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Sample records for distinct structural domains

  1. Application of modern tensor calculus to engineered domain structures. 2. Tensor distinction of domain states.

    PubMed

    Kopský, Vojtech

    2006-03-01

    The theory of domain states is reviewed as a prerequisite for consideration of tensorial distinction of domain states. It is then shown that the parameters of the first domain in a ferroic phase transition from a set of isomorphic groups of the same oriented Laue class can be systematically and suitably represented in terms of typical variables. On replacing these variables by actual tensor components according to the previous paper, we can reveal the tensorial parameters associated with each particular symmetry descent. Parameters are distinguished by the ireps to which they belong and this can be used to determine which of them are the principal parameters that distinguish all domain states, in contrast to secondary parameters which are common to several domain states. In general, the parameters are expressed as the covariant components of the tensors. A general procedure is described which is designed to transform the results to Cartesian components. It consists of two parts: the first, called the labelling of covariants, and its inverse, called the conversion equations. Transformation of parameters from the first domain state to other states is now reduced to irreducible subspaces whose maximal dimension is three in contrast with higher dimensions of tensor spaces. With this method, we can explicitly calculate tensor parameters for all domain states. To find the distinction of pairs of domain states, it is suitable to use the concept of the twinning group which is briefly described. PMID:16489243

  2. The Structurally Plastic CH2 Domain Is Linked to Distinct Functions of Fimbrins/Plastins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihui; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Meng; Wu, Youjun; Qu, Xiaolu; Huang, Shanjin

    2016-08-19

    Fimbrins/plastins have been implicated in the generation of distinct actin structures, which are linked to different cellular processes. Historically, fimbrins/plastins were mainly considered as generating tight actin bundles. Here, we demonstrate that different members of the fimbrin/plastin family have diverged biochemically during evolution to generate either tight actin bundles or loose networks with distinct biochemical and biophysical properties. Using the phylogenetically and functionally distinct Arabidopsis fimbrins FIM4 and FIM5 we found that FIM4 generates both actin bundles and cross-linked actin filaments, whereas FIM5 only generates actin bundles. The distinct functions of FIM4 and FIM5 are clearly observed at single-filament resolution. Domain swapping experiments showed that cooperation between the conformationally plastic calponin-homology domain 2 (CH2) and the N-terminal headpiece determines the function of the full-length protein. Our study suggests that the structural plasticity of fimbrins/plastins has biologically meaningful consequences, and provides novel insights into the structure-function relationship of fimbrins/plastins as well as shedding light on how cells generate distinct actin structures. PMID:27261463

  3. Distinct centromere domain structures with separate functions demonstrated in live fission yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Appelgren, Henrik; Kniola, Barbara; Ekwall, Karl

    2003-10-01

    Fission yeast (Saccharomyces pombe) centromere DNA is organized in a central core region flanked on either side by a region of outer repeat (otr) sequences. The otr region is known to be heterochromatic and bound by the Swi6 protein whereas the central core region contains an unusual chromatin structure involving the histone H3 variant Cnp1 (S. pombe CENP-A). The central core is the base for formation of the kinetochore structure whereas the flanking region is important for sister centromere cohesion. We have previously shown that the ultrastructural domain structure of S. pombe centromeres in interphase is similar to that of human centromeres. Here we demonstrate that S. pombe centromeres are organized in cytologically distinct domains even in mitosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of fixed metaphase cells revealed that the otr regions of the centromere were still held together by cohesion even after the sister kinetochores had separated. In live cells, the central cores and kinetochores of sister chromosomes could be distinguished from one another when they were subjected to mitotic tension. The function of the different centromeric domains was addressed. Transacting mutations affecting the kinetochore (nuf2) central core domain (mis6) and the heterochromatin domain (rik1) were analyzed in live cells. In interphase, both nuf2 and mis6 caused declustering of centromeres from the spindle pole body whereas centromere clustering was normal in rik1 despite an apparent decondensation defect. The declustering of centromeres in mis6 cells correlated with loss the Ndc80 kinetochore marker protein from the centromeres. Interestingly the declustered centromeres were still restricted to the nuclear periphery thus revealing a kinetochore-independent peripheral localization mechanism for heterochromatin. Time-lapse microscopy of live mis6 and nuf2-1 mutant cells in mitosis showed similar severe misaggregation phenotypes whereas the rik1 mutants showed a mild cohesion

  4. Structurally distinct modes of recognition of the KIX domain of CBP by Jun and CREB.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen M; Lumb, Kevin J

    2002-11-26

    Gene expression is coordinated in part by interactions between transcriptional activators and other transcription factors such as coactivators. The KIX domain of the coactivator and histone acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) binds numerous mammalian and viral transcriptional activators such as BRCA1, CREB, c-Jun, c-Myb, p53, papillomavirus E2, and HTLV-1 Tax. Formation of the CREB-CBP complex depends on phosphorylation of the KID region of CREB and involves induced folding of KID upon binding a hydrophobic groove of the KIX domain of CBP. Here we investigate the formation of the complex formed by human KIX and the N-terminal activation domain of human c-Jun. The c-Jun activation domain and KID do not share significant sequence similarity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that the Jun N-terminal activation domain is intrinsically disordered in isolation and that KIX binding is independent of Jun phosphorylation. In contrast to the mode of binding exhibited by CREB, NMR chemical shift mapping indicates that the c-Jun activation domain binds to a distinctly different surface of KIX than used by CREB. Moreover, NMR and sedimentation equilibrium studies show that the activation domains of c-Jun and CREB can simultaneously bind the KIX domain of CBP. The results illustrate a new mode of binding and combinatorial recruitment via the KIX domain of CBP by multiple transcriptional activators. PMID:12437352

  5. Structurally distinct Arabidopsis thaliana NLR immune receptors recognize tandem WY domains of an oomycete effector.

    PubMed

    Goritschnig, Sandra; Steinbrenner, Adam D; Grunwald, Derrick J; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2016-05-01

    Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR, or NLR) receptors mediate pathogen recognition. The Arabidopsis thaliana NLR RPP1 recognizes the tandem WY-domain effector ATR1 from the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis through direct association with C-terminal LRRs. We isolated and characterized homologous NLR genes RPP1-EstA and RPP1-ZdrA from two Arabidopsis ecotypes, Estland (Est-1) and Zdarec (Zdr-1), responsible for recognizing a novel spectrum of ATR1 alleles. RPP1-EstA and -ZdrA encode nearly identical NLRs that are phylogenetically distinct from known immunity-activating RPP1 homologs and possess greatly expanded LRR domains. Site-directed mutagenesis and truncation analysis of ATR1 suggests that these homologs recognize a novel surface of the 2(nd) WY domain of ATR1, partially specified by a C-terminal region of the LRR domain. Synteny comparison with RPP1 loci involved in hybrid incompatibility suggests that these functions evolved independently. Closely related RPP1 homologs have diversified their recognition spectra through LRR expansion and sequence variation, allowing them to detect multiple surfaces of the same pathogen effector. Engineering NLR receptor specificity may require a similar combination of repeat expansion and tailored amino acid variation. PMID:26725254

  6. Fosmid-Based Structure-Function Analysis Reveals Functionally Distinct Domains in the Cytoplasmic Domain of Drosophila Crumbs

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Sven; Flores-Benitez, David; Riedel, Falko; Knust, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein Crumbs is required for epithelial polarity and morphogenesis in the embryo, control of tissue size in imaginal discs and morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells, and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration. The small cytoplasmic domain contains two highly conserved regions, a FERM (i.e., protein 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-binding and a PDZ (i.e., postsynaptic density/discs large/ZO-1)-binding domain. Using a fosmid-based transgenomic approach, we analyzed the role of the two domains during invagination of the tracheae and the salivary glands in the Drosophila embryo. We provide data to show that the PDZ-binding domain is essential for the maintenance of cell polarity in both tissues. In contrast, in embryos expressing a Crumbs protein with an exchange of a conserved Tyrosine residue in the FERM-binding domain to an Alanine, both tissues are internalized, despite some initial defects in apical constriction, phospho-Moesin recruitment, and coordinated invagination movements. However, at later stages these embryos fail to undergo dorsal closure, germ band retraction, and head involution. In addition, frequent defects in tracheal fusion were observed. These results suggest stage and/or tissue specific binding partners. We discuss the power of this fosmid-based system for detailed structure-function analyses in comparison to the UAS/Gal4 system. PMID:23390593

  7. Distinct structural transitions of chromatin topological domains correlate with coordinated hormone-induced gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Le Dily, François; Baù, Davide; Pohl, Andy; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Serra, François; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Wright, Roni H.G.; Ballare, Cecilia; Filion, Guillaume; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    The human genome is segmented into topologically associating domains (TADs), but the role of this conserved organization during transient changes in gene expression is not known. Here we describe the distribution of progestin-induced chromatin modifications and changes in transcriptional activity over TADs in T47D breast cancer cells. Using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing), Hi-C (chromosome capture followed by high-throughput sequencing), and three-dimensional (3D) modeling techniques, we found that the borders of the ∼2000 TADs in these cells are largely maintained after hormone treatment and that up to 20% of the TADs could be considered as discrete regulatory units where the majority of the genes are either transcriptionally activated or repressed in a coordinated fashion. The epigenetic signatures of the TADs are homogeneously modified by hormones in correlation with the transcriptional changes. Hormone-induced changes in gene activity and chromatin remodeling are accompanied by differential structural changes for activated and repressed TADs, as reflected by specific and opposite changes in the strength of intra-TAD interactions within responsive TADs. Indeed, 3D modeling of the Hi-C data suggested that the structure of TADs was modified upon treatment. The differential responses of TADs to progestins and estrogens suggest that TADs could function as “regulons” to enable spatially proximal genes to be coordinately transcribed in response to hormones. PMID:25274727

  8. Tensor distinction of domains in ferroic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, D. B.

    2009-10-01

    Ferroic crystals contain two or more domains and may be distinguished by the values of components of tensorial physical properties of the domains. We have extended Aizu’s global tensor distinction by magnetization, polarization, and strain of all domains which arise in a ferroic phase transition to include distinction by toroidal moment, and from phases invariant under time reversal to domains which arise in transitions from all magnetic and non-magnetic phases. For determining possible switching of domains, a domain pair tensor distinction is also considered for all pairs of domains which arise in each ferroic phase transition.

  9. Clarifying the Nature of the Distinctiveness by Domain Interaction in Conceptual Structure: Comment on Cree, McNorgan, and McRae (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kirsten I.; Salamoura, Angeliki; Randall, Billi; Moss, Helen; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual structure account of semantic memory (CSA; L. K. Tyler & H. E. Moss, 2001) claims that feature correlation (the degree to which features co-occur) and feature distinctiveness (the number of concepts in which a feature occurs) interact with domains of knowledge (e.g., living vs. nonliving) such that the distinctive features of…

  10. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  11. Structural and Functional Modularity of the Orange Carotenoid Protein: Distinct Roles for the N- and C-Terminal Domains in Cyanobacterial Photoprotection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, Ryan L.; Jallet, Denis; Li, Ming-De; Mathies, Richard A.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP) serves as a sensor of light intensity and an effector of phycobilisome (PB)–associated photoprotection in cyanobacteria. Structurally, the OCP is composed of two distinct domains spanned by a single carotenoid chromophore. Functionally, in response to high light, the OCP converts from a dark-stable orange form, OCPO, to an active red form, OCPR. The C-terminal domain of the OCP has been implicated in the dynamic response to light intensity and plays a role in switching off the OCP’s photoprotective response through its interaction with the fluorescence recovery protein. The function of the N-terminal domain, which is uniquely found in cyanobacteria, is unclear. To investigate its function, we isolated the N-terminal domain in vitro using limited proteolysis of native OCP. The N-terminal domain retains the carotenoid chromophore; this red carotenoid protein (RCP) has constitutive PB fluorescence quenching activity comparable in magnitude to that of active, full-length OCPR. A comparison of the spectroscopic properties of the RCP with OCPR indicates that critical protein–chromophore interactions within the C-terminal domain are weakened in the OCPR form. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain dynamically regulates the photoprotective activity of an otherwise constitutively active carotenoid binding N-terminal domain. PMID:24399299

  12. Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of the promiscuous EphA4 receptor reveals two distinct conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Singla, Nikhil; Goldgur, Yehuda; Xu, Kai; Paavilainen, Sari; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Himanen, Juha P.

    2010-09-08

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication. They are divided in two subclasses based on their affinities for each other and on sequence conservation. Receptor-ligand binding within each subclass is fairly promiscuous, while binding cross the subclasses happens rarely. EphA4 is an exception to this general rule, since it has long been known to bind both A- and B-class ephrin ligands but the reason for this exceptional behavior has not been worked out at molecular level. Recent structural and biochemical studies on EphA4 ligand-binding domain alone and in complex with its ligands have addressed this question. However, the published structures of EphA4/ephrin complexes differ considerably from each other and strikingly different explanations for the exceptional promiscuity of EphA4 were proposed. To address these contradictory findings, we have determined a crystal structure of the EphA4 ligand-binding domain at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and show that the receptor has an unprecedented ability to exist in two very different, well-ordered conformations even in the unbound state. Our results suggest that the ligand promiscuity of the Ephs is directly correlated with the structural flexibility of the ligand-binding surface of the receptor.

  13. Structure of human apolipoprotein A-IV: a distinct domain architecture among exchangeable apolipoproteins with potential functional implications.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Kevin; Saito, Hiroyuki; Woods, Stephen C; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Tso, Patrick; Phillips, Michael C; Davidson, W Sean

    2004-08-24

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is an exchangeable apolipoprotein that shares many functional similarities with related apolipoproteins such as apoE and apoA-I but has also been implicated as a circulating satiety factor. However, despite the fact that it contains many predicted amphipathic alpha-helical domains, relatively little is known about its tertiary structure. We hypothesized that apoA-IV exhibits a characteristic functional domain organization that has been proposed to define apoE and apoA-I. To test this, we created truncation mutants in a bacterial system that deleted amino acids from either the N- or C-terminal ends of human apoA-IV. We found that apoA-IV was less stable than apoA-I but was more highly organized in terms of its cooperativity of unfolding. Deletion of the extreme N and C termini of apoA-IV did not significantly affect the cooperativity of unfolding, but deletions past amino acid 333 on the C terminus or amino acid 61 on the N terminus had major destabilizing effects. Functionally, apoA-IV was less efficient than apoA-I at clearing multilamellar phospholipid liposomes and promoting ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-mediated cholesterol efflux. However, deletion of a C-terminal region of apoA-IV, which is devoid of predicted amphipathic alpha helices (amino acids 333-376) stimulated both of these activities dramatically. We conclude that the amphipathic alpha helices in apoA-IV form a single, large domain that may be similar to the N-terminal helical bundle domains of apoA-I and apoE but that apoA-IV lacks the C-terminal lipid-binding and cholesterol efflux-promoting domain present in these apolipoproteins. In fact, the C terminus of apoA-IV appears to reduce the ability of apoA-IV to interact with lipids and promote cholesterol efflux. This indicates that, although apoA-IV may have evolved from gene duplication events of ancestral apolipoproteins and shares the basic amphipathic helical building blocks, the overall localization of

  14. Structural and functional analysis of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain reveals distinct roles in checkpoint signaling and DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Doré, Andrew S.; Roe, S. Mark; Nestoras, Konstantinos; Ho, Jenny C.Y.; Watts, Felicity Z.; Pearl, Laurence H.

    2008-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Crb2 is a checkpoint mediator required for the cellular response to DNA damage. Like human 53BP1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9 it contains Tudor2 and BRCT2 domains. Crb2-Tudor2 domain interacts with methylated H4K20 and is required for recruitment to DNA dsDNA breaks. The BRCT2 domain is required for dimerization, but its precise role in DNA damage repair and checkpoint signaling is unclear. The crystal structure of the Crb2–BRCT2 domain, alone and in complex with a phosphorylated H2A.1 peptide, reveals the structural basis for dimerization and direct interaction with γ-H2A.1 in ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF). Mutational analysis in vitro confirms the functional role of key residues and allows the generation of mutants in which dimerization and phosphopeptide binding are separately disrupted. Phenotypic analysis of these in vivo reveals distinct roles in the DNA damage response. Dimerization mutants are genotoxin sensitive and defective in checkpoint signaling, Chk1 phosphorylation, and Crb2 IRIF formation, while phosphopeptide-binding mutants are only slightly sensitive to IR, have extended checkpoint delays, phosphorylate Chk1, and form Crb2 IRIF. However, disrupting phosphopeptide binding slows formation of ssDNA-binding protein (Rpa1/Rad11) foci and reduces levels of Rad22(Rad52) recombination foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. PMID:18676809

  15. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  16. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  17. Structure-function analysis of Leishmania lipophosphoglycan. Distinct domains that mediate binding and inhibition of endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Ho, J L; Kim, H K; Sass, P M; He, S; Geng, J; Xu, H; Zhu, B; Turco, S J; Lo, S K

    1996-10-01

    We have shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) inhibits IL-1 beta gene expression in human monocytes. Here, we show that LPG can bind in a time-dependent manner and suppress endothelial cell activation, possibly via specific LPG domains. Endotoxin (10 ng/ml, 4 h) consistently caused endothelium to increase monocyte adhesion (approximately 20-fold). LPG pretreatment (2 microM, 2 h) completely blocked endotoxin-mediated monocyte adhesion. LPG did not grossly suppress endothelial functions because TNF-alpha- and IL-1 beta-mediated adhesion toward monocytes were not affected. Using four highly purified LPG fragments (namely, repeating phosphodisaccharide (PGM), phosphoglycan, phosphosaccharide core-lyso-alkyl-phosphatidylinositol (core-PI), and lyso-alkyl-phosphatidylinositol (lyso-PI)), we examined whether these fragments can independently inhibit endothelial adhesion. In contrast to that of intact LPG, neither the four LPG fragments (2 microM, 2 h) independently nor the co-addition of phosphoglycan and core-P1 fragments blocked the endotoxin-mediated adhesion to monocytes. To determine whether the fragments can reverse the effect of intact LPG, endothelial cells were first pretreated with the LPG fragments (10 microM, 15 min), followed by the addition of LPG (2 microM). All four LPG fragments fully reversed the effect of LPG. Simultaneous addition of LPG fragments and intact LPG caused only partial suppression (approximately 45%), while the addition of LPG fragments 14 min later had no reversal effect. Flow cytometry revealed that only core-P1 and lyso-P1 competitively inhibited (approximately 30%) LPG binding. Conversely, LPG competed with the binding of [3H]lyso-P1 (approximately 30%). Furthermore, mAb against the PGM reversed (approximately 70%) the effect of LPG. Thus, the lyso-P1 domain on LPG mediates binding to endothelial cells, whereas the PGM domain mediates the cell inhibitory effect. PMID:8816410

  18. Distinct structural domains of caveolin-1 independently regulate Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ microdomain-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Parekh, Anant B

    2015-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, calcium entry across the cell surface activates nuclear gene expression, a process critically important for cell growth and differentiation, learning, and memory and immune cell functions. In immune cells, calcium entry occurs through store-operated Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, comprised of STIM1 and Orai1 proteins. Local calcium entry through CRAC channels activates expression of c-fos- and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-dependent genes. Although c-fos and NFAT often interact to activate gene expression synergistically, they can be activated independently of one another to regulate distinct genes. This raises the question of how one transcription factor can be activated and not the other when both are stimulated by the same trigger. Here, we show that the lipid raft scaffolding protein caveolin-1 interacts with the STIM1-Orai1 complex to increase channel activity. Phosphorylation of tyrosine 14 on caveolin-1 regulates CRAC channel-evoked c-fos activation without impacting the NFAT pathway or Orai1 activity. Our results reveal that structurally distinct domains of caveolin-1 selectively regulate the ability of local calcium to activate distinct transcription factors. More generally, our findings reveal that modular regulation by a scaffolding protein provides a simple, yet effective, mechanism to tunnel a local signal down a specific pathway. PMID:25645930

  19. Interplay of two functionally and structurally distinct domains of the c-fos AU-rich element specifies its mRNA-destabilizing function.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C Y; Chen, T M; Shyu, A B

    1994-01-01

    AU-rich elements (ARE) in the 3' untranslated region of many highly labile mRNAs for proto-oncogenes, lymphokines, and cytokines can act as an RNA-destabilizing element. The absence of a clear understanding of the key sequence and structural features of the ARE that are required for its destabilizing function has precluded the further elucidation of its mode of action and the basis of its specificity. Combining extensive mutagenesis of the c-fos ARE with in vivo analysis of mRNA stability, we were able to identify mutations that exhibited kinetic phenotypes consistent with the biphasic decay characteristic of a two-step mechanism: accelerated poly(A) shortening and subsequent decay of the transcribed portion of the mRNA. These mutations, which affected either an individual step or both steps, all changed the mRNA stability. Our experiments further revealed the existence of two structurally distinct and functionally interdependent domains that constitute the c-fos ARE. Domain I, which is located within the 5' 49-nucleotide segment of the ARE and contains the three AUUUA motifs, can function as an RNA destabilizer by itself. It forms the essential core unit necessary for the ARE-destabilizing function. Domain II is a 20-nucleotide U-rich sequence which is located within the 3' part of the c-fos ARE. Although it alone can not act as an RNA destabilizer, this domain serves two critical roles: (i) its presence enhances the destabilizing ability of domain I by accelerating the deadenylation step, and (ii) it has a novel capacity of buffering decay-impeding effects exerted by mutations introduced within domain I. A model is proposed to explain how these critical structural features may be involved in the c-fos ARE-directed mRNA decay pathway. These findings have important implications for furthering our understanding of the molecular basis of differential mRNA decay mediated by different AREs. Images PMID:7903419

  20. Two distinct variants of erythrocyte spectrin beta IV domain.

    PubMed

    Pothier, B; Alloisio, N; Morlé, L; Maréchal, J; Barthélemy, H; Ducluzeau, M T; Dorier, A; Delaunay, J

    1989-11-01

    We report two distinct variants affecting the beta IV domain of erythrocyte spectrin, designated spectrin Saint-Chamond and spectrin Tlemcen. They were discovered in a French family and an Algerian individual, respectively. They appeared clinically and morphologically asymptomatic in the heterozygous state. In two-dimensional maps of spectrin partial digests, both mutants were manifested by cathodic shifts (with no change of the molecular weights) of the peptides that cover the N-terminal region of spectrin beta IV domain. The relevance of the abnormal peptides to the beta IV domain was established by quantitative analysis and by Western blotting using anti-beta IV domain-specific antibodies. These two variants are thus far the most distal variants of spectrin to be defined on an unequivocal structural basis. PMID:2807277

  1. CXCL1/MGSA Is a Novel Glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-binding Chemokine: STRUCTURAL EVIDENCE FOR TWO DISTINCT NON-OVERLAPPING BINDING DOMAINS.

    PubMed

    Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-02-19

    In humans, the chemokine CXCL1/MGSA (hCXCL1) plays fundamental and diverse roles in pathophysiology, from microbial killing to cancer progression, by orchestrating the directed migration of immune and non-immune cells. Cellular trafficking is highly regulated and requires concentration gradients that are achieved by interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). However, very little is known regarding the structural basis underlying hCXCL1-GAG interactions. We addressed this by characterizing the binding of GAG heparin oligosaccharides to hCXCL1 using NMR spectroscopy. Binding experiments under conditions at which hCXCL1 exists as monomers and dimers indicate that the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand. NMR experiments and modeling studies indicate that lysine and arginine residues mediate binding and that they are located in two non-overlapping domains. One domain, consisting of N-loop and C-helical residues (defined as α-domain) has also been identified previously as the GAG-binding domain for the related chemokine CXCL8/IL-8. The second domain, consisting of residues from the N terminus, 40s turn, and third β-strand (defined as β-domain) is novel. Eliminating β-domain binding by mutagenesis does not perturb α-domain binding, indicating two independent GAG-binding sites. It is known that N-loop and N-terminal residues mediate receptor activation, and we show that these residues are also involved in extensive GAG interactions. We also show that the GAG-bound hCXCL1 completely occlude receptor binding. We conclude that hCXCL1-GAG interactions provide stringent control over regulating chemokine levels and receptor accessibility and activation, and that chemotactic gradients mediate cellular trafficking to the target site. PMID:26721883

  2. Helical shifts generate two distinct conformers in the atomic resolution structure of the CheA phosphotransferase domain from Thermotoga maritima.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Cindy M; Gradinaru, Cristian; Simon, Melvin I; Bilwes, Alexandrine M; Crane, Brian R

    2004-08-27

    Helical histidine phosphotransferase (HPt) domains play a central role in many aspects of bacterial signal transduction. The 0.98 A resolution crystallographic structure of the amino-terminal HPt domain (P1) from the chemotaxis kinase CheA of Thermotoga maritima reveals a remarkable degree of structural heterogeneity within a four-helix bundle. Two of the four helices have alternate main-chain conformations that differ by a 1.3-1.7A shift along the bundle axis. These dual conformers were only resolved with atomic resolution diffraction data and their inclusion significantly improved refinement statistics. Neither conformer optimizes packing within the helical core, consistent with their nearly equal refined occupancies. Altered hydrogen bonding within an inter-helical loop may facilitate transition between conformers. Two discrete structural states rather than a continuum of closely related conformations indicates an energetic barrier to conversion between conformers in the crystal at 100K, although many more states are expected in solution at physiological temperatures. Anisotropic atomic thermal B factors within the two conformers indicate modest overall atomic displacement that is largest perpendicular to the helical bundle and not along the direction of apparent motion. Despite the conformational heterogeneity of P1 in the crystal at low temperature, the protein displays high thermal stability in solution (T(m)=100 degrees C). Addition of a variable C-terminal region that corresponds to a mobile helix in other CheA structures significantly narrows the temperature width of the unfolding transition and may affect domain dynamics. Helices that compose the kinase recognition site and contain the phospho-accepting His45 do not have alternate conformations. In this region, atomic resolution provides detailed structural parameters for a conserved hydrogen-bonding network that tunes the reactivity of His45. A neighboring glutamate (E67), essential for

  3. The structures of the SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo nuclease domains reveal a potential basis for their distinct DNA processing activities.

    PubMed

    Allerston, Charles K; Lee, Sook Y; Newman, Joseph A; Schofield, Christopher J; McHugh, Peter J; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-12-15

    The human SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo proteins are members of an extended family of eukaryotic nuclease containing a motif related to the prokaryotic metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) fold. SNM1A is a key exonuclease during replication-dependent and transcription-coupled interstrand crosslink repair, while SNM1B/Apollo is required for maintaining telomeric overhangs. Here, we report the crystal structures of SNM1A and SNM1B at 2.16 Å. While both proteins contain a typical MBL-β-CASP domain, a region of positive charge surrounds the active site of SNM1A, which is absent in SNM1B and explains the greater apparent processivity of SNM1A. The structures of both proteins also reveal a putative, wide DNA-binding groove. Extensive mutagenesis of this groove, coupled with detailed biochemical analysis, identified residues that did not impact on SNM1A catalytic activity, but drastically reduced its processivity. Moreover, we identified a key role for this groove for efficient digestion past DNA interstrand crosslinks, facilitating the key DNA repair reaction catalysed by SNM1A. Together, the architecture and dimensions of this groove, coupled to the surrounding region of high positive charge, explain the remarkable ability of SNM1A to accommodate and efficiently digest highly distorted DNA substrates, such as those containing DNA lesions. PMID:26582912

  4. The structures of the SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo nuclease domains reveal a potential basis for their distinct DNA processing activities

    PubMed Central

    Allerston, Charles K.; Lee, Sook Y.; Newman, Joseph A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; McHugh, Peter J.; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-01-01

    The human SNM1A and SNM1B/Apollo proteins are members of an extended family of eukaryotic nuclease containing a motif related to the prokaryotic metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) fold. SNM1A is a key exonuclease during replication-dependent and transcription-coupled interstrand crosslink repair, while SNM1B/Apollo is required for maintaining telomeric overhangs. Here, we report the crystal structures of SNM1A and SNM1B at 2.16 Å. While both proteins contain a typical MBL-β-CASP domain, a region of positive charge surrounds the active site of SNM1A, which is absent in SNM1B and explains the greater apparent processivity of SNM1A. The structures of both proteins also reveal a putative, wide DNA-binding groove. Extensive mutagenesis of this groove, coupled with detailed biochemical analysis, identified residues that did not impact on SNM1A catalytic activity, but drastically reduced its processivity. Moreover, we identified a key role for this groove for efficient digestion past DNA interstrand crosslinks, facilitating the key DNA repair reaction catalysed by SNM1A. Together, the architecture and dimensions of this groove, coupled to the surrounding region of high positive charge, explain the remarkable ability of SNM1A to accommodate and efficiently digest highly distorted DNA substrates, such as those containing DNA lesions. PMID:26582912

  5. Evolution of distinct EGF domains with specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Merridee A.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Chu, Carmen K.; Feng, Lina L.; Sparrow, Duncan B.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    EGF domains are extracellular protein modules cross-linked by three intradomain disulfides. Past studies suggest the existence of two types of EGF domain with three-disulfides, human EGF-like (hEGF) domains and complement C1r-like (cEGF) domains, but to date no functional information has been related to the two different types, and they are not differentiated in sequence or structure databases. We have developed new sequence patterns based on the different C-termini to search specifically for the two types of EGF domains in sequence databases. The exhibited sensitivity and specificity of the new pattern-based method represents a significant advancement over the currently available sequence detection techniques. We re-annotated EGF sequences in the latest release of Swiss-Prot looking for functional relationships that might correlate with EGF type. We show that important post-translational modifications of three-disulfide EGFs, including unusual forms of glycosylation and post-translational proteolytic processing, are dependent on EGF subtype. For example, EGF domains that are shed from the cell surface and mediate intercellular signaling are all hEGFs, as are all human EGF receptor family ligands. Additional experimental data suggest that functional specialization has accompanied subtype divergence. Based on our structural analysis of EGF domains with three-disulfide bonds and comparison to laminin and integrin-like EGF domains with an additional inter-domain disulfide, we propose that these hEGF and cEGF domains may have arisen from a four-disulfide ancestor by selective loss of different cysteine residues. PMID:15772310

  6. Spatially distinct and metabolically active membrane domain in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Jennifer M; Luo, Chu-Yuan; Mayfield, Jacob A; Hsu, Tsungda; Fukuda, Takeshi; Walfield, Andrew L; Giffen, Samantha R; Leszyk, John D; Baer, Christina E; Bennion, Owen T; Madduri, Ashoka; Shaffer, Scott A; Aldridge, Bree B; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sandler, Steven J; Kinoshita, Taroh; Moody, D Branch; Morita, Yasu S

    2016-05-10

    Protected from host immune attack and antibiotic penetration by their unique cell envelope, mycobacterial pathogens cause devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis. Seamless coordination of cell growth with cell envelope elongation at the pole maintains this barrier. Unraveling this spatiotemporal regulation is a potential strategy for controlling mycobacterial infections. Our biochemical analysis previously revealed two functionally distinct membrane fractions in Mycobacterium smegmatis cell lysates: plasma membrane tightly associated with the cell wall (PM-CW) and a distinct fraction of pure membrane free of cell wall components (PMf). To provide further insight into the functions of these membrane fractions, we took the approach of comparative proteomics and identified more than 300 proteins specifically associated with the PMf, including essential enzymes involved in cell envelope synthesis such as a mannosyltransferase, Ppm1, and a galactosyltransferase, GlfT2. Furthermore, comparative lipidomics revealed the distinct lipid composition of the PMf, with specific association of key cell envelope biosynthetic precursors. Live-imaging fluorescence microscopy visualized the PMf as patches of membrane spatially distinct from the PM-CW and notably enriched in the pole of the growing cells. Taken together, our study provides the basis for assigning the PMf as a spatiotemporally distinct and metabolically active membrane domain involved in cell envelope biogenesis. PMID:27114527

  7. Wnts grasp the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 at two distinct binding sites.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Krisztina; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2015-10-01

    Wnts have a structure resembling a hand with "thumb" and "index" fingers that grasp the cysteine rich domains of Frizzled receptors at two distinct binding sites. In the present work we show that the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 is also bound by Wnts at two sites. Using C-terminal domains of Wnt5a and Wnt7a and arginine-scanning mutagenesis of the WIF domain we demonstrate that, whereas the N-terminal, lipid-modified "thumb" of Wnts interacts with the alkyl-binding site of the WIF domain, the C-terminal domain of Wnts (Wnt-CTD) binds to a surface on the opposite side of the WIF domain. PMID:26342861

  8. An Unusual Cation-Binding Site and Distinct Domain-Domain Interactions Distinguish Class II Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate Synthases.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Krishna, Sankar N; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) catalyzes a critical step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. An essential prokaryotic enzyme and the molecular target of the herbicide glyphosate, EPSPSs are the subject of both pharmaceutical and commercial interest. Two EPSPS classes that exhibit low sequence homology, differing substrate/glyphosate affinities, and distinct cation activation properties have previously been described. Here, we report structural studies of the monovalent cation-binding class II Coxiella burnetii EPSPS (cbEPSPS). Three cbEPSPS crystal structures reveal that the enzyme undergoes substantial conformational changes that alter the electrostatic potential of the active site. A complex with shikimate-3-phosphate, inorganic phosphate (Pi), and K(+) reveals that ligand induced domain closure produces an unusual cation-binding site bordered on three sides by the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and the product Pi. A crystal structure of the class I Vibrio cholerae EPSPS (vcEPSPS) clarifies the basis of differential class I and class II cation responsiveness, showing that in class I EPSPSs a lysine side chain occupies the would-be cation-binding site. Finally, we identify distinct patterns of sequence conservation at the domain-domain interface and propose that the two EPSPS classes have evolved to differently optimize domain opening-closing dynamics. PMID:26813771

  9. Distinct domains of Complexin I differentially regulate neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingshan; Reim, Kerstin; Chen, Xiaocheng; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Deng, Hui; Rizo, Josep; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Complexins constitute a family of four synaptic high-affinity SNARE complex binding proteins. They positively regulate a late, post-priming step in Ca2+-triggered synchronous neurotransmitter release, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. We show here that SNARE complex binding of Complexin I via its central α-helix is necessary but unexpectedly not sufficient for its key function in promoting neurotransmitter release. An accessory α-helix N-terminal of the SNARE complex binding region plays an inhibitory role in fast synaptic exocytosis, while its N-terminally adjacent sequences facilitate Ca2+-triggered release even in the absence of the Ca2+ sensor Synaptotagmin 1. Our results indicate that distinct functional domains of Complexins differentially regulate synaptic exocytosis, and that via the interplay between these domains Complexins play a crucial role in fine-tuning Ca2+-triggered fast neurotransmitter release. PMID:17828276

  10. SH3 Domains Differentially Stimulate Distinct Dynamin I Assembly Modes and G Domain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sai; Collett, Michael; Robinson, Phillip J.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin I is a highly regulated GTPase enzyme enriched in nerve terminals which mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. One regulatory mechanism involves its interactions with proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. At least 30 SH3 domain-containing proteins bind dynamin at its proline-rich domain (PRD). Those that stimulate dynamin activity act by promoting its oligomerisation. We undertook a systematic parallel screening of 13 glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged endocytosis-related SH3 domains on dynamin binding, GTPase activity and oligomerisation. No correlation was found between dynamin binding and their potency to stimulate GTPase activity. There was limited correlation between the extent of their ability to stimulate dynamin activity and the level of oligomerisation, indicating an as yet uncharacterised allosteric coupling of the PRD and G domain. We examined the two variants, dynamin Iab and Ibb, which differ in the alternately splice middle domain α2 helix. They responded differently to the panel of SH3s, with the extent of stimulation between the splice variants varying greatly between the SH3s. This study reveals that SH3 binding can act as a heterotropic allosteric regulator of the G domain via the middle domain α2 helix, suggesting an involvement of this helix in communicating the PRD-mediated allostery. This indicates that SH3 binding both stabilises multiple conformations of the tetrameric building block of dynamin, and promotes assembly of dynamin-SH3 complexes with distinct rates of GTP hydrolysis. PMID:26659814

  11. CLASP2 Has Two Distinct TOG Domains That Contribute Differently to Microtubule Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maki, Takahisa; Grimaldi, Ashley D; Fuchigami, Sotaro; Kaverina, Irina; Hayashi, Ikuko

    2015-07-17

    CLIP-associated proteins CLASPs are mammalian microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) that promote MT rescue in vivo. Their plus-end localization is dependent on other +TIPs, EB1 and CLIP-170, but in the leading edge of the cell, CLASPs display lattice-binding activity. MT association of CLASPs is suggested to be regulated by multiple TOG (tumor overexpressed gene) domains and by the serine-arginine (SR)-rich region, which contains binding sites for EB1. Here, we report the crystal structures of the two TOG domains of CLASP2. Both domains consist of six HEAT repeats, which are similar to the canonical paddle-like tubulin-binding TOG domains, but have arched conformations. The degrees and directions of curvature are different between the two TOG domains, implying that they have distinct roles in MT binding. Using biochemical, molecular modeling and cell biological analyses, we have investigated the interactions between the TOG domains and αβ-tubulin and found that each domain associates differently with αβ-tubulin. Our findings suggest that, by varying the degrees of domain curvature, the TOG domains may distinguish the structural conformation of the tubulin dimer, discriminate between different states of MT dynamic instability and thereby function differentially as stabilizers of MTs. PMID:26003921

  12. Molecular dissection of radixin: distinct and interdependent functions of the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The ERM proteins--ezrin, radixin, and moesin--occur in particular cortical cytoskeletal structures. Several lines of evidence suggest that they interact with both cytoskeletal elements and plasma membrane components. Here we described the properties of full-length and truncated radixin polypeptides expressed in transfected cells. In stable transfectants, exogenous full-length radixin behaves much like endogenous ERM proteins, localizing to the same cortical structures. However, the presence of full-length radixin or its carboxy-terminal domain in cortical structures correlates with greatly diminished staining of endogenous moesin in those structures, suggesting that radixin and moesin compete for a limiting factor required for normal associations in the cell. The results also reveal distinct roles for the amino- and carboxy-terminal domains. At low levels relative to endogenous radixin, the carboxy-terminal polypeptide is associated with most of the correct cortical targets except cleavage furrows. In contrast, the amino-terminal polypeptide is diffusely localized throughout the cell. Low level expression of full-length radixin or either of the truncated polypeptides has no detectable effect on cell physiology. However, high level expression of the carboxy-terminal domain dramatically disrupts normal cytoskeletal structures and functions. At these high levels, the amino-terminal polypeptide does localize to cortical structures, but does not affect the cells. We conclude that the behavior of radixin in cells depends upon activities contributed by separate domains of the protein, but also requires modulating interactions between those domains. PMID:7744951

  13. STAS Domain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alok K.; Rigby, Alan C.; Alper, Seth L.

    2011-01-01

    Pendrin shares with nearly all SLC26/SulP anion transporters a carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic segment organized around a Sulfate Transporter and Anti-Sigma factor antagonist (STAS) domain. STAS domains of divergent amino acid sequence exhibit a conserved fold of 4 β strands interspersed among 5 α helices. The first STAS domain proteins studied were single-domain anti-sigma factor antagonists (anti-anti-σ). These anti-anti-σ indirectly stimulate bacterial RNA polymerase by inactivating inhibitory anti-σ kinases, liberating σ factors to direct specific transcription of target genes or operons. Some STAS domains are nucleotide-binding phosphoproteins or nucleotidases. Others are interaction/transduction modules within multidomain sensors of light, oxygen and other gasotransmitters, cyclic nucleotides, inositol phosphates, and G proteins. Additional multidomain STAS protein sequences suggest functions in sensing, metabolism, or transport of nutrients such as sugars, amino acids, lipids, anions, vitamins, or hydrocarbons. Still other multidomain STAS polypeptides include histidine and serine/threonine kinase domains and ligand-activated transcription factor domains. SulP/SLC26 STAS domains and adjacent sequences interact with other transporters, cytoskeletal scaffolds, and with enzymes metabolizing transported anion substrates, forming putative metabolons. STAS domains are central to membrane targeting of many SulP/SLC26 anion transporters, and STAS domain mutations are associated with at least three human recessive diseases. This review summarizes STAS domain structure and function. PMID:22116355

  14. Two distinct domains of protein 4.1 critical for assembly offunctional nuclei in Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Heald, Rebecca; Lee, Gloria; Nunomura, Wataru; Gimm,J. Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel AnneJ. Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2002-11-15

    Protein 4.1R, a multifunctional structural protein, acts asan adaptor in mature red cell membrane skeletons linking spectrin-actincomplexes to plasma membrane-associated proteins. In nucleated cellsprotein 4.1 is not associated exclusively with plasma membrane but isalso detected at several important subcellular locations crucial for celldivision. To identify 4.1 domains having critical functions in nuclearassembly, 4.1 domain peptides were added to Xenopus egg extract nuclearreconstitution reactions. Morphologically disorganized, replicationdeficient nuclei assembled when spectrin-actin binding domain orNuMA-binding C-terminal domain peptides were present. However, controlvariant spectrin-actin binding domain peptides incapable of bindingactin, or mutant C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding,had no deleterious effects on nuclear reconstitution. To test if 4.1 isrequired for proper nuclear assembly, 4.1 isoforms were depleted withspectrin-actin binding or C-terminal domain-specific antibodies. Nucleiassembled in depleted extracts ha d deranged phenotypes. However, nuclearassembly could be rescued by addition of recombinant 4.1R. Our dataestablishes that protein 4.1 is essential for nuclear assembly andidentifies two distinct 4.1 domains, initially characterized incytoskeletal interactions, that have crucial and versatile functions innuclear assembly.

  15. Two distinct domains of protein 4.1 critical for assembly of functional nuclei in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Heald, Rebecca; Lee, Gloria; Nunomura, Wataru; Gimm, J Aura; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2002-11-15

    Protein 4.1R, a multifunctional structural protein, acts as an adaptor in mature red cell membrane skeletons linking spectrin-actin complexes to plasma membrane-associated proteins. In nucleated cells protein 4.1 is not associated exclusively with plasma membrane but is also detected at several important subcellular locations crucial for cell division. To identify 4.1 domains having critical functions in nuclear assembly, 4.1 domain peptides were added to Xenopus egg extract nuclear reconstitution reactions. Morphologically disorganized, replication deficient nuclei assembled when spectrin-actin-binding domain or NuMA-binding C-terminal domain peptides were present. However, control variant spectrin-actin-binding domain peptides incapable of binding actin or mutant C-terminal domain peptides with reduced NuMA binding had no deleterious effects on nuclear reconstitution. To test whether 4.1 is required for proper nuclear assembly, 4.1 isoforms were depleted with spectrin-actin binding or C-terminal domain-specific antibodies. Nuclei assembled in the depleted extracts were deranged. However, nuclear assembly could be rescued by the addition of recombinant 4.1R. Our data establish that protein 4.1 is essential for nuclear assembly and identify two distinct 4.1 domains, initially characterized in cytoskeletal interactions, that have crucial and versatile functions in nuclear assembly. PMID:12171917

  16. The highly conserved domain of unknown function 1792 has a distinct glycosyltransferase fold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zhu, Fan; Yang, Tiandi; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Meixian; Li, Jingzhi; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne; Erlandsen, Heidi; Wu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    More than 33,000 glycosyltransferases have been identified. Structural studies, however, have only revealed two distinct glycosyltransferase (GT) folds, GT-A and GT-B. Here we report a 1.34 Å resolution X-ray crystallographic structure of a previously uncharacterized “domain of unknown function” 1792 (DUF1792) and show that the domain adopts a new fold and is required for glycosylation of a family of serine-rich repeat streptococcal adhesins. Biochemical studies reveal that the domain is a glucosyltransferase, and it catalyzes the transfer of glucose to the branch point of the hexasaccharide O-linked to the serine-rich repeat of the bacterial adhesin, Fap1 of Streptococcus parasanguinis. DUF1792 homologs from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria also exhibit the activity. Thus DUF1792 represents a new family of glycosyltransferases, so we designate it as a GT-D glycosyltransferase fold. As the domain is highly conserved in bacteria and not found in eukaryotes, it can be explored as a new antibacterial target. PMID:25023666

  17. Fibroblast migration on fibronectin requires three distinct functional domains.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard A F; An, Jian-Qiang; Greiling, Doris; Khan, Azim; Schwarzbauer, Jean E

    2003-10-01

    Mesenchymal cell movement is normally constrained; however, fibronectin can provide a pathway for stromal cell migration during embryogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound healing. Cells can adhere to fibronectin via integrin and nonintegrin receptors, which bind multiple unique peptide sequences. Synthetic peptides and recombinant proteins were used to delineate the functional domains needed for human fibroblast migration over fibronectin. The 9th and 10th fibronectin type III repeats, which contain RGD and PHSRN synergy cell attachment sequences, support almost maximal fibroblast attachment, but not migration of primary dermal fibroblasts. Specific sequences within the heparin domain and the IIICS region are also required for migration. These findings predict and additional data confirm the necessity for the cooperation of multiple integrin and nonintegrin receptors for fibroblast migration on fibronectin. Such stringency of migration most likely imposes an immense constraint on normal mesenchymal cell mobility in unperturbed tissue. Loss of such restraint may be critical for the migration cancer cells through the extracellular matrix. PMID:14632184

  18. Distinct Domains within PSD-95 Mediate Synaptic Incorporation, Stabilization and Activity-Dependent Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sturgill, James F.; Steiner, Pascal; Czervionke, Brian L.

    2009-01-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) consists of a lattice-like array of interacting proteins that organizes and stabilizes receptors, ion channels, structural, and signaling proteins necessary for synaptic function. To study the stabilization of proteins within this structure and the contribution of these proteins to the integrity of the PSD, we tagged synaptic proteins with photoactivatable GFP (PAGFP) and used combined 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) and 2-photon laser photoactivation (2PLP) to measure their rate of turnover in individual spines of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We find that PSD-95 is highly stable within the spine, more so than other PSD-associated proteins such as CaMKIIα, CaMKIIβ, GluR2 and Stargazin. Analysis of a series of PSD-95 mutants revealed that distinct domains stabilize PSD-95 within the PSD and contribute to PSD formation. Stabilization of PSD-95 within the PSD requires N-terminal palmitoylation and protein interactions mediated by the 1st and 2nd PDZ domains whereas formation of a stable lattice of PSD-95 molecules within the PSD additionally requires the C-terminal SH3 domain. Furthermore, in a PDZ domain 1 and 2 dependent manner, activation of NMDA receptors with a chemical LTD protocol rapidly destabilizes PSD-95 and causes a subset of the PSD-95 molecules previously anchored in the spine to be released. Thus, through the analysis of rates of exchange of synaptic PSD-95, we determine separate domains of PSD-95 that play specific roles in establishing a stable postsynaptic lattice, in allowing proteins to enter this lattice, and in reorganizing this structure in response to plasticity-inducing stimuli. PMID:19828799

  19. A Distinct Structure inside the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Baba, Daisuke; Haba, Yasuaki; Kadowaki, Ryota; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murai, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji; Naoi, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Sato, Shuji

    2005-03-01

    We present the result of a near-infrared (JHKs) survey along the Galactic plane, -10.5d<=l<=10.5d and b=+1deg, with the IRSF 1.4 m telescope and the SIRIUS camera. Ks versus H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams reveal a well-defined population of red clump stars whose apparent magnitude peak changes continuously along the Galactic plane, from Ks=13.4 at l=-10deg to Ks=12.2 at l=10deg after dereddening. This variation can be explained by the barlike structure found in previous studies, but we find an additional inner structure at |l|<~4deg, where the longitude-apparent magnitude relation is distinct from the outer bar and where the apparent magnitude peak changes by only ~0.1 mag over the central 8°. The exact nature of this inner structure is as yet uncertain.

  20. Protein structural domains: definition and prediction.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Tress, Michael L

    2011-11-01

    Recognition and prediction of structural domains in proteins is an important part of structure and function prediction. This unit lists the range of tools available for domain prediction, and describes sequence and structural analysis tools that complement domain prediction methods. Also detailed are the basic domain prediction steps, along with suggested strategies for different protein sequences and potential pitfalls in domain boundary prediction. The difficult problem of domain orientation prediction is also discussed. All the resources necessary for domain boundary prediction are accessible via publicly available Web servers and databases and do not require computational expertise. PMID:22045561

  1. Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doranz, B J; Lu, Z H; Rucker, J; Zhang, T Y; Sharron, M; Cen, Y H; Wang, Z X; Guo, H H; Du, J G; Accavitti, M A; Doms, R W; Peiper, S C

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major fusion coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To define the structures of CCR5 that can support envelope (Env)-mediated membrane fusion, we analyzed the activity of homologs, chimeras, and mutants of human CCR5 in a sensitive gene reporter cell-cell fusion assay. Simian, but not murine, homologs of CCR5 were fully active as HIV-1 fusion coreceptors. Chimeras between CCR5 and divergent chemokine receptors demonstrated the existence of two distinct regions of CCR5 that could be utilized for Env-mediated fusion, the amino-terminal domain and the extracellular loops. Dual-tropic Env proteins were particularly sensitive to alterations in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain, suggesting that this domain may play a pivotal role in the evolution of coreceptor usage in vivo. We identified individual residues in both functional regions, Asp-11, Lys-197, and Asp-276, that contribute to coreceptor function. Deletion of a highly conserved cytoplasmic motif rendered CCR5 incapable of signaling but did not abrogate its ability to function as a coreceptor, implying the independence of fusion and G-protein-mediated chemokine receptor signaling. Finally, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody to CCR5 to assist in future studies of CCR5 expression. PMID:9261347

  2. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  3. The distinct C-terminal acidic domains of HMGB proteins are functionally relevant in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Aguilera, Estefania Anahi; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Thiengo, Silvana; Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2016-04-01

    The Schistosoma mansoni High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 share highly conserved HMG box DNA binding domains but have significantly different C-terminal acidic tails. Here, we used three full-length and tailless forms of the S. mansoni HMGB proteins to examine the functional roles of their acidic tails. DNA binding assays revealed that the different lengths of the acidic tails among the three SmHMGB proteins significantly and distinctively influenced their DNA transactions. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the longest acidic tail of SmHMGB3 contributes to the structural stabilisation of this protein. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we showed distinct patterns of SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 expression in different tissues of adult worms. RNA interference approaches indicated a role for SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 in the reproductive system of female worms, whereas for SmHMGB1 no clear phenotype was observed. Schistosome HMGB proteins can be phosphorylated, acetylated and methylated. Importantly, the acetylation and methylation of schistosome HMGBs were greatly enhanced upon removal of the acidic tail. These data support the notion that the C-terminal acidic tails dictate the differences in the structure, expression and function of schistosome HMGB proteins. PMID:26820302

  4. Distinct phylogeographic structure recognized within Desmazierella acicola.

    PubMed

    Martinović, Tijana; Koukol, Ondřej; Hirose, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Desmazierella acicola (anamorph Verticicladium trifidum, Chorioactidaceae) represents a frequent colonizer of pine needles in litter. Considering the global diversity and distribution of pine species, we expected different phylogenetic lineages to exist in different geographical and climatic areas inhabited by these hosts. We compared DNA sequence data with phenotypic characteristics (morphology of the anamorph and growth at three different temperatures) of 43 strains isolated mostly from pine and also spruce needle litter sampled in various geographical areas. Analyses of ITS rDNA recovered eight geographically structured lineages. Fragments of genes for the translation elongation factor 1-α, and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II reproduced similar lineages, although not all of them were monophyletic. The similarity in ITS sequences among the clade with samples from Continental-Atlantic Europe and four other clades was lower than 95%. Several lineages exhibit also a tendency toward host specificity to a particular pine species. Growth tests at different temperatures indicated a different tolerance to specific climatic conditions in different geographic areas. However, the surveyed phenotypic characteristics also showed high variation within lineages, most evident in the morphology of the anamorph. Until a morphological study of the teleomorph is carried out, all of these lineages should be treated as distinct populations within a single species. PMID:26490702

  5. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-10-01

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-05-07

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions.

  7. The MDM2 RING domain and central acidic domain play distinct roles in MDM2 protein homodimerization and MDM2-MDMX protein heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Patrick L; Ke, Hengming; Zhang, Yanping

    2015-05-15

    The oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (MDM2) is an E3 ligase that plays a prominent role in p53 suppression by promoting its polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In its active form, MDM2 forms homodimers as well as heterodimers with the homologous protein murine double minute 4 (MDMX), both of which are thought to occur through their respective C-terminal RING (really interesting new gene) domains. In this study, using multiple MDM2 mutants, we show evidence suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization occur through distinct mechanisms because MDM2 RING domain mutations that inhibit MDM2 interaction with MDMX do not affect MDM2 interaction with WT MDM2. Intriguingly, deletion of a portion of the MDM2 central acidic domain selectively inhibits interaction with MDM2 while leaving intact the ability of MDM2 to interact with MDMX and to ubiquitinate p53. Further analysis of an MDM2 C-terminal deletion mutant reveals that the C-terminal residues of MDM2 are required for both MDM2 and MDMX interaction. Collectively, our results suggest a model in which MDM2-MDMX heterodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and proper RING domain structure of MDM2, whereas MDM2 homodimerization requires the extreme C terminus and the central acidic domain of MDM2, suggesting that MDM2 homo- and heterodimers utilize distinct MDM2 domains. Our study is the first to report mutations capable of separating MDM2 homo- and heterodimerization. PMID:25809483

  8. Magnetic tweezers-based force clamp reveals mechanically distinct apCAM domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, Devrim; Blasiak, Agata; O'Mahony, James J; Suter, Daniel M; Lee, Gil U

    2012-09-19

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgCAMs) play a crucial role in cell-cell interactions during nervous system development and function. The Aplysia CAM (apCAM), an invertebrate IgCAM, shares structural and functional similarities with vertebrate NCAM and therefore has been considered as the Aplysia homolog of NCAM. Despite these similarities, the binding properties of apCAM have not been investigated thus far. Using magnetic tweezers, we applied physiologically relevant, constant forces to apCAM-coated magnetic particles interacting with apCAM-coated model surfaces and characterized the kinetics of bond rupture. The average bond lifetime decreased with increasing external force, as predicted by theoretical considerations. Mathematical simulations suggest that the apCAM homophilic interaction is mediated by two distinct bonds, one involving all five immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in an antiparallel alignment and the other involving only two Ig domains. In summary, this study provides biophysical evidence that apCAM undergoes homophilic interactions, and that magnetic tweezers-based, force-clamp measurements provide a rapid and reliable method for characterizing relatively weak CAM interactions. PMID:22995484

  9. Structures of two distinct conformations of holo-non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Drake, Eric J; Miller, Bradley R; Shi, Ce; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T; Sundlov, Jesse A; Allen, C Leigh; Skiniotis, Georgios; Aldrich, Courtney C; Gulick, Andrew M

    2016-01-14

    Many important natural products are produced by multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). During synthesis, intermediates are covalently bound to integrated carrier domains and transported to neighbouring catalytic domains in an assembly line fashion. Understanding the structural basis for catalysis with non-ribosomal peptide synthetases will facilitate bioengineering to create novel products. Here we describe the structures of two different holo-non-ribosomal peptide synthetase modules, each revealing a distinct step in the catalytic cycle. One structure depicts the carrier domain cofactor bound to the peptide bond-forming condensation domain, whereas a second structure captures the installation of the amino acid onto the cofactor within the adenylation domain. These structures demonstrate that a conformational change within the adenylation domain guides transfer of intermediates between domains. Furthermore, one structure shows that the condensation and adenylation domains simultaneously adopt their catalytic conformations, increasing the overall efficiency in a revised structural cycle. These structures and the single-particle electron microscopy analysis demonstrate a highly dynamic domain architecture and provide the foundation for understanding the structural mechanisms that could enable engineering of novel non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. PMID:26762461

  10. Structures of Two Distinct Conformations of holo-Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Eric J.; Miller, Bradley R.; Shi, Ce; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Allen, C. Leigh; Skiniotis, Georgios; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Many important natural products are produced by multidomain nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs)1–4. During synthesis, intermediates are covalently bound to integrated carrier domains and transported to neighboring catalytic domains in an assembly line fashion5. Understanding the structural basis for catalysis with NRPSs will facilitate bioengineering to create novel products. Here we describe the structures of two different holo-NRPSs modules, each revealing a distinct step in the catalytic cycle. One structure depicts the carrier domain cofactor bound to the peptide bond-forming condensation domain, whereas a second structure captures the installation of the amino acid onto the cofactor within the adenylation domain. These structures demonstrate that a conformational change within the adenylation domain guides transfer of intermediates between domains. Furthermore, one structure shows that the condensation and adenylation domains simultaneously adopt their catalytic conformations, increasing the overall efficiency in a revised structural cycle. These structures and single-particle electron microscopy analysis demonstrate a highly dynamic domain architecture and provide the foundation for understanding the structural mechanisms that could enable engineering novel NRPSs. PMID:26762461

  11. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-01

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future. PMID:15567406

  12. Frequency domain modelling of wind turbine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Soerensen, P.; Larsen, G.C.; Christensen, C.J.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper describes a frequency domain model of the structure of an operating horizontal axis wind turbine. The frequency domain model is implemented along with an analogous time domain modeling the Risoe PC code Design Basis 2, and a more detailed description of the model is offered in a Risoe report by Soerensen (1994). The structure of an operating wind turbine is affected by essential non-linearities between structural variables on blades and tower respectively. These non-linearities are caused by the rotation of the blades. The transformations between the blade coordinate systems and the tower coordinate system will depend on the instantaneous azimuth positions of the blades as they rotate. Frequency domain analysis are much faster than time simulations and in some respects they give more insight into the dynamics of the structure. However, the non-linear terms in the dynamic equations for a complex wind turbine structure are usually thought to preclude the use of frequency domain methods. Design Basis 2 is used to verify the frequency domain model comparing loads on the structure calculated with the frequency domain model both to loads calculated with the time domain model and to measured loads. Examples show that frequency and time domain calculations of typical PSD`s of loads are in very good agreement. Also the agreement between the calculated and measured PSD`s is good. Moreover, Design Basis 2 has shown that the frequency domain model results in an extremely fast calculation method.

  13. Distinct Interaction Modes of the Kinesin-13 Motor Domain with the Microtubule.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Chandrima; Benoit, Matthieu P M H; DePaoli, Vania; Diaz-Valencia, Juan D; Asenjo, Ana B; Gerfen, Gary J; Sharp, David J; Sosa, Hernando

    2016-04-12

    Kinesins-13s are members of the kinesin superfamily of motor proteins that depolymerize microtubules (MTs) and have no motile activity. Instead of generating unidirectional movement over the MT lattice, like most other kinesins, kinesins-13s undergo one-dimensional diffusion (ODD) and induce depolymerization at the MT ends. To understand the mechanism of ODD and the origin of the distinct kinesin-13 functionality, we used ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence polarization microscopy to analyze the behavior and conformation of Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-13 KLP10A protein constructs bound to the MT lattice. We found that KLP10A interacts with the MT in two coexisting modes: one in which the motor domain binds with a specific orientation to the MT lattice and another where the motor domain is very mobile and able to undergo ODD. By comparing the orientation and dynamic behavior of mutated and deletion constructs we conclude that 1) the Kinesin-13 class specific neck domain and loop-2 help orienting the motor domain relative to the MT. 2) During ODD the KLP10A motor-domain changes orientation rapidly (rocks or tumbles). 3) The motor domain alone is capable of undergoing ODD. 4) A second tubulin binding site in the KLP10A motor domain is not critical for ODD. 5) The neck domain is not the element preventing KLP10A from binding to the MT lattice like motile kinesins. PMID:27074684

  14. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  15. Structural Basis for Myosin V Discrimination Between Distinct Cargoes

    SciTech Connect

    Pashkova,N.; Jin, Y.; Ramaswamy, S.; Weisman, L.

    2006-01-01

    Myosin V molecular motors move cargoes on actin filaments. A myosin V may move multiple cargoes to distinct places at different times. The cargoes attach to the globular tail of myosin V via cargo-specific receptors. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 {angstrom} of the myosin V globular tail. The overall tertiary structure has not been previously observed. There are several patches of highly conserved regions distributed on the surface of the tail. These are candidate attachment sites for cargo-specific receptors. Indeed, we identified a region of five conserved surface residues that are solely required for vacuole inheritance. Likewise, we identified a region of five conserved surface residues that are required for secretory vesicle movement, but not vacuole movement. These two regions are at opposite ends of the oblong-shaped cargo-binding domain, and moreover are offset by 180{sup o}. The fact that the cargo-binding areas are distant from each other and simultaneously exposed on the surface of the globular tail suggests that major targets for the regulation of cargo attachment are organelle-specific myosin V receptors.

  16. ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are distributed to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb detergent-resistant domains on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sano, Osamu; Ito, Shiho; Kato, Reiko; Shimizu, Yuji; Kobayashi, Aya; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Kioka, Noriyuki; Hanada, Kentaro; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Matsuo, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and ABCG4 are lipid transporters that mediate the efflux of cholesterol from cells. To analyze the characteristics of these lipid transporters, we examined and compared their distributions and lipid efflux activity on the plasma membrane. The efflux of cholesterol mediated by ABCA1 and ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was affected by a reduction of cellular sphingomyelin levels. Detergent solubility and gradient density ultracentrifugation assays indicated that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 were distributed to domains that were solubilized by Triton X-100 and Brij 96, resistant to Triton X-100 and Brij 96, and solubilized by Triton X-100 but resistant to Brij 96, respectively. Furthermore, ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was colocalized with flotillin-1 on the plasma membrane. The amounts of cholesterol extracted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin were increased by ABCA1, ABCG1, or ABCG4, suggesting that cholesterol in non-raft domains was increased. Furthermore, ABCG1 and ABCG4 disturbed the localization of caveolin-1 to the detergent-resistant domains and the binding of cholera toxin subunit B to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are localized to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb the meso-domain structures by reorganizing lipids on the plasma membrane; collectively, these observations may explain the different substrate profiles and lipid efflux roles of these transporters. PMID:25302608

  17. Genomic organization of alpha satellite DNA on human chromosome 7: evidence for two distinct alphoid domains on a single chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Waye, J S; England, S B; Willard, H F

    1987-01-01

    A complete understanding of chromosomal disjunction during mitosis and meiosis in complex genomes such as the human genome awaits detailed characterization of both the molecular structure and genetic behavior of the centromeric regions of chromosomes. Such analyses in turn require knowledge of the organization and nature of DNA sequences associated with centromeres. The most prominent class of centromeric DNA sequences in the human genome is the alpha satellite family of tandemly repeated DNA, which is organized as distinct chromosomal subsets. Each subset is characterized by a particular multimeric higher-order repeat unit consisting of tandemly reiterated, diverged alpha satellite monomers of approximately 171 base pairs. The higher-order repeat units are themselves tandemly reiterated and represent the most recently amplified or fixed alphoid sequences. We present evidence that there are at least two independent domains of alpha satellite DNA on chromosome 7, each characterized by their own distinct higher-order repeat structure. We determined the complete nucleotide sequences of a 6-monomer higher-order repeat unit, which is present in approximately 500 copies per chromosome 7, as well as those of a less-abundant (approximately 10 copies) 16-monomer higher-order repeat unit. Sequence analysis indicated that these repeats are evolutionarily distinct. Genomic hybridization experiments established that each is maintained in relatively homogeneous tandem arrays with no detectable interspersion. We propose mechanisms by which multiple unrelated higher-order repeat domains may be formed and maintained within a single chromosomal subset. Images PMID:3561394

  18. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Eamon F X; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F; Rambo, Robert P; Sansom, Mark S P; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2016-07-28

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzledclass G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked a top the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains. PMID:27437577

  19. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  20. Trapping a 96° domain rotation in two distinct conformations by engineered disulfide bridges

    PubMed Central

    Schultz-Heienbrok, Robert; Maier, Timm; Sträter, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    Engineering disulfide bridges is a common technique to lock a protein movement in a defined conformational state. We have designed two double mutants of Escherichia coli 5′-nucleotidase to trap the enzyme in both an open (S228C, P513C) and a closed (P90C, L424C) conformation by the formation of disulfide bridges. The mutant proteins have been expressed, purified, and crystallized, to structurally characterize the designed variants. The S228C, P513C is a double mutant crystallized in two different crystal forms with three independent conformers, which differ from each other by a rotation of up to 12° of the C-terminal domain with respect to the N-terminal domain. This finding, as well as an analysis of the domain motion in the crystal, indicates that the enzyme still exhibits considerable residual domain flexibility. In the double mutant that was designed to trap the enzyme in the closed conformation, the structure analysis reveals an unexpected intermediate conformation along the 96° rotation trajectory between the open and closed enzyme forms. A comparison of the five independent conformers analyzed in this study shows that the domain movement of the variant enzymes is characterized by a sliding movement of the residues of the domain interface along the interface, which is in contrast to a classical closure motion where the residues of the domain interface move perpendicular to the interface. PMID:15215524

  1. Distinct class of DNA-binding domains is exemplified by a master regulator of phenotypic switching in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Zordan, Rebecca E.; Cain, Christopher W.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    Among the most important classes of regulatory proteins are the sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that control transcription through the occupancy of discrete DNA sequences within genomes. Currently, this class of proteins encompasses at least 37 distinct structural superfamilies and more than 100 distinct structural motifs. In this paper, we examine the transcriptional regulator Wor1, a master regulator of white-opaque switching in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. As assessed by a variety of algorithms, this protein has no sequence or structural similarity to any known DNA-binding protein. It is, however, conserved across the vast fungal lineage, with a 300aa region of sequence conservation. Here, we show that this 300aa region of Wor1 exhibits sequence-specific DNA binding and therefore represents a new superfamily of DNA-binding proteins. We identify the 14-nucleotide-pair DNA sequence recognized by Wor1, characterize the site through mutational analysis, and demonstrate that this sequence is sufficient for the Wor1-dependent activation of transcription in vivo. Within the 300aa DNA-binding conserved region, which we have termed the WOPR box, are two domains (WOPRa and WOPRb), dissimilar to each other but especially well-conserved across the fungal lineage. We show that the WOPR box binds DNA as a monomer and that neither domain, when expressed and purified separately, exhibits sequence-specific binding. DNA binding is restored, however, when the two isolated domains are added together. These results indicate that the WOPR family of DNA-binding proteins involves an unusual coupling between two dissimilar, covalently linked domains. PMID:20660774

  2. Functionally distinct NEAT (NEAr Transporter) domains within the Staphylococcus aureus IsdH/HarA protein extract heme from methemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Pilpa, Rosemarie M; Robson, Scott A; Villareal, Valerie A; Wong, Melissa L; Phillips, Martin; Clubb, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus uses iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins to scavenge the essential nutrient iron from host hemoproteins. The IsdH protein (also known as HarA) is a receptor for hemoglobin (Hb), haptoglobin (Hp), and the Hb-Hp complex. It contains three NEAT (NEAr Transporter) domains: IsdH(N1), IsdH(N2), and IsdH(N3). Here we show that they have different functions; IsdH(N1) binds Hb and Hp, whereas IsdH(N3) captures heme that is released from Hb. The staphylococcal IsdB protein also functions as an Hb receptor. Primary sequence homology to IsdH indicates that it will also employ functionally distinct NEAT domains to bind heme and Hb. We have used site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance methods to localize the Hp and Hb binding surface on IsdH(N1). High affinity binding to these structurally unrelated proteins requires residues located within a conserved aromatic motif that is positioned at the end of the beta-barrel structure. Interestingly, this site is quite malleable, as other NEAT domains use it to bind heme. We also demonstrate that the IsdC NEAT domain can capture heme directly from Hb, suggesting that there are multiple pathways for heme transfer across the cell wall. PMID:18984582

  3. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD–linker domain–TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  4. The catalytic region and PEST domain of PTPN18 distinctly regulate the HER2 phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Xu, Yun-Fei; Ning, Shang-Lei; Yang, Du-Xiao; Li, Yi; Du, Yu-Jie; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ya; Liang, Nan; Yao, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Li; Gu, Li-Chuan; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Pang, Qi; Chen, Yu-Xin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Ma, Rong; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-09-01

    The tyrosine phosphorylation barcode encoded in C-terminus of HER2 and its ubiquitination regulate diverse HER2 functions. PTPN18 was reported as a HER2 phosphatase; however, the exact mechanism by which it defines HER2 signaling is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that PTPN18 regulates HER2-mediated cellular functions through defining both its phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes. Enzymologic characterization and three crystal structures of PTPN18 in complex with HER2 phospho-peptides revealed the molecular basis for the recognition between PTPN18 and specific HER2 phosphorylation sites, which assumes two distinct conformations. Unique structural properties of PTPN18 contribute to the regulation of sub-cellular phosphorylation networks downstream of HER2, which are required for inhibition of HER2-mediated cell growth and migration. Whereas the catalytic domain of PTPN18 blocks lysosomal routing and delays the degradation of HER2 by dephosphorylation of HER2 on pY(1112), the PEST domain of PTPN18 promotes K48-linked HER2 ubiquitination and its rapid destruction via the proteasome pathway and an HER2 negative feedback loop. In agreement with the negative regulatory role of PTPN18 in HER2 signaling, the HER2/PTPN18 ratio was correlated with breast cancer stage. Taken together, our study presents a structural basis for selective HER2 dephosphorylation, a previously uncharacterized mechanism for HER2 degradation and a novel function for the PTPN18 PEST domain. The new regulatory role of the PEST domain in the ubiquitination pathway will broaden our understanding of the functions of other important PEST domain-containing phosphatases, such as LYP and PTPN12. PMID:25081058

  5. The catalytic region and PEST domain of PTPN18 distinctly regulate the HER2 phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Xu, Yun-Fei; Ning, Shang-Lei; Yang, Du-Xiao; Li, Yi; Du, Yu-Jie; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ya; Liang, Nan; Yao, Wei; Zhang, Ling-Li; Gu, Li-Chuan; Gao, Cheng-Jiang; Pang, Qi; Chen, Yu-Xin; Xiao, Kun-Hong; Ma, Rong; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphorylation barcode encoded in C-terminus of HER2 and its ubiquitination regulate diverse HER2 functions. PTPN18 was reported as a HER2 phosphatase; however, the exact mechanism by which it defines HER2 signaling is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that PTPN18 regulates HER2-mediated cellular functions through defining both its phosphorylation and ubiquitination barcodes. Enzymologic characterization and three crystal structures of PTPN18 in complex with HER2 phospho-peptides revealed the molecular basis for the recognition between PTPN18 and specific HER2 phosphorylation sites, which assumes two distinct conformations. Unique structural properties of PTPN18 contribute to the regulation of sub-cellular phosphorylation networks downstream of HER2, which are required for inhibition of HER2-mediated cell growth and migration. Whereas the catalytic domain of PTPN18 blocks lysosomal routing and delays the degradation of HER2 by dephosphorylation of HER2 on pY1112, the PEST domain of PTPN18 promotes K48-linked HER2 ubiquitination and its rapid destruction via the proteasome pathway and an HER2 negative feedback loop. In agreement with the negative regulatory role of PTPN18 in HER2 signaling, the HER2/PTPN18 ratio was correlated with breast cancer stage. Taken together, our study presents a structural basis for selective HER2 dephosphorylation, a previously uncharacterized mechanism for HER2 degradation and a novel function for the PTPN18 PEST domain. The new regulatory role of the PEST domain in the ubiquitination pathway will broaden our understanding of the functions of other important PEST domain-containing phosphatases, such as LYP and PTPN12. PMID:25081058

  6. Isolation and characterization of distinct domains of sarcolemma and T-tubules from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, P; Rosemblatt, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1995-01-01

    1. Several cell-surface domains of sarcolemma and T-tubule from skeletal-muscle fibre were isolated and characterized. 2. A protocol of subcellular fractionation was set up that involved the sequential low- and high-speed homogenization of rat skeletal muscle followed by KCl washing, Ca2+ loading and sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. This protocol led to the separation of cell-surface membranes from membranes enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum and intracellular GLUT4-containing vesicles. 3. Agglutination of cell-surface membranes using wheat-germ agglutinin allowed the isolation of three distinct cell-surface membrane domains: sarcolemmal fraction 1 (SM1), sarcolemmal fraction 2 (SM2) and a T-tubule fraction enriched in protein tt28 and the alpha 2-component of dihydropyridine receptor. 4. Fractions SM1 and SM2 represented distinct sarcolemmal subcompartments based on different compositions of biochemical markers: SM2 was characterized by high levels of beta 1-integrin and dystrophin, and SM1 was enriched in beta 1-integrin but lacked dystrophin. 5. The caveolae-associated molecule caveolin was very abundant in SM1, SM2 and T-tubules, suggesting the presence of caveolae or caveolin-rich domains in these cell-surface membrane domains. In contrast, clathrin heavy chain was abundant in SM1 and T-tubules, but only trace levels were detected in SM2. 6. Immunoadsorption of T-tubule vesicles with antibodies against protein tt28 and against GLUT4 revealed the presence of GLUT4 in T-tubules under basal conditions and it also allowed the identification of two distinct pools of T-tubules showing different contents of tt28 and dihydropyridine receptors. 7. Our data on distribution of clathrin and dystrophin reveal the existence of subcompartments in sarcolemma from muscle fibre, featuring selective mutually exclusive components. T-tubules contain caveolin and clathrin suggesting that they contain caveolin- and clathrin-rich domains. Furthermore, evidence for the

  7. Different Transmembrane Domains Associate with Distinct Endoplasmic Reticulum Components during Membrane Integration of a Polytopic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meacock, Suzanna L.; Lecomte, Fabienne J.L.; Crawshaw, Samuel G.; High, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We have been studying the insertion of the seven transmembrane domain (TM) protein opsin to gain insights into how the multiple TMs of polytopic proteins are integrated at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We find that the ER components associated with the first and second TMs of the nascent opsin polypeptide chain are clearly distinct. The first TM (TM1) is adjacent to the α and β subunits of the Sec61 complex, and a novel component, a protein associated with the ER translocon of 10 kDa (PAT-10). The most striking characteristic of PAT-10 is that it remains adjacent to TM1 throughout the biogenesis and membrane integration of the full-length opsin polypeptide. TM2 is also found to be adjacent to Sec61α and Sec61β during its membrane integration. However, TM2 does not form any adducts with PAT-10; rather, a transient association with the TRAM protein is observed. We show that the association of PAT-10 with opsin TM1 does not require the N-glycosylation of the nascent chain and occurs irrespective of the amino acid sequence and transmembrane topology of TM1. We conclude that the precise makeup of the ER membrane insertion site can be distinct for the different transmembrane domains of a polytopic protein. We find that the environment of a particular TM can be influenced by both the “stage” of nascent chain biosynthesis reached, and the TM's relative location within the polypeptide. PMID:12475939

  8. Distinctiveness and Correlation in Conceptual Structure: Behavioral and Computational Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Billi; Moss, Helen E.; Rodd, Jennifer M.; Greer, Mike; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2004-01-01

    Patients with category-specific deficits have motivated a range of hypotheses about the structure of the conceptual system. One class of models claims that apparent category dissociations emerge from the internal structure of concepts rather than fractionation of the system into separate substores. This account claims that distinctive properties…

  9. Notch Transmembrane Domain: Secondary Structure and Topology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is critical in development, neuronal maintenance, and hematopoiesis. An obligate step in the activation of this pathway is cleavage of its transmembrane (TM) domain by γ-secretase. While the soluble domains have been extensively studied, little has been done to characterize its TM and flanking juxtamembrane (JM) segments. Here, we present the results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the human Notch1 TM/JM domain. The TM domain is largely α-helical. While the flanking JM segments do not adopt regular secondary structure, they interact with the membrane surface, suggesting membrane interactions may play a role in modulating its cleavage by γ-secretase and subsequent NOTCH signaling function. PMID:26023825

  10. Structured hints : extracting and abstracting domain expertise.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Stevens, R.; Sterling, T.; Gao, G. R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; California Inst. of Tech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ. of Delaware

    2009-03-16

    We propose a new framework for providing information to help optimize domain-specific application codes. Its design addresses problems that derive from the widening gap between the domain problem statement by domain experts and the architectural details of new and future high-end computing systems. The design is particularly well suited to program execution models that incorporate dynamic adaptive methodologies for live tuning of program performance and resource utilization. This new framework, which we call 'structured hints', couples a vocabulary of annotations to a suite of performance metrics. The immediate target is development of a process by which a domain expert describes characteristics of objects and methods in the application code that would not be readily apparent to the compiler; the domain expert provides further information about what quantities might provide the best indications of desirable effect; and the interactive preprocessor identifies potential opportunities for the domain expert to evaluate. Our development of these ideas is progressing in stages from case study, through manual implementation, to automatic or semi-automatic implementation. In this paper we discuss results from our case study, an examination of a large simulation of a neural network modeled after the neocortex.

  11. Domain structure of Fe-based microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, S. A.; Laroze, D.; Vargas, P.; Vazquez, M.

    2006-02-01

    Some magnetic characteristics of the Fe-based cast amorphous glass-coated microwires with positive magnetostriction constant are investigated. The residual stress distributions in this type of microwires determine the domain structures and the switching field behavior; in particular, we present a phenomenological law of its temperature dependence, which has a very good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Distinct Domains of Yeast Cortical Tag Proteins Bud8p and Bud9p Confer Polar Localization and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Anne-Brit; Taheri, Naimeh; Heinrich, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diploid yeast cells follow a bipolar budding program, which depends on the two transmembrane glycoproteins Bud8p and Bud9p that potentially act as cortical tags to mark the cell poles. Here, we have performed systematic structure-function analyses of Bud8p and Bud9p to identify functional domains. We find that polar transport of Bud8p and Bud9p does not depend on N-terminal sequences but instead on sequences in the median part of the proteins and on the C-terminal parts that contain the transmembrane domains. We show that the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factor Bud5p, which is essential for bud site selection and physically interacts with Bud8p, also interacts with Bud9p. Regions of Bud8p and Bud9p predicted to reside in the extracellular space are likely to confer interaction with the N-terminal region of Bud5p, implicating indirect interactions between the cortical tags and the GDP/GTP exchange factor. Finally, we have identified regions of Bud8p and Bud9p that are required for interaction with the cortical tag protein Rax1p. In summary, our study suggests that Bud8p and Bud9p carry distinct domains for delivery of the proteins to the cell poles, for interaction with the general budding machinery and for association with other cortical tag proteins. PMID:17581861

  13. Elongation factor TFIIS contains three structural domains: solution structure of domain II.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, P E; Awrey, D E; Edwards, A M; Arrowsmith, C H

    1996-01-01

    Transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II is regulated by the general elongation factor TFIIS. This factor stimulates RNA polymerase II to transcribe through regions of DNA that promote the formation of stalled ternary complexes. Limited proteolytic digestion showed that yeast TFIIS is composed of three structural domains, termed I, II, and III. The two C-terminal domains (II and III) are required for transcription activity. The structure of domain III has been solved previously by using NMR spectroscopy. Here, we report the NMR-derived structure of domain II: a three-helix bundle built around a hydrophobic core composed largely of three tyrosines protruding from one face of the C-terminal helix. The arrangement of known inactivating mutations of TFIIS suggests that two surfaces of domain II are critical for transcription activity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8855225

  14. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  15. Distinct Superficial and Deep Laminar Domains of Activity in the Visual Cortex during Rest and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Alexander; Adams, Geoffrey K.; Aura, Christopher; Leopold, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial patterns of spontaneous neural activity at rest have previously been associated with specific networks in the brain, including those pertaining to the functional architecture of the primary visual cortex (V1). However, despite the prominent anatomical differences between cortical layers, little is known about the laminar pattern of spontaneous activity in V1. We address this topic by investigating the amplitude and coherence of ongoing local field potential (LFP) signals measured from different layers in V1 of macaque monkeys during rest and upon presentation of a visual stimulus. We used a linear microelectrode array to measure LFP signals at multiple, evenly spaced positions throughout the cortical thickness. Analyzing both the mean LFP amplitudes and between-contact LFP coherences, we identified two distinct zones of activity, roughly corresponding to superficial and deep layers, divided by a sharp transition near the bottom of layer 4. The LFP signals within each laminar zone were highly coherent, whereas those between zones were not. This functional compartmentalization was found not only during rest, but also when the receptive field was stimulated during a visual task. These results demonstrate the existence of distinct superficial and deep functional domains of coherent LFP activity in V1 that may reflect the intrinsic interplay of V1 microcircuitry with cortical and subcortical targets, respectively. PMID:20802856

  16. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used

  17. Distinct prion strains are defined by amyloid core structure and chaperone binding site dynamics.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Debelouchina, Galia T; Kayatekin, Can; Dorminy, Tea; Jacavone, Angela C; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-02-20

    Yeast prions are self-templating protein-based mechanisms of inheritance whose conformational changes lead to the acquisition of diverse new phenotypes. The best studied of these is the prion domain (NM) of Sup35, which forms an amyloid that can adopt several distinct conformations (strains) that produce distinct phenotypes. Using magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we provide a detailed look at the dynamic properties of these forms over a broad range of timescales. We establish that different prion strains have distinct amyloid structures, with many side chains in different chemical environments. Surprisingly, the prion strain with a larger fraction of rigid residues also has a larger fraction of highly mobile residues. Differences in mobility correlate with differences in interaction with the prion-partitioning factor Hsp104 in vivo, perhaps explaining strain-specific differences in inheritance. PMID:24485763

  18. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer’s disease features distinct structures of amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark L.; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; ElHag, Mohamed; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Pichet, Termsarasab; Lissemore, Frances; Shea, Michelle; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Appleby, Brian S.; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K.; Sajatovic, Martha; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Zhang, Shulin; Mayo, Ping; Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lerner, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors that increase the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease are now well recognized but the cause of variable progression rates and phenotypes of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease is largely unknown. We aimed to investigate the relationship between diverse structural assemblies of amyloid-β and rates of clinical decline in Alzheimer’s disease. Using novel biophysical methods, we analysed levels, particle size, and conformational characteristics of amyloid-β in the posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of 48 cases of Alzheimer’s disease with distinctly different disease durations, and correlated the data with APOE gene polymorphism. In both hippocampus and posterior cingulate cortex we identified an extensive array of distinct amyloid-β42 particles that differ in size, display of N-terminal and C-terminal domains, and conformational stability. In contrast, amyloid-β40 present at low levels did not form a major particle with discernible size, and both N-terminal and C- terminal domains were largely exposed. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer’s disease that is associated with a low frequency of APOE e4 allele demonstrates considerably expanded conformational heterogeneity of amyloid-β42, with higher levels of distinctly structured amyloid-β42 particles composed of 30–100 monomers, and fewer particles composed of < 30 monomers. The link between rapid clinical decline and levels of amyloid-β42 with distinct structural characteristics suggests that different conformers may play an important role in the pathogenesis of distinct Alzheimer’s disease phenotypes. These findings indicate that Alzheimer’s disease exhibits a wide spectrum of amyloid-β42 structural states and imply the existence of prion-like conformational strains. PMID:25688081

  19. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer’s disease features distinct structures of amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark L.; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; ElHag, Mohamed; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Pichet, Termsarasab; Lissemore, Frances; Shea, Michelle; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Appleby, Brian S.; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K.; Sajatovic, Martha; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Zhang, Shulin; Mayo, Ping; Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lerner, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors that increase the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease are now well recognized but the cause of variable progression rates and phenotypes of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease is largely unknown. We aimed to investigate the relationship between diverse structural assemblies of amyloid-β and rates of clinical decline in Alzheimer’s disease. Using novel biophysical methods, we analysed levels, particle size, and conformational characteristics of amyloid-β in the posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of 48 cases of Alzheimer’s disease with distinctly different disease durations, and correlated the data with APOE gene polymorphism. In both hippocampus and posterior cingulate cortex we identified an extensive array of distinct amyloid-β42 particles that differ in size, display of N-terminal and C-terminal domains, and conformational stability. In contrast, amyloid-β40 present at low levels did not form a major particle with discernible size, and both N-terminal and C- terminal domains were largely exposed. Rapidly progressive Alzheimer’s disease that is associated with a low frequency of APOE e4 allele demonstrates considerably expanded conformational heterogeneity of amyloid-β42, with higher levels of distinctly structured amyloid-β42 particles composed of 30–100 monomers, and fewer particles composed of < 30 monomers. The link between rapid clinical decline and levels of amyloid-β42 with distinct structural characteristics suggests that different conformers may play an important role in the pathogenesis of distinct Alzheimer’s disease phenotypes. These findings indicate that Alzheimer’s disease exhibits a wide spectrum of amyloid-β42 structural states and imply the existence of prion-like conformational strains.

  20. Syntaxin-1 N-peptide and Habc-domain perform distinct essential functions in synaptic vesicle fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Pang, Zhiping P; Yang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yingsha; Rosenmund, Christian; Bacaj, Taulant; Südhof, Thomas C

    2013-01-01

    Among SNARE proteins mediating synaptic vesicle fusion, syntaxin-1 uniquely includes an N-terminal peptide (‘N-peptide') that binds to Munc18-1, and a large, conserved Habc-domain that also binds to Munc18-1. Previous in vitro studies suggested that the syntaxin-1 N-peptide is functionally important, whereas the syntaxin-1 Habc-domain is not, but limited information is available about the in vivo functions of these syntaxin-1 domains. Using rescue experiments in cultured syntaxin-deficient neurons, we now show that the N-peptide and the Habc-domain of syntaxin-1 perform distinct and independent roles in synaptic vesicle fusion. Specifically, we found that the N-peptide is essential for vesicle fusion as such, whereas the Habc-domain regulates this fusion, in part by forming the closed syntaxin-1 conformation. Moreover, we observed that deletion of the Habc-domain but not deletion of the N-peptide caused a loss of Munc18-1 which results in a decrease in the readily releasable pool of vesicles at a synapse, suggesting that Munc18 binding to the Habc-domain stabilizes Munc18-1. Thus, the N-terminal syntaxin-1 domains mediate different functions in synaptic vesicle fusion, probably via formation of distinct Munc18/SNARE-protein complexes. PMID:23188083

  1. Association of astrocytes with neurons and astrocytes derived from distinct progenitor domains in the subpallium

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Makio; Yamauchi, Kenta; Zhu, Yan; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes play pivotal roles in metabolism and homeostasis as well as in neural development and function in a manner thought to depend on their region-specific diversity. In the mouse spinal cord, astrocytes and neurons, which are derived from a common progenitor domain (PD) and controlled by common PD-specific transcription factors, migrate radially and share their final positions. However, whether astrocytes can only interact with neurons from common PDs in the brain remains unknown. Here, we focused on subpallium-derived cells, because the subpallium generates neurons that show a diverse mode of migration. We tracked their fate by in utero electroporation of plasmids that allow for chromosomal integration of transgenes or of a Cre recombinase expression vector to reporter mice. We also used an Nkx2.1Cre mouse line to fate map the cells originating from the medial ganglionic eminence and preoptic area. We find that although neurons and astrocytes are labeled in various regions, only neurons are labeled in the neocortex, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Furthermore, we find astrocytes derived from an Nkx 2.1-negative PD are associated with neurons from the Nkx2.1+ PD. Thus, forebrain astrocytes can associate with neurons as well as astrocytes derived from a distinct PD. PMID:26193445

  2. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules

    PubMed Central

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  3. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules.

    PubMed

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  4. Domain structure of black hole space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Harmark, Troels

    2009-07-15

    We introduce the domain structure for stationary black hole space-times. The domain structure lives on the submanifold of fixed points of the Killing vector fields. Depending on which Killing vector field has fixed points the submanifold is naturally divided into domains. The domain structure provides invariants of the space-time, both topological and continuous. It is defined for any space-time dimension and any number of Killing vector fields. We examine the domain structure for asymptotically flat space-times and find a canonical form for the metric of such space-times. The domain structure generalizes the rod structure introduced for space-times with D-2 commuting Killing vector fields. We analyze in detail the domain structure for Minkowski space, the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole and the Myers-Perry black hole in six and seven dimensions. Finally, we consider the possible domain structures for asymptotically flat black holes in six and seven dimensio0008.

  5. Structure and Molecular Evolution of CDGSH Iron-Sulfur Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shaomei; Ye, Keqiong

    2011-01-01

    The recently discovered CDGSH iron-sulfur domains (CISDs) are classified into seven major types with a wide distribution throughout the three domains of life. The type 1 protein mitoNEET has been shown to fold into a dimer with the signature CDGSH motif binding to a [2Fe-2S] cluster. However, the structures of all other types of CISDs were unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of type 3, 4, and 6 CISDs determined at 1.5 Å, 1.8 Å and 1.15 Å resolution, respectively. The type 3 and 4 CISD each contain one CDGSH motif and adopt a dimeric structure. Although similar to each other, the two structures have permutated topologies, and both are distinct from the type 1 structure. The type 6 CISD contains tandem CDGSH motifs and adopts a monomeric structure with an internal pseudo dyad symmetry. All currently known CISD structures share dual iron-sulfur binding modules and a β-sandwich for either intermolecular or intramolecular dimerization. The iron-sulfur binding module, the β-strand N-terminal to the module and a proline motif are conserved among different type structures, but the dimerization module and the interface and orientation between the two iron-sulfur binding modules are divergent. Sequence analysis further shows resemblance between CISD types 4 and 7 and between 1 and 2. Our findings suggest that all CISDs share common ancestry and diverged into three primary folds with a characteristic phylogenetic distribution: a eukaryote-specific fold adopted by types 1 and 2 proteins, a prokaryote-specific fold adopted by types 3, 4 and 7 proteins, and a tandem-motif fold adopted by types 5 and 6 proteins. Our comprehensive structural, sequential and phylogenetic analysis provides significant insight into the assembly principles and evolutionary relationship of CISDs. PMID:21949752

  6. AIDA: ab initio domain assembly for automated multi-domain protein structure prediction and domain–domain interaction prediction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Li, Zhanwen; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Most proteins consist of multiple domains, independent structural and evolutionary units that are often reshuffled in genomic rearrangements to form new protein architectures. Template-based modeling methods can often detect homologous templates for individual domains, but templates that could be used to model the entire query protein are often not available. Results: We have developed a fast docking algorithm ab initio domain assembly (AIDA) for assembling multi-domain protein structures, guided by the ab initio folding potential. This approach can be extended to discontinuous domains (i.e. domains with ‘inserted’ domains). When tested on experimentally solved structures of multi-domain proteins, the relative domain positions were accurately found among top 5000 models in 86% of cases. AIDA server can use domain assignments provided by the user or predict them from the provided sequence. The latter approach is particularly useful for automated protein structure prediction servers. The blind test consisting of 95 CASP10 targets shows that domain boundaries could be successfully determined for 97% of targets. Availability and implementation: The AIDA package as well as the benchmark sets used here are available for download at http://ffas.burnham.org/AIDA/. Contact: adam@sanfordburnham.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25701568

  7. Structure of Concatenated HAMP Domains Provides a Mechanism for Signal Transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Airola, Michael V.; Watts, Kylie J.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Crane, Brian R.

    2010-08-23

    HAMP domains are widespread prokaryotic signaling modules found as single domains or poly-HAMP chains in both transmembrane and soluble proteins. The crystal structure of a three-unit poly-HAMP chain from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa soluble receptor Aer2 defines a universal parallel four-helix bundle architecture for diverse HAMP domains. Two contiguous domains integrate to form a concatenated di-HAMP structure. The three HAMP domains display two distinct conformations that differ by changes in helical register, crossing angle, and rotation. These conformations are stabilized by different subsets of conserved residues. Known signals delivered to HAMP would be expected to switch the relative stability of the two conformations and the position of a coiled-coil phase stutter at the junction with downstream helices. We propose that the two conformations represent opposing HAMP signaling states and suggest a signaling mechanism whereby HAMP domains interconvert between the two states, which alternate down a poly-HAMP chain.

  8. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  9. The oceanic segment of the southern Brazilian margin: Morpho-structural domains and their tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassetto, Marcelo; Alkmim, Fernando F.; Szatmari, Peter; Mohriak, Webster U.

    A descriptive and evolutionary analysis of the main morpho-structural features of the oceanic domain of the southern portion of the Brazilian Continental Margin is supported by regional seismic profiles and potential field data from the Brazilian governmental LEPLAC (Plano de Levantamento da Plataforma Continental Brasileira) Project. The several morpho-structural elements can be differentiated, as for example: the dominant structural pattern of the acoustic basement, including extensional faulting and long-wavelength folding, crustal thickness changes, fracture zones location, distribution of volcanic centers, and development of wedges of seaward-dipping reflectors. Four broad distinct morpho-structural domains, separated by fracture zones and oceanic lineaments. Domain I is located south of the Porto Alegre Lineament; Domain II corresponds to the area between the Porto Alegre Lineament and the Rio Grande Fracture Zone; Domain III spans the area of the São Paulo Plateau; and Domain IV is located to the east of this plateau, towards the abyssal portions of the oceanic crust. These domains are defined by their distinct regional morphologic and structural characteristics. Sometimes these elements are well imaged in the seismic profiles, corroborated by gravity and magnetic anomalies, and eventually identified as prominent features at the sea bottom physiography. Using a multidisciplinary approach based on bathymetric maps, regional seismic interpretation, magnetic data analysis, and gravity models, this work attempts to characterize these elements in a descriptive and evolutionary view, identifying their role in the tectonic development of this portion of the South Atlantic.

  10. Solution structure of leptospiral LigA4 Big domain.

    PubMed

    Mei, Song; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2015-11-13

    Pathogenic Leptospiraspecies express immunoglobulin-like proteins which serve as adhesins to bind to the extracellular matrices of host cells. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like protein A (LigA), a surface exposed protein containing tandem repeats of bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, has been proved to be involved in the interaction of pathogenic Leptospira with mammalian host. In this study, the solution structure of the fourth Big domain of LigA (LigA4 Big domain) from Leptospira interrogans was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The structure of LigA4 Big domain displays a similar bacterial immunoglobulin-like fold compared with other Big domains, implying some common structural aspects of Big domain family. On the other hand, it displays some structural characteristics significantly different from classic Ig-like domain. Furthermore, Stains-all assay and NMR chemical shift perturbation revealed the Ca(2+) binding property of LigA4 Big domain. PMID:26449456

  11. Distinct deformational history of two contrasting tectonic domains in the Chinese Altai: Their significance in understanding accretionary orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Min; Schulmann, Karel; Zhao, Guochun; Wu, Qihang; Jiang, Yingde; Guy, Alexandra; Wang, Yuejun

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Altai, a key component of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt, is considered to be formed through multiple accretions of different terranes. However, the deformational histories of each terrane (tectonic domain), i.e. structural records before and after the accretion, are rarely studied, which has hindered our understanding of the accretionary processes. To fill the gap, a systematic macro- and microscopic structural analysis was carried out on two contrasting litho-tectonic units, i.e. the early Paleozoic low-grade Alegedayi Ophiolitic Complex (AOC) juxtaposed to the high grade Tarlang Granitic Massif (TGM). Selected rock samples were analyzed using zircon U-Pb isotopic dating to constrain the timing of polyphase deformation. Our structural and geochronological data suggest that the two litho-tectonic units were initially detached and located in different crustal levels and experienced distinct phases of deformation under contrasting P-T conditions. They were mutually accreted with each other in the early Devonian and jointly underwent a WNW-ESE-directed shortening deformational event (D1) at ∼390 Ma. The change of tectonic regime was further enhanced by a subsequent NNE-SSW-directed shortening deformation (D2) after ∼ 380 Ma. The shortening process ended before the crustal-scale sinistral strike-slip shearing deformation along the Erqis fault zone at 290 - 240 Ma. Results of this study provide solid field-based evidence for a model that the Chinese Altai initially underwent a nearly E-W-oriented subduction-accretional event in the middle Paleozoic, before it was reoriented to a nearly N-S-oriented convergence.

  12. Phase transitions and domain structures in multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahos, Eftihia

    2011-12-01

    Thin film ferroelectrics and multiferroics are two important classes of materials interesting both from a scientific and a technological prospective. The volatility of lead and bismuth as well as environmental issues regarding the toxicity of lead are two disadvantages of the most commonly used ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) materials such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and SrBi2Ta2O9. Therefore lead-free thin film ferroelectrics are promising substitutes as long as (a) they can be grown on technologically important substrates such as silicon, and (b) their T c and Pr become comparable to that of well established ferroelectrics. On the other hand, the development of functional room temperature ferroelectric ferromagnetic multiferroics could lead to very interesting phenomena such as control of magnetism with electric fields and control of electrical polarization with magnetic fields. This thesis focuses on the understanding of material structure-property relations using nonlinear optical spectroscopy. Nonlinear spectroscopy is an excellent tool for probing the onset of ferroelectricity, and domain dynamics in strained ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Second harmonic generation was used to detect ferroelectricity and the antiferrodistortive phase transition in thin film SrTiO3. Incipient ferroelectric CaTiO3 has been shown to become ferroelectric when strained with a combination of SHG and dielectric measurements. The tensorial nature of the induced nonlinear polarization allows for probing of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 polarization contributions in nanoscale BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices. In addition, nonlinear optics was used to demonstrate ferroelectricity in multiferroic EuTiO3. Finally, confocal SHG and Raman microscopy were utilized to visualize polar domains in incipient ferroelectric and ferroelastic CaTiO3.

  13. Distinct tRNA recognition strategies used by a homologous family of editing domains prevent mistranslation.

    PubMed

    Das, Mom; Vargas-Rodriguez, Oscar; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2014-04-01

    Errors in protein synthesis due to mispairing of amino acids with tRNAs jeopardize cell viability. Several checkpoints to prevent formation of Ala- and Cys-tRNA(Pro) have been described, including the Ala-specific editing domain (INS) of most bacterial prolyl-tRNA synthetases (ProRSs) and an autonomous single-domain INS homolog, YbaK, which clears Cys-tRNA(Pro) in trans. In many species where ProRS lacks an INS domain, ProXp-ala, another single-domain INS-like protein, is responsible for editing Ala-tRNA(Pro). Although the amino acid specificity of these editing domains has been established, the role of tRNA sequence elements in substrate selection has not been investigated in detail. Critical recognition elements for aminoacylation by bacterial ProRS include acceptor stem elements G72/A73 and anticodon bases G35/G36. Here, we show that ProXp-ala and INS require these same acceptor stem and anticodon elements, respectively, whereas YbaK lacks inherent tRNA specificity. Thus, these three related domains use divergent approaches to recognize tRNAs and prevent mistranslation. Whereas some editing domains have borrowed aspects of tRNA recognition from the parent aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, relaxed tRNA specificity leading to semi-promiscuous editing may offer advantages to cells. PMID:24371276

  14. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  15. The structural mechanism of KCNH-channel regulation by the eag domain

    PubMed Central

    Haitin, Yoni; Carlson, Anne E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The KCNH voltage-dependent potassium channels (ether-á-go-go, EAG; EAG-related gene, ERG; EAG-like channels, ELK) are important regulators of cellular excitability1-3 and have key roles in diseases such as cardiac long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2)4, epilepsy5, schizophrenia6 and cancer7. The intracellular domains of KCNH channels are structurally distinct from other voltage-gated channels. The amino-terminal region contains an eag domain, which is comprised of a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and a PAS-cap domain8, while the carboxy-terminal region contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD) which is connected to the pore through a C-linker domain. Many disease-causing mutations localize to these specialized intracellular domains, which underlie the unique gating and regulation of KCNH channels9. It has been suggested that the eag domain may regulate the channel by interacting with either the S4-S5 linker or the CNBHD8,10. Here we present a 2-Å resolution crystal structure of the eag domain-CNBHD complex of the mouse EAG1 (mEAG1) channel. It displays extensive interactions between the eag domain and the CNBHD, indicating that the regulatory mechanism of the eag domain involves primarily the CNBHD. Surprisingly, the structure reveals that a number of LQT2 mutations at homologous positions in hERG, and cancer-associated mutations in EAG channels, localize to the eag domain-CNBHD interface. Furthermore, mutations at the interface produced dramatic effects on channel gating demonstrating the important physiological role of the eag domain-CNBHD interaction. Our structure of the eag domain-CNBHD complex of mEAG1 provides unique insights into the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of KCNH channels. PMID:23975098

  16. The structural mechanism of KCNH-channel regulation by the eag domain.

    PubMed

    Haitin, Yoni; Carlson, Anne E; Zagotta, William N

    2013-09-19

    The KCNH voltage-dependent potassium channels (ether-à-go-go, EAG; EAG-related gene, ERG; EAG-like channels, ELK) are important regulators of cellular excitability and have key roles in diseases such as cardiac long QT syndrome type 2 (LQT2), epilepsy, schizophrenia and cancer. The intracellular domains of KCNH channels are structurally distinct from other voltage-gated channels. The amino-terminal region contains an eag domain, which is composed of a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and a PAS-cap domain, whereas the carboxy-terminal region contains a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain (CNBHD), which is connected to the pore through a C-linker domain. Many disease-causing mutations localize to these specialized intracellular domains, which underlie the unique gating and regulation of KCNH channels. It has been suggested that the eag domain may regulate the channel by interacting with either the S4-S5 linker or the CNBHD. Here we present a 2 Å resolution crystal structure of the eag domain-CNBHD complex of the mouse EAG1 (also known as KCNH1) channel. It displays extensive interactions between the eag domain and the CNBHD, indicating that the regulatory mechanism of the eag domain primarily involves the CNBHD. Notably, the structure reveals that a number of LQT2 mutations at homologous positions in human ERG, in addition to cancer-associated mutations in EAG channels, localize to the eag domain-CNBHD interface. Furthermore, mutations at the interface produced marked effects on channel gating, demonstrating the important physiological role of the eag domain-CNBHD interaction. Our structure of the eag domain-CNBHD complex of mouse EAG1 provides unique insights into the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of KCNH channels. PMID:23975098

  17. Capturing distinct KCNQ2 channel resting states by metal ion bridges in the voltage-sensor domain

    PubMed Central

    Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Kornilov, Polina; Pittel, Ilya; Peretz, Asher

    2014-01-01

    Although crystal structures of various voltage-gated K+ (Kv) and Na+ channels have provided substantial information on the activated conformation of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the topology of the VSD in its resting conformation remains highly debated. Numerous studies have investigated the VSD resting state in the Kv Shaker channel; however, few studies have explored this issue in other Kv channels. Here, we investigated the VSD resting state of KCNQ2, a K+ channel subunit belonging to the KCNQ (Kv7) subfamily of Kv channels. KCNQ2 can coassemble with the KCNQ3 subunit to mediate the IM current that regulates neuronal excitability. In humans, mutations in KCNQ2 are associated with benign neonatal forms of epilepsy or with severe epileptic encephalopathy. We introduced cysteine mutations into the S4 transmembrane segment of the KCNQ2 VSD and determined that external application of Cd2+ profoundly reduced the current amplitude of S4 cysteine mutants S195C, R198C, and R201C. Based on reactivity with the externally accessible endogenous cysteine C106 in S1, we infer that each of the above S4 cysteine mutants forms Cd2+ bridges to stabilize a channel closed state. Disulfide bonds and metal bridges constrain the S4 residues S195, R198, and R201 near C106 in S1 in the resting state, and experiments using concatenated tetrameric constructs indicate that this occurs within the same VSD. KCNQ2 structural models suggest that three distinct resting channel states have been captured by the formation of different S4–S1 Cd2+ bridges. Collectively, this work reveals that residue C106 in S1 can be very close to several N-terminal S4 residues for stabilizing different KCNQ2 resting conformations. PMID:25385787

  18. Distinct self-interaction domains promote Multi Sex Combs accumulation in and formation of the Drosophila histone locus body

    PubMed Central

    Terzo, Esteban A.; Lyons, Shawn M.; Poulton, John S.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Marzluff, William F.; Duronio, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear bodies (NBs) are structures that concentrate proteins, RNAs, and ribonucleoproteins that perform functions essential to gene expression. How NBs assemble is not well understood. We studied the Drosophila histone locus body (HLB), a NB that concentrates factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis at the replication-dependent histone gene locus. We coupled biochemical analysis with confocal imaging of both fixed and live tissues to demonstrate that the Drosophila Multi Sex Combs (Mxc) protein contains multiple domains necessary for HLB assembly. An important feature of this assembly process is the self-interaction of Mxc via two conserved N-terminal domains: a LisH domain and a novel self-interaction facilitator (SIF) domain immediately downstream of the LisH domain. Molecular modeling suggests that the LisH and SIF domains directly interact, and mutation of either the LisH or the SIF domain severely impairs Mxc function in vivo, resulting in reduced histone mRNA accumulation. A region of Mxc between amino acids 721 and 1481 is also necessary for HLB assembly independent of the LisH and SIF domains. Finally, the C-terminal 195 amino acids of Mxc are required for recruiting FLASH, an essential histone mRNA-processing factor, to the HLB. We conclude that multiple domains of the Mxc protein promote HLB assembly in order to concentrate factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis. PMID:25694448

  19. Computational Methods for Domain Partitioning of Protein Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretnik, Stella; Shindyalov, Ilya

    Analysis of protein structures typically begins with decomposition of structure into more basic units, called "structural domains". The underlying goal is to reduce a complex protein structure to a set of simpler yet structurally meaningful units, each of which can be analyzed independently. Structural semi-independence of domains is their hallmark: domains often have compact structure and can fold or function independently. Domains can undergo so-called "domain shuffling"when they reappear in different combinations in different proteins thus implementing different biological functions (Doolittle, 1995). Proteins can then be conceived as being built of such basic blocks: some, especially small proteins, consist usually of just one domain, while other proteins possess a more complex architecture containing multiple domains. Therefore, the methods for partitioning a structure into domains are of critical importance: their outcome defines the set of basic units upon which structural classifications are built and evolutionary analysis is performed. This is especially true nowadays in the era of structural genomics. Today there are many methods that decompose the structure into domains: some of them are manual (i.e., based on human judgment), others are semiautomatic, and still others are completely automatic (based on algorithms implemented as software). Overall there is a high level of consistency and robustness in the process of partitioning a structure into domains (for ˜80% of proteins); at least for structures where domain location is obvious. The picture is less bright when we consider proteins with more complex architectures—neither human experts nor computational methods can reach consistent partitioning in many such cases. This is a rather accurate reflection of biological phenomena in general since domains are formed by different mechanisms, hence it is nearly impossible to come up with a set of well-defined rules that captures all of the observed cases.

  20. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    PubMed

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-01

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices. PMID:16486888

  1. The structure of a PKD domain from polycystin-1: implications for polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Bycroft, M; Bateman, A; Clarke, J; Hamill, S J; Sandford, R; Thomas, R L; Chothia, C

    1999-01-15

    Most cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are the result of mutations in the PKD1 gene. The PKD1 gene codes for a large cell-surface glycoprotein, polycystin-1, of unknown function, which, based on its predicted domain structure, may be involved in protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions. Approximately 30% of polycystin-1 consists of 16 copies of a novel protein module called the PKD domain. Here we show that this domain has a beta-sandwich fold. Although this fold is common to a number of cell-surface modules, the PKD domain represents a distinct protein family. The tenth PKD domain of human and Fugu polycystin-1 show extensive conservation of surface residues suggesting that this region could be a ligand-binding site. This structure will allow the likely effects of missense mutations in a large part of the PKD1 gene to be determined. PMID:9889186

  2. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Zachariassen, Linda G; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna G; Pickering, Darryl S; Plested, Andrew J R; Kristensen, Anders S

    2016-07-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch-clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence changes within these intracellular domains, providing clues as to how posttranslational modifications and receptor function interact. PMID:27313205

  3. Genetic dissection of the outer membrane secretin PulD: are there distinct domains for multimerization and secretion specificity?

    PubMed

    Guilvout, I; Hardie, K R; Sauvonnet, N; Pugsley, A P

    1999-12-01

    Linker and deletion mutagenesis and gene fusions were used to probe the possible domain structure of the dodecameric outer membrane secretin PulD from the pullulanase secretion pathway of Klebsiella oxytoca. Insertions of 24 amino acids close to or within strongly predicted and highly conserved amphipathic beta strands in the C-terminal half of the polypeptide (the beta domain) abolished sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-resistant multimer formation that is characteristic of this protein, whereas insertions elsewhere generally had less dramatic effects on multimer formation. However, the beta domain alone did not form SDS-resistant multimers unless part of the N-terminal region of the protein (the N domain) was produced in trans. All of the insertions except one, close to the C terminus of the protein, abolished function. The N domain alone was highly unstable and did not form SDS-resistant multimers even when the beta domain was present in trans. We conclude that the beta domain is a major determinant of multimer stability and that the N domain contributes to multimer formation. The entire or part of the N domain of PulD could be replaced by the corresponding region of the OutD secretin from the pectate lyase secretion pathway of Erwinia chrysanthemi without abolishing pullulanase secretion. This suggests that the N domain of PulD is not involved in substrate recognition, contrary to the role proposed for the N domain of OutD, which binds specifically to pectate lyase secreted by E. chrysanthemi (V. E. Shevchik, J. Robert-Badouy, and G. Condemine, EMBO J. 16:3007-3016, 1997). PMID:10572123

  4. Predicting PDZ domain mediated protein interactions from structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PDZ domains are structural protein domains that recognize simple linear amino acid motifs, often at protein C-termini, and mediate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in important biological processes, such as ion channel regulation, cell polarity and neural development. PDZ domain-peptide interaction predictors have been developed based on domain and peptide sequence information. Since domain structure is known to influence binding specificity, we hypothesized that structural information could be used to predict new interactions compared to sequence-based predictors. Results We developed a novel computational predictor of PDZ domain and C-terminal peptide interactions using a support vector machine trained with PDZ domain structure and peptide sequence information. Performance was estimated using extensive cross validation testing. We used the structure-based predictor to scan the human proteome for ligands of 218 PDZ domains and show that the predictions correspond to known PDZ domain-peptide interactions and PPIs in curated databases. The structure-based predictor is complementary to the sequence-based predictor, finding unique known and novel PPIs, and is less dependent on training–testing domain sequence similarity. We used a functional enrichment analysis of our hits to create a predicted map of PDZ domain biology. This map highlights PDZ domain involvement in diverse biological processes, some only found by the structure-based predictor. Based on this analysis, we predict novel PDZ domain involvement in xenobiotic metabolism and suggest new interactions for other processes including wound healing and Wnt signalling. Conclusions We built a structure-based predictor of PDZ domain-peptide interactions, which can be used to scan C-terminal proteomes for PDZ interactions. We also show that the structure-based predictor finds many known PDZ mediated PPIs in human that were not found by our previous sequence-based predictor and is less dependent on

  5. Structure-dependent electrical conductivity of protein: its differences between alpha-domain and beta-domain structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X Y; Shao, Jian; Jiang, S X; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2015-03-27

    Electron transports in the α-domain and β-domain of proteins have been comprehensively investigated. The structure-dependent electron transport of proteins has been experimentally measured and theoretically simulated, and both the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate significant differences in electrical conductivity between the α-domain and β-domain. By controlling the feedback system of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the conductance of a single α-domain protein hemoglobin (Hgb) and a β-domain protein superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) were measured, respectively. The current signal of Hgb is obviously stronger, indicating that the α-domain is more conductive. To confirm our finding, molecular orbitals of both the β-domain in SOD and α-domain in Hgb have been analyzed based on first-principles calculations. As expected, tunneling transport and hopping in the α-domain are both more efficient, indicating that it is easier for electrons to transport through the α-domain, which are in great agreement with our experimental data. In order to explain our results, molecular structures of α- and β-domains have been carefully analyzed and show that the explanation should lie in the differences in packing mode between the α-domain and β-domain. This research should be very important to application prospects in molecular electronics. PMID:25736549

  6. Structure-dependent electrical conductivity of protein: its differences between alpha-domain and beta-domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Shao, Jian; Jiang, S. X.; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2015-03-01

    Electron transports in the α-domain and β-domain of proteins have been comprehensively investigated. The structure-dependent electron transport of proteins has been experimentally measured and theoretically simulated, and both the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate significant differences in electrical conductivity between the α-domain and β-domain. By controlling the feedback system of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the conductance of a single α-domain protein hemoglobin (Hgb) and a β-domain protein superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) were measured, respectively. The current signal of Hgb is obviously stronger, indicating that the α-domain is more conductive. To confirm our finding, molecular orbitals of both the β-domain in SOD and α-domain in Hgb have been analyzed based on first-principles calculations. As expected, tunneling transport and hopping in the α-domain are both more efficient, indicating that it is easier for electrons to transport through the α-domain, which are in great agreement with our experimental data. In order to explain our results, molecular structures of α- and β-domains have been carefully analyzed and show that the explanation should lie in the differences in packing mode between the α-domain and β-domain. This research should be very important to application prospects in molecular electronics.

  7. Differentiation of domains in composite surface structures by charge-contrast X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Suzer, Sefik; Dâna, Aykutlu; Ertas, Gulay

    2007-01-01

    An external bias is applied to two samples containing composite surface structures, while recording an XPS spectrum. Altering the polarity of the bias affects the extent of differential charging in domains that are chemically or electronically different to create a charge contrast. By utilizing this charge contrast, we show that two distinct silicon nitride and silicon oxynitride domains are present in one of the composite samples. Similarly, we use this technique to show that titanium oxide and silicon oxide domains exist as separate chemical entities in another composite sample. PMID:17194137

  8. Structural and functional analysis of the NLRP4 pyrin domain.

    PubMed

    Eibl, Clarissa; Grigoriu, Simina; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Puehringer, Sandra; Pinheiro, Anderson S; Wagner, Roland N; Proell, Martina; Reed, John C; Page, Rebecca; Diederichs, Kay; Peti, Wolfgang

    2012-09-18

    NLRP4 is a member of the nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat receptor (NLR) family of cytosolic receptors and a member of an inflammation signaling cascade. Here, we present the crystal structure of the NLRP4 pyrin domain (PYD) at 2.3 Å resolution. The NLRP4 PYD is a member of the death domain (DD) superfamily and adopts a DD fold consisting of six α-helices tightly packed around a hydrophobic core, with a highly charged surface that is typical of PYDs. Importantly, however, we identified several differences between the NLRP4 PYD crystal structure and other PYD structures that are significant enough to affect NLRP4 function and its interactions with binding partners. Notably, the length of helix α3 and the α2-α3 connecting loop in the NLRP4 PYD are unique among PYDs. The apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) is an adaptor protein whose interactions with a number of distinct PYDs are believed to be critical for activation of the inflammatory response. Here, we use co-immunoprecipitation, yeast two-hybrid, and nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation analysis to demonstrate that, despite being important for activation of the inflammatory response and sharing several similarities with other known ASC-interacting PYDs (i.e., ASC2), NLRP4 does not interact with the adaptor protein ASC. Thus, we propose that the factors governing homotypic PYD interactions are more complex than the currently accepted model, which states that complementary charged surfaces are the main determinants of PYD-PYD interaction specificity. PMID:22928810

  9. A hybrid method for identification of structural domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yongpan; Zhu, Min; Wang, Yuelong; Xie, Zhaoyang; Li, Menglong

    2014-12-01

    Structural domains in proteins are the basic units to form various proteins. In the protein's evolution and functioning, domains play important roles. But the definition of domain is not yet precisely given, and the update cycle of structural domain databases is long. The automatic algorithms identify domains slowly, while protein entities with great structural complexity are on the rise. Here, we present a method which recognizes the compact and modular segments of polypeptide chains to identify structural domains, and contrast some data sets to illuminate their effect. The method combines support vector machine (SVM) with K-means algorithm. It is faster and more stable than most current algorithms and performs better. It also indicates that when proteins are presented as some Alpha-carbon atoms in 3D space, it is feasible to identify structural domains by the spatially structural properties. We have developed a web-server, which would be helpful in identification of structural domains (http://vis.sculab.org/~huayongpan/cgi-bin/domainAssignment.cgi).

  10. A hybrid method for identification of structural domains.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yongpan; Zhu, Min; Wang, Yuelong; Xie, Zhaoyang; Li, Menglong

    2014-01-01

    Structural domains in proteins are the basic units to form various proteins. In the protein's evolution and functioning, domains play important roles. But the definition of domain is not yet precisely given, and the update cycle of structural domain databases is long. The automatic algorithms identify domains slowly, while protein entities with great structural complexity are on the rise. Here, we present a method which recognizes the compact and modular segments of polypeptide chains to identify structural domains, and contrast some data sets to illuminate their effect. The method combines support vector machine (SVM) with K-means algorithm. It is faster and more stable than most current algorithms and performs better. It also indicates that when proteins are presented as some Alpha-carbon atoms in 3D space, it is feasible to identify structural domains by the spatially structural properties. We have developed a web-server, which would be helpful in identification of structural domains (http://vis.sculab.org/~huayongpan/cgi-bin/domainAssignment.cgi). PMID:25503992

  11. Distinct characteristics of single starch-binding domain SBD1 derived from tandem domains SBD1-SBD2 of halophilic Kocuria varians alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao

    2012-03-01

    Kocuria varians alpha-amylase contains tandem starch-binding domains SBD1-SBD2 (SBD12) that possess typical halophilic characteristics. Recombinant tandem domains SBD12 and single domain SBD1, both with amino-terminal hexa-His tag, were expressed in and purified to homogeneity from Escherichia coli. The circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of His-SBD12 was characterized by a positive peak at 233 nm ascribed to the aromatic stacking. Although the signal occurred in the far UV region, it is an indication of tertiary structure folding. CD spectrum of single domain His-SBD1 exhibited the same peak position, signal intensity and spectral shape as those of His-SBD12, suggesting that the aromatic stacking must occur within the domain, and that two SBD domains in SBD12 and SBD1 has a similar folded structure. This structural observation was consistent with the biological activity that His-SBD1 showed binding activity against raw starch granules and amylose resin with 70-80% efficiency compared with binding of equimolar His-SBD12. Although the thermal unfolding rate of SBD12 and SBD1 were similar, the refolding rates of SBD12 and SBD1 from thermal melting were greatly different: His-SBD12 refolded slowly (T(1/2) = ~84 min), while refolding of single domain His-SBD1 was found to be 20-fold faster (T(1/2) = 4.2 min). The possible mechanism of this large difference in refolding rate was discussed. Maltose at 20 mM showed 5-6 °C increase in thermal melting of both His-SBD12 and His-SBD1, while its effects on the time course of unfolding and refolding were insignificant. PMID:22388479

  12. Effective Moment Feature Vectors for Protein Domain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Zhang, Yan-Ning; Chin, Francis Yuk-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Imaging processing techniques have been shown to be useful in studying protein domain structures. The idea is to represent the pairwise distances of any two residues of the structure in a 2D distance matrix (DM). Features and/or submatrices are extracted from this DM to represent a domain. Existing approaches, however, may involve a large number of features (100–400) or complicated mathematical operations. Finding fewer but more effective features is always desirable. In this paper, based on some key observations on DMs, we are able to decompose a DM image into four basic binary images, each representing the structural characteristics of a fundamental secondary structure element (SSE) or a motif in the domain. Using the concept of moments in image processing, we further derive 45 structural features based on the four binary images. Together with 4 features extracted from the basic images, we represent the structure of a domain using 49 features. We show that our feature vectors can represent domain structures effectively in terms of the following. (1) We show a higher accuracy for domain classification. (2) We show a clear and consistent distribution of domains using our proposed structural vector space. (3) We are able to cluster the domains according to our moment features and demonstrate a relationship between structural variation and functional diversity. PMID:24391828

  13. Cross-talk among structural domains of human DBP upon binding 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arjun; Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is structurally very similar to serum albumin (ALB); both have three distinct structural domains and high cysteine-content. Yet, functionally they are very different. DBP possesses high affinity for vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, but ALB does not. It has been suggested that there may be cross-talk among the domains so that binding of one ligand may influence the binding of others. In this study we have employed 2-p-toluidinyl-6-sulphonate (TNS), a reporter molecule that fluoresces upon binding to hydrophobic pockets of DBP. We observed that recombinant domain III possesses strong binding for TNS, which is not influenced by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3), yet TNS-fluorescence of the whole protein is quenched by 25-OH-D3. These results provide a direct evidence of cross-talk among the structural domains of DBP. PMID:18035050

  14. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails.

  15. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  16. The Solution Structure of the Regulatory Domain of Tyrosine Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengnan; Huang, Tao; Ilangovan, Udayar; Hinck, Andrew P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TyrH) catalyzes the hydroxylation of tyrosine to form 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in the biosynthesis of the catecholamine neurotransmitters. The activity of the enzyme is regulated by phosphorylation of serine residues in a regulatory domain and by binding of catecholamines to the active site. Available structures of TyrH lack the regulatory domain, limiting the understanding of the effect of regulation on structure. We report the use of NMR spectroscopy to analyze the solution structure of the isolated regulatory domain of rat TyrH. The protein is composed of a largely unstructured N-terminal region (residues 1-71) and a well-folded C-terminal portion (residues 72-159). The structure of a truncated version of the regulatory domain containing residues 65-159 has been determined and establishes that it is an ACT domain. The isolated domain is a homodimer in solution, with the structure of each monomer very similar to that of the core of the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase. Two TyrH regulatory domain monomers form an ACT domain dimer composed of a sheet of eight strands with four α-helices on one side of the sheet. Backbone dynamic analyses were carried out to characterize the conformational flexibility of TyrH65-159. The results provide molecular details critical for understanding the regulatory mechanism of TyrH. PMID:24361276

  17. The Nim1 kinase Gin4 has distinct domains crucial for septin assembly, phospholipid binding and mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Au Yong, Jie Ying; Wang, Yan-Ming; Wang, Yue

    2016-07-15

    In fungi, the Nim1 protein kinases, such as Gin4, are important regulators of multiple cell cycle events, including the G2-M transition, septin assembly, polarized growth and cytokinesis. Compelling evidence has linked some key functions of Gin4 with the large C-terminal non-kinase region which, however, is poorly defined. By systematically dissecting and functionally characterizing the non-kinase region of Gin4 in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, we report the identification of three new domains with distinct functions: a lipid-binding domain (LBD), a septin-binding domain (SBD) and a nucleolus-associating domain (NAD). The LBD and SBD are indispensable for the function of Gin4, and they alone could sufficiently restore septin ring assembly in GIN4-null mutants. The NAD localizes to the periphery of the nucleolus and physically associates with Cdc14, the ultimate effector of the mitotic exit network. Gin4 mutants that lack the NAD are defective in spindle orientation and exit mitosis prematurely. Furthermore, we show that Gin4 is a substrate of Cdc14. These findings provide novel insights into the roles and mechanisms of Nim1 kinases in the regulation of some crucial cell cycle events. PMID:27231094

  18. The Nim1 kinase Gin4 has distinct domains crucial for septin assembly, phospholipid binding and mitotic exit

    PubMed Central

    Au Yong, Jie Ying; Wang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In fungi, the Nim1 protein kinases, such as Gin4, are important regulators of multiple cell cycle events, including the G2–M transition, septin assembly, polarized growth and cytokinesis. Compelling evidence has linked some key functions of Gin4 with the large C-terminal non-kinase region which, however, is poorly defined. By systematically dissecting and functionally characterizing the non-kinase region of Gin4 in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, we report the identification of three new domains with distinct functions: a lipid-binding domain (LBD), a septin-binding domain (SBD) and a nucleolus-associating domain (NAD). The LBD and SBD are indispensable for the function of Gin4, and they alone could sufficiently restore septin ring assembly in GIN4-null mutants. The NAD localizes to the periphery of the nucleolus and physically associates with Cdc14, the ultimate effector of the mitotic exit network. Gin4 mutants that lack the NAD are defective in spindle orientation and exit mitosis prematurely. Furthermore, we show that Gin4 is a substrate of Cdc14. These findings provide novel insights into the roles and mechanisms of Nim1 kinases in the regulation of some crucial cell cycle events. PMID:27231094

  19. Structural and evolutionary divergence of cyclic nucleotide binding domains in eukaryotic pathogens: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Smita; Kennedy, Eileen J; Herberg, Friedrich W; Hui, Raymond; Taylor, Susan S; Langsley, Gordon; Kannan, Natarajan

    2015-10-01

    Many cellular functions in eukaryotic pathogens are mediated by the cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB) domain, which senses second messengers such as cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. Although CNB domain-containing proteins have been identified in many pathogenic organisms, an incomplete understanding of how CNB domains in pathogens differ from other eukaryotic hosts has hindered the development of selective inhibitors for CNB domains associated with infectious diseases. Here, we identify and classify CNB domain-containing proteins in eukaryotic genomes to understand the evolutionary basis for CNB domain functional divergence in pathogens. We identify 359 CNB domain-containing proteins in 31 pathogenic organisms and classify them into distinct subfamilies based on sequence similarity within the CNB domain as well as functional domains associated with the CNB domain. Our study reveals novel subfamilies with pathogen-specific variations in the phosphate-binding cassette. Analyzing these variations in light of existing structural and functional data provides new insights into ligand specificity and promiscuity and clues for drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25847873

  20. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  1. The structural plasticity of SCA7 domains defines their differential nucleosome-binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Jacques; Wang, Ying-Hui; Spedale, Gianpiero; Atkinson, R Andrew; Romier, Christophe; Hamiche, Ali; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; Timmers, H Th Marc; Tora, László; Devys, Didier; Kieffer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5 acetyltransferase), a coactivator complex involved in chromatin remodelling, harbours both histone acetylation and deubiquitination activities. ATXN7/Sgf73 and ATXN7L3, two subunits of the SAGA deubiquitination module, contain an SCA7 domain characterized by an atypical zinc-finger. We show that the yeast Sgf73–SCA7 domain is not required to recruit Sgf73 into SAGA. Instead, it binds to nucleosomes, a property that is conserved in the human ATXN7–SCA7 domain but is lost in the ATXN7L3 domain. The solution structures of the SCA7 domain of both ATXN7 and ATXN7L3 reveal a new, common zinc-finger motif at the heart of two distinct folds, providing a molecular basis for the observed functional differences. PMID:20634802

  2. Identifying Cross-Domain Distinguishing Features of Cognitive Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ifenthaler, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Our research aims to identify domain-specific similarities and differences of externalized cognitive structures. Cognitive structure, also known as knowledge structure or structural knowledge, is conceived as the manner in which an individual organizes the relationships of concepts in memory. By diagnosing these structures precisely, even…

  3. NMR structure of the flavin domain from soluble methane monooxygenase reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chatwood, Lisa L; Müller, Jens; Gross, John D; Wagner, Gerhard; Lippard, Stephen J

    2004-09-28

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to methanol, the first step in carbon assimilation by methanotrophs. This multicomponent system transfers electrons from NADH through a reductase component to the non-heme diiron center in the hydroxylase where O(2) is activated. The reductase component comprises three distinct domains, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin domain along with FAD- and NADH-binding domains. We report the solution structure of the reduced 27.6 kDa FAD- and NADH-binding domains (MMOR-FAD) of the reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). The FAD-binding domain consists of a six-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel and one alpha-helix, with the first 10 N-terminal residues unstructured. In the interface between the two domains, the FAD cofactor is tightly bound in an unprecedented extended conformation. The NADH-binding domain consists of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet with four alpha-helices packing closely around this sheet. MMOR-FAD is structurally homologous to other FAD-containing oxidoreductases, and we expect similar structures for the FAD/NADH-binding domains of reductases that occur in other multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:15379538

  4. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  5. The Octarepeat Domain of the Prion Protein Binds Cu(II) with Three Distinct Coordination Modes at pH 7.4

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Madhuri; Walter, Eric D.; Newell, Dustin J.; Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Peisach, Jack; Gerfen, Gary J.; Bennett, Brian; Antholine, William E.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2010-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) binds Cu2+ in its N-terminal octarepeat domain. This unusual domain is comprised of four or more tandem repeats of the fundamental sequence PHGGGWGQ. Previous work from our laboratories demonstrates that at full copper occupancy, each HGGGW segment binds a single Cu2+. However, several recent studies suggest that low copper occupancy favors different coordination modes, possibly involving imidazoles from histidines in adjacent octapeptide segments. This is investigated here using a combination of X-band EPR, S-band EPR, and ESEEM, along with a library of modified peptides designed to favor different coordination interactions. At pH 7.4, three distinct coordination modes are identified. Each mode is fully characterized to reveal a series of copper-dependent octarepeat domain structures. Multiple His coordination is clearly identified at low copper stoichiometry. In addition, EPR detected copper–copper interactions at full occupancy suggest that the octarepeat domain partially collapses, perhaps stabilizing this specific binding mode and facilitating cooperative copper uptake. This work provides the first complete characterization of all dominant copper coordination modes at pH 7.4. PMID:16144413

  6. Morphological transitions of elastic domain structures in constrained layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsker, J.; Artemev, A.; Roytburd, A. L.

    2002-06-01

    The phase transformation in a constrained layer is the subject of this article. The formation and evolution of polydomain microstructure under external stress in the constrained layer are investigated by phase-field simulation and analytically using homogeneous approximation. As a result of simulation, it has been shown that the three-domain hierarchical structure can be formed in the epitaxial films. Under external stress there are two types of morphological transitions: from the three-domain structure to the two-domain one and from the hierarchical three-domain structure to the cellular three-domain structure. The results of phase-field simulation are compared with conclusions of homogenous theory and with available experimental data.

  7. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  8. Mirror Domain Structures Induced by Interlayer Magnetic Wall Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Hatton, D. C.; Bland, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in ˜10×10 mm2 NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer.

  9. Distinct Domains of the GATA-1 Cofactor FOG-1 Differentially Influence Erythroid versus Megakaryocytic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Alan B.; Katz, Samuel G.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2002-01-01

    FOG family zinc finger proteins play essential roles in development through physical interaction with GATA factors. FOG-1, like its interacting partner GATA-1, is required for normal differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic cells. Here, we have developed a functional assay for FOG-1 based on its ability to rescue erythroid and megakaryocytic maturation of a genetically engineered FOG-1−/− cell line. We demonstrate that interaction through only one of FOG-1's four GATA-binding zinc fingers is sufficient for rescue, providing evidence against a model in which FOG-1 acts to bridge multiple GATA-binding DNA elements. Importantly, we find that distinct regions of FOG-1 differentially influence erythroid versus megakaryocyte maturation. As such, we propose that FOG-1 may modulate the fate of a bipotential erythroid/megakaryocytic precursor cell. PMID:12024038

  10. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Gadd, Samantha; Arold, Stefan T.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Jennings, Lawrence; Huff, Vicki; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Davidsen, Tanja M.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Meerzaman, Daoud; Hsu, Chih Hao; Nguyen, Cu; Anderson, James; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Marra, Marco A.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Ross, Nicole; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails. Moreover, MLLT1-mutant tumours show an increase in MYC gene expression and HOX dysregulation. Patients with MLLT1-mutant tumours present at a younger age and have a high prevalence of precursor intralobar nephrogenic rests. These data support a model whereby activating MLLT1 mutations early in renal development result in the development of Wilms tumour. PMID:26635203

  11. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  12. Crystal Structure of the Nipah Virus Phosphoprotein Tetramerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Barnett, Katherine C.; Bibby, Jaclyn; Thomas, Jens M. H.; Keegan, Ronan M.; Rigden, Daniel J.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.

    2014-01-01

    The Nipah virus phosphoprotein (P) is multimeric and tethers the viral polymerase to the nucleocapsid. We present the crystal structure of the multimerization domain of Nipah virus P: a long, parallel, tetrameric, coiled coil with a small, α-helical cap structure. Across the paramyxoviruses, these domains share little sequence identity yet are similar in length and structural organization, suggesting a common requirement for scaffolding or spatial organization of the functions of P in the virus life cycle. PMID:24155387

  13. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families. PMID:26253692

  14. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains

    PubMed Central

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families. PMID:26253692

  15. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  16. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species. PMID:27283856

  17. Two distinct regions of the BPV1 E1 replication protein interact with the activation domain of E2.

    PubMed

    Moscufo, N; Sverdrup, F; Breiding, D E; Androphy, E J

    1999-12-15

    Papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins co-operation in viral DNA replication is mediated by protein-protein interactions that lead to formation of an E1-E2 complex. To identify the domains involved, portions of the two proteins were expressed as fusions to the DNA-binding protein LexA or the transactivation domain of VP16 and analyzed by the yeast two-hybrid system. The C-terminal 266 amino acids of BPV1 E1 (E1C266) interacted strongly with E2 in the yeast system and in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. VP16-E1C266 interacted with a region encompassing amino acids 1-200 of the transactivation domain of E2 that was fused to LexA. The interaction between E1 full length and E2 was clearly observed only when E1 was expressed as LexA-E1 chimera. In addition, we found that in the LexA context also the N-terminal region encompassing the first 340 amino acids of E1 (E1N340) interacted with E2 full length. The interactions of E1N340 and E1C266 with E2 were confirmed also by in vitro binding studies. These observations demonstrate that two distinct regions of E1 mediate the interaction with E2 in vivo. PMID:10581387

  18. LIM domain only-2 (LMO2) induces T-cell leukemia by two distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen; Tripathi, Rati; Goodings, Charnise; Cleveland, Susan; Mathias, Elizabeth; Hardaway, J Andrew; Elliott, Natalina; Yi, Yajun; Chen, Xi; Downing, James; Mullighan, Charles; Swing, Deborah A; Tessarollo, Lino; Li, Liqi; Love, Paul; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Thompson, Mary Ann; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P

    2014-01-01

    The LMO2 oncogene is deregulated in the majority of human T-cell leukemia cases and in most gene therapy-induced T-cell leukemias. We made transgenic mice with enforced expression of Lmo2 in T-cells by the CD2 promoter/enhancer. These transgenic mice developed highly penetrant T-ALL by two distinct patterns of gene expression: one in which there was concordant activation of Lyl1, Hhex, and Mycn or alternatively, with Notch1 target gene activation. Most strikingly, this gene expression clustering was conserved in human Early T-cell Precursor ALL (ETP-ALL), where LMO2, HHEX, LYL1, and MYCN were most highly expressed. We discovered that HHEX is a direct transcriptional target of LMO2 consistent with its concordant gene expression. Furthermore, conditional inactivation of Hhex in CD2-Lmo2 transgenic mice markedly attenuated T-ALL development, demonstrating that Hhex is a crucial mediator of Lmo2's oncogenic function. The CD2-Lmo2 transgenic mice offer mechanistic insight into concordant oncogene expression and provide a model for the highly treatment-resistant ETP-ALL subtype. PMID:24465765

  19. Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup I Reveals Distinct Domains of Prehistoric Gene Flow in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rootsi, Siiri; Magri, Chiara; Kivisild, Toomas; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Help, Hela; Bermisheva, Marina; Kutuev, Ildus; Barać, Lovorka; Peričić, Marijana; Balanovsky, Oleg; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Dion, Daniel; Grobei, Monica; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Battaglia, Vincenza; Achilli, Alessandro; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Parik, Jüri; King, Roy; Cinnioğlu, Cengiz; Khusnutdinova, Elsa; Rudan, Pavao; Balanovska, Elena; Scheffrahn, Wolfgang; Simonescu, Maya; Brehm, Antonio; Goncalves, Rita; Rosa, Alexandra; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventre, Andre; Ferak, Vladimir; Füredi, Sandor; Oefner, Peter J.; Shen, Peidong; Beckman, Lars; Mikerezi, Ilia; Terzić, Rifet; Primorac, Dragan; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Krumina, Astrida; Torroni, Antonio; Underhill, Peter A.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Villems, Richard; Semino, Ornella

    2004-01-01

    To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals, or more recent events of gene flow, we have analyzed, in detail, haplogroup I (Hg I), the only major clade of the Y phylogeny that is widespread over Europe but virtually absent elsewhere. The analysis of 1,104 Hg I Y chromosomes, which were identified in the survey of 7,574 males from 60 population samples, revealed several subclades with distinct geographic distributions. Subclade I1a accounts for most of Hg I in Scandinavia, with a rapidly decreasing frequency toward both the East European Plain and the Atlantic fringe, but microsatellite diversity reveals that France could be the source region of the early spread of both I1a and the less common I1c. Also, I1b*, which extends from the eastern Adriatic to eastern Europe and declines noticeably toward the southern Balkans and abruptly toward the periphery of northern Italy, probably diffused after the Last Glacial Maximum from a homeland in eastern Europe or the Balkans. In contrast, I1b2 most likely arose in southern France/Iberia. Similarly to the other subclades, it underwent a postglacial expansion and marked the human colonization of Sardinia ∼9,000 years ago. PMID:15162323

  20. Targeting Three Distinct HER2 Domains with a Recombinant Antibody Mixture Overcomes Trastuzumab Resistance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mikkel W; Jacobsen, Helle J; Koefoed, Klaus; Dahlman, Anna; Kjær, Ida; Poulsen, Thomas T; Meijer, Per-Johan; Nielsen, Lars S; Horak, Ivan D; Lantto, Johan; Kragh, Michael

    2015-03-01

    HER2 plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype of several human cancers. As such, it is a frequently pursued therapeutic target and two antibodies targeting HER2 have been clinically approved, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. It has been suggested that optimal inhibition of HER2 is achieved when utilizing two or more antibodies targeting nonoverlapping epitopes. Superior clinical activity of the trastuzumab plus pertuzumab combination in metastatic breast cancer supports this hypothesis. Because trastuzumab and pertuzumab were not codeveloped, there may be potential for further optimizing HER2 targeting. The study herein evaluated functional activity of anti-HER2 antibody combinations identifying optimal epitope combinations that provide efficacious HER2 inhibition. High-affinity antibodies to all four extracellular domains on HER2 were identified and tested for ability to inhibit growth of different HER2-dependent tumor cell lines. An antibody mixture targeting three HER2 subdomains proved to be superior to trastuzumab, pertuzumab, or a combination in vitro and to trastuzumab in two in vivo models. Specifically, the tripartite antibody mixture induced efficient HER2 internalization and degradation demonstrating increased sensitivity in cell lines with HER2 amplification and high EGFR levels. When compared with individual and clinically approved mAbs, the synergistic tripartite antibody targeting HER2 subdomains I, II, and IV demonstrates superior anticancer activity. PMID:25612619

  1. Evolution of Structure and Mechanistic Divergence in Di-Domain Methyltransferases from Nematode Phosphocholine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The phosphobase methylation pathway is the major route for supplying phosphocholine to phospholipid biosynthesis in plants, nematodes, and Plasmodium. In this pathway, phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferases (PMT) catalyzes the sequential methylation of phosphoethanolamine to phosphocholine. In the PMT, one domain (MT1) catalyzes methylation of phosphoethanolamine to phosphomonomethylethanolamine and a second domain (MT2) completes the synthesis of phosphocholine. The x-ray crystal structures of the di-domain PMT from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus (HcPMT1 and HcPMT2) reveal that the catalytic domains of these proteins are structurally distinct and allow for selective methylation of phosphobase substrates using different active site architectures. These structures also reveal changes leading to loss of function in the vestigial domains of the nematode PMT. Divergence of function in the two nematode PMT provides two distinct anti-parasitic inhibitor targets within the same essential metabolic pathway. The PMT from nematodes, plants, and Plasmodium also highlight adaptable metabolic modularity in evolutionarily diverse organisms. PMID:24012478

  2. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2)2–(heparin)2 complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins. PMID:25760599

  3. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Rajendran, Abinaya; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP) metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain). In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins. PMID:25922789

  4. Distinct neurobehavioural effects of cannabidiol in transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Leonora E; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; Wong, Alexander; Spiro, Adena; McGregor, Iain S; Arnold, Jonathon C; Karl, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The cannabis constituent cannabidiol (CBD) possesses anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties. We have previously shown that transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mice display altered neurobehavioural responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here we investigated whether Nrg1 TM HET mice respond differently to CBD and whether CBD reverses schizophrenia-related phenotypes expressed by these mice. Adult male Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like littermates (WT) received vehicle or CBD (1, 50 or 100 mg/kg i.p.) for 21 days. During treatment and 48 h after withdrawal we measured behaviour, whole blood CBD concentrations and autoradiographic receptor binding. Nrg1 HET mice displayed locomotor hyperactivity, PPI deficits and reduced 5-HT(2A) receptor binding density in the substantia nigra, but these phenotypes were not reversed by CBD. However, long-term CBD (50 and 100 mg/kg) selectively enhanced social interaction in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Furthermore, acute CBD (100 mg/kg) selectively increased PPI in Nrg1 TM HET mice, although tolerance to this effect was manifest upon repeated CBD administration. Long-term CBD (50 mg/kg) also selectively increased GABA(A) receptor binding in the granular retrosplenial cortex in Nrg1 TM HET mice and reduced 5-HT(2A) binding in the substantia nigra in WT mice. Nrg1 appears necessary for CBD-induced anxiolysis since only WT mice developed decreased anxiety-related behaviour with repeated CBD treatment. Altered pharmacokinetics in mutant mice could not explain our findings since no genotype differences existed in CBD blood concentrations. Here we demonstrate that Nrg1 modulates acute and long-term neurobehavioural effects of CBD, which does not reverse the schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes. PMID:22509273

  5. Histone H3 Dynamics Reveal Domains with Distinct Proliferation Potential in the Arabidopsis Root.

    PubMed

    Otero, Sofía; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Peiró, Ramón; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2016-06-01

    A coordinated transition from cell proliferation to differentiation is crucial for organogenesis. We found that extensive chromatin reorganization, shown here for histone H3 proteins, characterizes cell population dynamics in the root developmental compartments. The canonical H3.1 protein, incorporated during S-phase, is maintained at high levels in cells dividing at a high rate but is massively evicted in cells undergoing their last cell cycle before exit to differentiation. A similar pattern was observed in the quadruple mutant for the H3.1-encoding genes HTR1, HTR2, HTR3, and HTR9 (htr1,2,3,9), in which H3.1 is expressed only from the HTR13 gene. H3 eviction is a fast process occurring within the G2 phase of the last cell cycle, which is longer than G2 in earlier cell cycles. This longer G2 likely contributes to lower the H3.1/H3.3 ratio in cells leaving the root meristem. The high H3.1/H3.3 ratio and H3.1 eviction process also occurs in endocycling cells before differentiation, revealing a common principle of H3 eviction in the proliferating and endocycling domains of the root apex. Mutants in the H3.1 chaperone CAF-1 (fas1-4) maintain a pattern similar to that of wild-type roots. Our studies reveal that H3 incorporation and eviction dynamics identify cells with different cell division potential during organ patterning. PMID:27207857

  6. The domain structure of centromeres is conserved from fission yeast to humans.

    PubMed

    Kniola, B; O'Toole, E; McIntosh, J R; Mellone, B; Allshire, R; Mengarelli, S; Hultenby, K; Ekwall, K

    2001-09-01

    The centromeric DNA of fission yeast is arranged with a central core flanked by repeated sequences. The centromere-associated proteins, Mis6p and Cnp1p (SpCENP-A), associate exclusively with central core DNA, whereas the Swi6 protein binds the surrounding repeats. Here, electron microscopy and immunofluorescence light microscopy reveal that the central core and flanking regions occupy distinct positions within a heterochromatic domain. An "anchor" structure containing the Ndc80 protein resides between this heterochromatic domain and the spindle pole body. The organization of centromere-associated proteins in fission yeast is reminiscent of the multilayered structures of human kinetochores, indicating that such domain structure is conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:11553715

  7. Evidence of distinct contaminant transport patterns in rivers using tracer tests and a multiple domain retention model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottacin-Busolin, Andrea; Marion, Andrea; Musner, Tommaso; Tregnaghi, Matteo; Zaramella, Mattia

    2011-06-01

    Solute transport in rivers is controlled by surface hydrodynamics and by mass exchanges with distinct retention zones. Surface and hyporheic retention processes can be accounted for separately in solute transport models with multiple storage compartments. In the simplest two component model, short term storage can be associated to in-channel transient retention, e.g. produced by riparian vegetation or surface dead zones, and the long-term storage can be associated to hyporheic exchange. The STIR (Solute Transport In Rivers) multiple domain transport model is applied here to tracer test data from three very different Mediterranean streams with distinctive characteristics in terms of flow discharge, vegetation and substrate material. The model is used with an exponential residence time distribution (RTD) to represent surface storage processes and two distinct modeling closures are tested to simulate hyporheic retention: a second exponential RTD and a power-law distribution approximating a known solution for bedform-induced hyporheic exchange. Each stream shows distinct retention patterns characterized by different timescales of the storage time distribution. Both modeling closures lead to very good approximations of the observed breakthrough curves in the two rivers with permeable bed exposed to the flow, where hyporheic flows are expected to occur. In the one case where the occurrence of hyporheic flows is inhibited by bottom vegetation, only the two exponential RTD model is acceptable and the time scales of the two components are of the same magnitude. The significant finding of this work is the recognition of a strong signature of the river properties on tracer data and the evidence of the ability of multiple-component models to describe individual stream responses. This evidence may open a new perspective in river contamination studies, where rivers could possibly be classified based on their ability to trap and release pollutants.

  8. Giant protein kinases: domain interactions and structural basis of autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J; Feil, S C; Parker, M W; Benian, G M; Weiss, K R; Kemp, B E

    1996-01-01

    The myosin-associated giant protein kinases twitchin and titin are composed predominantly of fibronectin- and immunoglobulin-like modules. We report the crystal structures of two autoinhibited twitchin kinase fragments, one from Aplysia and a larger fragment from Caenorhabditis elegans containing an additional C-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. The structure of the longer fragment shows that the immunoglobulin domain contacts the protein kinase domain on the opposite side from the catalytic cleft, laterally exposing potential myosin binding residues. Together, the structures reveal the cooperative interactions between the autoregulatory region and the residues from the catalytic domain involved in protein substrate binding, ATP binding, catalysis and the activation loop, and explain the differences between the observed autoinhibitory mechanism and the one found in the structure of calmodulin-dependent kinase I. Images PMID:9003756

  9. LRIG1 extracellular domain: structure and function analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yibin; Soo, Priscilla; Walker, Francesca; Zhang, Hui Hua; Redpath, Nicholas; Tan, Chin Wee; Nicola, Nicos A; Adams, Timothy E; Garrett, Thomas P; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Burgess, Antony W

    2015-05-22

    We have expressed and purified three soluble fragments of the human LRIG1-ECD (extracellular domain): the LRIG1-LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain, the LRIG1-3Ig (immunoglobulin-like) domain, and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment using baculovirus vectors in insect cells. The two LRIG1 domains crystallised so that we have been able to determine the three-dimensional structures at 2.3Å resolution. We developed a three-dimensional structure for the LRIG1-ECD using homology modelling based on the LINGO-1 structure. The LRIG1-LRR domain and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment are monomers in solution, whereas the LRIG1-3Ig domain appears to be dimeric. We could not detect any binding of the LRIG1 domains or the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment to the EGF receptor (EGFR), either in solution using biosensor analysis or when the EGFR was expressed on the cell surface. The FLAG-tagged LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment binds weakly to colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of EGFRs. Similarly, neither the soluble LRIG1-LRR nor the LRIG1-3Ig domains nor the full-length LRIG1 co-expressed in HEK293 cells inhibited ligand-stimulated activation of cell-surface EGFR. PMID:25765764

  10. Structural basis for the regulation of enzymatic activity of Regnase-1 by domain-domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Mariko; Tsushima, Takashi; Noda, Nobuo N.; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Yamashita, Kazuo; Standley, Daron M.; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Regnase-1 is an RNase that directly cleaves mRNAs of inflammatory genes such as IL-6 and IL-12p40, and negatively regulates cellular inflammatory responses. Here, we report the structures of four domains of Regnase-1 from Mus musculus—the N-terminal domain (NTD), PilT N-terminus like (PIN) domain, zinc finger (ZF) domain and C-terminal domain (CTD). The PIN domain harbors the RNase catalytic center; however, it is insufficient for enzymatic activity. We found that the NTD associates with the PIN domain and significantly enhances its RNase activity. The PIN domain forms a head-to-tail oligomer and the dimer interface overlaps with the NTD binding site. Interestingly, mutations blocking PIN oligomerization had no RNase activity, indicating that both oligomerization and NTD binding are crucial for RNase activity in vitro. These results suggest that Regnase-1 RNase activity is tightly controlled by both intramolecular (NTD-PIN) and intermolecular (PIN-PIN) interactions. PMID:26927947

  11. Structural basis for the regulation of enzymatic activity of Regnase-1 by domain-domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Mariko; Tsushima, Takashi; Noda, Nobuo N; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Yamashita, Kazuo; Standley, Daron M; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Regnase-1 is an RNase that directly cleaves mRNAs of inflammatory genes such as IL-6 and IL-12p40, and negatively regulates cellular inflammatory responses. Here, we report the structures of four domains of Regnase-1 from Mus musculus-the N-terminal domain (NTD), PilT N-terminus like (PIN) domain, zinc finger (ZF) domain and C-terminal domain (CTD). The PIN domain harbors the RNase catalytic center; however, it is insufficient for enzymatic activity. We found that the NTD associates with the PIN domain and significantly enhances its RNase activity. The PIN domain forms a head-to-tail oligomer and the dimer interface overlaps with the NTD binding site. Interestingly, mutations blocking PIN oligomerization had no RNase activity, indicating that both oligomerization and NTD binding are crucial for RNase activity in vitro. These results suggest that Regnase-1 RNase activity is tightly controlled by both intramolecular (NTD-PIN) and intermolecular (PIN-PIN) interactions. PMID:26927947

  12. Crystal structure of domain-swapped STE20 OSR1 kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Cobb, Melanie H.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.

    2009-09-15

    OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive-1) and SPAK (Ste20/Sps1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) belong to the GCK-VI subfamily of Ste20 group kinases. OSR1 and SPAK are key regulators of NKCCs (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporters) and activated by WNK family members (with-no-lysine kinase), mutations of which are known to cause Gordon syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of inherited hypertension. The crystal structure of OSR1 kinase domain has been solved at 2.25 {angstrom}. OSR1 forms a domain-swapped dimer in an inactive conformation, in which P+1 loop and {alpha}EF helix are swapped between dimer-related monomers. Structural alignment with nonswapped Ste20 TAO2 kinase indicates that the integrity of chemical interactions in the kinase domain is well preserved in the domain-swapped interfaces. The OSR1 kinase domain has now been added to a growing list of domain-swapped protein kinases recently reported, suggesting that the domain-swapping event provides an additional layer of complexity in regulating protein kinase activity.

  13. Identification of structural domains in proteins by a graph heuristic.

    PubMed

    Wernisch, L; Hunting, M; Wodak, S J

    1999-05-15

    A novel automatic procedure for identifying domains from protein atomic coordinates is presented. The procedure, termed STRUDL (STRUctural Domain Limits), does not take into account information on secondary structures and handles any number of domains made up of contiguous or non-contiguous chain segments. The core algorithm uses the Kernighan-Lin graph heuristic to partition the protein into residue sets which display minimum interactions between them. These interactions are deduced from the weighted Voronoi diagram. The generated partitions are accepted or rejected on the basis of optimized criteria, representing basic expected physical properties of structural domains. The graph heuristic approach is shown to be very effective, it approximates closely the exact solution provided by a branch and bound algorithm for a number of test proteins. In addition, the overall performance of STRUDL is assessed on a set of 787 representative proteins from the Protein Data Bank by comparison to domain definitions in the CATH protein classification. The domains assigned by STRUDL agree with the CATH assignments in at least 81% of the tested proteins. This result is comparable to that obtained previously using PUU (Holm and Sander, Proteins 1994;9:256-268), the only other available algorithm designed to identify domains with any number of non-contiguous chain segments. A detailed discussion of the structures for which our assignments differ from those in CATH brings to light some clear inconsistencies between the concept of structural domains based on minimizing inter-domain interactions and that of delimiting structural motifs that represent acceptable folding topologies or architectures. Considering both concepts as complementary and combining them in a layered approach might be the way forward. PMID:10328269

  14. An Algebro-Topological Description of Protein Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object – a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we invesigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH. PMID:21629687

  15. Structural origins of misfolding propensity in the platelet adhesive von Willebrand factor A1 domain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael T; Tischer, Alexander; Whitten, Steven T; Auton, Matthew

    2015-07-21

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1 and A3 domains are structurally isomorphic yet exhibit distinct mechanisms of unfolding. The A1 domain, responsible for platelet adhesion to VWF in hemostasis, unfolds through a molten globule intermediate in an apparent three-state mechanism, while A3 unfolds by a classical two-state mechanism. Inspection of the sequences or structures alone does not elucidate the source of this thermodynamic conundrum; however, the three-state character of the A1 domain suggests that it has more than one cooperative substructure yielding two separate unfolding transitions not present in A3. We investigate the extent to which structural elements contributing to intermediate conformations can be identified using a residue-specific implementation of the structure-energy-equivalence-of-domains algorithm (SEED), which parses proteins of known structure into their constituent thermodynamically cooperative components using protein-group-specific, transfer free energies. The structural elements computed to contribute to the non-two-state character coincide with regions where Von Willebrand disease mutations induce misfolded molten globule conformations of the A1 domain. This suggests a mechanism for the regulation of rheological platelet adhesion to A1 based on cooperative flexibility of the α2 and α3 helices flanking the platelet GPIbα receptor binding interface. PMID:26200876

  16. Structural Origins of Misfolding Propensity in the Platelet Adhesive Von Willebrand Factor A1 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michael T.; Tischer, Alexander; Whitten, Steven T.; Auton, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1 and A3 domains are structurally isomorphic yet exhibit distinct mechanisms of unfolding. The A1 domain, responsible for platelet adhesion to VWF in hemostasis, unfolds through a molten globule intermediate in an apparent three-state mechanism, while A3 unfolds by a classical two-state mechanism. Inspection of the sequences or structures alone does not elucidate the source of this thermodynamic conundrum; however, the three-state character of the A1 domain suggests that it has more than one cooperative substructure yielding two separate unfolding transitions not present in A3. We investigate the extent to which structural elements contributing to intermediate conformations can be identified using a residue-specific implementation of the structure-energy-equivalence-of-domains algorithm (SEED), which parses proteins of known structure into their constituent thermodynamically cooperative components using protein-group-specific, transfer free energies. The structural elements computed to contribute to the non-two-state character coincide with regions where Von Willebrand disease mutations induce misfolded molten globule conformations of the A1 domain. This suggests a mechanism for the regulation of rheological platelet adhesion to A1 based on cooperative flexibility of the α2 and α3 helices flanking the platelet GPIbα receptor binding interface. PMID:26200876

  17. Hemerythrin-like Domain within F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5) Communicates Cellular Iron and Oxygen Availability by Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chollangi, Srinivas; Thompson, Joel W.; Ruiz, Julio C.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins play a principal role in maintaining cellular iron homeostasis by post-transcriptionally regulating factors responsible for iron uptake, utilization, and storage. An E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing FBXL5 targets IRP2 for proteasomal degradation under iron- and oxygen-replete conditions, whereas FBXL5 itself is degraded when iron and oxygen availability decreases. FBXL5 contains a hemerythrin-like (Hr) domain at its N terminus that mediates its own differential stability. Here, we investigated the iron- and oxygen-dependent conformational changes within FBXL5-Hr that underlie its role as a cellular sensor. As predicted, FBXL5-Hr undergoes substantive structural changes when iron becomes limiting, accounting for its switch-like behavior. However, these same changes are not observed in response to oxygen depletion, indicating that this domain accommodates two distinct sensing mechanisms. Moreover, FBXL5-Hr does not behave as a dynamic sensor that continuously samples the cellular environment, assuming conformations in equilibrium with ever-changing cellular iron levels. Instead, the isolated domain appears competent to incorporate iron only at or near the time of its own synthesis. These observations have important implications for mechanisms by which these metabolites are sensed within mammalian cells. PMID:22648410

  18. Hemerythrin-like domain within F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5) communicates cellular iron and oxygen availability by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chollangi, Srinivas; Thompson, Joel W; Ruiz, Julio C; Gardner, Kevin H; Bruick, Richard K

    2012-07-01

    Iron regulatory proteins play a principal role in maintaining cellular iron homeostasis by post-transcriptionally regulating factors responsible for iron uptake, utilization, and storage. An E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing FBXL5 targets IRP2 for proteasomal degradation under iron- and oxygen-replete conditions, whereas FBXL5 itself is degraded when iron and oxygen availability decreases. FBXL5 contains a hemerythrin-like (Hr) domain at its N terminus that mediates its own differential stability. Here, we investigated the iron- and oxygen-dependent conformational changes within FBXL5-Hr that underlie its role as a cellular sensor. As predicted, FBXL5-Hr undergoes substantive structural changes when iron becomes limiting, accounting for its switch-like behavior. However, these same changes are not observed in response to oxygen depletion, indicating that this domain accommodates two distinct sensing mechanisms. Moreover, FBXL5-Hr does not behave as a dynamic sensor that continuously samples the cellular environment, assuming conformations in equilibrium with ever-changing cellular iron levels. Instead, the isolated domain appears competent to incorporate iron only at or near the time of its own synthesis. These observations have important implications for mechanisms by which these metabolites are sensed within mammalian cells. PMID:22648410

  19. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  20. Intracellular Expression of Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies Specific for Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Uncovers Distinct Features of Its Nuclear Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Joseph; Schmidt, Florian I.; Hanke, Leo; Cragnolini, Juanjo; Cavallari, Marco; Altenburg, Arwen; Brewer, Rebeccah; Ingram, Jessica; Shoemaker, Charles

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perturbation of protein-protein interactions relies mostly on genetic approaches or on chemical inhibition. Small RNA viruses, such as influenza A virus, do not easily lend themselves to the former approach, while chemical inhibition requires that the target protein be druggable. A lack of tools thus constrains the functional analysis of influenza virus-encoded proteins. We generated a panel of camelid-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) against influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP), a viral protein essential for nuclear trafficking and packaging of the influenza virus genome. We show that these VHHs can target NP in living cells and perturb NP's function during infection. Cytosolic expression of NP-specific VHHs (αNP-VHHs) disrupts virus replication at an early stage of the life cycle. Based on their specificity, these VHHs fall into two distinct groups. Both prevent nuclear import of the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex without disrupting nuclear import of NP alone. Different stages of the virus life cycle thus rely on distinct nuclear localization motifs of NP. Their molecular characterization may afford new means of intervention in the virus life cycle. IMPORTANCE Many proteins encoded by RNA viruses are refractory to manipulation due to their essential role in replication. Thus, studying their function and determining how to disrupt said function through pharmaceutical intervention are difficult. We present a novel method based on single-domain-antibody technology that permits specific targeting and disruption of an essential influenza virus protein in the absence of genetic manipulation of influenza virus itself. Characterization of such interactions may help identify new targets for pharmaceutical intervention. This approach can be extended to study proteins encoded by other viral pathogens. PMID:25540369

  1. Two appendages homologous between basal bodies and centrioles are formed using distinct Odf2 domains

    PubMed Central

    Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Yuji; Nishida, Tomoki; Watanabe, Shin; Kunimoto, Koshi; Ishikawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Ciliogenesis is regulated by context-dependent cellular cues, including some transduced through appendage-like structures on ciliary basal bodies called transition fibers and basal feet. However, the molecular basis for this regulation is not fully understood. The Odf2 gene product, ODF2/cenexin, is essential for both ciliogenesis and the formation of the distal and subdistal appendages on centrioles, which become basal bodies. We examined the effects of Odf2 deletion constructs on ciliogenesis in Odf2-knockout F9 cells. Electron microscopy revealed that ciliogenesis and transition fiber formation required the ODF2/cenexin fragment containing amino acids (aa) 188–806, whereas basal foot formation required aa 1–59 and 188–806. These sequences also formed distal and subdistal appendages, respectively, indicating that the centriole appendages are molecularly analogous to those on basal bodies. We used the differential formation of appendages by Odf2 deletion constructs to study the incorporation and function of molecules associated with each appendage type. We found that transition fibers and distal appendages were required for ciliogenesis and subdistal appendages stabilized the centrosomal microtubules. PMID:24189274

  2. Distinct protein domains regulate ciliary targeting and function of C. elegans PKD-2

    PubMed Central

    Knobel, Karla M.; Peden, Erik M.; Barr, Maureen M.

    2008-01-01

    TRPP2 (transient receptor potential polycystin-2) channels function in a range of cells where they are localized to specific subcellular regions including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and primary cilium. In humans, TRPP2/PC-2 mutations severely compromise kidney function and give rise to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The Caenorhabditis elegans TRPP2 homolog, PKD-2, is restricted to the somatodendritic (cell body and dendrite) and ciliary compartment of male specific sensory neurons. Within these neurons PKD-2 function is required for sensation. To understand the mechanisms regulating TRPP2 subcellular distribution and activity, we performed in vivo structure-function-localization studies using C. elegans as a model system. Our data demonstrate that somatodendritic and ciliary targeting requires the transmembrane (TM) region of PKD-2and that the PKD-2 cytosolic termini regulate subcellular distribution and function. Within neuronal cell bodies, PKD-2 colocalizes with the OSM-9 TRP vanilloid (TRPV) channel, suggesting that these TRPP and TRPV channels may function in a common process. When human TRPP2/PC-2 is heterologously expressed in transgenic C. elegans animals, PC-2 does not visibly localize to cilia but does partially rescue pkd-2 null mutant defects, suggesting that human PC-2 and PKD-2 are functional homologs. PMID:18037411

  3. Polymodal activation of the TREK-2 K2P channel produces structurally distinct open states.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Conor; Schewe, Marcus; Aryal, Prafulla; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Tucker, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    The TREK subfamily of two-pore domain (K2P) K(+) channels exhibit polymodal gating by a wide range of physical and chemical stimuli. Crystal structures now exist for these channels in two main states referred to as the "up" and "down" conformations. However, recent studies have resulted in contradictory and mutually exclusive conclusions about the functional (i.e., conductive) status of these two conformations. To address this problem, we have used the state-dependent TREK-2 inhibitor norfluoxetine that can only bind to the down state, thereby allowing us to distinguish between these two conformations when activated by different stimuli. Our results reconcile these previously contradictory gating models by demonstrating that activation by pressure, temperature, voltage, and pH produce more than one structurally distinct open state and reveal that channel activation does not simply involve switching between the up and down conformations. These results also highlight the diversity of structural mechanisms that K2P channels use to integrate polymodal gating signals. PMID:27241700

  4. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  5. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  6. The structure of the C-terminal domain of the Zaire ebolavirus nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dziubańska, Paulina J.; Derewenda, Urszula; Ellena, Jeffrey F.; Engel, Daniel A.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2014-01-01

    Ebolavirus (EBOV) causes severe hemorrhagic fever with a mortality rate of up to 90%. EBOV is a member of the order Mononegavirales and, like other viruses in this taxonomic group, contains a negative-sense single-stranded (ss) RNA. The EBOV ssRNA encodes seven distinct proteins. One of them, the nucleoprotein (NP), is the most abundant viral protein in the infected cell and within the viral nucleocapsid. Like other EBOV proteins, NP is multifunctional. It is tightly associated with the viral genome and is essential for viral transcription, RNA replication, genome packaging and nucleocapsid assembly prior to membrane encapsulation. NP is unusual among the Mononegavirales in that it contains two distinct regions, or putative domains, the C-terminal of which shows no homology to any known proteins and is purported to be a hub for protein–protein interactions within the nucleocapsid. The atomic structure of NP remains unknown. Here, the boundaries of the N- and C-terminal domains of NP from Zaire EBOV are defined, it is shown that they can be expressed as highly stable recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, and the atomic structure of the C-terminal domain (residues 641–739) derived from analysis of two distinct crystal forms at 1.98 and 1.75 Å resolution is described. The structure reveals a novel tertiary fold that is distantly reminiscent of the β-grasp architecture. PMID:25195755

  7. Crystal structure and dynamics of Spt16N-domain of FACT complex from Cicer arietinum.

    PubMed

    Are, Venkat N; Ghosh, Biplab; Kumar, Ashwani; Gadre, Rekha; Makde, Ravindra D

    2016-07-01

    The facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) complex, a heterodimer of SSRP1 and Spt16 proteins, is an essential histone chaperone that transiently reorganizes nucleosomes during transcription, replication and repair. N-terminal domain of Spt16 subunit (Spt16N) is strictly conserved in all the known Spt16 orthologs. Genetic studies in yeast have revealed a partially redundant role of Spt16N for the FACT functionality. Here, we report the crystal structure of Spt16N from a plant origin (Spt16Nca, Cicer arietinum) and its comparisons with the known Spt16N structures from yeasts and human. The inter-domain angle in Spt16Nca is significantly different from that of the yeast and human Spt16N structures. Normal mode analysis and classical molecular dynamics simulations reveal inter-domain movement in Spt16Nca and later also shows conformational flexibility of the critical loops. Spt16Nca binds to histone H3/H4 complex, similar to its orthologs from yeast and human origins. Further, conservation of electrostatic surface potentials in Spt16N structures from evolutionary distinct domains of eukaryotes (plant, human and fungi) have provided the potential sites on Spt16N for histone interactions. The structural comparisons with M24 peptidases show that the hydrophobic pocket shielded by a flexible loop of C-terminal domain of Spt16N that may be functionally important. PMID:26995613

  8. NMR solution structure of the neurotrypsin Kringle domain.

    PubMed

    Ozhogina, Olga A; Grishaev, Alexander; Bominaar, Emile L; Patthy, László; Trexler, Maria; Llinás, Miguel

    2008-11-25

    Neurotrypsin is a multidomain protein that serves as a brain-specific serine protease. Here we report the NMR structure of its kringle domain, NT/K. The data analysis was performed with the BACUS (Bayesian analysis of coupled unassigned spins) algorithm. This study presents the first application of BACUS to the structure determination of a 13C unenriched protein for which no prior experimental 3D structure was available. NT/K adopts the kringle fold, consisting of an antiparallel beta-sheet bridged by an overlapping pair of disulfides. The structure reveals the presence of a surface-exposed left-handed polyproline II helix that is closely packed to the core beta-structure. This feature distinguishes NT/K from other members of the kringle fold and points toward a novel functional role for a kringle domain. Functional divergence among kringle domains is discussed on the basis of their surface and electrostatic characteristics. PMID:18956887

  9. The exomer cargo adaptor structure reveals a novel GTPase-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Richardson, Brian C; Strassner, Amanda M; Fromme, J Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Cargo adaptors control intracellular trafficking of transmembrane proteins by sorting them into membrane transport carriers. The COPI, COPII, and clathrin cargo adaptors are structurally well characterized, but other cargo adaptors remain poorly understood. Exomer is a specialized cargo adaptor that sorts specific proteins into trans-Golgi network (TGN)-derived vesicles in response to cellular signals. Exomer is recruited to the TGN by the Arf1 GTPase, a universally conserved trafficking regulator. Here, we report the crystal structure of a tetrameric exomer complex composed of two copies each of the Chs5 and Chs6 subunits. The structure reveals the FN3 and BRCT domains of Chs5, which together we refer to as the FBE domain (FN3–BRCT of exomer), project from the exomer core complex. The overall architecture of the FBE domain is reminiscent of the appendage domains of other cargo adaptors, although it exhibits a distinct topology. In contrast to appendage domains, which bind accessory factors, we show that the primary role of the FBE domain is to bind Arf1 for recruitment of exomer to membranes. PMID:23000721

  10. Distinct antibody species: structural differences creating therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Muyldermans, Serge; Smider, Vaughn V

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies have been a remarkably successful class of molecules for binding a large number of antigens in therapeutic, diagnostic, and research applications. Typical antibodies derived from mouse or human sources use the surface formed by complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the variable regions of the heavy chain/light chain heterodimer, which typically forms a relatively flat binding surface. Alternative species, particularly camelids and bovines, provide a unique paradigm for antigen recognition through novel domains which form the antigen binding paratope. For camelids, heavy chain antibodies bind antigen with only a single heavy chain variable region, in the absence of light chains. In bovines, ultralong CDR-H3 regions form an independently folding minidomain, which protrudes from the surface of the antibody and is diverse in both its sequence and disulfide patterns. The atypical paratopes of camelids and bovines potentially provide the ability to interact with different epitopes, particularly recessed or concave surfaces, compared to traditional antibodies. PMID:26922135

  11. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  12. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  13. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity.

    PubMed

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Armstrong, Geoffrey S; Isern, Nancy G; Jones, David N M; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Eisenmesser, Elan Zohar

    2011-08-01

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. CD147 expression is so high in several cancers that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2, which is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues, and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2, which is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. We present the first crystal structure of the human CD147 Ig0 domain and show that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a crystallographic dimer with an I-type domain structure, which maintained in solution. Furthermore, we have utilized our structural data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins, both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain, within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6 and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Finally, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation. PMID:21620857

  14. Design of structurally distinct proteins using strategies inspired by evolution.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, T M; Williams, B; Williams, T; Xu, X; Eletsky, A; Federizon, J F; Szyperski, T; Kuhlman, B

    2016-05-01

    Natural recombination combines pieces of preexisting proteins to create new tertiary structures and functions. We describe a computational protocol, called SEWING, which is inspired by this process and builds new proteins from connected or disconnected pieces of existing structures. Helical proteins designed with SEWING contain structural features absent from other de novo designed proteins and, in some cases, remain folded at more than 100°C. High-resolution structures of the designed proteins CA01 and DA05R1 were solved by x-ray crystallography (2.2 angstrom resolution) and nuclear magnetic resonance, respectively, and there was excellent agreement with the design models. This method provides a new strategy to rapidly create large numbers of diverse and designable protein scaffolds. PMID:27151863

  15. Distinct functional domains of the Abelson tyrosine kinase control axon guidance responses to Netrin and Slit to regulate the assembly of neural circuits.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michael P; Bashaw, Greg J

    2013-07-01

    To develop a functional nervous system, axons must initially navigate through a complex environment, directed by guidance ligands and receptors. These receptors must link to intracellular signaling cascades to direct axon pathfinding decisions. The Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) plays a crucial role in multiple Drosophila axon guidance pathways during development, though the mechanism by which Abl elicits a diverse set of guidance outputs is currently unknown. We identified Abl in a genetic screen for genes that contribute to Netrin-dependent axon guidance in midline-crossing (commissural) neurons. We find that Abl interacts both physically and genetically with the Netrin receptor Frazzled, and that disrupting this interaction prevents Abl from promoting midline axon crossing. Moreover, we find that Abl exerts its diverse activities through at least two different mechanisms: (1) a partly kinase-independent, structural function in midline attraction through its C-terminal F-actin binding domain (FABD) and (2) a kinase-dependent inhibition of repulsive guidance pathways that does not require the Abl C terminus. Abl also regulates motor axon pathfinding through a non-overlapping set of functional domains. These results highlight how a multifunctional kinase can trigger diverse axon guidance outcomes through the use of distinct structural motifs. PMID:23720041

  16. Structure and Dynamics of the tRNA-like Structure Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweger, Mario; Nesbitt, David

    2014-03-01

    Conformational switching is widely accepted as regulatory mechanism in gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar regulation mechanisms are emerging for viral systems. One of the most abundant and best studied systems is the tRNA-like structure domain that is found in a number of plant viruses across eight genera. In this work, the folding dynamics of the tRNA-like structure domain of Brome Mosaic Virus are investigated using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer techniques. In particular, Burst fluorescence is applied to observe metal-ion induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the 3'-terminal 169nt of BMV RNA3. Histograms of EFRET probabilities reveal a complex equilibrium of three distinct populations. A step-wise kinetic model for TLS folding is developed in accord with the evolution of conformational populations and structural information in the literature. In this mechanism, formation of functional TLS domains from unfolded RNAs requires two consecutive steps; 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction followed by 2) formation of a 3' pseudoknot. This three-state equilibrium is well described by step-wise dissociation constants K1(328(30) μM) and K2(1092(183) μM) for [Mg2+] and K1(74(6) mM) and K2(243(52) mM) for [Na+]-induced folding. The kinetic model is validated by oligo competition with the STEM interaction. Implications of this conformational folding mechanism are discussed in regards to regulation of virus replication.

  17. Domain Structures in Nematic Liquid Crystals on a Polycarbonate Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  18. Domain structures in nematic liquid crystals on a polycarbonate surface.

    PubMed

    Parshin, Alexander M; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Zyryanov, Victor Y; Shabanov, Vasily F

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of nematic liquid crystals on polycarbonate films obtained with the use of solvents with different solvations is studied. Domain structures occurring during the growth on the polymer surface against the background of the initial thread-like or schlieren texture are demonstrated. It is established by optical methods that the domains are stable formations visualizing the polymer surface structures. In nematic droplets, the temperature-induced transition from the domain structure with two extinction bands to the structure with four bands is observed. This transition is shown to be caused by reorientation of the nematic director in the liquid crystal volume from the planar alignment to the homeotropic state with the pronounced radial configuration of nematic molecules on the surface. The observed textures are compared with different combinations of the volume LC orientations and the radial distribution of the director field and the disclination lines at the polycarbonate surface. PMID:23965955

  19. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S.; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Insect Odorant Receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection. PMID:25584517

  20. Structural basis for the Smad5 MH1 domain to recognize different DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Nan; Li, Wan-Xin; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Shi-Ming; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Smad proteins are important intracellular mediators of TGF-β signalling, which transmit signals directly from cell surface receptors to the nucleus. The MH1 domain of Smad plays a key role in DNA recognition. Two types of DNA sequence were identified as Smad binding motifs: the Smad binding element (SBE) and the GC-rich sequence. Here we report the first crystal structure of the Smad5 MH1 domain in complex with the GC-rich sequence. Compared with the Smad5-MH1/SBE complex structure, the Smad5 MH1 domain contacts the GC-rich site with the same β-hairpin, but the detailed interaction modes are different. Conserved β-hairpin residues make base specific contacts with the minimal GC-rich site, 5′-GGC-3′. The assembly of Smad5-MH1 on the GC-rich DNA also results in distinct DNA conformational changes. Moreover, the crystal structure of Smad5-MH1 in complex with a composite DNA sequence demonstrates that the MH1 domain is targeted to each binding site (GC-rich or SBE) with modular binding modes, and the length of the DNA spacer affects the MH1 assembly. In conclusion, our work provides the structural basis for the recognition and binding specificity of the Smad MH1 domain with the DNA targets. PMID:26304548

  1. The Bel1 protein of human foamy virus contains one positive and two negative control regions which regulate a distinct activation domain of 30 amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Chang, J; Lee, K J; Sung, Y C

    1994-01-01

    The Bel1 transactivator is essential for the replication of human foamy virus (HFV). To define the functional domains of HFV Bel1, we generated random missense mutations throughout the entire coding sequence of Bel1. Functional analyses of 24 missense mutations have revealed the presence of at least two functional domains in Bel1. One domain corresponds to a basic amino acid-rich motif which acts as a bipartite nuclear targeting sequence. A second, central domain corresponds to a presumed effector region which, when mutated, leads to dominant-negative mutants and/or lacks transactivating ability. In addition, deletion analyses and domain-swapping experiments further showed that Bel1 protein contains a strong carboxy-terminal activation domain. The activating region is also capable of functioning as a transcription-activating domain in yeast cells, although it does not bear any significant sequence homology to the well-characterized acidic activation domain which is known to function only in yeast and mammalian cells. We also demonstrated that the regions of Bel1 from residues 1 to 76 and from residues 153 to 225 repressed transcriptional activation exerted by the Bel1 activation domain. In contrast, the region from residues 82 to 150 appears to overcome an inhibitory effect. These results indicate that Bel1 contains one positive and two negative regulatory domains that modulate a distinct activation domain of Bel1. These regulatory domains of Bel1 cannot affect the function of the VP16 activation domain, suggesting that these domains specifically regulate the activation domain of Bel1. Furthermore, in vivo competition experiments showed that the positive regulatory domain acts in trans. Thus, our results demonstrate that Bel1-mediated transactivation appears to undergo a complex regulatory pathway which provides a novel mode of regulation for a transcriptional activation domain. Images PMID:8139046

  2. Joint time-frequency domain identification of nonlinearly controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Gang; Sain, Michael K.; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Pham, Khanh D.

    2006-05-01

    This paper introduces a 3-step approach for the identification of a linear structure that is controlled by nonlinear damping devices. First, the structure with the integrated nonlinear damper is subjected to random vibration test and the frequency response function (FRF) of the structure is calculated from the input-output data of the physical system. Based on the frequency domain data, a state space model is then estimated using a recently developed FRF curve-fitting technique that is designed especially for lightly damped structures with control inputs. Finally an iterative process is used to optimize the model performance in the time domain and an integrated model of the nonlinearly controlled structure is derived by interconnecting the structure model with that of the nonlinear damper. The complete approach is illustrated by the modeling of a base-isolated structure controlled by a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper.

  3. ASH structure alignment package: Sensitivity and selectivity in domain classification

    PubMed Central

    Standley, Daron M; Toh, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Haruki

    2007-01-01

    Background Structure alignment methods offer the possibility of measuring distant evolutionary relationships between proteins that are not visible by sequence-based analysis. However, the question of how structural differences and similarities ought to be quantified in this regard remains open. In this study we construct a training set of sequence-unique CATH and SCOP domains, from which we develop a scoring function that can reliably identify domains with the same CATH topology and SCOP fold classification. The score is implemented in the ASH structure alignment package, for which the source code and a web service are freely available from the PDBj website . Results The new ASH score shows increased selectivity and sensitivity compared with values reported for several popular programs using the same test set of 4,298,905 structure pairs, yielding an area of .96 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In addition, weak sequence homologies between similar domains are revealed that could not be detected by BLAST sequence alignment. Also, a subset of domain pairs is identified that exhibit high similarity, even though their CATH and SCOP classification differs. Finally, we show that the ranking of alignment programs based solely on geometric measures depends on the choice of the quality measure. Conclusion ASH shows high selectivity and sensitivity with regard to domain classification, an important step in defining distantly related protein sequence families. Moreover, the CPU cost per alignment is competitive with the fastest programs, making ASH a practical option for large-scale structure classification studies. PMID:17407606

  4. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (Sox2) proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(0bp)) or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(3bp)) separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox2(0bp) and Oct4/Sox2(3bp) complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming. PMID:26790000

  5. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (Sox2) proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox20bp) or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox23bp) separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox20bp and Oct4/Sox23bp complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming. PMID:26790000

  6. Distinct lobes of Limulus ventral photoreceptors. II. Structure and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The structure of Limulus ventral photoreceptors fixed in situ has been investigated using light and electron microscopy and computer-assisted reconstruction and planimetry. Photoreceptors occur singly and in clusters. All photoreceptors have two types of lobes. The rhabdomeral lobe (R lobe) appears to be specialized for light sensitivity, containing the rhabdomere, which completely covers its external surface and forms infoldings into the lobe. The structure of the external rhabdom differs from that within infoldings. The other main structures of the R lobe are the palisades along the rhabdom, multivesicular bodies, lamellar bodies, and mitochondria. The arhabdomeral lobe (A lobe) bears the axon and contains the nucleus, clusters of residual bodies, lamellar arrays of endoplasmic reticulum, masses of glycogen, lipid droplets, and Golgi complexes. The R lobe and A lobe are analogous to the outer and inner segments of vertebrae photoreceptors. In single photoreceptors A and R lobes are separated by an indentation filled with glial processes. Computer reconstructions of cell clusters reveal that each cell has both types of lobes and an axon. Most of the rhabdom is formed from abutting arrays of external rhabdom from the R lobes of different members of the cluster. Efferent fibers containing characteristic angular granules penetrate single cells and clusters in glial invaginations. The main, if not exclusive, target of the efferent fibers is the internal rhabdom. PMID:7175491

  7. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia. PMID:27595976

  8. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A.; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J.; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia. PMID:27595976

  9. Are The Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus functionally distinct structures?

    PubMed Central

    Fanselow, Michael S.; Dong, Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    One literature treats the hippocampus as a purely cognitive structure involved in memory; another treats it as a regulator of emotion whose dysfunction leads to psychopathology. We review behavioral, anatomical, and gene expression studies that together support a functional segmentation into 3 hippocampal compartments dorsal, intermediate and ventral. The dorsal hippocampus, which corresponds to the posterior hippocampus in primates, performs primarily cognitive functions. The ventral (anterior in primates) relates to stress, emotion and affect. Strikingly, gene expression in the dorsal hippocampus correlates with cortical regions involved in information processing, while genes expressed in the ventral hippocampus correlate with regions involved in emotion and stress (amygdala and hypothalamus). PMID:20152109

  10. Structures of the spectrin-ankyrin interaction binding domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Huang, Lei; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-01-07

    As key components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, spectrin and ankyrin specifically interact to tether the spectrin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. The structure of the spectrin binding domain of ankyrin and the ankyrin binding domain of spectrin have been solved to elucidate the structural basis for ankyrin-spectrin recognition. The structure of repeats 14 and 15 of spectrin shows that these repeats are similar to all other spectrin repeats. One feature that could account for the preference of ankyrin for these repeats is the presence of a conserved, negatively charged patch on one side of repeat 14. The structure of the ankyrin ZU5 domain shows a novel structure containing a {beta} core. The structure reveals that the canonical ZU5 consensus sequence is likely to be missing an important region that codes for a {beta} strand that forms part of the core of the domain. In addition, a positively charged region is suggestive of a binding surface for the negatively charged spectrin repeat 14. Previously reported mutants of ankyrin that map to this region lie mostly on the surface of the protein, although at least one is likely to be part of the core.

  11. Distinct structural rearrangements of the VSV glycoprotein drive membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Libersou, Sonia; Albertini, Aurélie A.V.; Ouldali, Malika; Maury, Virginie; Maheu, Christine; Raux, Hélène; de Haas, Felix; Roche, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells requires the fusion of viral and cellular membranes, driven by conformational changes in viral glycoproteins. Many studies have shown that fusion involves the cooperative action of a large number of these glycoproteins, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We used electron microscopy and tomography to study the low pH–induced fusion reaction catalyzed by vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (G). Pre- and post-fusion crystal structures were observed on virions at high and low pH, respectively. Individual fusion events with liposomes were also visualized. Fusion appears to be driven by two successive structural rearrangements of G at different sites on the virion. Fusion is initiated at the flat base of the particle. Glycoproteins located outside the contact zone between virions and liposomes then reorganize into regular arrays. We suggest that the formation of these arrays, which have been shown to be an intrinsic property of the G ectodomain, induces membrane constraints, achieving the fusion reaction. PMID:20921141

  12. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  13. Structure and VP16 binding of the Mediator Med25 activator interaction domain.

    PubMed

    Vojnic, Erika; Mourão, André; Seizl, Martin; Simon, Bernd; Wenzeck, Larissa; Larivière, Laurent; Baumli, Sonja; Baumgart, Karen; Meisterernst, Michael; Sattler, Michael; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    Eukaryotic transcription is regulated by interactions between gene-specific activators and the coactivator complex Mediator. Here we report the NMR structure of the Mediator subunit Med25 (also called Arc92) activator interaction domain (ACID) and analyze the structural and functional interaction of ACID with the archetypical acidic transcription activator VP16. Unlike other known activator targets, ACID forms a seven-stranded β-barrel framed by three helices. The VP16 subdomains H1 and H2 bind to opposite faces of ACID and cooperate during promoter-dependent activated transcription in a in vitro system. The activator-binding ACID faces are functionally required and conserved among higher eukaryotes. Comparison with published activator structures reveals that the VP16 activation domain uses distinct interaction modes to adapt to unrelated target surfaces and folds that evolved for activator binding. PMID:21378965

  14. Structure of the complete bacterial SRP Alu domain

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Georg; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2014-01-01

    The Alu domain of the signal recognition particle (SRP) arrests protein biosynthesis by competition with elongation factor binding on the ribosome. The mammalian Alu domain is a protein–RNA complex, while prokaryotic Alu domains are protein-free with significant extensions of the RNA. Here we report the crystal structure of the complete Alu domain of Bacillus subtilis SRP RNA at 2.5 Å resolution. The bacterial Alu RNA reveals a compact fold, which is stabilized by prokaryote-specific extensions and interactions. In this ‘closed’ conformation, the 5′ and 3′ regions are clamped together by the additional helix 1, the connecting 3-way junction and a novel minor groove interaction, which we term the ‘minor-saddle motif’ (MSM). The 5′ region includes an extended loop–loop pseudoknot made of five consecutive Watson–Crick base pairs. Homology modeling with the human Alu domain in context of the ribosome shows that an additional lobe in the pseudoknot approaches the large subunit, while the absence of protein results in the detachment from the small subunit. Our findings provide the structural basis for purely RNA-driven elongation arrest in prokaryotes, and give insights into the structural adaption of SRP RNA during evolution. PMID:25270875

  15. Crystal structure of caspase recruiting domain (CARD) of apoptosis repressor with CARD (ARC) and its implication in inhibition of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-ho; Kim, Seong Hyun; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Yeun Gil; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruiting domain (ARC) is a multifunctional inhibitor of apoptosis that is unusually over-expressed or activated in various cancers and in the state of the pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, ARC might be an optimal target for therapeutic intervention. Human ARC is composed of two distinct domains, N-terminal caspase recruiting domain (CARD) and C-terminal P/E (proline and glutamic acid) rich domain. ARC inhibits the extrinsic apoptosis pathway by interfering with DISC formation. ARC CARD directly interacts with the death domains (DDs) of Fas and FADD, as well as with the death effector domains (DEDs) of procaspase-8. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the CARD domain of ARC at a resolution of 2.4 Å. Our structure was a dimer with novel homo-dimerization interfaces that might be critical to its inhibitory function. Interestingly, ARC did not exhibit a typical death domain fold. The sixth helix (H6), which was detected at the typical death domain fold, was not detected in the structure of ARC, indicating that H6 may be dispensable for the function of the death domain superfamily. PMID:26038885

  16. PSI-2: Structural Genomics to Cover Protein Domain Family Space

    PubMed Central

    Dessailly, Benoît H.; Nair, Rajesh; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Kouranov, Andrei; Lee, David; Fiser, Andras; Godzik, Adam; Rost, Burkhard; Orengo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Summary One major objective of structural genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), has been to increase the structural coverage of protein sequence space. Here, we present the target selection strategy used during the second phase of PSI (PSI-2). This strategy, jointly devised by the bioinformatics groups associated with the PSI-2 large-scale production centres, targets representatives from large, structurally uncharacterised protein domain families, and from structurally uncharacterised subfamilies in very large and diverse families with incomplete structural coverage. These very large families are extremely diverse both structurally and functionally, and are highly over-represented in known proteomes. On the basis of several metrics, we then discuss to what extent PSI-2, during its first three years, has increased the structural coverage of genomes, and contributed structural and functional novelty. Together, the results presented here suggest that PSI-2 is successfully meeting its objectives and provides useful insights into structural and functional space. PMID:19523904

  17. STRUCTURALLY DISTINCT UBIQUITIN- AND SUMO-MODIFIED PCNA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR DISTINCT ROLES IN THE DNA DAMAGE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Weinacht, Christopher P.; Freudenthal, Bret D.; Yang, Kun; Zhuang, Zhihao; Washington, M. Todd; Tainer, John A.; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a pivotal replication protein, which also controls cellular responses to DNA damage. Posttranslational modification of PCNA by SUMO and ubiquitin modulate these responses. How the modifiers alter PCNA-dependent DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways is largely unknown. We used hybrid methods to identify atomic models of PCNAK107-Ub and PCNAK164-SUMO consistent with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data of these complexes in solution. We show that SUMO and ubiquitin have distinct modes of association to PCNA. Ubiquitin adopts discrete docked binding positions. By contrast, SUMO associates by simple tethering and adopts extended flexible conformations. These structural differences are the result of the opposite electrostatic potentials of SUMO and Ub. The unexpected contrast in conformational behavior of Ub-PCNA and SUMO-PCNA has implications for interactions with partner proteins, interacting surfaces accessibility, and access points for pathway regulation. PMID:25773143

  18. Potato leafroll virus structural proteins manipulate overlapping, yet distinct protein interaction networks during infection.

    PubMed

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Johnson, Richard; Sweeney, Michelle M; Karasev, Alexander; Gray, Stewart M; MacCoss, Michael J; Cilia, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) produces a readthrough protein (RTP) via translational readthrough of the coat protein amber stop codon. The RTP functions as a structural component of the virion and as a nonincorporated protein in concert with numerous insect and plant proteins to regulate virus movement/transmission and tissue tropism. Affinity purification coupled to quantitative MS was used to generate protein interaction networks for a PLRV mutant that is unable to produce the read through domain (RTD) and compared to the known wild-type PLRV protein interaction network. By quantifying differences in the protein interaction networks, we identified four distinct classes of PLRV-plant interactions: those plant and nonstructural viral proteins interacting with assembled coat protein (category I); plant proteins in complex with both coat protein and RTD (category II); plant proteins in complex with the RTD (category III); and plant proteins that had higher affinity for virions lacking the RTD (category IV). Proteins identified as interacting with the RTD are potential candidates for regulating viral processes that are mediated by the RTP such as phloem retention and systemic movement and can potentially be useful targets for the development of strategies to prevent infection and/or viral transmission of Luteoviridae species that infect important crop species. PMID:25787689

  19. Structural Studies on Cytosolic Domain of Magnesium Transporter MgtE from Enterococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Ragumani, S.; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg{sup 2+}) is an essential element for growth and maintenance of living cells. It acts as a cofactor for many enzymes and is also essential for stability of the plasma membrane. There are two distinct classes of magnesium transporters identified in bacteria that convey Mg{sup 2+} from periplasm to cytoplasm [ATPase-dependent (MgtA and MgtB) and constitutively active (CorA and MgtE)]. Previously published work on Mg{sup 2+} transporters yielded structures of full length MgtE from Thermus thermophilus, determined at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, and its cytoplasmic domain with and without bond Mg{sup 2+} determined at 2.3 and 3.9 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Here, they report the crystal structure of the Mg{sup 2+} bound form of the cytosolic portion of MgtE (residues 6-262) from Enterococcus faecalis at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. The present structure and magnesium bound cytosolic domain structure from T. thermophilus (PDB ID: 2YVY) are structurally similar. Three magnesium binding sites are common to both MgtE full length and the present structure. Their work revealed an additional Mg{sup 2+} binding site in the E. faecalis structure. In this report, they discuss the functional significance of Mg{sup 2+} binding sites in the cytosolic domains of MgtE transporters.

  20. Crystal Structure of the FERM Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli,D.; Song, H.; Poy, F.; Schaller, M.; Eck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells. Through phosphorylation of proteins assembled at the cytoplasmic tails of integrins, FAK promotes signaling events that modulate cellular growth, survival, and migration. The amino-terminal region of FAK contains a region of sequence homology with band 4.1 and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins termed a FERM domain. FERM domains are found in a variety of signaling and cytoskeletal proteins and are thought to mediate intermolecular interactions with partner proteins and phospholipids at the plasma membrane and intramolecular regulatory interactions. Here we report two crystal structures of an NH2-terminal fragment of avian FAK containing the FERM domain and a portion of the regulatory linker that connects the FERM and kinase domains. The tertiary folds of the three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3) are similar to those of known FERM structures despite low sequence conservation. Differences in the sequence and relative orientation of the F3 subdomain alters the nature of the interdomain interface, and the phosphoinositide binding site found in ERM family FERM domains is not present in FAK. A putative protein interaction site on the F3 lobe is masked by the proximal region of the linker. Additionally, in one structure the adjacent Src SH3 and SH2 binding sites in the linker associate with the surfaces of the F3 and F1 lobes, respectively. These structural features suggest the possibility that protein interactions of the FAK FERM domain can be regulated by binding of Src kinases to the linker segment.

  1. Sequence and structural analysis of BTB domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J; Downs, Gregory S; Jauhal, Jimmy JS; Nandra, Sukhjeen K; Privé, Gilbert G

    2005-01-01

    Background The BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a versatile protein-protein interaction motif that participates in a wide range of cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cytoskeleton dynamics, ion channel assembly and gating, and targeting proteins for ubiquitination. Several BTB domain structures have been experimentally determined, revealing a highly conserved core structure. Results We surveyed the protein architecture, genomic distribution and sequence conservation of BTB domain proteins in 17 fully sequenced eukaryotes. The BTB domain is typically found as a single copy in proteins that contain only one or two other types of domain, and this defines the BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF), BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK), voltage-gated potassium channel T1 (T1-Kv), MATH-BTB, BTB-NPH3 and BTB-BACK-PHR (BBP) families of proteins, among others. In contrast, the Skp1 and ElonginC proteins consist almost exclusively of the core BTB fold. There are numerous lineage-specific expansions of BTB proteins, as seen by the relatively large number of BTB-ZF and BBK proteins in vertebrates, MATH-BTB proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans, and BTB-NPH3 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the structural homology between Skp1 and the PLZF BTB homodimer, we present a model of a BTB-Cul3 SCF-like E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that shows that the BTB dimer or the T1 tetramer is compatible in this complex. Conclusion Despite widely divergent sequences, the BTB fold is structurally well conserved. The fold has adapted to several different modes of self-association and interactions with non-BTB proteins. PMID:16207353

  2. Unique Domain Structure of Two-Dimensional α-Mo2C Superconducting Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Xu, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Wang, Libin; Jiang, Yixiao; Du, Jiao; Liu, Ying; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2016-07-13

    The properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are strongly influenced by domain boundaries. Ultrathin transition metal carbides are a class of newly emerging 2D materials that are superconducting and have many potential applications such as in electrochemical energy storage, catalysis, and thermoelectric energy conversion. However, little is known about their domain structure and the influence of domain boundaries on their properties. Here we use atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with large-scale diffraction-filtered imaging to study the microstructure of chemical vapor deposited high-quality 2D α-Mo2C superconducting crystals of different regular shapes including triangles, rectangles, hexagons, octagons, nonagons, and dodecagons. The Mo atom sublattice in all these crystals has a uniform hexagonal closely packed arrangement without any boundaries. However, except for rectangular and octagonal crystals, the C atom sublattices are composed of three or six domains with rotational-symmetry and well-defined line-shaped domain boundaries because of the presence of three equivalent off-center directions of interstitial carbon atoms in Mo octahedra. We found that there is very small lattice shear strain across the domain boundary. In contrast to the single sharp transition observed in single-domain crystals, transport studies across domain boundaries show a broad resistive superconducting transition with two distinct transition processes due to the formation of localized phase slip events within the boundaries, indicating a significant influence of the boundary on 2D superconductivity. These findings provide new understandings on not only the microstructure of 2D transition metal carbides but also the intrinsic influence of domain boundaries on 2D superconductivity. PMID:27323935

  3. Linking structural features from mitochondrial and bacterial F-type ATP synthases to their distinct mechanisms of ATPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    ATP synthases are molecular motors, which synthesize ATP, the ubiquitous energy source in all living cells. They use an electrochemical gradient to drive a rotation in the membrane embedded Fo domain, namely the c-ring, causing a conformational change in the soluble F1 domain which leads to the catalytic event. In the opposite fashion, they can also hydrolyse ATP to maintain the ion gradient across the membrane. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, bacteria and mammals have developed peculiar mechanistic features in addition to a common one, namely MgADP inhibition. Here I discuss the distinct ATPase inhibition mechanism in mitochondrial (IF1) and bacterial (subunits ε and ζ) F-type ATP synthases, based on available structural, biophysical and biochemical data. PMID:26140992

  4. Crystal structure of the BTB domain from PLZF

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, K. Farid; Engel, Christian K.; Privé, Gilbert G.

    1998-01-01

    The BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is an evolutionarily conserved protein–protein interaction motif found at the N terminus of 5–10% of C2H2-type zinc-finger transcription factors, as well as in some actin-associated proteins bearing the kelch motif. Many BTB proteins are transcriptional regulators that mediate gene expression through the control of chromatin conformation. In the human promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) protein, the BTB domain has transcriptional repression activity, directs the protein to a nuclear punctate pattern, and interacts with components of the histone deacetylase complex. The association of the PLZF BTB domain with the histone deacetylase complex provides a mechanism of linking the transcription factor with enzymatic activities that regulate chromatin conformation. The crystal structure of the BTB domain of PLZF was determined at 1.9 Å resolution and reveals a tightly intertwined dimer with an extensive hydrophobic interface. Approximately one-quarter of the monomer surface area is involved in the dimer intermolecular contact. These features are typical of obligate homodimers, and we expect the full-length PLZF protein to exist as a branched transcription factor with two C-terminal DNA-binding regions. A surface-exposed groove lined with conserved amino acids is formed at the dimer interface, suggestive of a peptide-binding site. This groove may represent the site of interaction of the PLZF BTB domain with nuclear corepressors or other nuclear proteins. PMID:9770450

  5. Structures and Functions of the Multiple KOW Domains of Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Peter A.; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Mincheng; Yamada, Kentaro; Takagi, Yuichiro; Hartzog, Grant A.

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic Spt4-Spt5 heterodimer forms a higher-order complex with RNA polymerase II (and I) to regulate transcription elongation. Extensive genetic and functional data have revealed diverse roles of Spt4-Spt5 in coupling elongation with chromatin modification and RNA-processing pathways. A mechanistic understanding of the diverse functions of Spt4-Spt5 is hampered by challenges in resolving the distribution of functions among its structural domains, including the five KOW domains in Spt5, and a lack of their high-resolution structures. We present high-resolution crystallographic results demonstrating that distinct structures are formed by the first through third KOW domains (KOW1-Linker1 [K1L1] and KOW2-KOW3) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spt5. The structure reveals that K1L1 displays a positively charged patch (PCP) on its surface, which binds nucleic acids in vitro, as shown in biochemical assays, and is important for in vivo function, as shown in growth assays. Furthermore, assays in yeast have shown that the PCP has a function that partially overlaps that of Spt4. Synthesis of our results with previous evidence suggests a model in which Spt4 and the K1L1 domain of Spt5 form functionally overlapping interactions with nucleic acids upstream of the transcription bubble, and this mechanism may confer robustness on processes associated with transcription elongation. PMID:26217010

  6. Structural insights into SAM domain-mediated tankyrase oligomerization.

    PubMed

    DaRosa, Paul A; Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Xu, Wenqing; Klevit, Rachel E

    2016-09-01

    Tankyrase 1 (TNKS1; a.k.a. ARTD5) and tankyrase 2 (TNKS2; a.k.a ARTD6) are highly homologous poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) that function in a wide variety of cellular processes including Wnt signaling, Src signaling, Akt signaling, Glut4 vesicle translocation, telomere length regulation, and centriole and spindle pole maturation. Tankyrase proteins include a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain that undergoes oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. However, the SAM domains of TNKS1 and TNKS2 have not been structurally characterized and the mode of oligomerization is not yet defined. Here we model the SAM domain-mediated oligomerization of tankyrase. The structural model, supported by mutagenesis and NMR analysis, demonstrates a helical, homotypic head-to-tail polymer that facilitates TNKS self-association. Furthermore, we show that TNKS1 and TNKS2 can form (TNKS1 SAM-TNKS2 SAM) hetero-oligomeric structures mediated by their SAM domains. Though wild-type tankyrase proteins have very low solubility, model-based mutations of the SAM oligomerization interface residues allowed us to obtain soluble TNKS proteins. These structural insights will be invaluable for the functional and biophysical characterization of TNKS1/2, including the role of TNKS oligomerization in protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and PARylation-dependent ubiquitylation. PMID:27328430

  7. Parental Provision of Structure: Implementation and Correlates in Three Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grolnick, Wendy S.; Raftery-Helmer, Jacquelyn N.; Marbell, Kristine N; Flamm, Elizabeth S.; Cardemil, Esteban V.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined parents' provision of "structure," defined as the organization of the environment to facilitate competence, and the degree to which it supports versus controls children's autonomy, in the domains of homework and studying, unsupervised time, and responsibilities in a diverse sample of sixth-grade children and…

  8. Ultrafast optical demagnetization manipulates nanoscale spin structure in domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, B.; Schaffert, S.; Müller, L.; Gutt, C.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Büttner, F.; Delaunay, R.; Düsterer, S.; Flewett, S.; Frömter, R.; Geilhufe, J.; Guehrs, E.; Günther, C.M.; Hawaldar, R.; Hille, M.; Jaouen, N.; Kobs, A.; Li, K.; Mohanty, J.; Redlin, H.; Schlotter, W.F.; Stickler, D.; Treusch, R.; Vodungbo, B.; Kläui, M.; Oepen, H.P.; Lüning, J.; Grübel, G.; Eisebitt, S.

    2012-01-01

    During ultrafast demagnetization of a magnetically ordered solid, angular momentum has to be transferred between the spins, electrons, and phonons in the system on femto- and picosecond timescales. Although the intrinsic spin-transfer mechanisms are intensely debated, additional extrinsic mechanisms arising due to nanoscale heterogeneity have only recently entered the discussion. Here we use femtosecond X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser to study thin film samples with magnetic domain patterns. We observe an infrared-pump-induced change of the spin structure within the domain walls on the sub-picosecond timescale. This domain-topography-dependent contribution connects the intrinsic demagnetization process in each domain with spin-transport processes across the domain walls, demonstrating the importance of spin-dependent electron transport between differently magnetized regions as an ultrafast demagnetization channel. This pathway exists independent from structural inhomogeneities such as chemical interfaces, and gives rise to an ultrafast spatially varying response to optical pump pulses. PMID:23033076

  9. Structural basis for tandem L27 domain-mediated polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xue; Xie, Xingqiao; Chen, Liu; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Weijing; Tian, Ran; Zhang, Rongguang; Tian, Changlin; Long, Jiafu; Shen, Yuequan

    2010-12-01

    The establishment of epithelial cell polarity requires the assembly of multiprotein complexes and is crucial during epithelial morphogenesis. Three scaffolding proteins, Dlg1, MPP7, and Mals3, can be assembled to form a complex that functions in the establishment and maintenance of apicobasal polarity in epithelial tissues through their L27 domains. Here we report the crystal structure of a 4-L27-domain complex derived from the human tripartite complex Dlg1-MPP7-Mals3 in combination with paramagnetic relaxation enhancement measurements. The heterotrimer consists of 2 pairs of heterodimeric L27 domains. These 2 dimers are asymmetric due to the large difference between the N- and C-terminal tandem L27 domain of MPP7. Structural analysis combined with biochemical experiments further reveals that the loop {alpha}A-{alpha}B and helix {alpha}B of the C-terminal L27 domain of MPP7 play a critical role in assembling the entire tripartite complex, suggesting a synergistic tandem L27-mediated assembling event.

  10. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  11. On the structural organization of the intracellular domains of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Moran, Oscar

    2014-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a multidomain membrane protein forming an anion selective channel. Mutations in the gene encoding CFTR cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The intracellular side of CFTR constitutes about 80% of the total mass of the protein. This region includes domains involved in ATP-dependent gating and regulatory protein kinase-A phosphorylation sites. The high-resolution molecular structure of CFTR has not yet been solved. However, a range of lower resolution structural data, as well as functional biochemical and electrophysiological data, are now available. This information has enabled the proposition of a working model for the structural architecture of the intracellular domains of the CFTR protein. PMID:24513531

  12. Approximation method to compute domain related integrals in structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2015-11-01

    Various engineering calculi use integral calculus in theoretical models, i.e. analytical and numerical models. For usual problems, integrals have mathematical exact solutions. If the domain of integration is complicated, there may be used several methods to calculate the integral. The first idea is to divide the domain in smaller sub-domains for which there are direct calculus relations, i.e. in strength of materials the bending moment may be computed in some discrete points using the graphical integration of the shear force diagram, which usually has a simple shape. Another example is in mathematics, where the surface of a subgraph may be approximated by a set of rectangles or trapezoids used to calculate the definite integral. The goal of the work is to introduce our studies about the calculus of the integrals in the transverse section domains, computer aided solutions and a generalizing method. The aim of our research is to create general computer based methods to execute the calculi in structural studies. Thus, we define a Boolean algebra which operates with ‘simple’ shape domains. This algebraic standpoint uses addition and subtraction, conditioned by the sign of every ‘simple’ shape (-1 for the shapes to be subtracted). By ‘simple’ shape or ‘basic’ shape we define either shapes for which there are direct calculus relations, or domains for which their frontiers are approximated by known functions and the according calculus is carried out using an algorithm. The ‘basic’ shapes are linked to the calculus of the most significant stresses in the section, refined aspect which needs special attention. Starting from this idea, in the libraries of ‘basic’ shapes, there were included rectangles, ellipses and domains whose frontiers are approximated by spline functions. The domain triangularization methods suggested that another ‘basic’ shape to be considered is the triangle. The subsequent phase was to deduce the exact relations for the

  13. Structure of the membrane domain of respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Efremov, Rouslan G; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2011-08-25

    Complex I is the first and largest enzyme of the respiratory chain, coupling electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. It has a central role in cellular energy production and has been implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped enzyme consists of hydrophilic and membrane domains. Previously, we determined the structure of the hydrophilic domain. Here we report the crystal structure of the Esherichia coli complex I membrane domain at 3.0 Å resolution. It includes six subunits, NuoL, NuoM, NuoN, NuoA, NuoJ and NuoK, with 55 transmembrane helices. The fold of the homologous antiporter-like subunits L, M and N is novel, with two inverted structural repeats of five transmembrane helices arranged, unusually, face-to-back. Each repeat includes a discontinuous transmembrane helix and forms half of a channel across the membrane. A network of conserved polar residues connects the two half-channels, completing the proton translocation pathway. Unexpectedly, lysines rather than carboxylate residues act as the main elements of the proton pump in these subunits. The fourth probable proton-translocation channel is at the interface of subunits N, K, J and A. The structure indicates that proton translocation in complex I, uniquely, involves coordinated conformational changes in six symmetrical structural elements. PMID:21822288

  14. Crystal Structure and Oligomeric State of the RetS Signaling Kinase Sensory Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, X.; Jaw, J; Robinson, H; Schubot, F

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause both acute and chronic-persistent infections in predisposed individuals. Acute infections require the presence of a functional type III secretion system (T3SS), whereas chronic P. aeruginosa infections are characterized by the formation of drug-resistant biofilms. The T3SS and biofilm formation are reciprocally regulated by the signaling kinases LadS, RetS, and GacS. RetS downregulates biofilm formation and upregulates expression of the T3SS through a unique mechanism. RetS forms a heterodimeric complex with GacS and thus prevents GacS autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. The signals that regulate RetS are not known but RetS possesses a distinctive periplasmic sensor domain that is believed to serve as receptor for the regulatory ligand. We have determined the crystal structure of the RetS sensory domain at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structure closely resembles those of carbohydrate binding modules of other proteins, suggesting that the elusive ligands are likely carbohydrate moieties. In addition to the conserved beta-sandwich structure, the sensory domain features two alpha helices which create a unique surface topology. Protein-protein crosslinking and fluorescence energy transfer experiments also revealed that the sensory domain dimerizes with a dissociation constant of K{sub d} = 580 {+-} 50 nM, a result with interesting implications for our understanding of the underlying signaling mechanism.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Human, FIC-Domain Containing Protein HYPE and Implications for Its Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bunney, Tom D.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein, HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized. Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of autoAMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition. PMID:25435325

  16. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone.

    PubMed

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35-120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  17. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone

    PubMed Central

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35–120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  18. Human DNA-Damage-Inducible 2 Protein Is Structurally and Functionally Distinct from Its Yeast Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Sivá, Monika; Svoboda, Michal; Veverka, Václav; Trempe, Jean-François; Hofmann, Kay; Kožíšek, Milan; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Sedlák, František; Belza, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Šácha, Pavel; Hubálek, Martin; Starková, Jana; Flaisigová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Šašková, Klára Grantz

    2016-01-01

    Although Ddi1-like proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, their biological functions remain poorly characterized. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in cell cycle regulation, DNA-damage response, and exocytosis. By virtue of its ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, it has been proposed to serve as a proteasomal shuttle factor. All Ddi1-like family members also contain a highly conserved retroviral protease-like (RVP) domain with unknown substrate specificity. While the structure and biological function of yeast Ddi1 have been investigated, no such analysis is available for the human homologs. To address this, we solved the 3D structures of the human Ddi2 UBL and RVP domains and identified a new helical domain that extends on either side of the RVP dimer. While Ddi1-like proteins from all vertebrates lack a UBA domain, we identify a novel ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) located at the C-terminus of the protein. The UIM showed a weak yet specific affinity towards ubiquitin, as did the Ddi2 UBL domain. However, the full-length Ddi2 protein is unable to bind to di-ubiquitin chains. While proteomic analysis revealed no activity, implying that the protease requires other factors for activation, our structural characterization of all domains of human Ddi2 sets the stage for further characterization. PMID:27461074

  19. Human DNA-Damage-Inducible 2 Protein Is Structurally and Functionally Distinct from Its Yeast Ortholog.

    PubMed

    Sivá, Monika; Svoboda, Michal; Veverka, Václav; Trempe, Jean-François; Hofmann, Kay; Kožíšek, Milan; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Sedlák, František; Belza, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Šácha, Pavel; Hubálek, Martin; Starková, Jana; Flaisigová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Šašková, Klára Grantz

    2016-01-01

    Although Ddi1-like proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, their biological functions remain poorly characterized. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in cell cycle regulation, DNA-damage response, and exocytosis. By virtue of its ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, it has been proposed to serve as a proteasomal shuttle factor. All Ddi1-like family members also contain a highly conserved retroviral protease-like (RVP) domain with unknown substrate specificity. While the structure and biological function of yeast Ddi1 have been investigated, no such analysis is available for the human homologs. To address this, we solved the 3D structures of the human Ddi2 UBL and RVP domains and identified a new helical domain that extends on either side of the RVP dimer. While Ddi1-like proteins from all vertebrates lack a UBA domain, we identify a novel ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) located at the C-terminus of the protein. The UIM showed a weak yet specific affinity towards ubiquitin, as did the Ddi2 UBL domain. However, the full-length Ddi2 protein is unable to bind to di-ubiquitin chains. While proteomic analysis revealed no activity, implying that the protease requires other factors for activation, our structural characterization of all domains of human Ddi2 sets the stage for further characterization. PMID:27461074

  20. Structural domains of vault proteins: a role for the coiled coil domain in vault assembly.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Arend; Mossink, Marieke H; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-03-01

    Vaults consist of multiple copies of three proteins (MVP, VPARP, and TEP1) and several untranslated RNAs. The function of vaults is unknown but the typical and evolutionary conserved structure indicates a role in intracellular transport. Although all vault components have been identified and characterized, not much is known about vault protein assembly. In this study we identified and analyzed structural domains involved in vault assembly with emphasis on protein-protein interactions. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we demonstrate within MVP an intramolecular binding site and show that MVP molecules interact with each other via their coiled coil domain. We show that purified MVP is able to bind calcium, most likely at calcium-binding EF-hands. No interactions could be detected between TEP1 and other vault proteins. However, the N-terminal half of MVP binds to a specific domain in the C-terminus of VPARP. Furthermore, VPARP contains amino acid stretches mediating intramolecular binding. PMID:11855821

  1. Crystal Structures of the Human Doublecortin C- and N-terminal Domains in Complex with Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dominique; Stihle, Martine; Sharma, Ashwani; Di Lello, Paola; Benz, Jörg; D'Arcy, Brigitte; Debulpaep, Maja; Fry, David; Huber, Walter; Kremer, Thomas; Laeremans, Toon; Matile, Hugues; Ross, Alfred; Rufer, Arne C; Schoch, Guillaume; Steinmetz, Michel O; Steyaert, Jan; Rudolph, Markus G; Thoma, Ralf; Ruf, Armin

    2016-07-29

    Doublecortin is a microtubule-associated protein produced during neurogenesis. The protein stabilizes microtubules and stimulates their polymerization, which allows migration of immature neurons to their designated location in the brain. Mutations in the gene that impair doublecortin function and cause severe brain formation disorders are located on a tandem repeat of two doublecortin domains. The molecular mechanism of action of doublecortin is only incompletely understood. Anti-doublecortin antibodies, such as the rabbit polyclonal Abcam 18732, are widely used as neurogenesis markers. Here, we report the generation and characterization of antibodies that bind to single doublecortin domains. The antibodies were used as tools to obtain structures of both domains. Four independent crystal structures of the N-terminal domain reveal several distinct open and closed conformations of the peptide linking N- and C-terminal domains, which can be related to doublecortin function. An NMR assignment and a crystal structure in complex with a camelid antibody fragment show that the doublecortin C-terminal domain adopts the same well defined ubiquitin-like fold as the N-terminal domain, despite its reported aggregation and molten globule-like properties. The antibodies' unique domain specificity also renders them ideal research tools to better understand the role of individual domains in doublecortin function. A single chain camelid antibody fragment specific for the C-terminal doublecortin domain affected microtubule binding, whereas a monoclonal mouse antibody specific for the N-terminal domain did not. Together with steric considerations, this suggests that the microtubule-interacting doublecortin domain observed in cryo-electron micrographs is the C-terminal domain rather than the N-terminal one. PMID:27226599

  2. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 E. coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. PMID:25043589

  3. Structural domains and main-chain flexibility in prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Blinov, N; Berjanskii, M; Wishart, D S; Stepanova, M

    2009-02-24

    In this study we describe a novel approach to define structural domains and to characterize the local flexibility in both human and chicken prion proteins. The approach we use is based on a comprehensive theory of collective dynamics in proteins that was recently developed. This method determines the essential collective coordinates, which can be found from molecular dynamics trajectories via principal component analysis. Under this particular framework, we are able to identify the domains where atoms move coherently while at the same time to determine the local main-chain flexibility for each residue. We have verified this approach by comparing our results for the predicted dynamic domain systems with the computed main-chain flexibility profiles and the NMR-derived random coil indexes for human and chicken prion proteins. The three sets of data show excellent agreement. Additionally, we demonstrate that the dynamic domains calculated in this fashion provide a highly sensitive measure of protein collective structure and dynamics. Furthermore, such an analysis is capable of revealing structural and dynamic properties of proteins that are inaccessible to the conventional assessment of secondary structure. Using the collective dynamic simulation approach described here along with a high-temperature simulations of unfolding of human prion protein, we have explored whether locations of relatively low stability could be identified where the unfolding process could potentially be facilitated. According to our analysis, the locations of relatively low stability may be associated with the beta-sheet formed by strands S1 and S2 and the adjacent loops, whereas helix HC appears to be a relatively stable part of the protein. We suggest that this kind of structural analysis may provide a useful background for a more quantitative assessment of potential routes of spontaneous misfolding in prion proteins. PMID:19178154

  4. Ferroelectric domain structure of anisotropically strained NaNbO{sub 3} epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzkopf, J. Braun, D.; Schmidbauer, M.; Duk, A.; Wördenweber, R.

    2014-05-28

    NaNbO{sub 3} thin films have been grown under anisotropic biaxial strain on several oxide substrates by liquid-delivery spin metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Compressive lattice strain of different magnitude, induced by the deposition of NaNbO{sub 3} films with varying film thickness on NdGaO{sub 3} single crystalline substrates, leads to modifications of film orientation and phase symmetry, which are similar to the phase transitions in Pb-containing oxides near the morphotropic phase boundary. Piezoresponse force microscopy measurements exhibit large out-of-plane polarization components, but no distinctive domain structure, while C-V measurements indicate relaxor properties in these films. When tensile strain is provoked by the epitaxial growth on DyScO{sub 3}, TbScO{sub 3}, and GdScO{sub 3} single crystalline substrates, NaNbO{sub 3} films behave rather like a normal ferroelectric. The application of these rare-earth scandate substrates yields well-ordered ferroelectric stripe domains of the type a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} with coherent domain walls aligned along the [001] substrate direction as long as the films are fully strained. With increasing plastic lattice relaxation, initially, a 2D domain pattern with still exclusively in-plane electric polarization, and finally, domains with in-plane and out-of-plane polar components evolve.

  5. A Global Genomic Characterization of Nairoviruses Identifies Nine Discrete Genogroups with Distinctive Structural Characteristics and Host-Vector Associations

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Peter J.; Widen, Steven G.; Wood, Thomas G.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.; Vasilakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Nairoviruses are primarily tick-borne bunyaviruses, some of which are known to cause mild-to-severe febrile illness in humans or livestock. We describe the genome sequences of 11 poorly characterized nairoviruses that have ecological associations with either birds (Farallon, Punta Salinas, Sapphire II, Zirqa, Avalon, Clo Mor, Taggert, and Abu Hammad viruses), rodents (Qalyub and Bandia viruses), or camels (Dera Ghazi Khan virus). Global phylogenetic analyses of proteins encoded in the L, M, and S RNA segments of these and 20 other available nairovirus genomes identified nine well-supported genogroups (Nairobi sheep disease, Thiafora, Sakhalin, Keterah, Qalyub, Kasokero, Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, and Tamdy). Genogroup-specific structural variations were evident, particularly in the M segment encoding a polyprotein from which virion envelope glycoproteins (Gn and Gc) are generated by proteolytic processing. Structural variations include the extension, abbreviation, or absence sequences encoding an O-glycosylated mucin-like protein in the N-terminal domain, distinctive patterns of conserved cysteine residues in the GP38-like domain, insertion of sequences encoding a double-membrane-spanning protein (NSm) between the Gn and Gc domains, and the presence of an alternative long open reading frame encoding a viroporin-like transmembrane protein (Gx). We also observed strong genogroup-specific associations with categories of hosts and tick vectors. PMID:26903607

  6. A Global Genomic Characterization of Nairoviruses Identifies Nine Discrete Genogroups with Distinctive Structural Characteristics and Host-Vector Associations.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Widen, Steven G; Wood, Thomas G; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Vasilakis, Nikolaos

    2016-05-01

    Nairoviruses are primarily tick-borne bunyaviruses, some of which are known to cause mild-to-severe febrile illness in humans or livestock. We describe the genome sequences of 11 poorly characterized nairoviruses that have ecological associations with either birds (Farallon, Punta Salinas, Sapphire II, Zirqa, Avalon, Clo Mor, Taggert, and Abu Hammad viruses), rodents (Qalyub and Bandia viruses), or camels (Dera Ghazi Khan virus). Global phylogenetic analyses of proteins encoded in the L, M, and S RNA segments of these and 20 other available nairovirus genomes identified nine well-supported genogroups (Nairobi sheep disease, Thiafora, Sakhalin, Keterah, Qalyub, Kasokero, Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, and Tamdy). Genogroup-specific structural variations were evident, particularly in the M segment encoding a polyprotein from which virion envelope glycoproteins (Gn and Gc) are generated by proteolytic processing. Structural variations include the extension, abbreviation, or absence sequences encoding an O-glycosylated mucin-like protein in the N-terminal domain, distinctive patterns of conserved cysteine residues in the GP38-like domain, insertion of sequences encoding a double-membrane-spanning protein (NSm) between the Gn and Gc domains, and the presence of an alternative long open reading frame encoding a viroporin-like transmembrane protein (Gx). We also observed strong genogroup-specific associations with categories of hosts and tick vectors. PMID:26903607

  7. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  8. B30.2/SPRY domain in tripartite motif-containing 22 is essential for the formation of distinct nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Rajmohan, Rajamuthiah; Lin, Valerie C L

    2009-06-18

    Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) is an important antiviral protein that forms distinct nuclear bodies (NB) in many cell types. This study aims to identify functional domains/residues for TRIM22's nuclear localization and NB formation. Deletion of the really-interesting-new-gene (RING) domain, which is essential for its antiviral property, abolished TRIM22 NB formation. However, mutation of two critical residues Cys15 and Cys18 to alanine in the RING domain, did not affect NB formation notably. Although the deletion of the putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) abolished TRIM22 localization and NB formation, the B30.2/SplA and ryanodine receptor (SPRY) domain, and residues 491-494 specifically are also essential for nuclear localization and NB formation. PMID:19481078

  9. KIR2DL4 differentially signals downstream functions in human NK cells through distinct structural modules.

    PubMed

    Miah, S M Shahjahan; Hughes, Tracey L; Campbell, Kerry S

    2008-03-01

    KIR2DL4 (2DL4) is a member of the killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) family in human NK cells. It can stimulate potent cytokine production and weak cytolytic activity in resting NK cells, but the mechanism for 2DL4-mediated signaling remains unclear. In this study we characterized the signaling pathways stimulated by 2DL4 engagement. In a human NK-like cell line, KHYG-1, cross-linking of 2DL4 activated MAPKs including JNK, ERK, and p38. Furthermore, 2DL4 cross-linking resulted in phosphorylation of IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta) and the phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha, which indicate activation of the classical NF-kappaB pathway. Engagement of 2DL4 was also shown to activate the transcription and translation of a variety of cytokine genes, including TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, MIP1alpha, MIP1beta, and IL-8. Pharmacological inhibitors of JNK, MEK1/2 and p38, blocked IFN-gamma, IL-8, and MIP1alpha production, suggesting that MAPKs are regulating 2DL4-mediated cytokine production in a nonredundant manner. Activation of both p38 and ERK appear to be upstream of the stimulation of NF-kappaB. Mutation of a transmembrane arginine in 2DL4 to glycine (R/G mutant) abrogated FcepsilonRI-gamma association, as well as receptor-mediated cytolytic activity and calcium responses. Surprisingly, the R/G mutant still activated MAPKs and the NF-kappaB pathway and selectively stimulated the production of MIP1alpha, but not that of IFN-gamma or IL-8. In conclusion, we provide evidence that the activating functions of 2DL4 can be compartmentalized into two distinct structural modules: 1) through transmembrane association with FcepsilonRI-gamma; and 2) through another receptor domain independent of the transmembrane arginine. PMID:18292514

  10. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  11. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Jones, David N.M.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2011-06-18

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. In several cancers, CD147 expression is so high that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2 that is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2 that is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. Thus, here we have extensively characterized the CD147 Ig0 domain by elucidating its three-dimensional structure through crystallography and its solution behavior through several biophysical methods that include nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we have utilized this data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6, which is a well-known contributor to retinoblastoma and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Furthermore, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation.

  12. The Novel Plant Protein INAPERTURATE POLLEN1 Marks Distinct Cellular Domains and Controls Formation of Apertures in the Arabidopsis Pollen Exine[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dobritsa, Anna A.; Coerper, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Pollen grains protect the sperm cells inside them with the help of the unique cell wall, the exine, which exhibits enormous morphological variation across plant taxa, assembling into intricate and diverse species-specific patterns. How this complex extracellular structure is faithfully deposited at precise sites and acquires precise shape within a species is not understood. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of the novel Arabidopsis thaliana gene INAPERTURATE POLLEN1 (INP1), which is specifically involved in formation of the pollen surface apertures, which arise by restriction of exine deposition at specific sites. Loss of INP1 leads to the loss of all three apertures in Arabidopsis pollen, and INP1 protein exhibits a unique tripartite localization in developing pollen, indicative of its direct involvement in specification of aperture positions. We also show that aperture length appears to be sensitive to INP1 dosage and INP1 misexpression can affect global exine patterning. Phenotypes of some inp1 mutants indicate that Arabidopsis apertures are initiated at three nonrandom positions around the pollen equator. The identification of INP1 opens up new avenues for studies of how formation of distinct cellular domains results in the production of different extracellular morphologies. PMID:23136373

  13. Distinct functional and conformational states of the human lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain can be targeted by choice of the inhibitor chemotype.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Dušica; Xie, Yuli; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian; Landry, Donald W; Chung, Caty; Smith, Deborah H; Tautz, Lutz; Schürer, Stephan C

    2011-09-01

    The lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), encoded by the PTPN22 gene, has recently been identified as a promising drug target for human autoimmunity diseases. Like the majority of protein-tyrosine phosphatases LYP can adopt two functionally distinct forms determined by the conformation of the WPD-loop. The WPD-loop plays an important role in the catalytic dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we investigate the binding modes of two chemotypes of small molecule LYP inhibitors with respect to both protein conformations using computational modeling. To evaluate binding in the active form, we built a LYP protein structure model of high quality. Our results suggest that the two different compound classes investigated, bind to different conformations of the LYP phosphatase domain. Binding to the closed form is facilitated by an interaction with Asp195 in the WPD-loop, presumably stabilizing the active conformation. The analysis presented here is relevant for the design of inhibitors that specifically target either the closed or the open conformation of LYP in order to achieve better selectivity over phosphatases with similar binding sites. PMID:21904909

  14. Two carbohydrate recognizing domains from Cycas revoluta leaf lectin show the distinct sugar-binding specificity-A unique mannooligosaccharide recognition by N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Haraguchi, Tomokazu; Minami, Yuji; Yagi, Fumio; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Cycas revoluta leaf lectin (CRLL) of mannose-recognizing jacalin-related lectin (mJRL) has two tandem repeated carbohydrate recognition domains, and shows the characteristic sugar-binding specificity toward high mannose-glycans, compared with other mJRLs. We expressed the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain (CRLL-N and CRLL-C) separately, to determine the fine sugar-binding specificity of each domain, using frontal affinity chromatography, glycan array and equilibrium dialysis. The specificity of CRLL toward high mannose was basically derived from CRLL-N, whereas CRLL-C had affinity for α1-6 extended mono-antennary complex-type glycans. Notably, the affinity of CRLL-N was most potent to one of three Man 8 glycans and Man 9 glycan, whereas the affinity of CRLL-C decreased with the increase in the number of extended α1-2 linked mannose residue. The recognition of the Man 8 glycans by CRLL-N has not been found for other mannose recognizing lectins. Glycan array reflected these specificities of the two domains. Furthermore, it was revealed by equilibrium dialysis method that the each domain had two sugar-binding sites, similar with Banlec, banana mannose-binding Jacalin-related lectin. PMID:26867733

  15. A structure-based database of antibody variable domain diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, C.J.; Wiesmann, C.; Marsters, Jr., J.C.; Sidhu, S.S.

    2010-07-13

    The diversity of natural antibodies is limited by the genetic mechanisms that engender diversity and the functional requirements of antigen binding. Using an in vitro-evolved autonomous heavy chain variable domain (V{sub H}H-RIG), we have investigated the limits of structurally-tolerated diversity in the three complementarity-determining regions and a fourth loop within the third framework region. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the V{sub H}H-RIG domain at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and used it to guide the design of phage-displayed libraries encompassing the four loops. The libraries were subjected to selections for structural stability, and a database of structurally-tolerated sequences was compiled from the sequences of approximately 1000 unique clones. The results reveal that all four loops accommodate significantly greater diversity than is observed in nature. Thus, it appears that most sequence biases in the natural immune repertoire arise from factors other than structural constraints and, consequently, it should be possible to enhance the functions of antibodies significantly through in vitro evolution.

  16. Distinct structural changes in the GABAA receptor elicited by pentobarbital and GABA.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Theusch, Cassandra M; Czajkowski, Cynthia; Jackson, Meyer B

    2009-01-01

    The barbiturate pentobarbital binds to gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors, and this interaction plays an important role in the anesthetic action of this drug. Depending on its concentration, pentobarbital can potentiate (approximately 10-100 microM), activate (approximately 100-800 microM), or block (approximately 1-10 mM) the channel, but the mechanisms underlying these three distinct actions are poorly understood. To investigate the drug-induced structural rearrangements in the GABA(A) receptor, we labeled cysteine mutant receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes with the sulfhydryl-reactive, environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe tetramethylrhodamine-6-maleimide (TMRM). We then used combined voltage clamp and fluorometry to monitor pentobarbital-induced channel activity and local protein movements simultaneously in real time. High concentrations of pentobarbital induced a decrease in TMRM fluorescence (F(TMRM)) of labels tethered to two residues in the extracellular domain (alpha(1)L127C and beta(2)L125C) that have been shown previously to produce an increase in F(TMRM) in response to GABA. Label at beta(2)K274C in the extracellular end of the M2 transmembrane helix reported a small but significant F(TMRM) increase during application of low modulating pentobarbital concentrations, and it showed a much greater F(TMRM) increase at higher concentrations. In contrast, GABA decreased F(TMRM) at this site. These results indicate that GABA and pentobarbital induce different structural rearrangements in the receptor, and thus activate the receptor by different mechanisms. Labels at alpha(1)L127C and beta(2)K274C change their fluorescence by substantial amounts during channel blockade by pentobarbital. In contrast, picrotoxin blockade produces no change in F(TMRM) at these sites, and the pattern of F(TMRM) signals elicited by the antagonist SR95531 differs from that produced by other antagonists. Thus, with either channel block by antagonists or

  17. Structural and mutational analysis reveals that CTNNBL1 binds NLSs in a manner distinct from that of its closest armadillo-relative, karyopherin α☆

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Karuna; van Maldegem, Febe; Telerman, Stephanie B.; Simpson, Paul; Johnson, Christopher M.; Williams, Roger L.; Neuberger, Michael S.; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    CTNNBL1 is a spliceosome-associated protein that binds nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in splice factors CDC5L and Prp31 as well as the antibody diversifying enzyme AID. Here, crystal structures of human CTNNBL1 reveal a distinct structure from its closest homologue karyopherin-α. CTNNBL1 comprises a HEAT-like domain (including a nuclear export signal), a central armadillo domain, and a coiled-coil C-terminal domain. Structure-guided mutations of the region homologous to the karyopherin-α NLS-binding site fail to disrupt CTNNBL1–NLS interactions. Our results identify CTNNBL1 as a unique selective NLS-binding protein with striking differences from karyopherin-αs. PMID:24269683

  18. Structure of Yellow Fever Virus Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Volk, David E.; May, Fiona J.; Gandham, Sai H. A.; Anderson, Anjenique; Von Lindern, Jana J.; Beasley, David W. C.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Gorenstein, David G.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of recombinant domain III of the envelope protein (rED3) of yellow fever virus (YFV), containing the major neutralization site, was determined using NMR spectroscopy. The amino acid sequence and structure of the YFV-rED3 shows differences from ED3s of other mosquito-borne flaviviruses; in particular, the partially surface-exposed BC loop where methionine-304 and valine-324 were identified as being critical for the structure of the loop. Variations in the structure and surface chemistry of ED3 between flaviviruses affect neutralization sites and may affect host cell receptor interactions and play a role in the observed variations in viral pathogenesis and tissue tropism. PMID:19818466

  19. Structure of the Zinc-Bound Amino-Terminal Domain of the NMDA Receptor NR2B Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas, E.; Simorowski, N; Furukawa, H

    2009-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the mammalian brain. One of the hallmarks for the function of NMDA receptors is that their ion channel activity is allosterically regulated by binding of modulator compounds to the extracellular amino-terminal domain (ATD) distinct from the L-glutamate-binding domain. The molecular basis for the ATD-mediated allosteric regulation has been enigmatic because of a complete lack of structural information on NMDA receptor ATDs. Here, we report the crystal structures of ATD from the NR2B NMDA receptor subunit in the zinc-free and zinc-bound states. The structures reveal the overall clamshell-like architecture distinct from the non-NMDA receptor ATDs and molecular determinants for the zinc-binding site, ion-binding sites, and the architecture of the putative phenylethanolamine-binding site.

  20. A Role for the GSG Domain in Localizing Sam68 to Novel Nuclear Structures in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taiping; Boisvert, François-Michel; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Richard, Stéphane

    1999-01-01

    The GSG (GRP33, Sam68, GLD-1) domain is a protein module found in an expanding family of RNA-binding proteins. The numerous missense mutations identified genetically in the GSG domain support its physiological role. Although the exact function of the GSG domain is not known, it has been shown to be required for RNA binding and oligomerization. Here it is shown that the Sam68 GSG domain plays a role in protein localization. We show that Sam68 concentrates into novel nuclear structures that are predominantly found in transformed cells. These Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) are distinct from coiled bodies, gems, and promyelocytic nuclear bodies. Electron microscopic studies show that SNBs are distinct structures that are enriched in phosphorus and nitrogen, indicating the presence of nucleic acids. A GFP-Sam68 fusion protein had a similar localization as endogenous Sam68 in HeLa cells, diffusely nuclear with two to five SNBs. Two other GSG proteins, the Sam68-like mammalian proteins SLM-1 and SLM-2, colocalized with endogenous Sam68 in SNBs. Different GSG domain missense mutations were investigated for Sam68 protein localization. Six separate classes of cellular patterns were obtained, including exclusive SNB localization and association with microtubules. These findings demonstrate that the GSG domain is involved in protein localization and define a new compartment for Sam68, SLM-1, and SLM-2 in cancer cell lines. PMID:10473643

  1. Structural basis for recruitment of Rab6-interacting protein 1 to Golgi via a RUN domain.

    PubMed

    Recacha, Rosario; Boulet, Annick; Jollivet, Florence; Monier, Solange; Houdusse, Anne; Goud, Bruno; Khan, Amir R

    2009-01-14

    Small GTPase Rab6 regulates vesicle trafficking at the level of Golgi via recruitment of numerous and unrelated effectors. The crystal structure of Rab6a(GTP) in complex with a 378-residue internal fragment of the effector Rab6IP1 was solved at 3.2 angstroms resolution. This Rab6IP1 region encompasses an all alpha-helical RUN domain followed in tandem by a PLAT domain that adopts a beta sandwich fold. The structure reveals that the first and last alpha helices of the RUN domain mediate binding to switch I, switch II, and the interswitch region of Rab6. It represents the largest Rab-effector complex determined to date. Comparisons with the recent structure of Rab6 in complex with an unrelated effector, human golgin GCC185, reveals significant conformational changes in the conserved hydrophobic triad of Rab6. Flexibility in the switch and interswitch regions of Rab6 mediates recognition of compositionally distinct alpha-helical coiled coils, thereby contributing to Rab6 promiscuity in effector recruitment. PMID:19141279

  2. Identification, structure, and differential expression of members of a BURP domain containing protein family in soybean.

    PubMed

    Granger, Cheryl; Coryell, Virginia; Khanna, Anupama; Keim, Paul; Vodkin, Lila; Shoemaker, Randy C

    2002-08-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) exhibiting homology to a BURP domain containing gene family were identified from the Glycine max (L.) Merr. EST database. These ESTs were assembled into 16 contigs of variable sizes and lengths. Consistent with the structure of known BURP domain containing proteins, the translation products exhibit a modular structure consisting of a C-terminal BURP domain, an N-terminal signal sequence, and a variable internal region. The soybean family members exhibit 35-98% similarity in a -100-amino-acid C-terminal region, and a phylogenetic tree constructed using this region shows that some soybean family members group together in closely related pairs, triplets, and quartets, whereas others remain as singletons. The structure of these groups suggests that multiple gene duplication events occurred during the evolutionary history of this family. The depth and diversity of G. max EST libraries allowed tissue-specific expression patterns of the putative soybean BURPs to be examined. Consistent with known BURP proteins, the newly identified soybean BURPs have diverse expression patterns. Furthermore, putative paralogs can have both spatially and quantitatively distinct expression patterns. We discuss the functional and evolutionary implications of these findings, as well as the utility of EST-based analyses for identifying and characterizing gene families. PMID:12175072

  3. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  4. A distinct sortase SrtB anchors and processes a streptococcal adhesin AbpA with a novel structural property.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Scannapieco, Frank A; Haase, Elaine M; Matthews, Steve; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Surface display of proteins by sortases in Gram-positive bacteria is crucial for bacterial fitness and virulence. We found a unique gene locus encoding an amylase-binding adhesin AbpA and a sortase B in oral streptococci. AbpA possesses a new distinct C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. We demonstrated that this C-terminal motif is required for anchoring AbpA to cell wall. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that SrtB has dual functions, anchoring AbpA to the cell wall and processing AbpA into a ladder profile. Solution structure of AbpA determined by NMR reveals a novel structure comprising a small globular α/β domain and an extended coiled-coil heliacal domain. Structural and biochemical studies identified key residues that are crucial for amylase binding. Taken together, our studies document a unique sortase/adhesion substrate system in streptococci adapted to the oral environment rich in salivary amylase. PMID:27492581

  5. A distinct sortase SrtB anchors and processes a streptococcal adhesin AbpA with a novel structural property

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Scannapieco, Frank A.; Haase, Elaine M.; Matthews, Steve; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Surface display of proteins by sortases in Gram-positive bacteria is crucial for bacterial fitness and virulence. We found a unique gene locus encoding an amylase-binding adhesin AbpA and a sortase B in oral streptococci. AbpA possesses a new distinct C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. We demonstrated that this C-terminal motif is required for anchoring AbpA to cell wall. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that SrtB has dual functions, anchoring AbpA to the cell wall and processing AbpA into a ladder profile. Solution structure of AbpA determined by NMR reveals a novel structure comprising a small globular α/β domain and an extended coiled-coil heliacal domain. Structural and biochemical studies identified key residues that are crucial for amylase binding. Taken together, our studies document a unique sortase/adhesion substrate system in streptococci adapted to the oral environment rich in salivary amylase. PMID:27492581

  6. Adjacent proline residues in the inhibitory domain of the Oct-2 transcription factor play distinct functional roles.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y Z; Lee, I K; Locke, I; Dawson, S J; Latchman, D S

    1998-01-01

    A 40 amino acid region of Oct-2 from amino acids 142 to 181 functions as an active repressor domain capable of inhibiting both basal activity and activation of promoters containing a TATA box, but not of those that contain an initiator element. Based on our observation that the equivalent region of the closely related Oct-1 factor does not act as an inhibitory domain, we have mutated specific residues in the Oct-2 domain in an attempt to probe their importance in repressor domain function. Although mutations of several residues have no or minimal effect, mutation of proline 175 to arginine abolishes the ability to inhibit both basal and activated transcription. In contrast, mutation of proline 174 to arginine confers upon the domain the ability to repress activation of an initiator-containing promoter by acidic activation domains, and also suppresses the effect of the proline 175 mutation. Hence, adjacent proline residues play key roles in the functioning of the inhibitory domain and in limiting its specificity to TATA-box-containing promoters. PMID:9580701

  7. The X-ray structures of two mutant crystallin domains shed light on the evolution of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Norledge, B V; Mayr, E M; Glockshuber, R; Bateman, O A; Slingsby, C; Jaenicke, R; Driessen, H P

    1996-03-01

    We use protein engineering and crystallography to simulate aspects of the early evolution of beta gamma-crystallins by observing how a single domain oligomerizes in response to changes in a sequence extension. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of gamma beta-crystallin with its four-residue C-terminal extension shows that the domain does not form a symmetric homodimer analogous to the two-domain pairing in beta gamma-crystallins. Instead the C-terminal extension now forms heterologous interactions with other domains leading to the solvent exposure of the natural hydrophobic interface with a consequent loss in protein solubility. However, this domain truncated by just the C-terminal tyrosine forms a symmetric homodimer of domains in the crystal lattice. PMID:8605629

  8. Solution structure of a cyanobacterial phytochrome GAF domain in the red-light-absorbing ground state.

    PubMed

    Cornilescu, Gabriel; Ulijasz, Andrew T; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Markley, John L; Vierstra, Richard D

    2008-11-01

    The unique photochromic absorption behavior of phytochromes (Phys) depends on numerous reversible interactions between the bilin chromophore and the associated polypeptide. To help define these dynamic interactions, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the first solution structure of the chromophore-binding cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylcyclase/FhlA (GAF) domain from a cyanobacterial Phy assembled with phycocyanobilin (PCB). The three-dimensional NMR structure of Synechococcus OS-B' cyanobacterial Phy 1 in the red-light-absorbing state of Phy (Pr) revealed that PCB is bound to Cys138 of the GAF domain via the A-ring ethylidene side chain and is buried within the GAF domain in a ZZZsyn,syn,anti configuration. The D ring of the chromophore sits within a hydrophobic pocket and is tilted by approximately 80 degrees relative to the B/C rings by contacts with Lys52 and His169. The solution structure revealed remarkable flexibility for PCB and several adjacent amino acids, indicating that the Pr chromophore has more freedom in the binding pocket than anticipated. The propionic acid side chains of rings B and C and Arg101 and Arg133 nearby are especially mobile and can assume several distinct and energetically favorable conformations. Mutagenic studies on these arginines, which are conserved within the Phy superfamily, revealed that they have opposing roles, with Arg101 and Arg133 helping stabilize and destabilize the far-red-light-absorbing state of Phy (Pfr), respectively. Given the fact that the Synechococcus OS-B' GAF domain can, by itself, complete the Pr --> Pfr photocycle, it should now be possible to determine the solution structure of the Pfr chromophore and surrounding pocket using this Pr structure as a framework. PMID:18762196

  9. Structural and biochemical studies of the PDGFRA kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ling; Yan, Xiao-E; Yin, Yuxin; Yun, Cai-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase, and this kinase is a target for treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) as it is frequently mutated in these cancers. Most of the mutations that cause constitutive activation of PDGFRA occur in either the activation loop (A-loop) or in the juxtamembrane (JM) domain, such as the mutations D842V or V561D respectively. Treatment of PDGFRA-mutated GIST with imatinib is successful in some cases, but the D842V mutation is imatinib-resistant. To better understand the mechanism of PDGFRA drug-resistance, we have determined the crystal structure of the PDGFRA kinase domain in the auto-inhibited form, and studied the kinetics of the D842V mutation. Auto-inhibited PDGFRA is stabilized by the JM domain, which inserts into the active site of the kinase. The conserved residue Asp842 makes extensive contacts with several A-loop residues to maintain PDGFRA in the "DFG out" conformation, which stabilizes the kinase in the inactive state and facilitates the binding of imatinib. The D842V mutation would therefore be expected to activate the kinase and hinder the binding of drug through destabilizing the "DFG out" conformation. Furthermore, our kinetic data show that drug resistance in the D842V mutation may also in part result from its increased affinity for ATP. The PDGFRA kinase domain structure we report in this study has potential to facilitate development of new agents which can inhibit this kinase, including both its activating and drug-resistant mutations. PMID:27349873

  10. Structure and DNA-Binding Sites of the SWI1 AT-rich Interaction Domain (ARID) Suggest Determinants for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhkmann; Zhang, Ziming; Upchurch, Sean; Isern, Nancy G.; Chen, Yuan

    2004-04-16

    2 ARID is a homologous family of DNA-binding domains that occur in DNA binding proteins from a wide variety of species, ranging from yeast to nematodes, insects, mammals and plants. SWI1, a member of the SWI/SNF protein complex that is involved in chromatin remodeling during transcription, contains the ARID motif. The ARID domain of human SWI1 (also known as p270) does not select for a specific DNA sequence from a random sequence pool. The lack of sequence specificity shown by the SWI1 ARID domain stands in contrast to the other characterized ARID domains, which recognize specific AT-rich sequences. We have solved the three-dimensional structure of human SWI1 ARID using solution NMR methods. In addition, we have characterized non-specific DNA-binding by the SWI1 ARID domain. Results from this study indicate that a flexible long internal loop in ARID motif is likely to be important for sequence specific DNA-recognition. The structure of human SWI1 ARID domain also represents a distinct structural subfamily. Studies of ARID indicate that boundary of the DNA binding structural and functional domains can extend beyond the sequence homologous region in a homologous family of proteins. Structural studies of homologous domains such as ARID family of DNA-binding domains should provide information to better predict the boundary of structural and functional domains in structural genomic studies. Key Words: ARID, SWI1, NMR, structural genomics, protein-DNA interaction.