah, G.; Coldham, C.; Sutcliffe, R.; Roberts, J. K.; Muiesan, P.; Isaac, J.; Mirza, D.; Marudanayagam, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Biliary cystadenomas (BCAs) are rare, benign, potentially malignant cystic lesions of the liver, accounting for less than 5% of cystic liver tumours. We report the outcome following resection of biliary cystadenoma from a single tertiary centre. Methods. Data of patients who had resection of BCA between January 1993 and July 2014 were obtained from liver surgical database. Patient demographics, clinicopathological characteristics, operative data, and postoperative outcome were analysed. Results. 29 patients had surgery for BCA. Male : female ratio was 1 : 28. Clinical presentation was abdominal pain (74%), jaundice (20%), abdominal mass (14%), and deranged liver function tests (3%). Cyst characteristics included septations (48%), wall thickening (31%), wall irregularity (38%), papillary projections (10%), and mural nodule (3%). Surgical procedures included atypical liver resection (52%), left hemihepatectomy (34%), right hemihepatectomy (10%), and left lateral segmentectomy (3%). Median length of stay was 7 (IQ 6.5–8.5) days. Two patients developed postoperative bile leak. No patients had malignancy on final histology. Median follow-up was 13 (IQ 6.5–15.7) years. One patient developed delayed biliary stricture and one died of cholangiocarcinoma 11 years later. Conclusion. Biliary cystadenomas can be resected safely with significantly low morbidity. Malignant transformation and recurrence are rare. Complete surgical resection provides a cure. PMID:26839708

  9. [Endoscopic management of biliary stones].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, R

    1990-07-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is one of the more effective therapeutic procedures for the management of some biliary tree abnormalities. In choledocolitiasis, a 90% succesfull rate has been obtained. Complications include bleeding, perforation, cholangitis, and pancreatitis. Mortality rates between 1.0 to 1.3% are informed. Contraindications are the same as for panendoscopy as well as the presence of stones greater than 2.5 cms. In giant stones, some other endoscopic approaches can be used, including mechanical lithotripsy, chemical treatment, electrohydraulic shockwaves, laser and biliary stent application. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is also indicated as an adjuvant therapy previous to extracorporeal lithotripsy. PMID:19256137

  10. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Visrodia, Kavel H; Tabibian, James H; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic management of biliary obstruction has evolved tremendously since the introduction of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes over 50 years ago. For the last several decades, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has become established as the mainstay for definitively diagnosing and relieving biliary obstruction. In addition, and more recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has gained increasing favor as an auxiliary diagnostic and therapeutic modality in facilitating decompression of the biliary tree. Here, we provide a review of the current and continually evolving role of gastrointestinal endoscopy, including both ERCP and EUS, in the management of biliary obstruction with a focus on benign biliary strictures. PMID:26322153

  11. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Neuropathy - distal median nerve Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Jarvik JG, Comstock BA, Kliot M, et al. Surgery versus non-surgical therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized ... D. Disorders of peripheral nerves. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, ...

  12. Dual-incision laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; You, Young Kyoung; Kim, Dong Goo; Lee, Soo Ho; Han, Jae Hyun; Park, Sung Kyun; Na, Gun Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy has been widely performed for benign and borderline malignancy in the body or tail of the pancreas when there are not oncologic indications for splenectomy. As the need for minimally invasive procedures to reduce postoperative morbidity and improve the quality of life is increasing, many surgeons have attempted to reduce the number of trocars and incision size to minimize access trauma and scarring. Single-port laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy is the result of these efforts; however it has many limitations such as technical difficulty and prolonged operation time. In this article, we report the first case of dual-incision laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, proving that it can be a safe and feasible minimally invasive procedure for benign or borderline malignant tumors in the body or tail of the pancreas. PMID:25741499

  13. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    SciTech Connect

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-12-15

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  14. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fuqiang; Shen, Hongzhang; Li, Zhen; Meng, Fei; Li, Lei; Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Ying; Bo, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Ni, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus) and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities. PMID:26930491

  15. SUCCESSFUL SURGICAL TREATMENT OF OBSTRUCTIVE LIVER DISEASE CAUSED BY A BILIARY CALCULUS IN A CAPTIVE CHIMPANZEE (PAN TROGLODYTES).

    PubMed

    Chatterton, James; Unwin, Steve; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur; Bridson-Walton, Julie M

    2015-12-01

    A 40-yr-old female chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) presented with intermittent, short-duration episodes of nonspecific clinical signs that included lethargy and reduced responsiveness to external stimuli. Clinical examination and diagnostics suggested obstructive hepatic disease, which was confirmed by subsequent ultrasonographic examination. During routine laparotomy, a biliary calculus was removed from the distal common bile duct and the gallbladder was removed, which resulted in complete clinical recovery. The biliary calculus was analyzed as a mixed composition of predominantly cholesterol, bilirubin, and calcium. PMID:26667553

  16. Endoscopic approach to malignant strictures at the hepatic hilum

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Masone, Stefania; Rega, Maria; Simeoli, Immacolata; Salvatori, Francesca; Siciliano, Saverio; Maione, Francesco; Girardi, Valerio; Celiento, Marta; Persico, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Hilar tumors have proven to be a challenge to treat and manage because of their poor sensitivity to conventional therapies and our inability to prevent or to detect early tumor formation. Endoscopic stent drainage has been proposed as an alternative to biliary-enteric bypass surgery and percutaneous drainage to palliate malignant biliary obstruction. Prosthetic palliation of patients with malignant hilar stenoses poses particular difficulties, especially in advanced lesions (type II lesions or higher). The risk of cholangitis after contrast injection into the biliary tree in cases where incomplete drainage is achieved is well known. The success rate of plastic stent insertion is around 80% in patients with proximal tumors. Relief of symptoms can be achieved in nearly all patients successfully stented. PMID:17696220

  17. MicroRNA Markers for the Diagnosis of Pancreatic and Biliary-Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Motohiro; Sudo, Hiroko; Kawauchi, Junpei; Takizawa, Satoko; Kondou, Satoshi; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to detect pancreatic cancer or biliary-tract cancer at an early stage using current diagnostic technology. Utilizing microRNA (miRNA) markers that are stably present in peripheral blood, we aimed to identify pancreatic and biliary-tract cancers in patients. With “3D-Gene”, a highly sensitive microarray, we examined comprehensive miRNA expression profiles in 571 serum samples obtained from healthy patients, patients with pancreatic, biliary-tract, or other digestive cancers, and patients with non-malignant abnormalities in the pancreas or biliary tract. The samples were randomly divided into training and test cohorts, and candidate miRNA markers were independently evaluated. We found 81 miRNAs for pancreatic cancer and 66 miRNAs for biliary-tract cancer that showed statistically different expression compared with healthy controls. Among those markers, 55 miRNAs were common in both the pancreatic and biliary-tract cancer samples. The previously reported miR-125a-3p was one of the common markers; however, it was also expressed in other types of digestive-tract cancers, suggesting that it is not specific to cancer types. In order to discriminate the pancreato-biliary cancers from all other clinical conditions including the healthy controls, non-malignant abnormalities, and other types of cancers, we developed a diagnostic index using expression profiles of the 10 most significant miRNAs. A combination of eight miRNAs (miR-6075, miR-4294, miR-6880-5p, miR-6799-5p, miR-125a-3p, miR-4530, miR-6836-3p, and miR-4476) achieved a sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and AUC of 80.3%, 97.6%, 91.6% and 0.953, respectively. In contrast, CA19-9 and CEA gave sensitivities of 65.6% and 40.0%, specificities of 92.9% and 88.6%, and accuracies of 82.1% and 71.8%, respectively, in the same test cohort. This diagnostic index identified 18/21 operable pancreatic cancers and 38/48 operable biliary-tract cancers in the entire cohort. Our results suggest that the

  18. Distal radioulnar joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Binu P; Sreekanth, Raveendran

    2012-09-01

    Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint, forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments. The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis. PMID:23162140

  19. Failed biliary cannulation: Clinical and technical outcomes after tertiary referral endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Michael P; Bourke, Michael J; Williams, Stephen J; Alexander, Sina; Moss, Alan; Hope, Rick; Ruppin, David

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Prospective evaluation of repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for failed Schutz grade 1 biliary cannulation in a high-volume center. METHODS: Prospective intention-to-treat analysis of patients referred for biliary cannulation following recent unsuccessful ERCP. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients (35 female; mean age: 62.5 years; age range: 40-87 years) with previous failed biliary cannulation were referred for repeat ERCP. The indication for ERCP was primarily choledocholithiasis (45%) or pancreatic malignancy (18%). Successful biliary cannulation was 100%. The precut needle knife sphincterotomy (NKS) rate was 27.4%. Complications occurred in 3.9% (post-ERCP pancreatitis). An identifiable reason for initial unsuccessful biliary cannulation was present in 55% of cases. Compared to a cohort of 940 naïve papilla patients (female 61%; mean age: 59.9 years; age range: 18-94 years) who required sphincterotomy over the same time period, there was no statistical difference in the cannulation success rate (100% vs 98%) or post-ERCP pancreatitis (3.1% vs 3.9%). Precut NKS use was more frequent (27.4% vs 12.7%) (P = 0.017). CONCLUSION: Referral to a high-volume center following unsuccessful ERCP is associated with high technical success, with a favorable complication rate, compared to routine ERCP procedures. PMID:22174549

  20. Pseudo-obstruction of the biliary tract associated with a traumatic biliary fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Kidder, R.E.; Doherty, P.W.

    1984-05-01

    Documentation of a biliary fistula as a complication of hepatic trauma may be made simply and noninvasively using radionuclide (technetium) cholescintigraphy. This report describes the utility of this approach in the evaluation of the pathophysiology underlying apparent biliary obstruction in a patient with a large traumatic biliary fistula.

  1. Biliary tract obstruction secondary to cancer: management guidelines and selected literature review.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Kane, R A; Harrison, D A; McDermott, W V

    1987-06-01

    Malignant biliary tract obstruction (MBTO) due to either primary biliary tract cancer or metastasis to the porta hepatis is a common clinical problem. The most common metastatic tumors causing MBTO in order of frequency are gastric, colon, breast, and lung cancers. Radiographic diagnostic procedures should proceed in a cost-effective sequence from ultrasonography, computerized tomography (CT), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTHC), and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with the goal of establishing the site of the biliary tract obstruction. The identification of the site of obstruction could be established by ultrasound 70% to 80%, CT scan 80% to 90%, PTHC 100%, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) 85%. Therapeutic intervention by radiographic decompression (PTHC or endoscopic prosthesis), surgical bypass, or radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy may be selectively used based on (1) the site of obstruction; (2) the type of primary tumor; and (3) the presence of specific symptoms related to the obstruction. ("Prophylactic" biliary tract decompression to prevent ascending cholangitis is not supported by the literature in that the frequency of sepsis in the face of malignant obstruction is small (in contrast to sepsis associated with stone disease). Furthermore, PTHC with drainage as a long-term procedure is associated with a substantial frequency of sepsis and is unnecessary and possibly problematic as a preoperative procedure simply to reduce the bilirubin level. The use of radiation therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy for patients not deemed suitable for a surgical bypass because of the presence of proximal obstruction is an important alternative to PTHC. PMID:3295131

  2. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage: Who, when, which, and how?

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kazuo; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Okuno, Nozomi; Hieda, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Tukasa; Niwa, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Both endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) and EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) are relatively well established as alternatives to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS have high technical and clinical success rates (more than 90%) in high-volume centers. Complications for both procedures remain high at 10%-30%. Procedures performed by endoscopists who have done fewer than 20 cases sometimes result in severe or fatal complications. When learning EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD), we recommend a mentor’s supervision during at least the first 20 cases. For inoperable malignant lower biliary obstruction, a skillful endoscopist should perform EUS-BD before EUS-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) and PTBD. We should be select EUS-BD for patients having altered anatomy from malignant tumors before balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-RV, and PTBD. If both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS are available, we should select EUS-CDS, according to published data. EUS-BD will potentially become a first-line biliary drainage procedure in the near future. PMID:26811666

  3. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary drainage: Who, when, which, and how?

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hijioka, Susumu; Imaoka, Hiroshi; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Okuno, Nozomi; Hieda, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Tukasa; Niwa, Yasumasa

    2016-01-21

    Both endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) and EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) are relatively well established as alternatives to percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS have high technical and clinical success rates (more than 90%) in high-volume centers. Complications for both procedures remain high at 10%-30%. Procedures performed by endoscopists who have done fewer than 20 cases sometimes result in severe or fatal complications. When learning EUS-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD), we recommend a mentor's supervision during at least the first 20 cases. For inoperable malignant lower biliary obstruction, a skillful endoscopist should perform EUS-BD before EUS-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) and PTBD. We should be select EUS-BD for patients having altered anatomy from malignant tumors before balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-RV, and PTBD. If both EUS-CDS and EUS-HGS are available, we should select EUS-CDS, according to published data. EUS-BD will potentially become a first-line biliary drainage procedure in the near future. PMID:26811666

  4. Biliary atresia: the animal models.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Claus

    2012-08-01

    Biliary atresia (BA) is a progressive fibrosing process of the neonatal biliary tree and liver, of unknown origin, and an as-yet unexplained pathologic mechanism. The crucial point is to elucidate the origin of this rare disease to change palliative surgery to etiology-related procedures. Patient-based research can only begin at the time of the Kasai procedure and does not allow retracing of the pathology back to its origin. Basic research has focused on similar diseases in the veterinary literature and started to simulate BA in animal models. Unfortunately, even after 50 years of research, no knowledge has been gained from such models, which has led to a single clinical application. This article reviews BA in the context of the animal models available and discusses whether future studies are promising or futile. PMID:22800971

  5. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-06-28

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  6. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  7. Strategy for the use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-06-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma.

  8. Strategy for use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-06-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma.

  9. Biliary hemostasis using an endoscopic plastic stent placement for uncontrolled hemobilia caused by transpapillary forceps biopsy (with video).

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Kunihiro; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Toru; Kawata, Noboru; Uemura, Sunao; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    A 78-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the examination and treatment of jaundice. A transpapillary forceps biopsy for a long distal bile duct stricture was performed using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Immediately after the biopsy, massive bleeding was observed from the orifice of the papilla. Although hemobilia was pulsatile, an endoscopic biliary plastic stent placement was very effective in achieving hemostasis. However, a nasal biliary catheter was required because a blood clot clogged the stent on the following day. Although covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS) placement has been reported for achieving endoscopic hemostasis for bleeding, we chose to use a plastic stent to reduce the risk of post-procedure pancreatitis. The placement of both an endoscopic biliary plastic stent and a nasobiliary drainage catheter can be an alternative hemostatic tool to CSEMSs. PMID:26960930

  10. Migrated biliary stent predisposing to fatal ERCP-related perforation of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Paikos, Demetrios; Gatopoulou, Anthia; Moschos, John; Soufleris, Konstantinos; Tarpagos, Anestis; Katsos, Ioannis

    2006-12-01

    ERCP may be associated with very serious and even fatal complications. Internal drainage with endoscopical prostheses has been used as a palliative treatment for malignant bile duct obstruction. We report a rare case of subcutaneous emphysema with a fatal outcome. The emphysema resulted from a perforation of a duodenal ulcer during ERCP due to a migrated biliary stent that had been previously endoscopically placed. PMID:17205153

  11. Metatarsalgia: distal metatarsal osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Reinhard; Trnka, Hans Joerg

    2011-12-01

    Metatarsalgia is a common pathologic entity. It refers to pain at the MTP joints. Pain in the foot unrelated to the MTP joints (such as Morton’s neuroma) must be distinguished from those disorders, which lead to abnormal pressure distribution, reactive calluses, and pain. Initial treatment options for metatarsalgia include modifications of shoe wear, metatarsal pads, and custom-made orthoses. If conservative treatment fails, operative reconstructive procedures in terms of metatarsal osteotomies should be considered. Lesser metatarsal osteotomy is an effective and well-accepted method for the management of metatarsalgia. The main purpose of these osteotomies is to decrease prominence of the symptomatic metatarsal head. The distal metatarsal oblique osteotomy (Weil osteotomy) with its modification represents the best evaluated distal metatarsal osteotomy in terms of outcome studies and biomechanical analysis. The role of the Weil osteotomy in metatarsalgia owing to a subluxed or dislocated MTP joint is to bring the metatarsal head proximal to the callus and to provide axial decompression of the toe to correct the deformity contributing to metatarsalgia. PMID:22118231

  12. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tree

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Matolo, N.M.

    1981-08-01

    The new 99mTc biliary scintigraphy agents are highly sensitive and specific in detecting biliary tract disease and use of them is the initial procedure of choice in evaluating patients with suspected acute cholecystitis. Other clinically useful indications are evaluation of biliary kinetics; evaluation of patients with suspected traumatic bile leakage, gallbladder perforation, or postsurgical biliary tract complications; and evaluation of patients with suspected biliary obstruction. In 99mTc we have a simple radiopharmaceutical of low radiation for evaluating congenital abnormalities and neonatal jaundice. In the Orient 99mTc cholescintigraphy is extremely important in evaluating patients with suspected intrahepatic stones. The overall advantages of this technique include availability, safety, simplicity, and accuracy. In addition, it may be performed in those patients who are allergic to iodinated contrast agents.

  13. Volumetric modulated arc therapy planning for distal oesophageal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, M A; Bedford, J L; Warrington, A P; Tait, D M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel form of intensity-modulated radiation therapy that allows the radiation dose to be delivered in a single gantry rotation using conformal or modulated fields. The capability of VMAT to reduce heart and cord dose, while maintaining lung receiving 20 Gy <20%, was evaluated for chemoradiation for oesophageal cancer. Methods An optimised forward-planned four-field arrangement was compared with inverse-planned coplanar VMAT arcs with 35 control points for 10 patients with lower gastro-oesophageal tumours prescribed 54 Gy in 30 fractions. Conformal (cARC) and intensity-modulated (VMATi) arcs were considered. Plans were assessed and compared using the planning target volume (PTV) irradiated to 95% of the prescription dose (V95), volumes of lung irradiated to 20 Gy (V20), heart irradiated to 30 Gy (V30), spinal cord maximum dose and van't Riet conformation number (CN). The monitor units per fraction and delivery time were recorded for a single representative plan. Results VMATi provided a significant reduction in the heart V30 (31% vs 55%; p=0.02) with better CN (0.72 vs 0.65; p=0.01) than the conformal plan. The treatment delivery was 1 min 28 s for VMAT compared with 3 min 15 s. Conclusion For similar PTV coverage, VMATi delivers a lower dose to organs at risk than conformal plans in a shorter time, and this has warranted clinical implementation. PMID:21427179

  14. [Echographic signs of biliary atresia].

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, B A; Iaremenko, V V; Babko, S A; Klimenko, E F; Medvedenko, G F

    2004-10-01

    The assessment of echographic features of biliary atresia was conducted in 65 newborn children ageing up to 3 mo. Their characteristic variants were revealed: the absence or reduction in size of gall-bladder, the presence of hyperechogenic triangular formation in V. portae bifurcation (the symptom of "triangular cicatrix"); the thickening of anterior wall of V. portae right branch. The timely and correct establishment of the diagnosis permits a child to survive and serve the hepatic fibrosis prophylaxis. Echohepatography is a sufficiently trustful method of investigation. PMID:15628232

  15. Predictive Factors of Biliary Tract Cancer in Anomalous Union of the Pancreaticobiliary Duct

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Tae Young; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Hyun Kyo; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The assessment of malignancies associated with anomalous union of the pancreaticobiliary duct (AUPBD) is essential for the design of appropriate treatment strategies. The aim of the present study is to measure the incidence of AUPBD-related pancreaticobiliary malignancy and to identify predictive factors. This retrospective cohort study included cases of 229 patients with AUPBD between January 1999 and December 2013. The impact of bile duct dilatation on the incidence of AUPBD-related pancreaticobiliary disease was measured, and predictive factors were evaluated. Among 229 patients with AUPBD, 152 had common bile duct dilatation (≥10 mm) (dilated group) and 77 did not (<10 mm) (nondilated group). Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma occurred more frequently in the nondilated group than in the dilated group (3.9% vs 0%; P < 0.05). By contrast, no significant difference in the incidence of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma was observed between the 2 groups (1.3% vs 3.9%; P = 0.271). By univariate analysis, age, type of AUPBD, and the level of pancreatic enzymes refluxed in the bile duct were associated with occurrence of biliary tract cancers. In multivariate analysis, age ≥45 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.042, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.011–1.073, P < 0.05), P-C type (OR 3.327, 95% CI 1.031–10.740, P < 0.05), and a high level of biliary lipase (OR 4.132, 95% CI 1.420–12.021, P < 0.05) showed a significant association with AUPBD-related biliary tract cancer. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma may occur more frequently in AUPBD patients without bile duct dilatation. Age ≥45 years, P-C type, and biliary lipase level ≥45,000 IU/L are significantly associated with AUPBD-related biliary tract cancer. PMID:27196455

  16. Predictive Factors of Biliary Tract Cancer in Anomalous Union of the Pancreaticobiliary Duct.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Seok; Song, Tae Jun; Park, Tae Young; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Hyun Kyo; Park, Do Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    The assessment of malignancies associated with anomalous union of the pancreaticobiliary duct (AUPBD) is essential for the design of appropriate treatment strategies. The aim of the present study is to measure the incidence of AUPBD-related pancreaticobiliary malignancy and to identify predictive factors. This retrospective cohort study included cases of 229 patients with AUPBD between January 1999 and December 2013. The impact of bile duct dilatation on the incidence of AUPBD-related pancreaticobiliary disease was measured, and predictive factors were evaluated.Among 229 patients with AUPBD, 152 had common bile duct dilatation (≥10 mm) (dilated group) and 77 did not (<10 mm) (nondilated group). Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma occurred more frequently in the nondilated group than in the dilated group (3.9% vs 0%; P < 0.05). By contrast, no significant difference in the incidence of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma was observed between the 2 groups (1.3% vs 3.9%; P = 0.271). By univariate analysis, age, type of AUPBD, and the level of pancreatic enzymes refluxed in the bile duct were associated with occurrence of biliary tract cancers. In multivariate analysis, age ≥45 years (odds ratio [OR] 1.042, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.011-1.073, P < 0.05), P-C type (OR 3.327, 95% CI 1.031-10.740, P < 0.05), and a high level of biliary lipase (OR 4.132, 95% CI 1.420-12.021, P < 0.05) showed a significant association with AUPBD-related biliary tract cancer.Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma may occur more frequently in AUPBD patients without bile duct dilatation. Age ≥45 years, P-C type, and biliary lipase level ≥45,000 IU/L are significantly associated with AUPBD-related biliary tract cancer. PMID:27196455

  17. [Morphological study of bile in the diagnosis of biliary diseases].

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Iu P

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study principles of bile structurization in healthy people and patients with various biliary diseases. 160 patients with different biliary diseases and other diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone were examined. Samples of gallbladder bile were taken from corpses of young men, who did not have any diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone. Their diagnoses were confirmed by an ultrasound morphological study. Bile was studied by the cuneate dehydration and viscosimetric methods. The structure of facies of gallbladder bile under conditions of absence of diseases of the hepatopancreaticoduodenal zone was shown. The facies have a wide convex peripheral zone (a cushion) without any well-defined border. The central part of the facies is amorphous or fine-grained, sometimes with occasional inclusions of larger crystals. Markers of exacerbation of chronic cholecystitis (dendrites in the central zone of bile facies) as well as signs of the presence of a malignant neoplasm touching the bile (large diamond-shaped crystals in the central zone of bile facies where dendrites begin) were discovered. PMID:14556555

  18. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H.; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G.; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20–22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  19. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers.

    PubMed

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20-22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  20. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  1. Do We Really Need Additional Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Computed Tomography for Differential Diagnosis in Triage of Middle-Aged Subjects With Suspected Biliary Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Kyeom; Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Jaihwan; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced computed tomography (CT) is widely used for evaluating acute biliary pain in the emergency department (ED). However, concern about radiation exposure from CT has also increased. We investigated the usefulness of pre-contrast CT for differential diagnosis in middle-aged subjects with suspected biliary pain. A total of 183 subjects, who visited the ED for suspected biliary pain from January 2011 to December 2012, were included. Retrospectively, pre-contrast phase and multiphase CT findings were reviewed and the detection rate of findings suggesting disease requiring significant treatment by noncontrast CT (NCCT) was compared with cases detected by multiphase CT. Approximately 70% of total subjects had a significant condition, including 1 case of gallbladder cancer and 126 (68.8%) cases requiring intervention (122 biliary stone-related diseases, 3 liver abscesses, and 1 liver hemangioma). The rate of overlooking malignancy without contrast enhancement was calculated to be 0% to 1.5%. Biliary stones and liver space-occupying lesions were found equally on NCCT and multiphase CT. Calculated probable rates of overlooking acute cholecystitis and biliary obstruction were maximally 6.8% and 4.2% respectively. Incidental significant finding unrelated with pain consisted of 1 case of adrenal incidentaloma, which was also observed in NCCT. NCCT might be sufficient to detect life-threatening or significant disease requiring early treatment in young adults with biliary pain. PMID:25700321

  2. An Unusual Cause of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Sern Wei

    2012-01-01

    Portal biliary ductopathy (PBD) is a condition in which biliary and pancreatic ducts are extrinsically compressed by collateral branches of the portal venous system, which in turn have become dilated and varicosed due to portal hypertension. While the majority of patients with PBD are asymptomatic, a minority can present with symptoms of biliary obstruction and cholangitis with the potential of developing secondary chronic liver disease. This paper reports the case of a 29 year old male presenting with acute cholangitis, in whom PBD was diagnosed radiologically. A brief review of current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of this condition will also be presented. PMID:22844197

  3. Genetics Home Reference: distal arthrogryposis type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions distal arthrogryposis type 1 distal arthrogryposis type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Distal arthrogryposis type 1 is a disorder characterized by joint deformities (contractures) ...

  4. [Association of biliary calculosis and portal cavernomatosis].

    PubMed

    Crespi, C; De Giorgio, A M

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports the case of a woman, who underwent surgery because of cholelithiasis, with intraoperative finding of prehepatic portal hypertension from portal vein thrombosis ("portal cavernoma") with healthy liver, later confirmed by angiographic studies. This rare pathologic association carries a higher risk of major operative complications; therefore the Authors agree with the general belief that, for these cases, biliary tract surgery should be as simple and safe as possible. In the case of preoperative diagnosis of biliary disease associated with portal cavernoma, should a surgical approach on the biliary tract be required, we agree on the advisability of performing a shunting procedure before any kind of biliary surgery. In case of variceal bleeding endoscopic sclerotherapy will be the first choice; surgical procedures (shunting) should be seen as a second choice in case of rebleeding after sclerotherapy. PMID:1407632

  5. Endoscopic management of biliary hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Akkiz, Hikmet; Akinoglu, Alper; Çolakoglu, Salih; Demiryürek, Haluk; Yagmur, Özgür

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy in the management of biliary hydatid disease. Design A case study between January 1992 and December 1994. Setting A university-affiliated hospital in Adana, Turkey. Patients Five patients with biliary hydatid disease, in which the cyst had ruptured into the biliary tree. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months. Intervention Endoscopic sphincterotomy. Main Outcome Measures Morbidity, mortality and recurrence of the disease. Results All patients underwent successful endoscopic sphincterotomy, including removal of daughter cysts. During the follow-up period, ultrasonography and laboratory investigations showed complete cure in all patients. There were no complications due to endoscopic sphincterotomy. Conclusion Endoscopic sphincterotomy is the treatment of choice for the management of hydatid cysts that have ruptured into the biliary tract causing obstructive jaundice. PMID:8697318

  6. Percutaneous biliary interventions through the gallbladder and the cystic duct: What radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Hatzidakis, A; Venetucci, P; Krokidis, M; Iaccarino, V

    2014-12-01

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is an established drainage procedure for the management of high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis. However, percutaneous image-guided access to the gallbladder may not be limited to the simple placement of a drain, but may also be used as an alternative approach to the biliary tree through the catheterization of the cystic duct, for a variety of other more complicated conditions. Percutaneous transcholecystic interventions may be performed in both malignant and benign disease. In the case of malignant jaundice, the transcholecystic route may be used when the liver parenchyma is occupied by metastatic lesions and transhepatic access is not possible. In benign conditions, access through the gallbladder may offer a solution if the biliary tree is not dilated. The transcholecystic access may then be route of insertion of large sheaths, internal drainage catheters, lithotripsy devices, stone retrieval baskets, and stents. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the techniques and to discuss the indications, complications, and technical difficulties of this alternative access to the biliary tree. PMID:25172204

  7. Cytological Sampling Versus Forceps Biopsy During Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage and Analysis of Factors Predicting Success

    SciTech Connect

    Tapping, C. R.; Byass, O. R.; Cast, J. E. I.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of cytological sampling and forceps biopsy in obstructing biliary lesions and to identify factors predictive of success. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 119) with suspected malignant inoperable obstructive jaundice treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during 7 years were included (60 male; mean age 72.5 years). All patients underwent forceps biopsy plus cytological sampling by washing the forceps device in cytological solution. Patient history, procedural and pathological records, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Histological diagnosis after forceps biopsy was more successful than cytology: Sensitivity was 78 versus 61%, and negative predictive value was 30 versus 19%. Cytology results were never positive when the forceps biopsy was negative. The cytological sample was negative and forceps sample positive in 2 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 16 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, and 1 case of benign disease. Diagnostic accuracy was predicted by low bilirubin (p < 0.001), aspartate transaminase (p < 0.05), and white cell count (p {<=} 0.05). Conclusions: This technique is safe and effective and is recommended for histological diagnosis during PTBD in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures. Diagnostic yield is greater when bilirubin levels are low and there is no sepsis; histological diagnosis by way of forceps biopsy renders cytological sampling unnecessary.

  8. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alastair J; Parker, Robert J; Wiggins, John

    2008-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal asbestos-associated malignancy originating from the lining cells (mesothelium) of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, as well as the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis. The exact prevalence is unknown but it is estimated that mesotheliomas represent less than 1% of all cancers. Its incidence is increasing, with an expected peak in the next 10–20 years. Pleural malignant mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Typical presenting features are those of chest pain and dyspnoea. Breathlessness due to a pleural effusion without chest pain is reported in about 30% of patients. A chest wall mass, weight loss, sweating, abdominal pain and ascites (due to peritoneal involvement) are less common presentations. Mesothelioma is directly attributable to occupational asbestos exposure with a history of exposure in over 90% of cases. There is also evidence that mesothelioma may result from both para-occupational exposure and non-occupational "environmental" exposure. Idiopathic or spontaneous mesothelioma can also occur in the absence of any exposure to asbestos, with a spontaneous rate in humans of around one per million. A combination of accurate exposure history, along with examination radiology and pathology are essential to make the diagnosis. Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural disease can be challenging. The most helpful CT findings suggesting malignant pleural disease are 1) a circumferential pleural rind, 2) nodular pleural thickening, 3) pleural thickening of > 1 cm and 4) mediastinal pleural involvement. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team is recommended to ensure prompt and appropriate management, using a framework of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and symptom palliation with end of life care. Compensation issues must also be considered. Life expectancy in malignant mesothelioma is poor, with a median survival of about one year following diagnosis. PMID:19099560

  9. Biliary ascariasis: radiological clue to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Bansal, Satish; Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Navneet

    2015-03-01

    Ascariasis is caused by Ascaris lumbricoides. It is the most common helminthic infection seen worldwide. Ascariasis is an endemic disease in our country. This is due to the prevailing poor sanitary conditions and low level of education. Biliary ascariasis is an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice. We report a case of biliary ascariasis in a young labourer who presented with acute abdominal pain. PMID:26634136

  10. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage Complicated by Bilothorax.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stephanie H; Zangan, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is a well-established and safe technique for the management of biliary obstructions and leaks. While approach is variable based on operator preference, patient anatomy, and indications; PTBD is commonly performed via a right-sided intercostal route. With a right-sided approach, pleural complications may be encountered. The authors describe a case of a right PTBD complicated by a leak into the pleural space, with the subsequent development of bilothorax. PMID:27053829

  11. Imaging of the Distal Airways

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, Donald P.; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques of the lung continues to advance with improving ability to image the more distal airways. Two imaging techniques are reviewed, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance with hyperpolarized helium-3. PMID:19962040

  12. Distal radius fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Schneppendahl, Johannes; Windolf, Joachim; Kaufmann, Robert A

    2012-08-01

    Despite the frequency of distal radius fractures, the optimal treatment remains without consensus opinion. A trend toward increased distal radius fracture open reduction and internal fixation has been identified, with biomechanical and clinical studies suggesting treatment advantages of certain fixation methods over others. Well-controlled patient trials are still missing to lend objective findings to management algorithms. This article reviews the literature over the past 5 years to guide our management regarding this common upper-extremity injury. PMID:22763062

  13. Pathobiology of biliary epithelia and cholangiocarcinoma: proceedings of the Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single-Topic Conference.

    PubMed

    Sirica, Alphonse E; Nathanson, Michael H; Gores, Gregory J; Larusso, Nicholas F

    2008-12-01

    In June 2008, the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) sponsored the Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single-Topic Conference on the Pathobiology of Biliary Epithelia and Cholangiocarcinoma, which was held in Atlanta, GA. Attendees from 12 different countries participated in this conference, making it a truly international scientific event. Both oral and poster presentations were given by multidisciplinary experts, who highlighted important areas of current basic and translational research on biliary epithelial cell biology and pathophysiology, and on the etiology, cellular and molecular pathogenesis, and target-based therapy of cholangiocarcinoma. The specific goals and objectives of the conference were: (1) to advance knowledge of basic and molecular mechanisms underlying developmental and proliferative disorders of the biliary tract; (2) to foster a better and more comprehensive understanding of mechanisms regulating biliary epithelial (cholangiocyte) growth and transport, signaling, cell survival, and abnormalities that result in disease; and (3) to understand basic mechanisms of cholangiocarcinoma development and progression, with the added goal of identifying and exploiting potentially critical molecular pathways that may be targeted therapeutically. A number of interrelated themes emerged from the oral and poster sessions that affected current understandings of the complex organization of transcriptional and signaling mechanisms that regulate bile duct development, hepatic progenitor cell expansion, cholangiocyte secretory functions and proliferation, and mechanisms of cholangiocarcinogenesis and malignant cholangiocyte progression. Most notable were the critical questions raised as to how best to exploit aberrant signaling pathways associated with biliary disease as potential targets for therapy. PMID:18855901

  14. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  15. An Unusual Combination of Biliary Cystadenoma and Renal Angiomyolipoma- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thambi, Renu; Syriac, Sylvia; Kumar, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary cystadenomas are mucinous cystic neoplasms arising in the liver, extrahepatic bile ducts or gall bladder. Extrahepatic cystadenomas are rare neoplasms requiring complete excision as there is a chance for recurrence and malignant transformation. Angiomyolipoma (AML) belongs to the perivascular epithelioid cell group of neoplasms, and kidney is the commonest site involved. We report a case of an unusual combination of extrahepatic biliary cystadenoma with angiomyolipoma in an adult female without evidence of tuberous sclerosis. The patient presented with abdominal discomfort and on ultrasonological examination showed a cyst close to liver suggestive of hydatid disease and an incidental mass in kidney which was diagnosed as angiomyolipoma. Histopathological examination revealed biliary cystadenoma of liver and renal angiomyolipoma. Clinical and radiological evaluation did not show any manifestations of tuberous sclerosis. Such an unusual incidence of two separate neoplasms in a patient without syndromic association was not obtained even after extensive literature search.

  16. Contribution of Mature Hepatocytes to Biliary Regeneration in Rats with Acute and Chronic Biliary Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Hui; Chen, Hui-Ling; Chien, Chin-Sung; Wu, Shang-Hsin; Ho, Yi-Tian; Yu, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2015-01-01

    Whether hepatocytes can convert into biliary epithelial cells (BECs) during biliary injury is much debated. To test this concept, we traced the fate of genetically labeled [dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV)-positive] hepatocytes in hepatocyte transplantation model following acute hepato-biliary injury induced by 4,4’-methylene-dianiline (DAPM) and D-galactosamine (DAPM+D-gal) and in DPPIV-chimeric liver model subjected to acute (DAPM+D-gal) or chronic biliary injury caused by DAPM and bile duct ligation (DAPM+BDL). In both models before biliary injury, BECs are uniformly DPPIV-deficient and proliferation of DPPIV-deficient hepatocytes is restricted by retrorsine. We found that mature hepatocytes underwent a stepwise conversion into BECs after biliary injury. In the hepatocyte transplantation model, DPPIV-positive hepatocytes entrapped periportally proliferated, and formed two-layered plates along portal veins. Within the two-layered plates, the hepatocytes gradually lost their hepatocytic identity, proceeded through an intermediate state, acquired a biliary phenotype, and subsequently formed bile ducts along the hilum-to-periphery axis. In DPPIV-chimeric liver model, periportal hepatocytes expressing hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β (HNF-1β) were exclusively DPPIV-positive and were in continuity to DPPIV-positives bile ducts. Inhibition of hepatocyte proliferation by additional doses of retrorsine in DPPIV-chimeric livers prevented the appearance of DPPIV-positive BECs after biliary injury. Moreover, enriched DPPIV-positive BEC/hepatic oval cell transplantation produced DPPIV-positive BECs or bile ducts in unexpectedly low frequency and in mid-lobular regions. These results together suggest that mature hepatocytes but not contaminating BECs/hepatic oval cells are the sources of periportal DPPIV-positive BECs. We conclude that mature hepatocytes contribute to biliary regeneration in the environment of acute and chronic biliary injury through a ductal plate

  17. Effect of intestinal resection, type of dietary fat and time on biliary lipid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ayala, A E; Lisbona, F; López-Aliaga, I; Barrionuevo, M; Pallarés, I; Alférez, M J; Hartiti, S; Campos, M S

    1994-01-01

    The effects of time and the type of dietary fat on biliary physiology in rats with 50% resection of the distal small intestine were investigated. The effects of ursodeoxycholic acid as an exogenous source of bile acid added to the diet were also studied. The fat composition of all diets was the same in quantitative terms (4%), and differed only in the type of lipid supplied: olive oil (diet A) or one-third medium chain triglycerides, one-third sunflower seed oil and one-third olive oil (diet B). In resected rats given diet A for 1 or 3 months, there was a decrease in biliary secretion of cholesterol and phospholipids, and in the lithogenic index, with respect to the control group. Resected rats fed diet B for 1 or 3 months showed increases in biliary secretion of cholesterol and phospholipids, and in the lithogenic index, in comparison with resected rats fed diet A. The addition of ursodeoxycholic acid to diet B led to the decoupling of bile acid and bile lipid secretion. PMID:8011314

  18. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for adenocarcinoma: safe and reasonable?

    PubMed Central

    Postlewait, Lauren M.

    2015-01-01

    As a result of technological advances during the past two decades, surgeons now use minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches to pancreatic resection more frequently, yet the role of these approaches for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma resections remains uncertain, given the aggressive nature of this malignancy. Although there are no controlled trials comparing MIS technique to open surgical technique, laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma is performed with increasing frequency. Data from retrospective studies suggest that perioperative complication profiles between open and laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy are similar, with perhaps lower blood loss and fewer wound infections in the MIS group. Concerning oncologic outcomes, there appear to be no differences in the rate of achieving negative margins or in the number of lymph nodes (LNs) resected when compared to open surgery. There are limited recurrence and survival data on laparoscopic compared to open distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but in the few studies that assess long term outcomes, recurrence rates and survival outcomes appear similar. Recent studies show that though laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy entails a greater operative cost, the associated shorter length of hospital stay leads to decreased overall cost compared to open procedures. Multiple new technologies are emerging to improve resection of pancreatic cancer. Robotic pancreatectomy is feasible, but there are limited data on robotic resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and outcomes appear similar to laparoscopic approaches. Additionally fluorescence-guided surgery represents a new technology on the horizon that could improve oncologic outcomes after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, though published data thus far are limited to animal models. Overall, MIS distal pancreatectomy appears to be a safe and reasonable approach to treating selected patients with pancreatic ductal

  19. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct accompanying biliary mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Ichiro; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Harada, Kenichi; Maruzen, Syogo; Sakai, Seisyo; Makino, Isamu; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Tani, Takashi; Kayahara, Masato; Ikeda, Hiroko; Ohta, Tetsuo; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2013-05-28

    We present the first case of an intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) accompanying a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). A 74-year-old woman presented with fever of unknown cause. Laboratory data revealed jaundice and liver injury. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a 20 mm polypoid tumor in the dilated distal bile duct, which exhibited early enhancement and papillary growth. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed mucus production from the papilla of Vater, characterized by its protruding and dilated orifice. Endoscopic ultrasonography visualized the polypoid tumor in the distal bile duct, but no invasive region was suggested by diagnostic imaging. Therefore, the initial diagnosis was IPNB. After endoscopic nasobiliary drainage, a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Pathological examination of the resected bile duct revealed papillary proliferation of biliary-type cells with nuclear atypia, indicating pancreaticobiliary-type IPNB. In addition, solid portions comprised of tumor cells with characteristic salt-and-pepper nuclei were evident. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of the neuroendocrine marker synaptophysin in this solid component, diagnosing it as a neuroendocrine tumor (NET). Furthermore, the MIB-1 proliferation index of NET was higher than that of IPNB, and microinvasion of the NET component was found, indicating neuroendocrine carcinoma (NET G3). This unique case of MANEC, comprising IPNB and NET, provides insight into the pathogenesis of biliary NET. PMID:23716999

  20. Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct accompanying biliary mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Ichiro; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Harada, Kenichi; Maruzen, Syogo; Sakai, Seisyo; Makino, Isamu; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Tani, Takashi; Kayahara, Masato; Ikeda, Hiroko; Ohta, Tetsuo; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2013-01-01

    We present the first case of an intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) accompanying a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). A 74-year-old woman presented with fever of unknown cause. Laboratory data revealed jaundice and liver injury. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a 20 mm polypoid tumor in the dilated distal bile duct, which exhibited early enhancement and papillary growth. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed mucus production from the papilla of Vater, characterized by its protruding and dilated orifice. Endoscopic ultrasonography visualized the polypoid tumor in the distal bile duct, but no invasive region was suggested by diagnostic imaging. Therefore, the initial diagnosis was IPNB. After endoscopic nasobiliary drainage, a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Pathological examination of the resected bile duct revealed papillary proliferation of biliary-type cells with nuclear atypia, indicating pancreaticobiliary-type IPNB. In addition, solid portions comprised of tumor cells with characteristic salt-and-pepper nuclei were evident. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of the neuroendocrine marker synaptophysin in this solid component, diagnosing it as a neuroendocrine tumor (NET). Furthermore, the MIB-1 proliferation index of NET was higher than that of IPNB, and microinvasion of the NET component was found, indicating neuroendocrine carcinoma (NET G3). This unique case of MANEC, comprising IPNB and NET, provides insight into the pathogenesis of biliary NET. PMID:23716999

  1. GWAS in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gulamhusein, Aliya F.; Juran, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have been a significant technological advance in our ability to evaluate the genetic architecture of complex diseases such as Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC). To date, six large-scale studies have been performed which identified 27 non-HLA risk loci associated with PBC. The identified risk variants emphasize important disease concepts; namely, that disturbances in immunoregulatory pathways are important in the pathogenesis of PBC and that such perturbations are shared among a diverse number of autoimmune diseases – suggesting the risk architecture may confer a generalized propensity to autoimmunity not necessarily specific to PBC. Furthermore, the impact of non-HLA risk variants, particularly in genes involved with IL-12 signaling, and ethnic variation in conferring susceptibility to PBC have been highlighted. While GWAS have been a critical stepping-stone in understanding common genetic variation contributing to PBC, limitations pertaining to power, sample availability, and strong linkage disequilibrium across genes have left us with an incomplete understanding of the genetic underpinnings of disease pathogenesis. Future efforts to gain insight into this missing heritability, the genetic variation that contributes to important disease outcomes and the functional consequences of associated variants will be critical if practical clinical translation is to be realized. PMID:26676814

  2. Angiographic Findings in Biliary Atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Uflacker, Renan Pariente, Daniele M.

    2004-09-15

    We present the angiographic findings of 46 patients with biliary atresia (BA). There were 25 males and 21 females, with a mean age of 22.5 months (range - 1.5 to 141 months). Hepatic and mesenteric angiography were obtained as part of a liver transplantation work-up or as part of the treatment of clinical events. All patients had a histological diagnosis of BA. The portal vein was patent in 43 patients, with a mean size of 4.1 mm, using the arterial catheter as comparison. Portal hepatopetal flow was observed in 20 patient and hepatofugal flow was observed in 21 patients. Presence of gastroesophageal varices was observed in 41 patients. The hepatic artery was enlarged in all patients. In all 46 patients studied, the intrahepatic peripheral hepatic artery branches presented with irregularities in contour, including encasement, strictures, dilatation and angulation, and images suggestive of peripheral occlusion. Angiographic vascular 'tuft-like' blush surrounding the irregular or occluded peripheral arterial segments was observed in 40 patients. The injection of Microfil (registered) in one case showed a marked vascular proliferation within the portal tract, apparently derived from arterial and portal connections, filling the entire portal space. We conclude that the presence of angiographically demonstrable perivascular arterial tufts in the periphery of the hepatic arterial circulation is a common finding in cases of BA, and may be a characteristic diagnostic angiographic finding.

  3. Management of Biliary Strictures After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Nicolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Strictures of the bile duct are a well-recognized complication of liver transplant and account for more than 50% of all biliary complications after deceased donor liver transplant and living donor liver transplant. Biliary strictures that develop after transplant are classified as anastomotic strictures or nonanastomotic strictures, depending on their location in the bile duct. The incidence, etiology, natural history, and response to therapy of the 2 types vary greatly, so their distinction is clinically important. The imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis of biliary strictures is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography because of its high rate of diagnostic accuracy and limited risk of complications. Biliary strictures that develop after liver transplant may be managed with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), or surgical revision, including retransplant. The initial treatment of choice for these strictures is ERC with progressive balloon dilation and the placement of increasing numbers of plastic stents. PTC and surgery are generally reserved for failures of endoscopic therapy or for anatomic variants that are not suitable for ERC. In this article, we discuss the classification of biliary strictures, their diagnosis, and the therapeutic strategies that can be used to manage these common complications of liver transplant. PMID:27482175

  4. Positional biliary stasis: scintigraphic findings following biliary-enteric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, M H; Elgazzar, A H; Cummings, D D

    1995-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has proven to be a reliable noninvasive imaging modality to evaluate postoperative biliary obstruction, which is a frequent complication following biliary enteric bypass surgery. We present a case of a patient who had biliary enteric bypass surgery with a scintigraphic pattern simulating partial obstruction on a 99mTc hepatobiliary study performed with the patient in a supine position. The biliary stasis seen in the supine images disappeared almost completely when the images were repeated after 30 min in an upright position. Progressive accumulation of activity initially seen in the region of the biliary enteric anastomosis was not present 3 days later on a repeat study with the patient in an upright position, confirming that biliary stasis in this patient was due to a positional phenomenon. This case illustrates that biliary stasis may be positional in nature. Position related stasis should be a consideration when interpreting hepatobiliary scintigraphic studies in postoperative patients and when suspected, patients should be imaged in the upright position. PMID:7799060

  5. MicroRNA 141 Expression Is a Potential Prognostic Marker of Biliary Tract Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaihwan; Ryu, Ji Kon; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In recent years, a large number of micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) have been identified as putative prognostic biomarkers for solid cancers because of their role in controlling the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The aim of this study was to verify the utility of miRNA 141 as a prognostic biomarker of biliary tract cancers. Methods From June 2010 to June 2012, common bile duct cancer tissue samples and matched noncancerous tissues from the ampulla of Vater were obtained from patients with biliary tract cancer undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays, we measured the mean relative expression levels of miRNA 141 in both groups of tissues. Overexpression of miRNA 141 was defined as a greater than 2-fold increase in expression levels as determined by the 2−ΔΔCt method. Results In a cohort of 38 patients with biliary tract cancers (seven gallbladder, 13 hilar, and 18 distal bile duct cancers), 26 patients (68.4%) were male, and the median age was 69.5 (52 to 85) years. Nineteen patients (50%) had undergone R0 resection procedures, including three Whipple operations, seven pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomies, six bile duct resections, and three extended lobectomies. Among the patients who had undergone R0 resection, the overexpression of miRNA 141 was significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival and a greater risk of angiolymphatic invasion. Among the patients who did not undergo R0 resection, miRNA 141 overexpression was significantly associated with reduced overall survival. Conclusions Overexpression of miRNA 141 is an indicator of a poor prognosis in patients with biliary tract cancer, suggesting that miRNA 141 may be a valuable prognostic biomarker of this disease. PMID:27172928

  6. Nitinol Stents for Palliative Treatment of Malignant Obstructive Jaundice: Should We Stent the Sphincter of Oddi in Every Case?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Tsetis, Dimitris; Chrysou, Evangelia; Sanidas, Elias; Petrakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the necessity of metallic stenting of the sphincter of Oddi in malignant obstructive jaundice when the tumor is more than 2 cm from the papilla of Vater.Methods: Sixty-seven self-expandable biliary stents were used in 60 patients with extrahepatic lesions of the common hepatic or common bile duct and with the distal margin of the tumor located more than 2 cm from the papilla of Vater. Stents were placed above the papilla in 30 cases (group A) and in another 30 with their distal part protruding into the duodenum (group B).Results: The 30-day mortality was 15%, due to the underlying disease. The stent occlusion rate was 17% after a mean period of 4.3 months. No major complications were noted. Average survival was 132 days for group A and 140 days for group B. In group A, 19 patients survived {<=} 90 days and in eight of these, cholangitis occurred at least once. Of 11 patients in group A with survival > 90 days, only two developed cholangitis. In group B, 13 patients who survived {<=} 90 days had no episodes of cholangitis and in 17 with survival > 90 days, cholangitis occurred in three. There is a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) regarding the incidence of cholangitis in favor of group A.Conclusions: In patients with extrahepatic lesions more than 2 cm from the papilla and with a relative poor prognosis ({<=} 3 months), due to more advanced disease or to a worse general condition, the sphincter of Oddi should also be stented in order to reduce the postprocedural morbidity.

  7. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures. PMID:27044769

  8. Burdick's Technique for Biliary Access Revisited.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The precut sphincterotomy is used to facilitate selective biliary access in cases of difficult biliary cannulation. Needle-knife precut papillotomy is the standard of care but is associated with a high rate of complications such as pancreatitis, duodenal perforation, bleeding, etc. Sometimes during bowing of the sphincterotome/cannula and the use of guide wire to facilitate biliary cannulation, inadvertent formation of a false passage occurs in the 10 to 11 o'clock direction. Use of this step to access the bile duct by the intramucosal incision technique was first described by Burdick et al., and since then two more studies have also substantiated the safety and efficacy of this non-needle type of precut sphincterotomy. In this review, we discuss this non-needle technique of precut sphincterotomy and also share our experience using this "Burdick's technique." PMID:25674522

  9. Chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nowfal, Ahmed; Al-Abed, Yahya A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Biliary colic is a common clinical presentation, with the majority of cases being related to gallstone disease. However, rarely, patients may present with biliary symptoms without evidence of gallbladder stones – referred to as acalculous gallstone disease. This case report details a rare case of chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse. Case presentation A 24-year-old Caucasian female presented to the emergency department with a history of intermittent right upper quadrant pain associated with nausea and malaise. She had experienced bouts of similar symptoms three times a year for the past 4 years. Various investigations had been conducted during her multiple admissions, which showed possible dilatation of the common bile duct, with no evidence of gallstones. Conclusion Patients can present with a dilated common bile duct and an acalculous cholecystitis. This requires considerable investigation, with an emphasis on drug history, especially with the current rise of recreational hallucinogenic drug abuse. PMID:27330331

  10. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shailaja; Singh, Sanjeet K; Pujani, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST.We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. PMID:19568556

  11. Broncho-biliary fistula secondary to biliary obstruction and lung abscess in a patient with pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Panda, Dipanjan; Aggarwal, Mayank; Yadav, Vikas; Kumar, Sachin; Mukund, Amar; Baghmar, Saphalta

    2016-06-01

    We present a case report of broncho-biliary fistula that developed due to the blockage of biliary stent placed during the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET); diagnosed on high clinical suspicion, percutaneous cholangiogram and contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT); and successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). PMID:26994644

  12. External biliary drainage following major liver resection for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma: impact on development of liver failure and biliary leakage

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Pim B.; Coelen, Robert J.S.; Wiggers, Jimme K.; Besselink, Marc G.H.; Busch, Olivier R.C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Preoperative biliary drainage is considered essential in perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (PHC) requiring major hepatectomy with biliary-enteric reconstruction. However, evidence for postoperative biliary drainage as to protect the anastomosis is currently lacking. This study investigated the impact of postoperative external biliary drainage on the development of post-hepatectomy biliary leakage and liver failure (PHLF). Methods All patients who underwent major liver resection for suspected PHC between 2000 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Biliary leakage and PHLF was defined as grade B or higher according to the International Study Group of Liver Surgery (ISGLS) criteria. Results Eighty-nine out of 125 (71%) patients had postoperative external biliary drainage. PHLF was more prevalent in the drain group (29% versus 6%; P = 0.004). There was no difference in the incidence of biliary leakage (32% versus 36%). On multivariable analysis, postoperative external biliary drainage was identified as an independent risk factor for PHLF (Odds-ratio 10.3, 95% confidence interval 2.1–50.4; P = 0.004). Conclusions External biliary drainage following major hepatectomy for PHC was associated with an increased incidence of PHLF. It is therefore not recommended to routinely use postoperative external biliary drainage, especially as there is no evidence that this decreases the risk of biliary anastomotic leakage. PMID:27037204

  13. Development of chronic hepatocerebral degeneration eight years after a distal splenorenal (Warren) shunt.

    PubMed Central

    Bleasel, A F; Waugh, R C; McCaughan, G W

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that chronic encephalopathy may be a major complication after the establishment of a surgical portal caval shunt for an episode of variceal haemorrhage. In an effort to minimise this problem Warren and colleagues developed the distal splenorenal shunt where the portal and mesenteric blood flow to the liver was left intact. It is now recognised, however, that the longterm incidence of encephalopathy may be no different with this type of shunt compared with conventional surgical portal systemic shunts. Acquired chronic hepatocerebral degeneration has not been reported after such a selective shunt. A patient with primary biliary cirrhosis is reported who developed the clinical features of this syndrome eight years after a successful distal splenorenal shunt. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2583570

  14. Prosthetic reconstruction for tumors of the distal tibia. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Kenichiro; Naka, Norifumi; Murata, Yoichi; Yasui, Yukihiko; Joyama, Susumu; Araki, Nobuhito

    2011-09-01

    Prosthetic reconstruction in two patients with malignant bone tumors of the distal tibia was conducted. The diagnoses were metastatic bone tumor in one patient and low grade central osteosarcoma in another. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.5 years (3 and 8 years). Reconstruction was achieved using custom-made prosthesis (JMM, Japan Medical Materials), which replaced the distal tibia. In the patient with metastasis, local recurrence occurred 8 months after the primary surgery and the recurrent tumor was resected. Both patients were free from neoplastic disease at the latest follow-up. The average functional scores according to the system of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society were 25 and 23. Custom-made prostheses allow an early return to functional weight-bearing without major complications. This technique provides a safe and effective method of stabilization for properly selected malignant tumors of the distal tibia. PMID:21334192

  15. Novel technique for biliary reconstruction using an isolated gastric tube with a vascularized pedicle: a live animal experimental study and the first clinical case

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biliary tract reconstruction continues to be a challenging surgical problem. Multiple experimental attempts have been reported to reconstruct biliary defects with different materials and variable outcome. Our aim was to evaluate a new method for biliary reconstruction using an isolated pedicled gastric tube in a live animal trial and also to present the first clinical case. Methods Seven mongrel dogs underwent biliary reconstruction using gastric tube harvested, completely separated from the greater curvature, and based on a vascularized pedicle with the right gastroepiploic vessels. The tube was interposed between the common bile duct (CBD) and the duodenum. Postoperative mortality, morbidity, liver functions, gross and microscopic histological picture were assessed. The first clinical case was also presented where, in a patient with post-cholecystectomy biliary injury, an isolated pedicled gastric tube was interposed between the proximal and distal ends of the CBD. Results One dog did not recover from anesthesia and another one died postoperatively from septic peritonitis. Five dogs survived the procedure and showed uneventful course and no cholestasis. The mean anastomotic circumference was 4.8 mm (range 4-6) for CBD anastomosis and 6.2 mm (range 5-7) for duodenal anastomosis. Histologically, anastomotic sites showed good evidence of healing. In the first clinical case, the patient showed clinical and biochemical improvement. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography was feasible and assured patent biliary anastomoses. Conclusion In mongrel dogs, biliary reconstruction using pedicled gastric tube interposition between CBD and duodenum is feasible with satisfactory clinical results, anastomotic circumference and histological evidence of healing. The technique is also feasible in human and seems to be promising. PMID:21985492

  16. A prospective study of radionuclide biliary scanning in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.; Fossard, D. P.; Berry, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Early surgery for biliary pancreatitis has resulted in a need for an accurate method of gallstone detection in acute pancreatitis. Fifty patients with acute pancreatitis were studied prospectively to assess the diagnostic value of Radionuclide Biliary Scanning (RBS) performed within 72 hours of an attack. To assess the general accuracy of RBS a further 154 patients with suspected acute cholecystitis or biliary colic were similarly studied. There were 34 patients with biliary pancreatitis and 18 (53%) had a positive scan (no gallbladder seen). There were 16 patients with non-biliary pancreatitis and 5 (31%) had a positive scan. All 51 patients with acute cholecystitis had a positive scan, as did 82% of the 51 patients with biliary colic. There were 52 patients with no biliary or pancreatic disease and none of these had a positive scan. RBS is highly accurate in confirming a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis or biliary colic. However, it cannot be relied on to differentiate between biliary and non-biliary pancreatitis and should certainly not be used as the basis for biliary surgery in these patients. PMID:6859781

  17. Cholangiocarcinoma and malignant bile duct obstruction: A review of last decades advances in therapeutic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Helga; Frazzoni, Marzio; Mangiafico, Santi; Caruso, Angelo; Manno, Mauro; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Pigò, Flavia; Barbera, Carmelo; Manta, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades many advances have been achieved in endoscopy, in the diagnosis and therapy of cholangiocarcinoma, however blood test, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scan may fail to detect neoplastic disease at early stage, thus the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma is achieved usually at unresectable stage. In the last decades the role of endoscopy has moved from a diagnostic role to an invaluable therapeutic tool for patients affected by malignant bile duct obstruction. One of the major issues for cholangiocarcinoma is bile ducts occlusion, leading to jaundice, cholangitis and hepatic failure. Currently, endoscopy has a key role in the work up of cholangiocarcinoma, both in patients amenable to surgical intervention as well as in those unfit for surgery or not amenable to immediate surgical curative resection owing to locally advanced or advanced disease, with palliative intention. Endoscopy allows successful biliary drainage and stenting in more than 90% of patients with malignant bile duct obstruction, and allows rapid reduction of jaundice decreasing the risk of biliary sepsis. When biliary drainage and stenting cannot be achieved with endoscopy alone, endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage represents an effective alternative method affording successful biliary drainage in more than 80% of cases. The purpose of this review is to focus on the currently available endoscopic management options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26078827

  18. Chondrosarcoma in the distal phalanx of index finger: clinical report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tos, P; Artiaco, S; Linari, A; Battiston, B

    2009-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumour of the hand. This aggressive lesion is extremely rare in the distal phalanx and requires differential diagnosis with enchondroma and onycomatrichoma which are specific neoplasms of this phalanx. We report a case of chondrosarcoma arising from left index distal phalanx, which developed over a long period of time with a progressive deformity of the distal phalanx before becoming painful. The patient was investigated with X-ray and MRI scan which demonstrated a locally aggressive lesion. The surgical procedure was discussed with the patient and consisted of a wide resection with distal phalanx amputation; this surgery left an acceptable functional impairment. Recently, the optimal treatment for chondrosarcoma of the finger has been debated in the literature and a more conservative surgical approach has been proposed. Local recurrence and metastasis have been reported in the literature. Thus, after surgical treatment, the patients should be followed with careful postoperative surveillance. PMID:19345602

  19. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Laing distal myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for This Page GeneReview: Laing Distal Myopathy Laing NG, Laing BA, Meredith C, Wilton SD, Robbins P, ... T, Bridges LR, Fabian V, Rozemuller A, Laing NG. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect ...

  1. Removal of a large stone growing around and encasing a plastic biliary stent: respect the ductal axis.

    PubMed

    Dokas, S; Kalampakas, A; Delivorias, P; Sion, M; Tsitouridis, I

    2009-04-01

    Plastic biliary stents are commonly used during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP). The main indication for biliary stenting is benign or malignant obstruction. Plastic stents, among others, can be used as an escape route in patients with large common bile duct stones, or in cases of acute cholangitis with or without sphincterotomy to provide drainage until definitive treatment. Stent occlusion is the main disadvantage, limiting their patency to around 3 months, after which replacement is recommended. We present a case of a large, close to 2cm, stone developing around and encasing the proximal end of a plastic biliary stent. The stent/stone complex was successfully removed en bloc. The stent was placed in the common bile duct without sphincterotomy, and remained in situ for 2 years. The presented case highlights the importance of definitive treatment for common bile duct stones, the need to respect the ductal axis especially when dealing with large stones and the significance of biliary sphincterotomy during endoscopic interventions in the bile duct. PMID:18083076

  2. Distal clavicle fractures in children☆

    PubMed Central

    Labronici, Pedro José; da Silva, Ricardo Rodrigues; Franco, Marcos Vinícius Viana; Labronici, Gustavo José; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Franco, José Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze fractures of the distal clavicle region in pediatric patients. Methods Ten patients between the ages of five to eleven years (mean of 7.3 years) were observed. Nine patients were treated conservatively and one surgically. All the fractures were classified using the Nenopoulos classification system. Results All the fractures consolidated without complications. Conservative treatment was used for nine patients, of whom three were in group IIIB, three IIb, two IIa and one IV. The only patient who was treated surgically was a female patient of eleven years of age with a group IV fracture. Conclusion The treatment indication for distal fractures of the clavicle in children should be based on the patient's age and the displacement of the fragments. PMID:26962489

  3. Management of distal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    McCarty, L Pearce; Ring, David; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2005-09-01

    Fractures of the distal humerus are complex injuries that can be effectively treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORiF). Exposure of a complex intra-articular fracture may best be achieved through a posterior approach with osteotomy of the olecranon process. The ulnar nerve must be identified and protected, the articular surface must be reduced anatomically, and rigid fixation must be applied to both the medial and lateral columns of the distal humerus. Range of motion should be initiated as soon as possible postoperatively. Complications such as ulnar neuropathy, elbow stiffness, heterotopic ossification, and nonunion should be treated aggressively. Total elbow arthroplasty represents an effective option for fractures that cannot be treated with ORIF. PMID:16250484

  4. Four DNA methylation biomarkers in biliary brush samples accurately identify the presence of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Kim; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Vedeld, Hege Marie; Honne, Hilde; Jebsen, Peter; Hektoen, Merete; Wadsworth, Christopher A.; Clausen, Ole Petter; Lundin, Knut E.A.; Paulsen, Vemund; Foss, Aksel; Mathisen, Øystein; Aabakken, Lars; Schrumpf, Erik; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of the highly aggressive malignancy cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) remains a challenge but has the potential to render the tumor curable by surgical removal. This study evaluates a biomarker panel for the diagnosis of CCA by DNA methylation analyses of biliary brush samples. The methylation status of 13 candidate genes (CDO1, CNRIP1, DCLK1, FBN1, INA, MAL, SEPT9, SFRP1, SNCA, SPG20, TMEFF2, VIM, and ZSCAN18) was investigated in 93 tissue samples (39 CCAs and 54 nonmalignant controls) using quantitative methylation‐specific polymerase chain reaction. The 13 genes were further analyzed in a test series of biliary brush samples (15 CCAs and 20 nonmalignant primary sclerosing cholangitis controls), and the methylation status of the four best performing markers was validated (34 CCAs and 34 primary sclerosing cholangitis controls). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to evaluate the performance of individual biomarkers and the combination of biomarkers. The 13 candidate genes displayed a methylation frequency of 26%‐82% in tissue samples. The four best‐performing genes (CDO1, CNRIP1, SEPT9, and VIM) displayed individual methylation frequencies of 45%‐77% in biliary brushes from CCA patients. Across the test and validation biliary brush series, this four‐gene biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 98%, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.944. Conclusion: We report a straightforward biomarker assay with high sensitivity and specificity for CCA, outperforming standard brush cytology, and suggest that the biomarker panel, potentially in combination with cytological evaluation, may improve CCA detection, particularly among primary sclerosing cholangitis patients. (Hepatology 2015;61:1651–1659) PMID:25644509

  5. Paravertebral Block: An Improved Method of Pain Control in Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. McCowan, Timothy C.; DeValdenebro, Miguel; Wright, Lonnie B.; Workman, James L.; Culp, William C.

    2006-12-15

    Background and Purpose. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage remains a painful procedure in many cases despite the routine use of large amounts of intravenous sedation. We present a feasibility study of thoracic paravertebral blocks in an effort to reduce pain during and following the procedure and reduce requirements for intravenous sedation. Methods. Ten consecutive patients undergoing biliary drainage procedures received fluoroscopically guided paravertebral blocks and then had supplemental intravenous sedation as required to maintain patient comfort. Levels T8-T9 and T9-T10 on the right were targeted with 10-20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sedation requirements and pain levels were recorded. Results. Ten biliary drainage procedures in 8 patients were performed for malignancy in 8 cases and for stones in 2. The mean midazolam use was 1.13 mg IV, and the mean fentanyl requirement was 60.0 {mu}g IV in the block patients. Two episodes of hypotension, which responded promptly to volume replacement, may have been related to the block. No serious complications were encountered. The mean pain score when traversing the chest wall, liver capsule, and upon entering the bile ducts was 0.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, with 1 patient reporting a pain level of 1 and 9 reporting 0. The mean peak pain score, encountered when manipulating at the common bile duct level or when addressing stones there, was 5.4 and ranged from 0 to 10. Conclusions. Thoracic paravertebral block with intravenous sedation supplementation appears to be a feasible method of pain control during biliary interventions.

  6. Endoscopic Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-04-01

    Chronic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption can be managed by endoscopic arthrodesis of the syndesmosis. This is performed through the proximal anterolateral and posterolateral portals. The scar tissue and bone block are resected to facilitate the subsequent reduction of the syndesmosis. The reduction of the syndesmosis can be guided either arthroscopically or endoscopically. The tibial and fibular surfaces of the tibiofibular overlap can be microfractured to facilitate subsequent fusion. PMID:27462544

  7. [Headgear-free molar distalization].

    PubMed

    Manhartsberger, C

    1994-12-01

    The difficulty in treating dentoalveolar class II disharmonies is briefly outlined. An innovative treatment method is presented which makes possible a distalization without the use of headgear. In the treatment method bands are cemented on the first molars, next impressions are made of the upper and lower dental arch, and then the impressions are poured with plaster. Following this the models are mounted in centric relationship in an articulator and the bite is opened 2 mm to 3 mm, so that the molars can be moved without making occlusal contact. The apparatus, an acrylic splint, is constructed in such a fashion as to cover the palatal surfaces from 2nd premolar to 2nd premolar. In addition, the premolars are also covered occlusally and buccally and the canine tips and the incisal edges are covered labially. A headgear tube is attached at the buccal surface in the premolar region of the acrylic splint. This acrylic splint, which is itself retentive, is cemented using glass ionomer cement. Combining this apparatus with a modified Nance Button makes it possible to establish an anchoring segment which is able to retain its position in the face of molar distalization. Molar distalization is then performed using a 0.032 inch stainless steel wire, which is placed between the headgear tube of the acrylic splint and the headgear tube of the band of the first molar. Highly elastic nickel-titanium open coil springs are used as the force elements. PMID:7851830

  8. Biliary complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: a 10-year audit

    PubMed Central

    Gunawansa, Nalaka; McCall, John L; Holden, Andrew; Plank, Lindsay; Munn, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Background Biliary complications following liver transplantation result in major morbidity. We undertook a 10-year audit of the incidence, management and outcomes of post-transplant biliary complications at the New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit. Methods Prospectively collected data on 348 consecutive liver transplants performed between February 1998 and October 2008 were reviewed. The minimum follow-up was 6 months. Results A total of 309 adult and 39 paediatric transplants were performed over the study period. Of these, 296 (85%) were whole liver grafts and 52 (15%) were partial liver grafts (24 split-liver, eight reduced-size and 20 live-donor grafts). There were 80 biliary complications, which included 63 (18%) strictures and 17 (5%) bile leaks. Partial graft, a paediatric recipient and a Roux-en-Y biliary anastomosis were independent predictors of biliary strictures. Twenty-five (40%) strictures were successfully managed non-operatively and 38 (60%) required surgery (31 biliary reconstructions, three segmental resections and four retransplants). Seven (41%) bile leaks required surgical revision and 10 (59%) were managed non-operatively. There was no mortality related directly to biliary complications. Conclusions Biliary complications affected one in five transplant recipients. Paediatric status, partial graft and Roux-en-Y anastomosis were independently associated with the occurrence of biliary strictures. Over half of the affected patients required surgical revision, but no mortality resulted from biliary complications. PMID:21609371

  9. Malignant hyperpyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Hyam; Barlow, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The history, clinical presentation, and management of malignant hyperpyrexia are presented. The aetiology seems to be associated with some inherited abnormality which affects the movement and binding of calcium ions in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, sarcoplasm, and mitochondria. Whether this is a primary muscular defect or secondary to some trophic neural influence is yet to be established. The subjects carrying the abnormal trait show evidence of a myopathy which is subclinical in most instances and revealed only by estimation of serum CPK or biopsy. In some families where the myopathy is clinically obvious there may be, in addition, a variety of musculoskeletal abnormalities. A plea is made for routine monitoring of temperature during anaesthesia and for procainamide or procaine to be readily available in all operating theatres. A history of anaesthetic deaths in a family calls for special care, and, if the serum CPK is elevated, suxamethonium and halothane are to be avoided. Families with orthopaedic and muscular abnormalities are at increased risk and should have estimation of serum CPK before surgery. As a bonus of this study it is suggested that serum CPK estimations be used to screen pigs for selective breeding and so eliminate the disease, which causes soft exudative pork. Images PMID:4708457

  10. Probe-Based Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Indeterminate Biliary Strictures: Refinement of the Image Interpretation Classification

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, Marc; Jamidar, Priya; Gan, S. Ian; Cesaro, Paola; Caillol, Fabrice; Filoche, Bernard; Karia, Kunal; Smith, Ioana; Slivka, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Accurate diagnosis and clinical management of indeterminate biliary strictures are often a challenge. Tissue confirmation modalities during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) suffer from low sensitivity and poor diagnostic accuracy. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) has been shown to be sensitive for malignant strictures characterization (98%) but lacks specificity (67%) due to inflammatory conditions inducing false positives. Methods. Six pCLE experts validated the Paris Classification, designed for diagnosing inflammatory biliary strictures, using a set of 40 pCLE sequences obtained during the prospective registry (19 inflammatory, 6 benign, and 15 malignant). The 4 criteria used included (1) multiple thin white bands, (2) dark granular pattern with scales, (3) increased space between scales, and (4) thickened reticular structures. Interobserver agreement was further calculated on a separate set of 18 pCLE sequences. Results. Overall accuracy was 82.5% (n = 40 retrospectively diagnosed) versus 81% (n = 89 prospectively collected) for the registry, resulting in a sensitivity of 81.2% (versus 98% for the prospective study) and a specificity of 83.3% (versus 67% for the prospective study). The corresponding interobserver agreement for 18 pCLE clips was fair (k = 0.37). Conclusion. Specificity of pCLE using the Paris Classification for the characterization of indeterminate bile duct stricture was increased, without impacting the overall accuracy. PMID:25866506