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  1. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... Neonatal RDS occurs in infants whose lungs have not yet fully ... disease is mainly caused by a lack of a slippery substance in ...

  2. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... include: Bluish color of the skin and mucus membranes (cyanosis) Brief stop in breathing (apnea) Decreased urine ...

  3. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  4. The role of inhaled prostacyclin in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Searcy, Randi J; Morales, James R; Ferreira, Jason A; Johnson, Donald W

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute lung injury that is characterized by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and severe hypoxemia second to a pathogenic impairment of gas exchange. Despite significant advances in the area, mortality remains high among ARDS patients. High mortality and a limited spectrum of therapeutic options have left clinicians searching for alternatives, spiking interest in selective pulmonary vasodilators (SPVs). Despite the lack of robust evidence, SPVs are commonly employed for their therapeutic role in improving oxygenation in patients who have developed refractory hypoxemia in ARDS. While inhaled epoprostenol (iEPO) also impacts arterial oxygenation by decreasing ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) mismatching and pulmonary shunt flow, this effect is not different from inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). The most effective and safest dose for yielding a clinically significant increase in PaO2 and reduction in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) appears to be 20-30 ng/kg/min in adults and 30 ng/kg/min in pediatric patients. iEPO appears to have a ceiling effect above these doses in which no additional benefit may be derived. iNO and iEPO have shown similar efficacy profiles; however, they differ with respect to cost and ease of therapeutic administration. The most beneficial effects of iEPO have been seen in adult patients with secondary ARDS as compared with primary ARDS, most likely due to the difference in etiology of the two disease states, and in patients suffering from baseline right ventricular heart failure. Although iEPO has demonstrated improvements in hemodynamic parameters and oxygenation in ARDS patients, due to the limited number of randomized clinical trials and the lack of studies investigating mortality, the use of iEPO cannot be recommended as standard of care in ARDS. iEPO should be reserved for those refractory to traditional therapies. PMID:26294418

  5. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Is ARDS? ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads to low oxygen levels in the blood. ARDS can be life threatening because your body's organs need oxygen-rich ...

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  9. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss the new definition of ARDS, its risk factors and pathophysiology, and current evidence regarding ventilation management, adjunctive therapies, and intervention required in refractory hypoxemia. PMID:25829644

  10. Customization of an open-lung ventilation strategy to treat a case of life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grooms, David A; Sibole, Stephen H; Tomlinson, James R; Marik, Paul E; Chatburn, Robert L

    2011-04-01

    The ARDS Network low-tidal-volume protocol is considered the standard of care for patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The protocol is built on the foundation of low-tidal-volume ventilation, use of a combined PEEP and F(IO(2)) table, and managing alveolar end-inspiratory pressure by limiting the plateau airway pressure to ≤ 30 cm H(2)O. Although this strategy, to date, is the only method that significantly improves ALI/ARDS survival, alternative methods of improving hypoxemia and minimizing ventilator-induced lung injury, in conjunction with low-tidal-volume ventilation, can be used for life-threatening ARDS. We present a case in which we customized the use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers by analyzing the hysteresis of the pressure-volume curve to assess lung recruitability, decremental PEEP to sustain lung recruitment, and careful use of plateau pressure ≥ 30 cm H(2)O, which improved our patient's life-threatening hypoxemia within the first 36 min of arrival to our ICU. PMID:21255504

  11. Can we Replace Arterial Blood Gas Analysis by Pulse Oximetry in Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome, who are Treated According to INSURE Protocol?

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Pedram; Norouzi, Elahe; Bahman Bijari, Bahareh; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), who are treated according to INSURE protocol; require arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis to decide on appropriate management. We conducted this study to investigate the validity of pulse oximetry instead of frequent ABG analysis in the evaluation of these patients. From a total of 193 blood samples obtained from 30 neonates <1500 grams with RDS, 7.2% were found to have one or more of the followings: acidosis, hypercapnia, or hypoxemia. We found that pulse oximetry in the detection of hyperoxemia had a good validity to appropriately manage patients without blood gas analysis. However, the validity of pulse oximetry was not good enough to detect acidosis, hypercapnia, and hypoxemia. PMID:25999627

  12. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  13. Salmonella Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  14. Salmonella Typhi-Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Ugas, Melissa Brosset; Carroll, Timothy; Kovar, Lacey; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics. PMID:27294165

  15. The Effects of Massage with Coconut and Sunflower Oils on Oxygen Saturation of Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Sousan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ajoodanian, Najmeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays particular emphasis is placed on the developmental aspects of premature infants care. Massage therapy is one of the best-known methods of caring. Due to the minimal touch policy in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), massaging is not usually performed on premature infants. However, there is not sufficient evidence to support the claim that newborn infants with complex medical conditions should not be massaged. This study aimed to determine the effects of massage with coconut and sunflower oils on oxygen saturation of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 90 newborns who were admitted to Alzahra Hospital (Tabriz, Iran). The infants were divided into control and massage therapy groups (massage with coconut and sunflower oils). Data was collected using a hospital documentation form. A 15-minute daily massage was performed for 3 days. Respiratory rate (RR), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and oxygen saturation were measured 5 minutes before the massage, 3 times during the massage, and 5 minutes after the massage. The collected data was analyzed using a mixed model. Results: In comparison to coconut oil and control groups, mean oxygen saturation of sunflower oil group was improved. In addition, the coconut massage group showed lower oxygen saturation than the control group but was all values were within the normal range. Although massage decreased oxygen saturation, there was no need to increase FiO2. Conclusion: Massage therapy can provide developmental care for infants treated with NCPAP. PMID:25276695

  16. Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Impact on Hospital and 30 Day Postdischarge Survival.

    PubMed

    Modrykamien, Ariel M; Hernandez, Omar O; Im, Yunhee; Walters, Ryan W; Schrader, Caleb L; Smith, Lauren E; Lima, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation support for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients involves the use of low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure. Nevertheless, the optimal ventilator strategy for ARDS patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy remains unknown. A retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of adult ARDS patients treated with V-V ECMO from October 2012 to May 2015 was performed. Mechanical ventilation data, as well as demographic and clinical data, were collected. We assessed the association between ventilator data and outcomes of interest. The primary outcome was hospital survival. Secondary outcome was 30 day survival posthospital discharge. Sixty-four ARDS patients were treated with ECMO. Univariate analysis showed that plateau pressure was independently associated with hospital survival. Tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and plateau were independently associated with 30 day survival. Multivariate analysis, after controlling for covariates, revealed that a 1 unit increase in plateau pressure was associated with a 21% decrease in the odds of hospital survival (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.39-33.42%, p = 0.007). In regards to 30 day survival postdischarge, a 1 unit increase in plateau pressure was associated with a 14.4% decrease in the odds of achieving the aforementioned outcome (95% CI = 1.75-25.4%, p = 0.027). Also, a 1 unit increase in PEEP was associated with a 36.2% decrease in the odds of 30 day survival (95% CI = 10.8-54.4%, p = 0.009). Among ARDS patients undergoing ECMO therapy, only plateau pressure is associated with hospital survival. Plateau pressure and PEEP are both associated with 30 day survival posthospital discharge. PMID:27347707

  17. Administration of microparticles from blood of the lipopolysaccharide-treated rats serves to induce pathologic changes of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxia; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Xiaoyan; Gao, Yue; Cai, Shaohua

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of intratracheal and intravenous administration of microparticles (MPs) on developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The blood MPs from lipopolysaccharide-treated rats were collected and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cellular source of the MPs was identified by fluorescent-labeled antibodies after the circulating MPs were delivered to naïve rats. Levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-10 productions in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma were determined 24 h after the rats received intratracheal and intravenous administration of the MPs. Histopathologic examination of lungs was performed by light microscope. A TEM image of MPs showed spherical particles at a variable diameter from 0.1 to 0.5 µm. Endothelial- and leukocyte-derived vesicles were abundant in the investigated samples. Treatment with MPs may lead to significant increases in MPO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10 productions in BALF and plasma of the rats (all P < 0.001). Morphological observation indicated that alveolar structures were destroyed with a large amount of neutrophil infiltration in the lungs of the MP-treated rats. Perivascular and/or intra-alveolar hemorrhage were serious and hyaline membrane formed in the alveoli. Intratracheal and intravenous approaches to delivery of the circulating MPs to naïve recipient rats may induce ARDS. This presents an inducer of the onset of ARDS and provides potential therapeutic targets for attenuating lung injury. PMID:26088862

  18. Pyogenic sacroiliitis and adult respiratory distress syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asavamongkolkul, A; Keerasuntonpong, A; Kuagoolwongse, C

    2007-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus sacroiliitis is uncommon and may lead to bacteraemia, sepsis, and death if diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Its association with pulmonary symptoms has not been reported. We report a 36-year-old Thai woman who presented with a 4-day history of right buttock pain, aggravated by walking, which came on after having a traditional foot massage. She later developed adult respiratory distress syndrome. She was treated with open drainage, respiratory support, and antibiotics. PMID:17709867

  19. Personalizing mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berngard, S Clark; Beitler, Jeremy R; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-03-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes remains the cornerstone for treating patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Personalizing such an approach to each patient's unique physiology may improve outcomes further. Many factors should be considered when mechanically ventilating a critically ill patient with ARDS. Estimations of transpulmonary pressures as well as individual's hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics should influence PEEP decisions as well as response to therapy (recruitability). This summary will emphasize the potential role of personalized therapy in mechanical ventilation. PMID:27076966

  20. Personalizing mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beitler, Jeremy R.; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes remains the cornerstone for treating patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Personalizing such an approach to each patient’s unique physiology may improve outcomes further. Many factors should be considered when mechanically ventilating a critically ill patient with ARDS. Estimations of transpulmonary pressures as well as individual’s hemodynamics and respiratory mechanics should influence PEEP decisions as well as response to therapy (recruitability). This summary will emphasize the potential role of personalized therapy in mechanical ventilation. PMID:27076966

  1. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  2. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies. PMID:26331971

  3. The Role of Surfactant in Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christopher Cheng-Hwa; Ma, Sze

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the insufficient production of surfactant in the lungs of preterm infants. As a result, researchers have looked into the possibility of surfactant replacement therapy as a means of preventing and treating RDS. We sought to identify the role of surfactant in the prevention and management of RDS, comparing the various types, doses, and modes of administration, and the recent development. A PubMed search was carried out up to March 2012 using phrases: surfactant, respiratory distress syndrome, protein-containing surfactant, protein-free surfactant, natural surfactant, animal-derived surfactant, synthetic surfactant, lucinactant, surfaxin, surfactant protein-B, surfactant protein-C. Natural, or animal-derived, surfactant is currently the surfactant of choice in comparison to protein-free synthetic surfactant. However, it is hoped that the development of protein-containing synthetic surfactant, such as lucinactant, will rival the efficacy of natural surfactants, but without the risks of their possible side effects. Administration techniques have also been developed with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and selective surfactant administration now recommended; multiple surfactant doses have also reported better outcomes. An aerosolised form of surfactant is being trialled in the hope that surfactant can be administered in a non-invasive way. Overall, the advancement, concerning the structure of surfactant and its mode of administration, offers an encouraging future in the management of RDS. PMID:22859930

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complex disorder of heterogeneous etiologies characterized by a consistent, recognizable pattern of lung injury. Extensive epidemiologic studies and clinical intervention trials have been conducted to address the high mortality of this disorder and have provided significant insight into the complexity of studying new therapies for this condition. The existing clinical investigations in ARDS will be highlighted in this review. The limitations to current definitions, patient selection, and outcome assessment will be considered. While significant attention has been focused on the parenchymal injury that characterizes this disorder and the clinical support of gas exchange function, relatively limited focus has been directed to hemodynamic and pulmonary vascular dysfunction equally prominent in the disease. The limited available clinical information in this area will also be reviewed. The current standards for cardiopulmonary management of the condition will be outlined. Current gaps in our understanding of the clinical condition will be highlighted with the expectation that continued progress will contribute to a decline in disease mortality. PMID:22034606

  5. Kartagener syndrome: an uncommon cause of neonatal respiratory distress?

    PubMed

    Losa, M; Ghelfi, D; Hof, E; Felix, H; Fanconi, S

    1995-03-01

    We report a newborn with respiratory distress and situs inversus totalis. The diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia was confirmed by both ultrastructural and functional investigations. The immotile cilia syndrome was suspected because of respiratory distress, situs inversus, abnormal nasal discharge and hyperinflated chest X-ray. We suggest that ultrastructural and functional investigations of the respiratory mucosa should be done in any newborn with respiratory distress without explanation for the respiratory problems. Establishment of the correct diagnosis at an early stage may allow to improve the prognosis provided prophylactic physiotherapy, vaccinations, and aggressive antibiotic treatment of intercurrent respiratory infections are instituted. CONCLUSION Despite its rarity, primary ciliary dyskinesia should be considered in unexplained cases of neonatal distress. PMID:7758526

  6. How Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... build up in the babies' lungs. Treatment for Patent Ductus Arteriosus PDA is a possible complication of ... For more information, go to the Health Topics Patent Ductus Arteriosus article. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: ...

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp) and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp) with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure monitoring using the AVEA ventilator to tailor the ventilatory strategy. PMID:27076736

  8. What Is Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) or critical care unit (CCU) of a hospital. Therapies commonly used ... may be done. (See ATS fact sheet on Tracheostomy). What is an ICU and what can I ...

  9. Coping and Psychological Distress of Chinese Parents of Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Paul; Tang, Catherine So-Kum

    1995-01-01

    Coping and correlates of psychological distress of 174 Chinese parents of children with Down's syndrome, language delays, or no disabilities were compared. Down's syndrome parents more frequently used avoidance coping style. No differences were observed between Down's syndrome and language delay parents on psychological distress, optimism,…

  10. Uneven distribution of ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rylander, Christian; Tylén, Ulf; Rossi-Norrlund, Rauni; Herrmann, Peter; Quintel, Michael; Bake, Björn

    2005-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the volume of gas being poorly ventilated or non-ventilated within the lungs of patients treated with mechanical ventilation and suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods A prospective, descriptive study was performed of 25 sedated and paralysed ARDS patients, mechanically ventilated with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cmH2O in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit of a tertiary university hospital. The volume of poorly ventilated or non-ventilated gas was assumed to correspond to a difference between the ventilated gas volume, determined as the end-expiratory lung volume by rebreathing of sulphur hexafluoride (EELVSF6), and the total gas volume, calculated from computed tomography images in the end-expiratory position (EELVCT). The methods used were validated by similar measurements in 20 healthy subjects in whom no poorly ventilated or non-ventilated gas is expected to be found. Results EELVSF6 was 66% of EELVCT, corresponding to a mean difference of 0.71 litre. EELVSF6 and EELVCT were significantly correlated (r2 = 0.72; P < 0.001). In the healthy subjects, the two methods yielded almost identical results. Conclusion About one-third of the total pulmonary gas volume seems poorly ventilated or non-ventilated in sedated and paralysed ARDS patients when mechanically ventilated with a PEEP of 5 cmH2O. Uneven distribution of ventilation due to airway closure and/or obstruction is likely to be involved. PMID:15774050

  11. Chest associated to motor physiotherapy improves cardiovascular variables in newborns with respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the effects of chest and motor physiotherapy treatment on hemodynamic variables in preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. Methods We evaluated heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic (SAP), mean (MAP) and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), temperature and oxygen saturation (SO2%) in 44 newborns with respiratory distress syndrome. We compared all variables between before physiotherapy treatment vs. after the last physiotherapy treatment. Newborns were treated during 11 days. Variables were measured 2 minutes before and 5 minutes after each physiotherapy treatment. We applied paired Student t test to compare variables between the two periods. Results HR (148.5 ± 8.5 bpm vs. 137.1 ± 6.8 bpm - p < 0.001), SAP (72.3 ± 11.3 mmHg vs. 63.6 ± 6.7 mmHg - p = 0.001) and MAP (57.5 ± 12 mmHg vs. 47.7 ± 5.8 mmHg - p = 0.001) were significantly reduced after 11 days of physiotherapy treatment compared to before the first session. There were no significant changes regarding RR, temperature, DAP and SO2%. Conclusions Chest and motor physiotherapy improved cardiovascular parameters in respiratory distress syndrome newborns. PMID:22029840

  12. Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Recent Update

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Young

    2016-01-01

    Severe sepsis or septic shock is characterized by an excessive inflammatory response to infectious pathogens. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication of severe sepsis, from which patients have high mortality. Advances in treatment modalities including lung protective ventilation, prone positioning, use of neuromuscular blockade, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, have improved the outcome over recent decades, nevertheless, the mortality rate still remains high. Timely treatment of underlying sepsis and early identification of patients at risk of ARDS can help to decrease its development. In addition, further studies are needed regarding pathogenesis and novel therapies in order to show promising future treatments of sepsis-induced ARDS. PMID:27066082

  13. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers. PMID:26614238

  14. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: definitions, mechanisms and treatment].

    PubMed

    Urso, Domenico Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a secondary acute respiratory insufficiency caused by an inflammatory syndrome which is characterized by an increased of permeability pulmonary edema, associated with many other clinic anomalies, radiological and pathophysiological not directly caused by, but with which it could coexist, a left atrial hypertension. The illness, characterized by refractory hypoxemia, recognizes several causes, which have direct or indirect harm on the cells of the membrane alveolus-capillary. In spite of the improvements in the therapeutic approach, during these last 40 years, represented by the aid of the mechanical ventilation and the use of selective pulmonary vasodilators, this condition is life threatening and often lethal: 90% of mortality rate amongst those older than 65 years. PMID:16913178

  15. Relevant Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite distinct epidemiology and outcomes, pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS) is often managed based on evidence extrapolated from treatment of adults. The impact of non-pulmonary processes on mortality as well as the lower mortality rate compared to adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) renders the utilization of short-term mortality as a primary outcome measure for interventional studies problematic. However, data regarding alternatives to mortality are profoundly understudied, and proposed alternatives, such as ventilator-free days, may be themselves subject to hidden biases. Given the neuropsychiatric and functional impairment in adult survivors of ARDS, characterization of these morbidities in children with PARDS is of paramount importance. The purpose of this review is to frame these challenges in the context of the existing pediatric literature, and using adult ARDS as a guide, suggest potential clinically relevant outcomes that deserve further investigation. The goal is to identify important areas of study in order to better define clinical practice and facilitate future interventional trials in PARDS. PMID:27242980

  16. Atrial natriuretic factor and postnatal diuresis in respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Rozycki, H J; Baumgart, S

    1991-01-01

    To find out if atrial natriuretic factor plays a part in the control of urine output during the initiation alone or throughout postnatal diuresis in neonates with respiratory distress syndrome, atrial natriuretic factor concentrations and clinical and renal variables were measured prospectively three times during the first three days of life in 13 premature infants. Atrial natriuretic factor concentrations rose significantly between the first and second sample times as did the urine output and output:input ratio. By the time that the third sample was taken, atrial natriuretic factor concentration had decreased significantly since the second sample had been taken, while urine flow was maintained. All subjects initiated a spontaneous diuresis that was related to the second concentration of atrial natriuretic factor. With partial correlation analysis a significant relationship was shown between the concentration of atrial natriuretic factor and the maintenance of urine output throughout the study period. Individual hormone concentrations did not, however, correlate with simultaneous renal variables. Changes in the concentrations of atrial natriuretic factor coincided with initiation of spontaneous diuresis in babies with respiratory distress syndrome, and may have a role in the complex mechanisms that maintain this diuresis. PMID:1825462

  17. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  18. A calculator program for determining indices of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome severity.

    PubMed

    Horbar, J D

    1987-01-01

    The potential for treating and preventing neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant has created renewed interest in quantitative measures and derived scores that can be used to assess disease severity. Many different indices of RDS severity have been suggested. They are useful as outcome measures in clinical trials and may assist in the early identification of infants at risk for severe complications. In this article, a program for the Hewlett-Packard 41CV programmable calculator is presented that calculates indices of RDS severity based on ventilator settings and arterial blood gas values. PMID:3098256

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Oi, Rie; Ota, Muneyuki; Toriumi, Shinichi; Ogushi, Fumitaka

    2016-05-01

    Sporadic patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been reported. However, knowledge about the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of this condition is insufficient. Moreover, the pulmonary vascular permeability in ARDS related to M. pneumoniae infection has not been reported. We report a case of ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae without elevated pulmonary vascular permeability, which was successfully treated using low-dose short-term hydrocortisone, suggesting that pulmonary infiltration in ARDS caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae does not match the criteria of permeability edema observed in typical ARDS. PMID:27162691

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to systemic lupus erythematosus with hemophagocytic syndrome: an autopsy report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuma; Matsuda, Masayuki; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Hosoda, Waki; Gono, Takahisa; Hoshi, Kenichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2005-04-01

    This report concerns a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who died of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) 1 day after the onset of pulmonary symptoms. Autopsy demonstrated severe hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow and histopathology indicating a marked increase in vascular permeability in both lungs and kidneys. In this patient, active SLE and associated hemophagocytic syndrome may have induced an increase in the production of inflammatory cytokines, which immediately induced ARDS. Since fatal ARDS can occur as a life-threatening complication of SLE, careful observation is necessary, particularly when there are clinical findings suggestive of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. PMID:15338452

  2. Recurrent Postpartum Eosinophilic Pneumonia Presenting as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Elif Yilmazel; Araz, Omer; Yilmaz, Nafiye; Akgun, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia (EP) is a rare disease of the lung. We aimed to present atypical course of two EP cases. They were admitted to our hospital because of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in postpartum period. Eosinophilia was detected in bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage and laboratory examination. In these cases, no spesific cause for eosinophilic pneumonia was determined and steroid treatment was started. After the treatment, the patients were in full recovery which were confirmed by clinical and radiological investigations, readmitted to our clinic with relapses of ARDS. The patients have received regular treatment for 1 year. Our cases were neither fitting the classic definitions of acute eosinophilic pneumonia nor chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Therefore, we wanted to contribute additional data in the literature by sharing these interesting cases. PMID:25610194

  3. [The ultrastructural morphogenetic bases of the adult respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, V; Staudacher, C; Chiesa, R; Cristallo, M; Bevilacqua, G

    1980-09-01

    Sequential study of the submicroscopic pathological events characterising the natural history of the adult respiratory distress syndrome has pinpointed three different development stages related to clinical course and prognosis. In the first stage, the decisive biological element is represented by the increase in capillary permeability, whose morphological substrate consists of the distension of intercellular junctions. The result is the formation of interstitial oedema with the characteristics of the exudate. In the second stage, when reversibility is still possible, fluid and proteins pass into the alveolus. Finally, in the third stage, the persisting stimulus of pulmonary capillaries leads on the one hand to the formation of hyaline membranes and, on the other, to a reactive lung response in the form of interstitial fibrinogenesis and hyperplasia of granular pneumocytes. PMID:7219756

  4. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    PubMed

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice. PMID:24780650

  5. Pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arondi, Sabrina; Valsecchi, Alberto; Borghesi, Andrea; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common disease that involve almost constantly the lung. Usually the onset is insidious, and symptoms are slowly ingravescent. Very rarely, as in the case here reported, sarcoidosis can cause an acute respiratory failure with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A 20-year-old girl from Pakistan presented for acute fatigue, fever, and cough with a chest X-ray displayed the micronodular interstitial disease. Despite of anti-tuberculosis therapy, ARDS developed in a few days requiring continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Examinations on transbronchial specimens obtained by bronchoscopy permitted to reach the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and steroid therapy improved rapidly clinical conditions. This is the first case report reported in Europe that confirms the rare onset of sarcoidosis as ARDS. Steroid therapy allows to cure rapidly this severe complication. PMID:26933462

  6. How Is Long QT Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Long QT Syndrome Treated? The goal of treating long QT syndrome (LQTS) is to prevent life-threatening, ... levels. (For more information, go to "What Causes Long QT Syndrome?" ) Many people who have LQTS also ...

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Katrina E; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction. PMID:27275457

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wardrope, Katrina E.; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D. O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction.

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumor Lysis Syndrome in a Child with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D’Angelo, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a 10-year-old dog.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, T L

    2001-01-01

    A 10-year-old shih tzu was presented with lethargy, anorexia, coughing, and dyspnea of 2 days' duration. Despite treatment with parenteral fluids, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and diuretics, the dog died. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed histologically. PMID:11565374

  11. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  12. Morbidity and survival in neonates ventilated for the respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, A; Roberton, N R

    1985-01-01

    In a retrospective analysis the records of all (210) infants ventilated to treat the respiratory distress syndrome over three years were reviewed. A mortality of 19% was found. Intraventricular haemorrhage was associated than a significant increase in mortality in infants of less with 30 weeks' gestation (p less than 0.001) and was the commonest cause of death. Pneumothoraces developed in one third of babies regardless of gestational age but were significantly associated with an increase in mortality only in infants of 27-29 weeks' gestation. Patent ductus arteriosus was present in 31 infants and was commoner in babies of very low birth weight. The presence of a patent ductus arteriosus was not associated with decreased survival but was significantly related to an increased need for prolonged respiratory support (p less than 0.001). Thirty six infants developed chronic lung disease, three of whom died. Comparison with data from earlier studies indicated a steady improvement over the past decade in outcome for infants ventilated for the respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:3918687

  13. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered. PMID:22120615

  14. Increased incidence of neonatal respiratory distress in infants with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome).

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Charlotte; Burton, Barbara K

    2014-02-01

    Records were reviewed on all patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome) seen at a single institution from 1999 to 2013 to identify those with a history of neonatal intensive care. Eleven of 34 patients were in a neonatal intensive care unit and all had respiratory distress with 8 diagnoses of respiratory distress syndrome and 3 of transient tachypnea of the newborn. None of the infants were premature; four were delivered by cesarean section. These findings suggest that respiratory distress is more commonly observed in neonates with MPS II than in the general population. This may reflect airway disease already present in this disorder at the time of birth. PMID:24238892

  15. [Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skalická, Hana; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome manifested by rapidly progressive respiratory distress leading, without therapy, to severe respiratory insufficiency and subsequent multiorgan failure. The pathophysiological causes are: the change in the pressure gradients in the pulmonary capillaries, the impaired membrane permeability of the alveolocapillary in the lungs, and impaired lymphatic drainage. Unlike in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac disease is not a cause, and there is no increase in wedge pressure (< 18 mm Hg). The aetiological base is diverse and includes more clinical pathological factors. The diagnosis and evaluation are usually very difficult due to the rapidly deteriorating clinical condition of the patients. A decisive, quick and comprehensive approach, using all available invasive and non-invasive methods is necessary. The basic steps of treatment are: the use of different types of ventilatory support in order to achieve adequate oxygenation, dealing with possible hemodynamic instability, and, when needed, other specific procedures. It is always important to keep in mind that this is a very serious condition with a high mortality rate. And there is a need for fast and efficient access to the best specialized clinic. PMID:26750623

  16. Noninvasive ventilation on mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Wang, Jian; Xu, Xiaobo; Song, Yuanlin; Jiang, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). [Subjects and Methods] The clinical data of 58 patients with ARDS that required mechanical ventilation in two intensive care units (ICU) was reviewed. [Results] Endotracheal intubation was performed in 55.17% of the total patients and in 39.53% of the patients who received NIV treatment. The APACHE II score for patients who only received IV was significantly higher than those who only underwent NIV (25.67 ± 5.30 vs. 18.12 ± 7.20). However, there were no significant differences in 28-day/90-day survival rates, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay between these two groups. For patients from a NIV-to-IV group, the APACHE II scores before endotracheal intubation were higher than the scores from IV patients (26.12 ± 4.08 vs. 21.94 ± 6.10). The 90-day survival rate in the NIV-to-IV group was significantly lower than that of the IV-only group (23.5% vs. 73.3%), although there was no difference in the 28-day survival rate between the two groups. [Conclusion] The application of NIV reduces the percentage of patients requiring endotracheal intubation.

  17. A Pathophysiologic Approach to Biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blondonnet, Raiko; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Sapin, Vincent; Jabaudon, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute-onset hypoxic condition with radiographic bilateral lung infiltration. It is characterized by an acute exudative phase combining diffuse alveolar damage and lung edema followed by a later fibroproliferative phase. Despite an improved understanding of ARDS pathobiology, our ability to predict the development of ARDS and risk-stratify patients with the disease remains limited. Biomarkers may help to identify patients at the highest risk of developing ARDS, assess response to therapy, predict outcome, and optimize enrollment in clinical trials. After a short description of ARDS pathobiology, here, we review the scientific evidence that supports the value of various ARDS biomarkers with regard to their major biological roles in ARDS-associated lung injury and/or repair. Ongoing research aims at identifying and characterizing novel biomarkers, in order to highlight relevant mechanistic explorations of lung injury and repair, and to ultimately develop innovative therapeutic approaches for ARDS patients. This review will focus on the pathophysiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications of biomarkers in ARDS and on their utility to ultimately improve patient care. PMID:26980924

  18. An approach to ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Appropriate management of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a challenge for physicians working in the critical care environment. Significant advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of ARDS. There is also an increasing appreciation of the role of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is most likely related to several different aspects of ventilator management: barotrauma due to high peak airway pressures, lung overdistension or volutrauma due to high transpulmonary pressures, alveolar membrane damage due to insufficient positive end-expiratory pressure levels and oxygen-related cell toxicity. Various lung protective strategies have been suggested to minimize the damage caused by conventional modes of ventilation. These include the use of pressure- and volume-limited ventilation, the use of the prone position in the management of ARDS, and extracorporeal methods of oxygen delivery and carbon dioxide removal. Although the death rate resulting from ARDS has been declining over the past 10 years, there is no evidence that any specific treatment or change in approach to ventilation is the cause of this improved survival. PMID:10948686

  19. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU.

    PubMed

    Ingelse, Sarah A; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G; Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  20. Respiratory distress syndrome in the newborn: role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gitto, E; Reiter, R J; Karbownik, M; Xian-Tan, D; Barberi, I

    2001-07-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are generated by several inflammatory and structural cells of the airways. These oxidant species have important effects on a variety of lung cells as regulators of signal transduction, activators of key transcription factors and modulators of gene expression and apoptosis. Thus, increased oxidative stress accompanied by reduced endogenous antioxidant defenses may play a role in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory pulmonary diseases, including respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in the newborn. There obviously are conflicting reports on the effect of oxygen, ventilation and nitric oxide (NO) on RDS and, thus, the question arises as what the neonatologist should do when confronted with a newborn with RDS. Clearly, utilizing lung protective strategies requires compromises between gas exchange goals and potential toxicities associated with over-distension, derecruitment of lung units and high oxygen concentrations. The results discussed in this brief review suggest rigorous clinical tests with antioxidants which may help to define the mechanisms associated with RDS and which could lead to new treatment strategies. PMID:11534558

  1. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    PubMed Central

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar–capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  2. Protein Kinase C and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mondrinos, Mark J.; Kennedy, Paul A.; Lyons, Melanie; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Kilpatrick, Laurie E.

    2013-01-01

    The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a major public health problem and a leading source of morbidity in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Lung tissue in patients with ARDS is characterized by inflammation, with exuberant neutrophil infiltration, activation and degranulation that is thought to initiate tissue injury through the release of proteases and oxygen radicals. Treatment of ARDS is supportive primarily because the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. This gap in knowledge must be addressed in order to identify urgently needed therapies. Recent research efforts in anti-inflammatory drug development have focused on identifying common control points in multiple signaling pathways. The protein kinase C (PKC) serine-threonine kinases are master regulators of proinflammatory signaling hubs, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Pharmacological inhibition of broad spectrum PKC activity and, more importantly, of specific PKC isoforms (as well as deletion of PKCs in mice) exerts protective effects in various experimental models of lung injury. Furthermore, PKC isoforms have been implicated in inflammatory processes that may be involved in the pathophysiologic changes that result in ARDS, including activation of innate immune and endothelial cells, neutrophil trafficking to the lung, regulation of alveolar epithelial barrier functions and control of neutrophil pro-inflammatory and pro-survival signaling. This review focuses on the mechanistic involvement of PKC isoforms in the pathogenesis of ARDS and highlights the potential of developing new therapeutic paradigms based on the selective inhibition (or activation) of specific PKC isoforms. PMID:23572089

  3. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody–positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seo-Hyun; Park, I-Nae

    2016-07-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  5. Impairment and Distress Judgments of Symptoms Composing Childhood Externalizing and Internalizing Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Andrew J.; Watson, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The pattern of perceived dysfunction associated with symptoms composing the externalizing childhood disorder syndrome was compared to the pattern characterizing the internalizing syndrome. In Study 1, undergraduate students (N = 205) judged the social impairment, academic/occupational impairment and personal distress associated with symptoms from…

  6. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by tropical eosinophilic lung disease: a case in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Chani, M; Iken, M; Eljahiri, Y; Nzenze, J R; Mion, G

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the case of a 28-year-old woman in whom acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following cholecystectomy led to the discovery of eosinophilic lung disease. Outcome was favorable after oxygenotherapy and medical treatment using ivermectin and corticosteroids. The case shows that hypereosinophilic syndrome can be the underlying cause of ARDS. PMID:21695880

  7. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Mechanisms and Perspective Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, JN; Lucas, R; Verin, AD

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a severe lung inflammatory disorder with a 30–50% mortality. Sepsis and pneumonia are the leading causes of ARDS. On the cellular level there is pulmonary capillary endothelial cell permeability and fluid leakage into the pulmonary parenchyma, followed by neutrophils, cytokines and an acute inflammatory response. When fluid increases in the interstitium then the outward movement continues and protein rich fluid floods the alveolar spaces through the tight junctions of the epithelial cells. Neutrophils play an important role in the development of pulmonary edema associated with acute lung injury or ARDS. Animal studies have shown that endothelial injury appears within minutes to hours after Acute Lung Injury (ALI) initiation with resulting intercellular gaps of the endothelial cells. The Endothelial Cell (EC) gaps allow for permeability of fluid, neutrophils and cytokines into the pulmonary parenchymal space. The neutrophils that infiltrate the lungs and migrate into the airways express pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and contribute to both the endothelial and epithelial integrity disruption of the barriers. Pharmacological treatments have been ineffective. The ARDS Network trial identified low tidal volume mechanical ventilation, positive end expiratory pressure and fluid management guidelines that have improved outcomes for patients with ARDS. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is used in specialized centers for severe cases. Prone positioning has recently proven to have significantly decreased ventilator days and days in the intensive care unit. Current investigation includes administration of mesenchymal stem cell therapy, partial fluid ventilation, TIP peptide nebulized administration and the continued examination of pharmacologic drugs. PMID:26973981

  8. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair

    PubMed Central

    Im, Daniel; Shi, Wei; Driscoll, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI), including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within 7 days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9 to 9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation, and surfactant regulation have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long-term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long-term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute, and long-term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis. PMID:27066462

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Outcomes after Near-hanging

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Sahar; Afshar, Majid; Barrett, Matthew; Smith, Gordon S.; Barr, Erik A.; Lissauer, Matthew E.; McCurdy, Michael T.; Murthi, Sarah B.; Netzer, Giora

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assess the case rate of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) after near-hanging, and the secondary outcomes of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury, and death. Risk factors for the outcomes were assessed. Method Single-center, state-wide retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients admitted between August, 2002, and September, 2011, with a primary diagnosis of non-judicial "hanging injury". Results Of 56 patients, 73% were male. The median age was 31 (IQR: 16–56). Upon arrival, 9% (5/56) did not have a pulse, and 23% (13/56) patients were intubated. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13 (IQR: 3–15); 14% (8/56) had a GCS=3. ARDS developed in 9% (5/56) of patients. Traumatic anoxic brain injury resulted in 9% (5/56) of patients. The in-hospital case fatality was 5% (3/56). Lower median GCS [3 (IQR: 3–7) vs. 14 (IQR: 3–15), p=0.0003] and intubation in field or in trauma resuscitation unit [100% (5/5) vs. 16% (8/51), p=0.0003] were associated with ARDS development. Risk factors of death were GCS=3 [100% (3/3) vs. 9% (5/53), p=0.002]; pulselessness upon arrival of emergency medical services [100% (3/3) vs. 4% (2/53), p<0.001]; and abnormal neurologic imaging [50% (1/2) vs. zero, p=0.04]. Conclusions The ARDS case rate after near-hanging is similar to the general trauma population. Low GCS and intubation are associated with increased risk of ARDS development. The rate of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury in this population is low. PMID:25596627

  10. Incidence and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Tsai, Ching-Fang; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lin, Ming-Shian; Ware, Lorraine B.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most epidemiological studies of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been conducted in western countries, and studies in Asia are limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence, in-hospital mortality, and 1-year mortality of ARDS in Taiwan. We conducted a nationwide inpatient cohort study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between 1997 and 2011. A total of 40,876 ARDS patients (68% male; mean age 66 years) were identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition coding and further analyzed for clinical characteristics, medical costs, and mortality. The overall crude incidence of ARDS was 15.74 per 100,000 person-years, and increased from 2.53 to 19.26 per 100,000 person-years during the study period. The age-adjusted incidence of ARDS was 15.19 per 100,000 person-years. The overall in-hospital mortality was 57.8%. In-hospital mortality decreased from 59.7% in 1997 to 47.5% in 2011 (P < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality rate was lowest (33.5%) in the youngest patients (age 18–29 years) and highest (68.2%) in the oldest patients (>80 years, P < 0.001). The overall 1-year mortality rate was 72.1%, and decreased from 75.8% to 54.7% during the study period. Patients who died during hospitalization were older (69 ± 17 versus 62 ± 19, P < 0.001) and predominantly male (69.8% versus 65.3%, P < 0.001). In addition, patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher medical costs (6421 versus 5825 US Dollars, P < 0.001) and shorter lengths of stay (13 versus 19 days, P < 0.001) than patients who survived. We provide the first large-scale epidemiological analysis of ARDS incidence and outcomes in Asia. Although the overall incidence was lower than has been reported in a prospective US study, this may reflect underdiagnosis by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition code and identification of only patients with more severe ARDS in this

  11. Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Diagnosing HPS Diagnosing HPS in ... of patients that develop HPS from New World Hantaviruses recover completely. No chronic infection has been detected ...

  12. Evaluation of a practice guideline for the management of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants: A quality improvement initiative

    PubMed Central

    Read, Brooke; Lee, David SC; Fraser, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of mechanical ventilation to treat respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants has been associated with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. As part of a quality improvement initiative to reduce the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants, a new practice guideline for the management of respiratory distress syndrome was developed and adopted into practice in a neonatal intensive care unit in February 2012. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of implementing the new guideline in regard to the use of mechanical ventilation and surfactant, and the incidence of bronchopulmonary dypslasia. METHODS: An historical cohort of very preterm infants (gestational age 260 to 326 weeks) born one year before guideline implementation was compared with a similar cohort of infants born one year following guideline implementation. Data were collected retrospectively from the local neonatal intensive care unit database. RESULTS: A total of 272 preterm infants were included in the study: 129 in the preguideline cohort and 143 in the postguideline cohort. Following the implementation of the guideline, the proportion of infants treated with ongoing mechanical ventilation was reduced from 49% to 26% (P<0.001) and there was a trend toward a reduction in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (27% versus 18%; P=0.07). There was no difference in the proportion of infants treated with surfactant (54% versus 50%). CONCLUSION: The implementation of the practice guideline helped to minimize the use of ongoing mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. PMID:26941562

  13. High or conventional positive end-expiratory pressure in adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Alersi, R; Navarro-Ramírez, C

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome may require high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels, though the optimum level remains to be established. Several clinical trials have compared high PEEP levels versus conventional PEEP. Overall, although high PEEP levels improve oxygenation and are safe, they do not result in a significant reduction of the mortality rates. Nevertheless, some metaanalyses have revealed 2 situations in which high PEEP may decrease mortality: When used in severe distress and when PEEP is set following the characteristics of lung mechanics. Five studies have explored this latter scenario. Unfortunately, all of them have small sample sizes and have used different means to determine optimum PEEP. It is therefore necessary to conduct studies of sufficient sample size to compare the treatment of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, using a protective ventilation strategy with high PEEP guided by the characteristics of lung mechanics and ventilation with the protocol proposed by the ARDS Network. PMID:24290732

  14. Is there a need for emerging drugs for the acute respiratory distress syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and devastating syndrome of acute respiratory failure for which little effective pharmacotherapy exists. The authors describe some interventions that show promise as potential therapies for this condition, with particular reference to clinically relevant human models of ARDS. Aspirin, mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells, keratinocyte growth factor, IFN-β and oncostatin M inhibition are discussed. PMID:25152048

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to overdose desferrioxamine: report of a child.

    PubMed

    Atas, B; Caksen, H; Tuncer, O; Oner, A F; Kirimi, E; Akbayram, S

    2005-03-01

    In this article, we present an 18-month-old girl with acute iron poisoning who died from acute respiratory distress syndrome due to overdose of desferrioxamine. Our purpose is to emphasize the importance of close follow-up children with acute iron poisoning for desferrioxamine toxicity. PMID:16250288

  16. Aspirin as a potential treatment in sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toner, Philip; McAuley, Danny Francis; Shyamsundar, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a common condition that is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and health-care cost. Pulmonary and non-pulmonary sepsis are common causes of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mortality from ARDS remains high despite protective lung ventilation, and currently there are no specific pharmacotherapies to treat sepsis or ARDS. Sepsis and ARDS are characterised by activation of the inflammatory cascade. Although there is much focus on the study of the dysregulated inflammation and its suppression, the associated activation of the haemostatic system has been largely ignored until recently. There has been extensive interest in the role that platelet activation can have in the inflammatory response through induction, aggregation and activation of leucocytes and other platelets. Aspirin can modulate multiple pathogenic mechanisms implicated in the development of multiple organ dysfunction in sepsis and ARDS. This review will discuss the role of the platelet, the mechanisms of action of aspirin in sepsis and ARDS, and aspirin as a potential therapy in treating sepsis and ARDS. PMID:26494395

  17. Sivelestat relieves respiratory distress refractory to dexamethasone in all-trans retinoic acid syndrome: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Kozo; Akaike, Hiroto; Miyauchi, Ayaka; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2006-01-01

    Kawasaki K, Akaike H, Miyauchi A, Ouchi K. Sivelestat relieves respiratory distress refractory to dexamethasone in all-trans retinoic acid syndrome: a report of two cases. Treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) improves the prognosis of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), but ATRA syndrome may occur as a possible fatal side effect, especially in cases refractory to medication or involving pulmonary hemorrhage. We describe two patients with APL who suffered from intracranial hemorrhage. The first patient was a 16-yr-old girl who was treated with ATRA and then developed respiratory distress refractory to treatment with dexamethasone combined with anthracycline-cytarabine cytoreduction therapy. Treatment with Sivelestat, a small molecule inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, achieved rapid improvement in oxygenation and chest radiograph findings, and the patient has been in complete remission for 24 months. The second patient was a 10-yr-old boy in whom pulmonary hemorrhage developed following administration of ATRA, dexamethasone and cytoreduction therapy. Aspiration and administration of Sivelestat improved oxygenation and he remained stable. Hematological improvement was also achieved, but the patient died of brain dysfunction because of cerebral edema accompanied by intracranial bleeding. The two cases suggest that Sivelestat may be effective as an additional agent in the treatment of refractory ATRA syndrome, and, therefore, prospective randomized studies of treatment protocols are warranted. PMID:16930140

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an adult patient with a myelodysplastic disorder.

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Cini, G; Meola, N; Ferrannini, E

    1983-01-01

    A 58-year-old man was diagnosed to have refractory anaemia with excessive blasts. After 3 1/2 years of relative control on periodic blood transfusions, the patient developed an acute leukaemia. Although the blastic crisis was not extreme (WBC counts less than 100 X 10(9)/l), a severe, intractable respiratory distress syndrome set in and brought the patient to the exitus in a few days. Overt signs of septic shock were absent, as was evidence of any other known cause of adult respiratory distress. Acute pulmonary failure can be the cause of death in leukaemic patients even in the absence of overwhelming sepsis or hyperleucocytosis. PMID:6404107

  19. How Is Metabolic Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... by controlling all of your risk factors. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include heart-healthy eating , aiming for a ... you to. You should still follow a heart-healthy lifestyle, even if you take medicines to treat your ...

  20. How I treat hypereosinophilic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) are a group of rare disorders characterized by peripheral blood eosinophilia of 1.5 × 109/L or higher and evidence of end organ manifestations attributable to the eosinophilia and not otherwise explained in the clinical setting. HESs are pleomorphic in clinical presentation and can be idiopathic or associated with a variety of underlying conditions, including allergic, rheumatologic, infectious, and neoplastic disorders. Moreover, the etiology of the eosinophilia in HESs can be primary (myeloid), secondary (lymphocyte-driven), or unknown. Although corticosteroids remain the first-line therapy for most forms of HESs, the availability of an increasing number of novel therapeutic agents, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, has necessarily altered the approach to treatment of HESs. This review presents an updated treatment-based approach to the classification of patients with presumed HES and discusses the roles of conventional and novel agents in the management of these patients. PMID:25964669

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after the Use of Gadolinium Contrast Media

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jihye; Byun, Il Hwan; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Nam, Eun Ji

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a medical emergency that threatens life. To this day, ARDS is very rarely reported by iodine contrast media, and there is no reported case of ARDS induced by gadolinium contrast media. Here, we present a case with ARDS after the use of gadobutrol (Gadovist) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast medium. A 26 years old female without any medical history, including allergic diseases and without current use of drugs, visited the emergency room for abdominal pain. Her abdominopelvic computed tomography with iodine contrast media showed a right ovarian cyst and possible infective colitis. Eighty-three hours later, she underwent pelvis MRI after injection of 7.5 mL (0.1 mL/kg body weight) of gadobutrol (Gadovist) to evaluate the ovarian cyst. She soon presented respiratory difficulty, edema of the lips, nausea, and vomiting, and we could hear wheezing upon auscultation. She was treated with dexamethasone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Her chest X-ray showed bilateral central bat-wing consolidative appearance. Managed with mechanical ventilation, she was extubated 3 days later and discharged without complications. PMID:26069143

  2. Optimizing Sedative Dose in Preterm Infants Undergoing Treatment for Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thall, Peter F.; Nguyen, Hoang Q.; Zohar, Sarah; Maton, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The Intubation-Surfactant-Extubation (INSURE) procedure is used worldwide to treat pre-term newborn infants suffering from respiratory distress syndrome, which is caused by an insufficient amount of the chemical surfactant in the lungs. With INSURE, the infant is intubated, surfactant is administered via the tube to the trachea, and at completion the infant is extubated. This improves the infant’s ability to breathe and thus decreases the risk of long term neurological or motor disabilities. To perform the intubation safely, the newborn infant first must be sedated. Despite extensive experience with INSURE, there is no consensus on what sedative dose is best. This paper describes a Bayesian sequentially adaptive design for a multi-institution clinical trial to optimize the sedative dose given to pre-term infants undergoing the INSURE procedure. The design is based on three clinical outcomes, two efficacy and one adverse, using elicited numerical utilities of the eight possible elementary outcomes. A flexible Bayesian parametric trivariate dose-outcome model is assumed, with the prior derived from elicited mean outcome probabilities. Doses are chosen adaptively for successive cohorts of infants using posterior mean utilities, subject to safety and efficacy constraints. A computer simulation study of the design is presented. PMID:25368435

  3. Measurement of pulmonary status and surfactant protein levels during dexamethasone treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. Y.; Yeh, T. F.; Lin, Y. C.; Miyamura, K.; Holmskov, U.; Reid, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early postnatal use of dexamethasone in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has been shown effectively to improve pulmonary status and to allow early weaning off mechanical ventilation. However, the mechanisms to explain the beneficial effects of dexamethasone in ventilatory dependent preterm infants remain unclear. METHODS: A double blind, placebo controlled study was performed to determine the change in pulmonary ventilation of premature infants with RDS as a result of dexamethasone treatment, and to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone on the levels of surfactant-associated proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) in the tracheal fluid from 34 premature infants with RDS and 29 control subjects. RESULTS: Dexamethasone treatment decreased fractional inspired oxygen concentration (FIO2), arterial carbon dioxide tension (PCO2), mean airway pressure (MAP), and facilitated successful weaning from mechanical ventilation. SP-A concentrations in the tracheal aspirates were increased at days 7 and 14, and SP-D concentrations were increased during the period from days 3 to 14 in the dexamethasone treated group compared with the control group. However, albumin levels in the tracheal aspirate samples were decreased after dexamethasone treatment over the period from days 3 to 14. There was an inverse correlation between PCO2 values and SP-A concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that early use of dexamethasone can improve pulmonary status and also increase SP-A and SP-D levels in the tracheal fluid in premature infants with RDS. PMID:8984701

  4. How we treat Richter syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sameer A.; Kay, Neil E.

    2014-01-01

    Richter syndrome (RS) is defined as the transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) into an aggressive lymphoma, most commonly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). RS occurs in approximately 2% to 10% of CLL patients during the course of their disease, with a transformation rate of 0.5% to 1% per year. A combination of germline genetic characteristics, clinical features (eg, advanced Rai stage), biologic (ζ-associated protein-70+, CD38+, CD49d+) and somatic genetic (del17p13.1 or del11q23.1) characteristics of CLL B cells, and certain CLL therapies are associated with higher risk of RS. Recent studies have also identified the crucial role of CDKN2A loss, TP53 disruption, C-MYC activation, and NOTCH1 mutations in the transformation from CLL to RS. An excisional lymph node biopsy is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of RS; a 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan can help inform the optimal site for biopsy. Approximately 80% of DLBCL cases in patients with CLL are clonally related to the underlying CLL, and the median survival for these patients is approximately 1 year. In contrast, the remaining 20% of patients have a clonally unrelated DLBCL and have a prognosis similar to that of de novo DLBCL. For patients with clonally related DLBCL, induction therapy with either an anthracycline- or platinum-based regimen is the standard approach. Postremission stem cell transplantation should be considered for appropriate patients. This article summarizes our approach to the clinical management of CLL patients who develop RS. PMID:24421328

  5. The effect of fibreoptic bronchoscopy in acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental evidence from a lung model.

    PubMed

    Nay, M-A; Mankikian, J; Auvet, A; Dequin, P-F; Guillon, A

    2016-02-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy is essential for appropriate care during mechanical ventilation, but can significantly affect mechanical ventilation of the lungs, particularly for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We aimed to describe the consequences of bronchoscopy during lung-protective ventilation in a bench study, and thereby to determine the optimal diameter of the bronchoscope for avoiding disruption of the protective-ventilation strategy during the procedure. Immediately following the insertion of the bronchoscope into the tracheal tube, either minute ventilation decreased significantly, or positive end-expiratory pressure increased substantially, according to the setting of the inspiratory pressure limit. The increase in end-expiratory pressure led to an equivalent increase in the plateau pressure, and lung-protective ventilation was significantly altered during the procedure. We showed that a bronchoscope with an external diameter of 4 mm (or less) would allow safer bronchoscopic interventions in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:26559154

  6. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application. PMID:24485531

  7. Should Immune-Enhancing Formulations Be Used for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Roosevelt, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    The potential for regulating immune function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through enteral-administered anti-inflammatory lipids has generated much interest over the past 20 years. Yet recommendations remain inconclusive regarding the utilization of ω-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI). Studies are limited in number, with differing methods, small sample sizes, and conflicting results, making recommendations difficult to interpret. PMID:27339156

  8. Fatal measles presenting as acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Suman S; Marupudi, Krishna Chaitanya; Gupta, Anurag; Rau, Nileshwar Radhakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Fatal measles is known to occur among immunocompromised adults. We report a rare case of an immunocompetent non-pregnant young lady who suffered from fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome due to measles. Physicians must be vigilant to this deadly presentation of measles even in immunocompetent individuals. We emphasise the inadequacies of vaccination programmes in India reflected not only by the existing high measles-related childhood mortalities, but also an emerging rise in deaths among adults. PMID:25139919

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: use of specialized nutrients in pediatric patients and infants.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Leslie A; Trobaugh, Kimberly A

    2011-02-01

    With a high rate of mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has limited treatments options. Immune-enhanced formulas, containing eicosapentaenoic acid, borage oil, and antioxidants, have shown to be beneficial in adults patients with ARDS, decreasing mortality, length of mechanical ventilation, and new organ dysfunction. There is promising research in pediatric patients with improvement in oxygenation status found, but further trials are needed to realize these benefits in pediatric and infant populations. PMID:21266694

  10. Pulmonary Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    During the past ten years, functions of alveolar type II cells have been well characterized with isolated cells in vitro. Some of the functions were well known from studies in vivo, but others such as transepithelial sodium transport were unsuspected. A better understanding of this important pulmonary cell type improves our knowledge of the pathophysiology of adult respiratory distress syndrome and may in time lead to new therapeutic strategies. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:3909639

  11. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fink, Mitchell P

    2002-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are reactive, partially reduced derivatives of molecular oxygen (O 2 ). Important reactive oxygen species in biologic systems include superoxide radical anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. Closely related species include the hypohalous acids, particularly hypochlorous acid; chloramine and substituted chloramines; and singlet oxygen. Reactive nitrogen species are derived from the simple diatomic gas, nitric oxide. Peroxynitrite and its protonated form, peroxynitrous acid, are the most significant reactive nitrogen species in biologic systems. A variety of enzymatic and nonenzymatic processes can generate reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in mammalian cells. An extensive body of experimental evidence from studies using animal models supports the view that reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are important in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. This view is further supported by data from clinical studies that correlate biochemical evidence of reactive oxygen species-mediated or reactive nitrogen species-mediated stress with the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite these data, pharmacologic strategies directed at minimizing reactive oxygen species-mediated or reactive nitrogen species-mediated damage have yet to be successfully introduced into clinical practice. The most extensively studied compound in this regard is N -acetylcysteine; unfortunately, clinical trials with this compound in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome have yielded disappointing results. PMID:12205400

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: new definition, current and future therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Vlachou, Aikaterini; Ghannadian, Shirin; Simonetti, Umberto; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    Since acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was first described in 1967 there has been large number of studies addressing its pathogenesis and therapies. Despite this intense research activity, there are very few effective therapies for ARDS other than the use of lung protection strategies. This lack of therapeutic modalities is not only related to the complex pathogenesis of this syndrome but also the insensitive and nonspecific diagnostic criteria to diagnose ARDS. This review article will summarize the key features of the new definition of ARDS, and provide a brief overview of innovative therapeutic options that are being assessed in the management of ARDS. PMID:23825769

  13. On the complexity of scoring acute respiratory distress syndrome: do not forget hemodynamics!

    PubMed Central

    Repessé, Xavier; Aubry, Alix

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains associated with a poor outcome despite recent major therapeutic advances. Forecasting the outcome of patients suffering from such a syndrome is of a crucial interest and many scores have been proposed, all suffering from limits responsible for important discrepancies. Authors try to elaborate simple, routine and reliable scores but most of them do not consider hemodynamics yet acknowledged as a major determinant of outcome. This article aims at reminding the approach of scoring in ARDS and at deeply describing the most recently published one in order to highlight their main pitfall, which is to forget the hemodynamics. PMID:27618840

  14. How I treat catastrophic thrombotic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ortel, Thomas L; Erkan, Doruk; Kitchens, Craig S

    2015-09-10

    Catastrophic thrombotic syndromes are characterized by rapid onset of multiple thromboembolic occlusions affecting diverse vascular beds. Patients may have multiple events on presentation, or develop them rapidly over days to weeks. Several disorders can present with this extreme clinical phenotype, including catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), atypical presentations of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) or heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), and Trousseau syndrome, but some patients present with multiple thrombotic events in the absence of associated prothrombotic disorders. Diagnostic workup must rapidly determine which, if any, of these syndromes are present because therapeutic management is driven by the underlying disorder. With the exception of atypical presentations of TTP, which are treated with plasma exchange, anticoagulation is the most important therapeutic intervention in these patients. Effective anticoagulation may require laboratory confirmation with anti-factor Xa levels in patients treated with heparin, especially if the baseline (pretreatment) activated partial thromboplastin time is prolonged. Patients with catastrophic APS also benefit from immunosuppressive therapy and/or plasma exchange, whereas patients with HIT need an alternative anticoagulant to replace heparin. Progressive thrombotic events despite therapeutic anticoagulation may necessitate an alternative therapeutic strategy. If the thrombotic process can be controlled, these patients can recover, but indefinite anticoagulant therapy may be appropriate to prevent recurrent events. PMID:26179082

  15. Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ilan S.; Embil, John M.; Sharma, Atul; Goulet, Stephen; Light, R. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an uncommon, highly fatal, and poorly understood manifestation of blastomycosis. Optimal management remains unknown, including the roles of adjunctive corticosteroids and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis, managed in intensive care units in Manitoba, Canada, from 1992 to 2014. ARDS was defined using the Berlin definition. Corticosteroid therapy was defined as ≥150 mg cortisol equivalent in 24 hours. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants of a fatal outcome, and bootstrap resampling was used to assess sample size requirements. Forty-three patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis were identified. ARDS was mild, moderate, and severe in 2 (5%), 12 (28%), and 29 (67%) patients, respectively. Management included amphotericin B (n = 42, 98%), vasopressors (n = 36, 84%), corticosteroids (n = 22, 51%), renal replacement (n = 13, 30%), and ECMO (n = 4, 11%). Seventeen patients (40%) died. All patients treated with ECMO survived (P = 0.14). Corticosteroids were not associated with survival benefit in univariate (P = 0.43) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.11–2.34). Bootstrap studies indicated that almost 500 patients would be needed to confirm a significant reduction in mortality from corticosteroids (type I error = 0.05, power = 80%). Blastomycosis is an uncommon, albeit important, cause of ARDS in this geographic area. Given the rarity of disease and the large cohort needed to demonstrate mortality benefit, the role of adjunctive therapies, including corticosteroids and ECMO, may remain unconfirmed, and clinical judgment should guide management decisions. PMID:27149459

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Methods Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient’s condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Results Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. Discussion In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Conclusion Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission. PMID:24180319

  17. Management and Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Blastomycosis: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ilan S; Embil, John M; Sharma, Atul; Goulet, Stephen; Light, R Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an uncommon, highly fatal, and poorly understood manifestation of blastomycosis. Optimal management remains unknown, including the roles of adjunctive corticosteroids and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis, managed in intensive care units in Manitoba, Canada, from 1992 to 2014. ARDS was defined using the Berlin definition. Corticosteroid therapy was defined as ≥150 mg cortisol equivalent in 24 hours. Logistic regression was used to identify determinants of a fatal outcome, and bootstrap resampling was used to assess sample size requirements.Forty-three patients with ARDS caused by blastomycosis were identified. ARDS was mild, moderate, and severe in 2 (5%), 12 (28%), and 29 (67%) patients, respectively. Management included amphotericin B (n = 42, 98%), vasopressors (n = 36, 84%), corticosteroids (n = 22, 51%), renal replacement (n = 13, 30%), and ECMO (n = 4, 11%). Seventeen patients (40%) died. All patients treated with ECMO survived (P = 0.14). Corticosteroids were not associated with survival benefit in univariate (P = 0.43) or multivariate analyses (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.11-2.34). Bootstrap studies indicated that almost 500 patients would be needed to confirm a significant reduction in mortality from corticosteroids (type I error = 0.05, power = 80%).Blastomycosis is an uncommon, albeit important, cause of ARDS in this geographic area. Given the rarity of disease and the large cohort needed to demonstrate mortality benefit, the role of adjunctive therapies, including corticosteroids and ECMO, may remain unconfirmed, and clinical judgment should guide management decisions. PMID:27149459

  18. Children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndrome: More psychologically distressed than other children in pain?

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E; Williams, Sara E; Carullo, Veronica P; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Bruehl, Stephen; Berde, Charles B

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Historically, in both adult and pediatric populations, a lack of knowledge regarding complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and absence of clear diagnostic criteria have contributed to the view that this is a primarily psychiatric condition. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that children with CRPS are more functionally disabled, have more pain and are more psychologically distressed than children with other pain conditions. METHODS: A total of 101 children evaluated in a tertiary care pediatric pain clinic who met the International Association for the Study of Pain consensus diagnostic criteria for CRPS participated in the present retrospective study. Comparison groups included 103 children with abdominal pain, 291 with headache and 119 with back pain. Children and parents completed self-report questionnaires assessing disability, somatization, pain coping, depression, anxiety and school attendance. RESULTS: Children with CRPS reported higher pain intensity and more recent onset of pain at the initial tertiary pain clinic evaluation compared with children with other chronic pain conditions. They reported greater functional disability and more somatic symptoms than children with headaches or back pain. Scores on measures of depression and anxiety were within normal limits and similar to those of children in other pain diagnostic groups. CONCLUSIONS: As a group, clinic-referred children with CRPS may be more functionally impaired and experience more somatic symptoms compared with children with other pain conditions. However, overall psychological functioning as assessed by self-report appears to be similar to that of children with other chronic pain diagnoses. Comprehensive assessment using a biopsychosocial framework is essential to understanding and appropriately treating children with symptoms of CRPS. PMID:23662291

  19. Scrub Typhus with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and its Management in Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sankuratri, Srinivas; Kalagara, Pavani; Samala, Kartika Balaji; Veledandi, Prabhakar Krishna; Atiketi, Srinadh Babu

    2015-05-01

    Scrub typhus is zoonotic disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi (O tsutsugamushi). It is transmitted to humans by the bite of trombiculid mite larvae (chiggers). It is a re-emerging infectious disease in India. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, anorexia, myalgia, eschar, adenopathy and maculopapular rash. Complications of Scrub typhus develop after first week of illness. Complications include meningoencephalitis, jaundice, myocarditis, ARDS and renal failure. Eschar and rash may be unnoticed or absent. Thorough physical examination, identification of eschar/rash throws light in thinking about scrub typhus, treating and preventing further complications. Here, we report a case of scrub typhus with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and its management with non invasive ventilation in the intensive care unit. PMID:26155511

  20. [Mitochondrial and microcirculatory distress syndrome in the critical patient. Therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Navarrete, M L; Cerdeño, M C; Serra, M C; Conejero, R

    2013-10-01

    Mitochondrial and microcirculatory distress syndrome (MMDS) can occur during systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and is characterized by cytopathic tissue hypoxia uncorrected by oxygen transport optimization, and associated with an acquired defect in the use of oxygen and energy production in mitochondria, leading to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD). We examine the pathogenesis of MMDS, new diagnostic methods, and recent therapeutic approaches adapted to each of the three phases in the evolution of the syndrome. In the initial phase, the aim is prevention and early reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction. Once the latter is established, the aim is to restore flow of the electron chain, mitochondrial respiration, and to avoid cellular energy collapse. Finally, in the third (resolution) stage, treatment should focus on stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis and the repair or replacement of damaged mitochondria. PMID:24018281

  1. Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1): Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lingappa, Lokesh; Shah, Nikit; Motepalli, Ananth Sagar; Shaik, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1) is a rare cause of early infantile respiratory failure and death. No cases have been currently described from India. Two low-birth-weight infants presented prior to 6 months of age with recurrent apnea and respiratory distress. Both required prolonged ventilation, and had distal arthrogryposis and diaphragmatic eventration. Nerve conduction study revealed motor sensory axonopathy. Genetic testing confirmed mutations in immunoglobulin mu binding protein (IGHMBP2). These two cases establish presence of SMARD1 in our population. Both infants died on discontinuation of ventilation. Antenatal diagnoses done in one pregnancy. Though rare, high index of suspicion is essential in view of poor outcome and aid antenatal counseling. PMID:27570397

  2. Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1): Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Lingappa, Lokesh; Shah, Nikit; Motepalli, Ananth Sagar; Shaik, Farhan

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress syndrome (SMARD1) is a rare cause of early infantile respiratory failure and death. No cases have been currently described from India. Two low-birth-weight infants presented prior to 6 months of age with recurrent apnea and respiratory distress. Both required prolonged ventilation, and had distal arthrogryposis and diaphragmatic eventration. Nerve conduction study revealed motor sensory axonopathy. Genetic testing confirmed mutations in immunoglobulin mu binding protein (IGHMBP2). These two cases establish presence of SMARD1 in our population. Both infants died on discontinuation of ventilation. Antenatal diagnoses done in one pregnancy. Though rare, high index of suspicion is essential in view of poor outcome and aid antenatal counseling. PMID:27570397

  3. [Treating a psychotic syndrome in 2007].

    PubMed

    Olié, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that we have to consider 3 patterns of psychotic symptoms: positive (hallucinations, delusion...), negative (affective flatness, autism...) symptoms and disorganization (ambivalence, incoherence...). In the past, ECT (electroconvulsivotherapy) was the first effective treatment in psychiatry. Conventionnal neuroleptics have been determinant in the significant evolution of care to psychotic patients. ECT use is now better defined in terms of practise and indications. Assessment of new antipsychotic medications is mainly focused on efficacy on positive symptoms. Atypical antipsychotics brought improvement in treating psychotic syndromes: they are better tolerated and more effective on the whole spectrum of psychotic syndromes including emotional symptoms than conventional neuroleptics. Atypical antipsychotics have raised questions about metabolic and cardiac risks. Compliance remains a cause of failure of many antipsychotic treatments. Treating a psychotic syndrome requires complementary strategies to medications: conditions of assistance and rehabilitation, choice of psychotherapy. Research program are currently orientated towards: - identification of prepsychotic symptoms and endophenotypes which can be treatment targets; - assessment of putative therapeutical means such a brain stimulation. PMID:18718208

  4. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    PubMed

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:27418297

  5. Newborn Respiratory Distress.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Christian L; Mahajan, Anand

    2015-12-01

    Newborn respiratory distress presents a diagnostic and management challenge. Newborns with respiratory distress commonly exhibit tachypnea with a respiratory rate of more than 60 respirations per minute. They may present with grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. Common causes include transient tachypnea of the newborn, respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, sepsis, pneumothorax, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and delayed transition. Congenital heart defects, airway malformations, and inborn errors of metabolism are less common etiologies. Clinicians should be familiar with updated neonatal resuscitation guidelines. Initial evaluation includes a detailed history and physical examination. The clinician should monitor vital signs and measure oxygen saturation with pulse oximetry, and blood gas measurement may be considered. Chest radiography is helpful in the diagnosis. Blood cultures, serial complete blood counts, and C-reactive protein measurement are useful for the evaluation of sepsis. Most neonates with respiratory distress can be treated with respiratory support and noninvasive methods. Oxygen can be provided via bag/mask, nasal cannula, oxygen hood, and nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Ventilator support may be used in more severe cases. Surfactant is increasingly used for respiratory distress syndrome. Using the INSURE technique, the newborn is intubated, given surfactant, and quickly extubated to nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Newborns should be screened for critical congenital heart defects via pulse oximetry after 24 hours but before hospital discharge. Neonatology consultation is recommended if the illness exceeds the clinician's expertise and comfort level or when the diagnosis is unclear in a critically ill newborn. PMID:26760414

  6. Effects of Xuanbai Chengqi decoction on lung compliance for patients with exogenous pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhengrong; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of Xuanbai Chengqi decoction on lung compliance for patients with exogenous pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subjects and methods A total of 53 patients with exogenous pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, who were admitted to the intensive care unit of the First Affiliated Hospital of Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from March 2009 to February 2013, were selected. They were randomly divided into the treatment group (25 cases) and the control group (28 cases). Both the groups were treated with conventional treatment and lung-protective ventilation strategy; apart from these, enema therapy with Xuanbai Chengqi decoction was given to the treatment group. Meanwhile, static lung compliance, dynamic lung compliance, peak airway pressure, plateau pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) for patients in both the groups were observed and recorded at 24, 48, and 72 hours after the drug was used. Moreover, variations in the duration of parenteral nutrition, incidence rate of complications, and case fatality rate in patients after treatment were recorded. Results For patients in the treatment group, at 48 and 72 hours after treatment, the static lung compliance and dynamic lung compliance were significantly higher than those in the control group, while plateau pressure, peak airway pressure, and PEEP were significantly lower than those before treatment. At the same time, PEEP for patients in the treatment group at 72 hours after treatment was remarkably lower than that in the control group, showing significant difference (P<0.05). The duration of parenteral nutrition in the treatment group was significantly shorter than that in the control group (P<0.05). Both the incidence rate and the fatality rate of complications, such as abdominal distension and ventilator-associated pneumonia, for patients in the treatment group were distinctly smaller than those in the control group (P<0

  7. Trigeminal trophic syndrome treated with thermoplastic occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Anil M; Damian, Diona L; Moloney, Fergal J

    2011-02-01

    A 72-year-old man with a history of thrombotic CVA causing lateral medullary infarction presented with non-healing ulcers of the right side of the face of 5 months' duration. After extensive investigations, a diagnosis of trigeminal trophic syndrome was made. The ulcers progressed relentlessly despite amitriptyline and gabapentin, and he was treated with a combination of carbamazepine and thermoplastic mask occlusion of the right side of his face. Over the next 10 weeks the shallower facial ulcers began to diminish in depth and diameter, and the deeper ulcers stopped progressing. Although the patient showed early signs of healing, he died because of complications from the CVA. PMID:21332680

  8. A case of Mediterranean spotted fever associated with severe respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dželalija, Boris; Punda-Polić, Volga; Medić, Alan; Mraović, Boris; Šimurina, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever (MSF) is usually a mild endemic rickettsial disease occurring in southern Croatia. We have reported the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of an acute MSF case associated with severe respiratory distress syndrome and hemodynamical instability. The patient recovered completely after antimicrobial treatment. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (FOCUS Diagnostics Inc.) was performed to detect IgM and IgG antibodies to Rickettsia conorii. A significant increase of both IgM and IgG antibody titres found in paired acute- and convalescent-phase serum confirmed the diagnosis of acute MSF. PMID:26344605

  9. Fluid Management With a Simplified Conservative Protocol for the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Grissom, Colin K.; Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Dickerson, Justin B.; Brown, Samuel M.; Lanspa, Michael J.; Liu, Kathleen D.; Schoenfeld, David; Tidswell, Mark; Hite, R. Duncan; Rock, Peter; Miller, Russell R.; Morris, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network, a conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Conservative) resulted in a lower cumulative fluid balance and better outcomes than a liberal fluid protocol (FACTT Liberal). Subsequent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network studies used a simplified conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Lite). The objective of this study was to compare the performance of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal protocols. Design Retrospective comparison of FACTT Lite, FACTT Conservative, and FACTT Liberal. Primary outcome was cumulative fluid balance over 7 days. Secondary outcomes were 60-day adjusted mortality and ventilator-free days through day 28. Safety outcomes were prevalence of acute kidney injury and new shock. Setting ICUs of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network participating hospitals. Patients Five hundred three subjects managed with FACTT Conservative, 497 subjects managed with FACTT Liberal, and 1,124 subjects managed with FACTT Lite. Interventions Fluid management by protocol. Measurements and Main Results Cumulative fluid balance was 1,918 ± 323 mL in FACTT Lite, −136 ±491 mL in FACTT Conservative, and 6,992 ± 502 mL in FACTT Liberal (p < 0.001). Mortality was not different between groups (24% in FACTT Lite, 25% in FACTT Conservative and Liberal, p = 0.84). Ventilator-free days in FACTT Lite (14.9 ±0.3) were equivalent to FACTT Conservative (14.6±0.5) (p = 0.61) and greater than in FACTT Liberal (12.1 ±0.5, p < 0.001 vs Lite). Acute kidney injury prevalence was 58% in FACTT Lite and 57% in FACTT Conservative (p = 0.72). Prevalence of new shock in FACTT Lite (9%) was lower than in FACTT Conservative (13%) (p = 0.007 vs Lite) and similar to FACTT Liberal (11%) (p = 0.18 vs Lite). Conclusions FACTT Lite had a greater cumulative fluid balance than FACTT Conservative but had equivalent clinical and safety outcomes

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Role of Oleic Acid-Triggered Lung Injury and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Silva, Adriana Ribeiro; Burth, Patrícia; Castro-Faria, Mauro Velho; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire

    2015-01-01

    Lung injury especially acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be triggered by diverse stimuli, including fatty acids and microbes. ARDS affects thousands of people worldwide each year, presenting high mortality rate and having an economic impact. One of the hallmarks of lung injury is edema formation with alveoli flooding. Animal models are used to study lung injury. Oleic acid-induced lung injury is a widely used model resembling the human disease. The oleic acid has been linked to metabolic and inflammatory diseases; here we focus on lung injury. Firstly, we briefly discuss ARDS and secondly we address the mechanisms by which oleic acid triggers lung injury and inflammation. PMID:26640323

  11. [Comprehensive observation of a canine model of respiratory distress syndrome induced with bone marrow].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z T

    1990-02-01

    An animal model of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) was made with homologous bone marrow extraction in dogs, which had a similar alter to clinic ARDS patients in blood gases, chest X-ray films and pulmonary pathologic findings. Its pathogenetic key point was extensive pulmonary fat emboli, while active oxygen and neutrophil elastase also play an important role in it. Our results indicate that this model is a rather better one, and anisodamine has some therapeutic effects on the experimental RDS model. PMID:2379250

  12. Supine chest compression: alternative to prone ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Soni, Kapil Dev

    2014-05-01

    Prone ventilation is usually used for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. We applied an alternative method to prone position. We described 2 cases of trauma where prone position could not be done. Chest wall compression was performed by 2-kg weight in front of the chest wall bilaterally while the patient was in a supine position. Respiratory mechanics work to improve oxygenation almost as same as the mechanism proposed for prone position without any major adverse effects and serious complications. We suggest a larger randomized study to determine the efficacy and also to find out the optimum weight required to compress the chest. PMID:24332252

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in adenovirus type 4 pneumonia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Narra, R; Bono, P; Zoccoli, A; Orlandi, A; Piconi, S; Grasselli, G; Crotti, S; Girello, A; Piralla, A; Baldanti, F; Lunghi, G

    2016-08-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) cause a wide spectrum of clinical syndromes, depending on species and types, from mild respiratory infections to deadly pneumonia: in particular, severe infections occur in immunocompromised patients. In this report, we describe the case of a 36 years-old woman admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) with severe respiratory distress syndrome caused by adenovirus pneumonia, that required invasive respiratory support (mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation). Molecular assays detected the virus in respiratory and plasma specimen and sequencing procedure identified HAdV type 4. Patient improved after cidofovir administration. Leukopenia and subsequent bacterial infection occurred, but the patient recovered completely and was discharged from the hospital after 54days. PMID:27354307

  14. Fulminant adult respiratory distress syndrome after suction lipectomy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Boezaart, A P; Clinton, C W; Braun, S; Oettle, C; Lee, N P

    1990-12-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome developing within 24 hours in a patient who underwent suction lipectomy for body contouring under general anaesthesia is reported. During surgery, in which a total of 1.3 l of suction matter was removed, the patient became haemodynamically unstable and mildly hyperthermic. Subsequently, clinical signs and symptoms of the fat embolism syndrome developed. Aggressive haemodynamic and respiratory support over an 8-day period resulted in patient survival. Malignant hyperthermia was excluded as cause for the clinical presentation on muscle biopsy and in vitro caffeine contracture studies. Although usually complication-free, suction lipectomy may be associated with life-threatening incidents. Even suction volumes as low as 1.3 l have potential hazards, therefore the procedure merits regular postoperative observation and re-assessment. PMID:2251620

  15. The Role of Surfactant Therapy in Nonrespiratory Distress Syndrome Conditions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Amaris; Bhandari, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    While treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with surfactant in premature neonates is well established, evidence for its use in non-RDS conditions, especially in the term neonate, has been less abundant. The last published review on a PubMed search was in 2001. In this review, we comprehensively and critically evaluated the evidence from the literature regarding the use of surfactant in specific non-RDS disorders in neonates. Surfactant administered as a bolus should be considered in the treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome with progressive respiratory failure. While controversial in congenital diaphragmatic hernia, it should be considered in Group B streptococcal pneumonia. As evidence evolves, we anticipate the broader application and more routine use of surfactant therapy for respiratory failure because of causes other than RDS. PMID:26171600

  16. Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor is preferentially increased in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M; Donnelly, S C; Grant, I S; Robertson, C; Gauldie, J; Haslett, C

    1999-05-01

    Inappropriate release of proteases from inflammatory and stromal cells can lead to destruction of the lung parenchyma. Antiproteinases such as alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-Pi), secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and elastase-specific inhibitor (elafin) control excess production of human neutrophil elastase. In the present study, the concentrations of alpha1-Pi, SLPI and elafin found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from control subjects, patients at risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and patients with established ARDS were determined. Levels of all three inhibitors were raised in patients compared with normal subjects. SLPI was increased in the group of patients who were at risk of ARDS and went on to develop the condition, compared with the "at-risk" group who did not progress to ARDS (p=0.0083). Alpha1-Pi and elafin levels were similar in these two populations. In patients with established ARDS, both alpha1-Pi and SLPI levels were significantly increased, compared to patients at risk of ARDS who did (p=0.0089) or did not (p=0.0003) progress to ARDS. The finding of increased antiproteinases shortly before the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome provide further evidence for enhanced inflammation prior to clinical disease. PMID:10414400

  17. Stiff-person syndrome treated with rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Marcelo Evangelista; Araújo, Marx Lincoln Barros; Tomaz, Carlos Alberto Bezerra; Allam, Nasser

    2010-01-01

    Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare neurological condition consisting of progressive and fluctuating rigidity of the axial muscles combined with painful spasms. The pathophysiology of SPS is not fully understood, but there seems to be an autoimmune component. The use of rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody targeting CD20 protein in the surface of mature B cells, for the treatment of SPS is a recent therapeutical approach showing promising results. The authors present a case report of a 41-year-old female patient diagnosed with SPS who was treated with rituximab in a public hospital in Brasília, Brazil, showing a good and safe response to the treatment so far. Our data go along with some recent articles published in the literature. PMID:22802263

  18. Clinical trials of an intravenous oxygenator in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    High, K M; Snider, M T; Richard, R; Russell, G B; Stene, J K; Campbell, D B; Aufiero, T X; Thieme, G A

    1992-11-01

    In patients with severe adult respiratory distress syndrome, mechanical ventilation may not be able to ensure gas exchange sufficient to sustain life. We report the use of an intravenous oxygenator (IVOX) in five patients who were suffering from severe adult respiratory distress syndrome as a result of aspiration, fat embolism, or pneumonia. IVOX was used in an attempt to provide supplemental transfer of CO2 and O2 and thereby reduce O2 toxicity and barotrauma. All patients were tracheally intubated, sedated, and chemically paralyzed and had a PaO2 < 60 mmHg when the lungs were ventilated with an FIO2 = 1.0 and a positive end expiratory pressure of > or = 5 cmH2O. The right common femoral vein was located surgically, and the patient was systemically anticoagulated with heparin. A hollow introducer tube was inserted into the right common femoral vein, and the furled IVOX was passed into the inferior vena cava and advanced until the tip was in the lower portion of the superior vena cava. IVOX use ranged from 2 h to 4 days. In this group of patients, IVOX gas exchange ranged from 21 to 87 ml x min-1 of CO2 and from 28 to 85 ml x min-1 of O2. One of the five patients survived and was discharged from the hospital. The IVOX transferred up to 28% of metabolic gas-exchange requirements. One patient with a small vena cava showed signs of caval obstruction. Three other patients demonstrated signs of a septic syndrome after the device was inserted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1443737

  19. [Pierre Robin syndrome treated by physiotherapy electromyography assisted].

    PubMed

    Bilello, Giuseppa; Provenzano, Franco; Lo Cascio, Alessandro; Caradonna, Domenico

    2009-01-01

    Pierre Robin syndrome is characterized by the triad: micrognathia, cleft palate and glossoptosis. This syndrome, which often undermines several organs and systems, is treated with a multidisciplinary approach that involves several specialists. The AA. present a case of Pierre Robin syndrome in neuromuscular rehabilitation by physiotherapy EMG-assisted. PMID:19445280

  20. Predicting School Readiness from Neurodevelopmental Assessments at Age 2 Years after Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Infants Born Preterm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrianakos-Hoobler, Athena I.; Msall, Michael E.; Huo, Dezheng; Marks, Jeremy D.; Plesha-Troyke, Susan; Schreiber, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether neurodevelopmental outcomes at the age of 2 years accurately predict school readiness in children who survived respiratory distress syndrome after preterm birth. Method: Our cohort included 121 preterm infants who received surfactant and ventilation and were enrolled in a randomized controlled study of inhaled nitric…

  1. [Septic shock Fusobacterium necrophorum from origin gynecological at complicated an acute respiratory distress syndrome: a variant of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Huynh-Moynot, Sophie; Commandeur, Diane; Danguy des Déserts, Marc; Drouillard, Isabelle; Leguen, Patrick; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a female patient of 47 years old who presents in a state of septic shock with acute insufficient respiratory complicated with syndrome of acute respiratory distress, together with a list of abdominal pain and polyarthralgia too. In her case of medical history, it is retained that she has had a intra-uterine device since 6 years without medical follow up. The initial thoraco-abdomino-pelvic scan shows a left ovarian vein thrombosis, as well as the opaqueness alveolus diffused interstitiel bilaterally and an aspect of ileitis. The IUD is taken off because of sudden occuring of purulent leucorrhoea. This results in a clinical and paraclinical improvement, whereas aminopenicillin was administered to the patient since 1 week. The microbiological blood test allows to put in evidence Fusobacterium necrophorum found in a blood culture and is sensitive to the amoxicilline-acide clavulanique and metronidazole. Isolation of this bacteria, classically found in Lemierre's syndrome, allowed to explain the multilfocalization of the symtoms and the list of pain. The whole concerns about a variant of Lemierre's syndrom: a state of septic shock secondary then caused by the anaerobic Gram negative bacilli, which is a commensal bacteria of the female genital tractus, complicated of septic emboli typical. PMID:21464014

  2. Prolonged rupture of membranes, pre-eclamptic toxaemia, and respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Chiswick, M L

    1976-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was made of the incidence and severity of the idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in babies of less than 35 weeks' gestation born at this hospital from January 1967-December 1974. There was a lower incidence of RDS in babies born after pregnancies complicated only by prolonged rupture of membranes (PRM) (19%) and in babies born vaginally after pregnancies complicated only by pre-eclamptic toxaemia (PET) (18%) compared with the incidence of RDS after uncomplicated pregnancies (35%). Babies born vaginally who developed RDS after pregnancies complicated by PRM or PET had less severe disease compared with those who developed RDS after uncomplicated pregnancies. Mortality in babies who developed severe RDS was not influenced by the occurrence of PRM or PET. The biological implication of the study is that certain complications of pregnancy may accelerate pulmonary surfactant production in preterm babies. PMID:1036670

  3. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  4. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Rare Complication in Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Sudhanshu, Siddhnath; Jevalikar, Ganesh; Das, Pravin K; Singh, Pramod K; Bhatia, Eesh; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral edema (CE) and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema (acute respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS) are life-threatening complications of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). In contrast to CE complicating DKA, which is primarily reported in pediatric patients, ARDS is rarely described in this age group. Here, the authors present a child with DKA who developed both cerebral edema and ARDS during the course of her management. It is feasible that severe acidosis, hypotension, azotemia, hypoalbuminemia and the superimposed aggressive intravenous fluid administration were important risk factors for the development of cerebral edema and ARDS in the index patient. The report highlights the importance of early diagnosis and aggressive therapy in the management of ARDS, and summarizes the published literature on this rarely reported complication of pediatric DKA. PMID:26666907

  5. Increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability in patients at risk for adult respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.; Ehlers, N.A.; Hurst, J.M.

    1987-04-01

    Two methods for predicting adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were evaluated prospectively in a group of 81 multitrauma and sepsis patients considered at clinical high risk. A popular ARDS risk-scoring method, employing discriminant analysis equations (weighted risk criteria and oxygenation characteristics), yielded a predictive accuracy of 59% and a false-negative rate of 22%. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was determined with a radioaerosol lung-scan technique in 23 of these 81 patients, representing a statistically similar subgroup. Lung scanning achieved a predictive accuracy of 71% (after excluding patients with unilateral pulmonary contusion) and gave no false-negatives. We propose a combination of clinical risk identification and functional determination of PACP to assess a patient's risk of developing ARDS.

  6. MicroRNAs: Novel regulatory molecules in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CAO, YONGMEI; LYU, YI; TANG, JIAHUA; LI, YINGCHUAN

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are common and complex inflammatory lung diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a type of non-coding RNA molecule that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, have emerged as a novel class of gene regulators, which have critical roles in a wide range of human disorders and diseases, including ALI. Certain types of miRNAs are abnormally expressed in response to lung injury. miRNAs can regulate inflammation pathways by targeting specific molecules and modulate immune response in the process of lung injury and repair. The regulation of miRNA can relieve injury response and promote the recovery of ALI/ARDS. Therefore, miRNAs may serve as novel therapeutic targets in ALI/ARDS. PMID:27123242

  7. Neonatal arterial thromboembolism and limb loss following respiratory distress syndrome: Case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Shin; Park, Ihl Sung; Hong, Hyun Sook

    2015-06-01

    Thromboembolic disease in newborn infants is a serious problem. The most important risk factors are iatrogenic factors, including indwelling umbilical catheters or central catheters. Other risk factors include asphyxia, dehydration, sepsis, cardiac disease, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), disseminated intravascular coagulation, congenital thrombophilia (i.e., protein C or protein S deficiency), maternal diabetes mellitus, and passive transfer of maternal antiphospholipid antibodies. Neonates are more vulnerable to thrombosis than adults due to their reduced fibrinolytic capability. We describe a case of a 1-day-old female newborn with arterial thromboembolism in the lower leg without a central line catheter. The thromboembolismin in this case was associated with RDS. The infant underwent thrombolysis, anticoagulation therapy, and surgical thrombectomy. The leg of the infant was subsequently amputated below the knee. The case is described here with a brief review of relevant literatures. PMID:25996336

  8. [Current application of noninvasive ventilation in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Pan, Jia-Hua

    2014-11-01

    In order to reduce the serious complications associated with invasive mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has increasingly been chosen as the primary ventilation in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). In the last 4 decades, nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) has been as a main, or even the only mode of NIV in preterm infants with RDS. In the recent decade, improvements in sensors and nasal airway interfaces have resulted in the introduction of a variety of other new types of NIV, such as nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV), bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP). Subsequent studies have shown that some new modes may be more superior to NCPAP in preterm infants with RDS. In order to further understand the application of various NIV modes, we review literatures about all kinds of NIV as a primary mode of ventilation in preterm infants with RDS. PMID:25406569

  9. Adult onset Still's disease accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao-Tu; Wang, Mao-Jie; Huang, Run-Yue; Ding, Bang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by rash, leukocytosis, fever and arthralgia/arthritis. The most common pulmonary manifestations associated with AOSD are pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion. The present study describes a 40-year-old male with AOSD who developed fever, sore throat and shortness of breath. Difficulty breathing promptly developed, and the patient was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The patient did not respond to antibiotics, including imipenem, vancomycin, fluconazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin, doxycycline and meropenem, but was sensitive to glucocorticoid treatment, including methylprednisolone sodium succinate. ARDS accompanied by AOSD has been rarely reported in the literature. In conclusion, in a patient with ARDS who does not respond to antibiotic treatment, the involvement of AOSD should be considered. PMID:27588099

  10. Argument against the Routine Use of Steroids for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Silvia M.; Hough, Catherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Steroids have a plausible mechanism of action of reducing severity of lung disease in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but have failed to show consistent benefits in patient-centered outcomes. Many studies have confounding from the likely presence of ventilator-induced lung injury and steroids may have shown benefit because administration minimized ongoing inflammation incited by injurious ventilator settings. If steroids have benefit, it is likely for specific populations that fall within the heterogeneous diagnosis of ARDS. Those pediatric patients with concurrent active asthma or reactive airway disease of prematurity, in addition to ARDS, are the most common group likely to derive benefit from steroids, but are poorly studied. With the information currently available, it does not appear that the typical adult or pediatric patient with ARDS derives benefit from steroids and steroids should not be given on a routine basis. PMID:27517035

  11. Surfactant Treatment Threshold during NCPAP for the Treatment of Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dani, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Although surfactant is the most studied drug in the preterm infant, the best criteria for treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with surfactant have been not extensively investigated. We assessed the criteria used for deciding the rescue surfactant treatment of preterm infants with RDS in combination with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as reported by the main recent randomized controlled trials. We evaluated 10 studies and found that the criteria chosen for administering selective surfactant were very heterogeneous, different types and doses of surfactant were used, and this limits their applicability in the clinical practice. In conclusion, although current data seem to suggest that low threshold is better than high threshold, additional studies are necessary to identify the most effective criteria for selective surfactant treatment of preterm infants with RDS. PMID:27120482

  12. Pulmonary accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the adult respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Powe, J.E.; Short, A.; Sibbald, W.J.; Driedger, A.A.

    1982-11-01

    The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) plays an integral role in the development of permeability pulmonary edema associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This report describes 3 patients with ARDS secondary to systemic sepsis who demonstrated an abnormal diffuse accumulation of Indium (/sup 111/In)-labeled PMNs in their lungs, without concomitant clinical or laboratory evidence of a primary chest infection. In one patient, the accumulation of the pulmonary activity during an initial pass suggested that this observation was related to diffuse leukoaggregation within the pulmonary microvasculature. A 4th patient with ARDS was on high-dose corticosteroids at the time of a similar study, and showed no pulmonary accumulation of PMNs, suggesting a possible reason for the reported beneficial effect of corticosteroids in human ARDS.

  13. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a woman with heroin and methamphetamine misuse.

    PubMed

    Yeh, P S; Yuan, A; Yu, C J; Kuo, S H; Luh, K T; Yang, P C

    2001-08-01

    Methamphetamine, heroin, and cannabis are three of the most commonly misused drugs in Asia. In Taiwan, cases of misuse of methamphetamine have been increasing. In this paper, we report the case of a 23-year-old woman who had a 10-year history of smoking methamphetamine and intermittent use of heroin for 3 to 4 years. She developed pulmonary toxic effects associated with misuse of heroin and methamphetamine. She was brought to the emergency room because of consciousness disturbance and acute respiratory failure. Her symptoms of rapid progression of refractory hypoxemia, ill-defined densities over both lung fields, and normal pulmonary artery wedge pressure were consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Rapid resolution of infiltrations and improvement of oxygenation were observed after mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure support and oxygen therapy. She was discharged on the fifteenth hospital day without any sequela except for mild exertional dyspnea. PMID:11678007

  14. [Role of computed tomography in the diagnosis of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Franchi, Federico; Volterrani, Luca; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Macarini, Luca

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is a complex pulmonary pathology with high mortality rates, manifesting over a wide range of severity. Clinical diagnosis relies on the following 4 criteria stated by the American-European Consensus Conference: acute onset of impaired gas exchange, severe hypoxemia defined as a PaO2 to FiO2 ratio <300 (PaO2 in mmHg), bilateral diffuse infiltration on chest X-ray; pulmonary artery wedge pressure of ≤18 mmHg to rule out cardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. The aim of this study was to determine the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:23096732

  15. Recent advances in mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Brochard, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterised by different degrees of severity and different stages. Understanding these differences can help to better adapt the ventilatory settings to protect the lung from ventilator-induced lung injury by reducing hyperinflation or keeping the lung open when it is possible. The same therapies may be useful and beneficial in certain forms of ARDS, and risky or harmful at other stages: this includes high positive end-expiratory pressure, allowance of spontaneous breathing activity or use of noninvasive ventilation. The severity of the disease is the primary indicator to individualise treatment. Monitoring tools such as oesophageal pressure or lung volume measurements may also help to set the ventilator. At an earlier stage, an adequate lung protective strategy may also help to prevent the development of ARDS. PMID:25726563

  16. Isolation and phenotypic characteristics of microparticles in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongxia; Meng, Xiangyu; Gao, Yue; Cai, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the alterations of microparticles in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in rats. Methods: 18 Wistar male rats were randomly divided into three groups: no intervention, sham (saline control) group and ARDS group (LPS induced). Blood was collected from abdominal aorta and microparticles were extracted through multiple rounds of centrifugation. Particles were analyzed by flow cytometry and transmission electron microscope. Results: The circulating concentration of total microparticles of rats with ARDS induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) did not change compared with other two groups. However, ARDS rats expressed higher concentration of leukocyte- and endothelium- derived microparticles in the three groups. Conclusion: Our results indicate that leukocyte and endothelial cell-derived particles may play an important role in ARDS. Thus it is important not only to monitor total microparticle levels but also the phenotypes, which may contribute to the prevention and early treatment of ARDS. PMID:25973049

  17. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  18. Extracorporeal life support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: report of a Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The influenza H1N1 epidemics in 2009 led a substantial number of people to develop severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory hypoxemia. In these patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was used as rescue oxygenation therapy. Several randomized clinical trials and observational studies suggested that extracorporeal membrane oxygenation associated with protective mechanical ventilation could improve outcome, but its efficacy remains uncertain. Organized by the Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF) in conjunction with the Société Française d’Anesthésie et de Réanimation (SFAR), the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Française (SPLF), the Groupe Francophone de Réanimation et d’Urgences Pédiatriques (GFRUP), the Société Française de Perfusion (SOFRAPERF), the Société Française de Chirurgie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire (SFCTV) et the Sociedad Española de Medecina Intensiva Critica y Unidades Coronarias (SEMICYUC), a Consensus Conference was held in December 2013 and a jury of 13 members wrote 65 recommendations to answer the five following questions regarding the place of extracorporeal life support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: 1) What are the available techniques?; 2) Which patients could benefit from extracorporeal life support?; 3) How to perform extracorporeal life support?; 4) How and when to stop extracorporeal life support?; 5) Which organization should be recommended? To write the recommendations, evidence-based medicine (GRADE method), expert panel opinions, and shared decisions taken by all the thirteen members of the jury of the Consensus Conference were taken into account. PMID:24936342

  19. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  20. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A pathophysiology-based review.

    PubMed

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Papathanakos, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, Georgios

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome with heterogeneous underlying pathological processes. It represents a common clinical problem in intensive care unit patients and it is characterized by high mortality. The mainstay of treatment for ARDS is lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure sufficient for alveolar recruitment. Prone positioning is a supplementary strategy available in managing patients with ARDS. It was first described 40 years ago and it proves to be in alignment with two major ARDS pathophysiological lung models; the "sponge lung" - and the "shape matching" -model. Current evidence strongly supports that prone positioning has beneficial effects on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung protection and hemodynamics as it redistributes transpulmonary pressure, stress and strain throughout the lung and unloads the right ventricle. The factors that individually influence the time course of alveolar recruitment and the improvement in oxygenation during prone positioning have not been well characterized. Although patients' response to prone positioning is quite variable and hard to predict, large randomized trials and recent meta-analyses show that prone position in conjunction with a lung-protective strategy, when performed early and in sufficient duration, may improve survival in patients with ARDS. This pathophysiology-based review and recent clinical evidence strongly support the use of prone positioning in the early management of severe ARDS systematically and not as a rescue maneuver or a last-ditch effort. PMID:27152255

  1. Recovery and outcomes after the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Herridge, Margaret S; Moss, Marc; Hough, Catherine L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Rice, Todd W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are similar to those of other survivors of critical illness and largely affect the nerve, muscle, and central nervous system but also include a constellation of varied physical devastations ranging from contractures and frozen joints to tooth loss and cosmesis. Compromised quality of life is related to a spectrum of impairment of physical, social, emotional, and neurocognitive function and to a much lesser extent discrete pulmonary disability. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is ubiquitous and includes contributions from both critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, and recovery from these lesions may be incomplete at 5 years after ICU discharge. Cognitive impairment in ARDS survivors ranges from 70 to 100 % at hospital discharge, 46 to 80 % at 1 year, and 20 % at 5 years, and mood disorders including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also sustained and prevalent. Robust multidisciplinary and longitudinal interventions that improve these outcomes are still uncertain and data in our literature are conflicting. Studies are needed in family members of ARDS survivors to better understand long-term outcomes of the post-ICU family syndrome and to evaluate how it affects patient recovery. PMID:27025938

  2. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A pathophysiology-based review

    PubMed Central

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Papathanakos, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome with heterogeneous underlying pathological processes. It represents a common clinical problem in intensive care unit patients and it is characterized by high mortality. The mainstay of treatment for ARDS is lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure sufficient for alveolar recruitment. Prone positioning is a supplementary strategy available in managing patients with ARDS. It was first described 40 years ago and it proves to be in alignment with two major ARDS pathophysiological lung models; the “sponge lung” - and the “shape matching” -model. Current evidence strongly supports that prone positioning has beneficial effects on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung protection and hemodynamics as it redistributes transpulmonary pressure, stress and strain throughout the lung and unloads the right ventricle. The factors that individually influence the time course of alveolar recruitment and the improvement in oxygenation during prone positioning have not been well characterized. Although patients’ response to prone positioning is quite variable and hard to predict, large randomized trials and recent meta-analyses show that prone position in conjunction with a lung-protective strategy, when performed early and in sufficient duration, may improve survival in patients with ARDS. This pathophysiology-based review and recent clinical evidence strongly support the use of prone positioning in the early management of severe ARDS systematically and not as a rescue maneuver or a last-ditch effort. PMID:27152255

  3. [Genetic predisposition and Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: New tools for genetic study].

    PubMed

    Erranz, M Benjamín; Wilhelm, B Jan; Riquelme, V Raquel; Cruces, R Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most severe form of respiratory failure. Theoretically, any acute lung condition can lead to ARDS, but only a small percentage of individuals actually develop the disease. On this basis, genetic factors have been implicated in the risk of developing ARDS. Based on the pathophysiology of this disease, many candidate genes have been evaluated as potential modifiers in patient, as well as in animal models, of ARDS. Recent experimental data and clinical studies suggest that variations of genes involved in key processes of tissue, cellular and molecular lung damage may influence susceptibility and prognosis of ARDS. However, the pathogenesis of pediatric ARDS is complex, and therefore, it can be expected that many genes might contribute. Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy-number variations are likely associated with susceptibility to ARDS in children with primary lung injury. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies can objectively examine these variations, and help identify important new genes and pathogenetic pathways for future analysis. This approach might also have diagnostic and therapeutic implications, such as predicting patient risk or developing a personalized therapeutic approach to this serious syndrome. PMID:26235685

  4. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support. PMID:27398166

  5. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support. PMID:27398166

  6. [Morphological investigation of the neonatal lung with respiratory distress syndrome which was maximally distended with Somentor 33 and formalin (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frick, R

    1976-09-01

    The importance of morphological immaturity of the lung in the development of the respiratory distress syndrome was investigated. Atelectatic lungs of newborns were maximally expanded with a mineral oil of low kinematic viscosity (Somentor 33) or 10% Formalin. With this method, surface active forces of peripheral air spaces should not impede expansion of the lungs. 27 lungs of neonates who died of respiratory distress syndrome and 10 lungs of neonates without primary respiratory problems were examined. Following maximal expansion of the lungs with the respiratory distress syndrome show a hypercellular densely cellular tissue of the pulmonary segments, much like glanduloid hyperplasia with small peripheral air spaces and long distances for diffusion of the respiratory gases. The lungs of newborns without respiratory distress syndromes are well alveolar following expansion and show an optimal morphology for gas diffusion. A lack of a surfactant should have significant consequences in small air spaces. PMID:989753

  7. How Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of internal bleeding and when to seek emergency care. (For more information, go to "Living With Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome." ) Treatment During Pregnancy Pregnant women who have APS can have successful ...

  8. Treating persistent distress and anxiety in parents of children with cancer: an initial feasibility trial.

    PubMed

    Warner, Carrie Masia; Ludwig, Kristy; Sweeney, Corinne; Spillane, Clare; Hogan, Laura; Ryan, Julie; Carroll, William

    2011-01-01

    Persistent anxiety is common among parents of children with cancer and may affect the family's well-being and adjustment. The goals of this pilot study are to determine the feasibility and potential efficacy of a brief cognitive-behavioral parent intervention aimed at reducing parental distress and anxiety related to their child's cancer diagnosis. Parents of children with cancer, at least 1 month postdiagnosis, were screened at an outpatient oncology clinic, and those reporting elevated levels of distress were offered a 4-session cognitive-behavioral intervention based on a modified version of the Surviving Cancer Competently Intervention Program-Newly Diagnosed. Five parents reporting persistent distress received the intervention. Results revealed decreases in parents' distress, state anxiety, and depressive symptoms, as well as in parents' feelings of burden associated with their children's cancer. This initial study suggests that identification of parents with prolonged heightened psychological distress is feasible and acceptable and that offering them a brief intervention within a pediatric oncology setting may be beneficial. PMID:21646637

  9. Anesthetic management of parturient with thoracic kyphoscoliosis, malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ravindra Kr; Batra, Meenu M; Darlong, Vanlal; Garg, Rakesh; Punj, Jyotsna; Kumar, Sri

    2015-01-01

    The management of cesarean section in kyphoscoliotic patient is challenging. The respiratory changes and increased metabolic demands due to pregnancy may compromise the limited respiratory reserves in such patients. Presence of other comorbidities like malaria and respiratory tract infection will further compromise the effective oxygenation. We report a case of kyphoscoliosis along with malaria and acute respiratory distress syndrome for urgent cesarean section. PMID:26702219

  10. Interdisciplinary Peripartum Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation – a Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, J.; Bogdanski, R.; Ortiz, J. U.; Kuschel, B.; Schneider, K. T. M.; Lobmaier, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used for the management of acute severe cardiac and respiratory failure. One of the indications is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) for which, in some severe cases, ECMO represents the only possibility to save lives. We report on the successful long-term use of ECMO in a postpartum patient with recurrent pulmonary decompensation after peripartum uterine rupture with extensive blood loss. PMID:27065489

  11. The Hemagglutinin Stem-Binding Monoclonal Antibody VIS410 Controls Influenza Virus-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Jones, Jeremy C; Russier, Marion; Vogel, Peter; Szretter, Kristy J; Sloan, Susan E; Seiler, Patrick; Trevejo, Jose M; Webby, Richard J; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-04-01

    Most cases of severe influenza are associated with pulmonary complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no antiviral drugs of proven value for treating such complications are currently available. The use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the stem of the influenza virus surface hemagglutinin (HA) is a rapidly developing strategy for the control of viruses of multiple HA subtypes. However, the mechanisms of action of these antibodies are not fully understood, and their ability to mitigate severe complications of influenza has been poorly studied. We evaluated the effect of treatment with VIS410, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the HA stem region, on the development of ARDS in BALB/c mice after infection with influenza A(H7N9) viruses. Prophylactic administration of VIS410 resulted in the complete protection of mice against lethal A(H7N9) virus challenge. A single therapeutic dose of VIS410 given 24 h after virus inoculation resulted in dose-dependent protection of up to 100% of mice inoculated with neuraminidase inhibitor-susceptible or -resistant A(H7N9) viruses. Compared to the outcomes in mock-treated controls, a single administration of VIS410 improved viral clearance from the lungs, reduced virus spread in lungs in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a lower lung injury score, reduced the extent of the alteration in lung vascular permeability and protein accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and improved lung physiologic function. Thus, antibodies targeting the HA stem can reduce the severity of ARDS and show promise as agents for controlling pulmonary complications in influenza. PMID:26787699

  12. Adult respiratory distress syndrome due to fat embolism in the postoperative period following liposuction and fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Costa, André Nathan; Mendes, Daniel Melo; Toufen, Carlos; Arrunátegui, Gino; Caruso, Pedro; de Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2008-08-01

    Fat embolism is defined as mechanical blockage of the vascular lumen by circulating fat globules. Although it primarily affects the lungs, it can also affect the central nervous system, retina, and skin. Fat embolism syndrome is a dysfunction of these organs caused by fat emboli. The most common causes of fat embolism and fat embolism syndrome are long bone fractures, although there are reports of its occurrence after cosmetic procedures. The diagnosis is made clinically, and treatment is still restricted to support measures. We report the case of a female patient who developed adult respiratory distress syndrome due to fat embolism in the postoperative period following liposuction and fat grafting. In this case, the patient responded well to alveolar recruitment maneuvers and protective mechanical ventilation. In addition, we present an epidemiological and pathophysiological analysis of fat embolism syndrome after cosmetic procedures. PMID:18797748

  13. Distinct Proteasome Subpopulations in the Alveolar Space of Patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sixt, S. U.; Alami, R.; Hakenbeck, J.; Adamzik, M.; Kloß, A.; Costabel, U.; Jungblut, P. R.; Dahlmann, B.; Peters, J.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that proteasomes have a biological role in the extracellular alveolar space, but inflammation could change their composition. We tested whether immunoproteasome protein-containing subpopulations are present in the alveolar space of patients with lung inflammation evoking the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) supernatants and cell pellet lysate from ARDS patients (n = 28) and healthy subjects (n = 10) were analyzed for the presence of immunoproteasome proteins (LMP2 and LMP7) and proteasome subtypes by western blot, chromatographic purification, and 2D-dimensional gelelectrophoresis. In all ARDS patients but not in healthy subjects LMP7 and LMP2 were observed in BAL supernatants. Proteasomes purified from pooled ARDS BAL supernatant showed an altered enzyme activity ratio. Chromatography revealed a distinct pattern with 7 proteasome subtype peaks in BAL supernatant of ARDS patients that differed from healthy subjects. Total proteasome concentration in BAL supernatant was increased in ARDS (971 ng/mL ± 1116 versus 59 ± 25; P < 0.001), and all fluorogenic substrates were hydrolyzed, albeit to a lesser extent, with inhibition by epoxomicin (P = 0.0001). Thus, we identified for the first time immunoproteasome proteins and a distinct proteasomal subtype pattern in the alveolar space of ARDS patients, presumably in response to inflammation. PMID:22363101

  14. Surfactants in the Management of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Extremely Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rangasamy

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is primarily due to decreased production of pulmonary surfactant, and it is associated with significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. Exogenous pulmonary surfactant therapy is currently the treatment of choice for RDS, as it demonstrates the best clinical and economic outcomes. Studies confirm the benefits of surfactant therapy to include reductions in mortality, pneumothorax, and pulmonary interstitial emphysema, as well as improvements in oxygenation and an increased rate of survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Phospholipids (PL) and surfactant-associated proteins (SP) play key roles in the physiological activity of surfactant. Different types of natural and synthetic surfactant preparations are currently available. To date, natural surfactants demonstrate superior outcomes compared to the synthetic surfactants, at least during the acute phase of RDS. This disparity is often attributed to biochemical differences including the presence of surfactant-associated proteins in natural products that are not found in the currently available synthetic surfactants. Comparative trials of the natural surfactants strive to establish the precise differences in clinical outcomes among the different preparations. As new surfactants become available, it is important to evaluate them relative to the known benefits of the previously existing surfactants. In order to elucidate the role of surfactant therapy in the management of RDS, it is important to review surfactant biochemistry, pharmacology, and outcomes from randomized clinical trials. PMID:23118650

  15. Surfactant Protein-C Promoter Variants Associated with Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome Reduce Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Wambach, Jennifer A.; Yang, Ping; Wegner, Daniel J.; An, Ping; Hackett, Brian P.; Cole, F. S.; Hamvas, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Dominant mutations in coding regions of the surfactant protein-C gene (SFTPC) cause respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in infants. However, the contribution of variants in noncoding regions of SFTPC to pulmonary phenotypes is unknown. Using a case-control group of infants ≥34 weeks gestation (n=538), we used complete resequencing of SFTPC and its promoter, genotyping, and logistic regression to identify 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Three promoter SNPs were statistically associated with neonatal RDS among European descent infants. To assess the transcriptional effects of these three promoter SNPs, we selectively mutated the SFTPC promoter and performed transient transfection using MLE-15 cells and a firefly luciferase reporter vector. Each promoter SNP decreased SFTPC transcription. The combination of two variants in high linkage dysequilibrium also decreased SFTPC transcription. In silico evaluation of transcription factor binding demonstrated that the rare allele at g.-1167 disrupts a SOX (SRY-related high mobility group box) consensus motif and introduces a GATA-1 site, at g.-2385 removes a MZF-1 (myeloid zinc finger) binding site, and at g.-1647 removes a potential methylation site. This combined statistical, in vitro, and in silico approach suggests that reduced SFTPC transcription contributes to the genetic risk for neonatal RDS in developmentally susceptible infants. PMID:20539253

  16. Pathophysiological Approaches of Acute Respiratory Distress syndrome: Novel Bases for Study of Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, R.L; Carrasco Loza, R; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Experimental approaches have been implemented to research the lung damage related-mechanism. These models show in animals pathophysiological events for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), such as neutrophil activation, reactive oxygen species burst, pulmonary vascular hypertension, exudative edema, and other events associated with organ dysfunction. Moreover, these approaches have not reproduced the clinical features of lung damage. Lung inflammation is a relevant event in the develop of ARDS as component of the host immune response to various stimuli, such as cytokines, antigens and endotoxins. In patients surviving at the local inflammatory states, transition from injury to resolution is an active mechanism regulated by the immuno-inflammatory signaling pathways. Indeed, inflammatory process is regulated by the dynamics of cell populations that migrate to the lung, such as neutrophils and on the other hand, the role of the modulation of transcription factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS) sources, such as nuclear factor kappaB and NADPH oxidase. These experimental animal models reproduce key components of the injury and resolution phases of human ALI/ARDS and provide a methodology to explore mechanisms and potential new therapies. PMID:26312099

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cardiovascular surgery: current concepts and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hoegl, Sandra; Zwissler, Bernhard; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Vohwinkel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review gives an update on current treatment options and novel concepts on the prevention and treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cardiovascular surgery patients. Recent findings The only proven beneficial therapeutic options in ARDS are those that help to prevent further ventilator-induced lung injury, such as prone position, use of lung-protective ventilation strategies, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In the future also new approaches like mesenchymal cell therapy, activation of hypoxia-elicited transcription factors or targeting of purinergic signaling may be successful outside the experimental setting. Owing to the so far limited treatment options, it is of great importance to determine patients at risk for developing ARDS already perioperatively. In this context, serum biomarkers and lung injury prediction scores could be useful. Summary Preventing ARDS as a severe complication in the cardiovascular surgery setting may help to reduce morbidity and mortality. As cardiovascular surgery patients are of greater risk to develop ARDS, preventive interventions should be implemented early on. Especially, use of low tidal volumes, avoiding of fluid overload and restrictive blood transfusion regimes may help to prevent ARDS. PMID:26598954

  18. Enterobacter cloacae Sacroiliitis with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Ko, Jeong Hee; Lee, Seunghun; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen, but is rarely a cause of sacroiliitis. Herein, we present the first reported case of Enterobacter cloacae sacroiliitis associated with sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A previously healthy 14-year-old boy presented with low-grade fever and pain in the left side of the hip that was aggravated by walking. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) showed normal findings, and the patient received supportive care for transient synovitis with no antibiotics. However, there was no clinical improvement. On the third day of hospitalization, magnetic resonance imaging of the hip revealed findings compatible with sacroiliitis, for which vancomycin and ceftriaxone were administered. The patient suddenly developed high fever with dyspnea. Chest radiography and CT findings and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 mmHg were suggestive of ARDS; the patient subsequently received ventilatory support and low-dose methylprednisolone infusions. Within one week, defervescence occurred, and the patient was able to breathe on his own. Following the timely recognition of, and therapeutic challenge to, ARDS, and after 6 weeks of parenteral antimicrobial therapy, the patient was discharged in good health with no complications. PMID:26157593

  19. Prescribing Patterns of Drugs in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute respiratory failure and is associated with wide range of clinical disorders. Controversy prevails over the pharmacological intervention in this disease. The aim of the study was to observe the prescribing pattern of drugs in patients with ARDS managed at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted at tertiary care hospital in India. Data of patients admitted from January 2010 to December 2012 was collected. Patients aged more than 18 years admitted in ICU, who were diagnosed to have ARDS during the study period, were included. A total of 150 patients of ARDS were selected. Data was collected as per the pre designed proforma and it included patients’ age, gender, clinical disorders precipitating ARDS, prescribing pattern of drugs and outcome. The data of the subjects was collected till discharge from hospital or death. Results: Infection was the cause of ARDS in 81.3% (n=122) of subjects. Antibiotics were prescribed in all the subjects and beta-lactams were prescribed in 97.3% (n=146). 41.3% (n=62) were prescribed corticosteroids, 39.3% (n=59) diuretics and 89.3% (n=134) intravenous fluids. Conclusion: The outcome of patients on different pharmacological treatment did not show any statistically significant difference. PMID:25859465

  20. What is the clinical significance of pulmonary hypertension in acute respiratory distress syndrome? A review

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Mita, Carol; Thompson, B. Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Elevated pulmonary arterial pressures appear to be a prominent feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Current clinical guidelines for the management of ARDS do not specifically address treatment of pulmonary hypertension or associated right ventricular dysfunction because the clinical significance of this entity remains unclear. Interpretation of elevated pulmonary arterial pressures, pulmonary vascular resistance, and transpulmonary gradient as well as signs of right ventricular dysfunction is confounded by the effects of positive pressure ventilation. There does not appear to be a consistent relationship between the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular failure and mortality in patients with ARDS, but it is unclear if right ventricular failure contributes to the mortality risk per se or if the underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension, including intravascular micro and macro thrombosis, are simply markers for systemic dysregulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis that may lead to multiorgan failure in ARDS. While studies of pulmonary vasodilator therapies have not shown a mortality benefit in ARDS, such trials have targeted improved oxygenation rather than improved pulmonary hemodynamics so that the possible contribution of improved right ventricular function to better outcomes has not been directly tested in large trials. Future studies are needed to determine if treatment of pulmonary hypertension and associated right ventricular dysfunction will affect mortality in patients with ARDS. PMID:24193181

  1. Gamma scintigraphic analysis of albumin flux in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sugerman, H.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Burke, T.S.; Strash, A.M.; Glauser, F.L.

    1984-06-01

    Computerized gamma-scintigraphy provides a new method for the analysis of albumin flux in patients with pulmonary permeability edema. In this technique, 10 mCi of /sup 99/mTc -tagged human serum albumin is administered and lung:heart radioactivity ratios are determined. This ratio remains constant unless there is a leak of albumin, when a rising ratio with time, called the ''slope index'' (SI), is seen. Thirty-five scintigraphic studies were obtained in 28 patients by means of a portable computerized gamma-camera. Thirteen of these patients had clinical evidence of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and six had or were recovering from left ventricular induced congestive heart failure (CHF). Five of the patients with CHF and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) below 30 mm Hg had normal scintigraphic studies. The patients with ARDS were found to have significantly higher SIs than patients who did not have, or had recovered from, ARDS. Positive SIs were present from 1 to 8 days following the apparent onset of ARDS in seven studies in five patients. Recovery of gas exchange was associated with a return to a normal SI in four patients. In conclusion, computerized gamma-scintigraphy was a sensitive, noninvasive tool for the detection of a pathologic increase in pulmonary protein flux. Positive scintigraphic findings were associated with significantly impaired gas exchange. The method documented that the leak of albumin in patients with ARDS may last for days but resolves with recovery.

  2. Venovenous Extracorporeal Life Support in Single-Ventricle Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Alison B.; Oishi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    There is new and growing experience with venovenous extracorporeal life support (VV ECLS) for neonatal and pediatric patients with single-ventricle physiology and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Outcomes in this population have been defined but could be improved; survival rates in single-ventricle patients on VV ECLS for respiratory failure are slightly higher than those in single-ventricle patients on venoarterial ECLS for cardiac failure (48 vs. 32–43%), but are lower than in patients with biventricular anatomy (58–74%). To that end, special consideration is necessary for patients with single-ventricle physiology who require VV ECLS for ARDS. Specifically, ARDS disrupts the balance between pulmonary and systemic blood flow through dynamic alterations in cardiopulmonary mechanics. This complexity impacts how to run the VV ECLS circuit and the transition back to conventional support. Furthermore, these patients have a complicated coagulation profile. Both venous and arterial thrombi carry marked risk in single-ventricle patients due to the vulnerability of the pulmonary, coronary, and cerebral circulations. Finally, single-ventricle palliation requires the preservation of low resistance across the pulmonary circulation, unobstructed venous return, and optimal cardiac performance including valve function. As such, the proper timing as well as the particular conduct of ECLS might differ between this population and patients without single-ventricle physiology. The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of VV ECLS in the single-ventricle population in the context of these special considerations. PMID:27446889

  3. MicroRNA Regulation of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajaguru, P; Sudhakar Gandhi, P S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K

    2016-10-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI), is a very common condition associated with critically ill patients, which causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite decades of research, effective therapeutic strategies for clinical ALI/ARDS are not available. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding molecules have emerged as a major area of biomedical research as they post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in diverse biological and pathological processes, including ALI/ARDS. In this context, this present review summarizes a large body of evidence implicating miRNAs and their target molecules in ALI/ARDS originating largely from studies using animal and cell culture model systems of ALI/ARDS. We have also focused on the involvement of miRNAs in macrophage polarization, which play a critical role in regulating the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. Finally, the possible future directions that might lead to novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ALI/ARDS are also reviewed. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2097-2106, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26790856

  4. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: role of nutritional modulation of inflammation through dietary lipids.

    PubMed

    Mizock, Barry A; DeMichele, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most serious form of acute hypoxic respiratory failure. ARDS represents the expression of an acute, diffuse, inflammatory process in the lungs consequent to a variety of infectious and noninfectious conditions. It is characterized pathologically by damage to pulmonary epithelial and endothelial cells, with subsequent alveolar-capillary leak and exudative pulmonary edema. The main clinical features of ARDS include rapid onset of dyspnea, severe defects in gas exchange, and imaging studies demonstrating diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. The role of nutrition in the management of ARDS has traditionally been supportive. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of certain dietary oils (eg, fish oil, borage oil) to modulate pulmonary inflammation, thereby improving lung compliance and oxygenation, and reducing time on mechanical ventilation. This article reviews the alterations in the immune response that underlie ARDS, discusses the physiology of dietary oils as immunonutrients, summarizes animal and human studies that explore the therapeutic effects of dietary oils, and provides clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:16215155

  5. Noninvasive Ventilation for Preterm Twin Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Wang, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Nan; Shi, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation has been proven to be effective strategies for reducing the need for endotracheal ventilation in preterm infant with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), however the best option needs to be further determined. A single center, paired design, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between Jan 2011 and July 2014. Preterm twins with RDS were included. One of a pair was randomized to NIPPV, while another to NCPAP. Surfactant was administrated as rescue treatment. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal ventilation. The secondary outcomes were the complications. 143 pairs were randomized and 129 pairs finished the trial. The rates of endotracheal ventilation did not differ significantly between NIPPV and NCPAP groups (11.9% vs 19.6%, P = 0.080). This difference was not observed in the subgroup of infants who received surfactant therapy (11.1% vs 19.7%, P = 0.087). No secondary outcomes also differed significantly between the two groups. NIPPV did not result in a significantly lower incidence of intubation as compared with NCPAP in preterm twins with RDS. PMID:26399752

  6. New therapies for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS):--a review.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V G

    1999-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been associated with high mortality. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology, recognition of precipitating events and improved management has decreased the mortality over the years. Mechanical ventilation is still the corner stone of the management of the disease. It is well recognised that high tidal volumes and airway pressures increase the morbidity, hence the need to use alternative modes of ventilation like pressure control with or without inverse ratio ventilation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is still experimental and not easily available, whereas prone position to improve oxygenation is simple and inexpensive. The concept of pathological oxygen dependency and therapy aimed at supranormal values has failed to improve survival. Restricting the fluids to prevent further oedema formation in an already wet lung has improved the survival rate. Nitric oxide and surfactant have failed to produce desirable effect in large studies. Pharmacological support to inhibit inflammation with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antifungal agents, prostaglandin and corticosteroids have all failed. Interestingly corticosteroid rescue treatment in the late phase of ARDS has shown promise. Antiendotoxin and anticytokine studies which began with much enthusiasm is yet to produce desirable results. PMID:10972019

  7. Cost implications of different approaches to the prevention of respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, M; Piercy, J; Chalmers, I

    1991-01-01

    Because the incidence of both neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and neonatal mortality can be reduced by giving corticosteroids to women expected to deliver preterm and by giving surfactant to babies at high risk of developing hyaline membrane disease, we have considered what effects the adoption of one or both of these preventive policies would have on the costs of neonatal care. We have estimated the effects of treatment from overviews of the relevant controlled trials, and estimated costs from observations of care at one neonatal unit. Our results suggest that if either of these policies is adopted for all babies under 35 weeks' gestation at a drug cost of 150 pounds or less/baby, the overall costs of care would be reduced by between 1 and 10%. The cost per survivor would be reduced by up to 16% even if the drug cost were to be as high as pounds 550/baby. If the policies were to be adopted only for babies under 31 weeks' gestation, both policies would result in a reduction in cost of between 5 and 16%/survivor, although the increased survival resulting from the policies would lead to an increase in overall costs for babies of less then 31 weeks' gestation of between 7 and 32%. PMID:1863120

  8. Association of SCNN1A Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Long, Chen; Renjun, Li; Zhangxue, Hu; Yin, Hu; Wanwei, Li; Juan, Ma; Yuan, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that lung fluid absorption disorders might be an important cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) by influencing gas exchange or surfactant function. The SCNN1A gene, which encodes the α-ENaC, might predispose infants to RDS. To explore whether the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of SCNN1A are associated with RDS, we conducted a case-control study to investigate the RDS-associated loci in Han Chinese infants. Seven target SNPs were selected from the SCNN1A gene and were genotyped using the improved multiplex ligase detection reaction (iMLDR). In the total sample, only rs4149570 was associated with NRDS; this association was further confirmed in logistic regression analysis after adjusting for birth weight, gestational age and sex. In the subgroup of infants whose gestational age was 37 weeks and older, in addition to rs4149570, rs7956915 also showed a significant association with RDS. Interestingly, these associations were only observed in term infants. No significant association was observed between the target SNPs and the risk of RDS in preterm infants. We report for the first time that the rs4149570 and rs7956915 polymorphisms of SCNN1A might play important roles in the susceptibility to RDS, particularly in term infants. PMID:26611714

  9. Noninvasive Ventilation for Preterm Twin Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Wang, Li; Li, Jie; Wang, Nan; Shi, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation has been proven to be effective strategies for reducing the need for endotracheal ventilation in preterm infant with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), however the best option needs to be further determined. A single center, paired design, randomized, controlled trial was conducted between Jan 2011 and July 2014. Preterm twins with RDS were included. One of a pair was randomized to NIPPV, while another to NCPAP. Surfactant was administrated as rescue treatment. The primary outcome was the need for endotracheal ventilation. The secondary outcomes were the complications. 143 pairs were randomized and 129 pairs finished the trial. The rates of endotracheal ventilation did not differ significantly between NIPPV and NCPAP groups (11.9% vs 19.6%, P = 0.080). This difference was not observed in the subgroup of infants who received surfactant therapy (11.1% vs 19.7%, P = 0.087). No secondary outcomes also differed significantly between the two groups. NIPPV did not result in a significantly lower incidence of intubation as compared with NCPAP in preterm twins with RDS. PMID:26399752

  10. Increased extravascular lung water reduces the efficacy of alveolar recruitment maneuver in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smetkin, Alexey A; Kuzkov, Vsevolod V; Suborov, Eugeny V; Bjertnaes, Lars J; Kirov, Mikhail Y

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the recruitment maneuver (RM) is used to reexpand atelectatic areas of the lungs aiming to improve arterial oxygenation. The goal of our paper was to evaluate the response to RM, as assessed by measurements of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) in ARDS patients. Materials and Methods. Seventeen adult ARDS patients were enrolled into a prospective study. Patients received protective ventilation. The RM was performed by applying a continuous positive airway pressure of 40 cm H(2)O for 40 sec. The efficacy of the RM was assessed 5 min later. Patients were identified as responders if PaO(2)/FiO(2) increased by >20% above the baseline. EVLWI was assessed by transpulmonary thermodilution before the RM, and patients were divided into groups of low EVLWI (<10 mL/kg) and high EVLWI (≥10 mL/kg). Results. EVLWI was increased in 12 patients. Following RM, PaO(2)/FiO(2) increased by 33 (4-65) % in the patients with low EVLWI, whereas those in the high EVLWI group experienced a change by only -1((-13)-(+5)) % (P = 0.035). Conclusion. In ARDS, the response to a recruitment maneuver might be related to the severity of pulmonary edema. In patients with incresed EVLWI, the recruitment maneuver is less effective. PMID:22649717

  11. The Current Status of the Respiratory Distress Syndrome of the Newly Born

    PubMed Central

    Swyer, P. R.; Levison, H.

    1965-01-01

    The respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) occurs in 14% of premature infants and is twice as common and twice as lethal in males as in females. Recent work suggests that, during the intrauterine period a disturbance in nutrition of the lung resulting from fetal pulmonary vascular constriction results in alveolar-cell damage and a decrease in pulmonary surface activity with resultant atelectasis. Data on respiratory work levels, oxygen consumption and arterial oxygen tension suggest that there is an oxygen debt in the acute stage of the disease. Such data have further clarified the pathogenesis of the metabolic and respiratory components of the acidosis and the secondary effects thereof. In prevention, prophylaxis of prematurity is of major importance. A program of treatment designed to combat the various aspects of the pathophysiological disturbances is described in the form of a case profile. Modern methods of observation, biochemical control and treatment, as well as the necessity for critical evaluation, suggest that infants with RDS are best cared for in special centres. ImagesFig. 11 PMID:14339292

  12. Recent insights: mesenchymal stromal/stem cell therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Shahd; Laffey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes respiratory failure, which is associated with severe inflammation and lung damage and has a high mortality and for which there is no therapy. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are adult multi-progenitor cells that can modulate the immune response and enhance repair of damaged tissue and thus may provide a therapeutic option for ARDS. MSCs demonstrate efficacy in diverse in vivo models of ARDS, decreasing bacterial pneumonia and ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury while enhancing repair following ventilator-induced lung injury. MSCs reduce the pro-inflammatory response to injury while augmenting the host response to bacterial infection. MSCs appear to exert their effects via multiple mechanisms—some are cell interaction dependent whereas others are paracrine dependent resulting from both soluble secreted products and microvesicles/exosomes derived from the cells. Strategies to further enhance the efficacy of MSCs, such as by overexpressing anti-inflammatory or pro-repair molecules, are also being investigated. Encouragingly, early phase clinical trials of MSCs in patients with ARDS are under way, and experience with these cells in trials for other diseases suggests that the cells are well tolerated. Although considerable translational challenges, such as concerns regarding cell manufacture scale-up and issues regarding cell potency and batch variability, must be overcome, MSCs constitute a highly promising potential therapy for ARDS. PMID:27408702

  13. Recruitment maneuvers in acute respiratory distress syndrome and during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chiumello, Davide; Algieri, Ilaria; Grasso, Salvatore; Terragni, Pierpaolo; Pelosi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The use of low tidal volume ventilation and low to moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels is a widespread strategy to ventilate patients with non-injured lungs during general anesthesia and in intensive care as well with mild to moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Higher PEEP levels have been recommended in severe ARDS. Due to the presence of alveolar collapse, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) by causing a transient elevation in airway pressure (i.e. transpulmonary pressure) have been suggested to improve lung inflation in non-inflated and poorly-inflated lung regions. Various types of RMs such as sustained inflation at high pressure, intermittent sighs and stepwise increases of PEEP and/or airway plateau inspiratory pressure have been proposed. The use of RMs has been associated with mixed results in terms of physiological and clinical outcomes. The optimal method for RMs has not yet been identified. The use of RMs is not standardized and left to the individual physician based on his/her experience. Based on the same grounds, RMs have been proposed to improve lung aeration during general anesthesia. The aim of this review was to present the clinical evidence supporting the use of RMs in patients with ARDS and during general anesthesia and as well their potential biological effects in experimental models of acute lung injury. PMID:25881732

  14. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Injured lungs can be partially protected by optimal settings and ventilation modes, using low tidal volume (VT) values and high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). The benefits in ARDS outcomes caused by these interventions have been confirmed by several prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and are attributed to reduction in volutrauma. The purpose of this article is to present an approach to VILI pathophysiology focused on the effects of volutrauma that lead to lung injury and the ‘mechanotransduction’ mechanism. A more complete understanding about the molecular effects that physical forces could have, is essential for a better assessment of existing strategies as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies to reduce the damage resulting from VILI, and thereby contribute to reducing mortality in ARDS. PMID:26312103

  15. Preservation of normal lung regions in the adult respiratory distress syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Maunder, R.J.; Shuman, W.P.; McHugh, J.W.; Marglin, S.I.; Butler, J.

    1986-05-09

    In this report, the authors challenge the commonly held assumption that the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a homogeneous process associated with generalized and relatively uniform damage to the alveolar capillary membrane. They studied 13 patients with ARDS, comparing the pulmonary parenchymal changes seen by standard bedside chest roentgenograms with those seen by computed tomography of the chest. Three patients demonstrated generalized lung involvement by both radiologic techniques. In another eight patients, despite the appearance of generalized involvement on the standard chest x-ray film, the computed tomographic scans showed patchy infiltrates interspersed with areas of normal-appearing lung. Two patients showed patchy involvement by both techniques. The fact that ARDS spares some regions of lung parenchyma is useful knowledge in understanding the gas-exchange abnormalities of ARDS, the variable responsiveness to positive end-expiratory pressure, and the occurrence of oxygen toxicity. The problem of regional inhomogeneity should also be kept in mind when interpreting lung biopsy specimens or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with ARDS.

  16. Recognizing and Treating Rett Syndrome in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzek, Megan; Jenson, William R.; Houlihan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature on Rett syndrome (RS) for school-based professionals is presented from a behavioral perspective. A description of RS is provided, including distinctive physical, behavioral, and emotional features, diagnostic criteria for classic and "formes frustes" forms of RS, and stages of the disorder. The similarities and…

  17. Lenalidomide in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. A study on the role of noninvasive ventilation in mild-to-moderate acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Chaudhuri, Soumik; Dhooria, Sahajal; Agarwal, Ritesh; Chaudhry, Dhruva

    2015-01-01

    Aim: There is sparse data on the role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) from India. Herein, we report our experience with the use of NIV in mild to moderate ARDS. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study involving consecutive subjects of ARDS treated with NIV using an oronasal mask. Patients were monitored clinically with serial arterial blood gas analysis. The success of NIV, duration of NIV use, Intensive Care Unit stay, hospital mortality, and improvement in clinical and blood gas parameters were assessed. The success of NIV was defined as prevention of endotracheal intubation. Results: A total of 41 subjects (27 women, mean age: 30.9 years) were included in the study. Tropical infections followed by abdominal sepsis were the most common causes of ARDS. The use of NIV was successful in 18 (44%) subjects, while 23 subjects required intubation. The median time to intubation was 3 h. Overall, 19 (46.3%) deaths were encountered, all in those requiring invasive ventilation. The mean duration of ventilation was significantly higher in the intubated patients (7.1 vs. 2.6 days, P = 0.004). Univariate analysis revealed a lack of improvement in PaO2/FiO2 at 1 h and high baseline Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) as predictors of NIV failure. Conclusions: Use of NIV in mild to moderate ARDS helped in avoiding intubation in about 44% of the subjects. A baseline APACHE II score of >17 and a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <150 at 1 h predicts NIV failure. PMID:26628824

  19. A conceptual framework: the early and late phases of skeletal muscle dysfunction in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Sanchez, Michael A; Morris, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) often develop severe diaphragmatic and limb skeletal muscle dysfunction. Impaired muscle function in ARDS is associated with increased mortality, increased duration of mechanical ventilation, and functional disability in survivors. In this review, we propose that muscle dysfunction in ARDS can be categorized into an early and a late phase. These early and late phases are based on the timing in relationship to lung injury and the underlying mechanisms. The early phase occurs temporally with the onset of lung injury, is driven by inflammation and disuse, and is marked predominantly by muscle atrophy from increased protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome, autophagy, and calpain-caspase pathways have all been implicated in early-phase muscle dysfunction. Late-phase muscle weakness persists in many patients despite resolution of lung injury and cessation of ongoing acute inflammation-driven muscle atrophy. The clinical characteristics and mechanisms underlying late-phase muscle dysfunction do not involve the massive protein degradation and atrophy of the early phase and may reflect a failure of the musculoskeletal system to regain homeostatic balance. Owing to these underlying mechanistic differences, therapeutic interventions for treating muscle dysfunction in ARDS may differ during the early and late phases. Here, we review clinical and translational investigations of muscle dysfunction in ARDS, placing them in the conceptual framework of the early and late phases. We hypothesize that this conceptual model will aid in the design of future mechanistic and clinical investigations of the skeletal muscle system in ARDS and other critical illnesses. PMID:26134116

  20. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome treated with fludrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Marwan; El Khatib, Mohammad; Yamout, Bassem; Hujeily, Elissar; Ayoub, Sophie; Ayoub, Chakib; Skaf, Ghassan

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare syndrome characterized by orthostatic headache not associated with trauma or dural puncture. In most cases, it is caused by a spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage as demonstrated by neuroradiological studies. The standard of care consists of conservative treatment including bed rest, hydration, and administration of caffeine or glucocorticoids. When such conservative therapy fails, an epidural blood patch is recommended. In this report, we describe the treatment of 2 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension who failed conservative treatment and went on to have complete and sustained resolution of their symptoms after the administration of oral fludrocortisone. PMID:25612272

  1. Uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax malaria in pregnancy associated with mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    McGready, Rose; Wongsaen, Klanarong; Chu, Cindy S; Tun, Nay Win; Chotivanich, Kesinee; White, Nicholas J; Nosten, François

    2014-01-01

    The association between severe malaria and Plasmodium vivax species is contentious. On the Thai-Myanmar border, all pregnant women are followed systematically with active weekly malaria screening. Over a 27-year period of providing antenatal care, 48,983 have been prospectively followed until pregnancy outcome (miscarriage or delivery) and 4,298 women have had P. vivax detected at least once. Reported here is the first known P. vivax-associated death amongst these women. The initial patient presentation was of uncomplicated P. vivax (0.5% parasitaemia) in a term, multigravida woman who responded rapidly to oral artesunate and mefloquine treatment, clearing her blood stage parasites within 48 hours. The patient appeared well, was ambulatory and due to be discharged but became unwell with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring ventilation three days (67 hours) into treatment. Despite induction and delivery of a stillborn foetus, ventilatory requirements increased and the patient died on day 7. The patient had a low body mass index. Sensitive detection with nested PCR confirmed only the presence of P. vivax species and concomitant infections such as tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were also ruled out. The contemporaneous treatment of acute uncomplicated P. vivax and the onset of ARDS on day 3 in this patient implies a possible but unconfirmed association with death in this patient. Assuming this death was caused by P. vivax, the risk of ARDS-related maternal mortality in this setting did not differ significantly between Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax (0.24 per 1,000 (1/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), contrary to the increased risk of maternal mortality from P. falciparum compared to P. vivax, 2.89 per 1,000 (12/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), P = 0.003. PMID:24886559

  2. Uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax malaria in pregnancy associated with mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The association between severe malaria and Plasmodium vivax species is contentious. On the Thai-Myanmar border, all pregnant women are followed systematically with active weekly malaria screening. Over a 27-year period of providing antenatal care, 48,983 have been prospectively followed until pregnancy outcome (miscarriage or delivery) and 4,298 women have had P. vivax detected at least once. Reported here is the first known P. vivax-associated death amongst these women. The initial patient presentation was of uncomplicated P. vivax (0.5% parasitaemia) in a term, multigravida woman who responded rapidly to oral artesunate and mefloquine treatment, clearing her blood stage parasites within 48 hours. The patient appeared well, was ambulatory and due to be discharged but became unwell with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring ventilation three days (67 hours) into treatment. Despite induction and delivery of a stillborn foetus, ventilatory requirements increased and the patient died on day 7. The patient had a low body mass index. Sensitive detection with nested PCR confirmed only the presence of P. vivax species and concomitant infections such as tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were also ruled out. The contemporaneous treatment of acute uncomplicated P. vivax and the onset of ARDS on day 3 in this patient implies a possible but unconfirmed association with death in this patient. Assuming this death was caused by P. vivax, the risk of ARDS-related maternal mortality in this setting did not differ significantly between Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax (0.24 per 1,000 (1/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), contrary to the increased risk of maternal mortality from P. falciparum compared to P. vivax, 2.89 per 1,000 (12/4,158) versus 0.23 per 1,000 (1/4,298), P = 0.003. PMID:24886559

  3. A preterm pig model of lung immaturity and spontaneous infant respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caminita, Frank; van der Merwe, Marie; Hance, Brittany; Krishnan, Ramesh; Miller, Sarah; Buddington, Karyl; Buddington, Randal K

    2015-01-15

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia remain the leading causes of preterm infant morbidity, mortality, and lifelong disability. Research to improve outcomes requires translational large animal models for RDS. Preterm pigs delivered by caesarian section at gestation days (GD) 98, 100, 102, and 104 were provided 24 h of neonatal intensive care, monitoring (pulse oximetry, blood gases, serum biomarkers, radiography), and nutritional support, with or without intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV; pressure control ventilation with volume guarantee). Spontaneous development of RDS and mortality without MV are inversely related with GD at delivery and correspond with inadequacy of tidal volume and gas exchange. GD 98 and 100 pigs have consolidated lungs, immature alveolar architecture, and minimal surfactant protein-B expression, and MV is essential at GD 98. Although GD 102 pigs had some alveoli lined by pneumocytes and surfactant was released in response to MV, blood gases and radiography revealed limited recruitment 1-2 h after delivery, and mortality at 24 h was 66% (35/53) with supplemental oxygen provided by a mask and 69% (9/13) with bubble continuous positive airway pressure (8-9 cmH2O). The lungs at GD 104 had higher densities of thin-walled alveoli that secreted surfactant, and MV was not essential. Between GD 98 and 102, preterm pigs have ventilation inadequacies and risks of RDS that mimic those of preterm infants born during the saccular phase of lung development, are compatible with standards of neonatal intensive care, and are alternative to fetal nonhuman primates and lambs. PMID:25398985

  4. Aspiration-Related Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Acute Stroke Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of oral or gastric contents into the larynx and lower respiratory tract is a common problem in acute stroke patients, which significantly increases the incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the clinical characteristics of aspiration-related ARDS in acute stroke patients. Methods Over 17-month period a retrospective cohort study was done on 1495 consecutive patients with acute stroke. The data including demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, chest imaging, and hospital discharge status were collected to analysis. Results Aspiration-related ARDS was diagnosed in 54 patients (3.6%). The most common presenting symptom was tachypnea (respiratory rate ≥25 breaths/min) in 50 cases. Computed tomography (CT) images usually demonstrated diffuse ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and inhomogeneous patchy consolidations involving the low lobes. Age, NIHSS score, GCS score, dysphagia, dysarthria, hemoglobin concentration, serum aspertate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin, serum sodium, and admission glucose level were independently associated with aspiration-related ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.04–1.07); OR 2.87, (2.68–3.63); OR 4.21, (3.57–5.09); OR 2.18, (1.23–3.86); OR 1.67, (1.31–2.14); OR 2.31, (1.11–4.84); OR 1.68, (1.01–2.80); OR 2.15, (1.19–3.90); OR 1.92, (1.10–3.36) and OR 1.14, (1.06–1.21) respectively). Conclusions Aspiration-related ARDS frequently occurs in acute stroke patient with impairment consciousness. It is advisable that performing chest CT timely may identify disease early and prompt treatment to rescue patients. PMID:25790377

  5. Postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with previous exposure to bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Aakre, Benjamin M.; Efem, Richard I.; Wilson, Greg A.; Kor, Daryl J.; Eisenach, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence and risk factors for postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome (PO-ARDS) in a large cohort of bleomycin-exposed patients undergoing surgery with general endotracheal anesthesia. Patients and Methods From a Mayo Clinic cancer registry, we identified patients who had received systemic bleomycin (n=1120) and then underwent a major surgical procedure requiring >1 hour of general anesthesia between January 1, 2000 and August 30, 2012. Heart/lung/liver transplants were excluded. PO-ARDS (within seven days after surgery) was defined according to Berlin criteria. Results We identified 316 patients who underwent 541 major surgical procedures. Only 7 patients met criteria for PO-ARDS; all were Caucasian males, and 6 were current or former smokers. On univariate analysis, we observed an increased risk for PO-ARDS in patients who were current or former smokers. Furthermore, there was significantly greater crystalloid and colloid administration in patients with PO-ARDS. We also observed a trend toward longer surgical duration and red blood cell transfusion in patients with PO-ARDS, though this was not significant. Intraoperative FiO2 was not associated with PO-ARDS. In bleomycin-exposed patients, the incidence of PO-ARDS following major surgery under general anesthesia is approximately 1.3% (C.I. 0.6–2.6%). For first major procedures after bleomycin, the incidence is 1.9% (C.I. 0.9–4.1%). Conclusions The risk for PO-ARDS in patients exposed to systemic bleomycin appears to be lower than expected. Smoking status may be an important factor modifying risk for PO-ARDS in these patients. PMID:24485131

  6. Effect of intrauterine cocaine exposure on respiratory distress syndrome in very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Beeram, M. R.; Abedin, M.; Young, M.; Leftridge, C.; Dhanireddy, R.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of intrauterine cocaine exposure on lung maturity of very low birthweight infants, the medical records of all infants with birthweight < 1500 g born between January 1989 and December 1990 at DC General Hospital were reviewed. Infants with conditions known to cause lung maturity, severe congenital anomalies, proven early sepsis, and birthweight > or = 500 g were excluded. A total of 69 infants were included in the study. Chest roentgenograms of these infants were evaluated by a pediatric radiologist, who was unaware of the infant's medical course, for evidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and radiological findings were correlated with clinical signs. Forty infants were exposed to cocaine in utero (cocaine group) and 29 were not exposed (noncocaine group). African-American ethnicity, pregnancy-induced hypertension, prolonged rupture of membranes, and alcohol use were similar in both groups. Tobacco use among cocaine group mothers was higher (42.5% versus 13.8%; P = .01). Gestational age (28.3 +/- 2.8 versus 28.3 +/- 3 weeks), birthweight (966 +/- 282 versus 1059 +/- 295 g), male gender, and Apgar scores were similar in both groups. Thirty (75%) infants in the cocaine group developed RDS compared with 19 (66%) in the noncocaine group (P > .05). Using multiple logistic regression analysis and controlling for smoking, alcohol use, and prolonged rupture of membranes (24 to 72 hours), the incidence of RDS between the groups remained statistically insignificant. We conclude that intrauterine cocaine exposure does not alter the incidence of RDS in very low birthweight infants. PMID:8046765

  7. Pathophysiology of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome: implications for early treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Sean B

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) remains one of the major causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity despite advances in perinatal care. The initial management of infants with RDS has almost become 'too routine' with little thought about the pathophysiological processes that lead to the disease and how the clinician can use the existing therapeutic interventions to optimize care. The transition from fetus to infant involves many complex adaptations at birth; the most important is the function of the lungs as a gas exchange organ. Preterm surfactant-deficient infants are less well equipped to deal with this transition. Optimum gas exchange is achieved through matching of ventilation and perfusion. In RDS, ventilation may be affected by homogeneity of the airways with atelectasis and over distension, as hyaline membranes block small airways. In turn this contributes to the inflammation that becomes bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Exogenous surfactant given early, particularly with positive end-expiratory pressure and, where necessary, gentle ventilation, would seem to be the optimum way to prevent atelectasis. How this can be achieved in neonates after surfactant therapy is explored through a review of the normal physiology of the newborn lung and how this is affected by RDS. The therapeutic interventions of resuscitation, exogenous surfactant, ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide are discussed in relation to their effects and what are currently the optimum ways to use these. It is hoped that with a better understanding of the normal physiology in the newborn lung, and the effects of both disease and interventions on that physiology, the practising clinician will have a greater appreciation of management of preterm infants with, or at risk of, RDS. PMID:16336027

  8. Surviving Critical Illness: The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Experienced by Patients and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christopher E.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Brandon, Debra H.; Whaley, Christie; Attix, Deborah K.; Clay, Alison S.; Dore, Daniel V.; Hough, Catherine L.; White, Douglas B.; Tulsky, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a systemic critical illness, often report poor quality of life based on responses to standardized questionnaires. However, the experiences of ARDS survivors have not been reported. Our objective was to characterize the effects of critical illness in the daily lives and functioning of ARDS survivors. Design, Setting, and Patients We recruited consecutively 31 ARDS survivors and their informal caregivers from medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic medical center and a community hospital. Eight patients died before completing interviews. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 ARDS survivors and 24 caregivers three to nine months after ICU admission, stopping enrollment after thematic saturation was reached. Transcripts were analyzed using Colaizzi’s qualitative methodology to identify significant ways in which survivors’ critical illness experience impacted their lives. Measurements and Main Results Participants related five key elements of experience as survivors of ARDS: pervasive memories of critical care, day to day impact of new disability, critical illness defining the sense of self, relationship strain and change, and ability to cope with disability. Survivors described remarkable disability that persisted for months. Caregivers’ interviews revealed substantial strain from caregiving responsibilities, as well as frequent symptom minimization by patients. Conclusions The diverse and unique experiences of ARDS survivors reflect the global impact of severe critical illness. We have identified symptom domains important to ARDS patients that are not well represented in existing health outcomes measures. These insights may aid the development of targeted interventions to enhance recovery and return of function after ARDS. PMID:19865004

  9. Hyperpolarized Gas Diffusion MRI for the Study of Atelectasis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Kadlecek, Stephen; Hamedani, Hooman; Rajaei, Jennia; Clapp, Justin; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains about the best ventilator strategies for the mitigation of atelectasis and associated airspace stretch in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition to several immediate physiological effects, atelectasis increases the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), which has been shown to significantly worsen ARDS outcomes. A number of lung imaging techniques have made substantial headway in clarifying the mechanisms of atelectasis. This paper reviews the contributions of CT, PET, and conventional MRI to understanding this phenomenon. In doing so, it also reveals several important shortcomings inherent to each of these approaches. Once these shortcomings have been made apparent, we describe how hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (HP MRI)—a technique that is uniquely able to assess responses to mechanical ventilation and lung injury in peripheral airspaces—is poised to fill several of these knowledge gaps. The HP-MRI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantifies the restriction of 3He diffusion by peripheral airspaces, thereby obtaining pulmonary structural information at an extremely small scale. Lastly, this paper reports the results of a series of experiments that measured ADC in mechanically ventilated rats in order to investigate (i) the effect of atelectasis on ventilated airspaces; (ii) the relationship between positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), hysteresis, and the dimensions of peripheral airspaces; and (iii) the ability of PEEP and surfactant to reduce airspace dimensions after lung injury. An increase in ADC was found to be a marker of atelectasis-induced overdistension. With recruitment, higher airway pressures were shown to reduce stretch rather than worsen it. Moving forward, HP MRI has significant potential to shed further light on the atelectatic processes that occur during mechanical ventilation. PMID:24920074

  10. Lung ventilation strategies for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changsong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chi, Chunjie; Guo, Libo; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Pi, Xin; Sun, Bo; Lian, Ailing; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    To identify the best lung ventilation strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we performed a network meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Web of Science were searched, and 36 eligible articles were included. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP], the hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were 0.624 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.419-0.98) for lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning and 0.572 (0.34-0.968) for pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning had the greatest potential to reduce mortality, and the possibility of receiving the first ranking was 61.6%. Permissive hypercapnia, recruitment maneuver, and low airway pressures were most likely to be the worst in terms of all-cause mortality. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP, pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning ventilation are associated with lower mortality in ARDS patients. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning ventilation and lower tidal volumes with pressure-volume (P-V) static curve-guided individual PEEP are potential optimal strategies for ARDS patients. PMID:26955891

  11. Immunogold localization of SP-A in lungs of infants dying from respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    deMello, D. E.; Heyman, S.; Phelps, D. S.; Floros, J.

    1993-01-01

    Prematurely born infants can develop the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) because of a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. This lipoprotein complex synthesized by type II pneumocytes has different ultrastructural forms--intra- and extracellular lamellar bodies, which within the alveoli are transformed into tubular myelin, and this in turn gives rise to the surface monolayer, the functionally active form of surfactant. We have previously shown that at autopsy RDS lungs lack tubular myelin and have decreased immunoreactivity for antisera to surfactant protein A (SP-A), an important component of tubular myelin. Therefore, we proposed a role for SP-A in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and in the pathogenesis of RDS. To explore this possibility further, we compared in 14 RDS and 14 control lungs the distribution of SP-A in ultrathin sections, using affinity-purified rabbit anti-human-SP-A IgG and goat anti-rabbit IgG-conjugated with 10 nm colloidal gold particles. In controls, gold label was present in lamellar bodies, endoplasmic reticulum, on the cytoplasmic membrane of type II cells, and on lamellar bodies and tubular myelin either within alveoli or macrophages. In RDS lungs, reduced label was present in the same intracellular compartments and organelles, except in tubular myelin, which is absent. It is postulated that if SP-A is indeed necessary for the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin, in RDS either there is a deficiency of adequate amounts of functional SP-A or some other important component of surfactant is missing. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8494055

  12. Identification of Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome by Exome-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Shortt, Katherine; Chaudhary, Suman; Grigoryev, Dmitry; Heruth, Daniel P.; Venkitachalam, Lakshmi; Zhang, Li Q.; Ye, Shui Q.

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a lung condition characterized by impaired gas exchange with systemic release of inflammatory mediators, causing pulmonary inflammation, vascular leak and hypoxemia. Existing biomarkers have limited effectiveness as diagnostic and therapeutic targets. To identify disease-associating variants in ARDS patients, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 96 ARDS patients, detecting 1,382,399 SNPs. By comparing these exome data to those of the 1000 Genomes Project, we identified a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) which are potentially associated with ARDS. 50,190SNPs were found in all case subgroups and controls, of which89 SNPs were associated with susceptibility. We validated three SNPs (rs78142040, rs9605146 and rs3848719) in additional ARDS patients to substantiate their associations with susceptibility, severity and outcome of ARDS. rs78142040 (C>T) occurs within a histone mark (intron 6) of the Arylsulfatase D gene. rs9605146 (G>A) causes a deleterious coding change (proline to leucine) in the XK, Kell blood group complex subunit-related family, member 3 gene. rs3848719 (G>A) is a synonymous SNP in the Zinc-Finger/Leucine-Zipper Co-Transducer NIF1 gene. rs78142040, rs9605146, and rs3848719 are associated significantly with susceptibility to ARDS. rs3848719 is associated with APACHE II score quartile. rs78142040 is associated with 60-day mortality in the overall ARDS patient population. Exome-seq is a powerful tool to identify potential new biomarkers for ARDS. We selectively validated three SNPs which have not been previously associated with ARDS and represent potential new genetic biomarkers for ARDS. Additional validation in larger patient populations and further exploration of underlying molecular mechanisms are warranted. PMID:25372662

  13. Echocardiographic parameters of right ventricular function predict mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Trushil G; Wadia, Subeer K; Kovach, Julie; Fogg, Louis; Tandon, Rajive

    2016-06-01

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) contributes to increased mortality. Our aim is to identify reproducible transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) parameters of RV dysfunction that can be used to predict outcomes in ARDS. We performed a retrospective single-center cohort pilot study measuring tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), Tei index, RV-fractional area change (RV-FAC), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and septal shift, reevaluated by an independent blinded cardiologist (JK). Thirty-eight patients were included. Patients were divided on the basis of 30-day survival. Thirty-day mortality was 47%. Survivors were younger than nonsurvivors. Survivors had a higher pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratio, and TAPSE. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were lower in survivors. TAPSE has the strongest association with increased 30-day mortality from date of TTE. Accordingly, TAPSE has a strong positive correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, and Tei index has a strong negative correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Septal shift was associated with lower PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Decrease in TAPSE, increase in Tei index, and septal shift were seen in the severe ARDS group. In multivariate logistic regression models, TAPSE maintained a significant association with mortality independent of age, pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, positive end expiratory pressure, PCO2, serum bicarbonate, plateau pressures, driving pressures, APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA scores. In conclusion, TAPSE and other TTE parameters should be used as novel predictive indicators for RV dysfunction in ARDS. These parameters can be used as surrogate noninvasive RV hemodynamic measurements to be manipulated to improve mortality in patients with ARDS and contributory RV dysfunction. PMID:27252840

  14. IGF1 and IGFBP3 in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahasic, Amy M.; Zhai, Rihong; Su, Li; Zhao, Yang; Aronis, Konstantinos N.; Thompson, B.Taylor; Mantzoros, Christos S.; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and its most abundant binding protein, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3), have been implicated in fibrotic lung diseases and persistent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) because of profibrogenic and antiapoptotic activity. Whether levels of circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3 are altered in ARDS, and whether they predict progression of and survival from ARDS remains unknown. This study aims to characterize circulating levels of IGF1 and IGFBP3 in patients at risk for ARDS in relation to (1) development of ARDS, and (2) mortality among ARDS cases. Design In this case-cohort study, consecutive patients with risk factors for ARDS admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) were enrolled and followed prospectively for development of ARDS. Cases were followed for all-cause mortality through Day 60. Of 2397 patients enrolled in the parent study, plasma samples were available in 531 (22%) patients (356 controls, 175 cases) from early in presentation. Total plasma IGF1 and IGFBP3 were measured. Results After adjusting for relevant clinical covariates including severity of illness, IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were significantly lower in ARDS cases than controls (odds ratio [OR], 0.58; P =0.006; OR, 0.57; P=0.0015, respectively). Among ARDS cases, IGF1 and IGFBP3 levels were significantly lower in the 78 (45%) non-survivors (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; P =0.024; HR, 0.69; P=0.021, respectively). Conclusions Lower levels of circulating IGF1 and IGFBP3 were independently associated with ARDS case status. Furthermore, lower levels were associated with mortality among ARDS cases. This data supports a role of the IGF pathway in ARDS. PMID:22004906

  15. Titration of tidal volume and induced hypercapnia in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roupie, E; Dambrosio, M; Servillo, G; Mentec, H; el Atrous, S; Beydon, L; Brun-Buisson, C; Lemaire, F; Brochard, L

    1995-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation may promote overdistension-induced pulmonary lesions in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The static pressure-volume (P-V) curve of the respiratory system can be used to determine the lung volume and corresponding static airway pressure at which lung compliance begins to diminish (the upper inflection point, or UIP). This fall in compliance may indicate overdistension of lung units. We prospectively studied 42 patients receiving mechanical ventilation with an FIO2 of 0.5 or more for at least 24 h. According to the Lung Injury Score (LIS), 25 patients were classified as having ARDS (LIS > 2.5), while 17 patients constituted a non-ARDS control group. The P-V curve was obtained every 2 d. Mechanical ventilation initially used standard settings (volume-control mode, a positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] adjusted to the lower inflection point on the P-V curve, and a tidal volume [VT] of 10 ml/kg). The end-inspiratory plateau pressure (Pplat) was compared to the UIP, and VT was lowered when the Pplat was above the UIP. In the range of lung volume studied on the P-V curves (up to 1600 ml), a UIP could be shown in only one control patient (at 23 cm H2O). By contrast, a UIP was present on the P-V curve obtained from all patients with ARDS, corresponding to a mean airway pressure of 26 +/- 6 cm H2O, a lung volume of 850 +/- 200 ml above functional residual capacity and 610 +/- 235 ml above PEEP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599810

  16. Risk Factors Affecting School Readiness in Premature Infants With Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Patrianakos-Hoobler, Athena I.; Msall, Michael E.; Marks, Jeremy D.; Huo, Dezheng; Schreiber, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Advances in neonatal care have resulted in children born pre-maturely with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) successfully reaching school age. It is unknown how many will be ready for school and what factors affect school readiness in these children at high risk. Our objective was to assess readiness of children born prematurely with RDS in the last decade for entry into public school, and determine risk factors associated with lack of school readiness in this population. METHODS This was a single-center prospective cohort study. Follow-up data were collected for 135 of 167 (81%) surviving premature infants with RDS requiring surfactant-replacement therapy and mechanical ventilation. The children were seen between July 2005 and September 2006 (average age: 5.7 ± 1.0 years) and underwent standardized neurodevelopmental and health assessments and socioeconomic status classification. A 4-level school-readiness score was constructed by using each child’s standardized scores on assessments of basic concepts (Bracken School-Readiness Assessment), perceptual skills (Visual-Motor Integration Test), receptive vocabulary (Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition), daily living functional skills (Pediatric Functional Independence Measure), and presence of sensory impairments or autism. Proportional odds models were used to identify risk factors predicting lower school-readiness levels. RESULTS Of the children examined, the mean birth weight was 1016 ± 391 g, and the mean gestational age was 27.5 ± 2.6 weeks. Ninety-one (67%) children were school-ready. Using multivariate analysis, male gender, chronic lung disease, and severe intraventricular hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia were associated with lower school-readiness levels. However, the most powerful factor determining school-readiness level was low socioeconomic status. CONCLUSION Interventions targeting neonatal morbidities may be much less effective at improving overall performance at

  17. The potential role and limitations of echocardiography in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Chiara; Cianchi, Giovanni; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Batacchi, Stefano; Peris, Adriano; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2016-04-01

    Bedside use of Doppler echocardiography is being featured as a promising, clinically useful tool in assessing the pulmonary circulation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present review is aimed at summarizing the available evidence obtained with echocardiography on right ventricle (RV) function and pulmonary circulation in ARDS and to highlight the potential of this technique in clinical practice (only articles in English language were considered). According to the available evidence on echocardiographic findings, the following conclusions can be drawn: (a) echocardiography (transthoracic and transesophageal) has a growing role in the management ARDS patients mainly because of the strict interactions between the lung (and ventilation) and the RV and pulmonary circulation; (b) there may be a continuum of alterations in RV size and function and pulmonary circulation which may end in the development of acute cor pulmonale, probably paralleling ARDS disease severity; and (c) the detection of acute cor pulmonale should prompt intensivists to tailor their ventilatory strategy to the individual patient depending on the echocardiography findings. Bearing in mind the clinical role and growing importance of echocardiography in ARDS and the available evidence on this topic, we present a flow chart including the parameters to be measured and the timing of echo exams in ARDS patients. Despite the important progress that echocardiography has gained in the evaluation of patients with ARDS, several open questions remain and echocardiography still appears to be underused in these patients. A more systematic use of echocardiography (mainly through shared protocols) in ARDS could help intensivists to tailor the optimal treatment in individual patients as well as highlighting the limits and potential of this methodology in patients with ALI. PMID:26660667

  18. [Pathophysiologic and therapeutic aspects of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)].

    PubMed

    Thiel, M; Forst, H; Peter, K

    1991-02-01

    Since the first characterization of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), knowledge of its aetiology and pathogenesis has grown considerably. In spite of this, mortality remains up to 50 to 90%, particularly if multiple organ failure is present. Because no causative clinical therapy is available up to now, significant attention is given to preventive measures like early operative stabilisation of long bone fractures, or prophylaxis of nosocomial infections. After clinical manifestation of ARDS, treatment focuses on functional disturbances of the cardiopulmonary system and on the underlying disease. The aim of this symptomatic therapy is to ensure oxygen supply according to the organisms demand. It is still unknown, however, whether the mortality of patients with ARDS can be reduced by optimising the oxygen supply. In general, oxygen supply can be enhanced by improving pulmonary gas exchange, cardiac output and blood oxygen transport capacity. For practical use the therapy often ends up with a therapeutical dilemma: On one hand, the improvement of the pulmonary gas exchange by application of PEEP can be associated with a critical decline in cardiac output, particularly if the afterload of the right ventricle is elevated. On the other hand, to increase cardiac output, both volume replacement and vasodilators can severely affect pulmonary gas exchange if the alveolo-capillary permeability is increased and pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction is disturbed. Thus, oxygen supply can be optimised only via invasive monitoring of the cardiorespiratory system. Although still experimental, the most promising approaches seem to be pharmacological interventions directed at suppressing the formation and effects of various humoral and cellular mediators. An improved understanding of the inflammatory processes might provide new insights in the pathophysiology of ARDS and the related therapeutic interventions. PMID:1863681

  19. Echocardiographic parameters of right ventricular function predict mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Subeer K.; Kovach, Julie; Fogg, Louis; Tandon, Rajive

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) contributes to increased mortality. Our aim is to identify reproducible transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) parameters of RV dysfunction that can be used to predict outcomes in ARDS. We performed a retrospective single-center cohort pilot study measuring tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), Tei index, RV-fractional area change (RV-FAC), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), and septal shift, reevaluated by an independent blinded cardiologist (JK). Thirty-eight patients were included. Patients were divided on the basis of 30-day survival. Thirty-day mortality was 47%. Survivors were younger than nonsurvivors. Survivors had a higher pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratio, and TAPSE. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were lower in survivors. TAPSE has the strongest association with increased 30-day mortality from date of TTE. Accordingly, TAPSE has a strong positive correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, and Tei index has a strong negative correlation with PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Septal shift was associated with lower PaO2∶FiO2 ratios. Decrease in TAPSE, increase in Tei index, and septal shift were seen in the severe ARDS group. In multivariate logistic regression models, TAPSE maintained a significant association with mortality independent of age, pH, PaO2∶FiO2 ratios, positive end expiratory pressure, PCO2, serum bicarbonate, plateau pressures, driving pressures, APACHE II, SAPS II, and SOFA scores. In conclusion, TAPSE and other TTE parameters should be used as novel predictive indicators for RV dysfunction in ARDS. These parameters can be used as surrogate noninvasive RV hemodynamic measurements to be manipulated to improve mortality in patients with ARDS and contributory RV dysfunction. PMID:27252840

  20. Unexpected Role for Adaptive αβTH17 Cells in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome1

    PubMed Central

    Li, John T.; Melton, Andrew C.; Su, George; Hamm, David E.; LaFemina, Michael; Howard, James; Fang, Xiaohui; Bhat, Sudarshan; Huynh, Kieu-My; O’Kane, Cecilia M.; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Muir, Roshell R.; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.; Sheppard, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder characterized by increased alveolar permeability with no effective treatment beyond supportive care. Current mechanisms underlying ARDS focus on alveolar endothelial and epithelial injury caused by products of innate immune cells and platelets. However, the role of adaptive immune cells in ARDS remains largely unknown. Here we report that expansion of antigen-specific αβT helper 17 (αβTH17) cells contribute to ARDS by local secretion of IL-17A, which in turn directly increases alveolar epithelial permeability. Mice with a highly restrictive defect in antigen-specific αβTH17 cells were protected from experimental ARDS induced by a single dose of endotracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Loss of IL-17 receptor C or antibody blockade of IL-17A was similarly protective, further suggesting that IL-17A released by these cells was responsible for this effect. LPS induced a rapid and specific clonal expansion of αβTH17 cells in the lung, as determined by deep sequencing of the hypervariable CD3RβVJ region of the T cell receptor. Our findings could be relevant to ARDS in humans, since we found significant elevation of IL-17A in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ARDS and recombinant IL-17A directly increased permeability across cultured human alveolar epithelial monolayers. These results reveal a previously unexpected role for adaptive immune responses that increase alveolar permeability in ARDS and suggest that αβTH17 cells and IL-17A could be novel therapeutic targets for this currently untreatable disease. PMID:26002979

  1. Unexpected Role for Adaptive αβTh17 Cells in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, John T; Melton, Andrew C; Su, George; Hamm, David E; LaFemina, Michael; Howard, James; Fang, Xiaohui; Bhat, Sudarshan; Huynh, Kieu-My; O'Kane, Cecilia M; Ingram, Rebecca J; Muir, Roshell R; McAuley, Daniel F; Matthay, Michael A; Sheppard, Dean

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder characterized by increased alveolar permeability with no effective treatment beyond supportive care. Current mechanisms underlying ARDS focus on alveolar endothelial and epithelial injury caused by products of innate immune cells and platelets. However, the role of adaptive immune cells in ARDS remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that expansion of Ag-specific αβTh17 cells contributes to ARDS by local secretion of IL-17A, which in turn directly increases alveolar epithelial permeability. Mice with a highly restrictive defect in Ag-specific αβTh17 cells were protected from experimental ARDS induced by a single dose of endotracheal LPS. Loss of IL-17 receptor C or Ab blockade of IL-17A was similarly protective, further suggesting that IL-17A released by these cells was responsible for this effect. LPS induced a rapid and specific clonal expansion of αβTh17 cells in the lung, as determined by deep sequencing of the hypervariable CD3RβVJ region of the TCR. Our findings could be relevant to ARDS in humans, because we found significant elevation of IL-17A in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with ARDS, and rIL-17A directly increased permeability across cultured human alveolar epithelial monolayers. These results reveal a previously unexpected role for adaptive immune responses that increase alveolar permeability in ARDS and suggest that αβTh17 cells and IL-17A could be novel therapeutic targets for this currently untreatable disease. PMID:26002979

  2. Lung ventilation strategies for acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changsong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chi, Chunjie; Guo, Libo; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Nana; Wang, Weiwei; Pi, Xin; Sun, Bo; Lian, Ailing; Shi, Jinghui; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    To identify the best lung ventilation strategy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), we performed a network meta-analysis. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Web of Science were searched, and 36 eligible articles were included. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP], the hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality were 0.624 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.419–0.98) for lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning and 0.572 (0.34–0.968) for pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning had the greatest potential to reduce mortality, and the possibility of receiving the first ranking was 61.6%. Permissive hypercapnia, recruitment maneuver, and low airway pressures were most likely to be the worst in terms of all-cause mortality. Compared with higher tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP, pressure-controlled ventilation with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided lower PEEP and prone positioning ventilation are associated with lower mortality in ARDS patients. Lower tidal volumes with FiO2-guided higher PEEP and prone positioning ventilation and lower tidal volumes with pressure-volume (P–V) static curve-guided individual PEEP are potential optimal strategies for ARDS patients. PMID:26955891

  3. Computer simulation allows goal-oriented mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uttman, Leif; Ögren, Helena; Niklason, Lisbet; Drefeldt, Björn; Jonson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Introduction To prevent further lung damage in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it is important to avoid overdistension and cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli. Previous studies have demonstrated protective effects of using low tidal volume (VT), moderate positive end-expiratory pressure and low airway pressure. Aspiration of dead space (ASPIDS) allows a reduction in VT by eliminating dead space in the tracheal tube and tubing. We hypothesized that, by applying goal-orientated ventilation based on iterative computer simulation, VT can be reduced at high respiratory rate and much further reduced during ASPIDS without compromising gas exchange or causing high airway pressure. Methods ARDS was induced in eight pigs by surfactant perturbation and ventilator-induced lung injury. Ventilator resetting guided by computer simulation was then performed, aiming at minimal VT, plateau pressure 30 cmH2O and isocapnia, first by only increasing respiratory rate and then by using ASPIDS as well. Results VT decreased from 7.2 ± 0.5 ml/kg to 6.6 ± 0.5 ml/kg as respiratory rate increased from 40 to 64 ± 6 breaths/min, and to 4.0 ± 0.4 ml/kg when ASPIDS was used at 80 ± 6 breaths/min. Measured values of arterial carbon dioxide tension were close to predicted values. Without ASPIDS, total positive end-expiratory pressure and plateau pressure were slightly higher than predicted, and with ASPIDS they were lower than predicted. Conclusion In principle, computer simulation may be used in goal-oriented ventilation in ARDS. Further studies are needed to investigate potential benefits and limitations over extended study periods. PMID:17352801

  4. Proteomic profiles in acute respiratory distress syndrome differentiates survivors from non-survivors.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Becker, Trisha L; Viken, Kevin J; Jagtap, Pratik D; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Kumar, Vipin; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Christine H

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) continues to have a high mortality. Currently, there are no biomarkers that provide reliable prognostic information to guide clinical management or stratify risk among clinical trial participants. The objective of this study was to probe the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome to identify proteins that differentiate survivors from non-survivors of ARDS. Patients were divided into early-phase (1 to 7 days) and late-phase (8 to 35 days) groups based on time after initiation of mechanical ventilation for ARDS (Day 1). Isobaric tags for absolute and relative quantitation (iTRAQ) with LC MS/MS was performed on pooled BALF enriched for medium and low abundance proteins from early-phase survivors (n = 7), early-phase non-survivors (n = 8), and late-phase survivors (n = 7). Of the 724 proteins identified at a global false discovery rate of 1%, quantitative information was available for 499. In early-phase ARDS, proteins more abundant in survivors mapped to ontologies indicating a coordinated compensatory response to injury and stress. These included coagulation and fibrinolysis; immune system activation; and cation and iron homeostasis. Proteins more abundant in early-phase non-survivors participate in carbohydrate catabolism and collagen synthesis, with no activation of compensatory responses. The compensatory immune activation and ion homeostatic response seen in early-phase survivors transitioned to cell migration and actin filament based processes in late-phase survivors, revealing dynamic changes in the BALF proteome as the lung heals. Early phase proteins differentiating survivors from non-survivors are candidate biomarkers for predicting survival in ARDS. PMID:25290099

  5. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of a new porcine surfactant in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Celso Moura; Precioso, Alexander Roberto; Mascaretti, Renata Suman

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of a new porcine-derived pulmonary surfactant developed by Instituto Butantan with those of animal-derived surfactants commercially available in Brazil, regarding neonatal mortality and the major complications of prematurity in preterm newborns with birth weight up to 1500g and diagnosed with respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Neonates diagnosed with respiratory distress syndrome were randomized to receive either Butantan surfactant (Butantan group) or one of the following surfactants: Survanta® or Curosurf®. Newborns receiving Survanta® or Curosurf® comprised the control group. The main outcome measures were mortality rates at 72 hours and at 28 days of life; the typical complications of prematurity as evaluated on the 28th day of life were defined as secundary outcomes. Results No differences were observed between the Butantan (n=154) and control (n=173) groups in relation to birth weight, gestational age, sex, and prenatal use of corticosteroids, or in mortality rates both at 72 hours (14.19% versus 14.12%; p=0.98) and at 28 days (39.86% versus 33.33%; p=0.24) of life. Higher 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores were observed among control group newborns. No differences were observed as regards the secondary outcomes, except for greater need for supplemental oxygen and a higher incidence of interstitial pulmonary emphysema in the Butantan group. Conclusion The mortality rates at 72 hours and 28 days of life and the incidence of major complications of prematurity were comparable to those found with the animal-derived surfactants commercially available in Brazil, showing the efficacy and safety of the new surfactant in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. PMID:25628188

  6. A Case of Scrub Typhus Complicated by Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Successful Management with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Young; Lee, Seung Yun; Kwon, Hea Yoon; Im, Jae Hyoung; Durey, Areum; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Young Sam; Kang, Jae-Seung; Lee, Jin-Soo

    2016-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman was diagnosed as having scrub typhus with pneumonitis. On admission, she was started on a combination therapy with levofloxacin and doxycycline. However, the patient developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) on the 2nd day, and as a result, she underwent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). She was weaned from ECMO on the 10th day, as her respiratory status gradually improved. She was discharged without sequelae on the 23rd day. The outcome suggests that the use of ECMO should be considered for patients with ARDS induced from scrub typhus. PMID:27458040

  7. A Case of Paenibacillus pasadenensis Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Microsurgical Clipping

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Hyung Woo

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of bacteremia by a novel Paenibacillus species, Paenibacillus pasadenensis, from a 55-year-old male patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome, following a microsurgical clipping procedure of a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The bacterium was identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis, which was applied because current conventional methods employed in the clinical microbiology laboratory proved unsuccessful. Since this bacterium was first identified in 2006 and has never been reported elsewhere, we believe this report can provide practitioners with useful insight on the pathogenicity of this species. PMID:25844266

  8. Moral distress and Burnout syndrome: are there relationships between these phenomena in nursing workers?1

    PubMed Central

    Dalmolin, Graziele de Lima; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Lunardi, Guilherme Lerch; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; da Silveira, Rosemary Silva

    2014-01-01

    Objective to identify relationships between moral distress and Burnout in the professional performance from the perceptions of the experiences of nursing workers. Methods this is a survey type study with 375 nursing workers working in three different hospitals of southern Rio Grande do Sul, with the application of adaptations of the Moral Distress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory, validated and standardized for use in Brazil. Data validation occurred through factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha. For the data analysis bivariate analysis using Pearson's correlation and multivariate analysis using multiple regression were performed. Results the existence of a weak correlation between moral distress and Burnout was verified. A possible positive correlation between Burnout and therapeutic obstinacy, and a negative correlation between professional fulfillment and moral distress were identified. Conclusion the need was identified for further studies that include mediating and moderating variables that may explain more clearly the models studied. PMID:24553701

  9. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  10. Predictors of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Patients with Paraquat Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hu, Ching-Chih; Lin, Ja-Liang; Lin-Tan, Dan-Tzu; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Paraquat poisoning is characterized by acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, respiratory failure, and multi-organ failure, resulting in a high rate of mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this study were to identify predictors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cases of paraquat poisoning and determine the association between these parameters. Materials and Methods In total, 187 patients were referred for management of intentional paraquat ingestion between 2000 and 2010. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) scores were collected, and predictors of ARDS were analyzed. Results The overall mortality rate for the entire population was 54% (101/187). Furthermore, the mortality rate was higher in the ARDS patients than in the non-ARDS patients (80% vs. 43.80%, P<0.001). Additionally, the ARDS patients not only had higher AKIN48-h scores (P<0.009), SOFA48-h scores (P<0.001), and time to ARDS/nadir PaO2 (P=0.008) but also suffered from lower nadir PaO2 (P<0.001), nadir AaDO2 (P<0.001), and nadir eGFR (P=0.001) compared to those in the non-ARDS patients. Moreover, pneumomediastinum episodes were more frequent in the ARDS patients than in the non-ARDS patients (P<0.001). A multivariate Cox regression model revealed that blood paraquat concentrations (P<0.001), SOFA48-h scores (P=0.001), and steroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapies (P=0.024) were significant predictors of ARDS. The cumulative survival rates differed significantly (P<0.001) between patients with SOFA48-h scores <3 and SOFA48-h scores ≥3, with a sensitivity of 95.8%, specificity of 58.4%, and overall correctness of 67.6%. Finally, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) analysis showed that SOFA48-h scores (P<0.001) had a better discriminatory power than blood paraquat concentrations (P=0.01) for predicting ARDS. Conclusions The analytical results

  11. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral oxygen extraction in the preterm infant: the impact of respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lemmers, Petra M A; Toet, Mona; van Schelven, Leonard J; van Bel, Frank

    2006-08-01

    Haemodynamic factors play an important role in the etiology of cerebral lesions in preterm infants. Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), a common problem in preterms, is strongly related with low and fluctuating arterial blood pressure. This study investigated the relation between mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), fractional cerebral oxygen saturation (ScO2) and fractional (cerebral) tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), a measure of oxygen utilisation of the brain, during the first 72 h of life. Thirty-eight infants (gestational age < 32 week) were included, 18 with and 20 without RDS. Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), MABP and near infrared spectroscopy-determined ScO2 were continuously measured. FTOE was calculated as a ratio: (SaO2-ScO2)/SaO2. Gestational age and birth weight did not differ between groups, but assisted ventilation and use of inotropic drugs were more common in RDS infants (P<0.01). MABP was lower in RDS patients (P<0.05 from 12 up to 36 h after birth), but increased in both groups over time. ScO2 and FTOE were not different between groups over time, but in RDS infants ScO2 and FTOE had substantial larger variance (P<0.05 at all time points except at 36-48 h for ScO2 and P<0.05 at 12-18, 18-24, 36-48 and 48-60 h for FTOE). During the first 72 h of life, RDS infants showed more periods of positive correlation between MABP and ScO2 (P<0.05 at 18-24, 24-36 36-48 48-60 h) and negative correlation between MABP and FTOE (P<0.05 at 18-24, 36-48 h). Although we found that the patterns of cerebral oxygenation and extraction in RDS infants were not different as compared to infants without RDS, we suggest that the frequent periods with possible lack of cerebral autoregulation in RDS infants may make these infants more vulnerable to cerebral damage. PMID:16506004

  12. Systemic combined melatonin-mitochondria treatment improves acute respiratory distress syndrome in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Lee, Fan-Yen; Kao, Ying-Hsien; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Leu, Steve; Wu, Ying-Chung; Lu, Hung-I; Chen, Yung-Lung; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Su, Hong-Lin; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2015-03-01

    Despite high in-hospital mortality associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there is no effective therapeutic strategy. We tested the hypothesis that combined melatonin-mitochondria treatment ameliorates 100% oxygen-induced ARDS in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) were equally categorized into normal controls, ARDS, ARDS-melatonin, ARDS with intravenous liver-derived mitochondria (1500 μg per rat 6 hr after ARDS induction), and ARDS receiving combined melatonin-mitochondria. The results showed that 22 hr after ARDS induction, oxygen saturation (saO2 ) was lowest in the ARDS group and highest in normal controls, significantly lower in ARDS-melatonin and ARDS-mitochondria than in combined melatonin-mitochondria group, and significantly lower in ARDS-mitochondria than in ARDS-melatonin group. Conversely, right ventricular systolic blood pressure and lung weight showed an opposite pattern compared with saO2 among all groups (all P < 0.001). Histological integrity of alveolar sacs showed a pattern identical to saO2 , whereas lung crowding score exhibited an opposite pattern (all P < 0.001). Albumin level and inflammatory cells (MPO+, CD40+, CD11b/c+) from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed a pattern opposite to saO2 (all P < 0.001). Protein expression of indices of inflammation (MMP-9, TNF-α, NF-κB), oxidative stress (oxidized protein, NO-1, NOX-2, NOX-4), apoptosis (mitochondrial Bax, cleaved caspase-3, and PARP), fibrosis (Smad3, TGF-β), mitochondrial damage (cytochrome C), and DNA damage (γ-H2AX+) exhibited an opposite pattern compared to saO2 in all groups, whereas protein (HO-1, NQO-1, GR, GPx) and cellular (HO-1+) expressions of antioxidants exhibited a progressively increased pattern from normal controls to ARDS combined melatonin-mitochondria group (all P < 0.001). In conclusion, combined melatonin-mitochondrial was superior to either treatment alone in attenuating ARDS in this rat model. PMID:25491480

  13. Effect of parenterally l-arginine supplementation on the respiratory distress syndrome in preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Cansever, Murat; Akin, Mustafa Ali; Akcakus, Mustafa; Ozcan, Alper; Gunes, Tamer; Ozturk, Adnan; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2016-07-01

    l-Arginine (l-Arg) is the precursor of nitric oxide which plays an important role on pulmonary circulation and pulmonary vascular tone. Earlier studies suggested that l-Arg levels in preterm newborns with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were low due to its consumption and l-Arg supplementation may reduce the severity of RDS. Our aim was detect the effect of the parenterally l-Arg supplementation on RDS severity. The subjects were chosen between preterm newborns (gestational age <34 weeks) (n = 30). Twenty of the subjects were diagnosed with permaturity and RDS, and 10 of the subjects were healthy preterm newborns. Ten of the subjects was taken l-Arg (1.5 mmol/kg/d) in addition to routine RDS treatment and assumed as "Group 1". In this group, daily l-Arg supplementation was started end of the first day, and continued at end of fifth day. The others of the subjects diagnosed with RDS was take routine RDS treatment and assumed as "Group 2". Healthy preterm newbors assumed as "Group 3". Blood collections for l-Arg levels via tandem mass spectrometry were made in first day and repeated on the seventh days. Oxygenation index was used to determine severity of RDS. l-Arg consentrations in Group 1 were 8.7 ± 4.1 μM/L and 11.9 ± 5.0 μM/L in first and seventh day, respectively. l-Arg consentrations were 12.6±4.5 μM/Land 10.9 ± 5.4 μM/L in Group 2 and 8.6 ± 5.1 μM/L and 9.4 ± 4.1 μM/L in Group 3. There is no correlation between l-Arg concentrations and OI also duration of the mechanical ventilation of the subjects in patient groups (Group 1 and 2). PMID:26365434

  14. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  15. Prognostic and diagnostic value of plasma soluble ST2 concentrations in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ednan K.; Volk, Jessica A.; Christiani, David C.; Harris, R. Scott; Matthay, Michael A.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Januzzi, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Soluble ST2 (sST2) is a biomarker of myocardial strain and inflammation. The characteristics of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) include inflammation and cardiovascular dysfunction. We sought to determine whether plasma sST2 concentration is associated with outcome and response to conservative fluid management, and whether sST2 concentration discriminates ARDS from decompensated heart failure (HF). Design, Setting, and Patients We assayed plasma sST2 concentrations in 826 patients in the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT), a multi-center randomized controlled trial of conservative fluid management in ARDS, as well as a cohort of patients with decompensated HF. We tested whether sST2 was associated with outcome, response to therapy, and diagnostic utility for ARDS vs. HF. Measurements and Main Results Non-survivors had higher day 0 (P<.0001) and day 3 (P<.0001) sST2 concentrations. After adjustment for severity of illness, higher sST2 concentration was associated with mortality, with odds ratio (ORadj) 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99 – 2.20, P=.06) at day 0, 2.94 (95% CI 2.00 – 4.33, P<.0001) at day 3, and 3.63 (95% CI 2.38 – 5.53, P<.0001) if sST2 increased between days. Cumulative fluid balance was more positive among patients with higher day 0 (median 5212 mL, interquartile range [IQR] 200 – 12284 vs. 2020 mL, −2034 – 7091; P<0.0001), and day 3 sST2 (median 7678 mL, IQR 2217 – 14278 vs. 1492 mL, −2384 – 6239; P<0.0001). sST2 showed excellent discriminative ability between the FACTT and HF populations (Area under ROC curve=0.98, P<0.0001). Conclusions Higher sST2 concentrations are associated with worse outcome in ARDS and may have value for discriminating ARDS from heart failure. PMID:23939353

  16. Clinical and biological role of secretory phospholipase A2 in acute respiratory distress syndrome infants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Secretory phospholipase A2 is supposed to play a role in acute lung injury but no data are available for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It is not clear which enzyme subtypes are secreted and what the relationships are between enzyme activity, biophysical and biochemical parameters, and clinical outcomes. We aimed to measure the enzyme and identify its subtypes and to study its biochemical and biophysical effect. The secondary aim was to correlate enzyme activity with clinical outcome. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 24 infants with ARDS and 14 controls with no lung disease. Samples were assayed for secretory phospholipase A2 and molecules related to its activity and expression. Western blotting and captive bubble surfactometry were also performed. Clinical data were real time downloaded. Results Tumor necrosis factor-α (814 (506-2,499) vs. 287 (111-1,315) pg/mL; P = 0.04), enzyme activity (430 (253-600) vs. 149 (61-387) IU/mL; P = 0.01), free fatty acids (4.3 (2.8-8.6) vs. 2 (0.8-4.6) mM; P = 0.026), and minimum surface tension (25.6 ± 6.1 vs. 18 ± 1.8 mN/m; P = 0.006) were higher in ARDS than in controls. Phospholipids are lower in ARDS than in controls (76.5 (54-100) vs. 1,094 (536-2,907) μg/mL; P = 0.0001). Three enzyme subtypes were identified (-IIA, -V, -X), although in lower quantities in controls; another subtype (-IB) was mainly detected in ARDS. Significant correlations exist between enzyme activity, free fatty acids (ρ = 0.823; P < 0.001), and surface tension (ρ = 0.55; P < 0.028). Correlations also exist with intensive care stay (ρ = 0.54; P = 0.001), PRISM-III24 (ρ = 0.79; P< 0.001), duration of ventilation (ρ = 0.53; P = 0.002), and oxygen therapy (ρ = 0.54; P = 0.001). Conclusions Secretory phospholipase A2 activity is raised in pediatric ARDS and constituted of four subtypes. Enzyme correlates with some inflammatory mediators, surface tension, and major clinical outcomes. Secretory

  17. Role of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Juliette Lucinda; Bronicki, Ronald A.; Anas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several systematic reviews with meta-analysis that have shown no reduction in mortality with the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Importantly, these reports fail to make a distinction between the pediatric and adult patient. The number of adult patients in these reviews are far greater than the number of pediatric patients, which makes it difficult to interpret the data regarding the role of iNO on the pediatric population. Extrapolating data from the adult population to the pediatric population is complicated as we know that physiology and the body’s response to disease can be different between adult and pediatric patients. iNO has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in term and near-term infants with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. Recently, Bronicki et al. published a prospective randomized control trial investigating the impact of iNO on the pediatric patient population with acute respiratory failure. In this study, a benefit of decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and an increased rate of ECMO-free survival was demonstrated in patients who were randomized to receiving iNO, suggesting that there may be benefit to the use of iNO in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) that has not been demonstrated in adults. iNO has repeatedly been shown to transiently improve oxygenation in all age groups, and yet neonates and pediatric patients have shown improvement in other outcomes that have not been seen in adults. The mechanism that explains improvement with the use of iNO in these patient populations are not well understood but does not appear to be solely a result of sustained improvement in oxygenation. There are physiologic studies that suggest alternative mechanisms for explaining the positive effects of iNO, such as platelet aggregation inhibition and reduction in systemic inflammation. Hence, the role of iNO by various mechanisms and in various

  18. Infantile Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Its Probable Links With Parameters of the Maternal Patient History: A Forensic Case Report.

    PubMed

    Giannitsis, Charilaos; Arampatzis, Asterios; Stefanidou, Maria; Anestakis, Doxakis; Raikos, Nikolaos; Pavlidis, Pavlos

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has a major contribution to neonatal mortality worldwide. Multiple factors associated with increased risk for RDS have been documented to effectively understand the emergence and progression of this disorder. A portion of these parameters has been broadly examined whereas the role of others, despite being clinically described, has not been fully evaluated. In this report, we analyze a forensic RDS case of a late preterm infant. Taking the maternal medical history into account, we focused on 2 not widely established risk factors, oligohydramnios and maternal age, discussing their possible pathophysiological relation to the development of RDS. Simultaneously, the fundamental role of the histopathological examination as a diagnostic tool resurfaces. Following a multidisciplinary approach derived from the collaboration of clinicians and researchers, the identification of factors that precipitate or contribute to this syndrome can be enhanced, leading to novel prognostic and therapeutic strategies against RDS. PMID:27049660

  19. Evaluation of the Role of Postnatal Ambroxol in the Prevention and Treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Hesham F; Elkhaiouby, Muhammed I; Elsharkawey, Sunia M; Elnemr, Muna A

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to study the effect of the postnatal administration of Ambroxol in the prevention of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm neonates at risk and on the severity of the disease in those neonates already suffering from it. Methods: the study was a randomized clinical trial performed on 120 preterm neonates admitted to the neonatal unit of the Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, with gestational age of 28 to 34 weeks. It was performed in the period from September 2001 through March 2003. Half of the enrolled neonates received intravenous ambroxol (20 mg/kg/d), while the control group received the routine management of prematurity and a placebo. Results: Ambroxol decreased the incidence of Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS), improved the gas exchange, and decreased Continious Positive Airway pressure (CPAP) pressure, the length of mechanical ventilation and also the mortality rate. Conclusion: the study concluded that Ambroxol reduced the incidence of this disease in preterm neonates at risk of developing it, and improved the clinical course of RDS. PMID:21748134

  20. Diagnostic delay of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with aspiration pneumonia: Two case reports and a mini-review from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Makoto; Sone, Kazuki; Kagawa, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Ryota; Sato, Hidefumi; Kunieda, Takefumi; Muramatsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing active tuberculosis in elderly patients presents problems due to nonspecific symptoms and complications such as aspiration pneumonia. The current study presents two cases of pulmonary tuberculosis with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates associated with aspiration pneumonia. The two elderly patients developed acute respiratory distress syndrome as a result of aspiration pneumonia. The diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis were delayed in both cases, as the patients were diagnosed with active tuberculosis following discharge from hospital. The sputum test for acid-fast bacillus at the time of administration was smear-negative/culture-positive in these patients. They were treated with isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol, and nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis from these patients was not reported. The number of elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia is predicted to increase rapidly, and aspiration pneumonia combined with pulmonary tuberculosis is a major medical and healthcare concern in Japan. The present study concludes that physicians should always consider the complication of pulmonary tuberculosis when treating pneumonia patients, in particular in treating elderly patients with pulmonary infiltrates.

  1. Expiratory washout versus optimization of mechanical ventilation during permissive hypercapnia in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Richecoeur, J; Lu, Q; Vieira, S R; Puybasset, L; Kalfon, P; Coriat, P; Rouby, J J

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three ventilatory techniques for reducing PaCO2 in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with permissive hypercapnia: (1) expiratory washout alone at a flow of 15 L/min, (2) optimized mechanical ventilation defined as an increase in the respiratory frequency to the maximal rate possible without development of intrinsic positive end- expiratory pressure (PEEP) combined with a reduction of the instrumental dead space, and (3) the combination of both methods. Tidal volume was set according to the pressure-volume curve in order to obtain an inspiratory plateau airway pressure equal to the upper inflection point minus 2 cm H2O after setting the PEEP at 2 cm H2O above the lower inflection point and was kept constant throughout the study. The three modalities were compared at the same inspiratory plateau airway pressure through an adjustment of the extrinsic PEEP. During conventional mechanical ventilation using a respiratory frequency of 18 breaths/min, respiratory acidosis (PaCO2 = 84 +/- 24 mm Hg and pH = 7.21 +/- 0.12) was observed. Expiratory washout and optimized mechanical ventilation (respiratory frequency of 30 +/- 4 breaths/min) had similar effects on CO2 elimination (DeltaPaCO2 = -28 +/- 11% versus -27 +/- 12%). A further decrease in PaCO2 was observed when both methods were combined (DeltaPaCO2 = -46 +/- 7%). Extrinsic PEEP had to be reduced by 5.3 +/- 2.1 cm H2O during expiratory washout and by 7.3 +/- 1.3 cm H2O during the combination of the two modes, whereas it remained unchanged during optimized mechanical ventilation alone. In conclusion, increasing respiratory rate and reducing instrumental dead space during conventional mechanical ventilation is as efficient as expiratory washout to reduce PaCO2 in patients with severe ARDS and permissive hypercapnia. When used in combination, both techniques have additive effects and result in PaCO2 levels close to normal values. PMID:10390383

  2. Dual hit lipopolysaccharide & oleic acid combination induced rat model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hagawane, T.N.; Gaikwad, R.V.; Kshirsagar, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Despite advances in therapy and overall medical care, acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) management remains a problem. Hence the objective of this study was to develop a rat model that mimics human ALI/ARDS. Methods: Four groups of Wistar rats, 48 per group were treated with (i) intratracheal (IT) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (5 mg/kg) dissolved in normal saline (NS), (ii) intravenous (iv) oleic acid (OA) (250 μl/kg) suspension in bovine serum albumin (BSA), (iii) dual hit: IT LPS (2 mg/kg) dissolved in NS and iv OA (100 μl/kg) and (iv) control group: IT NS and iv BSA. From each group at set periods of time various investigations like chest X-rays, respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (TV), total cell count, differential cell count, total protein count and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung wet/dry weight ratio and histopathological examination were done. Results: It was noted that the respiratory rate, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were significantly higher at 4 h in the dual hit group as compared to LPS, OA and control groups. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were significantly higher in the dual hit group as compared to LPS at 8 and 24 h, OA at 8 h and control (at all time intervals) group. IL-1β levels were significantly higher in LPS and dual hit groups at all time intervals, but not in OA and control groups. The injury induced in dual hit group was earlier and more sustained as compared to LPS and OA alone. Interpretation & conclusions: The lung pathology and changes in respiration functions produced by the dual hit model were closer to the diagnostic criteria of ALI/ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury and the injury persisted longer as compared to LPS and OA single hit model. Therefore, the ARDS model produced by the dual hit method was closer to the diagnostic criteria of ARDS in terms of clinical manifestations and pulmonary injury. PMID

  3. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F.; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  4. Bayesian inference of the lung alveolar spatial model for the identification of alveolar mechanics associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christley, Scott; Emr, Bryanna; Ghosh, Auyon; Satalin, Josh; Gatto, Louis; Vodovotz, Yoram; Nieman, Gary F; An, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is acute lung failure secondary to severe systemic inflammation, resulting in a derangement of alveolar mechanics (i.e. the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during tidal ventilation), leading to alveolar instability that can cause further damage to the pulmonary parenchyma. Mechanical ventilation is a mainstay in the treatment of ARDS, but may induce mechano-physical stresses on unstable alveoli, which can paradoxically propagate the cellular and molecular processes exacerbating ARDS pathology. This phenomenon is called ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), and plays a significant role in morbidity and mortality associated with ARDS. In order to identify optimal ventilation strategies to limit VILI and treat ARDS, it is necessary to understand the complex interplay between biological and physical mechanisms of VILI, first at the alveolar level, and then in aggregate at the whole-lung level. Since there is no current consensus about the underlying dynamics of alveolar mechanics, as an initial step we investigate the ventilatory dynamics of an alveolar sac (AS) with the lung alveolar spatial model (LASM), a 3D spatial biomechanical representation of the AS and its interaction with airflow pressure and the surface tension effects of pulmonary surfactant. We use the LASM to identify the mechanical ramifications of alveolar dynamics associated with ARDS. Using graphical processing unit parallel algorithms, we perform Bayesian inference on the model parameters using experimental data from rat lung under control and Tween-induced ARDS conditions. Our results provide two plausible models that recapitulate two fundamental hypotheses about volume change at the alveolar level: (1) increase in alveolar size through isotropic volume change, or (2) minimal change in AS radius with primary expansion of the mouth of the AS, with the implication that the majority of change in lung volume during the respiratory cycle occurs in the

  5. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  6. Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome successfully treated with high-volume hemofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Bugedo, Guillermo; Florez, Jorge; Ferres, Marcela; Roessler, Eric; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome has a high mortality rate, and early connection to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has been suggested to improve outcomes. We report the case of a patient with demonstrated Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome and refractory shock who fulfilled the criteria for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and responded successfully to high volume continuous hemofiltration. The implementation of high volume continuous hemofiltration along with protective ventilation reversed the shock within a few hours and may have prompted recovery. In patients with Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome, a short course of high volume continuous hemofiltration may help differentiate patients who can be treated with conventional intensive care unit management from those who will require more complex therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. PMID:27410413

  7. Small airway remodeling in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a study in autopsy lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Airway dysfunction in patients with the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is evidenced by expiratory flow limitation and dynamic hyperinflation. These functional alterations have been attributed to closure/obstruction of small airways. Airway morphological changes have been reported in experimental models of acute lung injury, characterized by epithelial necrosis and denudation in distal airways. To date, however, no study has focused on the morphological airway changes in lungs from human subjects with ARDS. The aim of this study is to evaluate structural and inflammatory changes in distal airways in ARDS patients. Methods We retrospectively studied autopsy lung tissue from subjects who died with ARDS and from control subjects who died of non pulmonary causes. Using image analysis, we quantified the extension of epithelial changes (normal, abnormal and denudated epithelium expressed as percentages of the total epithelium length), bronchiolar inflammation, airway wall thickness, and extracellular matrix (ECM) protein content in distal airways. The Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test was used to compare data between the ARDS and control groups. Bonferroni adjustments were used for multiple tests. The association between morphological and clinical data was analyzed by Pearson rank test. Results Thirty-one ARDS patients (A: PaO2/FiO2 ≤200, 45 ± 14 years, 16 males) and 11 controls (C: 52 ± 16 years, 7 males) were included in the study. ARDS airways showed a shorter extension of normal epithelium (A:32.9 ± 27.2%, C:76.7 ± 32.7%, P < 0.001), a larger extension of epithelium denudation (A:52.6 ± 35.2%, C:21.8 ± 32.1%, P < 0.01), increased airway inflammation (A:1(3), C:0(1), P = 0.03), higher airway wall thickness (A:138.7 ± 54.3 μm, C:86.4 ± 33.3 μm, P < 0.01), and higher airway content of collagen I, fibronectin, versican and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) compared to controls (P ≤0.03). The extension of normal epithelium

  8. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  9. A randomized clinical trial on the effectiveness of an intervention to treat psychological distress and improve quality of life after autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Braamse, Annemarie M J; van Meijel, B; Visser, O J; Boenink, A D; Cuijpers, P; Eeltink, C E; Hoogendoorn, A W; van Marwijk Kooy, M; van Oppen, P; Huijgens, P C; Beekman, A T F; Dekker, J

    2016-01-01

    Psychological distress contributes to impaired quality of life in hematological cancer patients. Stepped care treatment, in which patients start with the least intensive treatment most likely to work and only receive more intensive interventions if needed, could improve distress. We aimed to evaluate the outcome of stepped care treatment on psychological distress and physical functioning in patients treated with autologous stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancies. In the present study, we performed a randomized clinical trial with two treatment arms: stepped care and care as usual. Baseline assessment and randomization occurred during pre-transplant hospitalization. Stepped care was initiated after 6 weeks, consisting of (1) watchful waiting, (2) Internet-based self-help intervention, and (3) face-to-face counseling/ psychopharmacological treatment/ referral. Follow-up measurements were conducted at 13, 30, and 42 weeks after transplantation. Stepped care (n = 47) and care as usual (n = 48) were comparable on baseline characteristics. The uptake of the intervention was low: 24 patients started with step 1, 23 with step 2, and none with step 3. Percentages of distressed patients ranged from 4.1 to 9.7 %. Ten percent of patients received external psychological or psychiatric care. No statistically significant differences were found between stepped care and care as usual on psychological distress or physical functioning in intention to treat analyses, nor in per protocol analyses. The stepped care program was not effective in decreasing psychological distress. The low intervention uptake, probably related to the low levels of psychological distress, offers an explanation for this outcome. Future research should take into account patients' specific care needs. Netherlands Trial Registry identifier: NTR1770. PMID:26420062

  10. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Distressed Couples: A Case Study With Two Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.; Feingold, Tal; Davidson, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Although the field of couple therapy has made significant strides in recent years, there continues to be a need for theoretically sound and empirically supported treatments. The current case study examines whether Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), an experiential acceptance-based behavior therapy, can be effective in treating distressed…

  11. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Association with Colon Motility, Bowel Symptoms, and Psychological Distress

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Madhusudan; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Palsson, Olafur S.; Chitkara, Denesh K.; Gangarosa, Lisa M.; Drossman, Douglas A.; Whitehead, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), although with significant controversy. Aims To determine the prevalence of SIBO in IBS and its association with colonic motility, bowel symptoms and psychological distress. Methods Sucrose hydrogen and methane breath tests were performed in 158 IBS and 34 healthy controls (HC). Thresholds for pain and urgency were tested by barostat in the descending colon. The motility index (MI) was calculated as the average area under the curve for all phasic contractions. Questionnaires assessed psychological distress, IBS symptom severity (IBSSS), IBS Quality of Life (IBS-QOL) and self reported bowel symptoms. Results 52/158 (32.9%) IBS patients had abnormal breath tests compared with 6/34 (17.9%) HC (χ2=0.079). SIBO (SIBO+) and Non-SIBO (SIBO−) did not differ in the prevalence of IBS-subtypes, IBS-SS, IBS-QOL and psychological distress variables. IBS had a greater post-distension increase in MI than HC, but there was no difference between SIBO+ and SIBO−. Predominant methane producers had higher urge thresholds (28.4 vs. 18.3, p<0.05) and higher baseline MI (461 vs. 301.45, p<0.05) than SIBO− IBS, and they reported more “hard or lumpy stools” when compared to predominant hydrogen producers (p<0.05) and SIBO− IBS (p< 0.05). Conclusions SIBO is unlikely to contribute significantly in the pathogenesis of IBS. Methane production is associated with constipation. PMID:18482250

  12. Pituitary hypoplasia and respiratory distress syndrome in Prop1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Ward, Robert D; Raetzman, Lori T; Seasholtz, Audrey F; Saunders, Thomas L; Gillespie, Patrick J; Camper, Sally A

    2004-11-15

    Mutations in Prophet of PIT1 (Prop1), one of several homeodomain transcription factors that are required for the development of the anterior pituitary gland, are the predominant cause of MPHD (multiple pituitary hormone deficiency) in humans. We show that deletion of Prop1 in mice causes severe pituitary hypoplasia with failure of the entire Pit1 lineage and delayed gonadotrope development. The pituitary hormone deficiencies cause secondary endocrine problems and a high rate of perinatal mortality due to respiratory distress. Lung atelectasis in mutants correlates with reduced levels of NKX2.1 and surfactant. Lethality of mice homozygous for either the null allele or a spontaneous hypomorphic allele is strongly influenced by genetic background. Prop1-null mice are an excellent model for MPHD and may be useful for testing the efficacy of pharmaceutical intervention for neonatal respiratory distress. PMID:15459176

  13. Management of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome Employing ACoRN Respiratory Sequence Protocol versus Early Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Pedram; Faghani, Asadallah; Afjeh, Seyed-Abolfazl; Moradinazer, Mehdi; Bahman-Bijari, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a common cause of respiratory distress in premature infants. This study was designed to evaluate two different RDS treatment protocols by comparing the outcomes. Methods: This study was a double center cross sectional study performed from June to December 2012. During that period, 386 neonates with RDS were hospitalized and treated according to two different therapeutic protocols so-called Acute Care of at-Risk Newborns (ACoRN) respiratory sequence protocol (group I) and Early Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (E-NCPAP) protocol (group II). The variables and main outcomes of this study were gestational age, birth weight, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), pulmonary hemorrhage (PH), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), air leak and mortality rate (MR). Findings : Out of 386 infants, 202 infants were in group I (male 60.4%, female 39.6%, mean gestational age 316/7 weeks, mean birth weight=1688 grams) and group II included 184 infants (male 61.4%, female 38.6%, mean gestational age 32 weeks, mean birth weight 1787 grams), P= 0.07. The ratios of BPD of group I to group II and PH of group I to group two were not significant (P=0.63 and P=0.84, respectively). Air leak ratio in group I was higher than in group II (P=0.001). Although IVH ratio in group II was higher than in group I (P=0.01), grade III and IV IVH was higher in group I (30% vs. 4.6%). In case of MR, it was higher in group I than in group II (P=0.001). Conclusion: According to the findings the incidence of air leak, grade III and IV IVH and MR was less common in E-NCPAP protocol, so it may show the effectiveness of this protocol. The authors suggest that more researches are needed for more accurate results. PMID:25793046

  14. Massive Systemic Air Embolism during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support of a Neonate with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Timpa, Joseph G.; O’Meara, Carlisle; McILwain, R. Britt; Dabal, Robert J.; Alten, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is universally accepted as a potential lifesaving therapy for neonates suffering severe cardiorespiratory failure, with survival reported as 81% weaning off ECMO and 69% to hospital discharge in this population. Although ECMO may reduce mortality in certain neonatal patients, it is associated with significant complications. Air in the circuit complicates 4.9% of neonatal ECMO runs, and it is crucial that all ECMO caregivers are trained in the prevention of air embolism and possess the knowledge necessary to efficiently identify and remove air from the ECMO circuit to prevent life threatening consequences. We present a fatal case of neonatal systemic air embolism leading to massive entrainment of air into the ECMO venous return cannula of a neonatal patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome following repair of obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. We describe the pathophysiology and presentation of this rare condition and the importance of early recognition, due to its high mortality rate. PMID:21848179

  15. Successful management of H1N1 related severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with noninvasive positive pressure ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Abdulla Ismaeel; Chaari, Anis; Abulfateh, Fatima N.; Alshaikh, Khalid A.; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life threatening complication of H1N1 pneumonia. According to the Berlin conference guidelines, severe ARDS requires management with early invasive mechanical ventilation. Whether noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) should be attempted in patients with H1N1 pneumonia is still a matter of debate. We report the case of one patient with severe ARDS without other organ failure. The patient was managed successfully using NIPPV. Endotracheal intubation was avoided and the patient was discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) after 10 days with a successful outcome. NIPPV can be useful in patients with isolated severe H1N1 ARDS provided early improvement of the oxygenation parameters is achieved. Patients with multiple organ failure or with persistent severe hypoxemia under noninvasive ventilation should be electively intubated and started on invasive mechanical ventilation. PMID:27275488

  16. Hitch-hiker taken for a ride: an unusual cause of myocarditis, septic shock and adult respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kushawaha, Anurag; Brown, Mark; Martin, Ismael; Evenhuis, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a serious tick-borne illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii that is endemic in southeastern USA. Although RMSF has been described as causing the classic clinical triad of fever, headache and a characteristic rash, serious and potentially life-threatening manifestations can occur. Cardiopulmonary involvement, although infrequent, may occur with severe cases of RMSF. Rickettsial myocarditis is an uncommon occurrence. We present a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old man, who was hitch-hiking across the southeastern USA, with serologically proven RMSF causing adult respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock and myocarditis manifested by elevated cardiac enzymes and decrease in myocardial function. After treatment with antibiotics, the myocarditis resolved. Therefore, although unusual, clinicians should be aware of possible myocardial involvement in patients with appropriate tick-exposure histories or other clinical signs of RMSF. PMID:23314875

  17. Complement-mediated neutrophil activation in sepsis- and trauma-related adult respiratory distress syndrome. Clarification with radioaerosol lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Complement-mediated neutrophil activation (CMNA) has been proposed as an important pathogenic mechanism causing acute microvascular lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). To clarify the relationship between CMNA and evolving lung injury, we studied 26 patients with multiple trauma and sepsis within 24 hours of risk establishment for ARDS. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was quantified as the clearance rate of a particulate radioaerosol. Seventeen patients (65%) had increased PACP (six developed ARDS) while nine (35%) had normal PACP (none developed ARDS; clearance rates of 3.4%/min and 1.5%/min, respectively). These patients, regardless of evidence of early lung injury, had elevated plasma C3adesArg levels and neutrophil chemotactic desensitization to C5a/C5adesArg. Plasma C3adesArg levels correlated weakly, but significantly, with PACP. Thus, CMNA may be a necessary, but not a sufficient, pathogenic mechanism in the evolution of ARDS.

  18. Surfactant therapy in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and in near-term or term newborns with acute RDS.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, R

    2006-05-01

    Many different surfactant preparations derived from animal sources, as well as synthetic surfactants, are available for the treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Natural, modified surfactants containing surfactant-associated proteins appear to be more effective than non-protein-containing synthetic surfactants. Comparative trials with poractant alfa at a higher initial dose of 200 mg/kg appear to be associated with rapid weaning of FiO2, less need for additional doses, and decreased mortality in infants <32 weeks gestation when compared with beractant. Early rescue (<30 min of age) surfactant therapy is an effective method to minimize over treatment of some preterm infants who may not develop RDS. Surfactant therapy followed by rapid extubation to nasal ventilation appears to be more beneficial than continued mechanical ventilation. In near-term or term newborns with acute RDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be 70% effective in improving respiratory failure. PMID:16625226

  19. [Effects on the pulmonary function after single dose of exogenous pulmonary surfactant in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, W B; Mângia, C M

    1997-01-01

    The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a pulmonary lesion of multifactorial cause in which the surfactant system is altered owing to inactivation and impairment of composition and metabolism. The use of exogenous pulmonary surfactant is a therapeutic option with the objective to maintain alveolar stability thus improving the pulmonary compliance (increasing the residual functional capacity), oxygenation and ventilatory mechanics. A study carried out on two pediatric patients with ARDS submitted to mechanic pulmonary ventilation, applying a single dose of exogenous pulmonary surfactant is described. The patients were evaluated using arterial and venous gasometry before and after the use of surfactant, observing increment in oxygenation, reduction of shunt fraction, improvement in ventilation immediately after exogenous pulmonary surfactant instillation and return to the previous situation after 240 minutes in case 1 and 120 minutes in case 2. More prospective clinical and randomized studies are needed to effectively evaluate this therapeutic modality. PMID:9336050

  20. Predicting school readiness from neurodevelopmental assessments at age 2 years after respiratory distress syndrome in infants born preterm

    PubMed Central

    PATRIANAKOS-HOOBLER, ATHENA I; MSALL, MICHAEL E; HUO, DEZHENG; MARKS, JEREMY D; PLESHA-TROYKE, SUSAN; SCHREIBER, MICHAEL D

    2010-01-01

    AIM To determine whether neurodevelopmental outcomes at the age of 2 years accurately predict school readiness in children who survived respiratory distress syndrome after preterm birth. METHOD Our cohort included 121 preterm infants who received surfactant and ventilation and were enrolled in a randomized controlled study of inhaled nitric oxide for respiratory distress syndrome. Abnormal outcomes at the age of 2 years were defined as neurosensory disability (cerebral palsy, blindness, or bilateral hearing loss) or delay (no neurosensory disability but Bayley Scales of Infant Development mental or performance developmental index scores <70). School readiness (assessed at a mean age of 5y 6mo, SD 1y) was determined using neurodevelopmental assessments of motor, sensory, receptive vocabulary, perceptual, conceptual, and adaptive skills. RESULTS The mean birthweight of the cohort (57 males, 64 females) was 987g (SD 374), and the mean gestational age was 27.3 weeks (SD 2.6). At the age of 2 years, the neurodevelopmental classification was ‘disabled’ in 11% and ‘delayed’ in 23%. At the age of 5 years 6 months, intensive special education was required for 11% and some special education for 21%. Disability and delay at the age of 2 years were 92% and 50% predictive of lack of school readiness respectively, whereas only 15% of children who were normal at the age of 2 years were not school ready at the later assessment. Children with delay at 2 years were more likely to need special education if they were socially disadvantaged. INTERPRETATION Without preschool developmental supports, preterm survivors living in poverty will require more special education services. PMID:20002128

  1. Clustering of cardiac risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome and associations with psychosocial distress in a young Asian Indian population.

    PubMed

    Suchday, Sonia; Bellehsen, Mayer; Friedberg, Jennifer P; Almeida, Maureen; Kaplan, Erica

    2014-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a precursor for coronary heart disease. However, its pathophysiology is not clear, its phenotypic expression may vary by region; also, the phenotypic manifestation may be exacerbated by psychosocial distress and family history. The purpose of the current study was to assess the factor structure of the metabolic syndrome in young urban Asian Indians. Asian Indian youth (N = 112) were evaluated for body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, blood pressure (systolic: SBP; diastolic: DBP), blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, psychosocial distress and family health history. Factor analyses were computed on components of the metabolic syndrome. Three factors were identified for the entire sample: hemodynamic-obesity (SBP, DBP, waist-hip ratio), Lipid (cholesterol, triglyceride), and insulin-obesity (blood sugar, BMI, insulin). Similar to previous research with this population, three distinct factors with no overlap were identified. Factors did not correlate with psychosocial distress or family history. Lack of correlation with family history and psychosocial distress may be a function of the young age and demographics of the sample. PMID:23775637

  2. Psychopathological manifestations of joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome/ Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: The link between connective tissue and psychological distress revised.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Ursini, Gianluca; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Psychological distress is a known feature of generalized joint hypermobility (gJHM), as well as of its most common syndromic presentation, namely Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome - JHS/EDS-HT), and significantly contributes to the quality of life of affected individuals. Most published articles dealt with the link between gJHM (or JHS/EDS-HT) and anxiety-related conditions, and a novel generation of studies is emerging aimed at investigating the psychopathologic background of such an association. In this paper, literature review was carried out with a semi-systematic approach spanning the entire spectrum of psychopathological findings in gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT. Interestingly, in addition to the confirmation of a tight link between anxiety and gJHM, preliminary connections with depression, attention deficit (and hyperactivity) disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder were also found. Few papers investigated the relationship with schizophrenia with contrasting results. The mind-body connections hypothesized on the basis of available data were discussed with focus on somatotype, presumed psychopathology, and involvement of the extracellular matrix in the central nervous system. The hypothesis of positive Beighton score and alteration of interoceptive/proprioceptive/body awareness as possible endophenotypes in families with symptomatic gJHM or JHS/EDS-HT is also suggested. Concluding remarks addressed the implications of the psychopathological features of gJHM and JHS/EDS-HT in clinical practice. PMID:25821094

  3. Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Light, Kathleen C.; White, Andrea T.; Tadler, Scott; Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    In complex multisymptom disorders like fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) that are defined primarily by subjective symptoms, genetic and gene expression profiles can provide very useful objective information. This paper summarizes research on genes that may be linked to increased susceptibility in developing and maintaining these disorders, and research on resting and stressor-evoked changes in leukocyte gene expression, highlighting physiological pathways linked to stress and distress. These include the adrenergic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and serotonergic pathways, and exercise responsive metabolite-detecting ion channels. The findings to date provide some support for both inherited susceptibility and/or physiological dysregulation in all three systems, particularly for catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) genes, the glucocorticoid and the related mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C1, NR3C2), and the purinergic 2X4 (P2X4) ion channel involved as a sensory receptor for muscle pain and fatigue and also in upregulation of spinal microglia in chronic pain models. Methodological concerns for future research, including potential influences of comorbid clinical depression and antidepressants and other medications, on gene expression are also addressed. PMID:22110941

  4. Strong correlation between lung ultrasound and chest computerized tomography imaging for the detection of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Huang, Daozheng; Guo, Liheng; Chen, Quanfu; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a clinical imaging technique for diagnosing acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In humans and several large animals, LUS demonstrates similar specificity and sensitivity to computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Current study evaluated the degree of agreement between LUS and CT imaging in characterizing ALI/ARDS in rats. Methods Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were imaged by LUS before randomization into three groups to receive intratracheal saline, 3 or 6 mg/kg LPS respectively (n=10). LUS and CT imaging was conducted 2 hours after instillation. Cross table analyses and kappa statistics were used to determine agreement levels between LUS and CT assessments of lung condition. Results Before instillation, rats presented with a largely A-pattern in LUS images, however, a significantly increase B-lines were observed in all groups after instillation and showed dose response to LPS or to saline. One rat treated with 6 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) presented with lung consolidation. The agreement between the LUS and the CT in detecting the main characteristics of ALI/ARDS in rat was strong (r=0.758, P<0.01, k=0.737). Conclusions In conclusion, LUS detects ALI/ARDS with high agreement with micro PET/CT scanning in a rat model, suggesting that LUS represents a positive refinement in rat ALI/ARDS disease models. PMID:27499930

  5. Effects of L-carnitine supplementation on respiratory distress syndrome development and prognosis in premature infants: A single blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, MEHMET ADNAN; KARDAS, ZEHRA; KARDAS, FATİH; GUNES, TAMER; KURTOGLU, SELİM

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of L-carnitine therapy on the occurrence and prognosis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). A single blind, randomized controlled trial study was conducted on 130 infants with gestational ages of 28–36 weeks. Infants were assigned to experimental groups (groups 1 and 2) and control groups (groups 3 and 4). Groups 1 and 3 consisted of infants with RDS, and groups 2 and 4 groups were composed of infants without RDS. The experimental groups were treated with carnitine. No statistically significant differences in serum carnitine levels were detected between the study and the control groups on day 1 of treatment (P=0.06). However, on day 7 of treatment, serum carnitine levels in the experimental groups were significantly increased (P=0.02), as compared with the control groups. The surfactant requirement value, which is how many rounds of surfactant therapy were required, was 1.56±0.97 in group 1, and 2.12±0.99 in group 3 (P<0.001). The mean duration of mechanical ventilation required was 3.04±3.60 days in group 1, and 4.73±5.63 days in group 3 (P<0.001). The present results indicate that carnitine supplementation in premature infants with RDS may help to increase carnitine levels, thus decreasing the duration of mechanical ventilation and surfactant requirement. PMID:26998047

  6. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  7. Early Surfactant Therapy With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or Continued Mechanical Ventilation in Very Low Birth Weight Neonates With Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Bita; Fakhraie, Seyed Hasan; Afjeh, Seyed Abulfazl; Kazemian, Mohammad; Shohrati, Majid; Saburi, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various strategies have been suggested for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of two common methods of RDS management among neonates with low birth weight. Patients and Methods: A cohort study was conducted on 98 neonates with definite diagnosis of RDS during 2008-2009. The neonates were divided into two groups by a blinded supervisor using simple randomization (odd and even numbers). Forty-five cases in the first group were treated with intubation, surfactant therapy, extubation (INSURE method) followed by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (N.CPAP) and 53 cases in the second group underwent intubation, surfactant therapy followed by mechanical ventilation (MV). Results: Five (11.1%) cases in the first group and 23 (43%) cases in the second group expired during the study. The rates of MV dependency among cases with INSURE failure and cases in the MV group were 37% and 83%, respectively (P < 0.001). Birth weight (BW) (P = 0.017), presence of retinopathy of prematurity (P = 0.022), C/S delivery (P = 0.029) and presence of lung bleeding (P = 0.010) could significantly predict mortality in the second group, although only BW (P = 0.029) had a significant impact on the mortality rate in the first group. Moreover, BW was significantly related to the success rate in the first group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Our findings demonstrated that INSURE plus NCPAP was more effective than the routine method (permanent intubation after surfactant prescription). In addition, the lower rates of mortality, MV dependency, duration of hospitalization, and complications were observed in cases treated with the INSURE method compared to the routine one. PMID:24910785

  8. Actigraph Evaluation of Acupuncture for Treating Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingzhe; Li, Mao; Wang, Qiudong; Kwak, Shin; Jiang, Wenfei; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of acupuncture in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) by actigraph recordings. Among the 38 patients with RLS enrolled, 31 (M = 12, F = 19; mean age, 47.2 ± 9.7 years old) completed the study. Patients were treated with either standard acupuncture (n = 15) or randomized acupuncture (n = 16) in a single-blind manner for 6 weeks. Changes in nocturnal activity (NA) and early sleep activity (ESA) between week 0 (baseline), week 2, week 4, and week 6 were assessed using leg actigraph recordings, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Rating Scale (IRLSRS), and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Standard but not randomized acupuncture reduced the abnormal leg activity of NA and ESA significantly in week 2, week 4, and week 6 based on the changes in the clinical scores for IRLSRS and ESS in week 4 and week 6 compared with the baseline. No side effects were observed. The results indicate that standard acupuncture might improve the abnormal leg activity in RLS patients and thus is a potentially suitable integrative treatment for long-term use. PMID:25763089

  9. Dyspnoea management in acute coronary syndrome patients treated with ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Guido; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspnoea in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients has always been considered a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic clinical scenario. P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitors (i.e., clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently the cornerstone of treatment of ACS patients. Thus, in the last few years, the potential association between ACS and dyspnoea has also become more challenging with the increasing use of ticagrelor in these patients due to its beneficial effects on ischaemic event prevention and mortality, since ticagrelor can induce dyspnoea as a side effect. The present article is intended to review the current literature regarding dyspnoea occurrence in ACS patients, especially those treated with ticagrelor, and to propose ticagrelor-associated dyspnoea management recommendations based on current knowledge. PMID:25267878

  10. Extremes of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Expression Associate with Worse Outcomes in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Caceres, Silvia M; Kret, Jennifer E; Poch, Katie R; Strand, Matthew; Faino, Anna V; Nichols, David P; Saavedra, Milene T; Taylor-Cousar, Jennifer L; Geraci, Mark W; Burnham, Ellen L; Fessler, Michael B; Suratt, Benjamin T; Abraham, Edward; Moss, Marc; Malcolm, Kenneth C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) severity may be influenced by heterogeneity of neutrophil activation. Interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) are a broad gene family induced by Type I interferons, often as a response to viral infections, which evokes extensive immunomodulation. We tested the hypothesis that over- or under-expression of immunomodulatory ISG by neutrophils is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Genome-wide transcriptional profiles of circulating neutrophils isolated from patients with sepsis-induced ARDS (n = 31) and healthy controls (n = 19) were used to characterize ISG expression. Hierarchical clustering of expression identified 3 distinct subject groups with Low, Mid and High ISG expression. ISG accounting for the greatest variability in expression were identified (MX1, IFIT1, and ISG15) and used to analyze a prospective cohort at the Colorado ARDS Network site. One hundred twenty ARDS patients from four urban hospitals were enrolled within 72 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Circulating neutrophils were isolated from patients and expression of ISG determined by PCR. Samples were stratified by standard deviation from the mean into High (n = 21), Mid, (n = 82) or Low (n = 17) ISG expression. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with High or Low ISG expression to those with Mid-range expression. At enrollment, there were no differences in age, gender, co-existing medical conditions, or type of physiologic injury between cohorts. After adjusting for age, race, gender and BMI, patients with either High or Low ISG expression had significantly worse clinical outcomes than those in the Mid for number of 28-day ventilator- and ICU-free days (P = 0.0006 and 0.0004), as well as 90-day mortality and 90-day home with unassisted breathing (P = 0.02 and 0.004). These findings suggest extremes of ISG expression by circulating neutrophils from ARDS patients recovered early in the syndrome are associated