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Sample records for distinct subunit species

  1. Deletion mutants of AP-1 adaptin subunits display distinct phenotypes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Takeuchi, Mai; Sugiura, Reiko; Sio, Susie O; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2009-08-01

    Adaptins are subunits of the heterotetrameric (beta/mu/gamma/sigma) adaptor protein (AP) complexes that are involved in clathrin-mediated membrane trafficking. Here, we show that in Schizosaccharomyces pombe the deletion strains of each individual subunit of the AP-1 complex [Apl2 (beta), Apl4 (gamma), Apm1 (mu) and Aps1 (sigma)] caused distinct phenotypes on growth sensitivity to temperature or drugs. We also show that the Deltaapm1 and Deltaapl2 mutants displayed similar but more severe phenotypes than those of Deltaaps1 or Deltaapl4 mutants. Furthermore, the Deltaapl2Deltaaps1 and Deltaapl2Deltaapl4 double mutants displayed synthetic growth defects, whereas the Deltaaps1Deltaapl4 and Deltaapl2Deltaapm1 double mutants did not. In pull-down assay, Apm1 binds Apl2 even in the absence of Aps1 and Apl4, and Apl4 binds Aps1 even in the absence of Apm1 and Apl2. Consistently, the deletion of any subunit generally caused the disassociation of the heterotetrameric complex from endosomes, although some subunits weakly localized to endosomes. In addition, the deletion of individual subunits caused similar endosomal accumulation of v-SNARE synaptobrevin Syb1. Altogether, results suggest that the four subunits are all essential for the heterotetrameric complex formation and for the AP-1 function in exit transport from endosomes. PMID:19624755

  2. Identification of Four Distinct Subunit Types in the Unique 6×6 Hemocyanin of the Centipede Scutigera coleoptrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, W.; Markl, J.

    We isolated 6×6 hemocyanin, dissociated it into subunits, and examined it by electron microscopy. The subunits were separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Single subunits were isolated by gel cutting from native PAGE and identified as hemocyanin by measuring their ultraviolet spectrum. A total of four distinct hemocyanin subunits were identified, and the subunit pattern of the three electrophoresis systems assigned to each other. The relative proportion of subunits a:b:c:d were 2 : 2 :>: 1 as determined by densitometry. Presumably, c and d act as linkers between hexamers.

  3. Different Leishmania Species Drive Distinct Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Benjamin P; Regli, Ivo B; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne

    2016-05-01

    Leishmaniases are vector-borne diseases of serious public health importance. During a sand fly blood meal, Leishmania parasites are deposited in the host dermis where neutrophils are rapidly recruited. Neutrophils are the first line of defense and can kill pathogens by an array of mechanisms. They can also form web-like structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that can trap and/or kill microbes. The function of neutrophils in leishmaniasis was reported to be either beneficial by contributing to parasite killing or detrimental by impairing immune response development and control of parasite load. Here we review recent data showing that different Leishmania species elicit distinct neutrophil functions thereby influencing disease outcomes. Emerging evidence suggests that neutrophils should be considered important modulators of leishmaniasis. PMID:26944469

  4. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  5. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  6. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits perform distinct functional roles in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joon-Hee; Kim, Jung-Eun; Malapi-Wight, Martha; Choi, Yoon-E; Shaw, Brian D; Shim, Won-Bo

    2013-06-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize causing ear rot and stalk rot. The fungus also produces fumonisins, a group of mycotoxins linked to disorders in animals and humans. A cluster of genes, designated FUM genes, plays a key role in the synthesis of fumonisins. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of fumonisin biosynthesis is still incomplete. We have demonstrated previously that Cpp1, a protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit, negatively regulates fumonisin production and is involved in cell shape maintenance. In general, three PP2A subunits, structural A, regulatory B and catalytic C, make up a heterotrimer complex to perform regulatory functions. Significantly, we identified two PP2A regulatory subunits in the F. verticillioides genome, Ppr1 and Ppr2, which are homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc55 and Rts1, respectively. In this study, we hypothesized that Ppr1 and Ppr2 are involved in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and/or cell development in F. verticillioides, and generated a series of mutants to determine the functional role of Ppr1 and Ppr2. The PPR1 deletion strain (Δppr1) resulted in drastic growth defects, but increased microconidia production. The PPR2 deletion mutant strain (Δppr2) showed elevated fumonisin production, similar to the Δcpp1 strain. Germinating Δppr1 conidia formed abnormally swollen cells with a central septation site, whereas Δppr2 showed early hyphal branching during conidia germination. A kernel rot assay showed that the mutants were slow to colonize kernels, but this is probably a result of growth defects rather than a virulence defect. Results from this study suggest that two PP2A regulatory subunits in F. verticillioides carry out distinct roles in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and fungal development. PMID:23452277

  7. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. PMID:25320267

  8. Thermostable Cross-Protective Subunit Vaccine against Brucella Species

    PubMed Central

    Barabé, Nicole D.; Grigat, Michelle L.; Lee, William E.; Poirier, Robert T.; Jager, Scott J.; Berger, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 105 CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. PMID:25320267

  9. The different large subunit isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase confer distinct kinetic and regulatory properties to the heterotetrameric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Crevillén, Pedro; Ballicora, Miguel A; Mérida, Angel; Preiss, Jack; Romero, José M

    2003-08-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the first and limiting step in starch biosynthesis and is allosterically regulated by the levels of 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphate in plants. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from plants are heterotetramers composed of two types of subunits (small and large). In this study, the six Arabidopsis thaliana genes coding for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase isoforms (two small and four large subunits) have been cloned and expressed in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. The co-expression of the small subunit APS1 with the different Arabidopsis large subunits (APL1, APL2, APL3, and APL4) resulted in heterotetramers with different regulatory and kinetic properties. Heterotetramers composed of APS1 and APL1 showed the highest sensitivity to the allosteric effectors as well as the highest apparent affinity for the substrates (glucose-1-phosphate and ATP), whereas heterotetramers formed by APS1 and APL2 showed the lower response to allosteric effectors and the lower affinity for the substrates. No activity was detected for the second gene coding for a small subunit isoform (APS2) annotated in the Arabidopsis genome. This lack of activity is possibly due to the absence of essential amino acids involved in catalysis and/or in the binding of glucose-1-phosphate and 3-phosphoglycerate. Kinetic and regulatory properties of the different heterotetramers, together with sequence analysis has allowed us to make a distinction between sink and source enzymes, because the combination of different large subunits would provide a high plasticity to ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity and regulation. This is the first experimental data concerning the role that all the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase isoforms play in a single plant species. This phenomenon could have an important role in vivo, because different large subunits would confer distinct regulatory properties to ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase according

  10. Two distinct effects of PIP2 underlie auxiliary subunit-dependent modulation of Slo1 BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Florian; Xu, Rong; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hou, Shangwei

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) plays a critical role in modulating the function of numerous ion channels, including large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-dependent K+ (BK, Slo1) channels. Slo1 BK channel complexes include four pore-forming Slo1 (α) subunits as well as various regulatory auxiliary subunits (β and γ) that are expressed in different tissues. We examined the molecular and biophysical mechanisms underlying the effects of brain-derived PIP2 on human Slo1 BK channel complexes with different subunit compositions that were heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. PIP2 inhibited macroscopic currents through Slo1 channels without auxiliary subunits and through Slo1 + γ1 complexes. In contrast, PIP2 markedly increased macroscopic currents through Slo1 + β1 and Slo1 + β4 channel complexes and failed to alter macroscopic currents through Slo1 + β2 and Slo1 + β2 Δ2–19 channel complexes. Results obtained at various membrane potentials and divalent cation concentrations suggest that PIP2 promotes opening of the ion conduction gate in all channel types, regardless of the specific subunit composition. However, in the absence of β subunits positioned near the voltage-sensor domains (VSDs), as in Slo1 and probably Slo1 + γ1, PIP2 augments the negative surface charge on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, thereby shifting the voltage dependence of VSD-mediated activation in the positive direction. When β1 or β4 subunits occupy the space surrounding the VSDs, only the stimulatory effect of PIP2 is evident. The subunit compositions of native Slo1 BK channels differ in various cell types; thus, PIP2 may exert distinct tissue- and divalent cation–dependent modulatory influences. PMID:25825171

  11. Differential regulation of AMPA receptor subunit trafficking by palmitoylation of two distinct sites.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takashi; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Huganir, Richard L

    2005-09-01

    Modification of AMPA receptor function is a major mechanism for the regulation of synaptic transmission and underlies several forms of synaptic plasticity. Post-translational palmitoylation is a reversible modification that regulates localization of many proteins. Here, we report that palmitoylation of the AMPA receptor regulates receptor trafficking. All AMPA receptor subunits are palmitoylated on two cysteine residues in their transmembrane domain (TMD) 2 and in their C-terminal region. Palmitoylation on TMD 2 is upregulated by the palmitoyl acyl transferase GODZ and leads to an accumulation of the receptor in the Golgi and a reduction of receptor surface expression. C-terminal palmitoylation decreases interaction of the AMPA receptor with the 4.1N protein and regulates AMPA- and NMDA-induced AMPA receptor internalization. Moreover, depalmitoylation of the receptor is regulated by activation of glutamate receptors. These data suggest that regulated palmitoylation of AMPA receptor subunits modulates receptor trafficking and may be important for synaptic plasticity. PMID:16129400

  12. DNA barcoding of Sri Lankan phlebotomine sand flies using cytochrome c oxidase subunit I reveals the presence of cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Gajapathy, Kanapathy; Tharmasegaram, Tharmatha; Eswaramohan, Thampoe; Peries, Lalanthika B S L; Jayanetti, Raveendra; Surendran, Sinnathamby N

    2016-09-01

    Sri Lanka is known for high diversity of phlebotomine sand flies and prevalence of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis; a disease vectored by sand flies. The taxonomy of phlebotomine sand flies is complicated and often the diversity is over/underrated. The current study aims to use the cytochrome c oxidase gene subunit 1 (COI) sequence and formulate a barcode for the sand fly species in Sri Lanka. A total of 70 samples comprising seven species morphologically identified and collected from dry zone districts of Hambantota, Anuradhapura, Vavuniya, Trincomalee and Jaffna were processed. Neighbour-joining (NJ) tree created using the sequences revealed the species identity is compatible with the current morphology based identification. Further the analysis delineated morphologically identified Se. bailyi, Se babu babu and Se babu insularis into genetically distinct groups. PMID:27180216

  13. Diverse gene-silencing mechanisms with distinct requirements for RNA polymerase subunits in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Amy E; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; McGinnis, Karen M

    2014-11-01

    In Zea mays, transcriptional regulation of the b1 (booster1) gene requires a distal enhancer and MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (MOP1), MOP2, and MOP3 proteins orthologous to Arabidopsis components of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway. We compared the genetic requirements for MOP1, MOP2, and MOP3 for endogenous gene silencing by two hairpin transgenes with inverted repeats of the a1 (anthocyaninless1) gene promoter (a1pIR) and the b1 gene enhancer (b1IR), respectively. The a1pIR transgene induced silencing of endogenous A1 in mop1-1 and mop3-1, but not in Mop2-1 homozygous plants. This finding suggests that transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) circumvented the requirement for MOP1, a predicted RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and MOP3, the predicted largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV). Because the Arabidopsis protein orthologous to MOP2 is the second largest subunit of Pol IV and V, our results may indicate that hairpin-induced siRNAs cannot bypass the requirement for the predicted scaffolding activity of Pol V. In contrast to a1pIR, the b1IR transgene silenced endogenous B1 in all three homozygous mutant genotypes--mop1-1, Mop2-1, and mop3-1--suggesting that transgene mediated b1 silencing did not involve MOP2-containing Pol V complexes. Based on the combined results for a1, b1, and three previously described loci, we propose a speculative hypothesis of locus-specific deployment of Pol II, MOP2-containing Pol V, or alternative versions of Pol V with second largest subunits other than MOP2 to explain the mechanistic differences in silencing at specific loci, including one example associated with paramutation. PMID:25164883

  14. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits Iks channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (Iks) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed Iks current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert Iks inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K+ current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26307551

  15. R-subunit Isoform Specificity in Protein Kinase A: Distinct Features of Protein Interfaces in PKA Types I and II by Amide H/2H exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ganesh S.; Hotchko, Matthew; Brown, Simon H.J.; Ten Eyck, Lynn F.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    The two isoforms (RI and RII) of the regulatory (R) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) are similar in sequence yet have different biochemical properties and physiological functions. To further understand the molecular basis for R-isoform-specificity, the interactions of the RIIβ isoform with the PKA catalytic (C) subunit were analyzed by amide H/2H exchange mass spectrometry to compare solvent accessibility of RIIβ and the C subunit in their free and complexed states. Direct mapping of the RIIβ-C interface revealed important differences between the intersubunit interfaces in the type I and type II holoenzyme complexes. These differences are seen in both the R-subunits as well as the C-subunit. Unlike the type I isoform, the type II isoform complexes require both cAMP-binding domains, and ATP is not obligatory for high affinity interactions with the C-subunit. Surprisingly, the C-subunit mediates distinct, overlapping surfaces of interaction with the two R-isoforms despite a strong homology in sequence and similarity in domain organization. Identification of a remote allosteric site on the C-subunit that is essential for interactions with RII, but not RI subunits, further highlights the considerable diversity in interfaces found in higher order protein complexes mediated by the C-subunit of PKA. PMID:17942118

  16. Inter-Species Complementation of the Translocon Beta Subunit Requires Only Its Transmembrane Domain

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Alexandre; Rokeach, Luis A.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, proteins enter the secretory pathway through the translocon pore of the endoplasmic reticulum. This protein translocation channel is composed of three major subunits, called Sec61α, β and γ in mammals. Unlike the other subunits, the β subunit is dispensable for translocation and cell viability in all organisms studied. Intriguingly, the knockout of the Sec61β encoding genes results in different phenotypes in different species. Nevertheless, the β subunit shows a high level of sequence homology across species, suggesting the conservation of a biological function that remains ill-defined. To address its cellular roles, we characterized the homolog of Sec61β in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sbh1p). Here, we show that the knockout of sbh1+ results in severe cold sensitivity, increased sensitivity to cell-wall stress, and reduced protein secretion at 23°C. Sec61β homologs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human complement the knockout of sbh1+ in S. pombe. As in S. cerevisiae, the transmembrane domain (TMD) of S. pombe Sec61β is sufficient to complement the phenotypes resulting from the knockout of the entire encoding gene. Remarkably, the TMD of Sec61β from S. cerevisiae and human also complement the gene knockouts in both yeasts. Together, these observations indicate that the TMD of Sec61β exerts a cellular function that is conserved across species. PMID:19057642

  17. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatialmore » regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.« less

  18. Distinct function of 2 chromatin remodeling complexes that share a common subunit, Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF).

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Fujiki, Ryoji; Tanabe, Masahiko; Takezawa, Shinichiro; Takada, Ichiro; Yamaoka, Ikuko; Yonezawa, Masayoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Hisato; Yoshinaga, Shin; Masuda, Takeyoshi; Fukuda, Toru; Yamamoto, Yoko; Ebihara, Kanae; Li, Dean Y; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takeuchi, Jun K; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-06-01

    A number of nuclear complexes modify chromatin structure and operate as functional units. However, the in vivo role of each component within the complexes is not known. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes form several types of protein complexes, which reorganize chromatin structure cooperatively with histone modifiers. Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) was biochemically identified as a major subunit, along with 2 distinct complexes: WINAC, a SWI/SNF-type complex, and WICH, an ISWI-type complex. Here, WSTF(-/-) mice were generated to investigate its function in chromatin remodeling in vivo. Loss of WSTF expression resulted in neonatal lethality, and all WSTF(-/-) neonates and approximately 10% of WSTF(+/-) neonates suffered cardiovascular abnormalities resembling those found in autosomal-dominant Williams syndrome patients. Developmental analysis of WSTF(-/-) embryos revealed that Gja5 gene regulation is aberrant from E9.5, conceivably because of inappropriate chromatin reorganization around the promoter regions where essential cardiac transcription factors are recruited. In vitro analysis in WSTF(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells also showed impaired transactivation functions of cardiac transcription activators on the Gja5 promoter, but the effects were reversed by overexpression of WINAC components. Likewise in WSTF(-/-) MEF cells, recruitment of Snf2h, an ISWI ATPase, to PCNA and cell survival after DNA damage were both defective, but were ameliorated by overexpression of WICH components. Thus, the present study provides evidence that WSTF is shared and is a functionally indispensable subunit of the WICH complex for DNA repair and the WINAC complex for transcriptional control. PMID:19470456

  19. Distinct functions of the RNA polymerase σ subunit region 3.2 in RNA priming and promoter escape

    PubMed Central

    Pupov, Danil; Kuzin, Ivan; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    The σ subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) has been implicated in all steps of transcription initiation, including promoter recognition and opening, priming of RNA synthesis, abortive initiation and promoter escape. The post-promoter-recognition σ functions were proposed to depend on its conserved region σ3.2 that directly contacts promoter DNA immediately upstream of the RNAP active centre and occupies the RNA exit path. Analysis of the transcription effects of substitutions and deletions in this region in Escherichia coli σ70 subunit, performed in this work, suggests that (i) individual residues in the σ3.2 finger collectively contribute to RNA priming by RNAP, likely by the positioning of the template DNA strand in the active centre, but are not critical to promoter escape; (ii) the physical presence of σ3.2 in the RNA exit channel is important for promoter escape; (iii) σ3.2 promotes σ dissociation during initiation and suppresses σ-dependent promoter-proximal pausing; (iv) σ3.2 contributes to allosteric inhibition of the initiating NTP binding by rifamycins. Thus, region σ3.2 performs distinct functions in transcription initiation and its inhibition by antibiotics. The B-reader element of eukaryotic factor TFIIB likely plays similar roles in RNAPII transcription, revealing common principles in transcription initiation in various domains of life. PMID:24452800

  20. Partial protection against four species of chicken coccidia induced by multivalent subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaokai; Gao, Yunlu; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-15

    In this study, a multivalent subunit vaccine was designed to protect chickens against simultaneous infection by several Eimeria species. This vaccine contains recombinant proteins from four Eimeria species - E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. acervulina and E. maxima - and was evaluated for efficacy in animals. To produce this vaccine, candidate antigens from each Eimeria species were first screened in chickens via intramuscular inoculation and subsequent challenge. Antigens tested include recombinant proteins TA4 and SO7 from E. tenella, NA4 and NPmz19 from E. necatrix, LDH, 3-1E and MIF from E. acervulina, and Em6 and Em8 (two portions of EmTFP250) from E. maxima. A homologous challenge was then performed to identify which antigen from each species conferred the best protection. The antigens identified as most protective against its species were then challenged by heterologous species. Finally, the selected recombinant proteins from each of the four respective species were mixed with the final concentration of 400 μg/ml (100 μg of each protein/ml) to form the multivalent subunit vaccine, which was tested for efficacy in animals. The results indicated that TA4 from E. tenella, NA4 from E. necatrix, LDH from E. acervulina, and Em8 from E. maxima each induced the most effective protection from homologous challenge. Cross-protection results showed that TA4 provided partial cross-protection against E. necatrix, NA4 provided partial cross-protection against E. tenella and E. acervulina, LDH provided partial cross-protection against E. tenella and E. necatrix, and Em8 provided partial cross-protection against E. tenella and E. acervulina. The multivalent subunit vaccine provided partial protection against E. tenella, E. necatrix, E. acervulina and E. maxima challenge, and resulted in ACIs of more than 170. These results suggest that our candidate multivalent vaccine could protect chickens against simultaneous infection by several Eimeria species. PMID:26341156

  1. Lungfish aestivating activities are locked in distinct encephalic γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor α subunits.

    PubMed

    Giusi, Giuseppina; Crudo, Michele; Di Vito, Anna; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Garofalo, Filippo; Chew, Shit Fun; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Canonaco, Marcello

    2011-03-01

    Ammonia in dipnoans plays a crucial role on neuronal homeostasis, especially for those brain areas that maintain torpor and awakening states in equilibrium. In the present study, specific α subunits of the major neuroreceptor inhibitory complex (GABA(A) R), which predominated during some phases of aestivation of the lungfish Protopterus annectens, turned out to be key adaptive factors of this species. From the isolation, for the first time, of the encoding sequence for GABA(A) R α₁, α₄ , and α₅ subunits in Protopterus annectens, qPCR and in situ hybridization levels of α₄ transcript in thalamic (P < 0.001) and mesencephalic (P < 0.01) areas proved to be significantly higher during long aestivating maintenance states. Very evident α₅ mRNA levels were detected in diencephalon during short inductive aestivating states, whereas an α₄ /α₁ turnover characterized the arousal state. Contextually, the recovery of physiological activities appeared to be tightly related to an evident up-regulation of α₁ transcripts in telencephalic and cerebellar sites. Surprisingly, TUNEL and amino cupric silver methods corroborated apoptotic and neurodegenerative cellular events, respectively, above all in telencephalon and cerebellum of lungfish exposed to long maintenance aestivating conditions. Overall, these results tend to underlie a novel GABAergic-related ON/OFF molecular switch operating during aestivation of the lungfish, which might have a bearing on sleeping disorders. PMID:21259328

  2. Megabirnavirus structure reveals a putative 120-subunit capsid formed by asymmetrical dimers with distinctive large protrusions.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Salaipeth, Lakha; Kanematsu, Satoko; Iwasaki, Kenji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Rosellinia necatrix megabirnavirus 1 (RnMBV1) W779 is a bi-segmented dsRNA virus and a strain of the type species Rosellinia necatrix megabirnavirus 1 of the family Megabirnaviridae. RnMBV1 causes severe reduction of both mycelial growth of Rosellinia necatrix in synthetic medium and fungal virulence to plant hosts, and thus has strong potential for virocontrol (biological control using viruses) of white rot. The structure of RnMBV1 was examined by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction at 15.7 Å resolution. The diameter of the RnMBV1 capsid was 520 Å, and the capsid was composed of 60 asymmetrical dimers in the T = 1 (so-called T = 2) lattice that is well conserved among dsRNA viruses. However, RnMBV1 has putatively 120 large protrusions with a width of ∼ 45 Å and a height of ∼ 50 Å on the virus surface, making it distinguishable from the other dsRNA viruses. PMID:25968130

  3. Distinct function of 2 chromatin remodeling complexes that share a common subunit, Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF)

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Fujiki, Ryoji; Tanabe, Masahiko; Takezawa, Shinichiro; Takada, Ichiro; Yamaoka, Ikuko; Yonezawa, Masayoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Hisato; Yoshinaga, Shin; Masuda, Takeyoshi; Fukuda, Toru; Yamamoto, Yoko; Ebihara, Kanae; Li, Dean Y.; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Takeuchi, Jun K.; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-01-01

    A number of nuclear complexes modify chromatin structure and operate as functional units. However, the in vivo role of each component within the complexes is not known. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes form several types of protein complexes, which reorganize chromatin structure cooperatively with histone modifiers. Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) was biochemically identified as a major subunit, along with 2 distinct complexes: WINAC, a SWI/SNF-type complex, and WICH, an ISWI-type complex. Here, WSTF−/− mice were generated to investigate its function in chromatin remodeling in vivo. Loss of WSTF expression resulted in neonatal lethality, and all WSTF−/− neonates and ≈10% of WSTF+/− neonates suffered cardiovascular abnormalities resembling those found in autosomal-dominant Williams syndrome patients. Developmental analysis of WSTF−/− embryos revealed that Gja5 gene regulation is aberrant from E9.5, conceivably because of inappropriate chromatin reorganization around the promoter regions where essential cardiac transcription factors are recruited. In vitro analysis in WSTF−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells also showed impaired transactivation functions of cardiac transcription activators on the Gja5 promoter, but the effects were reversed by overexpression of WINAC components. Likewise in WSTF−/− MEF cells, recruitment of Snf2h, an ISWI ATPase, to PCNA and cell survival after DNA damage were both defective, but were ameliorated by overexpression of WICH components. Thus, the present study provides evidence that WSTF is shared and is a functionally indispensable subunit of the WICH complex for DNA repair and the WINAC complex for transcriptional control. PMID:19470456

  4. Distinct Effects of Different Phosphatidylglycerol Species on Mouse Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ding; Seremwe, Mutsa; Edwards, John G.; Podolsky, Robert; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that liposomes composed of egg-derived phosphatidylglycerol (PG), with a mixed fatty acid composition (comprising mainly palmitate and oleate), inhibit the proliferation and promote the differentiation of rapidly dividing keratinocytes, and stimulate the growth of slowly proliferating epidermal cells. To determine the species of PG most effective at modulating keratinocyte proliferation, primary mouse keratinocytes were treated with different PG species, and proliferation was measured. PG species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids were effective at inhibiting rapidly proliferating keratinocytes, whereas PG species with monounsaturated fatty acids were effective at promoting proliferation in slowly dividing cells. Thus, palmitoyl-arachidonyl-PG (16∶0/20∶4), palmitoyl-linoleoyl-PG (16∶0/18∶2), dilinoleoyl-PG (18∶2/18∶2) and soy PG (a PG mixture with a large percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids) were particularly effective at inhibiting proliferation in rapidly dividing keratinocytes. Conversely, palmitoyl-oleoyl-PG (16∶0/18∶1) and dioleoyl-PG (18∶1/18∶1) were especially effective proproliferative PG species. This result represents the first demonstration of opposite effects of different species of a single class of phospholipid and suggests that these different PG species may signal to diverse effector enzymes to differentially affect keratinocyte proliferation and normalize keratinocyte proliferation. Thus, different PG species may be useful for treating skin diseases characterized by excessive or insufficient proliferation. PMID:25233484

  5. A Distinct Group II Alphabaculovirus Isolated from a Peridroma Species.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, George F; Erlandson, Martin A; Theilmann, David A

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of an alphabaculovirus isolated from a Peridroma species indicated that it is a novel member of a group II lineage most closely related to alphabaculoviruses from Spodoptera exigua and Agrotis segetum. It contains a genome of 151,110 nucleotides (nt), with a G+C content of 53.3%. PMID:25838477

  6. Distribution of Plasmids in Distinct Leptospira Pathogenic Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhuo; Zhuang, Xuran; Zhong, Yi; Zhang, Cuicai; Zhang, Yan; Zeng, Lingbing; Zhu, Yongzhang; He, Ping; Dong, Ke; Pal, Utpal; Guo, Xiaokui; Qin, Jinhong

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic Leptospira, is a worldwide zoonotic infection. The genus Leptospira includes at least 21 species clustered into three groups—pathogens, non-pathogens, and intermediates—based on 16S rRNA phylogeny. Research on Leptospira is difficult due to slow growth and poor transformability of the pathogens. Recent identification of extrachromosomal elements besides the two chromosomes in L. interrogans has provided new insight into genome complexity of the genus Leptospira. The large size, low copy number, and high similarity of the sequence of these extrachromosomal elements with the chromosomes present challenges in isolating and detecting them without careful genome assembly. In this study, two extrachromosomal elements were identified in L. borgpetersenii serovar Ballum strain 56604 through whole genome assembly combined with S1 nuclease digestion following pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) analysis. Further, extrachromosomal elements in additional 15 Chinese epidemic strains of Leptospira, comprising L. borgpetersenii, L. weilii, and L. interrogans, were successfully separated and identified, independent of genome sequence data. Southern blot hybridization with extrachromosomal element-specific probes, designated as lcp1, lcp2 and lcp3-rep, further confirmed their occurrences as extrachromosomal elements. In total, 24 plasmids were detected in 13 out of 15 tested strains, among which 11 can hybridize with the lcp1-rep probe and 11 with the lcp2-rep probe, whereas two can hybridize with the lcp3-rep probe. None of them are likely to be species-specific. Blastp search of the lcp1, lcp2, and lcp3-rep genes with a nonredundant protein database of Leptospira species genomes showed that their homologous sequences are widely distributed among clades of pathogens but not non-pathogens or intermediates. These results suggest that the plasmids are widely distributed in Leptospira species, and further elucidation of their biological

  7. Distribution of Plasmids in Distinct Leptospira Pathogenic Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanzhuo; Zhuang, Xuran; Zhong, Yi; Zhang, Cuicai; Zhang, Yan; Zeng, Lingbing; Zhu, Yongzhang; He, Ping; Dong, Ke; Pal, Utpal; Guo, Xiaokui; Qin, Jinhong

    2015-11-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic Leptospira, is a worldwide zoonotic infection. The genus Leptospira includes at least 21 species clustered into three groups--pathogens, non-pathogens, and intermediates--based on 16S rRNA phylogeny. Research on Leptospira is difficult due to slow growth and poor transformability of the pathogens. Recent identification of extrachromosomal elements besides the two chromosomes in L. interrogans has provided new insight into genome complexity of the genus Leptospira. The large size, low copy number, and high similarity of the sequence of these extrachromosomal elements with the chromosomes present challenges in isolating and detecting them without careful genome assembly. In this study, two extrachromosomal elements were identified in L. borgpetersenii serovar Ballum strain 56604 through whole genome assembly combined with S1 nuclease digestion following pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) analysis. Further, extrachromosomal elements in additional 15 Chinese epidemic strains of Leptospira, comprising L. borgpetersenii, L. weilii, and L. interrogans, were successfully separated and identified, independent of genome sequence data. Southern blot hybridization with extrachromosomal element-specific probes, designated as lcp1, lcp2 and lcp3-rep, further confirmed their occurrences as extrachromosomal elements. In total, 24 plasmids were detected in 13 out of 15 tested strains, among which 11 can hybridize with the lcp1-rep probe and 11 with the lcp2-rep probe, whereas two can hybridize with the lcp3-rep probe. None of them are likely to be species-specific. Blastp search of the lcp1, lcp2, and lcp3-rep genes with a nonredundant protein database of Leptospira species genomes showed that their homologous sequences are widely distributed among clades of pathogens but not non-pathogens or intermediates. These results suggest that the plasmids are widely distributed in Leptospira species, and further elucidation of their biological

  8. Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis: two immunologically distinct species.

    PubMed Central

    Khelef, N; Danve, B; Quentin-Millet, M J; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis are closely related species. Both are responsible for outbreaks of whooping cough in humans and produce similar virulence factors, with the exception of pertussis toxin, specific to B. pertussis. Current pertussis whole-cell vaccine will soon be replaced by acellular vaccines containing major adhesins (filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin) and major toxin (pertussis toxin). All of these factors are antigens that stimulate a protective immune response in the murine respiratory model and in clinical assays. In the present study, we examined the protective efficacies of these factors, and that of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, another B. pertussis toxin, against B. parapertussis infection in a murine respiratory model. As expected, pertussis toxin did not protect against B. parapertussis infection, since this bacterium did not express this protein, but the surprising result was that none of the other factors were protective against B. parapertussis infection. Furthermore, B. parapertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, although it protected against B. parapertussis infection, did not protect against B. pertussis infection. Despite a high degree of homology between both B. pertussis and B. parapertussis species, no cross-protection was observed. Our results outline the fact that, as in other gram-negative bacteria, Bordetella surface proteins vary immunologically. Images PMID:8423077

  9. Distinct antibody species: structural differences creating therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Muyldermans, Serge; Smider, Vaughn V

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies have been a remarkably successful class of molecules for binding a large number of antigens in therapeutic, diagnostic, and research applications. Typical antibodies derived from mouse or human sources use the surface formed by complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the variable regions of the heavy chain/light chain heterodimer, which typically forms a relatively flat binding surface. Alternative species, particularly camelids and bovines, provide a unique paradigm for antigen recognition through novel domains which form the antigen binding paratope. For camelids, heavy chain antibodies bind antigen with only a single heavy chain variable region, in the absence of light chains. In bovines, ultralong CDR-H3 regions form an independently folding minidomain, which protrudes from the surface of the antibody and is diverse in both its sequence and disulfide patterns. The atypical paratopes of camelids and bovines potentially provide the ability to interact with different epitopes, particularly recessed or concave surfaces, compared to traditional antibodies. PMID:26922135

  10. Biochemical and functional properties of distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the superior cervical ganglion of mice with targeted deletions of nAChR subunit genes.

    PubMed

    David, Reinhard; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Simeone, Xenia; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Papke, Roger L; McIntosh, J M; Huck, Sigismund; Scholze, Petra

    2010-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate fast synaptic transmission in ganglia of the autonomic nervous system. Here, we determined the subunit composition of hetero-pentameric nAChRs in the mouse superior cervical ganglion (SCG), the function of distinct receptors (obtained by deletions of nAChR subunit genes) and mechanisms at the level of nAChRs that might compensate for the loss of subunits. As shown by immunoprecipitation and Western blots, wild-type (WT) mice expressed: alpha 3 beta 4 (55%), alpha 3 beta 4 alpha 5 (24%) and alpha 3 beta 4 beta 2 (21%) nAChRs. nAChRs in beta 4 knockout (KO) mice were reduced to < 15% of controls and no longer contained the alpha 5 subunit. Compound action potentials, recorded from the postganglionic (internal carotid) nerve and induced by preganglionic nerve stimulation, did not differ between alpha 5 beta 4 KO and WT mice, suggesting that the reduced number of receptors in the KO mice did not impair transganglionic transmission. Deletions of alpha 5 or beta2 did not affect the overall number of receptors and we found no evidence that the two subunits substitute for each other. In addition, dual KOs allowed us to study the functional properties of distinct alpha 3 beta4 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors that have previously only been investigated in heterologous expression systems. The two receptors strikingly differed in the decay of macroscopic currents, the efficacy of cytisine, and their responses to the alpha-conotoxins AuIB and MII. Our data, based on biochemical and functional experiments and several mouse KO models, clarify and significantly extend previous observations on the function of nAChRs in heterologous systems and the SCG. PMID:20377613

  11. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species.

    PubMed

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P; Donat-Torres, María P; Llinares, Josep V; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus-both halophytes-and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600-800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants. PMID:27490924

  12. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species

    PubMed Central

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P.; Donat-Torres, María P.; Llinares, Josep V.; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus–both halophytes–and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600–800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants. PMID:27490924

  13. Genome-wide analysis reveals distinct substrate specificities of Rrp6, Dis3, and core exosome subunits.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Daniel L; Andrulis, Erik D

    2010-04-01

    The RNA processing exosome complex was originally defined as an evolutionarily conserved multisubunit complex of ribonucleases responsible for the processing and/or turnover of stable RNAs. The exosome complex is also involved in the surveillance of mRNAs in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, including nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) targets. The detailed mechanisms for how individual exosome subunits participate in each of these RNA metabolic pathways remains unclear. Here, we use RNAi to deplete exosome subunits, the exonucleases Rrp6 and Dis3, and an exosome cofactor in Drosophila melanogaster S2 tissue culture cells and assay the effects on global mRNA levels using gene expression microarrays. Consistent with the RNA degradative activities ascribed to the exosome, most mRNAs are increased. Notably, these stabilized mRNAs possess 3' untranslated regions that are longer than the representative transcriptomic average. Moreover, our results reveal substantial differences in the pools of affected mRNAs for each depleted subunit. For example, approximately 25% of the affected transcripts in Rrp6 depleted cells represent NMD substrates. While the affected mRNAs were dissimilar, they encode proteins that function in similar cellular pathways. We conclude that individual exosome subunits are largely functionally independent at the transcript level, but are interdependent on a transcriptomic level. PMID:20185544

  14. Fast Photochemistry of Prototypical Phytochromes—A Species vs. Subunit Specific Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Ihalainen, Janne A.; Takala, Heikki; Lehtivuori, Heli

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are multi-domain red light photosensor proteins, which convert red light photons to biological activity utilizing the multitude of structural and chemical reactions. The steady increase in structural information obtained from various bacteriophytochromes has increased understanding about the functional mechanism of the photochemical processes of the phytochromes. Furthermore, a number of spectroscopic studies have revealed kinetic information about the light-induced reactions. The spectroscopic changes are, however, challenging to connect with the structural changes of the chromophore and the protein environment, as the excited state properties of the chromophores are very sensitive to the small structural and chemical changes of their environment. In this article, we concentrate on the results of ultra-fast spectroscopic experiments which reveal information about the important initial steps of the photoreactions of the phytochromes. We survey the excited state properties obtained during the last few decades. The differences in kinetics between different research laboratories are traditionally related to the differences of the studied species. However, we notice that the variation in the excited state properties depends on the subunit composition of the protein as well. This observation illustrates a feedback mechanism from the other domains to the chromophore. We propose that two feedback routes exist in phytochromes between the chromophore and the remotely located effector domain. The well-known connection between the subunits is the so-called tongue region, which changes its secondary structure while changing the light-activated state of the system. The other feedback route which we suggest is less obvious, it is made up of several water molecules ranging from the dimer interface to the vicinity of the chromophore, allowing even proton transfer reactions nearby the chromophore. PMID:26779488

  15. A Streamlined System for Species Diagnosis in Caenorhabditis (Nematoda: Rhabditidae) with Name Designations for 15 Distinct Biological Species

    PubMed Central

    Félix, Marie-Anne; Braendle, Christian; Cutter, Asher D.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid pace of species discovery outstrips the rate of species description in many taxa. This problem is especially acute for Caenorhabditis nematodes, where the naming of distinct species would greatly improve their visibility and usage for biological research, given the thousands of scientists studying Caenorhabditis. Species description and naming has been hampered in Caenorhabditis, in part due to the presence of morphologically cryptic species despite complete biological reproductive isolation and often enormous molecular divergence. With the aim of expediting species designations, here we propose and apply a revised framework for species diagnosis and description in this group. Our solution prioritizes reproductive isolation over traditional morphological characters as the key feature in delineating and diagnosing new species, reflecting both practical considerations and conceptual justifications. DNA sequence divergence criteria help prioritize crosses for establishing patterns of reproductive isolation among the many species of Caenorhabditis known to science, such as with the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS2) DNA barcode. By adopting this approach, we provide new species name designations for 15 distinct biological species, thus increasing the number of named Caenorhabditis species in laboratory culture by nearly 3-fold. We anticipate that the improved accessibility of these species to the research community will expand the opportunities for study and accelerate our understanding of diverse biological phenomena. PMID:24727800

  16. Changes in the Lung Microbiome following Lung Transplantation Include the Emergence of Two Distinct Pseudomonas Species with Distinct Clinical Associations

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Erb-Downward, John R.; Freeman, Christine M.; Walker, Natalie; Scales, Brittan S.; Beck, James M.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Lama, Vibha N.; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple independent culture-based studies have identified the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in respiratory samples as a positive risk factor for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Yet, culture-independent microbiological techniques have identified a negative association between Pseudomonas species and BOS. Our objective was to investigate whether there may be a unifying explanation for these apparently dichotomous results. Methods We performed bronchoscopies with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) on lung transplant recipients (46 procedures in 33 patients) and 26 non-transplant control subjects. We analyzed bacterial communities in the BAL fluid using qPCR and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and compared the culture-independent data with the clinical metadata and culture results from these subjects. Findings Route of bronchoscopy (via nose or via mouth) was not associated with changes in BAL microbiota (p = 0.90). Among the subjects with positive Pseudomonas bacterial culture, P. aeruginosa was also identified by culture-independent methods. In contrast, a distinct Pseudomonas species, P. fluorescens, was often identified in asymptomatic transplant subjects by pyrosequencing but not detected via standard bacterial culture. The subject populations harboring these two distinct pseudomonads differed significantly with respect to associated symptoms, BAL neutrophilia, bacterial DNA burden and microbial diversity. Despite notable differences in culturability, a global database search of UM Hospital Clinical Microbiology Laboratory records indicated that P. fluorescens is commonly isolated from respiratory specimens. Interpretation We have reported for the first time that two prominent and distinct Pseudomonas species (P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa) exist within the post-transplant lung microbiome, each with unique genomic and microbiologic features and widely divergent clinical associations, including presence during acute infection

  17. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: evidence for spatially distinct subunit domains obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.G.; Vanoni, M.A.; Hainfeld, J.F.; Wall, J.

    1984-10-10

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of individual unfixed molecules of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase has been used to determine the molecular mass distribution of the protein. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, which has a subunit molecular mass of 77 kilodaltons, was found to exist predominantly as a dimer with an apparent molecular mass of 136 +/- 29 kilodaltons. The mass distribution of the enzyme molecules was unchanged in the presence of the allosteric inhibitor S-adenosylmethionine. Examination of negatively stained protein molecules suggested that each subunit of the dimer consists of two globular domains of approximately equal size. Limited proteolysis of the enzyme by trypsin gave results which were entirely consistent with that view. In the presence of 1% trypsin, the enzyme was cleaved into two fragments. The masses of these fragments were 39 and 36 kilodaltons as assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Tryptic cleavage did not lead to loss of NADPH-menadione or NADPH-methylenetetrahydrofolate oxidoreductase activity, and the flavin prosthetic group remained bound to the protein. However, the cleaved protein was completely desensitized with respect to inhibition by S-adenosylmethionine. These results suggest that each subunit of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase contains two domains and that allosteric inhibition requires specific interactions between these domains. The region between these two domains appears to be very sensitive to proteolysis, while the domains themselves are relatively resistant to further degradation. 14 references, 3 figures.

  18. Culturing-based Temperature Calibration of a Genetically Distinct, Alkenone-producing Haptophyte Species isolated from Lake George, ND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Andersen, R. A.; Huang, Y.; Amaral-Zettler, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lacustrine alkenones are rapidly becoming an important tool for continental paleoclimate reconstructions. However, DNA sequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA marker genes has uncovered multiple species of haptophytes in different lakes. To date, there are only two isolated lacustrine species Chrysotila lamellosa and Isochrysis galbana available for culture studies. In our study, we report the isolation of a new haptophyte species from Lake George (LG) that, based on analyses of partial large subunit rRNA gene sequences, is genetically distinct from both Chrysotila lamellosa and Isochrysis galbana. We examined alkenone unsaturation index UK37 values for the LG species at 4°C, 10°C, 15°C, 20°C and 25°C as a function of temperature in a culture experiment. The temperature sensitivity of the new species was significantly higher than previously cultured Isochrysis galbana and Chrysotila lamellosa strains, with a slope that was 25 to 100 % higher. We found that the best linear relationship was obtained when two double-bond alkenones were excluded from the calibration (we developed an index termed UK''37 = [C37:4] / [C37:3+C37:4]). In particular, UK''37 is more linear to the growth temperature than UK37 at low (4-10°C) and high (20-25°C) temperature ranges. Our experiments show that both UK37 and UK''37 of this new alkenone-produced species is strongly controlled by culture temperature and can be used for paleoclimate reconstruction. However, we recommend the use of UK''37 index to reconstruct temperature if the haptophyte's growing environment falls within temperature extremes (4-10°C and 20-25°C). This newly cultivated species broadens our ability of applying lacustrine haptophyte calibrations to continental paleothermometry.

  19. Hidden species complexes within distinctive taxa: the case of Epanthidium bicoloratum (Smith) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epanthidium bicoloratum (Smith) differs from all other Neotropical Anthidiini in the distinctive tegula, which is narrowed posteriorly forming a slender wedge. Examination of material standing under this name revealed that it represents a species complex that includes three new cryptic species, E. ...

  20. Distinct Signaling Roles of Ceramide Species in Yeast Revealed Through Systematic Perturbation and Systems Biology Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Chen, Lujia; Matmati, Nabil; Lu, Songjian; Newcomb, Benjamin; Cooper, Gregory F.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Lu, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, is an important bioactive molecule participating in cellular regulatory events and having implications for disease. A challenge in deciphering ceramide signaling emanates from the myriad of ceramide species that exist and the possibility that many of them may have distinct functions. Here, we applied systems biology and molecular approaches to perturb ceramide metabolism in the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and inferred causal relationships between ceramide species and their potential targets by combining lipidomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analyses. We find that during heat stress distinct metabolic mechanisms control the abundance of different groups of ceramide species. Additionally, distinct groups of ceramide species regulated different sets of functionally related genes, indicating that specific sub-groups of lipids participated in different regulatory pathways. These results indicate a previously unrecognized complexity and versatility of lipid-mediated cell regulation. PMID:24170935

  1. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits I(ks) channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (I(ks)) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed I(ks) current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert I(ks) inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K(+) current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26307551

  2. A new distinctive species of pagurid hermit crab (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) from Japan.

    PubMed

    Komai, T; Osawa, M

    2001-12-01

    A new species of pagurid hermit crab, Pagurus decimbranchiae, is described and illustrated based on 20 specimens collected from shallow waters of the Pacific coast of Japan ranging from Boso Peninsula to Tanegashima Island. It is quite distinctive in having the rudimentary arthrobranch on the third maxilliped represented by a single bud, however close morphological similarity is found between the new species and P. moluccensis Haig and Ball. Comparisons are also made among other species, including P. boriaustraliensis Morgan, P. sp. cf. boriaustraliensis sensu Rahayu and Komai (2000) and the members of the P. anachoretus group. The present generic assignment of the new species should be considered provisional, as more extensive study is needed to investigate phylogenetic relationships of the new species and the other species of Pagurus. PMID:11911085

  3. 76 FR 515 - Endangered and Threatened Species, Designation of Critical Habitat for Southern Distinct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ...We, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), propose to designate critical habitat for the southern Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of Pacific eulachon (Thaleichthys pacificus), which was recently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). We have proposed 12 specific areas for designation as critical habitat within the states of California, Oregon, and Washington. The......

  4. A natural M RNA reassortant arising from two distinct tospovirus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a tospovirus isolate from south Florida tomatoes was determined. Phylogenetic reconstructions of each genomic RNA segment showed that this isolate was produced by reassortment of segments from two distinct tospovirus species. The S and L segments are most closel...

  5. Distinctive interactions of the Arabidopsis homolog of the 30 kD subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (AtCPSF30) with other polyadenylation factor subunits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The Arabidopsis ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of the mammalian Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (AtCPSF30) is an RNA-binding endonuclease that is associated with other Arabidopsis CPSF subunits (orthologs of the 160, 100, and 73 kD subunits of CPSF). In order to better u...

  6. Three hamster species with different scrapie incubation times and neuropathological features encode distinct prion proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, D H; Butler, D A; Westaway, D; McKinley, M P; DeArmond, S J; Prusiner, S B

    1990-01-01

    Given the critical role of the prion protein (PrP) in the transmission and pathogenesis of experimental scrapie, we investigated the PrP gene and its protein products in three hamster species, Chinese (CHa), Armenian (AHa), and Syrian (SHa), each of which were found to have distinctive scrapie incubation times. Passaging studies demonstrated that the host species, and not the source of scrapie prions, determined the incubation time for each species, and histochemical studies of hamsters with clinical signs of scrapie revealed characteristic patterns of neuropathology. Northern (RNA) analysis showed the size of PrP mRNA from CHa, AHa, and SHa hamsters to be 2.5, 2.4, and 2.1 kilobases, respectively. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the PrP isoforms were of similar size (33 to 35 kilodaltons); however, the monoclonal antibody 13A5 raised against SHa PrP did not react with the CHa or AHa PrP molecules. Comparison of the three predicted amino acid sequences revealed that each is distinct. Furthermore, differences within the PrP open reading frame that uniquely distinguish the three hamster species are within a hydrophilic segment of 11 amino acids that includes polymorphisms linked to scrapie incubation times in inbred mice and an inherited prion disease of humans. Single polymorphisms in this region correlate with the presence or absence of amyloid plaques for a given hamster species or mouse inbred strain. Our findings demonstrate distinctive molecular, pathological, and clinical characteristics of scrapie in three related species and are consistent with the hypothesis that molecular properties of the host PrP play a pivotal role in determining the incubation time and neuropathological features of scrapie. Images PMID:2406562

  7. Chlamydia Infection Across Host Species Boundaries Promotes Distinct Sets of Transcribed Anti-Apoptotic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Messinger, Joshua E.; Nelton, Emmalin; Feeney, Colleen; Gondek, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydiae, obligate intracellular bacteria, cause significant human and veterinary associated diseases. Having emerged an estimated 700-million years ago, these bacteria have twice adapted to humans as a host species, causing sexually transmitted infection (C. trachomatis) and respiratory associated disease (C. pneumoniae). The principle mechanism of host cell defense against these intracellular bacteria is the induction of cell death via apoptosis. However, in the “arms race” of co-evolution, Chlamydiae have developed mechanisms to promote cell viability and inhibit cell death. Herein we examine the impact of Chlamydiae infection across multiple host species on transcription of anti-apoptotic genes. We found mostly distinct patterns of gene expression (Mcl1 and cIAPs) elicited by each pathogen-host pair indicating Chlamydiae infection across host species boundaries does not induce a universally shared host response. Understanding species specific host-pathogen interactions is paramount to deciphering how potential pathogens become emerging diseases. PMID:26779446

  8. The Lipid-Modifying Multiple Peptide Resistance Factor Is an Oligomer Consisting of Distinct Interacting Synthase and Flippase Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Sebastian; Slavetinsky, Christoph J.; Krismer, Bernhard; Heilbronner, Simon; Gekeler, Cordula; Kraus, Dirk; Wagner, Samuel; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    -positive, Gram-negative, and even archaeal commensals or pathogens and confers resistance to CAMPs by modifying anionic phospholipids with amino acids, thereby compromising the membrane interaction of CAMPs. Here we describe how MprF does not only modify phospholipids but uses an additional, distinct domain for translocating the resulting lysinylated phospholipids to the outer leaflet of the membrane. We reveal critical details for the structure and function of MprF, the first dedicated prokaryotic phospholipid flippase, which may pave the way for targeting MprF with new antimicrobials that would not kill bacteria but sensitize them to antibiotics and innate host defense molecules. PMID:25626904

  9. Targeted deletion of one or two copies of the G protein β subunit Gβ5 gene has distinct effects on body weight and behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Levay, Konstantin; Chanturiya, Tatyana; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Anderson, Karen L.; Bianco, Suzy D. C.; Ueta, Cintia B.; Molano, R. Damaris; Pileggi, Antonello; Gurevich, Eugenia V.; Gavrilova, Oksana; Slepak, Vladlen Z.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the physiological role of Gβ5, a unique G protein β subunit that dimerizes with regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins of the R7 family instead of Gγ. Gβ5 is essential for stability of these complexes, so that its knockout (KO)causes degradation of the entire Gβ5-R7 family. We report that the Gβ5-KO mice remain leaner than the wild type (WT) throughout their lifetime and are resistant to a high-fat diet. They have a 5-fold increase in locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis, and lower serum insulin, all of which correlate with a higher level of secreted epinephrine. Heterozygous (HET) mice are 2-fold more active than WT mice. Surprisingly, with respect to body weight, the HET mice display a phenotype opposite to that of the KO mice: by the age of 6 mo, they are ≥15% heavier than the WT and have increased adiposity, insulin resistance, and liver steatosis. These changes occur in HET mice fed a normal diet and without apparent hyperphagia, mimicking basic characteristics of human metabolic syndrome. We conclude that even a partial reduction in Gβ5-R7 level can perturb normal animal metabolism and behavior. Our data on Gβ5 haploinsufficient mice may explain earlier observations of genetic linkage between R7 family mutations and obesity in humans.—Wang, Q., Levay, K., Chanturiya, T., Dvoriantchikova, G., Anderson, K. L., Bianco, S. D. C., Ueta, C. B., Molano, R. D., Pileggi, A., Gurevich, E. V., Gavrilova, O., and Slepak, V. Z. Targeted deletion of one or two copies of the G protein β subunit Gβ5 gene has distinct effects on body weight and behavior in mice. PMID:21804131

  10. Identification of distinct physiochemical properties of toxic prefibrillar species formed by A{beta} peptide variants

    SciTech Connect

    Goeransson, Anna-Lena; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Kagedal, Katarina; Brorsson, Ann-Christin

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of toxic prefibrillar A{beta} species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence measurements using a combined set of fluorophores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology studies using transmission electron microscopy. -- Abstract: The formation of amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) aggregates at an early stage during the self-assembly process is an important factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The toxic effect is believed to be exerted by prefibrillar species of A{beta}. It is therefore important to identify which prefibrillar species are toxic and characterize their distinct properties. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro aggregation behavior of A{beta}-derived peptides possessing different levels of neurotoxic activity, using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity of various A{beta} aggregates was assessed by using cultures of human neuroblastoma cells. Through combined use of the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonate (ANS) and the novel luminescent probe pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid (p-FTAA), we were able to identify those A{beta} peptide-derived prefibrillar species which exhibited cellular toxicity. In particular, species, which formed early during the aggregation process and showed strong p-FTAA and ANS fluorescence, were the species that possessed toxic activities. Moreover, by manipulating the aggregation conditions, it was possible to change the capacity of the A{beta} peptide to form nontoxic versus toxic species.

  11. Morphological Differences between Larvae of the Ciona intestinalis Species Complex: Hints for a Valid Taxonomic Definition of Distinct Species

    PubMed Central

    Pennati, Roberta; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Brunetti, Riccardo; Caicci, Federico; Gasparini, Fabio; Griggio, Francesca; Sato, Atsuko; Stach, Thomas; Kaul-Strehlow, Sabrina; Gissi, Carmela; Manni, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan ascidian Ciona intestinalis is the most common model species of Tunicata, the sister-group of Vertebrata, and widely used in developmental biology, genomics and evolutionary studies. Recently, molecular studies suggested the presence of cryptic species hidden within the C. intestinalis species, namely C. intestinalis type A and type B. So far, no substantial morphological differences have been identified between individuals belonging to the two types. Here we present morphometric, immunohistochemical, and histological analyses, as well as 3-D reconstructions, of late larvae obtained by cross-fertilization experiments of molecularly determined type A and type B adults, sampled in different seasons and in four different localities. Our data point to quantitative and qualitative differences in the trunk shape of larvae belonging to the two types. In particular, type B larvae exhibit a longer pre-oral lobe, longer and relatively narrower total body length, and a shorter ocellus-tail distance than type A larvae. All these differences were found to be statistically significant in a Discriminant Analysis. Depending on the number of analyzed parameters, the obtained discriminant function was able to correctly classify > 93% of the larvae, with the remaining misclassified larvae attributable to the existence of intra-type seasonal variability. No larval differences were observed at the level of histology and immunohistochemical localization of peripheral sensory neurons. We conclude that type A and type B are two distinct species that can be distinguished on the basis of larval morphology and molecular data. Since the identified larval differences appear to be valid diagnostic characters, we suggest to raise both types to the rank of species and to assign them distinct names. PMID:25955391

  12. Genome-wide Evidence Reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals Are Distinct Species.

    PubMed

    Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Pollinger, John; Godinho, Raquel; Robinson, Jacqueline; Lea, Amanda; Hendricks, Sarah; Schweizer, Rena M; Thalmann, Olaf; Silva, Pedro; Fan, Zhenxin; Yurchenko, Andrey A; Dobrynin, Pavel; Makunin, Alexey; Cahill, James A; Shapiro, Beth; Álvares, Francisco; Brito, José C; Geffen, Eli; Leonard, Jennifer A; Helgen, Kristofer M; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Wayne, Robert K

    2015-08-17

    The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus), which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a previously unrecognized phylogenetically distinct species despite a long history of taxonomic work on African canids. To test the distinct-species hypothesis and understand the evolutionary history that would account for this puzzling result, we analyzed extensive genomic data including mitochondrial genome sequences, sequences from 20 autosomal loci (17 introns and 3 exon segments), microsatellite loci, X- and Y-linked zinc-finger protein gene (ZFX and ZFY) sequences, and whole-genome nuclear sequences in African and Eurasian golden jackals and gray wolves. Our results provide consistent and robust evidence that populations of golden jackals from Africa and Eurasia represent distinct monophyletic lineages separated for more than one million years, sufficient to merit formal recognition as different species: C. anthus (African golden wolf) and C. aureus (Eurasian golden jackal). Using morphologic data, we demonstrate a striking morphologic similarity between East African and Eurasian golden jackals, suggesting parallelism, which may have misled taxonomists and likely reflects uniquely intense interspecific competition in the East African carnivore guild. Our study shows how ecology can confound taxonomy if interspecific competition constrains size diversification. PMID:26234211

  13. A new rhabditoid nematode species in Asian sciurids, distinct from Strongyloides robustus in North American sciurids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Torii, Harumi; Une, Yumi; Ooi, Hong-Kean

    2007-12-01

    Strongyloides callosciureus n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabditoidea), from Asian sciurids, is described based on morphology, morphometry, and the small and large subunit (SSU/LSU) ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences. This new species was collected from Pallas's squirrels (Callosciurus erythraeus) in the central part of mainland Japan (Honshu), which were originally introduced from Taiwan some decades ago, and plantain squirrels (Callosciurus notatus) imported from Malaysia as personal pets. For comparison, Strongyloides robustus Chandler, 1942 was collected from American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) and southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans) imported from the United States as personal pets. The parasitic females found in North American and Asian sciurids shared some key morphological features such as the ovary running spirally around the gut, and the shapes of the stoma in the apical view and the tail. However, morphometric features of parasitic females in North American and Asian sciurids differed significantly from each other; the former was larger than the latter, and the relative position of the vulva to the whole body length from the mouth was different. The SSU/LSU rDNA sequences supported the division of sciurid Strongyloides isolates by geographical distribution of the host and morphological features, leading us to propose the erection of new species. PMID:18314696

  14. Two Rumex species from contrasting hydrological niches regulate flooding tolerance through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Hans; Mustroph, Angelika; Barding, Gregory A; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen; Welschen-Evertman, Rob A M; Pedersen, Ole; Visser, Eric J W; Larive, Cynthia K; Pierik, Ronald; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2013-11-01

    Global climate change has increased flooding events, which affect both natural vegetation dynamics and crop productivity. The flooded environment is lethal for most plant species because it restricts gas exchange and induces an energy and carbon crisis. Flooding survival strategies have been studied in Oryza sativa, a cultivated monocot. However, our understanding of plant adaptation to natural flood-prone environments remains scant, even though wild plants represent a valuable resource of tolerance mechanisms that could be used to generate stress-tolerant crops. Here we identify mechanisms that mediate the distinct flooding survival strategies of two related wild dicot species: Rumex palustris and Rumex acetosa. Whole transcriptome sequencing and metabolite profiling reveal flooding-induced metabolic reprogramming specific to R. acetosa. By contrast, R. palustris uses the early flooding signal ethylene to increase survival by regulating shade avoidance and photomorphogenesis genes to outgrow submergence and by priming submerged plants for future low oxygen stress. These results provide molecular resolution of flooding survival strategies of two species occupying distinct hydrological niches. Learning how these contrasting flood adaptive strategies evolved in nature will be instrumental for the development of stress-tolerant crop varieties that deliver enhanced yields in a changing climate. PMID:24285788

  15. The cane or marine toad, Rhinella marina (Anura, Bufonidae): two genetically and morphologically distinct species.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Aldemar A; Lampo, Margarita; Cipriani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Rhinella marina is a Neotropical toad that has been introduced widely worldwide. Its toxic effects to frog-eating predators threaten the native and domestic fauna of some regions where it has been introduced. Despite previous studies suggesting two genetically distinct cryptic species within R. marina, one east and one west of the Andes, its taxonomic status remained unresolved due to the absence of morphological complementary evidence. For the first time, data from two mitochondrial genes (ND3 and CR) and 23 morphometric landmarks are combined to evaluate the taxonomic status of this species. Our results support the hypothesis of two separate evolutionary lineages within R. marina and demonstrate that these lineages have significantly diverged in skull shape. We identified two distinct morphotypes, one eastern and one Andean western, with no overlapping morphospaces. The geographic pattern of genetic variation was consistent with a stable structured population with no evidence of recent demographic or geographic expansions. The concordance between the observed geographic patterns in morphometric and genic traits calls for the recognition of two species under R. marina name. PMID:27394759

  16. Coexisting orchid species have distinct mycorrhizal communities and display strong spatial segregation.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Brys, Rein; Merckx, Vincent S F T; Waud, Michael; Lievens, Bart; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2014-04-01

    Because orchids are dependent on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and establishment of seedlings, differences in the mycorrhizal communities associating with orchids can be expected to mediate the abundance, spatial distribution and coexistence of terrestrial orchids in natural communities. We assessed the small-scale spatial distribution of seven orchid species co-occurring in 25 × 25 m plots in two Mediterranean grasslands. In order to characterize the mycorrhizal community associating with each orchid species, 454 pyrosequencing was used. The extent of spatial clustering was assessed using techniques of spatial point pattern analysis. The community of mycorrhizal fungi consisted mainly of members of the Tulasnellaceae, Thelephoraceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, although sporadically members of the Sebacinaceae, Russulaceae and Cortinariaceae were observed. Pronounced differences in mycorrhizal communities were observed between species, whereas strong clustering and significant segregation characterized the spatial distribution of orchid species. However, spatial segregation was not significantly related to phylogenetic dissimilarity of fungal communities. Our results indicate that co-occurring orchid species have distinctive mycorrhizal communities and show strong spatial segregation, suggesting that mycorrhizal fungi are important factors driving niche partitioning in terrestrial orchids and may therefore contribute to orchid coexistence. PMID:24325257

  17. Visual stimuli that elicit appetitive behaviors in three morphologically distinct species of praying mantis.

    PubMed

    Prete, Frederick R; Komito, Justin L; Dominguez, Salina; Svenson, Gavin; López, LeoLin Y; Guillen, Alex; Bogdanivich, Nicole

    2011-09-01

    We assessed the differences in appetitive responses to visual stimuli by three species of praying mantis (Insecta: Mantodea), Tenodera aridifolia sinensis, Mantis religiosa, and Cilnia humeralis. Tethered, adult females watched computer generated stimuli (erratically moving disks or linearly moving rectangles) that varied along predetermined parameters. Three responses were scored: tracking, approaching, and striking. Threshold stimulus size (diameter) for tracking and striking at disks ranged from 3.5 deg (C. humeralis) to 7.8 deg (M. religiosa), and from 3.3 deg (C. humeralis) to 11.7 deg (M. religiosa), respectively. Unlike the other species which struck at disks as large as 44 deg, T. a. sinensis displayed a preference for 14 deg disks. Disks moving at 143 deg/s were preferred by all species. M. religiosa exhibited the most approaching behavior, and with T. a. sinensis distinguished between rectangular stimuli moving parallel versus perpendicular to their long axes. C. humeralis did not make this distinction. Stimulus sizes that elicited the target behaviors were not related to mantis size. However, differences in compound eye morphology may be related to species differences: C. humeralis' eyes are farthest apart, and it has an apparently narrower binocular visual field which may affect retinal inputs to movement-sensitive visual interneurons. PMID:21553126

  18. Re-consideration of Peronospora farinosa infecting Spinacia oleracea as distinct species, Peronospora effusa.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Joon; Hong, Seung-Beom; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2007-04-01

    Downy mildew is probably the most widespread and potentially destructive global disease of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). The causal agent of downy mildew disease on various plants of Chenopodiaceae, including spinach, is regarded as a single species, Peronospora farinosa. In the present study, the ITS rDNA sequence and morphological data demonstrated that P. farinosa from S. oleracea is distinct from downy mildew of other chenopodiaceous hosts. Fifty-eight spinach specimens were collected or loaned from 17 countries of Asia, Europe, Oceania, North and South America, which all formed a distinct monophyletic group. No intercontinental genetic variation of the ITS rDNA within Peronospora accessions causing spinach downy mildew disease was found. Phylogenetic trees supported recognition of Peronospora from spinach as a separate species. Microscopic examination also revealed morphological differences between Peronospora specimens from Spinacia and P. farinosa s. lat. specimens from Atriplex, Bassia, Beta, and Chenopodium. Consequently, the name Peronospora effusa should be reinstated for the downy mildew fungus found on spinach. Here, a specimen of the original collections of Peronospora effusa is designated as lectotype. PMID:17509849

  19. Direct and remote modulation of L-channels in chromaffin cells: distinct actions on alpha1C and alpha1D subunits?

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Pietro; Hernández-Guijo, Jesus Miguel; Carabelli, Valentina; Novara, Monica; Cesetti, Tiziana; Andrés-Mateos, Eva; Montiel, Carmen; Carbone, Emilio

    2004-02-01

    Understanding precisely the functioning of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and their modulation by signaling molecules will help clarifying the Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms controlling exocytosis in chromaffin cells. In recent years, we have learned more about the various pathways through which Ca2+ channels can be up- or down-modulated by hormones and neurotransmitters and how these changes may condition chromaffin cell activity and catecolamine release. Recently, the attention has been focused on the modulation of L-channels (CaV 1), which represent the major Ca2+ current component in rat and human chromaffin cells. L-channels are effectively inhibited by the released content of secretory granules or by applying mixtures of exogenous ATP, opioids, and adrenaline through the activation of receptor-coupled G proteins. This unusual inhibition persists in a wide range of potentials and results from a direct (membrane-delimited) interaction of G protein subunits with the L-channels co-localized in membrane microareas. Inhibition of L-channels can be reversed when the cAMP/PKA pathway is activated by membrane permeable cAMP analog or when cells are exposed to isoprenaline (remote action), suggesting the existence of parallel and opposite effects on L-channel gating by distinctly activated membrane autoreceptors. Here, the authors review the molecular components underlying these two opposing signaling pathways and present new evidence supporting the presence of two L-channel types in rat chromaffin cells (alpha1C and alpha1D), which open new interesting issues concerning Ca(2+)-channel modulation. In light of recent findings on the regulation of exocytosis by Ca(2+)-channel modulation, the authors explore the possible role of L-channels in the autocontrol of catecholamine release. PMID:15034224

  20. Testing the utility of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 sequences for phylogenetic estimates of relationships between crane (Grus) species.

    PubMed

    Yu, D B; Chen, R; Kaleri, H A; Jiang, B C; Xu, H X; Du, W-X

    2011-01-01

    Morphology and biogeography are widely used in animal taxonomy. Recent study has suggested that a DNA-based identification system, using a 648-bp portion of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1), also known as the barcoding gene, can aid in the resolution of inferences concerning phylogenetic relationships and for identification of species. However, the effectiveness of DNA barcoding for identifying crane species is unknown. We amplified and sequenced 894-bp DNA fragments of CO1 from Grus japonensis (Japanese crane), G. grus (Eurasian crane), G. monacha (hooded crane), G. canadensis (sandhill crane), G. leucogeranus (Siberian crane), and Balearica pavonina (crowned crane), along with those of 15 species obtained from GenBank and DNA barcoding, to construct four algorithms using Tringa stagnatilis, Scolopax rusticola, and T. erythropus as outgroups. The four phylum profiles showed good resolution of the major taxonomic groups. We concluded that reconstruction of the molecular phylogenetic tree can be helpful for classification and that CO1 sequences are suitable for studying the molecular evolution of cranes. Although support for several deeper branches was limited, CO1 data gave remarkably good separations, especially considering that our analysis was based on just a fragment of the gene and that CO1 has generally been viewed as useful only for resolving shallow divergences. PMID:22194213

  1. Phenotypic Convergence in Genetically Distinct Lineages of a Rhinolophus Species Complex (Mammalia, Chiroptera)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David S.; Babiker, Hassan; Bastian, Anna; Kearney, Teresa; van Eeden, Rowen; Bishop, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypes of distantly related species may converge through adaptation to similar habitats and/or because they share biological constraints that limit the phenotypic variants produced. A common theme in bats is the sympatric occurrence of cryptic species that are convergent in morphology but divergent in echolocation frequency, suggesting that echolocation may facilitate niche partitioning, reducing competition. If so, allopatric populations freed from competition, could converge in both morphology and echolocation provided they occupy similar niches or share biological constraints. We investigated the evolutionary history of a widely distributed African horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus darlingi, in the context of phenotypic convergence. We used phylogenetic inference to identify and date lineage divergence together with phenotypic comparisons and ecological niche modelling to identify morphological and geographical correlates of those lineages. Our results indicate that R. darlingi is paraphyletic, the eastern and western parts of its distribution forming two distinct non-sister lineages that diverged ~9.7 Mya. We retain R. darlingi for the eastern lineage and argue that the western lineage, currently the sub-species R. d. damarensis, should be elevated to full species status. R. damarensis comprises two lineages that diverged ~5 Mya. Our findings concur with patterns of divergence of other co-distributed taxa which are associated with increased regional aridification between 7-5 Mya suggesting possible vicariant evolution. The morphology and echolocation calls of R. darlingi and R. damarensis are convergent despite occupying different biomes. This suggests that adaptation to similar habitats is not responsible for the convergence. Furthermore, R. darlingi forms part of a clade comprising species that are bigger and echolocate at lower frequencies than R. darlingi, suggesting that biological constraints are unlikely to have influenced the convergence. Instead, the

  2. Two distinct Epichloë species symbiotic with Achnatherum inebrians, drunken horse grass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Li, Xiuzhang; Li, Chunjie; Swoboda, Ginger A; Young, Carolyn A; Sugawara, Koya; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Schardl, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Achnatherum inebrians, colloquially known as drunken horse grass, is associated with livestock toxicity in northern China. Epichloë gansuensis (Eg) was described from endophyte isolates from A. inebrians in Sunan County, Gansu Province, whereas a morphologically distinct variety, E. gansuensis var. inebrians (Ei), was described based on two isolates from A. inebrians seeds collected in Urumqi County, Xinjiang Province. Genome sequencing and alkaloid analyses also distinguish these taxa; the Ei isolates produce neurotropic lysergic acid amides (ergot alkaloids), and an Eg isolate produces paxilline (an indole-diterpene alkaloid). To better elucidate the taxonomic diversity of Epichloë spp. symbiotic with A. inebrians, we surveyed eight populations in Xinjiang, Gansu and Inner Mongolia provinces of China and analyzed their genotypes by multiplex PCR for alkaloid biosynthesis genes and mating-type genes. Genotypes consistent with Ei were present in all eight populations, of which they dominated seven. The Ei isolates were all mating type A and tested positive for the ergot alkaloid gene, dmaW. In contrast Eg isolates were all mating type B and had the indole-diterpene gene, idtG. The genome was sequenced from an Ei isolate from seeds collected in Xiahe County, Gansu, and compared to that of the varietal ex type isolate from Urumqi. Alkaloid genes and four different housekeeping genes were nearly identical between the two sequenced Ei isolates and were distinct from a sequenced Eg isolate. Phylogenetic analysis placed Ei, Eg and Epichloë sibirica into respective subclades of a clade that emanated from the base of the Epichloë phylogeny. Given its chemotypic, genotypic, morphological and phylogenetic distinctiveness, its widespread occurrence in rangelands of northern China, and its importance in livestock toxicity, we propose raising Ei to species rank as Epichloë inebrians. PMID:25911697

  3. Beyond the EDGE with EDAM: Prioritising British Plant Species According to Evolutionary Distinctiveness, and Accuracy and Magnitude of Decline

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, William D.; Chase, Mark W.; Crawley, Michael J.; Dolphin, Konrad; Fay, Michael F.; Joseph, Jeffrey A.; Powney, Gary; Preston, Chris D.; Rapacciuolo, Giovanni; Roy, David B.; Purvis, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Conservation biologists have only finite resources, and so must prioritise some species over others. The EDGE-listing approach ranks species according to their combined evolutionary distinctiveness and degree of threat, but ignores the uncertainty surrounding both threat and evolutionary distinctiveness. We develop a new family of measures for species, which we name EDAM, that incorporates evolutionary distinctiveness, the magnitude of decline, and the accuracy with which decline can be predicted. Further, we show how the method can be extended to explore phyogenetic uncertainty. Using the vascular plants of Britain as a case study, we find that the various EDAM measures emphasise different species and parts of Britain, and that phylogenetic uncertainty can strongly affect the prioritisation scores of some species. PMID:26018568

  4. Beyond the EDGE with EDAM: Prioritising British Plant Species According to Evolutionary Distinctiveness, and Accuracy and Magnitude of Decline.

    PubMed

    Pearse, William D; Chase, Mark W; Crawley, Michael J; Dolphin, Konrad; Fay, Michael F; Joseph, Jeffrey A; Powney, Gary; Preston, Chris D; Rapacciuolo, Giovanni; Roy, David B; Purvis, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Conservation biologists have only finite resources, and so must prioritise some species over others. The EDGE-listing approach ranks species according to their combined evolutionary distinctiveness and degree of threat, but ignores the uncertainty surrounding both threat and evolutionary distinctiveness. We develop a new family of measures for species, which we name EDAM, that incorporates evolutionary distinctiveness, the magnitude of decline, and the accuracy with which decline can be predicted. Further, we show how the method can be extended to explore phyogenetic uncertainty. Using the vascular plants of Britain as a case study, we find that the various EDAM measures emphasise different species and parts of Britain, and that phylogenetic uncertainty can strongly affect the prioritisation scores of some species. PMID:26018568

  5. Transcription of rat mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase subunits. Presence of antisense and precursor RNA species.

    PubMed

    Tullo, A; Tanzariello, F; D'Erchia, A M; Nardelli, M; Papeo, P A; Sbisà, E; Saccone, C

    1994-10-31

    We have characterized the transcriptional pattern of the rat mitochondrial ND6-containing region in vivo. We have identified a stable polyadenylated RNA species complementary for the full length of the ND6 mRNA. The analysis of the ND5 region has revealed the presence of an antisense RNA only at its 3' end. The presence of these stable antisense species complementary to structural genes is intriguing and suggests a possible regulatory function. The quantitative analyses have demonstrated that the H transcripts, both codogenic and non-codogenic, are more stable than the L transcripts. We have defined the 5' end of the ND6 mRNA at the level of the ATG downstream of the tRNA(Glu). The mapping of the ND1 5' end has demonstrated that GTG is the first codon of the mRNA. Our findings suggest that the post-transcriptional mechanisms involved in the expression of the mt genome are much more numerous and complex than those already described in the literature. PMID:7957896

  6. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III from the fungus Podospora comata. Purification, subunit structure and comparison with the homologous enzyme of a related species.

    PubMed

    Barreau, C; Begueret, J

    1982-12-15

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase III has been purified to homogeneity from the filamentous fungus Podospora comata. The enzyme was extracted at low ionic strength, separated from the polymerases I and II by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography and purified by heparin-Sepharose and phosphocellulose chromatography; 0.1-0.2 mg highly purified homogeneous enzyme with a specific activity of 220 units/mg could be obtained from 2 kg wet mycelium. The subunit composition of the enzyme was determined after sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; thirteen putative subunits of molecular weight 174000 (a), 129000 b), 87000 (c), 50000 (d), 39000 (e), 23500 (f), 21000 (g), 19000 (h), 17000 (i), 16500 (j), 13500 (k), 11000 (l) and 10000 (m) were identified. All of the polypeptide components of the enzyme are present in about integral stoichiometric amounts as judged by dye binding. The presence of subunit Mr = 87000 in a molar ratio 1:1 is necessary to obtain very active enzyme. Thirteen homologous subunits were observed in a preparation of RNA polymerase III from Podospora anserina, which is a related species. Only subunit i is different in the two species. PMID:7151805

  7. A Novel Cardiotropic Murine Adenovirus Representing a Distinct Species of Mastadenoviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Klempa, Boris; Krüger, Detlev H.; Auste, Brita; Stanko, Michal; Krawczyk, Adalbert; Nickel, Katrin F.; Überla, Klaus; Stang, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    During cell culture isolation experiments to recover Dobrava hantavirus from a suspension of liver from a striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius), an unknown virus was coisolated. Atypically for hantaviruses, it had extensive cytopathic effects. Using a random PCR approach, it was identified as a novel murine adenovirus, MAdV-3 (for MAdV type 3). A plaque-purified virus clone was prepared and further characterized. The complete genome sequence of MAdV-3 was determined to be 30,570 bp in length. Sequence comparisons to other adenovirus species revealed highest similarity to MAdV-1, the representative of the murine adenovirus A species. However, substantial differences were found in the E1, E3, and E4 genomic regions. The phylogenetic distance of MAdV-3 amino acid sequences for pVIII, protease, polymerase, and hexon from MAdV-1 is markedly higher than 0.1 exchange per position, and, based on our cross-neutralization experiments, MAdV-3 and MAdV-1 can be regarded as different serotypes. Therefore, we propose to classify MAdV-3 as the first isolate of a novel adenovirus species, designated murine adenovirus C (MAdV-C). The novel MAdV-3 virus is not only genetically and serologically distinct from MAdV-1 but also shows a unique organ tropism in infected mice. In contrast to MAdV-1, the virus was not detectable in brain but predominantly infected heart tissue. Thus, infection of mice with cardiotropic MAdV-3 might be an interesting animal model of adenovirus-induced myocarditis. PMID:19297486

  8. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of Catopsilia pomona nucleopolyhedrovirus: A Distinct Species in Group I Alphabaculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Dianhai; Wang, Manli; Arif, Basil; Kou, Zheng; Wang, Hualin; Deng, Fei; Hu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequence of Catopsilia pomona nucleopolyhedrovirus (CapoNPV) was determined by the Roche 454 sequencing system. The genome consisted of 128,058 bp and had an overall G+C content of 40%. There were 130 hypothetical open reading frames (ORFs) potentially encoding proteins of more than 50 amino acids and covering 92% of the genome. Among all the hypothetical ORFs, 37 baculovirus core genes, 23 lepidopteran baculovirus conserved genes and 10 genes conserved in Group I alphabaculoviruses were identified. In addition, the genome included regions of 8 typical baculoviral homologous repeat sequences (hrs). Phylogenic analysis showed that CapoNPV was in a distinct branch of clade “a” in Group I alphabaculoviruses. Gene parity plot analysis and overall similarity of ORFs indicated that CapoNPV is more closely related to the Group I alphabaculoviruses than to other baculoviruses. Interesting, CapoNPV lacks the genes encoding the fibroblast growth factor (fgf) and ac30, which are conserved in most lepidopteran and Group I baculoviruses, respectively. Sequence analysis of the F-like protein of CapoNPV showed that some amino acids were inserted into the fusion peptide region and the pre-transmembrane region of the protein. All these unique features imply that CapoNPV represents a member of a new baculovirus species. PMID:27166956

  9. Evidence for a Common Origin of Homomorphic and Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes in Distinct Spinacia Species

    PubMed Central

    Fujito, Satoshi; Takahata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Reimi; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Ohmido, Nobuko; Onodera, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The dioecious genus Spinacia is thought to include two wild relatives (S. turkestanica Ilj. and S. tetrandra Stev.) of cultivated spinach (S. oleracea L.). In this study, nuclear and chloroplast sequences from 21 accessions of Spinacia germplasm and six spinach cultivars or lines were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to define the relationships among the three species. Maximum-likelihood sequence analysis suggested that the Spinacia plant samples could be classified into two monophyletic groups (Group 1 and Group 2): Group 1 consisted of all accessions, cultivars, and lines of S. oleracea L. and S. turkestanica Ilj. and two of five S. tetrandra Stev. accessions, whereas Group 2 was composed of the three remaining S. tetrandra Stev. accessions. By using flow cytometry, we detected a distinct difference in nuclear genome size between the groups. Group 2 also was characterized by a sexual dimorphism in inflorescence structure, which was not observed in Group 1. Interspecific crosses between the groups produced hybrids with drastically reduced pollen fertility and showed that the male is the heterogametic sex (XY) in Group 2, as is the case in S. oleracea L. (Group 1). Cytogenetic and DNA marker analyses suggested that Group 1 and Group 2 have homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs (XY), respectively, and that the sex chromosome pairs of the two groups evolved from a common ancestral pair. Our data suggest that the Spinacia genus may serve as a good model for investigation of evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs from ancestral homomorphic pairs. PMID:26048564

  10. Evidence for a Common Origin of Homomorphic and Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes in Distinct Spinacia Species.

    PubMed

    Fujito, Satoshi; Takahata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Reimi; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Ohmido, Nobuko; Onodera, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The dioecious genus Spinacia is thought to include two wild relatives (S. turkestanica Ilj. and S. tetrandra Stev.) of cultivated spinach (S. oleracea L.). In this study, nuclear and chloroplast sequences from 21 accessions of Spinacia germplasm and six spinach cultivars or lines were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to define the relationships among the three species. Maximum-likelihood sequence analysis suggested that the Spinacia plant samples could be classified into two monophyletic groups (Group 1 and Group 2): Group 1 consisted of all accessions, cultivars, and lines of S. oleracea L. and S. turkestanica Ilj. and two of five S. tetrandra Stev. accessions, whereas Group 2 was composed of the three remaining S. tetrandra Stev. accessions. By using flow cytometry, we detected a distinct difference in nuclear genome size between the groups. Group 2 also was characterized by a sexual dimorphism in inflorescence structure, which was not observed in Group 1. Interspecific crosses between the groups produced hybrids with drastically reduced pollen fertility and showed that the male is the heterogametic sex (XY) in Group 2, as is the case in S. oleracea L. (Group 1). Cytogenetic and DNA marker analyses suggested that Group 1 and Group 2 have homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs (XY), respectively, and that the sex chromosome pairs of the two groups evolved from a common ancestral pair. Our data suggest that the Spinacia genus may serve as a good model for investigation of evolutionary mechanisms underlying the emergence of heteromorphic sex chromosome pairs from ancestral homomorphic pairs. PMID:26048564

  11. DNA barcoding, MALDI-TOF, and AFLP data support Fusarium ficicrescens as a distinct species within the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex.

    PubMed

    Al-Hatmi, Abdullah M S; Mirabolfathy, Mansoureh; Hagen, Ferry; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Stielow, J Benjamin; Karami-Osbo, Rouhollah; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Meis, Jacques F; de Hoog, G Sybren

    2016-02-01

    The Fusarium fujikuroi species complex (FFSC) is one of the most common groups of fusaria associated with plant diseases, mycotoxin production and traumatic and disseminated human infections. Here we present the description and taxonomy of a new taxon, Fusarium ficicrescens sp. nov., collected from contaminated fig fruits in Iran. Initially this species was identified as Fusarium andiyazi by morphology. In the present study the species was studied by multilocus sequence analysis, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and phenotypic characters. Multilocus analyses were based on translation elongation factor 1α (TEF1), RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) and beta-tubulin (BT2) and proved F. ficicrescens as a member of the FFSC. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the fungus is closely related to Fusarium lactis, Fusarium ramigenum, and Fusarium napiforme; known plant pathogens, mycotoxin producers, and occasionally occurring multidrug resistant opportunists. The new species differed by being able to grow at 37 °C and by the absence of mycotoxin production. TEF1 was confirmed as an essential barcode for identifying Fusarium species. In addition to TEF1, we evaluated BT2 and RPB2 in order to provide sufficient genetic and species boundaries information for recognition of the novel species. PMID:26781381

  12. 75 FR 30769 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Listing of Nine Distinct Population Segments of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Distinct Population Segments of Loggerhead Sea Turtles as Endangered or Threatened; Extension of Comment... proposed listing of nine distinct population segments of loggerhead sea turtles as endangered or threatened... . Mail: NMFS National Sea Turtle Coordinator, Attn: Loggerhead Proposed Listing Rule, Office of...

  13. 77 FR 64959 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of 5-Year Review for the Southern Distinct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... update, if necessary, the Northern DPS' status in five years time (70 FR 17386; April 6, 2005). Therefore...; Initiation of 5-Year Review for the Southern Distinct Population Segment of North American Green Sturgeon... 5-year review of the Southern Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of North American green...

  14. 75 FR 37385 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of a 5-Year Review of the Eastern Distinct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... the Recognition of Distinct Vertebrate in Population Segments (61 FR 4722). For a population to be...) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA). A 5-year review is a periodic process... law. If you wish us to withhold your name or address, you must state this request clearly at...

  15. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation is mediated by high-affinity interactions between distinct domains within the p110 and p85 subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, K H; Olson, L; Moye-Rowley, W S; Pessin, J E

    1994-01-01

    Domains of interaction between the p85 and p110 subunits of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) were studied with the yeast two-hybrid expression system. A gene fusion between the GAL4 transactivation domain and p85 activated transcription from a GAL1-lacZ reporter gene when complemented with a gene fusion between the GAL4 DNA binding domain and p110. To define subdomains responsible for this interaction, a series of p85 deletion mutants were analyzed. A 192-amino-acid inter-SH2 (IS) fragment (residues 429 to 621) was the smallest determinant identified that specifically associated with p110. In analogous experiments, the subdomain within p110 responsible for interaction with p85 was localized to an EcoRI fragment encoding the amino-terminal 127 residues. Expression of these two subdomains [p85(IS) with p110RI] resulted in 100-fold greater reporter activity than that obtained with full-length p85 and p110. Although the p85(IS) domain conferred a strong interaction with the p110 catalytic subunit, this region was not sufficient to impart phosphotyrosine peptide stimulation of PI 3-kinase activity. In contrast, coexpression of the p110 subunit with full-length p85 or with constructs containing the IS sequences flanked by both SH2 domains of p85 [p85(n/cSH2)] or either of the individual SH2 domains [p85(nSH2+IS) or p85(IS+cSH2)] resulted in PI 3-kinase activity that was activated by a phosphotyrosine peptide. These data suggest that phosphotyrosine peptide binding to either SH2 domain generates an intramolecular signal propagated through the IS region to allosterically activate p110. Images PMID:8264609

  16. Identification of Species and Sources of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Storm Waters with a Small-Subunit rRNA-Based Diagnostic and Genotyping Tool

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Alderisio, Kerri; Limor, Josef; Royer, Michael; Lal, Altaf A.

    2000-01-01

    The identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples is largely made by the use of an immunofluorescent assay. In this study, we have used a small-subunit rRNA-based PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique to identify species and sources of Cryptosporidium oocysts present in 29 storm water samples collected from a stream in New York. A total of 12 genotypes were found in 27 positive samples; for 4 the species and probable origins were identified by sequence analysis, whereas the rest represent new genotypes from wildlife. Thus, this technique provides an alternative method for the detection and differentiation of Cryptosporidium parasites in environmental samples. PMID:11097935

  17. First comparative characterization of three distinct ferritin subunits from a teleost: Evidence for immune-responsive mRNA expression and iron depriving activity of seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis) ferritins.

    PubMed

    Oh, Minyoung; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Wan, Qiang; Jo, Eunyoung; Ko, Jiyeon; Noh, Gyeong Eon; Shin, Sangok; Rho, Sum; Lee, Jehee

    2016-02-01

    Ferritins play an indispensable role in iron homeostasis through their iron-withholding function in living beings. In the current study, cDNA sequences of three distinct ferritin subunits, including a ferritin H, a ferritin M, and a ferritin L, were identified from big belly seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis, and molecularly characterized. Complete coding sequences (CDS) of seahorse ferritin H (HaFerH), ferritin M (HaFerM), and ferritin L (HaFerL) subunits were comprised of 531, 528, and 522 base pairs (bp), respectively, which encode polypeptides of 177, 176, and 174 amino acids, respectively, with molecular masses of ∼20-21 kDa. Our in silico analyses demonstrate that these three ferritin subunits exhibit the typical characteristics of ferritin superfamily members including iron regulatory elements, domain signatures, and reactive centers. The coding sequences of HaFerH, M, and L were cloned and the corresponding proteins were overexpressed in a bacterial system. Recombinantly expressed HaFer proteins demonstrated detectable in vivo iron sequestrating (ferroxidase) activity, consistent with their putative iron binding capability. Quantification of the basal expression of these three HaFer sequences in selected tissues demonstrated a gene-specific ubiquitous spatial distribution pattern, with abundance of mRNA in HaFerM in the liver and predominant expression of HaFerH and HaFerL in blood. Interestingly, the basal expression of all three ferritin genes was found to be significantly modulated against pathogenic stress mounted by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), poly I:C, Streptococcus iniae, and Edwardsiella tarda. Collectively, our findings suggest that the three HaFer subunits may be involved in iron (II) homeostasis in big belly seahorse and that they are important in its host defense mechanisms. PMID:26747640

  18. Posttranslational Modifications in the Amino- Terminal Region of the Large Subunit of Ribulose- 1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase from Several Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Houtz, Robert L.; Poneleit, Loelle; Jones, Samantha B.; Royer, Malcolm; Stults, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A combination of limited tryptic proteolysis, reverse phasehigh performance liquid chromatography, Edman degradative sequencing, amino acid analysis, and fast-atom bombardment mass-spectrometry was used to remove and identify the first 14 to 18 N-terminal amino acid residues of the large subunit of higher plant-type ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Marchantia polymorpha, pea (Pisum sativum), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), potato (Solanum tuberosum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), soybean (Glycine max), petunia (Petunia x hybrida), cowpea (Vigna sinensis), and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants. The N-terminal tryptic peptide from acetylated Pro-3 to Lys-8 of the large subunit of Rubisco was identical in all species, but the amino acid sequence of the penultimate N-terminal tryptic peptide varied. Eight of the 10 species examined contained a trimethyllysyl residue at position 14 in the large subunit of Rubisco, whereas Chlamydomonas and Marchantia contained an unmodified lysyl residue at this position. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668742

  19. 76 FR 9734 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Distinct Population Segments of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 77476), we published a proposed rule to list the Beringia and Okhotsk Distinct Population... (February 8, 2011) was extended to March 25, 2011 (76 FR 6754; February 8, 2011). Public Hearings Joint... both the proposed rule for bearded seals and the proposed rule for ringed seals (75 FR 77476;...

  20. Mus lepidoides (Muridae, Rodentia) of central Burma is a distinct species of potentially great evolutionary and biogeographic significance.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Tomofumi; Aplin, Ken P; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Mus lepidoides of central Burma (Myanmar) was described 75 years ago but has since been dismissed as a regional variant of the Indian field mouse, M. booduga. DNA sequences of multiple mitochondrial and nuclear genes from recently collected specimens, combined with a fresh morphological reassessment, reaffirm the distinctiveness of M. lepidoides from M. booduga and from all other species of Mus. Mus lepidoides is so distinct in fact that it warrants placement in its own Species Group within subgenus Mus. Molecular and morphological assessments of phylogenetic affinities converge on the exciting possibility that M. lepidoides represents the previously elusive sibling taxon to the Mus musculus Species Group. If confirmed, this relationship would provide the previously missing connection between the main radiation of subgenus Mus in Southeast and South Asia, and the radiation of the M. musculus Species Group in western Asia and Europe. We speculate that a common ancestor of M. lepidoides and the M. musculus Species Group occupied a continuous but episodic tract of xeric habitat that linked central Burma with northern India at various times during the late Pliocene and Quaternary. Further molecular and cytogenetic studies on the phylogenetic position of M. lepidoides clearly represent a high priority in mouse research. PMID:20443693

  1. Wild plant species growing closely connected in a subalpine meadow host distinct root-associated bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Aleklett, Kristin; Leff, Jonathan W.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots are known to harbor large and diverse communities of bacteria. It has been suggested that plant identity can structure these root-associated communities, but few studies have specifically assessed how the composition of root microbiota varies within and between plant species growing under natural conditions. We assessed the community composition of endophytic and epiphytic bacteria through high throughput sequencing using 16S rDNA derived from root tissues collected from a population of a wild, clonal plant (Orange hawkweed–Pilosella aurantiaca) as well as two neighboring plant species (Oxeye daisy–Leucanthemum vulgare and Alsike clover–Trifolium hybridum). Our first goal was to determine if plant species growing in close proximity, under similar environmental conditions, still hosted unique root microbiota. Our results showed that plants of different species host distinct bacterial communities in their roots. In terms of community composition, Betaproteobacteria (especially the family Oxalobacteraceae) were found to dominate in the root microbiota of L. vulgare and T. hybridum samples, whereas the root microbiota of P. aurantiaca had a more heterogeneous distribution of bacterial abundances where Gammaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria occupied a larger portion of the community. We also explored the extent of individual variance within each plant species investigated, and found that in the plant species thought to have the least genetic variance among individuals (P. aurantiaca) still hosted just as diverse microbial communities. Whether all plant species host their own distinct root microbiota and plants more closely related to each other share more similar bacterial communities still remains to be fully explored, but among the plants examined in this experiment there was no trend that the two species belonging to the same family shared more similarities in terms of bacterial community composition. PMID:25755932

  2. Wild plant species growing closely connected in a subalpine meadow host distinct root-associated bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Aleklett, Kristin; Leff, Jonathan W; Fierer, Noah; Hart, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Plant roots are known to harbor large and diverse communities of bacteria. It has been suggested that plant identity can structure these root-associated communities, but few studies have specifically assessed how the composition of root microbiota varies within and between plant species growing under natural conditions. We assessed the community composition of endophytic and epiphytic bacteria through high throughput sequencing using 16S rDNA derived from root tissues collected from a population of a wild, clonal plant (Orange hawkweed-Pilosella aurantiaca) as well as two neighboring plant species (Oxeye daisy-Leucanthemum vulgare and Alsike clover-Trifolium hybridum). Our first goal was to determine if plant species growing in close proximity, under similar environmental conditions, still hosted unique root microbiota. Our results showed that plants of different species host distinct bacterial communities in their roots. In terms of community composition, Betaproteobacteria (especially the family Oxalobacteraceae) were found to dominate in the root microbiota of L. vulgare and T. hybridum samples, whereas the root microbiota of P. aurantiaca had a more heterogeneous distribution of bacterial abundances where Gammaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria occupied a larger portion of the community. We also explored the extent of individual variance within each plant species investigated, and found that in the plant species thought to have the least genetic variance among individuals (P. aurantiaca) still hosted just as diverse microbial communities. Whether all plant species host their own distinct root microbiota and plants more closely related to each other share more similar bacterial communities still remains to be fully explored, but among the plants examined in this experiment there was no trend that the two species belonging to the same family shared more similarities in terms of bacterial community composition. PMID:25755932

  3. Gene Expression Variation in Duplicate Lactate dehydrogenase Genes: Do Ecological Species Show Distinct Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Cristescu, Melania E.; Demiri, Bora; Altshuler, Ianina; Crease, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been shown to play an important role in adaptation of several aquatic species to different habitats. The genomes of Daphnia pulex, a pond species, and Daphnia pulicaria, a lake inhabitant, encode two L-LDH enzymes, LDHA and LDHB. We estimated relative levels of Ldh gene expression in these two closely related species and their hybrids in four environmental settings, each characterized by one of two temperatures (10°C or 20°C), and one of two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO; 6.5–7 mg/l or 2–3 mg/l). We found that levels of LdhA expression were 4 to 48 times higher than LdhB expression (p<0.005) in all three groups (the two parental species and hybrids). Moreover, levels of LdhB expression differed significantly (p<0.05) between D. pulex and D. pulicaria, but neither species differed from the hybrid. Consistently higher expression of LdhA relative to LdhB in both species and the hybrid suggests that the two isozymes could be performing different functions. No significant differences in levels of gene expression were observed among the four combinations of temperature and dissolved oxygen (p>0.1). Given that Daphnia dwell in environments characterized by fluctuating conditions with long periods of low dissolved oxygen concentration, we suggest that these species could employ regulated metabolic depression to survive in such environments. PMID:25080082

  4. Gene expression variation in duplicate lactate dehydrogenase genes: do ecological species show distinct responses?

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Melania E; Demiri, Bora; Altshuler, Ianina; Crease, Teresa J

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has been shown to play an important role in adaptation of several aquatic species to different habitats. The genomes of Daphnia pulex, a pond species, and Daphnia pulicaria, a lake inhabitant, encode two L-LDH enzymes, LDHA and LDHB. We estimated relative levels of Ldh gene expression in these two closely related species and their hybrids in four environmental settings, each characterized by one of two temperatures (10°C or 20°C), and one of two concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO; 6.5-7 mg/l or 2-3 mg/l). We found that levels of LdhA expression were 4 to 48 times higher than LdhB expression (p<0.005) in all three groups (the two parental species and hybrids). Moreover, levels of LdhB expression differed significantly (p<0.05) between D. pulex and D. pulicaria, but neither species differed from the hybrid. Consistently higher expression of LdhA relative to LdhB in both species and the hybrid suggests that the two isozymes could be performing different functions. No significant differences in levels of gene expression were observed among the four combinations of temperature and dissolved oxygen (p>0.1). Given that Daphnia dwell in environments characterized by fluctuating conditions with long periods of low dissolved oxygen concentration, we suggest that these species could employ regulated metabolic depression to survive in such environments. PMID:25080082

  5. Crustose coralline algal species host distinct bacterial assemblages on their surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Jennifer M; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Paul, Valerie J

    2015-11-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are important components of many marine ecosystems. They aid in reef accretion and stabilization, create habitat for other organisms, contribute to carbon sequestration and are important settlement substrata for a number of marine invertebrates. Despite their ecological importance, little is known about the bacterial communities associated with CCA or whether differences in bacterial assemblages may have ecological implications. This study examined the bacterial communities on four different species of CCA collected in Belize using bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S rDNA. CCA were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Actinomycetes. At the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level, each CCA species had a unique bacterial community that was significantly different from all other CCA species. Hydrolithon boergesenii and Titanoderma prototypum, CCA species that facilitate larval settlement in multiple corals, had higher abundances of OTUs related to bacteria that inhibit the growth and/or biofilm formation of coral pathogens. Fewer coral larvae settle on the surfaces of Paragoniolithon solubile and Porolithon pachydermum. These CCA species had higher abundances of OTUs related to known coral pathogens and cyanobacteria. Coral larvae may be able to use the observed differences in bacterial community composition on CCA species to assess the suitability of these substrata for settlement and selectively settle on CCA species that contain beneficial bacteria. PMID:25918832

  6. Analyses of mitochondrial amino acid sequence datasets support the proposal that specimens of Hypodontus macropi from three species of macropodid hosts represent distinct species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypodontus macropi is a common intestinal nematode of a range of kangaroos and wallabies (macropodid marsupials). Based on previous multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE) and nuclear ribosomal DNA sequence data sets, H. macropi has been proposed to be complex of species. To test this proposal using independent molecular data, we sequenced the whole mitochondrial (mt) genomes of individuals of H. macropi from three different species of hosts (Macropus robustus robustus, Thylogale billardierii and Macropus [Wallabia] bicolor) as well as that of Macropicola ocydromi (a related nematode), and undertook a comparative analysis of the amino acid sequence datasets derived from these genomes. Results The mt genomes sequenced by next-generation (454) technology from H. macropi from the three host species varied from 13,634 bp to 13,699 bp in size. Pairwise comparisons of the amino acid sequences predicted from these three mt genomes revealed differences of 5.8% to 18%. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence data sets using Bayesian Inference (BI) showed that H. macropi from the three different host species formed distinct, well-supported clades. In addition, sliding window analysis of the mt genomes defined variable regions for future population genetic studies of H. macropi in different macropodid hosts and geographical regions around Australia. Conclusions The present analyses of inferred mt protein sequence datasets clearly supported the hypothesis that H. macropi from M. robustus robustus, M. bicolor and T. billardierii represent distinct species. PMID:24261823

  7. Distinct Leishmania Species Infecting Wild Caviomorph Rodents (Rodentia: Hystricognathi) from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cássia-Pires, Renata; Boité, Mariana C.; D'Andrea, Paulo S.; Herrera, Heitor M.; Cupolillo, Elisa; Jansen, Ana Maria; Roque, André Luiz R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caviomorph rodents, some of the oldest Leishmania spp. hosts, are widely dispersed in Brazil. Despite both experimental and field studies having suggested that these rodents are potential reservoirs of Leishmania parasites, not more than 88 specimens were analyzed in the few studies of natural infection. Our hypothesis was that caviomorph rodents are inserted in the transmission cycles of Leishmania in different regions, more so than is currently recognized. Methodology We investigated the Leishmania infection in spleen fragments of 373 caviomorph rodents from 20 different species collected in five Brazilian biomes in a period of 13 years. PCR reactions targeting kDNA of Leishmania sp. were used to diagnose infection, while Leishmania species identification was performed by DNA sequencing of the amplified products obtained in the HSP70 (234) targeting. Serology by IFAT was performed on the available serum of these rodents. Principal findings In 13 caviomorph rodents, DNA sequencing analyses allowed the identification of 4 species of the subgenus L. (Viannia): L. shawi, L. guyanensis, L. naiffi, and L. braziliensis; and 1 species of the subgenus L. (Leishmania): L. infantum. These include the description of parasite species in areas not previously included in their known distribution: L. shawi in Thrichomys inermis from Northeastern Brazil and L. naiffi in T. fosteri from Western Brazil. From the four other positive rodents, two were positive for HSP70 (234) targeting but did not generate sequences that enabled the species identification, and another two were positive only in kDNA targeting. Conclusions/Significance The infection rate demonstrated by the serology (51.3%) points out that the natural Leishmania infection in caviomorph rodents is much higher than that observed in the molecular diagnosis (4.6%), highlighting that, in terms of the host species responsible for maintaining Leishmania species in the wild, our current knowledge represents only the

  8. Are Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) distinct species?

    PubMed

    Chatzidimitriou, Evangelia; Simonato, Mauro; Watson, Gillian W; Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Zhao, Jing; Pellizzari, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Among the Nearctic species of Phenacoccus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris are morphologically similar and it can be difficult to separate them on the basis of microscopic morphological characters of the adult female alone. In order to resolve their identity, a canonical variates morphological analysis of 199 specimens from different geographical origins and host plants and a molecular analysis of the COI and 28S genes were performed. The morphological analysis supported synonymy of the two species, as although the type specimens of the "species" are widely separated from each other in the canonical variates plot, they are all part of a continuous range of variation. The molecular analysis showed that P. solani and P. defectus are grouped in the same clade. On the basis of the morphological and molecular analyses, P. defectus is synonymized under the senior name P. solani, syn. n. PMID:27394512

  9. Interaction of T4 AsiA with its target sites in the RNA polymerase sigma70 subunit leads to distinct and opposite effects on transcription.

    PubMed

    Minakhin, Leonid; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Adelman, Karen; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Heyduk, Tomasz; Severinov, Konstantin

    2003-02-21

    Bacteriophage T4 AsiA is a homodimeric protein that orchestrates a switch from the host and early viral transcription to middle viral transcription by binding to the sigma(70) subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme (Esigma(70)) and preventing promoter complex formation on most E.coli and early T4 promoters. In addition, Esigma(70)AsiA, but not Esigma(70), is a substrate of transcription activation by T4-encoded DNA-binding protein MotA, a co-activator of transcription from middle viral promoters. The molecular determinants of sigma(70)-AsiA interaction necessary for transcription inhibition reside in the sigma(70) conserved region 4.2, which recognizes the -35 promoter consensus element. The molecular determinants of sigma(70)-AsiA interaction necessary for MotA-dependent transcription activation have not been identified. Here, we show that in the absence of sigma(70) region 4.2, AsiA interacts with sigma(70) conserved region 4.1 and activates transcription in a MotA-independent manner. Further, we show that the AsiA dimer must dissociate to interact with either region 4.2 or region 4.1 of sigma(70). We propose that MotA may co-activate transcription by restricting AsiA binding to sigma(70) region 4.1. PMID:12581632

  10. Mercury's Exosphere During MESSENGER's Second Flyby: Detection of Magnesium and Distinct Distributions of Neutral Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Bradley, E. Todd; Killen, Rosemary M.; Mouawad, Nelly; Sprague, Ann L.; Burger, Matthew H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2009-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer observed emission from Mercury's neutral exosphere. These observations include the first detection of emission from magnesium. Differing spatial distributions for sodium, calcium, and magnesium were revealed by observations beginning in Mercury's tail region, approximately 8 Mercury radii anti-sunward of the planet, continuing past the nightside, and ending near the dawn terminator. Analysis of these observations, supplemented by observations during the first Mercury flyby as well as those by other MESSENGER instruments, suggests that the distinct spatial distributions arise from a combination of differences in source, transfer, and loss processes.

  11. Requirement for functional BK channels in maintaining oscillation in venomotor tone revealed by species differences in expression of the β1 accessory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Kandlikar, Sachin S; Westcott, Erika B; Fink, Gregory D; Galligan, James J

    2011-01-01

    We determined the possible role of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels in regulation of venous tone in small capacitance veins and blood pressure. In rat mesenteric venous smooth muscle cells (MV SMC), BK channel α- and β1-subunits were co-expressed, unitary BK currents were detected, and single channel currents were sensitive to voltage and [Ca2+]i. Rat MV SMCs displayed Ca2+ sparks and iberiotoxin (IBTX)-sensitive spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs). Under resting conditions in vitro, rat MV exhibited nifedipine-sensitive spontaneous oscillatory constrictions. Blockade of BK channels by paxilline and Ca2+ sparks by ryanodine constricted rat MV. Nifedipine caused venodilation and blocked paxilline-, KCl (20 mM) and BayK 8644-induced contraction. Acute inhibition of BK channels with IBTX in vivo increased blood pressure and reduced venous capacitance, measured as an increase in mean circulatory filling pressure in conscious rats. BK channel α-subunits and L-type Ca2+ channel α1-C subunits are expressed in murine MV. However, these channels are not functional as murine MV lacked nifedipine-sensitive basal tone and rhythmic constrictions. Murine MV were also insensitive to paxilline, ryanodine, KCl and BayK8644, consistent with our previous studies showing that murine MV do not have BK β1-subunits. These data show that not only there are species-dependent properties in ion channel control of venomotor tone, but also that BK channels are required for rhythmic oscillations in venous tone. PMID:21885988

  12. Characterization of the Uukuniemi virus group (Phlebovirus: Bunyaviridae): evidence for seven distinct species.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Gustavo; Savji, Nazir; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Guzman, Hilda; Yu, Xuejie; Desai, Aaloki; Rosen, Gail Emilia; Hutchison, Stephen; Lipkin, W Ian; Tesh, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Evolutionary insights into the phleboviruses are limited because of an imprecise classification scheme based on partial nucleotide sequences and scattered antigenic relationships. In this report, the serologic and phylogenetic relationships of the Uukuniemi group viruses and their relationships with other recently characterized tick-borne phleboviruses are described using full-length genome sequences. We propose that the viruses currently included in the Uukuniemi virus group be assigned to five different species as follows: Uukuniemi virus, EgAn 1825-61 virus, Fin V707 virus, Chizé virus, and Zaliv Terpenia virus would be classified into the Uukuniemi species; Murre virus, RML-105-105355 virus, and Sunday Canyon virus would be classified into a Murre virus species; and Grand Arbaud virus, Precarious Point virus, and Manawa virus would each be given individual species status. Although limited sequence similarity was detected between current members of the Uukuniemi group and Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) and Heartland virus, a clear serological reaction was observed between some of them, indicating that SFTSV and Heartland virus should be considered part of the Uukuniemi virus group. Moreover, based on the genomic diversity of the phleboviruses and given the low correlation observed between complement fixation titers and genetic distance, we propose a system for classification of the Bunyaviridae based on genetic as well as serological data. Finally, the recent descriptions of SFTSV and Heartland virus also indicate that the public health importance of the Uukuniemi group viruses must be reevaluated. PMID:23283959

  13. The Impact of Distinct Insect Species on Pollination and Gene Flow in Alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollinator species and plant density can influence pollination and gene flow. The efficacy of different floral visitors at tripping alfalfa flowers was examined in both low and high density patches to determine their potential role in pollination. In addition, for a subset of the floral visitors, th...

  14. 75 FR 12597 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Listing of Nine Distinct Population Segments of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... loggerhead sea turtle as threatened throughout its worldwide range on July 28, 1978 (43 FR 32800). On July 12... endangered species under the ESA. NMFS published a notice in the Federal Register on November 16, 2007 (72 FR... Federal Register on March 5, 2008 (73 FR 11849), concluding that the petitioners (Center for...

  15. Characterization of the Uukuniemi Virus Group (Phlebovirus: Bunyaviridae): Evidence for Seven Distinct Species

    PubMed Central

    Savji, Nazir; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Guzman, Hilda; Yu, Xuejie; Desai, Aaloki; Rosen, Gail Emilia; Hutchison, Stephen; Lipkin, W. Ian; Tesh, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary insights into the phleboviruses are limited because of an imprecise classification scheme based on partial nucleotide sequences and scattered antigenic relationships. In this report, the serologic and phylogenetic relationships of the Uukuniemi group viruses and their relationships with other recently characterized tick-borne phleboviruses are described using full-length genome sequences. We propose that the viruses currently included in the Uukuniemi virus group be assigned to five different species as follows: Uukuniemi virus, EgAn 1825-61 virus, Fin V707 virus, Chizé virus, and Zaliv Terpenia virus would be classified into the Uukuniemi species; Murre virus, RML-105-105355 virus, and Sunday Canyon virus would be classified into a Murre virus species; and Grand Arbaud virus, Precarious Point virus, and Manawa virus would each be given individual species status. Although limited sequence similarity was detected between current members of the Uukuniemi group and Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) and Heartland virus, a clear serological reaction was observed between some of them, indicating that SFTSV and Heartland virus should be considered part of the Uukuniemi virus group. Moreover, based on the genomic diversity of the phleboviruses and given the low correlation observed between complement fixation titers and genetic distance, we propose a system for classification of the Bunyaviridae based on genetic as well as serological data. Finally, the recent descriptions of SFTSV and Heartland virus also indicate that the public health importance of the Uukuniemi group viruses must be reevaluated. PMID:23283959

  16. Genetic variation at nuclear loci fails to distinguish two morphologically distinct species of Aquilegia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elizabeth A; Whittall, Justen B; Hodges, Scott A; Nordborg, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Aquilegia formosa and pubescens are two closely related species belonging to the columbine genus. Despite their morphological and ecological differences, previous studies have revealed a large degree of intercompatibility, as well as little sequence divergence between these two taxa. We compared the inter- and intraspecific patterns of variation for 9 nuclear loci, and found that the two species were practically indistinguishable at the level of DNA sequence polymorphism, indicating either very recent speciation or continued gene flow. As a comparison, we also analyzed variation at two loci across 30 other Aquilegia taxa; this revealed slightly more differentiation among taxa, which seemed best explained by geographic distance. By contrast, we found no evidence for isolation by distance on a more local geographic scale. We conclude that the extremely low levels of genetic differentiation between A. formosa and A. pubescens at neutral loci will facilitate future genome-wide scans for speciation genes. PMID:20098727

  17. Sink-source characteristics of two distinctly different forest species as affected by elevated carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pushnik, J.C.; Florv, W.B.; Demaree, R.S. ); Anderson, P.D.; Houpis J.L.J. )

    1993-05-01

    The basic physiology and biochemistry of photosynthesis is being correlated with the leaf level processes and morphology of the Sierra Nevada varieties of Taxus brevifolia and Pinus ponderosa in an attempt to identify control mechanisms of carbohydrate partitioning. We are evaluating sink/source relationships in terms of carbon assimilation (gas-exchange (A[ci] curves and temperature effects); RuBPCase activity, chloroplast structure, integrity, and distributions, stomatal densities, internal leaf organization); transport functions (sucrose-phosphate synthetase (SPS) activity); long-term sink (immunoelectron microscopic detection of taxol). The results of these investigations suggest carbon acquisition characteristics are similar among the conifers, but with distinct differences in carboxylation efficiencies, SPS activity, needle starch content/chloroplast, and vascular tissue areas. These baseline characteristics are currently being evaluated in response to elevated CO[sub 2].

  18. Two Rumex Species from Contrasting Hydrological Niches Regulate Flooding Tolerance through Distinct Mechanisms[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, Hans; Mustroph, Angelika; Barding, Gregory A.; Vergeer-van Eijk, Marleen; Welschen-Evertman, Rob A.M.; Pedersen, Ole; Visser, Eric J.W.; Larive, Cynthia K.; Pierik, Ronald; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change has increased flooding events, which affect both natural vegetation dynamics and crop productivity. The flooded environment is lethal for most plant species because it restricts gas exchange and induces an energy and carbon crisis. Flooding survival strategies have been studied in Oryza sativa, a cultivated monocot. However, our understanding of plant adaptation to natural flood-prone environments remains scant, even though wild plants represent a valuable resource of tolerance mechanisms that could be used to generate stress-tolerant crops. Here we identify mechanisms that mediate the distinct flooding survival strategies of two related wild dicot species: Rumex palustris and Rumex acetosa. Whole transcriptome sequencing and metabolite profiling reveal flooding-induced metabolic reprogramming specific to R. acetosa. By contrast, R. palustris uses the early flooding signal ethylene to increase survival by regulating shade avoidance and photomorphogenesis genes to outgrow submergence and by priming submerged plants for future low oxygen stress. These results provide molecular resolution of flooding survival strategies of two species occupying distinct hydrological niches. Learning how these contrasting flood adaptive strategies evolved in nature will be instrumental for the development of stress-tolerant crop varieties that deliver enhanced yields in a changing climate. PMID:24285788

  19. The turkey erythrocyte beta-adrenergic receptor couples to both adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C via distinct G-protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    James, S R; Vaziri, C; Walker, T R; Milligan, G; Downes, C P

    1994-01-01

    By contrast with mammalian beta-adrenergic receptors, the avian isoform elicits two distinct effector responses, activation of adenylate cyclase and polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) leading to the accumulation of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol phosphates. We have investigated the mechanisms of beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in turkey erythrocytes. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase by the beta-adrenergic-receptor agonist isoprenaline exhibits a 30-fold lower EC50 than that for PLC activation, which may indicate a marked receptor reserve for the former effector. Similar Ki values were obtained for the inhibition of both responses by four beta-adrenergic antagonists, arguing that a single receptor population is responsible for both effects. Antibodies raised against G-protein peptide sequences were used to show that the identity of the G-protein mediating the PLC response was an avian homologue of G11, the level of expression of which was very similar to that of the stimulatory G-protein of adenylate cyclase, Gs. Thus a single population of beta-adrenergic receptors apparently interacts with distinct G-proteins to activate different effectors. The stoichiometries of the receptor-G-protein-effector interactions are therefore similar for both second-messenger responses and the data are discussed in terms of the different efficacies observed for each response. Images Figure 4 PMID:7998968

  20. Is Homo heidelbergensis a distinct species? New insight on the Mauer mandible.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Aurélien; Marchal, François; Condemi, Silvana

    2009-03-01

    The discovery of new fossils in Africa, Asia, and Europe, and the recognition of a greater diversity in the middle Pleistocene fossil record, has led to a reconsideration of the species Homo heidelbergensis. This nomen, formulated by Schoetensack in 1908 to describe the Mauer jaw (Germany), was almost forgotten during most of the past century. Numerous fossils have been attributed to it but no consensus has arisen concerning their classification. The holotype anatomical traits are still poorly understood, and numerous fossils with no mandibular remains have been placed in the taxon. Some researchers propose H. heidelbergensis as an Afro-European taxon that is ancestral to both modern humans and Neandertals whereas others think it is a strictly European species that is part of the Neandertal lineage. We focus on the validity of H. heidelbergensis, using the traditional basis of species recognition: anatomical description. We provide a comparative morphological analysis using 47 anatomical traits of 36 Pleistocene fossils from Africa, Asia, and Europe and 35 extant human mandibles. We re-examine the mandibular features of Mauer and discuss the specimen's inclusion in H. heidelbergensis, as well as alternative evolutionary theories. To lend objectivity to specimen grouping, we use multiple correspondence analysis associated with hierarchical classification that creates clusters corresponding to phenetic similarities between jaws. Our phenetic and comparative morphological analyses support the validity of H. heidelbergensis as a taxon. A set of morphological features can be statistically identified for the definition of the species. Some traits can be used to delimit H. heidelbergensis in an evolutionary framework (e.g., foramina mentale posteriorly positioned, horizontal retromolar surface). Those traits are also present on African (e.g., Tighenif) and European (e.g., Sima de los Huesos) specimens that show a close relationship with the Mauer mandible. Therefore, the

  1. Two distinct types of the inhibition of vasculogenesis by different species of charged particles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Charged particle radiation is known to be more biologically effective than photon radiation. One example of this is the inhibition of the formation of human blood vessels. This effect is an important factor influencing human health and is relevant to space travel as well as to cancer radiotherapy. We have previously shown that ion particles with a high energy deposition, or linear energy transfer (LET) are more than four times more effective at disrupting mature vessel tissue models than particles with a lower LET. For vasculogenesis however, the relative biological effectiveness between particles is the same. This unexpected result prompted us to investigate whether the inhibition of vasculogenesis was occurring by distinct mechanisms. Methods Using 3-Dimensional human vessel models, we developed assays that determine at what stage angiogenesis is inhibited. Vessel morphology, the presence of motile tip structures, and changes in the matrix architecture were assessed. To confirm that the mechanisms are distinct, stimulation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) with phorbol ester (PMA) was employed to selectively restore vessel formation in cultures where early motile tip activity was inhibited. Results Endothelial cells in 3-D culture exposed to low LET protons failed to make connections with other cells but eventually developed a central lumen. Conversely, cells exposed to high LET Fe charged particles extended cellular processes and made connections to other cells but did not develop a central lumen. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons indicated that motility at the extending tips of endothelial cells is inhibited by low LET but not high LET particles. Actin-rich protrusive structures that contain bundled microtubules showed a 65% decrease when exposed to low LET particles but not high LET particles, with commensurate changes in the matrix architecture. Stimulation of PKC with PMA restored tip motility and capillary formation in low but not high LET particle

  2. Differential Costs of Two Distinct Resistance Mechanisms Induced by Different Herbivore Species in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Reichelt, Michael; van Doorn, Arjen; Schuurink, Robert C; Dicke, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Plants respond to herbivory with the induction of resistance, mediated by distinct phytohormonal signaling pathways and their interactions. Phloem feeders are known to induce plant resistance via the salicylic acid pathway, whereas biting-chewing herbivores induce plant resistance mainly via the jasmonate pathway. Here, we show that a specialist caterpillar (biting-chewing herbivore) and a specialist aphid (phloem feeder) differentially induce resistance against Pieris brassicae caterpillars in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Caterpillar feeding induces resistance through the jasmonate signaling pathway that is associated with the induction of kaempferol 3,7-dirhamnoside, whereas aphid feeding induces resistance via a novel mechanism involving sinapoyl malate. The role of sinapoyl malate is confirmed through the use of a mutant compromised in the biosynthesis of this compound. Caterpillar-induced resistance is associated with a lower cost in terms of plant growth reduction than aphid-induced resistance. A strong constitutive resistance against P. brassicae caterpillars in combination with a strong growth attenuation in plants of a transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertion mutant of WRKY70 (wrky70) suggest that the WRKY70 transcription factor, a regulator of downstream responses mediated by jasmonate-salicylic acid signaling cross talk, is involved in the negative regulation of caterpillar resistance and in the tradeoff between growth and defense. In conclusion, different mechanisms of herbivore-induced resistance come with different costs, and a functional WRKY70 transcription factor is required for the induction of low-cost resistance. PMID:26603653

  3. Phylogenetic Reassessment of Antarctic Tetillidae (Demospongiae, Tetractinellida) Reveals New Genera and Genetic Similarity among Morphologically Distinct Species.

    PubMed

    Carella, Mirco; Agell, Gemma; Cárdenas, Paco; Uriz, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Species of Tetillidae are distributed worldwide. However, some genera are unresolved and only a few genera and species of this family have been described from the Antarctic. The incorporation of 25 new COI and 18S sequences of Antarctic Tetillidae to those used recently for assessing the genera phylogeny, has allowed us to improve the resolution of some poorly resolved nodes and to confirm the monophyly of previously identified clades. Classical genera such as Craniella recovered their traditional diagnosis by moving the Antarctic Tetilla from Craniella, where they were placed in the previous family phylogeny, to Antarctotetilla gen. nov. The morphological re-examination of specimens used in the previous phylogeny and their comparison to the type material revealed misidentifications. The proposed monotypic new genus Levantinella had uncertain phylogenetic relationships depending on the gene partition used. Two more clades would require the inclusion of additional species to be formally established as new genera. The parsimony tree based on morphological characters and the secondary structure of the 18S (V4 region) almost completely matched the COI M1-M6 and the COI+18S concatenated phylogenies. Morphological synapomorphies have been identified for the genera proposed. New 15 28S (D3-D5) and 11 COI I3-M11 partitions were exclusively sequenced for the Antarctic species subset. Remarkably, species within the Antarctic genera Cinachyra (C. barbata and C. antarctica) and Antarctotetilla (A. leptoderma, A. grandis, and A. sagitta), which are clearly distinguishable morphologically, were not genetically differentiated with any of the markers assayed. Thus, as it has been reported for other Antarctic sponges, both the mitochondrial and nuclear partitions used did not differentiate species that were well characterized morphologically. Antarctic Tetillidae offers a rare example of genetically cryptic (with the traditional markers used for sponges), morphologically distinct

  4. Phylogenetic Reassessment of Antarctic Tetillidae (Demospongiae, Tetractinellida) Reveals New Genera and Genetic Similarity among Morphologically Distinct Species

    PubMed Central

    Carella, Mirco; Agell, Gemma; Cárdenas, Paco; Uriz, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Species of Tetillidae are distributed worldwide. However, some genera are unresolved and only a few genera and species of this family have been described from the Antarctic. The incorporation of 25 new COI and 18S sequences of Antarctic Tetillidae to those used recently for assessing the genera phylogeny, has allowed us to improve the resolution of some poorly resolved nodes and to confirm the monophyly of previously identified clades. Classical genera such as Craniella recovered their traditional diagnosis by moving the Antarctic Tetilla from Craniella, where they were placed in the previous family phylogeny, to Antarctotetilla gen. nov. The morphological re-examination of specimens used in the previous phylogeny and their comparison to the type material revealed misidentifications. The proposed monotypic new genus Levantinella had uncertain phylogenetic relationships depending on the gene partition used. Two more clades would require the inclusion of additional species to be formally established as new genera. The parsimony tree based on morphological characters and the secondary structure of the 18S (V4 region) almost completely matched the COI M1-M6 and the COI+18S concatenated phylogenies. Morphological synapomorphies have been identified for the genera proposed. New 15 28S (D3-D5) and 11 COI I3-M11 partitions were exclusively sequenced for the Antarctic species subset. Remarkably, species within the Antarctic genera Cinachyra (C. barbata and C. antarctica) and Antarctotetilla (A. leptoderma, A. grandis, and A. sagitta), which are clearly distinguishable morphologically, were not genetically differentiated with any of the markers assayed. Thus, as it has been reported for other Antarctic sponges, both the mitochondrial and nuclear partitions used did not differentiate species that were well characterized morphologically. Antarctic Tetillidae offers a rare example of genetically cryptic (with the traditional markers used for sponges), morphologically distinct

  5. Simultaneous identification and DNA barcoding of six Eimeria species infecting turkeys using PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus.

    PubMed

    Hafeez, Mian A; Shivaramaiah, Srichaitanya; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Cobean, Julie; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    Species-specific PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus were generated that allow for the specific identification of the most common Eimeria species infecting turkeys (i.e., Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria innocua). PCR reaction chemistries were optimized with respect to divalent cation (MgCl2) and dNTP concentrations, as well as PCR cycling conditions (particularly anneal temperature for primers). Genomic DNA samples from single oocyst-derived lines of six Eimeria species were tested to establish specificity and sensitivity of these newly designed primer pairs. A mixed 60-ng total DNA sample containing 10 ng of each of the six Eimeria species was used as DNA template to demonstrate specific amplification of the correct product using each of the species-specific primer pairs. Ten nanograms of each of the five non-target Eimeria species was pooled to provide a non-target, control DNA sample suitable to test the specificity of each primer pair. The amplifications of the COI region with species-specific primer pairs from pooled samples yielded products of expected sizes (209 to 1,012 bp) and no amplification of non-target Eimeria sp. DNA was detected using the non-target, control DNA samples. These primer pairs specific for Eimeria spp. of turkeys did not amplify any of the seven Eimeria species infecting chickens. The newly developed PCR primers can be used as a diagnostic tool capable of specifically identifying six turkey Eimeria species; additionally, sequencing of the PCR amplification products yields sequence-based genotyping data suitable for identification and molecular phylogenetics. PMID:25678350

  6. Meteorological influences on stemflow generation across diameter size classes of two morphologically distinct deciduous species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stan, John T.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Levia, Delphis F.

    2014-12-01

    Many tree species have been shown to funnel substantial rainfall to their stem base as stemflow flux, given a favorable stand structure and storm conditions. As stemflow is a spatially concentrated flux, prior studies have shown its impact on ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes can be significant. Less work has been performed examining stemflow variability from meteorological conditions compared to canopy structural traits. As such, this study performs multiple regressions: (1) to examine stemflow variability due to event-based rainfall amount, intensity, mean wind speeds, and vapor pressure deficit; (2) across three diameter size classes (10-20, 21-40, and >41 cm DBH); and (3) for two common tree species in the northeastern USA of contrasting canopy morphology— Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) versus Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech). On the whole, multiple regression results yielded significant positive correlations with stemflow for rainfall amount, intensity, and mean wind speed and a significant negative correlation for vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Tree size altered stemflow-meteorological condition relationships, where larger trees strengthened indirect stemflow-VPD and direct stemflow-rainfall and stemflow-intensity associations. Canopies of rougher bark and lower branch angle (represented by L. tulipifera) enhanced correlations for nearly all meteorological conditions via greater stemflow residence time (and longer exposure to meteorological conditions). Multiple regressions performed on leafless canopy stemflow resulted in an inverse relationship with wind speeds, likely decoupling stemflow sheltered solely on bark surfaces from VPD influences. Leaf presence generally increased direct stemflow associations with rainfall intensity, yet diminished stemflow-rainfall relationships. F. grandifolia canopies (exemplifying structures of smoother bark and greater branch angle) strengthened differences in stemflow associations with

  7. Meteorological influences on stemflow generation across diameter size classes of two morphologically distinct deciduous species.

    PubMed

    Van Stan, John T; Van Stan, Jarrad H; Levia, Delphis F

    2014-12-01

    Many tree species have been shown to funnel substantial rainfall to their stem base as stemflow flux, given a favorable stand structure and storm conditions. As stemflow is a spatially concentrated flux, prior studies have shown its impact on ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes can be significant. Less work has been performed examining stemflow variability from meteorological conditions compared to canopy structural traits. As such, this study performs multiple regressions: (1) to examine stemflow variability due to event-based rainfall amount, intensity, mean wind speeds, and vapor pressure deficit; (2) across three diameter size classes (10-20, 21-40, and >41 cm DBH); and (3) for two common tree species in the northeastern USA of contrasting canopy morphology--Liriodendron tulipifera L. (yellow poplar) versus Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American beech). On the whole, multiple regression results yielded significant positive correlations with stemflow for rainfall amount, intensity, and mean wind speed and a significant negative correlation for vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Tree size altered stemflow-meteorological condition relationships, where larger trees strengthened indirect stemflow-VPD and direct stemflow-rainfall and stemflow-intensity associations. Canopies of rougher bark and lower branch angle (represented by L. tulipifera) enhanced correlations for nearly all meteorological conditions via greater stemflow residence time (and longer exposure to meteorological conditions). Multiple regressions performed on leafless canopy stemflow resulted in an inverse relationship with wind speeds, likely decoupling stemflow sheltered solely on bark surfaces from VPD influences. Leaf presence generally increased direct stemflow associations with rainfall intensity, yet diminished stemflow-rainfall relationships. F. grandifolia canopies (exemplifying structures of smoother bark and greater branch angle) strengthened differences in stemflow associations with

  8. Distinct and Conserved Prominin-1/CD133–Positive Retinal Cell Populations Identified across Species

    PubMed Central

    Jászai, József; Fargeas, Christine A.; Graupner, Sylvi; Tanaka, Elly M.; Brand, Michael; Huttner, Wieland B.; Corbeil, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Besides being a marker of various somatic stem cells in mammals, prominin-1 (CD133) plays a role in maintaining the photoreceptor integrity since mutations in the PROM1 gene are linked with retinal degeneration. In spite of that, little information is available regarding its distribution in eyes of non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with high regenerative abilities. To address this subject, prominin-1 cognates were isolated from axolotl, zebrafish and chicken, and their retinal compartmentalization was investigated and compared to that of their mammalian orthologue. Interestingly, prominin-1 transcripts—except for the axolotl—were not strictly restricted to the outer nuclear layer (i.e., photoreceptor cells), but they also marked distinct subdivisions of the inner nuclear layer (INL). In zebrafish, where the prominin-1 gene is duplicated (i.e., prominin-1a and prominin-1b), a differential expression was noted for both paralogues within the INL being localized either to its vitreal or scleral subdivision, respectively. Interestingly, expression of prominin-1a within the former domain coincided with Pax-6–positive cells that are known to act as progenitors upon injury-induced retino-neurogenesis. A similar, but minute population of prominin-1–positive cells located at the vitreal side of the INL was also detected in developing and adult mice. In chicken, however, prominin-1–positive cells appeared to be aligned along the scleral side of the INL reminiscent of zebrafish prominin-1b. Taken together our data indicate that in addition to conserved expression of prominin-1 in photoreceptors, significant prominin-1–expressing non-photoreceptor retinal cell populations are present in the vertebrate eye that might represent potential sources of stem/progenitor cells for regenerative therapies. PMID:21407811

  9. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  10. Sympatric populations of the highly cross-fertile coral species Acropora hyacinthus and Acropora cytherea are genetically distinct.

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, L M; van Oppen, M J H; Willis, B L; Miller, D J

    2002-01-01

    High cross-fertilization rates in vitro and non-monophyletic patterns in molecular phylogenies challenge the taxonomic status of species in the coral genus Acropora. We present data from eight polymorphic allozyme loci that indicate small, but significant, differentiation between sympatric populations of Acropora cytherea and Acropora hyacinthus (F(ST) = 0.025-0.068, p < 0.05), a pair of acroporid corals with very high interspecific fertilization rates in vitro. Although no fixed allelic differences were found between these species, the absence of genetic differentiation between widely allopatric populations suggests that allele frequency differences between A. cytherea and A. hyacinthus in sympatry are biologically significant. By contrast, populations of Acropora tenuis, a species which spawns 2-3 hours earlier and shows low cross-fertilization rates with congeners in vitro, were clearly distinct from A. cytherea and A. hyacinthus (F(ST) = 0.427-0.465, p < 0.05). Moreover, allopatric populations of A. tenuis differed significantly, possibly as a consequence of its relatively short period of larval competency. Our results effectively rule out the possibility that A. hyacinthus and A. cytherea are morphotypes within a single species, and indicate that hybridization occurs relatively infrequently between these taxa in nature. PMID:12065046

  11. Distinctive stable isotope ratios in important zooplankton species in relation to estuarine salinity gradients: Potential tracer of fish migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Keita W.; Kasai, Akihide; Isoda, Takane; Nakayama, Kouji; Tanaka, Masaru

    2008-07-01

    To assess the potential of stable isotope ratios as an indicator of fish migration within estuaries, stable isotope ratios in important zooplankton species were analyzed in relation to estuarine salinity gradients. Gut contents from migratory juveniles of the euryhaline marine fish Lateolabrax japonicus were examined along the Chikugo River estuary of the Ariake Sea, which has the most developed estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) in Japan. Early juveniles in March and April preyed primarily on two copepod species; Sinocalanus sinensis at lower salinities and Acartia omorii at higher salinities. Late juveniles (standard length > 40 mm) at lower salinities preyed exclusively on the mysid Acanthomysis longirostris until July and complementarily on the decapod Acetes japonicus in August. These prey species were collected along the estuary during the spring-summer seasons of 2003 and 2004, and their carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios ( δ13C and δ15N) were evaluated. The δ13C values of prey species were distinct from each other and were primarily depleted within and in close proximity to the ETM (salinity < 10); S. sinensis (-26.6‰) < Acanthomysis longirostris (-23.3‰) < Acartia omorii (-21.1‰) < Acetes japonicus (-18.5‰). The overall gradient of δ13C with salinity occurred for all prey species and showed minor temporal fluctuations, while it was not directly influenced by the δ13C values in particulate organic matter along the estuary. In contrast to δ13C, the δ15N values of prey species did not exhibit any clear relationship with salinity. The present study demonstrated that δ13C has the potential for application as a tracer of fish migration into lower salinity areas including the ETM.

  12. Distinctive green recovery of silver species from modified cellulose: mechanism and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Amarendra Dhar; Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Sillanpää, Mika; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Suopajärvi, Terhi; Niinimäki, Jouko; Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Changha

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to recover precious silver in order to identify the adsorption coupled reduction pathways that determine this process. A combination technique of adsorption and nanocrystallization was used to investigate the recovery of silver species from taurine-cellulose (T-DAC) samples. The non-synthetic route of nanocrystallization yielded spherical zero-valent silver sized ∼ 18 nm. Rate-controlling steps were modeled by adsorption parameters by the best fit of Langmuir capacity (55 mg/g), pseudo-second order curves, and exothermic chemical reactions. The T-DAC was an excellent sorbing phase for the treatment of silver-polluted waters over a broad range of pH (2.1-10.1) and varying ionic strengths (8.5-850 mM, as NaCl), which are the conditions often encountered in industrial and mining effluents. A good recovery of silver (40-65%) was also obtained in the presence of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(VI), Ni(II), and As(V) at lower or equivalent concentrations with Ag(I), either from individually added metals or from all metal ions mixed together. Desorption was compared with a series of five eluents including complexing agents. In these experiments acidified thiourea yielded 86% desorption of Ag(I). Aqueous silver reduced to metallic silver on the surface of the T-DAC samples, which was confirmed by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy. PMID:25732618

  13. Identification of beta-subunit of bacterial RNA-polymerase--a non-species-specific bacterial protein--as target of antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Roesler, Kai-Wolfgang; Schmider, Wolfgang; Kist, Manfred; Batsford, Stephen; Schiltz, Emile; Oelke, Mathias; Tuczek, Anja; Dettenborn, Therese; Behringer, Dirk; Kreisel, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    Several observations suggest that bacteria induce autoimmunity in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Since no PBC-specific bacterial species could be identified, it can be speculated that the triggers are non-species-specific bacterial proteins. This hypothesis would imply that several or even all bacterial species can trigger PBC. Therefore, we investigated whether PBC exhibits immune reactions to non-species-specific bacterial antigens. Yersinia enterocolitica O3 was screened for the presence of proteins that were labeled by immunoblotting using PBC sera. We focused our investigations on a 160-kDa protein, which was further enriched and characterized by partial N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The prevalence of antibodies to this protein was determined by immunoblotting in a variety of diseases. The 160-kDa protein was identified as the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA-polymerase, a highly conserved bacterial protein with a very high degree of sequence identity among all bacterial species. Antibodies to the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase were specific for this protein. Until now no mammalian protein could be found that cross-reacts with these antibodies. The prevalence of antibodies to the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase (ARPA) using the protein from Yersinia enterocolitica O3 (serum dilution 1:1000) was: healthy controls (HC, N = 101) 7.9%, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, N = 61) 32.8%, autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH, N = 46) 26.1%, alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC, N = 44) 9.1%, Crohn's disease (CD, N = 38) 7.9%, ulcerative colitis (UC, N = 24) 8.3%, primary sclerosing cholangitis + UC (PSC/UC, N = 11) 0%, acute yersiniosis (Yers, N = 36) 19.4%, acute infection with Campylobacter jejuni (Camp, N = 10) 0%, acute Q-fever (QF, N = 16) 6.25%, chronic hepatitis C (HCV, N = 39) 7.7%, c-ANCA-positive vasculitis (Vasc, N = 40) 15%, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, N = 28) 10.7%, and malaria tropica (MT, N = 24) 16.7%. There was no significant

  14. Distinct mechanisms of the inhibition of vasculogenesis by different species of ionizing particles

    PubMed Central

    Grabham, Peter; Sharma, Preety; Bigelow, Alan; Geard, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The human vasculature includes a vast network of microcapillaries networking the body and is a major target for non-carcinogenic effects of space radiation in the body. The brain microvascular system is crucial to healthy functioning of the brain and its pathology is not only a primary event in a range of neurodegenerative diseases but also an important influencing factor in many others. The vasculature is maintained by angiogenesis regenerating vessels as they are needed, this is particularly relevant if the blood–brain barrier is damaged by agents such as space radiation, thereby creating the need for angiogenic regeneration. The resulting lack of vasculature due to the inhibition of re-growth of vessels can, in turn, lead to a negative feedback loop and further pathologies. Using three-dimensional human vessel cultures with human umbilical vein and brain microvascular endothelial cells, we have developed assays that determine at what stage angiogenesis is inhibited by ionizing radiation. The relative biological effect of high linear energy transfer (LET) 1 GeV Fe ions compared with low LET 1 GeV protons is only one for developing vessels but greater than four for mature vessels. This action of low LET protons on developing vessels was surprisingly effective (50% inhibition with 40 cGy exposure) and together with the effect of high LET ions may represent a significant hazard in the space environment. The morphology of developing vessels 5 days after exposure showed significant differences that suggest distinct mechanisms of inhibition. Cells exposed to protons failed to make connections with other cells. Conversely, cells exposed to Fe ions extended cellular processes and made connections to other cells but did not develop a central lumen. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons showed differences indicating that motility at the extending tips of endothelial cells is inhibited by protons but not Fe ions. Actin-rich protrusive structures that contain bundled and

  15. The Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit I Gene Occurs on a Minichromosome with Extensive Heteroplasmy in Two Species of Chewing Lice, Geomydoecus aurei and Thomomydoecus minor.

    PubMed

    Pietan, Lucas L; Spradling, Theresa A; Demastes, James W

    2016-01-01

    In animals, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) typically occurs as a single circular chromosome with 13 protein-coding genes and 22 tRNA genes. The various species of lice examined previously, however, have shown mitochondrial genome rearrangements with a range of chromosome sizes and numbers. Our research demonstrates that the mitochondrial genomes of two species of chewing lice found on pocket gophers, Geomydoecus aurei and Thomomydoecus minor, are fragmented with the 1,536 base-pair (bp) cytochrome-oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene occurring as the only protein-coding gene on a 1,916-1,964 bp minicircular chromosome in the two species, respectively. The cox1 gene of T. minor begins with an atypical start codon, while that of G. aurei does not. Components of the non-protein coding sequence of G. aurei and T. minor include a tRNA (isoleucine) gene, inverted repeat sequences consistent with origins of replication, and an additional non-coding region that is smaller than the non-coding sequence of other lice with such fragmented mitochondrial genomes. Sequences of cox1 minichromosome clones for each species reveal extensive length and sequence heteroplasmy in both coding and noncoding regions. The highly variable non-gene regions of G. aurei and T. minor have little sequence similarity with one another except for a 19-bp region of phylogenetically conserved sequence with unknown function. PMID:27589589

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SPECIES AND SOURCES IN RAW WASTEWATER USING A SMALL SUBUNIT RRNA-BASED PCR-RFLP TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The species composition and source of Cryptosporidium oocysts in wastewater have never been determined, even though it is widely assumed that these oocysts are from human sewage. Recent molecular characterizations of Cryptosporidium parasites make it possible to differentiate hum...

  17. Extracellular ATP promotes stomatal opening of Arabidopsis thaliana through heterotrimeric G protein α subunit and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Hua; Wang, Wei-Xia; Chen, Chen; Wang, Yu-Fang; Liu, Ting; Li, Xia; Shang, Zhong-Lin

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) has been reported to exist in apoplasts of plant cells as a signal molecule. Extracellular ATP (eATP) plays important roles in plant growth, development, and stress tolerance. Here, extracellular ATP was found to promote stomatal opening of Arabidopsis thaliana in light and darkness. ADP, GTP, and weakly hydrolyzable ATP analogs (ATPγS, Bz-ATP, and 2meATP) showed similar effects, whereas AMP and adenosine did not affect stomatal movement. Apyrase inhibited stomatal opening. ATP-promoted stomatal opening was blocked by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor (diphenylene iodonium) or deoxidizer (dithiothreitol), and was impaired in null mutant of NADPH oxidase (atrbohD/F). Added ATP triggered ROS generation in guard cells via NADPH oxidase. ATP also induced Ca(2+) influx and H(+) efflux in guard cells. In atrbohD/F, ATP-induced ion flux was strongly suppressed. In null mutants of the heterotrimeric G protein α subunit, ATP-promoted stomatal opening, cytoplasmic ROS generation, Ca(2+) influx, and H(+) efflux were all suppressed. These results indicated that eATP-promoted stomatal opening possibly involves the heterotrimeric G protein, ROS, cytosolic Ca(2+), and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. PMID:22138967

  18. Novel sequences encoding venom C-type lectins are conserved in phylogenetically and geographically distinct Echis and Bitis viper species.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R A; Oliver, J; Hasson, S S; Bharati, K; Theakston, R D G

    2003-10-01

    Envenoming by Echis saw scaled vipers and Bitis arietans puff adders is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite their medical importance, the composition and constituent functionality of venoms from these vipers remains poorly understood. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding seven clusters or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive C-type lectin (CTL) proteins from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus, E. pyramidum leakeyi, E. carinatus sochureki and B. arietans. All these CTL sequences encoded the cysteine scaffold that defines the carbohydrate-recognition domain of mammalian CTLs. All but one of the Echis and Bitis CTL sequences showed greater sequence similarity to the beta than alpha CTL subunits in venoms of related Asian and American vipers. Four of the new CTL clusters showed marked inter-cluster sequence conservation across all four viper species which were significantly different from that of previously published viper CTLs. The other three Echis and Bitis CTL clusters showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom CTLs. Because viper venom CTLs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis and Bitis CTLs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of inter-specific and inter-generic sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis and Bitis CTLs leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. PMID:14557069

  19. Molecular characterization of a distinct bipartite Begomovirus species infecting ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L.) in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, K; Satya, V K; Mohankumar, S; Karthikeyan, G

    2016-02-01

    A distinct bipartite begomovirus was found to be associated with the mosaic disease on ivy gourd (Coccinia grandis L.) in Tamil Nadu, India. The complete DNA A and DNA B components were cloned by rolling circle amplification. Genome organization of this virus is found to be typical of Old World bipartite begomovirus. The association of betasatellite component with this virus is absent. The closest nucleotide identity of 73.4 % was seen with the Loofa yellow mosaic virus (LYMV-[VN]-AF509739) suggesting that it is a new virus species Coccinia mosaic virus (CoMoV-Ivy gourd [TN TDV Coc1]) and distantly related to the other known begomoviruses. The DNA B component shared a maximum identity of 55 % with that of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). In the phylogenetic analysis, CoMoV-Ivy gourd form cluster separate from other begomoviruses. Recombination analysis showed that there was no recombination event in the genome. This is the distinct begomovirus infecting ivy gourd. PMID:26739457

  20. Deep mitochondrial DNA lineage divergences within Alberta populations of Dermacentor albipictus (Acari: Ixodidae) do not indicate distinct species.

    PubMed

    Leo, Sarah S T; Pybus, Margo J; Sperling, Felix A H

    2010-07-01

    The winter tick Dermacentor albipictus (Packard) has a single-host life cycle that allows it to reach severe infestation levels on ungulates, particularly moose. Genotypic variation within these and related ticks has been a source of taxonomic confusion, although the continuity in their morphology and life history has generally been interpreted as indicating the existence of a single species. To further investigate this variation, we sequenced regions of two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes (COI and 16S rDNA),two nuclear genes (lysozyme and ITS-2), and two bacterial markers from Francisella-like endosymbionts found in these ticks (eubacterial mtDNA 16S rRNA and a homolog of Francisella tularensis [Dorofe'ev] 17-kDa lipoprotein). We sampled 42 D. albipictus individuals from whitetail and mule deer culled from three populations in east-central Alberta, as well as four D. albipictus and two Dermacentor variabilis (Say) from other locations. We then compared DNA sequence variation between the genes and related this to variation in the morphology of spiracle plates. Both mtDNA regions indicated two deeply diverged lineages (mean difference of 7.1% for COI and 4.5% for 16S) that would normally be considered diagnostic of distinct species in DNA barcoding studies. However, very little divergence was revealed by nuclear gene sequences, bacterial endosymbionts, and morphometric analyses, and any variation that did occur in these markers was not congruent with mtDNA divergences. We conclude that the sampled populations in Alberta represent a single species, D. albipictus, and reiterate the importance of integrative approaches in species delimitation. PMID:20695271

  1. Molecular evidence for genetic distinctions between Chlamydiaceae detected in Siamese crocodiles (Crocodylus siamensis) and known Chlamydiaceae species.

    PubMed

    Sariya, Ladawan; Kladmanee, Kan; Bhusri, Benjaporn; Thaijongrak, Prawporn; Tonchiangsai, Kanittha; Chaichoun, Kridsada; Ratanakorn, Parntep

    2015-02-01

    Chlamydiosis, caused by Chlamydiaceae, is a zoonotic disease found in humans and several species of animals, including reptiles and amphibians. Although chlamydiosis in saltwater crocodiles has been previously reported in South Africa and Papua New Guinea, the reported strains have not been identified or confirmed. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to sequence and characterize Chamydiaceae isolated from Siamese crocodiles. Results showed the 16S ribosomal (r) RNA and the 16S/23S rRNA gene of the crocodile isolates were closely related to the genus Chlamydophila with matched identity greater than 98%. The phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S/23S rRNA gene showed the crocodile cluster diverges far from Cp. caviae with a 100% bootstrap value. The tree based on the ompA gene loci distinguished the crocodile strains into genotypes I, II, and III. The present study is the first report on Chlamydophila detected in Siamese crocodiles that is genetically distinct from the known species of Chlamydiaceae. PMID:25854083

  2. Subterranean, Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatile Increases Biological Control Activity of Multiple Beneficial Nematode Species in Distinct Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Jared G.; Alborn, Hans T.; Campos-Herrera, Raquel; Kaplan, Fatma; Duncan, Larry W.; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Koppenhöfer, Albrecht M.; Stelinski, Lukasz L.

    2012-01-01

    While the role of herbivore-induced volatiles in plant-herbivore-natural enemy interactions is well documented aboveground, new evidence suggests that belowground volatile emissions can protect plants by attracting entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs). However, due to methodological limitations, no study has previously detected belowground herbivore-induced volatiles in the field or quantified their impact on attraction of diverse EPN species. Here we show how a belowground herbivore-induced volatile can enhance mortality of agriculturally significant root pests. First, in real time, we identified pregeijerene (1,5-dimethylcyclodeca-1,5,7-triene) from citrus roots 9–12 hours after initiation of larval Diaprepes abbreviatus feeding. This compound was also detected in the root zone of mature citrus trees in the field. Application of collected volatiles from weevil-damaged citrus roots attracted native EPNs and increased mortality of beetle larvae (D. abbreviatus) compared to controls in a citrus orchard. In addition, field applications of isolated pregeijerene caused similar results. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that pregeijerene increased pest mortality by attracting four species of naturally occurring EPNs in the field. Finally, we tested the generality of this root-zone signal by application of pregeijerene in blueberry fields; mortality of larvae (Galleria mellonella and Anomala orientalis) again increased by attracting naturally occurring populations of an EPN. Thus, this specific belowground signal attracts natural enemies of widespread root pests in distinct agricultural systems and may have broad potential in biological control of root pests. PMID:22761668

  3. RT-PCR for detecting five distinct Tospovirus species using degenerate primers and dsRNA template.

    PubMed

    Okuda, M; Hanada, K

    2001-08-01

    RT-PCR procedures for detection of multiple species of tospovirus from plant tissues were investigated. Downstream primers were designated from the 3' untranslated sequences of the S RNA. An upstream primer was designated from the degenerated sequences of the nucleocapsid protein. Approximately 450 bp DNA fragments were detected when Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)- or Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV)- infected tissues were examined. Approximately 350 bp DNA fragments were detected when Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV)- or Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV)-infected tissues were examined. Template RNA was extracted using CF 11 cellulose powder, and nonspecific amplification became unnoticeable when double-stranded RNA was used. The amplified fragments of WSMoV were differentiated from those of MYSV by AluI or TaqI digestion. The amplified fragments of TSWV were differentiated from those of INSV by DraI or HindIII digestion. An alstroemeria plant that was infected with an unidentified tospovirus was also examined, and a 350 bp fragment that was 97% identical to Iris yellow spot virus was detected. This method, therefore, detected at least five distinct Tospovirus species. PMID:11445145

  4. Loss of Apm1, the μ1 Subunit of the Clathrin-Associated Adaptor-Protein-1 Complex, Causes Distinct Phenotypes and Synthetic Lethality with Calcineurin Deletion in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Ayako; Sugiura, Reiko; Shoji, Hiromi; He, Yi; Deng, Lu; Lu, Yabin; Sio, Susie O.; Takegawa, Kaoru; Sakaue, Motoyoshi; Shuntoh, Hisato; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2004-01-01

    Calcineurin is a highly conserved regulator of Ca2+ signaling in eukaryotes. In fission yeast, calcineurin is not essential for viability but is required for cytokinesis and Cl- homeostasis. In a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion, we isolated a mutant, cis1-1/apm1-1, an allele of the apm1+ gene that encodes a homolog of the mammalian μ1A subunit of the clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) complex. The cis1-1/apm1-1 mutant as well as the apm1-deleted (Δapm1) cells showed distinct phenotypes: temperature sensitivity; tacrolimus (FK506) sensitivity; and pleiotropic defects in cytokinesis, cell integrity, and vacuole fusion. Electron micrographs revealed that Δapm1 cells showed large vesicular structures associated with Golgi stacks and accumulated post-Golgi secretory vesicles. Δapm1 cells also showed the massive accumulation of the exocytic v-SNARE Syb1 in the Golgi/endosomes and a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase. These phenotypes observed in apm1 mutations were accentuated upon temperature up-shift and FK506 treatment. Notably, Apm1-GFP localized to the Golgi/endosomes, the spindle pole bodies, and the medial region. These findings suggest a role for Apm1 associated with the Golgi/endosome function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including secretion, cytokinesis, vacuole fusion, and cell integrity and also suggest that calcineurin is involved in these events. PMID:15047861

  5. Nine novel DNA components associated with the foorkey disease of large cardamom: evidence of a distinct babuvirus species in Nanoviridae.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bikash; Shilpi, S; Barman, Ashis Roy; Mandal, Seema; Varma, Anupam

    2013-12-26

    Foorkey disease is a serious constraint to the production of large cardamom (Amomum subulatum, family Zingiberaceae). The disease is characterized by profuse proliferation of excessive stunted shoots, which makes the clump totally unproductive. The disease has been known in India since 1936 but the complete genome of the virus had not yet been characterized. In a preliminary study, an associated virus tentatively named as Cardamom bushy dwarf virus (CBDV) was identified based on the partial sequence of a single DNA component (DNA-R). In the present study, a high incidence (37.2-39.3%) of foorkey was recorded in certain plantations in the Darjeeling hills located at lower altitudes (300-1380 m) and CBDV was detected in several field samples by PCR. Nine novel DNA components were isolated and characterized from foorkey affected plants. CBDV contained six major DNA components (DNA-R, -S, -M, -C, -N and -U3) similar to the integral genome components known for the members of the genus Babuvirus in the family Nanoviridae. Additional components, satellite Rep (DNA-sRep1) and unknown components (DNA-Uf1 and -Uf2) were also identified. The size of the genome components ranged from 1028 to 1127. The sequence identity and phylogeny based on the individual components as well as overall genome (59.8-62% identity) distinguished CBDV from the two existing babuvirus species, Banana bunchy top virus and Abaca bunchy top virus. CBDV is the first distinct babuvirus species that affects plant species outside family Musaceae. This study shows further diversity in the genus Babuvirus. PMID:24091364

  6. Development and application of small-subunit rRNA probes for assessment of selected Thiobacillus species and members of the genus Acidiphilium.

    PubMed

    Peccia, J; Marchand, E A; Silverstein, J; Hernandez, M

    2000-07-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using (32)P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (T(d)) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined T(d)s. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris. PMID:10877807

  7. Differential immunological cross-reactions with antisera against the V-ATPase of Kalanchoë daigremontiana reveal structural differences of V-ATPase subunits of different plant species.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Schliebs, E; Ball, E; Berndt, E; Besemfelder-Butz, E; Binzel, M L; Drobny, M; Mühlenhoff, D; Müller, M L; Rakowski, K; Ratajczak, R

    1997-10-01

    Two antisera (ATP88 and ATP95) raised against the V-ATPase holoenzyme of Kalanchoë daigremontiana were tested for their cross-reactivity with subunits of V-ATPases from other plant species. V-ATPases from Kalanchoë blossfeldiana, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, Nicotiana tabacum, Lycopersicon esculentum, Citrus limon, Lemna gibba, Hordeum vulgare and Zea mays were immunoprecipitated with an antiserum against the catalytic V-ATPase subunit A of M. crystallinum. As shown by silver staining and Western blot analysis with ATP88, subunits A, B, C, D and c were present in all immunoprecipitated V-ATPases. In contrast, ATP95 recognized the whole set of subunits only in K. blossfeldiana, M. crystallinum, H. vulgare and Z. mays. This differential cross reactivity of ATP95 indicates the presence of structural differences of certain V-ATPase subunits. Based on the Bafilomycin A1-sensitive ATPase activity of tonoplast enriched vesicles, and on the amount of V-ATPase solubilized and immunoprecipitated, the specific ATP-hydrolysis activity of the V-ATPases under test was determined. The structural differences correlate with the ability of V-ATPases from different species to hydrolyze ATP at one given assay condition for ATP-hydrolysis measurements. Interestingly V-ATPases showing cross-reactivity of subunits A, B, C, D and c with ATP95 showed higher rates of specific ATP hydrolysis compared to V-ATPases containing subunits which were not labeled by ATP95. Thus, V-ATPases with high turnover rates in our assay conditions may show common structural characteristics which separate them from ATPases with low turnover rates. PMID:9372182

  8. 75 FR 38979 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of a 5-Year Review of the Eastern Distinct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... for the eastern Distinct Population Segment of the Steller sea lion (75 FR 37385). NMFS inadvertently... of a 5-Year Review of the Eastern Distinct Population Segment of the Steller Sea Lion AGENCY... of a 5-year review of the eastern Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of the Steller Sea...

  9. Cells have distinct mechanisms to maintain protection against different reactive oxygen species: Oxidative-stress-response genes

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Geoffrey W.; Fong, Chii S.; Alic, Nazif; Higgins, Vincent J.; Dawes, Ian W.

    2004-01-01

    The complete set of viable deletion strains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was screened for sensitivity of mutants to five oxidants to identify cell functions involved in resistance to oxidative stress. This screen identified a unique set of mainly constitutive functions providing the first line of defense against a particular oxidant; these functions are very dependent on the nature of the oxidant. Most of these functions are distinct from those involved in repair and recovery from damage, which are generally induced in response to stress, because there was little correlation between mutant sensitivity and the reported transcriptional response to oxidants of the relevant gene. The screen identified 456 mutants sensitive to at least one of five different types of oxidant, and these were ranked in order of sensitivity. Many genes identified were not previously known to have a role in resistance to reactive oxygen species. These encode functions including protein sorting, ergosterol metabolism, autophagy, and vacuolar acidification. Only two mutants were sensitive to all oxidants examined, only 12 were sensitive to at least four, and different oxidants had very different spectra of deletants that were sensitive. These findings highlight the specificity of cellular responses to different oxidants: No single oxidant is representative of general oxidative stress. Mitochondrial respiratory functions were overrepresented in mutants sensitive to H2O2, and vacuolar protein-sorting mutants were enriched in mutants sensitive to diamide. Core functions required for a broad range of oxidative-stress resistance include transcription, protein trafficking, and vacuolar function. PMID:15087496

  10. Simultaneous Observation of an Intraband Transition and Distinct Transient Species in the Infrared Region for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Narra, Sudhakar; Chung, Chih-Chun; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2016-07-01

    Solar cells based on organometal-halide perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 have emerged as a promising next-generation photovoltaic system, but the underlying photophysics and photochemistry remain to be established because of the limited availability of methods to implement the simultaneous and direct measurement of various charge carriers and ions that play a crucial role in the operating device. We used nanosecond time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy to investigate, with high molecular specificity, distinct transient species that are formed in perovskite solar cells after photoexcitation. In CH3NH3PbI3 planar-heterojuction solar cells, we simultaneously observed infrared spectral signatures that are associated with an intraband transition of conduction-band electrons, Fano resonance, and the spiro-OMeTAD cation having an exceptionally short lifetime of 1.0 μs (at ∼1485 cm(-1)). The present results show that the time-resolved IR method offers a unique capability to elucidate these important transients in perovskite solar cells and their dynamic interplay in a comprehensive manner. PMID:27302315

  11. Comparison of tick-borne microorganism communities in Ixodes spp. of the Ixodes ricinus species complex at distinct geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Movila, Alexandru; Dubinina, Helen V; Sitnicova, Natalia; Bespyatova, Liubov; Uspenskaia, Inga; Efremova, Galina; Toderas, Ion; Alekseev, Andrey N

    2014-05-01

    Characterizing the tick-borne microorganism communities of Ixodes ricinus (sheep tick) and Ixodes persulcatus (taiga tick) from the I. ricinus species complex in distinct geographical regions of Eastern Europe and European Russia, we demonstrated differences between the two ticks. Taiga ticks were more frequently mono- and co-infected than sheep ticks: 24.4 % (45/184 tested ticks) versus 17.5 % (52/297) and 4.3 % (8/184) versus 3.4 % (10/297), respectively. Ginsberg co-infection index values were significant at the various sites. Diversity of the tick-borne microorganism communities was estimated by the Shannon index, reaching values of 1.71 ± 0.46 and 1.20 ± 0.15 at the sheep-tick and the taiga-tick harbored sites, respectively. Richness of the tick-borne microorganism community in the sheep tick collection sites was about twice the value of the taiga tick collection sites. Future investigations are warranted to further characterize the peculiarities of the tick-borne microorganism communities among the ticks of the Ixodes ricinus complex. PMID:24356921

  12. Gene flow analysis demonstrates that Phytophthora fragariae var. rubi constitutes a distinct species, Phytophthora rubi comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Man in 't Veld, Willem A

    2007-01-01

    Isozyme analysis and cytochrome oxidase sequences were used to examine whether differentiation of P. fragariae var. fragariae and P. fragariae var. rubi at the variety level is justified. In isozyme studies six strains of both P. fragariae varieties were analyzed with malate dehydrogenase (MDH), glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), aconitase (ACO), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD), comprising altogether seven putative loci. Five unique alleles (Mdh-1(A), Mdh-2(B), Gpi(A), Aco(B) and Idh-1(B)) were found in strains of P. fragariae var. fragariae, whereas five unique alleles (Mdh-1(B), Mdh-2(A), Gpi(B), Aco(A) and Idh-1(A)) were present in strains of P. fragariae var. rubi. It was inferred from these data that there is no gene flow between the two P. fragariae varieties. Cytochrome oxidase I (Cox I) sequences showed consistent differences at 15 positions between strains of Fragaria and Rubus respectively. Based on isozyme data, cytochrome oxidase I sequences, and previously published differences in restyriction enzyme patterns of mitochondrial DNA, sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, AFLP patterns and pathogenicity, it was concluded that both specific pathogenic varieties of P. fragariae are reproductively isolated and constitute a distinct species. Consequently strains isolated from Rubus idaeus are assigned to Phytophthora rubi comb. nov. PMID:17682774

  13. Experimental Crossing of Two Distinct Species of Leopard Geckos, Eublepharis angramainyu and E. macularius: Viability, Fertility and Phenotypic Variation of the Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Jančúchová-Lásková, Jitka; Landová, Eva; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization between distinct species of animals and subsequent genetic introgression plays a considerable role in the speciation process and the emergence of adaptive characters. Fitness of between-species hybrids usually sharply decreases with the divergence time of the concerned species and the divergence depth, which still allows for a successful crossing differs among principal clades of vertebrates. Recently, a review of hybridization events among distinct lizard species revealed that lizards belong to vertebrates with a highly developed ability to hybridize. In spite of this, reliable reports of experimental hybridizations between genetically fairly divergent species are only exceptional. Here, we show the results of the crossing of two distinct allopatric species of eyelid geckos possessing temperature sex determination and lacking sex chromosomes: Eublepharis macularius distributed in Pakistan/Afghanistan area and E. angramainyu, which inhabits Mesopotamia and adjacent areas. We demonstrated that F1 hybrids were viable and fertile, and the introgression of E. angramainyu genes into the E. macularius genome can be enabled via a backcrossing. The examined hybrids (except those of the F2 generation) displayed neither malformations nor a reduced survival. Analyses of morphometric and coloration traits confirmed phenotypic distinctness of both parental species and their F1 hybrids. These findings contrast with long-term geographic and an evolutionary separation of the studied species. Thus, the occurrence of fertile hybrids of comparably divergent species, such as E. angramainyu and E. macularius, may also be expected in other taxa of squamates. This would violate the current estimates of species diversity in lizards. PMID:26633648

  14. Experimental Crossing of Two Distinct Species of Leopard Geckos, Eublepharis angramainyu and E. macularius: Viability, Fertility and Phenotypic Variation of the Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Jančúchová-Lásková, Jitka; Landová, Eva; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization between distinct species of animals and subsequent genetic introgression plays a considerable role in the speciation process and the emergence of adaptive characters. Fitness of between-species hybrids usually sharply decreases with the divergence time of the concerned species and the divergence depth, which still allows for a successful crossing differs among principal clades of vertebrates. Recently, a review of hybridization events among distinct lizard species revealed that lizards belong to vertebrates with a highly developed ability to hybridize. In spite of this, reliable reports of experimental hybridizations between genetically fairly divergent species are only exceptional. Here, we show the results of the crossing of two distinct allopatric species of eyelid geckos possessing temperature sex determination and lacking sex chromosomes: Eublepharis macularius distributed in Pakistan/Afghanistan area and E. angramainyu, which inhabits Mesopotamia and adjacent areas. We demonstrated that F1 hybrids were viable and fertile, and the introgression of E. angramainyu genes into the E. macularius genome can be enabled via a backcrossing. The examined hybrids (except those of the F2 generation) displayed neither malformations nor a reduced survival. Analyses of morphometric and coloration traits confirmed phenotypic distinctness of both parental species and their F1 hybrids. These findings contrast with long-term geographic and an evolutionary separation of the studied species. Thus, the occurrence of fertile hybrids of comparably divergent species, such as E. angramainyu and E. macularius, may also be expected in other taxa of squamates. This would violate the current estimates of species diversity in lizards. PMID:26633648

  15. Discovery of a novel bottlenose dolphin coronavirus reveals a distinct species of marine mammal coronavirus in Gammacoronavirus.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lam, Carol S F; Tsang, Alan K L; Hui, Suk-Wai; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Martelli, Paolo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    While gammacoronaviruses mainly comprise infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and its closely related bird coronaviruses (CoVs), the only mammalian gammacoronavirus was discovered from a white beluga whale (beluga whale CoV [BWCoV] SW1) in 2008. In this study, we discovered a novel gammacoronavirus from fecal samples from three Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), which we named bottlenose dolphin CoV (BdCoV) HKU22. All the three BdCoV HKU22-positive samples were collected on the same date, suggesting a cluster of infection, with viral loads of 1 × 10(3) to 1 × 10(5) copies per ml. Clearance of virus was associated with a specific antibody response against the nucleocapsid of BdCoV HKU22. Complete genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis showed that BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1 have similar genome characteristics and structures. Their genome size is about 32,000 nucleotides, the largest among all CoVs, as a result of multiple unique open reading frames (NS5a, NS5b, NS5c, NS6, NS7, NS8, NS9, and NS10) between their membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) protein genes. Although comparative genome analysis showed that BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1 should belong to the same species, a major difference was observed in the proteins encoded by their spike (S) genes, which showed only 74.3 to 74.7% amino acid identities. The high ratios of the number of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks) to the number of nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site (Ka) in multiple regions of the genome, especially the S gene (Ka/Ks ratio, 2.5), indicated that BdCoV HKU22 may be evolving rapidly, supporting a recent transmission event to the bottlenose dolphins. We propose a distinct species, Cetacean coronavirus, in Gammacoronavirus, to include BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1, whereas IBV and its closely related bird CoVs represent another species, Avian coronavirus, in Gammacoronavirus. PMID:24227844

  16. Discovery of a Novel Bottlenose Dolphin Coronavirus Reveals a Distinct Species of Marine Mammal Coronavirus in Gammacoronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lam, Carol S. F.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Hui, Suk-Wai; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Martelli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    While gammacoronaviruses mainly comprise infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and its closely related bird coronaviruses (CoVs), the only mammalian gammacoronavirus was discovered from a white beluga whale (beluga whale CoV [BWCoV] SW1) in 2008. In this study, we discovered a novel gammacoronavirus from fecal samples from three Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), which we named bottlenose dolphin CoV (BdCoV) HKU22. All the three BdCoV HKU22-positive samples were collected on the same date, suggesting a cluster of infection, with viral loads of 1 × 103 to 1 × 105 copies per ml. Clearance of virus was associated with a specific antibody response against the nucleocapsid of BdCoV HKU22. Complete genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis showed that BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1 have similar genome characteristics and structures. Their genome size is about 32,000 nucleotides, the largest among all CoVs, as a result of multiple unique open reading frames (NS5a, NS5b, NS5c, NS6, NS7, NS8, NS9, and NS10) between their membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) protein genes. Although comparative genome analysis showed that BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1 should belong to the same species, a major difference was observed in the proteins encoded by their spike (S) genes, which showed only 74.3 to 74.7% amino acid identities. The high ratios of the number of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks) to the number of nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site (Ka) in multiple regions of the genome, especially the S gene (Ka/Ks ratio, 2.5), indicated that BdCoV HKU22 may be evolving rapidly, supporting a recent transmission event to the bottlenose dolphins. We propose a distinct species, Cetacean coronavirus, in Gammacoronavirus, to include BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1, whereas IBV and its closely related bird CoVs represent another species, Avian coronavirus, in Gammacoronavirus. PMID:24227844

  17. A non-toxigenic but morphologically and phylogenetically distinct new species of Pseudo-nitzschia, P. sabit sp. nov. (Bacillariophyceae).

    PubMed

    Teng, Sing Tung; Lim, Po Teen; Lim, Hong Chang; Rivera-Vilarelle, María; Quijano-Scheggia, Sonia; Takata, Yoshinobu; Quilliam, Michael A; Wolf, Matthias; Bates, Stephen S; Leaw, Chui Pin

    2015-08-01

    A new species of Pseudo-nitzschia (Bacillariophyceae) is described from plankton samples collected from Port Dickson (Malacca Strait, Malaysia) and Manzanillo Bay (Colima, Mexico). The species possesses a distinctive falcate cell valve, from which they form sickle-like colonies in both environmental samples and cultured strains. Detailed observation of frustules under TEM revealed ultrastructure that closely resembles P. decipiens, yet the new species differs by the valve shape and greater ranges of striae and poroid densities. The species is readily distinguished from the curve-shaped P. subcurvata by the presence of a central interspace. The morphological distinction is further supported by phylogenetic discrimination. We sequenced and analyzed the nuclear ribosomal RNA genes in the LSU and the second internal transcribed spacer, including its secondary structure, to infer the phylogenetic relationship of the new species with its closest relatives. The results revealed a distinct lineage of the new species, forming a sister cluster with its related species, P. decipiens and P. galaxiae, but not with P. subcurvata. We examined the domoic acid (DA) production of five cultured strains from Malaysia by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), but they showed no detectable DA. Here, we present the taxonomic description of the vegetative cells, document the sexual reproduction, and detail the molecular phylogenetics of Pseudo-nitzschia sabit sp. nov. PMID:26986792

  18. Isotopic 'fingerprinting' of distinct water reservoirs in the critical zone and their exploitation by different tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshun, J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Dawson, T. E.; Rempe, D. M.; Fung, I. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Channel incision, surface erosion, and drainage of landscapes leads to emergent hillslopes underlain by varying degrees of soil development and weathered bedrock. Vertical and lateral differentiation by weathering leads to a structured heterogeneity of soil and rock properties that affect water pathways, moisture retention, and moisture availability to plants. Near surface evaporative losses cause seasonal isotopic enrichment of soil water, but we asked, what is the isotopic pattern of the deeper moisture and how important is it as a water source to the vegetation? Here, we report on the use of stable isotopic data to 'fingerprint' and then characterize the structure of subsurface water reservoirs that lie beneath an old-growth forested hillslope in the Eel River basin of northern California. The site, Rivendell, a 4000 m2 heavily instrumented, unchannled basin draining to Elder Creek 0.5 km upstream from the confluence with the South Fork Eel River, is composed of turbidite sequences of vertically dipping mudstone and minor sandstone. Soils are thin (0-60 cm), and are underlain by a 1-4 m thick saprolite layer, and a 3-20 m thick weathered rock zone. Annual precipitation of 1900 mm, predominantly from October to May, raises the water table from summer lows of 5-28 m below the ground to winter highs of 2.5 m below the ground, with depth to the water table increasing with upslope distance from Elder Creek. Whereas the north-facing slope has a dominant forest canopy composed of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and a mid-story of hardwood species (Quercus agrifolia, Umbellularia californica, Notholithocarpus densiflorus, Arbutus menziesii, and the riparian tree, Acer macrophyllum), the south-facing slope, which drains directly to the South Fork Eel River, is primarily hardwood. Intensive sampling over 20 months reveals subsurface moisture reservoirs in the mobile and bulk water of the soil, saprolite, and weathered rock, with persistent and distinct isotopic

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Mediate Species-Specific Modulations of Programmed Necrosis through the Viral Ribonucleotide Reductase Large Subunit R1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoliang; Li, Yun; Chen, Qin; Su, Chenhe; Zhang, Zili; Yang, Chengkui; Hu, Zhilin; Hou, Jue; Zhou, Jinying; Gong, Ling; Jiang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3) and its substrate mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) are core regulators of programmed necrosis. The elimination of pathogen-infected cells by programmed necrosis acts as an important host defense mechanism. Here, we report that human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 had opposite impacts on programmed necrosis in human cells versus their impacts in mouse cells. Similar to HSV-1, HSV-2 infection triggered programmed necrosis in mouse cells. However, neither HSV-1 nor HSV-2 infection was able to induce programmed necrosis in human cells. Moreover, HSV-1 or HSV-2 infection in human cells blocked tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced necrosis by preventing the induction of an RIP1/RIP3 necrosome. The HSV ribonucleotide reductase large subunit R1 was sufficient to suppress TNF-induced necrosis, and its RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM) domain was required to disrupt the RIP1/RIP3 complex in human cells. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HSV has likely evolved strategies to evade the host defense mechanism of programmed necrosis in human cells. IMPORTANCE This study demonstrated that infection with HSV-1 and HSV-2 blocked TNF-induced necrosis in human cells while these viruses directly activated programmed necrosis in mouse cells. Expression of HSV R1 suppressed TNF-induced necrosis of human cells. The RHIM domain of R1 was essential for its association with human RIP3 and RIP1, leading to disruption of the RIP1/RIP3 complex. This study provides new insights into the species-specific modulation of programmed necrosis by HSV. PMID:26559832

  20. Binding of EBP50 to Nox organizing subunit p47phox is pivotal to cellular reactive species generation and altered vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Al Ghouleh, Imad; Meijles, Daniel N; Mutchler, Stephanie; Zhang, Qiangmin; Sahoo, Sanghamitra; Gorelova, Anastasia; Henrich Amaral, Jefferson; Rodríguez, Andrés I; Mamonova, Tatyana; Song, Gyun Jee; Bisello, Alessandro; Friedman, Peter A; Cifuentes-Pagano, M Eugenia; Pagano, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    Despite numerous reports implicating NADPH oxidases (Nox) in the pathogenesis of many diseases, precise regulation of this family of professional reactive oxygen species (ROS) producers remains unclear. A unique member of this family, Nox1 oxidase, functions as either a canonical or hybrid system using Nox organizing subunit 1 (NoxO1) or p47(phox), respectively, the latter of which is functional in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this manuscript, we identify critical requirement of ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50; aka NHERF1) for Nox1 activation and downstream responses. Superoxide (O2 (•-)) production induced by angiotensin II (AngII) was absent in mouse EBP50 KO VSMC vs. WT. Moreover, ex vivo incubation of aortas with AngII showed a significant increase in O2 (•-) in WT but not EBP50 or Nox1 nulls. Similarly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress was attenuated in femoral arteries from EBP50 KO vs. WT. In silico analyses confirmed by confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay, FRET, and gain-/loss-of-function mutagenesis revealed binding of EBP50, via its PDZ domains, to a specific motif in p47(phox) Functional studies revealed AngII-induced hypertrophy was absent in EBP50 KOs, and in VSMC overexpressing EBP50, Nox1 gene silencing abolished VSMC hypertrophy. Finally, ex vivo measurement of lumen diameter in mouse resistance arteries exhibited attenuated AngII-induced vasoconstriction in EBP50 KO vs. WT. Taken together, our data identify EBP50 as a previously unidentified regulator of Nox1 and support that it promotes Nox1 activity by binding p47(phox) This interaction is pivotal for agonist-induced smooth muscle ROS, hypertrophy, and vasoconstriction and has implications for ROS-mediated physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:27540115

  1. Taxonomy and Phylogeny of the Fusarium dimerum Species Group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The morphospecies Fusarium dimerum, known only from its anamorph, comprises at least 12 phylogenetically distinct species. Analyses of the large subunit ribosomal DNA (LSU rDNA) show they are taxa of the Nectriaceae (Hypocreales) and form a phylogenetically distinct clade within Fusarium. Accordin...

  2. Conservation prioritization in widespread species: the use of genetic and morphological data to assess population distinctiveness in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Eric B; Tamkee, Patrick; Keeley, Ernest R; Parkinson, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Prioritization of efforts to maintain biodiversity is an important component of conservation, but is more often applied to ecosystems or species than within species. We assessed distinctiveness among 27 populations of rainbow trout (Salmonidae: Oncorhynchus mykiss) from British Columbia, Canada, using microsatellite DNA variation (representing historical or contemporary demography) and morphology (representing adaptive variation). Standardized genetic scores, that is, the average deviation across individuals within populations from the overall genetic score generated by factorial correspondence analysis, ranged from 1.05 to 4.90 among populations. Similar standardized morphological scores, generated by principal components analysis, ranged from 1.19 to 5.35. There was little correlation between genetic and morphological distinctiveness across populations, although one population was genetically and morphologically the most distinctive. There was, however, a significant correlation (r = 0.26, P = 0.008) between microsatellite (FST) and morphological (PST) divergence. We combined measures of allelic richness, genetic variation within, and divergence among, populations and morphological variation to provide a conservation ranking of populations. Our approach can be combined with other measures of biodiversity value (habitat, rarity, human uses, threat status) to rationalize the prioritization of populations, especially for widespread species where geographic isolation across distinct environments promotes intraspecific variability. PMID:25567956

  3. Comparison of four species-delimitation methods applied to a DNA barcode data set of insect larvae for use in routine bioassessment for use in routine bioassessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species delimitation (grouping individuals into distinct taxonomic groups) is an essential part of evolutionary, conservation, and molecular ecology. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcodes, short fragments of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, are being used in environm...

  4. Rare Failures of DNA Bar Codes to Separate Morphologically Distinct Species in a Biodiversity Survey of Iberian Leaf Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Baselga, Andrés; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola; Novoa, Francisco; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2013-01-01

    During a survey of genetic and species diversity patterns of leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) assemblages across the Iberian Peninsula we found a broad congruence between morphologically delimited species and variation in the cytochrome oxidase (cox1) gene. However, one species pair each in the genera Longitarsus Berthold and Pachybrachis Chevrolat was inseparable using molecular methods, whereas diagnostic morphological characters (including male or female genitalia) unequivocally separated the named species. Parsimony haplotype networks and maximum likelihood trees built from cox1 showed high genetic structure within each species pair, but no correlation with the morphological types and neither with geographic distributions. This contrasted with all analysed congeneric species, which were recovered as monophyletic. A limited number of specimens were sequenced for the nuclear 18S rRNA gene, which showed no or very limited variation within the species pair and no separation of morphological types. These results suggest that processes of lineage sorting for either group are lagging behind the clear morphological and presumably reproductive separation. In the Iberian chrysomelids, incongruence between DNA-based and morphological delimitations is a rare exception, but the discovery of these species pairs may be useful as an evolutionary model for studying the process of speciation in this ecological and geographical setting. In addition, the study of biodiversity patterns based on DNA requires an evolutionary understanding of these incongruences and their potential causes. PMID:24040352

  5. [Molecular cloning of the DNA sequence of activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides from panda and related species and its application in the research of phylogeny and taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Xi-Zhong; He, Guang-Xin; Chen, Hong-Wei; Fei, Li-Song

    2002-09-01

    Activin, which is included in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) superfamily of proteins and receptors, is known to have broad-ranging effects in the creatures. The mature peptide of beta A subunit of this gene, one of the most highly conserved sequence, can elevate the basal secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary and FSH is pivotal to organism's reproduction. Reproduction block is one of the main reasons which cause giant panda to extinct. The sequence of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides has been successfully amplified from giant panda, red panda and malayan sun bear's genomic DNA by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The PCR products were cloned into the vector pBlueScript+ of Esherichia coli. Sequence analysis of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides shows that the length of this gene segment is the same (359 bp) and there is no intron in all three species. The sequence encodes a peptide of 119 amino acid residues. The homology comparison demonstrates 93.9% DNA homology and 99% homology in amino acid among these three species. Both GenBank blast search result and restriction enzyme map reveal that the sequences of Activin beta A subunit gene mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during the evolution process. Phylogeny analysis is performed with PHYLIP software package. A consistent phylogeny tree has been drawn with three different methods. The software analysis outcome accords with the academic view that giant panda has a closer relationship to the malayan sun bear than the red panda. Giant panda should be grouped into the bear family (Uersidae) with the malayan sun bear. As to the red panda, it would be better that this animal be grouped into the unique family (red panda family) because of great difference between the red panda and the bears (Uersidae). PMID:12561224

  6. 76 FR 76386 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 5-Year Reviews for 4 Distinct Population Segments of Steelhead...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... Pacific salmon ESUs and steelhead DPSs in California, Oregon, Washington, and Idaho (75 FR 13082). Both... Reviews for 4 Distinct Population Segments of Steelhead in California AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Viable Salmonid Population framework, which relies on evaluating four key population...

  7. 75 FR 53272 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of 5-Year Review of the Eastern Distinct Population...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... requesting information related to that review (75 FR 37385). A notice correcting the email address and fax number to which comments and information should be sent was published July 7, 2010 (75 FR 38979). Written... of 5-Year Review of the Eastern Distinct Population Segment of the Steller Sea Lion AGENCY:...

  8. Distinctive presence of peritracheal athrocytes in Bombyx mori L. and Bombyx mandarina M. as compared to their absence in several other lepidopteran species.

    PubMed

    Owa, Chie; Aoki, Fugaku; Nagata, Masao

    2006-06-01

    Pericardial cells are present in a wide variety of insects and are thought to constitute the majority of 'athrocytes (nephrocytes)'. In contrast, peritracheal athrocytes have only been observed in Bombyx mori L. Although peritracheal athrocytes have a distinct morphology, it is unknown whether these cells are common to all lepidopterans. We anatomically compared eight lepidopteran species: Bombyx mori L. and Bombyx mandarina M. (Bombycidae); Samia cynthia ricini D. (Saturniidae); Agrius convolvuli L. (Sphingidae); Spodoptera litura F. and Mythimna separata W. (Noctuidae); Pieris rapae L. (Pieridae); and Glyphodes pyloalis W. (Crambidae). Of these species, only Bombyx mori L. and Bombyx mandarina M. possess peritracheal athrocytes. PMID:18089062

  9. Clarifying the identity of Amblyseius swirskii and Amblyseius rykei (Acari: Phytoseiidae): are they two distinct species or two populations of one species?

    PubMed

    Zannou, Ignace Dossa; Hanna, Rachid

    2011-04-01

    The generalist predator Amblyseius swirskii is an efficient natural enemy of small insects and phytophagous mites, particularly thrips and spider mites. This phytoseiid species was considered for a long time as a subtropical species and Amblyseius rykei as a sub-Saharan African species. A recent revision of phytoseiid species of the subtribe Amblyseiina from sub-Saharan Africa Zannou et al. (Zootaxa 1550:1-47, 2007) determined that the two species are identical and synonymized them. To confirm or invalidate that morphological study, we crossed a Benin population of A. rykei and an Israel population of A. swirskii through two generations and back-crossed their hybrids to their parents. We also compared demographic parameters of both species on maize pollen, and their predation and oviposition rates on first larval instars of Frankliniella occidentalis. All females of homogamic and heterogamic crosses produced viable progeny, fertile F1 and viable F2. All the laid eggs hatched and sex ratio was female-biased for all crosses. Demographic parameters of the two species on maize pollen, and their predation rates and development times (egg to adult) on first instars of F. occidentalis were similar. Only oviposition of A. swirskii on larvae of F. occidentalis was significantly higher than that of A. rykei. These results indicate that A. rykei and A. swirkii are conspecific, and thus are a single species as concluded by Zannou et al. PMID:21072570

  10. Super-resolution fluorescence of huntingtin reveals growth of globular species into short fibers and coexistence of distinct aggregates.

    PubMed

    Duim, Whitney C; Jiang, Yan; Shen, Koning; Frydman, Judith; Moerner, W E

    2014-12-19

    Polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin, the protein encoded by HTT mutations associated with Huntington's disease, forms aggregate species in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the mechanism of growth of fibrillar aggregates from soluble monomeric protein is critical to understanding the progression of Huntington's disease and to designing therapeutics for the disease, as well as for aggregates implicated in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We used the technique of multicolor single-molecule, super-resolution fluorescence imaging to characterize the growth of huntingtin exon 1 aggregates. The huntingtin exon 1 aggregation followed a pathway from exclusively spherical or globular species of ∼80 nm to fibers ∼1 μm in length that increased in width, but not length, over time with the addition of more huntingtin monomers. The fibers further aggregated with one another into aggregate assemblies of increasing size. Seeds created by sonication, which were comparable in shape and size to the globular species in the pathway, were observed to grow through multidirectional elongation into fibers, suggesting a mechanism for growth of globular species into fibers. The single-molecule sensitivity of our approach made it possible to characterize the aggregation pathway across a large range of size scales, from monomers to fiber assemblies, and revealed the coexistence of different aggregate species (globular species, fibers, fiber assemblies) even at late time points. PMID:25330023

  11. Super-Resolution Fluorescence of Huntingtin Reveals Growth of Globular Species into Short Fibers and Coexistence of Distinct Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin, the protein encoded by HTT mutations associated with Huntington’s disease, forms aggregate species in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the mechanism of growth of fibrillar aggregates from soluble monomeric protein is critical to understanding the progression of Huntington’s disease and to designing therapeutics for the disease, as well as for aggregates implicated in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We used the technique of multicolor single-molecule, super-resolution fluorescence imaging to characterize the growth of huntingtin exon 1 aggregates. The huntingtin exon 1 aggregation followed a pathway from exclusively spherical or globular species of ∼80 nm to fibers ∼1 μm in length that increased in width, but not length, over time with the addition of more huntingtin monomers. The fibers further aggregated with one another into aggregate assemblies of increasing size. Seeds created by sonication, which were comparable in shape and size to the globular species in the pathway, were observed to grow through multidirectional elongation into fibers, suggesting a mechanism for growth of globular species into fibers. The single-molecule sensitivity of our approach made it possible to characterize the aggregation pathway across a large range of size scales, from monomers to fiber assemblies, and revealed the coexistence of different aggregate species (globular species, fibers, fiber assemblies) even at late time points. PMID:25330023

  12. Genes encoding biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genomics is a useful tool to investigate gene and genome evolution. Biotin carboxylase (BC), an important subunit of heteromeric ACCase that is a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, catalyzes ATP, biotin-carboxyl-carrier protein and CO2 to form carboxybiotin-carbo...

  13. Characterization of the first honeybee Ca²⁺ channel subunit reveals two novel species- and splicing-specific modes of regulation of channel inactivation.

    PubMed

    Cens, Thierry; Rousset, Matthieu; Collet, Claude; Raymond, Valérie; Démares, Fabien; Quintavalle, Annabelle; Bellis, Michel; Le Conte, Yves; Chahine, Mohamed; Charnet, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    The honeybee is a model system to study learning and memory, and Ca(2+) signals play a key role in these processes. We have cloned, expressed, and characterized the first honeybee Ca(2+) channel subunit. We identified two splice variants of the Apis CaVβ Ca(2+) channel subunit (Am-CaVβ) and demonstrated expression in muscle and neurons. Although AmCaVβ shares with vertebrate CaVβ subunits the SH3 and GK domains, it beholds a unique N terminus that is alternatively spliced in the first exon to produce a long (a) and short (b) variant. When expressed with the CaV2 channels both, AmCaVβa and AmCaVβb, increase current amplitude, shift the voltage-sensitivity of the channel, and slow channel inactivation as the vertebrate CaVβ2a subunit does. However, as opposed to CaVβ2a, slow inactivation induced by Am-CaVβa was insensitive to palmitoylation but displayed a unique PI3K sensitivity. Inactivation produced by the b variant was PI3K-insensitive but staurosporine/H89-sensitive. Deletion of the first exon suppressed the sensitivity to PI3K inhibitors, staurosporine, or H89. Recording of Ba(2+) currents in Apis neurons or muscle cells evidenced a sensitivity to PI3K inhibitors and H89, suggesting that both AmCaVβ variants may be important to couple cell signaling to Ca(2+) entry in vivo. Functional interactions with phospho-inositide and identification of phosphorylation sites in AmCaVβa and AmCaVβb N termini, respectively, suggest that AmCaVβ splicing promoted two novel and alternative modes of regulation of channel activity with specific signaling pathways. This is the first description of a splicing-dependent kinase switch in the regulation of Ca(2+) channel activity by CaVβ subunit. PMID:23588376

  14. Taxonomic utility of environmental niche models for species distinction: A case study in Anthophora (Heliophila) (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taxonomy has far-reaching effects throughout biology, and incorrect taxonomy can be detrimental in many ways. Polymorphic species complexes, many of which exist in the bee genus Anthophora Latreille, lend themselves to such difficulties. This study employs environmental niche mapping (ENM) and tradi...

  15. Distinct migratory and non-migratory ecotypes of an endemic New Zealand eleotrid (Gobiomorphus cotidianus) – implications for incipient speciation in island freshwater fish species

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Many postglacial lakes contain fish species with distinct ecomorphs. Similar evolutionary scenarios might be acting on evolutionarily young fish communities in lakes of remote islands. One process that drives diversification in island freshwater fish species is the colonization of depauperate freshwater environments by diadromous (migratory) taxa, which secondarily lose their migratory behaviour. The loss of migration limits dispersal and gene flow between distant populations, and, therefore, is expected to facilitate local morphological and genetic differentiation. To date, most studies have focused on interspecific relationships among migratory species and their non-migratory sister taxa. We hypothesize that the loss of migration facilitates intraspecific morphological, behavioural, and genetic differentiation between migratory and non-migratory populations of facultatively diadromous taxa, and, hence, incipient speciation of island freshwater fish species. Results Microchemical analyses of otolith isotopes (88Sr, 137Ba and 43Ca) differentiated migratory and non-migratory stocks of the New Zealand endemic Gobiomorphus cotidianus McDowall (Eleotridae). Samples were taken from two rivers, one lake and two geographically-separated outgroup locations. Meristic analyses of oculoscapular lateral line canals documented a gradual reduction of these structures in the non-migratory populations. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints revealed considerable genetic isolation between migratory and non-migratory populations. Temporal differences in reproductive timing (migratory = winter spawners, non-migratory = summer spawners; as inferred from gonadosomatic indices) provide a prezygotic reproductive isolation mechanism between the two ecotypes. Conclusion This study provides a holistic look at the role of diadromy in incipient speciation of island freshwater fish species. All four analytical approaches (otolith microchemistry, morphology

  16. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Becraft, Eric D; Wood, Jason M; Rusch, Douglas B; Kühl, Michael; Jensen, Sheila I; Bryant, Donald A; Roberts, David W; Cohan, Frederick M; Ward, David M

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Stable Ecotype Model, evolution leads to the divergence of ecologically distinct populations (e.g., with different niches and/or behaviors) of ecologically interchangeable membership. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to provide deep sequence coverage of Synechococcus psaA genes and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species [putative ecotypes (PEs)], which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation), exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature-defined positions in the effluent channel and vertical position in the upper 1 mm-thick mat layer. Importantly, in most cases variants predicted to belong to the same PE formed unique clusters relative to temperature and depth in the mat in canonical correspondence analysis, supporting the hypothesis that while the PEs are ecologically distinct, the members of each ecotype are ecologically homogeneous. PEs responded differently to experimental perturbations of temperature and light, but the genetic variation within each PE was maintained as the relative abundances of PEs changed, further indicating that each population responded as a set of ecologically interchangeable individuals. Compared to PEs that predominate deeper within the mat photic zone, the timing of transcript abundances for selected genes differed for PEs that predominate in microenvironments closer to upper surface of the mat with spatiotemporal differences in light and O2 concentration. All of these findings are consistent with the hypotheses that Synechococcus species in hot spring mats are sets of ecologically interchangeable individuals that are differently adapted, that these adaptations control their distributions, and that the resulting distributions constrain the activities of the species in space and time. PMID:26157420

  17. The molecular dimension of microbial species: 1. Ecological distinctions among, and homogeneity within, putative ecotypes of Synechococcus inhabiting the cyanobacterial mat of Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Kühl, Michael; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bryant, Donald A.; Roberts, David W.; Cohan, Frederick M.; Ward, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Stable Ecotype Model, evolution leads to the divergence of ecologically distinct populations (e.g., with different niches and/or behaviors) of ecologically interchangeable membership. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to provide deep sequence coverage of Synechococcus psaA genes and transcripts over a large number of habitat types in the Mushroom Spring microbial mat. Putative ecological species [putative ecotypes (PEs)], which were predicted by an evolutionary simulation based on the Stable Ecotype Model (Ecotype Simulation), exhibited distinct distributions relative to temperature-defined positions in the effluent channel and vertical position in the upper 1 mm-thick mat layer. Importantly, in most cases variants predicted to belong to the same PE formed unique clusters relative to temperature and depth in the mat in canonical correspondence analysis, supporting the hypothesis that while the PEs are ecologically distinct, the members of each ecotype are ecologically homogeneous. PEs responded differently to experimental perturbations of temperature and light, but the genetic variation within each PE was maintained as the relative abundances of PEs changed, further indicating that each population responded as a set of ecologically interchangeable individuals. Compared to PEs that predominate deeper within the mat photic zone, the timing of transcript abundances for selected genes differed for PEs that predominate in microenvironments closer to upper surface of the mat with spatiotemporal differences in light and O2 concentration. All of these findings are consistent with the hypotheses that Synechococcus species in hot spring mats are sets of ecologically interchangeable individuals that are differently adapted, that these adaptations control their distributions, and that the resulting distributions constrain the activities of the species in space and time. PMID:26157420

  18. Biological and molecular characterisation of Bidens mosaic virus supports its assignment as a member of a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Marcio Martinello; De Marchi, Bruno R; Spadotti, David Marques; Nozaki, Denise Nakada; Pavan, Marcelo A; Krause-Sakate, Renate

    2014-08-01

    The complete nucleotide (nt) sequence of Bidens mosaic virus (BiMV) isolate SP01 was determined and shown to consist of 9,557 nt. Since it shared highest identities in the nt sequence of the whole genome (66-73 %) and in the aa sequence of the polyprotein (60-76 %) with viruses of the potato virus Y subgroup, it was compared with them genetically and biologically. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the closest relative of BiMV is sunflower chlorotic mottle virus, from which it, however, differed significantly in various respects. These results indicate that BiMV should represent a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus. PMID:24634052

  19. Photolysis of Hi-CO Nitrogenase – Observation of a Plethora of Distinct CO Species using Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lifen; Dapper, Christie H.; George, Simon J.; Wang, Hongxin; Mitra, Devrani; Dong, Weibing; Newton, William E.; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to study the photochemistry of CO-inhibited Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase using visible light at cryogenic temperatures. The FT-IR difference spectrum of photolyzed hi-CO at 4 K comprises negative bands at 1973 cm−1 and 1679 cm−1 together with positive bands at 1711 cm−1, 2135 and 2123 cm−1. The negative bands are assigned to a hi-CO state that comprises 2 metal-bound CO ligands, one terminally bound, and one bridged and/or protonated species. The positive band at 1711 cm−1 is assigned to a lo-CO product with a single bridged and/or protonated metal-CO group. We term these species ‘Hi-1’ and ‘Lo-1’ respectively. The high-energy bands are assigned to a liberated CO trapped in the protein pocket. Warming results in CO recombination, and the temperature dependence of the recombination rate yields an activation energy of 4 kJ mol−1. Two α-H195 variant enzymes yielded additional signals. Asparagine substitution, α-H195N, gives a spectrum containing 2 negative ‘Hi-2’ bands at 1936 and 1858 cm−1 with a positive ‘Lo-2’ band at 1780 cm−1, while glutamine substitution, α-H195Q, produces a complex spectrum that includes a third CO species, with negative ‘Hi-3’ bands at 1938 and 1911 cm−1 and a positive feature ‘Lo-3’ band at 1921 cm−1. These species can be assigned to a combination of terminal, bridged, and possibly protonated CO groups bound to the FeMo-cofactor active site. The proposed structures are discussed in terms of both CO inhibition and the mechanism nitrogenase catalysis. Given the intractability of observing nitrogenase intermediates by crystallographic methods, IR-monitored photolysis appears to be a promising and information-rich probe of nitrogenase structure and chemistry.

  20. Whole genome characterization of a chelonian orthoreovirus strain identifies significant genetic diversity and may classify reptile orthoreoviruses into distinct species.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Renáta; Marschang, Rachel E; Ihász, Katalin; Lengyel, György; Jakab, Ferenc; Bányai, Krisztián; Farkas, Szilvia L

    2016-04-01

    In this study we report the sequence and phylogenetic characterization of an orthoreovirus strain, CH1197/96, isolated from a spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) on chicken embryo fibroblast cells. The 23,957 bp long genome sequence was obtained by combined use of semiconductor and capillary sequencing. Although the genomic characterization showed that the virus was most similar to the bush viper reovirus strain, 47/02, and in phylogenies performed with all segments the two strains formed a monophyletic group, the nucleotide (48.4-70.3%) and amino acid (39.2-80.7%) sequence identity values were moderate between the two reptile origin reoviruses. Based on our results and existing classification criteria for the genus Orthoreovirus, the tortoise reovirus strain CH1197/96 might be the first representative of a novel reptilian origin Orthoreovirus species. PMID:26892635

  1. Cu(I)-catalyzed diamination of conjugated dienes. Complementary regioselectivity from two distinct mechanistic pathways involving Cu(II) and Cu(III) species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoguo; Peng, Xingao; Zhu, Yingguang; Ramirez, Thomas A; Cornwall, Richard G; Shi, Yian

    2011-12-28

    Conjugated dienes can be diaminated at the internal and/or terminal double bonds using Cu(I) as catalyst and N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) as nitrogen source. The regioselectivity is highly dependent upon the choice of Cu(I) catalyst and the substituents on diene substrates. The diamination likely proceeds via two mechanistically distinct pathways. The N-N bond of N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) is first homolytically cleaved by the Cu(I) catalyst to form four-membered Cu(III) species A and Cu(II) radical species B, which are in rapid equilibrium. The internal diamination likely proceeds in a concerted manner via Cu(III) species A, and the terminal diamination likely involves Cu(II) radical species B. Kinetic studies have shown that the diamination is first-order in N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1), zero-order in olefin, and first-order in total Cu(I) catalyst, and the cleavage of the N-N bond of 1 by the Cu(I) catalyst is the rate-determining step. The internal diamination is favored by use of CuBr without ligand and electron-rich dienes. The terminal diamination is favored when using CuCl-L and dienes with radical-stabilizing groups. PMID:22081888

  2. Cu(I)-Catalyzed Diamination of Conjugated Dienes. Complementary Regioselectivity from Two Distinct Mechanistic Pathways Involving Cu(II) and Cu(III) Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoguo; Peng, Xingao; Zhu, Yingguang; Ramirez, Thomas A.; Cornwall, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Conjugated dienes can be diaminated at the internal and/or terminal double bonds using Cu(I) as catalyst and N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) as nitrogen source. The regioselectivity is highly dependent upon the choice of Cu(I) catalyst and the substituents on diene substrates. The diamination likely proceeds via two mechanistically distinct pathways. The N-N bond of N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) is first homolytically cleaved by the Cu(I) catalyst to form four-membered Cu(III) species A and Cu(II) radical species B, which are in rapid equilibrium. The internal diamination likely proceeds in a concerted manner via Cu(III) species A and the terminal diamination likely involves Cu(II) radical species B. Kinetic studies have shown that the diamination is first-order in N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1), zero-order in olefin, first-order in total Cu(I) catalyst, and the cleavage of the N-N bond of 1 by the Cu(I) catalyst is the rate-determining step. The internal diamination is favored by use of CuBr without ligand and electron-rich dienes. The terminal diamination is favored when using CuCl-L and dienes with radical-stabilizing groups. PMID:22081888

  3. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-05-02

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA Polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), providing the first description of their physical compositions in plants. AC40 and AC19 subunits are typically common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes whose mutation, in humans, is a cause of the craniofacial disorder, Treacher-Collins Syndrome. Surprisingly, A. thaliana, and related species, express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Pol III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with this functional divergence of Pol I and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit, and either variant can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the twelve subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers.

  4. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-05-02

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA Polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), providing the first description of their physical compositions in plants. AC40 and AC19 subunits are typically common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes whose mutation, in humans, is a cause of the craniofacial disorder, Treacher-Collins Syndrome. Surprisingly, A. thaliana, and related species, express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Polmore » III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with this functional divergence of Pol I and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit, and either variant can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the twelve subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers.« less

  5. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), the first analysis of their physical compositions in plants. In all eukaryotes examined to date, AC40 and AC19 subunits are common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes. Surprisingly, A. thaliana and related species express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Pol III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with the functional divergence of Pol I- and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit and either protein can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the 12 subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers. PMID:25813043

  6. Distinct contributions of reactive oxygen species in amygdala to bee venom-induced spontaneous pain-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun-Fei; Neugebauer, Volker; Chen, Jun; Li, Zhen

    2016-04-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, play essential roles in physiological plasticity and are also involved in the pathogenesis of persistent pain. Roles of peripheral and spinal ROS in pain have been well established, but much less is known about ROS in the amygdala, a brain region that plays an important role in pain modulation. The present study explored the contribution of ROS in the amygdala to bee venom (BV)-induced pain behaviors. Our data show that the amygdala is activated following subcutaneous BV injection into the left hindpaw, which is reflected in the increased number of c-Fos positive cells in the central and basolateral amygdala nuclei in the right hemisphere. Stereotaxic administration of a ROS scavenger (tempol, 10mM), NADPH oxidase inhibitor (baicalein, 5mM) or lipoxygenase inhibitor (apocynin, 10mM) into the right amygdala attenuated the BV-induced spontaneous licking and lifting behaviors, but had no effect on BV-induced paw flinch reflexes. Our study provides further evidence for the involvement of the amygdala in nociceptive processing and pain behaviors, and that ROS in amygdala may be a potential target for treatment strategies to inhibit pain. PMID:26971700

  7. Distinction of three wood species by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Anmin; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Junliang; Fei, Benhua; Sun, Suqin

    2008-07-01

    Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen, Pterocarpus santalinus L.F. and Pterocarpus soyauxii are three kinds of the most valuable wood species, which are hard to distinguish. In this paper, differentiation of D. odorifera, P. santalinus and P. soyauxii was carried out by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative IR spectra and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. The three woods have their characteristic peaks in conventional IR spectra. For example, D. odorifera has obvious absorption peaks at 1640 and 1612 cm -1; P. santalinus has only one peak at 1614 cm -1; and P. soyauxii has one peak at 1619 cm -1 and one shoulder peak at 1597 cm -1. To enhance spectrum resolution and amplify the differences between the IR spectra of different woods, the second derivative technology was adopted to examine the three wood samples. More differences could be observed in the region of 800-1700 cm -1. Then, the thermal perturbation is applied to distinguish different wood samples in an easier way, because of the spectral resolution being enhanced by the 2D correlation spectroscopy. In the region of 1300-1800 cm -1, D. odorifera has five auto-peaks at 1518, 1575, 1594, 1620 and 1667 cm -1; P. santalinus has four auto-peaks at 1469, 1518, 1627 and 1639 cm -1 and P. soyauxii has only two auto-peaks at 1627 and 1639 cm -1. It is proved that the 2D correlation IR spectroscopy can be a new method to distinguish D. odorifera, P. santalinus and P. soyauxii.

  8. Local vasotocin modulation of the pacemaker nucleus resembles distinct electric behaviors in two species of weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Rossana; Migliaro, Adriana; Comas, Virginia; Quintana, Laura; Borde, Michel; Silva, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The neural bases of social behavior diversity in vertebrates have evolved in close association with hypothalamic neuropeptides. In particular, arginine-vasotocin (AVT) is a key integrator underlying differences in behavior across vertebrate taxa. Behavioral displays in weakly electric fish are channeled through specific patterns in their electric organ discharges (EODs), whose rate is ultimately controlled by a medullary pacemaker nucleus (PN). We first explored interspecific differences in the role of AVT as modulator of electric behavior in terms of EOD rate between the solitary Gymnotus omarorum and the gregarious Brachyhypopomus gauderio. In both species, AVT IP injection (10μg/gbw) caused a progressive increase of EOD rate of about 30%, which was persistent in B. gauderio, and attenuated after 30min in G. omarorum. Secondly, we demonstrated by in vitro electrophysiological experiments that these behavioral differences can be accounted by dissimilar effects of AVT upon the PN in itself. AVT administration (1μM) to the perfusion bath of brainstem slices containing the PN produced a small and transient increase of PN activity rate in G. omarorum vs the larger and persistent increase previously reported in B. gauderio. We also identified AVT neurons, for the first time in electric fish, using immunohistochemistry techniques and confirmed the presence of hindbrain AVT projections close to the PN that might constitute the anatomical substrate for AVT influences on PN activity. Taken together, our data reinforce the view of the PN as an extremely plastic medullary central pattern generator that not only responds to higher influences to adapt its function to diverse contexts, but also is able to intrinsically shape its response to neuropeptide actions, thus adding a hindbrain target level to the complexity of the global integration of central neuromodulation of electric behavior. PMID:25125289

  9. Molecular Identification of Sibling Species of Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) That Parasitize Buprestid and Cerambycid Beetles by Using Partial Sequences of Mitochondrial DNA Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit 1 and 28S Ribosomal RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Yang, Zhongqi; Wang, Xiaoyi; Hou, Yuxia

    2015-01-01

    The species belonging to Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) are currently the most important insect natural enemies of wood borer pests, mainly buprestid and cerambycid beetles, in China. However, some sibling species of this genus are very difficult to distinguish because of their similar morphological features. To address this issue, we conducted phylogenetic and genetic analyses of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 28S RNA gene sequences from eight species of Sclerodermus reared from different wood borer pests. The eight sibling species were as follows: S. guani Xiao et Wu, S. sichuanensis Xiao, S. pupariae Yang et Yao, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1–5). A 594-bp fragment of COI and 750-bp fragment of 28S were subsequently sequenced. For COI, the G-C content was found to be low in all the species, averaging to about 30.0%. Sequence divergences (Kimura-2-parameter distances) between congeneric species averaged to 4.5%, and intraspecific divergences averaged to about 0.09%. Further, the maximum sequence divergences between congeneric species and Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5) averaged to about 16.5%. All 136 samples analyzed were included in six reciprocally monophyletic clades in the COI neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. The NJ tree inferred from the 28S rRNA sequence yielded almost identical results, but the samples from S. guani, S. sichuanensis, S. pupariae, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1–4) clustered together and only Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5) clustered separately. Our findings indicate that the standard barcode region of COI can be efficiently used to distinguish morphologically similar Sclerodermus species. Further, we speculate that Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5) might be a new species of Sclerodermus. PMID:25782000

  10. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes) encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome) in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits). Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest–covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats–to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5) and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND5) of

  11. Steady state or non-steady state? Identifying driving mechanisms of oxygen isotope signatures of leaf transpiration in functionally distinct plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Cuntz, Matthias; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Isotope techniques are widely applied in ecosystem studies. For example, isoflux models are used to separate soil evaporation from transpiration in ecosystems. These models often assume that plant transpiration occurs at isotopic steady state, i.e. that the transpired water shows the same isotopic signature as the source water. Yet, several studies found that transpiration did not occur at isotopic steady state, under both controlled and field conditions. Here we focused on identifying the internal and external factors which drive the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration. Using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the effect of both environmental variables and leaf physiological traits on δ18OT was investigated under controlled conditions. Six plant species with distinct leaf physiological traits were exposed to step changes in relative air humidity (RH), their response in δ18OT and gas exchange parameters and their leaf physiological traits were assessed. Moreover, two functionally distinct plant types (tree, i.e. Quercus suber, and grassland) of a semi-arid Mediterranean oak-woodland where observed under natural conditions throughout an entire growth period in the field. The species differed substantially in their leaf physiological traits and their turn-over times of leaf water. They could be grouped in species with fast (<60 min.), intermediate (ca. 120 min.) and slow (>240 min.) turn-over times, mostly due to differences in stomatal conductance, leaf water content or a combination of both. Changes in RH caused an immediate response in δ18OT, which were similarly strong in all species, while leaf physiological traits affected the subsequent response in δ18OT. The turn-over time of leaf water determined the speed of return to the isotopic steady or a stable δ18OT value (Dubbert & Kübert et al., in prep.). Under natural conditions, changes in environmental conditions over the diurnal cycle had a huge impact on the diurnal development of δ18OT in both

  12. Phylogenetic relationship and virulence inference of Streptococcus Anginosus Group: curated annotation and whole-genome comparative analysis support distinct species designation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    VNTR numbers that occurred over the course of one year. Conclusions The comparative genomic analysis of the SAG clarifies the phylogenetics of these bacteria and supports the distinct species classification. Numerous potential virulence determinants were identified and provide a foundation for further studies into SAG pathogenesis. Furthermore, the data may be used to enable the development of rapid diagnostic assays and therapeutics for these pathogens. PMID:24341328

  13. Extremely low microsatellite diversity but distinct population structure in a long-lived threatened species, the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri (Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jane M; Schmidt, Daniel J; Huey, Joel A; Real, Kathryn M; Espinoza, Thomas; McDougall, Andrew; Kind, Peter K; Brooks, Steven; Roberts, David T

    2015-01-01

    The Australian lungfish is a unique living representative of an ancient dipnoan lineage, listed as 'vulnerable' to extinction under Australia's Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Historical accounts indicate this species occurred naturally in two adjacent river systems in Australia, the Burnett and Mary. Current day populations in other rivers are thought to have arisen by translocation from these source populations. Early genetic work detected very little variation and so had limited power to answer questions relevant for management including how genetic variation is partitioned within and among sub-populations. In this study, we use newly developed microsatellite markers to examine samples from the Burnett and Mary Rivers, as well as from two populations thought to be of translocated origin, Brisbane and North Pine. We test whether there is significant genetic structure among and within river drainages; assign putatively translocated populations to potential source populations; and estimate effective population sizes. Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci genotyped in 218 individuals gave an average within-population heterozygosity of 0.39 which is low relative to other threatened taxa and for freshwater fishes in general. Based on FST values (average over loci = 0.11) and STRUCTURE analyses, we identify three distinct populations in the natural range, one in the Burnett and two distinct populations in the Mary. These analyses also support the hypothesis that the Mary River is the likely source of translocated populations in the Brisbane and North Pine rivers, which agrees with historical published records of a translocation event giving rise to these populations. We were unable to obtain bounded estimates of effective population size, as we have too few genotype combinations, although point estimates were low, ranging from 29 - 129. We recommend that, in order to preserve any local adaptation in the three distinct populations that

  14. Extremely Low Microsatellite Diversity but Distinct Population Structure in a Long-Lived Threatened Species, the Australian Lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri (Dipnoi)

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jane M.; Schmidt, Daniel J.; Huey, Joel A.; Real, Kathryn M.; Espinoza, Thomas; McDougall, Andrew; Kind, Peter K.; Brooks, Steven; Roberts, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The Australian lungfish is a unique living representative of an ancient dipnoan lineage, listed as ‘vulnerable’ to extinction under Australia’s Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Historical accounts indicate this species occurred naturally in two adjacent river systems in Australia, the Burnett and Mary. Current day populations in other rivers are thought to have arisen by translocation from these source populations. Early genetic work detected very little variation and so had limited power to answer questions relevant for management including how genetic variation is partitioned within and among sub-populations. In this study, we use newly developed microsatellite markers to examine samples from the Burnett and Mary Rivers, as well as from two populations thought to be of translocated origin, Brisbane and North Pine. We test whether there is significant genetic structure among and within river drainages; assign putatively translocated populations to potential source populations; and estimate effective population sizes. Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci genotyped in 218 individuals gave an average within-population heterozygosity of 0.39 which is low relative to other threatened taxa and for freshwater fishes in general. Based on FST values (average over loci = 0.11) and STRUCTURE analyses, we identify three distinct populations in the natural range, one in the Burnett and two distinct populations in the Mary. These analyses also support the hypothesis that the Mary River is the likely source of translocated populations in the Brisbane and North Pine rivers, which agrees with historical published records of a translocation event giving rise to these populations. We were unable to obtain bounded estimates of effective population size, as we have too few genotype combinations, although point estimates were low, ranging from 29 - 129. We recommend that, in order to preserve any local adaptation in the three distinct populations

  15. Two distinct abnormalities in patients with C8 alpha-gamma deficiency. Low level of C8 beta chain and presence of dysfunctional C8 alpha-gamma subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, F; Roncelli, L; Petersen, B H; Agnello, V; Sodetz, J M

    1990-01-01

    The sera from three C8 alpha-gamma deficient patients previously reported to have a selective C8 alpha-gamma defect were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot using two polyclonal antisera to C8 alpha-gamma and a monoclonal antibody to C8 alpha. All three sera exhibited C8 alpha-gamma bands that dissociated into alpha and gamma chains under reducing conditions. Quantitation of the alpha-gamma subunit in these sera by a sensitive ELISA revealed an amount approximately 1% of that found in normal human serum. A similar assay performed with a specific antiserum to C8 beta showed unexpectedly low levels of C8 beta in these sera, which were confirmed by hemolytic titration of C8 beta. The remarkable differences between C8 alpha-gamma and C8 beta in the C8 alpha-gamma deficient sera was that in spite of their comparable immunochemical levels, C8 beta still exhibited functional activity whereas C8 alpha-gamma was totally inactive. That the residual C8 alpha-gamma was inactive was also proved by its inability to show lytic bands in an overlay system after SDS-PAGE and subsequent removal of SDS. The implications of these findings for a novel concept of C8 deficiency are discussed. Images PMID:2394837

  16. RNA sequencing supports distinct reactive oxygen species-mediated pathways of apoptosis by high and low size mass fractions of Bay leaf (Lauris nobilis) in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Annabelle L; Ververis, Katherine; Sayakkarage, Dheeshana; Khan, Abdul W; Rafehi, Haloom; Ziemann, Mark; Loveridge, Shanon J; Lazarus, Ross; Kerr, Caroline; Lockett, Trevor; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C; Bennett, Louise E

    2015-08-01

    Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) in mammalian cancer and HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells have been previously attributed to effects of polyphenolic and essential oil chemical species. Recently, we demonstrated differentiated growth-regulating effects of high (HFBL) versus low molecular mass (LFBL) aqueous fractions of bay leaf and now confirm by comparative effects on gene expression, that HFBL and LFBL suppress HT-29 growth by distinct mechanisms. Induction of intra-cellular lesions including DNA strand breakage by extra-cellular HFBL, invoked the hypothesis that iron-mediated reactive oxygen species with capacity to penetrate cell membrane, were responsible for HFBL-mediated effects, supported by equivalent effects of HFBL in combination with γ radiation. Activities of HFBL and LFBL were interpreted to reflect differentiated responses to iron-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS), occurring either outside or inside cells. In the presence of LFBL, apoptotic death was relatively delayed compared with HFBL. ROS production by LFBL mediated p53-dependent apoptosis and recovery was suppressed by promoting G1/S phase arrest and failure of cellular tight junctions. In comparison, intra-cellular anti-oxidant protection exerted by LFBL was absent for extra-cellular HFBL (likely polysaccharide-rich), which potentiated more rapid apoptosis by producing DNA double strand breaks. Differentiated effects on expression of genes regulating ROS defense and chromatic condensation by LFBL versus HFBL, were observed. The results support ferrous iron in cell culture systems and potentially in vivo, can invoke different extra-cellular versus intra-cellular ROS-mediated chemistries, that may be regulated by exogenous, including dietary species. PMID:26114728

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIES AND SOURCES OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN STORM WATERS BY A SMALL SUBUNIT RRNA-BASED DIAGNOSTIC AND GENOTYPING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples is largely made by the use of immunofluorescent assay (IFA). because IFA detects oocysts from all Cryptosporidium parasites, the species distribution and source of Cryptosporidium parasites in environmental sa...

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SPECIES AND THE SOURCES IN RAW WASTEWATER USING A SMALL SUBUNIT RRNA-BASED PCR-RFLP TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The species composition and source of Cryptosporidium oocysts in wastewater have never been determined, even though it is widely assumed that these oocysts are from human sewage. Recent molecular characterizations of Cryptosporidium parasites make it possible to differentiate hum...

  19. A comparative study on Ca content and distribution in two Gesneriaceae species reveals distinctive mechanisms to cope with high rhizospheric soluble calcium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlong; Xu, Falun; Chen, Shixuan; Zhang, Zhennan; Zhao, Yan; Jin, Yukuan; Li, Meijing; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Yongxiu; Yang, Yi; Deng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Excessive Ca is toxic to plants thus significantly affects plant growth and species distribution in Ca-rich karst areas. To understand how plants survive high Ca soil, laboratory experiments were established to compare the physiological responses and internal Ca distribution in organ, tissue, cell, and intracellular levels under different Ca levels for Lysionotus pauciflorus and Boea hygrometrica, two karst habitant Gesneriaceae species in Southwest China. In the controlled condition, L. pauciflorus could survive as high as 200 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, attributed to a series of physiological responses and preferential storage that limited Ca accumulation in chloroplasts of palisade cells. In contrast, B. hygrometrica could survive only 20 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, but accumulated a high level of internal Ca in both palisade and spongy cells without disturbance on photosynthetic activity. By phenotype screening of transgenic plants expressing high Ca-inducible genes from B. hygrometrica, the expression of BhDNAJC2 in A. thaliana was found to enhance plant growth and photosynthesis under high soluble Ca stress. BhDNAJC2 encodes a recently reported heat shock protein (HSP) 40 family DnaJ-domain protein. The Ca-resistant phenotype of BhDNAJC2 highlights the important role of chaperone-mediated protein quality control in Ca tolerance in B. hygrometrica. Taken together, our results revealed that distinctive mechanisms were employed in the two Gesneriaceae karst habitants to cope with a high Ca environment. PMID:25477893

  20. IFN-β-inducing, unusual viral RNA species produced by paramyxovirus infection accumulated into distinct cytoplasmic structures in an RNA-type-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Asuka; Kawabata, Ryoko; Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Irie, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) system is one of the most important defensive responses of mammals against viruses, and is rapidly evoked when the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) of viruses are sensed. Non-self, virus-derived RNA species have been identified as the PAMPs of RNA viruses. In the present study, we compared different types of IFN-β-inducing and -non-inducing viruses in the context of Sendai virus infection. We found that some types of unusual viral RNA species were produced by infections with IFN-β-inducing viruses and accumulated into distinct cytoplasmic structures in an RNA-type-dependent manner. One of these structures was similar to the so-called antiviral stress granules (avSGs) formed by an infection with IFN-inducing viruses whose C proteins were knocked-out or mutated. Non-encapsidated, unusual viral RNA harboring the 5′-terminal region of the viral genome as well as RIG-I and typical SG markers accumulated in these granules. Another was a non-SG-like inclusion formed by an infection with the Cantell strain; a copyback-type DI genome, but not an authentic viral genome, specifically accumulated in the inclusion, whereas RIG-I and SG markers did not. The induction of IFN-β was closely associated with the production of these unusual RNAs as well as the formation of the cytoplasmic structures. PMID:26300870

  1. Comprehensive genetic analyses reveal evolutionary distinction of a mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei) proposed for delisting from the US Endangered Species Act

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Switzer, J.F.; Morrison, C.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Young, C.C.; Lubinski, B.A.; Cryan, P.

    2006-01-01

    Zapus hudsonius preblei, listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), is one of 12 recognized subspecies of meadow jumping mice found in North America. Recent morphometric and phylogenetic comparisons among Z. h. preblei and neighbouring conspecifics questioned the taxonomic status of selected subspecies, resulting in a proposal to delist the Z. h. preblei from the ESA. We present additional analyses of the phylogeographic structure within Z. hudsonius that calls into question previously published data (and conclusions) and confirms the original taxonomic designations. A survey of 21 microsatellite DNA loci and 1380 base pairs from two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions (control region and cytochrome b) revealed that each Z. hudsonius subspecies is genetically distinct. These data do not support the null hypothesis of a homogeneous gene pool among the five subspecies found within the southwestern portion of the species' range. The magnitude of the observed differentiation was considerable and supported by significant findings for nearly every statistical comparison made, regardless of the genome or the taxa under consideration. Structuring of nuclear multilocus genotypes and subspecies-specific mtDNA haplotypes corresponded directly with the disjunct distributions of the subspecies investigated. Given the level of correspondence between the observed genetic population structure and previously proposed taxonomic classification of subspecies (based on the geographic separation and surveys of morphological variation), we conclude that the nominal subspecies surveyed in this study do not warrant synonymy, as has been proposed for Z. h. preblei, Z. h. campestris, and Z. h. intermedius. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  2. Molecular phylogeny of the subfamily Gerbillinae (Muridae, Rodentia) with emphasis on species living in the Xinjiang-Uygur Autonomous Region of China and based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II genes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mamoru; Jiang, Wei; Sato, Jun J; Zhen, Qiang; Jiao, Wei; Goto, Kazuo; Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiwata, Kenji; Oku, Yuzaburo; Chai, June-Jie; Kamiya, Haruo

    2010-03-01

    Rodents belonging to the subfamily Gerbillinae and living in the Xinjiang-Uygur autonomous region of China were collected in field surveys between 2001 and 2003. We found four Meriones species, including M. chengi M. liycus, M. meridianus, and M. tamariscinus, as well as related species from different genera, Rhombomys opimus and Brachiones przewaliskii For phylogenetic analyses of these gerbilline species, DNA sequences of parts of the mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) genes were examined with the neighbor Joining, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference methods. Our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the genus Meriones is not monophyletic and place M. tamaricinus as the sister taxon to a clade comprising Brachiones, Psammomys, Rhombomys, and the other Meriones species. The remaining Meriones species separate into three lineages: M. meridianus (including M. chengi), Meriones unguiculatus, and a clade that includes multiple Meriones species originating from Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. The phylogenetic relationships among the genera Brachines, Meriones, Psammomys, and Rhombomys remain ambiguous, probably due to the saturation of mutations that occurs in fast-evolving mitochondrial DNA. In addition, intraspecific variation was observed for M. meridianus, and this mostly correlated with collection localities, i.e., the northern and southern parts of the Xinjiang region. This variation corresponded to interspecific levels of divergence among other lineages of Meriones. Interestingly, no differences were observed in either the Cytb or COII gene sequences isolated from M. chengi collected from the Turfan Basin in the north and those from M. meridianus in the south, suggesting that M. chengi may be a synonym of M. meridianus. PMID:20192696

  3. Evidence for the existence of two distinct species: Psammomys obesus and Psammomys vexillaris within the sand rats (Rodentia, Gerbillinae), reservoirs of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ben Hamou; Abderrazak Souha, Ben; Sabeh, Frigui; Noureddine, Chatti; Riadh, Ben Ismail

    2006-07-01

    A thorough taxonomic knowledge about putative animal reservoirs of transmissible diseases is an absolute prerequisite to any ecological investigation and epidemiological survey of zoonoses. Indeed, accurate identification of these reservoirs is essential for predicting species-specific population outbreaks and therefore to develop accurate ecological control strategies. The systematic status of sand rats (genus Psammomys) remains unclear despite the pivotal role of these rodents in the epidemiology of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ZCL) disease as sand rats are the main known reservoir hosts of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major. In the present work, we expose morphological, biochemical, genetic and cytogenetic evidence supporting the identification of at least two cryptic species within the genus Psammomys in Tunisia. First, significant morphometric differences were observed and were correlated associated with external features and biogeographic origins. Second, differences in patterns of two isoenzymic systems (Glutamate Oxaloacetate Transaminase (GOT) and 6-PhosphoGluconate Dehydrogenase (6PGD)) were found, which makes it possible to amount these isoenzyme characters to two diagnostic loci. Third, based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene, a high magnitude of genetic distance (13.89%) was also observed. Fourth, cytogenetic analysis showed that these two populations groups differ in their diploid chromosome numbers, i.e. 2N=46 versus 2N=48. We consider that all these variations are enough important to be considered as demonstrative and we propose that these two lineages should be considered as two distinct species that we refer to the fat sand rat Psammomys obesus Cretzschmar, 1828 and the thin sand rat Psammomys vexillaris Thomas, 1925. Implications of such results on the eco-epidemiology of ZCL in Tunisia are discussed. PMID:16243007

  4. Characterization of Brassica nigra collections using simple sequence repeat markers reveals distinct groups associated with geographical location, and frequent mislabelling of species identity.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Aneeta; Nelson, Matthew N; Plummer, Julie A; Cowling, Wallace A; Yan, Guijun

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 180 Brassica nigra (L.) Kochgenotypes from 60 different accessions was evaluated using 15 simple sequence repeat markers with known locations on the Brassica A, B, and C genomes. Two lines each from Brassica juncea (L.) Czern and Brassica carinata Braunwere also included as comparator species. A total of 218 high quality alleles were used to generate a genetic distance matrix, and clustering and multidimensional scaling analyses were used to investigate genetic relationships among the accessions. Accessions from the same country of origin tended to cluster together. Surprisingly, 13 accessions declared to be B. nigra had A- and B-genome alleles and morphology consistent with them being B. juncea, which was supported by their positioning near B. juncea in the cluster analysis. Two B. nigra accessions possessed alleles associated more closely with the A genome than the B genome, and these may be Brassica rapa L. accessions. One B. nigra accession had B- and C-genome alleles and morphology consistent with it being B. carinata. The remaining 44 accessions (73%) appeared to be truly B. nigra and formed morphologically and genetically distinct groups associated with country or region of origin, notably Ethiopia, Israel, India, and Europe. Most B. nigra accessions were highly heterozygous, consistent with their obligate outcrossing habit. This study demonstrated the value of using molecular markers with known genome locations (in this case, in the Brassica A, B, and C genomes) to confirm species identity in families such as Brassicaceae where species identification based solely on morphological characters is difficult. PMID:21217806

  5. Sensitivity to Low-Dose/Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in Mammalian Cells Harboring Mutations in Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit C is Governed by Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Slane, Benjamin G.; Liu, Annie T. Y.; Owens, Kjerstin M.; O'Malley, Malinda S.; Smith, Brian J.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that ionizing radiation-induced disruptions in mitochondrial O2 metabolism lead to persistent heritable increases in steady-state levels of intracellular superoxide (O2•−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that contribute to the biological effects of radiation. Hamster fibroblasts (B9 cells) expressing a mutation in the gene coding for the mitochondrial electron transport chain protein succinate dehydrogenase subunit C (SDHC) demonstrate increases in steady-state levels of O2•− and H2O2. When B9 cells were exposed to low-dose/low-LET radiation (5–50 cGy), they displayed significantly increased clonogenic cell killing compared with parental cells. Clones derived from B9 cells overexpressing a wild-type human SDHC (T4, T8) demonstrated significantly increased surviving fractions after exposure to 5–50 cGy relative to B9 vector controls. In addition, pretreatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated CuZn superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as adenoviral-mediated overexpression of MnSOD and/or mitochondria-targeted catalase resulted in significantly increased survival of B9 cells exposed to 10 cGy ionizing radiation relative to vector controls. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of either MnSOD or mitochondria-targeted catalase alone was equally as effective as when both were combined. These results show that mammalian cells over expressing mutations in SDHC demonstrate low-dose/low-LET radiation sensitization that is mediated by increased levels of O2•− and H2O2. These results also support the hypothesis that mitochondrial O2•− and H2O2 originating from SDH are capable of playing a role in low-dose ionizing radiation-induced biological responses. PMID:21268708

  6. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis

    PubMed Central

    DaMata, Jarina Pena; Mendes, Bárbara Pinheiro; Maciel-Lima, Kátia; Menezes, Cristiane Alves Silva; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Horta, Maria Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6), whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection. PMID:26513474

  7. Detailed LC-MS/MS analysis of ciguatoxins revealing distinct regional and species characteristics in fish and causative alga from the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Yogi, Kentaro; Oshiro, Naomasa; Inafuku, Yasuo; Hirama, Masahiro; Yasumoto, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Toxin profiles of representative ciguatera species caught at different locations of Japan were investigated in fish flesh by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Identification and quantification of 16 toxins were facilitated by the use of 14 reference toxins prepared by either synthesis or isolation from natural sources and the previous LC-MS data thereof. Sodium adduct ions [M + Na](+) were used as parent and product ions. Distinct regional differences were unveiled: ciguatoxin-1B type toxins were found in snappers and groupers from Okinawa, ciguatoxin-3C type toxins were found in a spotted knifejaw, Oplegnathus punctatus, from Miyazaki located 730 km north of Okinawa, and both types of toxins were found in a red snapper, Lutjanus bohar, from Minamitorishima (Marcus) Island. Twelve toxins were identified in a dinoflagellate, Gambierdiscus toxicus, collected as the primary toxin source in French Polynesia. Occurrence of M-seco-toxins in fish and oxidized toxins in the dinoflagellate was confirmed for the first time. The present LC-MS/MS method is rapid, specific, and accurate. It not only outperforms the currently employed mouse bioassays but also enables the study of the toxin dynamics during the food chain transmission. PMID:22010820

  8. Characterization and charge distribution of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on secreted mouse thyrotropin and free alpha-subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Gesundheit, N.; Gyves, P.W.; DeCherney, G.S.; Stannard, B.S.; Winston, R.L.; Weintraub, B.D.

    1989-06-01

    Mouse hemipituitaries in vitro secrete TSH, composed of an alpha-beta heterodimer, as well as excess (free) alpha-subunits. By dual metabolic labeling with (35S)sulfate and (3H)mannose, we have characterized oligosaccharides from secreted TSH alpha, TSH beta, and free alpha-subunits released from the apoprotein by enzymatic deglycosylation. Oligosaccharides from each subunit displayed a distinct anion exchange HPLC profile due to a specific pattern of sialylation and sulfation. Six species were obtained from TSH alpha (with two glycosylation sites), including neutral oligosaccharides as well as those with one or two negative charges. For TSH beta (with one glycosylation site) at least eight oligosaccharide species were noted, representing nearly every permutation of sialylation and sulfation; approximately 30% contained three or more negative charges. Analysis of (3H)mannose-labeled oligosaccharides on Concanavalin-A-agarose showed 85% binding for those from TSH alpha, 70% for free alpha, and 50% for those from TSH beta. These data demonstrate that oligosaccharides from secreted TSH beta were more sialylated and sulfated, consistent with a more complex branching pattern, than those from TSH alpha. Oligosaccharides from free alpha-subunit were more sialylated than those from TSH alpha, and the net negative charge was intermediate between those of TSH alpha and TSH beta. Although great microheterogeneity is present even at the single glycosylation site on the beta-subunit of secreted TSH, a pattern of sialylation and sulfation could be discerned.

  9. Genes encoding the alpha-carboxyltransferase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Yin, Wei-Bo; Guo, Huan; Song, Li-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hong; Guan, Rong-Zhan; Wang, Jing-Qiao; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2010-05-01

    Heteromeric acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase), a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, is a multi-enzyme complex consisting of biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase (alpha-CT and beta-CT). In the present study, four genes encoding alpha-CT were cloned from Brassica napus, and two were cloned from each of the two parental species, B. rapa and B. oleracea. Comparative and cluster analyses indicated that these genes were divided into two major groups. The major divergence between group-1 and group-2 occurred in the second intron. Group-2 alpha-CT genes represented the ancestral form in the genus Brassica. The divergence of group-1 and group-2 genes occurred in their common ancestor 12.96-17.78 million years ago (MYA), soon after the divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica (15-20 MYA). This time of divergence is identical to that reported for the paralogous subgenomes of diploid Brassica species (13-17 MYA). Real-time reverse transcription PCR revealed that the expression patterns of the two groups of genes were similar in different organs, except in leaves. To better understand the regulation and evolution of alpha-CT genes, promoter regions from two sets of orthologous gene copies from B. napus, B. rapa, and B. oleracea were cloned and compared. The function of the promoter of gene Bnalpha-CT-1-1 in group-1 and gene Bnalpha-CT-2-1 in group-2 was examined by assaying beta-glucuronidase activity in transgenic A. thaliana. Our results will be helpful in elucidating the evolution and regulation of ACCase in oilseed rape. PMID:20616867

  10. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R M; Franco, E; Teixeira, A R

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a +5 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35S-labelled ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (< 1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photo-synthetic tissues. PMID:8761476

  11. Oxidant regulated inter-subunit disulfide bond formation between ASIC1a subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xiang-ming; Wang, Runping; Collier, Dan M.; Snyder, Peter M.; Wemmie, John A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a) is composed of 3 subunits and is activated by a decrease in extracellular pH. It plays an important role in diseases associated with a reduced pH and production of oxidants. Previous work showed that oxidants reduce ASIC1a currents. However, the effects on channel structure and composition are unknown. We found that ASIC1a formed inter-subunit disulfide bonds and the oxidant H2O2 increased this link between subunits. Cys-495 in the ASIC1a C terminus was particularly important for inter-subunit disulfide bond formation, although other C-terminal cysteines contributed. Inter-subunit disulfide bonds also produced some ASIC1a complexes larger than trimers. Inter-subunit disulfide bond formation reduced the proportion of ASIC1a located on the cell surface and contributed to the H2O2-induced decrease in H+-gated current. These results indicate that channel function is controlled by disulfide bond formation between intracellular residues on distinct ASIC1a subunits. They also suggest a mechanism by which the redox state can dynamically regulate membrane protein activity by forming intracellular bridges. PMID:19218436

  12. Binding interface between the Salmonella σS/RpoS subunit of RNA polymerase and Crl: hints from bacterial species lacking crl

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Paola; Sizun, Christina; Levi-Acobas, Fabienne; Nowakowski, Mireille; Monteil, Véronique; Bontems, François; Bellalou, Jacques; Mayer, Claudine; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In many Gram-negative bacteria, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), the sigma factor RpoS/σS accumulates during stationary phase of growth, and associates with the core RNA polymerase enzyme (E) to promote transcription initiation of genes involved in general stress resistance and starvation survival. Whereas σ factors are usually inactivated upon interaction with anti-σ proteins, σS binding to the Crl protein increases σS activity by favouring its association to E. Taking advantage of evolution of the σS sequence in bacterial species that do not contain a crl gene, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we identified and assigned a critical arginine residue in σS to the S. Typhimurium σS-Crl binding interface. We solved the solution structure of S. Typhimurium Crl by NMR and used it for NMR binding assays with σS and to generate in silico models of the σS-Crl complex constrained by mutational analysis. The σS-Crl models suggest that the identified arginine in σS interacts with an aspartate of Crl that is required for σS binding and is located inside a cavity enclosed by flexible loops, which also contribute to the interface. This study provides the basis for further structural investigation of the σS-Crl complex. PMID:26338235

  13. Phylogeographic Evidence for 2 Genetically Distinct Zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi Parasites, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Ruhani; Ahmed, Md Atique; Jelip, Jenarun; Ngian, Hie Ung; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Hussin, Hani Mat; Fong, Mun Yik; Mahmud, Rohela; Sitam, Frankie Anak Thomas; Japning, J. Rovie-Ryan; Snounou, Georges; Escalante, Ananias A.

    2016-01-01

    Infections of humans with the zoonotic simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi occur throughout Southeast Asia, although most cases have occurred in Malaysia, where P. knowlesi is now the dominant malaria species. This apparently skewed distribution prompted an investigation of the phylogeography of this parasite in 2 geographically separated regions of Malaysia, Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo. We investigated samples collected from humans and macaques in these regions. Haplotype network analyses of sequences from 2 P. knowlesi genes, type A small subunit ribosomal 18S RNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, showed 2 genetically distinct divergent clusters, 1 from each of the 2 regions of Malaysia. We propose that these parasites represent 2 distinct P. knowlesi types that independently became zoonotic. These types would have evolved after the sea-level rise at the end of the last ice age, which separated Malaysian Borneo from Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:27433965

  14. Phylogeographic Evidence for 2 Genetically Distinct Zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi Parasites, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Ruhani; Ahmed, Md Atique; Jelip, Jenarun; Ngian, Hie Ung; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Hussin, Hani Mat; Fong, Mun Yik; Mahmud, Rohela; Sitam, Frankie Anak Thomas; Japning, J Rovie-Ryan; Snounou, Georges; Escalante, Ananias A; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-08-01

    Infections of humans with the zoonotic simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi occur throughout Southeast Asia, although most cases have occurred in Malaysia, where P. knowlesi is now the dominant malaria species. This apparently skewed distribution prompted an investigation of the phylogeography of this parasite in 2 geographically separated regions of Malaysia, Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo. We investigated samples collected from humans and macaques in these regions. Haplotype network analyses of sequences from 2 P. knowlesi genes, type A small subunit ribosomal 18S RNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, showed 2 genetically distinct divergent clusters, 1 from each of the 2 regions of Malaysia. We propose that these parasites represent 2 distinct P. knowlesi types that independently became zoonotic. These types would have evolved after the sea-level rise at the end of the last ice age, which separated Malaysian Borneo from Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:27433965

  15. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Carbonate Species Using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five Ordinary Chondrite (OC) meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were identified and requested from NASA based upon their size, alteration history, and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They are also assumed to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This research addresses two questions involving Mars carbonates: 1) characterize terrestrial, secondary carbonate isotope values to apply to Martian meteorites for isolating in-situ carbonates, and 2) increase understanding of carbonates formed in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each approximately 0.5 grams, were crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) R times 0 for 1 hour at 30 degrees Centigrade (fine calcite extraction), b) R times 1 for 18 hours at 30 degrees Centigrade (course calcite extraction), and c) R times 2 for 3 hours at 150 degrees Centigrade (siderite and/or magnesite extraction). CO (sub 2) was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6 foot 2 millimeter stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof-tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected error bands. Two distinct species of carbonates are found: 1) calcite, and 2) non-calcite carbonate (future testing will attempt to differentiate siderite from magnesite). Preliminary results indicate the terrestrial carbonates are formed at approximately sigma (sup 13) C equal to plus 5 per mille, which is consistent with atmospheric CO (sub 2) sigma (sup 13) C equal to minus 7 per mille and fractionation of plus

  16. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Terrestrial Carbonate Species using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure Impacting Mars Carbonate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Niles, P. B.; Locke, D.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five OC meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were selected for analysis based upon their size and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They were also selected based on petrologic type (3+) such that they were likely to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This study has two main tasks: 1) characterize the isotopic composition of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals formed on meteorites in Antarctica, and 2) study the mechanisms of carbonate formation in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each ~0.5g, was crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) Rx0 for 1 hour at 30°C, b) Rx1 for 18 hours at 30°C, and c) Rx2 for 3 hours at 150°C. CO2 was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6' 2mm stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected uncertainties. Two distinct species of carbonates are found based on the stepped extraction technique: 1) Ca-rich carbonate released at low temperatures, and 2) Mg, or Fe-rich carbonate released at high temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that most of the carbonates present in the ordinary chondrites analyzed have δ13C=+5‰, which is consistent with formation from atmospheric CO2 δ13C=-7‰ at -20°C. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates vary between +4‰ and +34‰ with the Mg-rich and/or Fe-rich carbonates possessing the lowest δ18O values. This suggests that the carbonates formed under a wide range of temperatures. However, the carbonate oxygen

  17. Distinct phylogeographic structure recognized within Desmazierella acicola.

    PubMed

    Martinović, Tijana; Koukol, Ondřej; Hirose, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Desmazierella acicola (anamorph Verticicladium trifidum, Chorioactidaceae) represents a frequent colonizer of pine needles in litter. Considering the global diversity and distribution of pine species, we expected different phylogenetic lineages to exist in different geographical and climatic areas inhabited by these hosts. We compared DNA sequence data with phenotypic characteristics (morphology of the anamorph and growth at three different temperatures) of 43 strains isolated mostly from pine and also spruce needle litter sampled in various geographical areas. Analyses of ITS rDNA recovered eight geographically structured lineages. Fragments of genes for the translation elongation factor 1-α, and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II reproduced similar lineages, although not all of them were monophyletic. The similarity in ITS sequences among the clade with samples from Continental-Atlantic Europe and four other clades was lower than 95%. Several lineages exhibit also a tendency toward host specificity to a particular pine species. Growth tests at different temperatures indicated a different tolerance to specific climatic conditions in different geographic areas. However, the surveyed phenotypic characteristics also showed high variation within lineages, most evident in the morphology of the anamorph. Until a morphological study of the teleomorph is carried out, all of these lineages should be treated as distinct populations within a single species. PMID:26490702

  18. The Small Ribosomal Subunit RNA Isoforms in Plasmodium Cynomolgi

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, V.; Enea, V.

    1994-01-01

    We report the isolation, characterization and analysis of the small subunit rRNA genes in Plasmodium cynomolgi (Ceylon). As in other Plasmodium species, these genes are present in low copy number, are unlinked and form two types that are distinct in sequence and are expressed stage specifically. The asexually expressed (type A) genes are present in four copies in the Ceylon(-) and in five copies in the Berok(-) strain. Surprisingly, the sexually expressed (type B) gene is present in a single copy. The vast majority of the differences between gene types is confined to the variable regions. The pattern of divergence is different from that observed in Plasmodium berghei or in Plasmodium falciparum. Analysis of the small subunit rRNA sequences of P. cynomolgi, P. berghei and P. falciparum, indicates that the two gene types do not evolve independently but rather interact (through gene conversion or some form of recombination) to such an extent as to erase whatever stage-specific sequence signatures they may have had in the last common ancestor. PMID:8005440

  19. The Arabidopsis KINβγ Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Regulates Pollen Hydration on the Stigma by Mediating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pollen.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin-Qi; Liu, Chang Zhen; Li, Dan Dan; Zhao, Ting Ting; Li, Fei; Jia, Xiao Na; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Pollen-stigma interactions are essential for pollen germination. The highly regulated process of pollen germination includes pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination on the stigma. However, the internal signaling of pollen that regulates pollen-stigma interactions is poorly understood. KINβγ is a plant-specific subunit of the SNF1-related protein kinase 1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of plant development. Here, we showed that KINβγ was a cytoplasm- and nucleus-localized protein in the vegetative cells of pollen grains in Arabidopsis. The pollen of the Arabidopsis kinβγ mutant could not germinate on stigma, although it germinated normally in vitro. Further analysis revealed the hydration of kinβγ mutant pollen on the stigma was compromised. However, adding water to the stigma promoted the germination of the mutant pollen in vivo, suggesting that the compromised hydration of the mutant pollen led to its defective germination. In kinβγ mutant pollen, the structure of the mitochondria and peroxisomes was destroyed, and their numbers were significantly reduced compared with those in the wild type. Furthermore, we found that the kinβγ mutant exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pollen. The addition of H2O2 in vitro partially compensated for the reduced water absorption of the mutant pollen, and reducing ROS levels in pollen by overexpressing Arabidopsis CATALASE 3 resulted in compromised hydration of pollen on the stigma. These results indicate that Arabidopsis KINβγ is critical for the regulation of ROS levels by mediating the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes in pollen, which is required for pollen-stigma interactions during pollination. PMID:27472382

  20. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Lower Abundance of Complex I Subunits and Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B Protein Despite Normal Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Resistant Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin; Willis, Wayne T.; Bailowitz, Zachary; De Filippis, Elena A.; Brophy, Colleen; Meyer, Christian; Højlund, Kurt; Yi, Zhengping; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. Comparative proteomics are being applied to generate new hypotheses in human biology and were applied here to isolated mitochondria to identify novel changes in mitochondrial protein abundance present in insulin-resistant muscle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondria were isolated from vastus lateralis muscle from lean and insulin-sensitive individuals and from obese and insulin-resistant individuals who were otherwise healthy. Respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates were measured in vitro. Relative abundances of proteins detected by mass spectrometry were determined using a normalized spectral abundance factor method. RESULTS NADH- and FADH2-linked maximal respiration rates were similar between lean and obese individuals. Rates of pyruvate and palmitoyl-dl-carnitine (both including malate) ROS production were significantly higher in obesity. Mitochondria from obese individuals maintained higher (more negative) extramitochondrial ATP free energy at low metabolic flux, suggesting that stronger mitochondrial thermodynamic driving forces may underlie the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B). CONCLUSIONS We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:20682693

  1. The Arabidopsis KINβγ Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Regulates Pollen Hydration on the Stigma by Mediating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pollen

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ting Ting; Li, Fei; Jia, Xiao Na; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Pollen–stigma interactions are essential for pollen germination. The highly regulated process of pollen germination includes pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination on the stigma. However, the internal signaling of pollen that regulates pollen–stigma interactions is poorly understood. KINβγ is a plant-specific subunit of the SNF1-related protein kinase 1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of plant development. Here, we showed that KINβγ was a cytoplasm- and nucleus-localized protein in the vegetative cells of pollen grains in Arabidopsis. The pollen of the Arabidopsis kinβγ mutant could not germinate on stigma, although it germinated normally in vitro. Further analysis revealed the hydration of kinβγ mutant pollen on the stigma was compromised. However, adding water to the stigma promoted the germination of the mutant pollen in vivo, suggesting that the compromised hydration of the mutant pollen led to its defective germination. In kinβγ mutant pollen, the structure of the mitochondria and peroxisomes was destroyed, and their numbers were significantly reduced compared with those in the wild type. Furthermore, we found that the kinβγ mutant exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pollen. The addition of H2O2 in vitro partially compensated for the reduced water absorption of the mutant pollen, and reducing ROS levels in pollen by overexpressing Arabidopsis CATALASE 3 resulted in compromised hydration of pollen on the stigma. These results indicate that Arabidopsis KINβγ is critical for the regulation of ROS levels by mediating the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes in pollen, which is required for pollen–stigma interactions during pollination. PMID:27472382

  2. Heteromeric assembly of P2X subunits

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Anika; Hausmann, Ralf; Kless, Achim; Nicke, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Transcripts and/or proteins of P2X receptor (P2XR) subunits have been found in virtually all mammalian tissues. Generally more than one of the seven known P2X subunits have been identified in a given cell type. Six of the seven cloned P2X subunits can efficiently form functional homotrimeric ion channels in recombinant expression systems. This is in contrast to other ligand-gated ion channel families, such as the Cys-loop or glutamate receptors, where homomeric assemblies seem to represent the exception rather than the rule. P2XR mediated responses recorded from native tissues rarely match exactly the biophysical and pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed homomeric P2XRs. Heterotrimerization of P2X subunits is likely to account for this observed diversity. While the existence of heterotrimeric P2X2/3Rs and their role in physiological processes is well established, the composition of most other P2XR heteromers and/or the interplay between distinct trimeric receptor complexes in native tissues is not clear. After a description of P2XR assembly and the structure of the intersubunit ATP-binding site, this review summarizes the distribution of P2XR subunits in selected mammalian cell types and the biochemically and/or functionally characterized heteromeric P2XRs that have been observed upon heterologous co-expression of P2XR subunits. We further provide examples where the postulated heteromeric P2XRs have been suggested to occur in native tissues and an overview of the currently available pharmacological tools that have been used to discriminate between homo- and heteromeric P2XRs. PMID:24391538

  3. Diversity of host species and strains of Pneumocystis carinii is based on rRNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Shah, J S; Pieciak, W; Liu, J; Buharin, A; Lane, D J

    1996-01-01

    We have amplified by PCR Pneumocystis carinii cytoplasmic small-subunit rRNA (variously referred to as 16S-like or 18S-like rRNA) genes from DNA extracted from bronchoalveolar lavage and induced sputum specimens from patients positive for P. carinii and from infected ferret lung tissue. The amplification products were cloned into pUC18, and individual clones were sequenced. Comparison of the determined sequences with each other and with published rat and partial human P.carinii small-subunit rRNA gene sequences reveals that, although all P. carinii small-subunit rRNAs are closely related (approximately 96% identity), small-subunit rRNA genes isolated from different host species (human, rat, and ferret) exhibit distinctive patterns of sequence variation. Two types of sequences were isolated from the infected ferret lung tissue, one as a predominant species and the other as a minor species. There was 96% identity between the two types. In situ hybridization of the infected ferret lung tissue with oligonucleotide probes specific for each type revealed that there were two distinct strains of P. carinii present in the ferret lung tissue. Unlike the ferret P. carinii isolates, the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences from different human P. carinii isolates have greater than 99% identity and are distinct from all rat and ferret sequences so far inspected or reported in the literature. Southern blot hybridization analysis of PCR amplification products from several additional bronchoalveolar lavage or induced sputum specimens from P. carinii-infected patients, using a 32P-labeled oligonucleotide probe specific for human P. carinii, also suggests that all of the human P. carinii isolates are identical. These findings indicate that human P. carinii isolates may represent a distinct species of P. carinii distinguishable from rat and ferret P. carinii on the basis of characterization of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences. PMID:8770515

  4. Cloning and characterization of GABAA α subunits and GABAB subunits in Xenopus laevis during development

    PubMed Central

    Kaeser, Gwendolyn E.; Rabe, Brian A.; Saha, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult nervous system, acts via two classes of receptors, the ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors. During the development of the nervous system GABA acts in a depolarizing, excitatory manner and plays an important role in various neural developmental processes including cell proliferation, migration, synapse formation and activity-dependent differentiation. Here we describe the spatial and temporal expression patterns of the GABAA and GABAB receptors during early development of Xenopus laevis. Using in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR, GABAA α2 was detected as a maternal mRNA. All other α-subunits were first detected by tailbud through hatching stages. Expression of the various subunits was seen in the brain, spinal cord, cranial ganglia, olfactory epithelium, pineal, and pituitary gland. Each receptor subunit showed a distinctive, unique expression pattern suggesting these receptors have specific functions and are regulated in a precise spatial and temporal manner. PMID:21384470

  5. GABAA receptor beta subunit heterogeneity: functional expression of cloned cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ymer, S; Schofield, P R; Draguhn, A; Werner, P; Köhler, M; Seeburg, P H

    1989-01-01

    Cloned cDNAs encoding two new beta subunits of the rat and bovine GABAA receptor have been isolated using a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on a highly conserved peptide sequence in the second transmembrane domain of GABAA receptor subunits. The beta 2 and beta 3 subunits share approximately 72% sequence identity with the previously characterized beta 1 polypeptide. Northern analysis showed that both beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs are more abundant in the brain than beta 1 mRNA. All three beta subunit encoding cDNAs were also identified in a library constructed from adrenal medulla RNA. Each beta subunit, when co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with an alpha subunit, forms functional GABAA receptors. These results, together with the known alpha subunit heterogeneity, suggest that a variety of related but functionally distinct GABAA receptor subtypes are generated by different subunit combinations. Images PMID:2548852

  6. The evolution of new lipoprotein subunits of the bacterial outer membrane BAM complex

    PubMed Central

    Anwari, Khatira; Webb, Chaille T; Poggio, Sebastian; Perry, Andrew J; Belousoff, Matthew; Celik, Nermin; Ramm, Georg; Lovering, Andrew; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Smit, John; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine; Lithgow, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) complex is an essential feature of all bacteria with an outer membrane. The core subunit of the BAM complex is BamA and, in Escherichia coli, four lipoprotein subunits: BamB, BamC, BamD and BamE, also function in the BAM complex. Hidden Markov model analysis was used to comprehensively assess the distribution of subunits of the BAM lipoproteins across all subclasses of proteobacteria. A patchwork distribution was detected which is readily reconciled with the evolution of the α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacteria. Our findings lead to a proposal that the ancestral BAM complex was composed of two subunits: BamA and BamD, and that BamB, BamC and BamE evolved later in a distinct sequence of events. Furthermore, in some lineages novel lipoproteins have evolved instead of the lipoproteins found in E. coli. As an example of this concept, we show that no known species of α-proteobacteria has a homologue of BamC. However, purification of the BAM complex from the model α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus identified a novel subunit we refer to as BamF, which has a conserved sequence motif related to sequences found in BamC. BamF and BamD can be eluted from the BAM complex under similar conditions, mirroring the BamC:D module seen in the BAM complex of γ-proteobacteria such as E. coli. PMID:22524202

  7. The Lesser of Two Weevils: Molecular-Genetics of Pest Palm Weevil Populations Confirm Rhynchophorus vulneratus (Panzer 1798) as a Valid Species Distinct from R. ferrugineus (Olivier 1790), and Reveal the Global Extent of Both

    PubMed Central

    Rugman-Jones, Paul F.; Hoddle, Christina D.; Hoddle, Mark S.; Stouthamer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The red palm weevil (RPW) is a major pest of palms. It is native to southeast Asia and Melanesia, but in recent decades has vastly expanded its range as the result of multiple accidental anthropogenic introductions into the Middle East, Mediterranean Basin, Caribbean, and U.S.A. Currently regarded as a single species, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier), RPW displays remarkable color variation across its range, and consequently has a taxonomic history littered with new species descriptions and synonymization. We compared DNA sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene from RPW populations throughout the native and invaded ranges, to investigate the specific status and invasion history of this serious economic pest, and to identify possible common routes of entry. Analyses of COI haplotype data provide conclusive support, corroborated by sequences of additional nuclear gene regions, for the existence of at least two predominantly allopatric species. The true R. ferrugineus is native only to the northern and western parts of continental southeast Asia, Sri Lanka and the Philippines, and is responsible for almost all invasive populations worldwide. In contrast, the second species, which is currently synonymized under R. ferrugineus and should be resurrected under the name R. vulneratus (Panzer), has a more southern distribution across Indonesia, and is responsible for only one invasive population; that in California, U.S.A. The distribution of COI haplotypes is used to discuss the possible existence of further cryptic species, sources and routes of entry of different invasive populations, and the implications of our findings for current control methods. PMID:24143263

  8. Multigene Phylogeography of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae): Distinct Genetic Lineages in Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Song, Sze-Looi; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera caudata is a pest of pumpkin flower. Specimens of B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (mainland Asia) and southern hemisphere (Indonesia) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of the nuclear 28S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS-2) genes, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) and 16S rRNA genes. The COI, COII, 16S rDNA and concatenated COI+COII+16S and COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences revealed that B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (Peninsular Malaysia, East Malaysia, Thailand) was distinctly different from the southern hemisphere (Indonesia: Java, Bali and Lombok), without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades (northern and southern hemispheres), indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected 'p' distance for the concatenated COI+COII+16S nucleotide sequences between the taxa from the northern and southern hemispheres ('p' = 4.46-4.94%) was several folds higher than the 'p' distance for the taxa in the northern hemisphere ('p' = 0.00-0.77%) and the southern hemisphere ('p' = 0.00%). This distinct difference was also reflected by concatenated COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences with an uncorrected 'p' distance of 2.34-2.69% between the taxa of northern and southern hemispheres. In accordance with the type locality the Indonesian taxa belong to the nominal species. Thus the taxa from the northern hemisphere, if they were to constitute a cryptic species of the B. caudata species complex based on molecular data, need to be formally described as a new species. The Thailand and Malaysian B. caudata populations in the northern hemisphere showed distinct genetic structure and phylogeographic pattern. PMID:26090853

  9. Multigene Phylogeography of Bactrocera caudata (Insecta: Tephritidae): Distinct Genetic Lineages in Northern and Southern Hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Tan, Ji; Song, Sze-Looi; Suana, I Wayan; Eamsobhana, Praphathip

    2015-01-01

    Bactrocera caudata is a pest of pumpkin flower. Specimens of B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (mainland Asia) and southern hemisphere (Indonesia) were analysed using the partial DNA sequences of the nuclear 28S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS-2) genes, and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) and 16S rRNA genes. The COI, COII, 16S rDNA and concatenated COI+COII+16S and COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences revealed that B. caudata from the northern hemisphere (Peninsular Malaysia, East Malaysia, Thailand) was distinctly different from the southern hemisphere (Indonesia: Java, Bali and Lombok), without common haplotype between them. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two distinct clades (northern and southern hemispheres), indicating distinct genetic lineage. The uncorrected ‘p’ distance for the concatenated COI+COII+16S nucleotide sequences between the taxa from the northern and southern hemispheres (‘p’ = 4.46-4.94%) was several folds higher than the ‘p’ distance for the taxa in the northern hemisphere (‘p’ = 0.00-0.77%) and the southern hemisphere (‘p’ = 0.00%). This distinct difference was also reflected by concatenated COI+COII+16S+28S+ITS-2 nucleotide sequences with an uncorrected 'p' distance of 2.34-2.69% between the taxa of northern and southern hemispheres. In accordance with the type locality the Indonesian taxa belong to the nominal species. Thus the taxa from the northern hemisphere, if they were to constitute a cryptic species of the B. caudata species complex based on molecular data, need to be formally described as a new species. The Thailand and Malaysian B. caudata populations in the northern hemisphere showed distinct genetic structure and phylogeographic pattern. PMID:26090853

  10. Identification of Dermatophyte Species by 28S Ribosomal DNA Sequencing with a Commercial Kit

    PubMed Central

    Ninet, Béatrice; Jan, Isabelle; Bontems, Olympia; Léchenne, Barbara; Jousson, Olivier; Panizzon, Renato; Lew, Daniel; Monod, Michel

    2003-01-01

    We have shown that dermatophyte species can be easily identified on the basis of a DNA sequence encoding a part of the large-subunit (LSU) rRNA (28S rRNA) by using the MicroSeq D2 LSU rRNA Fungal Sequencing Kit. Two taxa causing distinct dermatophytoses were clearly distinguished among isolates of the Trichophyton mentagrophytes species complex. PMID:12574293

  11. DNA barcoding and morphology reveal three cryptic species of Anania (Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Pyraustinae) in North America, all distinct from their European counterpart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anania coronata (Hufnagel), a Holarctic species of pyraustine crambid moth, has long been treated as having two geographically separated subspecies, the nominotypical Anania coronata in the Palaearctic Region, and Anania coronata tertialis (Guenée) in the Nearctic Region. Maximum likelihood and Baye...

  12. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella tarda isolates from fish in the eastern United States suggests the existence of two genetically distinct species, Edwardsiella tarda and Edwardsiella pseudotarda sp. nov

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, is often implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of a collection of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United State...

  13. Reevaluation of the Taxonomic Status of Recently Described Species of Enterococcus: Evidence that E. thailandicus Is a Senior Subjective Synonym of “E. sanguinicola” and Confirmation of E. caccae as a Species Distinct from E. silesiacus▿

    PubMed Central

    Shewmaker, Patricia Lynn; Steigerwalt, Arnold G.; Nicholson, Ainsley C.; Carvalho, Maria da Glória S.; Facklam, Richard R.; Whitney, Anne M.; Teixeira, Lúcia M.

    2011-01-01

    Several of the more recently proposed new species of Enterococcus are nearly identical based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phenotypic traits. In the present study, DNA-DNA reassociation experiments, in conjunction with sequencing of the 16S rRNA and rpoB genes, provided evidence that “Enterococcus sanguinicola” and Enterococcus thailandicus actually represent the same species. In contrast, Enterococcus caccae and Enterococcus silesiacus, two other species with nearly identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, were confirmed to be separate species. PMID:21543565

  14. Transcription, Signaling Receptor Activity, Oxidative Phosphorylation, and Fatty Acid Metabolism Mediate the Presence of Closely Related Species in Distinct Intertidal and Cold-Seep Habitats.

    PubMed

    Van Campenhout, Jelle; Vanreusel, Ann; Van Belleghem, Steven; Derycke, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Bathyal cold seeps are isolated extreme deep-sea environments characterized by low species diversity while biomass can be high. The Håkon Mosby mud volcano (Barents Sea, 1,280 m) is a rather stable chemosynthetic driven habitat characterized by prominent surface bacterial mats with high sulfide concentrations and low oxygen levels. Here, the nematode Halomonhystera hermesi thrives in high abundances (11,000 individuals 10 cm(-2)). Halomonhystera hermesi is a member of the intertidal Halomonhystera disjuncta species complex that includes five cryptic species (GD1-5). GD1-5's common habitat is characterized by strong environmental fluctuations. Here, we compared the transcriptomes of H. hermesi and GD1, H. hermesi's closest relative. Genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation are more strongly expressed in H. hermesi than in GD1, and many genes were only observed in H. hermesi while being completely absent in GD1. Both observations could in part be attributed to high sulfide concentrations and low oxygen levels. Additionally, fatty acid elongation was also prominent in H. hermesi confirming the importance of highly unsaturated fatty acids in this species. Significant higher amounts of transcription factors and genes involved in signaling receptor activity were observed in GD1 (many of which were completely absent in H. hermesi), allowing fast signaling and transcriptional reprogramming which can mediate survival in dynamic intertidal environments. GC content was approximately 8% higher in H. hermesi coding unigenes resulting in differential codon usage between both species and a higher proportion of amino acids with GC-rich codons in H. hermesi. In general our results showed that most pathways were active in both environments and that only three genes are under natural selection. This indicates that also plasticity should be taken in consideration in the evolutionary history of Halomonhystera species. Such plasticity, as well as possible

  15. Transcription, Signaling Receptor Activity, Oxidative Phosphorylation, and Fatty Acid Metabolism Mediate the Presence of Closely Related Species in Distinct Intertidal and Cold-Seep Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Van Campenhout, Jelle; Vanreusel, Ann; Van Belleghem, Steven; Derycke, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Bathyal cold seeps are isolated extreme deep-sea environments characterized by low species diversity while biomass can be high. The Håkon Mosby mud volcano (Barents Sea, 1,280 m) is a rather stable chemosynthetic driven habitat characterized by prominent surface bacterial mats with high sulfide concentrations and low oxygen levels. Here, the nematode Halomonhystera hermesi thrives in high abundances (11,000 individuals 10 cm−2). Halomonhystera hermesi is a member of the intertidal Halomonhystera disjuncta species complex that includes five cryptic species (GD1-5). GD1-5’s common habitat is characterized by strong environmental fluctuations. Here, we compared the transcriptomes of H. hermesi and GD1, H. hermesi’s closest relative. Genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation are more strongly expressed in H. hermesi than in GD1, and many genes were only observed in H. hermesi while being completely absent in GD1. Both observations could in part be attributed to high sulfide concentrations and low oxygen levels. Additionally, fatty acid elongation was also prominent in H. hermesi confirming the importance of highly unsaturated fatty acids in this species. Significant higher amounts of transcription factors and genes involved in signaling receptor activity were observed in GD1 (many of which were completely absent in H. hermesi), allowing fast signaling and transcriptional reprogramming which can mediate survival in dynamic intertidal environments. GC content was approximately 8% higher in H. hermesi coding unigenes resulting in differential codon usage between both species and a higher proportion of amino acids with GC-rich codons in H. hermesi. In general our results showed that most pathways were active in both environments and that only three genes are under natural selection. This indicates that also plasticity should be taken in consideration in the evolutionary history of Halomonhystera species. Such plasticity, as well as possible

  16. Megraft: A software package to graft ribosomal small subunit (16S/18S) fragments onto full-length sequences for accurate species richness and sequencing depth analysis in pyrosequencing-length metagenomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metagenomic libraries represent subsamples of the total DNA found at a study site and offer unprecedented opportunities to study ecological and functional aspects of microbial communities. To examine the depth of the sequencing effort, rarefaction analysis of the ribosomal small sub-unit (SSU/16S/18...

  17. Structural determinants of alpha-bungarotoxin binding to the sequence segment 181-200 of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. alpha. subunit: Effects of cysteine/cystine modification and species-specific amino acid substitution

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, K.E.; Wu, Xiadong; Diethelm, B.; Conti-Tronconi, B.M. )

    1991-05-21

    The sequence segment 181-200 of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) {alpha}subunit forms a binding site for {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX). Synthetic peptides corresponding to the homologous sequences of human, calf, mouse, chicken, frog, and cobra muscle nAChR {alpha}1 subunits were tested for their ability to bind {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX, and differences in {alpha}-BTX affinity were determined by using solution (IC{sub 50}s) and solid-phase (K{sub d}s) assays. Panels of overlapping peptides corresponding to the complete {alpha}1 subunit of mouse and human were also tested for {alpha}-BTX binding, but other sequence segments forming the {alpha}-BTX site were not consistently detectable. The role of a putative vicinal disulfide bound between Cys-192 and -193, relative to the Torpedo sequence, was determined by modifying the peptides with sulfhydryl reagents. Reduction and alkylation of the peptides decreased {alpha}-BTX binding, whereas oxidation of the peptides had little effect. These results indicate that while the adjacent cysteines are likely to be involved in forming the toxin/{alpha}1-subunit interface a vicinal disulfide bound was not required for {alpha}-BTX binding.

  18. flaB Gene as a Molecular Marker for Distinct Identification of Borrelia Species in Environmental Samples by the PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Method ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wodecka, Beata

    2011-01-01

    A new protocol employing nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) based on the flaB gene and two restriction enzymes was worked out. This protocol allows the identification of all Borrelia species transmitted by Ixodes ricinus in Europe, including Borrelia miyamotoi and 3 genetic variants of B. garinii. A dendrogram of flaB sequence similarity was in accordance with RFLP variants. PMID:21841027

  19. Plasmodium forresteri n. sp., from raptors in Florida and southern Georgia: its distinction from Plasmodium elongatum morphologically within and among host species and by vector susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Telford, S R; Nayar, J K; Foster, G W; Knight, J W

    1997-10-01

    Plasmodium forresteri n. sp. naturally infects eastern screech-owls (Otus asio), great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), barred owls (Strix varia), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus), broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus), and red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) in Florida and southern Georgia. Schizonts occur in mature or nearly mature erythrocytes, produce 2-6 merozoites arranged most commonly in fan or cruciform configuration, with mean dimensions among host species varying from 3.7 to 4.8 x 2.5 to 3.4 microns. Gametocytes are elongate, with mean dimensions among host species varying from 11.5 to 13.1 x 2.0 to 2.4 microns. One or both gametocyte margins are irregular and often crenulate. Gametocytes seldom fill the space between the erythrocyte nucleus and margin. Species characteristics were maintained in isodiagnostic Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and Pekin ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). In mosquito infection studies, only Culex restuans could support sporogony of P. forresteri, in contrast to Plasmodium elongatum of raptor origin that completed sporogony in both Cx. restuans and Culex nigripalpus. PMID:9379302

  20. Genetic and biological characterization of Muko virus, a new distinct member of the species Great Island virus (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae), isolated from ixodid ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ejiri, Hiroko; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Isawa, Haruhiko; Kuwata, Ryusei; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Kinoshita, Hitomi; Kakiuchi, Satsuki; Horiya, Madoka; Kotaki, Akira; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Maeda, Ken; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Saijo, Masayuki; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2015-12-01

    Among the tick-borne orbiviruses (genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae), 36 serotypes are currently classified within a single virus species, Great Island virus. In this study, we report the first characterization of a tick-borne orbivirus isolated from the tick Ixodes turdus in Japan, which we identified as a new member of the species Great Island virus. The virus isolate, designated Muko virus (MUV), replicated and induced cytopathic effects in BHK-21, Vero E6, and CCL-141 cells and caused high mortality in suckling mice after intracerebral inoculation. Full genome sequence analysis showed that MUV shared the greatest phylogenetic similarity with Tribeč virus in terms of the amino acid sequences of all viral proteins except for outer capsid protein 1 (OC1; VP4 of MUV). Analysis of genome segment 9 in MUV detected an uninterrupted open reading frame that overlaps with VP6 (Hel), which putatively encodes a molecular and functional equivalent of NS4 from Great Island virus. Our study provides new insights into the geographic distribution, genetic diversity, and evolutionary history of the members of the species Great Island virus. PMID:26350980

  1. Phylogenomics characterization of a highly virulent Edwardsiella strain ET080813(T) encoding two distinct T3SS and three T6SS gene clusters: Propose a novel species as Edwardsiella anguillarum sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shuai; Lai, Qiliang; Liu, Qin; Wu, Haizhen; Xiao, Jingfan; Shao, Zongze; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-02-01

    As important zoonotic organisms causing infections in humans, Edwardsiella bacteria are also notorious leading fish pathogens haunting worldwide aquaculture industries. However, the taxa are now widely recognized to be misclassified, which hurdled the understanding of the epidemiology and development of effective diagnostics and vaccines. Currently the genus Edwardsiella consists of three species Edwardsiella tarda, E. ictaluri, and E. hoshinae. Previous phylogenomic analysis revealed that E. tarda strains display two major highly divergent genomic types (genotypes), EdwGI and EdwGII, and the former represents a genotype of fish-pathogenic isolates and being recently proposed as a novel species E. piscicida, sp. nov. Here multiple phylogenetic analyses and the genome-level comparisons of EdwGI strains disclose that the phylogroup strains from diseased eel formed an obviously distinct cluster that could be equated with a new species status. The phylogenetic evidence for the new species assignment was also supported by corresponding DNA-DNA hybridization estimation values and by phenotypic characteristics. Interestingly, further comparative genomics reveals that these strains have acquired the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes and as a result these bacteria contain at least 2 sets of distinct T3SS and 3 sets of T6SS gene clusters, respectively. It is therefore proposed that the phylogroup strains from diseased eel should be classified as Edwardisella anguillarum sp. nov., and the type strain is ET080813(T) (=DSM27202(T)=CCUG 64215(T)=CCTCC AB2013118(T)=MCCC 1K00238(T)). These findings will contribute to development of species-specific control measures against Edwardsiella bacterium in aquatic animals, while also shedding light on the pathogenesis evolution in Edwardsiella bacterium. PMID:25466920

  2. Autocatalytic processing of m-AAA protease subunits in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koppen, Mirko; Bonn, Florian; Ehses, Sarah; Langer, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    m-AAA proteases are ATP-dependent proteolytic machines in the inner membrane of mitochondria which are crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial activities. Conserved nuclear-encoded subunits, termed paraplegin, Afg3l1, and Afg3l2, form various isoenzymes differing in their subunit composition in mammalian mitochondria. Mutations in different m-AAA protease subunits are associated with distinct neuronal disorders in human. However, the biogenesis of m-AAA protease complexes or of individual subunits is only poorly understood. Here, we have examined the processing of nuclear-encoded m-AAA protease subunits upon import into mitochondria and demonstrate autocatalytic processing of Afg3l1 and Afg3l2. The mitochondrial processing peptidase MPP generates an intermediate form of Afg3l2 that is matured autocatalytically. Afg3l1 or Afg3l2 are also required for maturation of newly imported paraplegin subunits after their cleavage by MPP. Our results establish that mammalian m-AAA proteases can act as processing enzymes in vivo and reveal overlapping activities of Afg3l1 and Afg3l2. These findings might be of relevance for the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders associated with mutations in different m-AAA protease subunits. PMID:19656850

  3. Modulation of BK Channel Function by Auxiliary Beta and Gamma Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q.; Yan, J.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and displays diverse biophysical or pharmacological characteristics. This diversity is in part conferred by channel modulation with different regulatory auxiliary subunits. To date, two distinct classes of BK channel auxiliary subunits have been identified: β subunits and γ subunits. Modulation of BK channels by the four auxiliary β (β1–β4) subunits has been well established and intensively investigated over the past two decades. The auxiliary γ subunits, however, were identified only very recently, which adds a new dimension to BK channel regulation and improves our understanding of the physiological functions of BK channels in various tissues and cell types. This chapter will review the current understanding of BK channel modulation by auxiliary β and γ subunits, especially the latest findings. PMID:27238261

  4. Microheliella maris (Microhelida ord. n.), an ultrastructurally highly distinctive new axopodial protist species and genus, and the unity of phylum Heliozoa.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Akinori; Chao, Ema E; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    A new heliozoan, Microheliella maris, has sufficiently distinctive ultrastructure to merit a new order, Microhelida. Its 18S and 28S rRNA genes were sequenced earlier under the informal name 'marine microheliozoan'; we here sequenced its Hsp90 gene. A three-gene tree suggests that it is distantly related to centrohelids and others in chromist subkingdom Hacrobia; but it is too divergent to be placed accurately by few genes. Unlike centrohelids, its central spherical centrosome has two concentric granular shells and a dense core devoid of a trilaminar central disc. Microtubules radiate from the centrosomal shells. Unlike centrohelids, axopodia have only three microtubules, fixed basally by dense plasma membrane anchors, and bear terminal and lateral haptosome-like extrusomes. As in the heliomonad Heliomorpha, the centrosome is embedded in a nuclear cavity, and centrosomal microtubules traverse the nucleus inside cytoplasmic channels. A novel filogranular network interconnects mitochondria, ER, and plasma membrane. The microbody is attached to the nucleus and mitochondrion, which has vermicular tubular cristae. We group Microhelida and Heliomonadida, purged of dissimilar flagellates, as a new tubulicristate class Endohelea within phylum Heliozoa. Previously misassigned GenBank 18S rDNA sequences reveal Microhelida as diverse and ancient. We discuss principles underlying the biogenesis and diversity of axopodial patterns. PMID:22153838

  5. Staggering of subunits in NMDAR channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I; Rooney, LeeAnn; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2002-01-01

    Functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are heteromultimers formed by NR1 and NR2 subunits. The M3 segment, as contributed by NR1, forms the core of the extracellular vestibule, including binding sites for channel blockers, and represents a critical molecular link between ligand binding and channel opening. Taking advantage of the substituted cysteine accessibility method along with channel block and multivalent coordination, we studied the contribution of the M3 segment in NR2C to the extracellular vestibule. We find that the M3 segment in NR2C, like that in NR1, contributes to the core of the extracellular vestibule. However, the M3 segments from the two subunits are staggered relative to each other in the vertical axis of the channel. Compared to NR1, homologous positions in NR2C, including those in the highly conserved SYTANLAAF motif, are located about four amino acids more externally. The staggering of subunits may represent a key structural feature underlying the distinct functional properties of NMDARs. PMID:12496098

  6. Comparative analyses of three Chlorella species in response to light and sugar reveal distinctive lipid accumulation patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Julian N; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnes, Austin; Noel, Eric A; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Oyler, George A

    2014-01-01

    While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG) lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM) and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L-1). Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18:1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18:2 relative to 18:1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L(-1) d(-1) to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L-1 d-1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis. PMID:24699196

  7. Comparative Analyses of Three Chlorella Species in Response to Light and Sugar Reveal Distinctive Lipid Accumulation Patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Austin; Noel, Eric A.; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Oyler, George A.

    2014-01-01

    While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG) lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM) and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L−1). Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18∶1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18∶2 relative to 18∶1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L−1 d−1 to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L−1 d−1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis. PMID:24699196

  8. Distinct Cell-Specific Expression of Homospermidine Synthase Involved in Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Three Species of the Boraginales1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Niemüller, Daniel; Reimann, Andreas; Ober, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Homospermidine synthase (HSS) is the first specific enzyme in pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) biosynthesis, a pathway involved in the plant’s chemical defense. HSS has been shown to be recruited repeatedly by duplication of a gene involved in primary metabolism. Within the lineage of the Boraginales, only one gene duplication event gave rise to HSS. Here, we demonstrate that the tissue-specific expression of HSS in three boraginaceous species, Heliotropium indicum, Symphytum officinale, and Cynoglossum officinale, is unique with respect to plant organ, tissue, and cell type. Within H. indicum, HSS is expressed exclusively in nonspecialized cells of the lower epidermis of young leaves and shoots. In S. officinale, HSS expression has been detected in the cells of the root endodermis and in leaves directly underneath developing inflorescences. In young roots of C. officinale, HSS is detected only in cells of the endodermis, but in a later developmental stage, additionally in the pericycle. The individual expression patterns are compared with those within the Senecioneae lineage (Asteraceae), where HSS expression is reproducibly found in specific cells of the endodermis and the adjacent cortex parenchyma of the roots. The individual expression patterns within the Boraginales species are discussed as being a requirement for the successful recruitment of HSS after gene duplication. The diversity of HSS expression within this lineage adds a further facet to the already diverse patterns of expression that have been observed for HSS in other PA-producing plant lineages, making this PA-specific enzyme one of the most diverse expressed proteins described in the literature. PMID:22566491

  9. Comparison of Large Subunits of Type II DNA-dependent RNA Polymerases from Higher Plants.

    PubMed

    Kidd, G H; Link, G; Bogorad, L

    1979-10-01

    Two-dimensional tryptic mapping of (125)I-labeled polypeptides has been employed to compare the large subunits of type II DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from maize, parsley (Petroselinum sativum), and wheat. Maps of the 220 kilodalton (kd) and 140 kd subunits from wheat RNA polymerase II differ from those of the corresponding subunits from parsley enzyme II. The 180 kd subunits from maize and parsley type II enzymes also yield dissimilar tryptic maps. Thus, despite similarities in molecular mass, the large subunits of wheat, parsley, and maize type II RNA polymerases are unique to each individual plant species. PMID:16661032

  10. Horseradish curly top virus is a distinct subgroup II geminivirus species with rep and C4 genes derived from a subgroup III ancestor.

    PubMed

    Klute, K A; Nadler, S A; Stenger, D C

    1996-07-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence (3080 nt) of an infectious DNA clone derived from the geminivirus horseradish curly top virus (HrCTV) has been determined. The relationship of HrCTV to other geminiviruses was examined using dot matrix plots of nucleotide sequence similarities, and by phylogeny of predicted amino acid sequences of individual ORFs based upon parsimony or neighbour-joining methods. These analyses indicate that the V1 and V2 virion sense ORFs of HrCTV are most closely related to, yet distinct from, the corresponding ORFs of the subgroup II geminivirus beet curly top virus (BCTV). HrCTV also encodes a third virion sense ORF (V3) which is similar (72-74 percent amino acid identity) to the BCTV V3 ORF; however, the HrCTV V3 ORF has diverged in sequence to a greater extent relative to that observed among isolates of BCTV (98-100% amino acid identity). The HrCTV genome encodes only three complementary sense ORFs (Cl, C2 and C4) and lacks a C3 ORF which is conserved among all other subgroup II and III geminiviruses characterized to date. Although the neighbour-joining analysis indicated that the HrCTV C2 ORF was distantly related to the C2 ORF of BCTV, the predicted amino acid sequence deduced from the HrCTV C2 ORF lacks the characteristic zinc-finger domain present in the transcriptional activating protein (TrAP) encoded by the subgroup III ORF AC2, which is also retained within the TrAP-related product of the BCTV C2 ORF. Surprisingly, the rep and C4 proteins encoded by HrCTV share a closer phylogenetic relationship to the corresponding proteins of the subgroup III geminivirus squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) than to BCTV. These results suggest that the HrCTV genome may have arisen by a recombination event between a BCTV-like subgroup II virus ancestor and an SLCV-like subgroup III virus ancestor. Possible mechanisms that may explain recombination events among geminiviruses are discussed. PMID:8757976

  11. Distinct transcriptome profiles reveal gene expression patterns during fruit development and maturation in five main cultivated species of pear (Pyrus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Yue; Xue, Cheng; Xu, Linlin; Sun, Honghe; Qin, Meng-Fan; Zhang, Shaoling; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptomes of five pear cultivars, ‘Hosui’ (P. pyrifolia), ‘Yali’ (P. bretschneideri), ‘Kuerlexiangli’ (P. sinkiangensis), ‘Nanguoli’ (P. ussuriensis), and ‘Starkrimson’ (P. communis) were sequenced at seven key fruit developmental stages, from fruit setting to maturation and fruit senescence after harvesting. In total, 33,136 genes that could be mapped by reads, were analyzed. Most gene expression cluster models showed a steadily decreasing trend. Gene expression patterns had obvious differences according to maturity type, that is, post-ripening cultivars were still vigorous at maturity, and showed a higher proportion of up-regulated genes; non post-ripening cultivars had a gradually decreasing tendency during fruit maturation. Meanwhile, differentially expressed genes related to fruit quality and development, such as stone cells, sugar, acid and hormones, were identified. Co-expression analysis revealed that several ethylene synthesis genes and polyphenoloxidase-related genes interacted with each other directly, and an indirect relationship was reflected between ethylene synthesis genes and ethylene response genes. In addition, the highly diverse SNPs represented the great differences between oriental and occidental pears. Understanding how RNA-seq based gene-expression patterns and differential gene expression contribute to fruit quality allows us to build models for gene-expression for fruit development of Pyrus species. PMID:27305967

  12. Distinct transcriptome profiles reveal gene expression patterns during fruit development and maturation in five main cultivated species of pear (Pyrus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Yue; Xue, Cheng; Xu, Linlin; Sun, Honghe; Qin, Meng-Fan; Zhang, Shaoling; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The transcriptomes of five pear cultivars, 'Hosui' (P. pyrifolia), 'Yali' (P. bretschneideri), 'Kuerlexiangli' (P. sinkiangensis), 'Nanguoli' (P. ussuriensis), and 'Starkrimson' (P. communis) were sequenced at seven key fruit developmental stages, from fruit setting to maturation and fruit senescence after harvesting. In total, 33,136 genes that could be mapped by reads, were analyzed. Most gene expression cluster models showed a steadily decreasing trend. Gene expression patterns had obvious differences according to maturity type, that is, post-ripening cultivars were still vigorous at maturity, and showed a higher proportion of up-regulated genes; non post-ripening cultivars had a gradually decreasing tendency during fruit maturation. Meanwhile, differentially expressed genes related to fruit quality and development, such as stone cells, sugar, acid and hormones, were identified. Co-expression analysis revealed that several ethylene synthesis genes and polyphenoloxidase-related genes interacted with each other directly, and an indirect relationship was reflected between ethylene synthesis genes and ethylene response genes. In addition, the highly diverse SNPs represented the great differences between oriental and occidental pears. Understanding how RNA-seq based gene-expression patterns and differential gene expression contribute to fruit quality allows us to build models for gene-expression for fruit development of Pyrus species. PMID:27305967

  13. CARRAGEENAN-INDUCED NFκB ACTIVATION DEPENDS ON DISTINCT PATHWAYS MEDIATED BY REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND HSP27 OR BY BCL10

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2013-01-01

    Carrageenans are highly sulfated polysaccharides that are widely used as food additives due to their ability to improve food texture. They are also widely recognized for their ability to induce inflammation in animal models of colitis. Recently, we reported that carrageenan (CGN) activated a pathway of innate immunity in human colonic epithelial cells mediated by Bcl10 (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10). However, increases in phospho-IκBα and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) were not completely inhibited by silencing Bcl10, suggesting that CGN also influenced another mechanism, or mechanisms, of inflammation. In this report, we demonstrate that CGN increases production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human colonic epithelial cells. The combination of ROS quenching by the free radical scavenger Tempol and of Bcl10 silencing by siRNA completely inhibited the CGN-induced increases in nuclear NFκB (p65), phospho-IκBα, and secretion of IL-8. The CGN-induced increase in ROS was associated with declines in phosphorylation of MAPK 12 (p38γ), MAPK 13 (p38δ), and heat-shock protein (Hsp) 27. The CGN-induced decline in phospho-Hsp27 was reversed by co-administration of Tempol (100nM), but unaffected by silencing Bcl10. Since Hsp27 phosphorylation is inversely associated with phosphorylation of the IκBα kinase (IKK) signalosome, CGN exposure appears to affect the IKK signalosome by both the catalytic component, mediated by ROS-phospho-Hsp27, and the regulatory component, mediated by Bcl10 interaction with IKKγ (Nemo). Hence, the CGN-activated inflammatory cascades related to innate immunity and to generation of ROS may be integrated at the level of the IKK signalosome. PMID:18452717

  14. High ploidy diversity and distinct patterns of cytotype distribution in a widespread species of Oxalis in the Greater Cape Floristic Region

    PubMed Central

    Krejčíková, Jana; Sudová, Radka; Lučanová, Magdalena; Trávníček, Pavel; Urfus, Tomáš; Vít, Petr; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Kolano, Bożena; Oberlander, Kenneth; Dreyer, Leanne L.; Suda, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome duplication is widely acknowledged as a major force in the evolution of angiosperms, although the incidence of polyploidy in different floras may differ dramatically. The Greater Cape Floristic Region of southern Africa is one of the world's biodiversity hotspots and is considered depauperate in polyploids. To test this assumption, ploidy variation was assessed in a widespread member of the largest geophytic genus in the Cape flora: Oxalis obtusa. Methods DNA flow cytometry complemented by confirmatory chromosome counts was used to determine ploidy levels in 355 populations of O. obtusa (1014 individuals) across its entire distribution range. Ecological differentiation among cytotypes was tested by comparing sets of vegetation and climatic variables extracted for each locality. Key Results Three majority (2x, 4x, 6x) and three minority (3x, 5x, 8x) cytotypes were detected in situ, in addition to a heptaploid individual originating from a botanical garden. While single-cytotype populations predominate, 12 mixed-ploidy populations were also found. The overall pattern of ploidy level distribution is quite complex, but some ecological segregation was observed. Hexaploids are the most common cytotype and prevail in the Fynbos biome. In contrast, tetraploids dominate in the Succulent Karoo biome. Precipitation parameters were identified as the most important climatic variables associated with cytotype distribution. Conclusions Although it would be premature to make generalizations regarding the role of genome duplication in the genesis of hyperdiversity of the Cape flora, the substantial and unexpected ploidy diversity in Oxalis obtusa is unparalleled in comparison with any other cytologically known native Cape plant species. The results suggest that ploidy variation in the Greater Cape Floristic Region may be much greater than currently assumed, which, given the documented role of polyploidy in speciation, has direct implications for radiation

  15. Developmental and Regulatory Functions of Na(+) Channel Non-pore-forming β Subunits.

    PubMed

    Winters, J J; Isom, L L

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) isolated from mammalian neurons are heterotrimeric complexes containing one pore-forming α subunit and two non-pore-forming β subunits. In excitable cells, VGSCs are responsible for the initiation of action potentials. VGSC β subunits are type I topology glycoproteins, containing an extracellular amino-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) domain with homology to many neural cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), a single transmembrane segment, and an intracellular carboxyl-terminal domain. VGSC β subunits are encoded by a gene family that is distinct from the α subunits. While α subunits are expressed in prokaryotes, β subunit orthologs did not arise until after the emergence of vertebrates. β subunits regulate the cell surface expression, subcellular localization, and gating properties of their associated α subunits. In addition, like many other Ig-CAMs, β subunits are involved in cell migration, neurite outgrowth, and axon pathfinding and may function in these roles in the absence of associated α subunits. In sum, these multifunctional proteins are critical for both channel regulation and central nervous system development. PMID:27586289

  16. Phylogenetic relationships among Vairimorpha and Nosema species (Microspora) based on ribosomal RNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Baker, M D; Vossbrinck, C R; Maddox, J V; Undeen, A H

    1994-09-01

    A portion (approximately 350 nucleotides) of the large subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) 5' to the 580 region (Escherichia coli numbering) was sequenced using the reverse transcriptase dideoxy method and compared for several species of Nosema and Vairimorpha. Comparison among Nosema species suggests that this genus is composed of several unrelated groups. The group which includes the type species, Nosema bombycis, consists of closely related species found primarily in Lepidoptera. Other Nosema species sequenced (Nosema kingi, Nosema algerae, and Nosema locustae) do not appear to be closely related to each other or to the lepidopteran Nosema group. Comparison among the Vairimorpha species indicates that two distinct but very closely related groups exist. The Lymantria group consists of species isolated from the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, while the Vairimorpha necatrix group consists of species isolated from other Lepidoptera. Intergeneric comparison of the sequence data suggests that the lepidopteran Nosema species are closely related to the Vairimorpha species. PMID:7963643

  17. Primary structure of the ovine pituitary follitropin beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Sairam, M R; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    1981-01-01

    The complete amino acids sequence of the ovine pituitary follitropin beta-subunit was established by studying the tryptic, chymotryptic and thermolytic peptides. The N-terminal sequence of the subunit was confirmed by subjecting the oxidated protein to Edman degradation in an automated sequenator. Automated Edman degradation of the reduced and alkylated (with iodo [14C]acetamide) beta-subunit indicated that most of the molecules used in the sequence studies had lost the N-terminal serine residue. This also confirmed the location of the first five half-cystine residues in the sequence. The proposed structure shows the presence of 111 amino acid residues with the two oligosaccharide moieties linked to asparagine residues located at positions 6 and 23. Heterogeneity occurs at both the termini of the polypeptide chain. Comparison of the sequence of beta-subunit of the ovine hormone with that proposed for human follitropin beta-subunit shows the absence of any deletions in the middle of the peptide chain. Of the 13 replacements, 11 residues can be explained on the basis of a single base change in the codon. The single tryptophan residue of the follitropin occupies an identical position in all the four species that have been studied. The region corresponding to residues 63-105 of the ovine beta-subunit is highly conserved in all the species. PMID:6798969

  18. Molecular and morphological evidence supports the species status of the Mahachai fighter Betta sp. Mahachai and reveals new species of Betta from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriwattanarothai, N; Steinke, D; Ruenwongsa, P; Hanner, R; Panijpan, B

    2010-08-01

    Two regions of mitochondrial (mt) DNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and 16S rRNA, were sequenced in nine species of Betta from Thailand and Indonesia. Most species showed little intraspecific COI variation (adjusted mean = 0.48%) including the putative species Betta sp. Mahachai, but one species (Betta smaragdina) included three lineages showing much greater divergence (7.03-13.48%) that probably represent overlooked species. These findings were confirmed by maximum likelihood analysis and Bayesian inference, which revealed well-supported corresponding monophyletic clades. Based on these results and morphological differences, the putative species Betta sp. Mahachai from central Thailand is a species distinct from other members of the B. splendens group and represents a new and hitherto undescribed species. Furthermore, this study also demonstrated the probable existence of two overlooked Betta species found in the Khorat plateau basin, illustrating the utility of mitochondrial genetic markers in the revelation of overlooked diversity. PMID:20646165

  19. A remarkably stable TipE gene cluster: evolution of insect Para sodium channel auxiliary subunits

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background First identified in fruit flies with temperature-sensitive paralysis phenotypes, the Drosophila melanogaster TipE locus encodes four voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channel auxiliary subunits. This cluster of TipE-like genes on chromosome 3L, and a fifth family member on chromosome 3R, are important for the optional expression and functionality of the Para NaV channel but appear quite distinct from auxiliary subunits in vertebrates. Here, we exploited available arthropod genomic resources to trace the origin of TipE-like genes by mapping their evolutionary histories and examining their genomic architectures. Results We identified a remarkably conserved synteny block of TipE-like orthologues with well-maintained local gene arrangements from 21 insect species. Homologues in the water flea, Daphnia pulex, suggest an ancestral pancrustacean repertoire of four TipE-like genes; a subsequent gene duplication may have generated functional redundancy allowing gene losses in the silk moth and mosquitoes. Intronic nesting of the insect TipE gene cluster probably occurred following the divergence from crustaceans, but in the flour beetle and silk moth genomes the clusters apparently escaped from nesting. Across Pancrustacea, TipE gene family members have experienced intronic nesting, escape from nesting, retrotransposition, translocation, and gene loss events while generally maintaining their local gene neighbourhoods. D. melanogaster TipE-like genes exhibit coordinated spatial and temporal regulation of expression distinct from their host gene but well-correlated with their regulatory target, the Para NaV channel, suggesting that functional constraints may preserve the TipE gene cluster. We identified homology between TipE-like NaV channel regulators and vertebrate Slo-beta auxiliary subunits of big-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels, which suggests that ion channel regulatory partners have evolved distinct lineage-specific characteristics

  20. Similar GABAA receptor subunit composition in somatic and axon initial segment synapses of hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerti-Szigeti, Katalin; Nusser, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells (PCs) express many GABAAR subunit types and receive GABAergic inputs from distinct interneurons. Previous experiments revealed input-specific differences in α1 and α2 subunit densities in perisomatic synapses, suggesting distinct IPSC decay kinetics. However, IPSC decays evoked by axo-axonic, parvalbumin- or cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells were found to be similar. Using replica immunogold labeling, here we show that all CA1 PC somatic and AIS synapses contain the α1, α2, β1, β2, β3 and γ2 subunits. In CA3 PCs, 90% of the perisomatic synapses are immunopositive for the α1 subunit and all synapses are positive for the remaining five subunits. Somatic synapses form unimodal distributions based on their immunoreactivity for these subunits. The α2 subunit densities in somatic synapses facing Cav2.1 (i.e. parvalbumin) or Cav2.2 (cholecystokinin) positive presynaptic active zones are comparable. We conclude that perisomatic synapses made by three distinct interneuron types have similar GABAA receptor subunit content. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18426.001 PMID:27537197

  1. Similar GABAA receptor subunit composition in somatic and axon initial segment synapses of hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Kerti-Szigeti, Katalin; Nusser, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells (PCs) express many GABAAR subunit types and receive GABAergic inputs from distinct interneurons. Previous experiments revealed input-specific differences in α1 and α2 subunit densities in perisomatic synapses, suggesting distinct IPSC decay kinetics. However, IPSC decays evoked by axo-axonic, parvalbumin- or cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells were found to be similar. Using replica immunogold labeling, here we show that all CA1 PC somatic and AIS synapses contain the α1, α2, β1, β2, β3 and γ2 subunits. In CA3 PCs, 90% of the perisomatic synapses are immunopositive for the α1 subunit and all synapses are positive for the remaining five subunits. Somatic synapses form unimodal distributions based on their immunoreactivity for these subunits. The α2 subunit densities in somatic synapses facing Cav2.1 (i.e. parvalbumin) or Cav2.2 (cholecystokinin) positive presynaptic active zones are comparable. We conclude that perisomatic synapses made by three distinct interneuron types have similar GABAA receptor subunit content. PMID:27537197

  2. Intracellular dissociation and reassembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase:the alpha-subunits associated with the immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) allowing reassembly with the beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Bulleid, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) consists of two distinct polypeptides; the catalytically more important alpha-subunit and the beta-subunit, which is identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulphide isomerase. The enzyme appears to be assembled in vivo into an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer from newly synthesized alpha-subunits associating with an endogenous pool of beta-subunits. Using a cell-free system, we have shown previously that enzyme assembly is redox-dependent and that assembled alpha-subunits are intramolecularly disulphide-bonded [John and Bulleid (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14018-14025]. Here we have studied this assembly process within intact cells by expressing both subunits in COS-1 cells. Newly synthesized alpha-subunits were shown to assemble with the beta-subunit, to form insoluble aggregates, or to remain soluble but not associate with the beta-subunit. Treatment of cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) led to dissociation of P4-H into subunits and on removal of DTT the enzyme reassembled. This reassembly was ATP-dependent, suggesting an interaction with an ATP-dependent chaperone. This was confirmed when immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) and alpha-subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies against the alpha-subunit and BiP, respectively. These results indicate that unassembled alpha-subunits are maintained in an assembly-competent form by interacting with the molecular chaperone BiP. PMID:8760347

  3. Interaction of factor XIII subunits.

    PubMed

    Katona, Eva; Pénzes, Krisztina; Csapó, Andrea; Fazakas, Ferenc; Udvardy, Miklós L; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Orosz, Zsuzsanna Z; Muszbek, László

    2014-03-13

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a heterotetramer consisting of 2 catalytic A subunits (FXIII-A2) and 2 protective/inhibitory B subunits (FXIII-B2). FXIII-B, a mosaic protein consisting of 10 sushi domains, significantly prolongs the lifespan of catalytic subunits in the circulation and prevents their slow progressive activation in plasmatic conditions. In this study, the biochemistry of the interaction between the 2 FXIII subunits was investigated. Using a surface plasmon resonance technique and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding assay, the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for the interaction was established in the range of 10(-10) M. Based on the measured Kd, it was calculated that in plasma approximately 1% of FXIII-A2 should be in free form. This value was confirmed experimentally by measuring FXIII-A2 in plasma samples immunodepleted of FXIII-A2B2. Free plasma FXIII-A2 is functionally active, and when activated by thrombin and Ca(2+), it can cross-link fibrin. In cerebrospinal fluid and tears with much lower FXIII subunit concentrations, >80% of FXIII-A2 existed in free form. A monoclonal anti-FXIII-B antibody that prevented the interaction between the 2 subunits reacted with the recombinant combined first and second sushi domains of FXIII-B, and its epitope was localized to the peptide spanning positions 96 to 103 in the second sushi domain. PMID:24408323

  4. Distinct serum proteome profiles associated with collagen-induced arthritis and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in CD38⁻/⁻ mice: The discriminative power of protein species or proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Longobardo, Victoria; Lario, Antonio; Merino, Jesús; Merino, Ramón; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Collagen-type-II-induced arthritis (CIA) is an autoimmune disease, which involves a complex host systemic response including inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. CIA is milder in CD38(-/-) than in wild-type (WT) mice. ProteoMiner-equalized serum samples were subjected to 2D-DiGE and MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses to identify proteins that changed in their relative abundances in CD38(-/-) versus WT mice either with arthritis (CIA(+) ), with no arthritis (CIA(-) ), or with inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated mice). Multivariate analyses revealed that a multiprotein signature (n = 28) was able to discriminate CIA(+) from CIA(-) mice, and WT from CD38(-/-) mice within each condition. Likewise, a distinct multiprotein signature (n = 16) was identified which differentiated CIA(+) CD38(-/-) mice from CIA(+) WT mice, and lastly, a third multiprotein signature (n = 18) indicated that CD38(-/-) and WT mice could be segregated in response to CFA treatment. Further analyses showed that the discriminative power to distinguish these groups was reached at protein species level and not at the protein level. Hence, the need to identify and quantify proteins at protein species level to better correlate proteome changes with disease processes. It is crucial for plasma proteomics at the low-abundance protein species level to apply the ProteoMiner enrichment. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001788, PXD001799 and PXD002071 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001788, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001799 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002071). PMID:26175002

  5. Talaromyces rubrifaciens, a new species discovered from heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Lu, Xiaohong; Bi, Wu; Liu, Fan; Gao, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    A new Talaromyces species, T. rubrifaciens, was isolated from supply air outlets of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in three kinds of public building in Beijing and Nanjing, China. Morphologically it exhibits many characters of section Trachyspermi but is distinguished from other species of this section by restricted growth and broad and strictly biverticillate conidiophores. Phylogenetic analyses based on the internal transcribed spacer rDNA (ITS), β-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM) and RNA polymerase second largest subunit (RPB2) genes reveal that T. rubrifaciens is a distinct species in section Trachyspermi. PMID:27055570

  6. Is Kir6.1 a subunit of mitoK{sub ATP}?

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Foster, D.; Rucker, Jasma J.; Marban, Eduardo

    2008-02-15

    The subunit composition of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K{sup +}-channel (mitoK{sub ATP}) is unknown, though some suspect a role for the inward rectifier, Kir6.1, based largely on antibody studies of heart mitochondria. To ascertain the molecular identity of mitoK{sub ATP} we therefore sought to purify this putative mitochondrial Kir6.1, and conclusively identify the subunits by mass spectrometry. Immunoblots, conducted with two commercially available antibodies, revealed two distinct signals in isolated heart mitochondria, of 51 and 48 kDa, respectively. Localization was confirmed by either immuno-gold electron microscopy or by immunofluorescence. Each putative Kir6.1 species was extracted, purified, and identified by LC-MS/MS. The 51 kDa band was identified as NADH-dehydrogenase flavoprotein 1, while the preponderant protein in the 48-kDa band was mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP form). 1D-, 2D-, and native gel analyses were consistent with these assignments. The data suggest it is premature to assign Kir6.1 a role in mitoK{sub ATP} on the basis of immunoreactivity alone.

  7. Thermosensitive TRPV Channel Subunits Coassemble into Heteromeric Channels with Intermediate Conductance and Gating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei; Yang, Fan; Takanishi, Christina L.; Zheng, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels (TRPV1–4) form the major cellular sensors for detecting temperature increases. Homomeric channels formed by thermosensitive TRPV subunits exhibit distinct temperature thresholds. While these subunits do share significant sequence similarity, whether they can coassemble into heteromeric channels has been controversial. In the present study we investigated the coassembly of TRPV subunits using both spectroscopy-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and single-channel recordings. Fluorescent protein–tagged TRPV subunits were coexpressed in HEK 293 cells; FRET between different subunits was measured as an indication of the formation of heteromeric channels. We observed strong FRET when fluorescence signals were collected selectively from the plasma membrane using a “spectra FRET” approach but much weaker or no FRET from intracellular fluorescence. In addition, no FRET was detected when TRPV subunits were coexpressed with members of the TRPM subfamily or CLC-0 chloride channel subunits. These results indicate that a substantial fraction of TRP channels in the plasma membrane of cotransfected cells were heteromeric. Single-channel recordings confirmed the existence of multiple heteromeric channel forms. Interestingly, heteromeric TRPV channels exhibit intermediate conductance levels and gating kinetic properties. As these subunits coexpress both in sensory neurons and in other tissues, including heart and brain, coassembly between TRPV subunits may contribute to greater functional diversity. PMID:17325193

  8. Hybrid rotors in F1F(o) ATP synthases: subunit composition, distribution, and physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Karsten; Müller, Volker

    2015-09-01

    The c ring of the Na+ F1F(o) ATP synthase from the anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii is encoded by three different genes: atpE1, atpE2 and atpE3. Subunit c1 is similar to typical V-type c subunits and has four transmembrane helices with one ion binding site. Subunit c2 and c3 are identical at the amino acid level and are typical F-type c subunits with one ion binding site in two transmembrane helices. All three constitute a hybrid F(o)V(o) c ring, the first found in nature. To analyze whether other species may have similar hybrid rotors, we searched every genome sequence publicly available as of 23 February 2015 for F1F(o) ATPase operons that have more than one gene encoding the c subunit. This revealed no other species that has three different c subunit encoding genes but twelve species that encode one F(o)- and one V(o)-type c subunit in one operon. Their c subunits have the conserved binding motif for Na+. The organisms are all anaerobic. The advantage of hybrid c rings for the organisms in their environments is discussed. PMID:25838297

  9. Transcription factor assembly on the nicotinic receptor beta4 subunit gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Michael D; Brüschweiler-Li, Lei; Mou, Zhongming; Gardner, Paul D

    2008-04-16

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in a plethora of fundamental biological processes ranging from muscle contraction to formation of memories. The receptors are pentameric proteins whose subunits are encoded by distinct genes. Subunit composition of a mature nicotinic receptor is governed in part by the transcriptional regulation of each subunit gene. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we report the interaction of the transcription factors Sp1, Sp3, c-Jun and Sox10 with the beta4 subunit gene promoter in neuronal-like cell lines and rodent brain tissue. Our results corroborate previous in-vitro data demonstrating that these transcription factors interact with the beta4 promoter. Taken together, these data suggest that Sp1, Sp3, c-Jun and Sox10 regulate expression of the beta4 subunit gene in the mammalian brain. PMID:18382288

  10. The utility of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) in confirming species boundaries in the genus Gonatocerus:comparison to the cytochrome oxidase subunit I(COI) gene and taxonomic data: molecular key based on ITS2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sequenced the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2(ITS2) from several glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) [Homalodisca vitripennis Germar (=H.coagulata Say)] egg parasitoid species (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) belonging to the genus Gonatocerus Nees to test the utility of this fragmen...