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Sample records for distributary deep-water deposits

  1. Distribution of palaeosols and deposits in the temporal evolution of a semiarid fluvial distributary system (Bauru Group, Upper Cretaceous, SE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilici, Giorgio; Bo, Patrick Führ Dal'; de Oliveira, Emerson Ferreira

    2016-07-01

    The stratigraphic and sedimentological knowledge of the Bauru Group (Upper Cretaceous, SE Brazil) is still generally insufficient and controversial. A sedimentological and palaeopedological study allowed to interpret the south-eastern portion of the Bauru Group according to the model of a fluvial distributary system. This work has two objectives: (1) to include palaeosols in the interpretation of a fluvial distributary system and (2) to give detailed information on the sedimentological and stratigraphic features of the SE portion of the Bauru Group in order to support biostratigraphical, taphonomic and palaeoecological studies. In the south-eastern portion of the Bauru Group, three genetic stratigraphic units were described and interpreted, here informally called lower, intermediate and upper units. The lower unit is constituted of muddy sandstone salt flat deposits and sandstone sheet deltas deposits and is interpreted as a basinal part of a fluvial distributary system. The intermediate unit is formed of very fine to fine-grained sandstone-filled ribbon channel and sandy sheet-shaped beds, suggesting a distal or medial portion of a fluvial distributary system. The upper unit does not match with the present models of the fluvial distributary system because mostly constituted of moderately developed, well-drained, medium- to fine-grained sandstone palaeosols, which testify pauses of sedimentation to the order of 104 years. Preserved features of sedimentary structures suggest that the parent material was formed by occasional catastrophic unconfined flows. This unit may represent the most distal portion of a fluvial distributary system generated by retrogradation of the alluvial system due to aridification of the climate. The upper unit may be interpreted also as proximal portion of fluvial distributary system if considering the coarser-grained and the well-drained palaeosols. However, the absence of channel deposits makes this interpretation unconvincing.

  2. Evidence for deep-water deposition of abyssal Mediterranean evaporites during the Messinian salinity crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeleit, Elizabeth C.; Brandon, Mark T.; Zhuang, Guangsheng

    2015-10-01

    Scientific drilling of the abyssal evaporites beneath the deepest parts of the Mediterranean basin gave rise to the idea that the Mediterranean sea completely evaporated at the end of the Messinian. Herein, we show, using new organic geochemical data, that those evaporites were deposited beneath a deep-water saline basin, not in a subaerial saltpan, as originally proposed. Abundant fossil organic lipids were extracted from evaporites in Mediterranean Deep Sea Drilling Project cores. The archaeal lipid distribution and new analyses, using the ACE salinity proxy and TEX86 temperature proxy, indicate that surface waters at the time of evaporite deposition had normal marine salinity, ranging from ∼26 to 34 practical salinity units, and temperatures of 25-28 °C. These conditions require a deep-water setting, with a mixed layer with normal marine salinity and an underlying brine layer at gypsum and halite saturation. After correction for isostatic rebound, our results indicate maximum drawdown of ∼2000 m and ∼2900 m relative to modern sea level in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins, respectively. Our results are consistent with previously proposed scenarios for sea level drawdown based on both subaerial and submarine incision and backfilling of the Rhone and Nile rivers, which require Messinian sea level drops of ∼1300 m and ∼200 m, respectively. This study provides new evidence for an old debate and also demonstrates the importance of further scientific drilling and sampling of deeper part of the abyssal Messinian units.

  3. Highstand fans in the California borderland: the overlooked deep-water depositional systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Covault, Jacob A.; Normark, William R.; Romans, Brian W.; Graham, Stephan A.

    2007-01-01

    Contrary to widely used sequence-stratigraphic models, lowstand fans are only part of the turbidite depositional record; our analysis reveals that a comparable volume of coarse-grained sediment has been deposited in California borderland deep-water basins regardless of sea level. Sedimentation rates and periods of active sediment transport have been determined for deep-water canyon-channel systems contributing to the southeastern Gulf of Santa Catalina and San Diego Trough since 40 ka using an extensive grid of high-resolution and deep-penetration seismic-reflection data. A regional seismic-reflection horizon (40 ka) has been correlated across the study area using radiocarbon age dates from the Mohole borehole and U.S. Geological Survey piston cores. This study focused on the submarine fans fed by the Oceanside, Carlsbad, and La Jolla Canyons, all of which head within the length of the Ocean-side littoral cell. The Oceanside Canyon–channel system was active from 45 to 13 ka, and the Carlsbad system was active from 50 (or earlier) to 10 ka. The La Jolla system was active over two periods, from 50 (or earlier) to 40 ka, and from 13 ka to the present. One or more of these canyon-channel systems have been active regardless of sea level. During sea-level fluctuation, shelf width between the canyon head and the littoral zone is the primary control on canyon-channel system activity. Highstand fan deposition occurs when a majority of the sediment within the Oceanside littoral cell is intercepted by one of the canyon heads, currently La Jolla Canyon. Since 40 ka, the sedimentation rate on the La Jolla highstand fan has been >2 times the combined rates on the Oceanside and Carlsbad lowstand fans.

  4. Markov chains and entropy tests in genetic-based lithofacies analysis of deep-water clastic depositional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between structural elements and the so-called genetic lithofacies in a clastic deep-water depositional system. Process-sedimentology has recently been gaining importance in the characterization of these systems. This way the recognized facies attributes can be associated with the depositional processes establishing the genetic lithofacies. In this paper this approach was presented through a case study of a Tertiary deep-water sequence of the Pannonian-basin. Of course it was necessary to interpret the stratigraphy of the sequences in terms of "general" sedimentology, focusing on the structural elements. For this purpose, well-logs and standard deep-water models were applied. The cyclicity of sedimentary sequences can be easily revealed by using Markov chains. Though Markov chain analysis has broad application in mainly fluvial depositional environments, its utilization is uncommon in deep-water systems. In this context genetic lithofacies was determined and analysed by embedded Markov chains. The randomness in the presence of a lithofacies within a cycle was estimated by entropy tests (entropy after depositional, before depositional, for the whole system). Subsequently the relationships between lithofacies were revealed and a depositional model (i.e. modal cycle) was produced with 90% confidence level of stationarity. The non-randomness of the latter was tested by chi-square test. The consequences coming from the comparison of "general" sequences (composed of architectural elements), the genetic-based sequences (showing the distributions of the genetic lithofacies) and the lithofacies relationships were discussed in details. This way main depositional channel has the best, channelized lobes have good potential hydrocarbon reservoir attributes, with symmetric alternation of persistent fine-grained sandstone (Facies D) and muddy fine-grained sandstone with traction structures (Facies F)

  5. Dynamic depositional and early diagenetic processes in a deep-water shelf setting, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, North Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, S.D.; Nance, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Austin Chalk of north Texas was deposited on a deep-water shelf north of the Sea Marcos Platform during a worldwide Coniacian and Santonian sea-level highstand. Transgressive (lowermost lower Austin Chalk), highstand (uppermost lower Austin Chalk), and regressive (middle and upper Austin Chalk) phases of cyclic chalk and marl sedimentation are recognized in excavations and tunnels created in Ellis County for the Superconducting Super Collider provide new evidence of sediment transport during Austin Chalk deposition. During transgression, bottom currents syndepositionally reworked nannoplankton oozes, incising channels as much as 120 ft across and 8 ft deep. Weakly burrowed channel fills having preservation of fine lamination document rapid infilling. Channel fills are composed of pyritized and carbonized wood and Inoceramus lag deposits, pellets, echinoderm fragments, and globigerinid grainstones, and coccolith ooze. During maximum highstand, bottom reworking was suppressed. Detrital content of highstand marls is low (>20 percent); organic content is high (1.4 to 3.5 percent). Coccolith preservation is excellent because of minimal diagenetic alteration. Regression is marked by resumed channel cutting and storm-bed winnowing in the middle and upper Austin Chalk. Suppressed resistivity log response and recessive weathering characteristics of the middle Austin Chalk are not primarily related to depositional environment but rather to increased input of volcanic ash during the accumulation of this interval. Early stabilization of ash produced clay-coated microfabrics in sediments that are otherwise similar to the transgressive deposits.

  6. Role of sea-level change in deep water deposition along a carbonate shelf margin, Early and Middle Permian, Delaware Basin: implications for reservoir characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shunli; Yu, Xinghe; Li, Shengli; Giles, Katherine A.

    2015-04-01

    The architecture and sedimentary characteristics of deep water deposition can reflect influences of sea-level change on depositional processes on the shelf edge, slope, and basin floor. Outcrops of the northern slope and basin floor of the Delaware Basin in west Texas are progressively exposed due to canyon incision and road cutting. The outcrops in the Delaware Basin were measured to characterize gravity flow deposits in deep water of the basin. Subsurface data from the East Ford and Red Tank fields in the central and northeastern Delaware Basin were used to study reservoir architectures and properties. Depositional models of deep water gravity flows at different stages of sea-level change were constructed on the basis of outcrop and subsurface data. In the falling-stage system tracts, sandy debris with collapses of reef carbonates are deposited on the slope, and high-density turbidites on the slope toe and basin floor. In the low-stand system tracts, deep water fans that consist of mixed sand/mud facies on the basin floor are comprised of high- to low-density turbidites. In the transgression and high-stand system tracts, channel-levee systems and elongate lobes of mud-rich calciturbidite deposits formed as a result of sea level rise and scarcity of sandy sediment supply. For the reservoir architecture, the fan-like debris and high-density turbidites show high net-to-gross ratio of 62 %, which indicates the sandiest reservoirs for hydrocarbon accumulation. Lobe-like deep water fans with net-to-gross ratio of 57 % facilitate the formation of high quality sandy reservoirs. The channel-levee systems with muddy calciturbidites have low net-to-gross ratio of 30 %.

  7. Origin and architecture of deep-water levee deposits: Insight from the ancient rock record and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Zishann

    Although levee deposits make up a significant part of modern and ancient deep-marine slope systems, details of their internal lithological composition and stratal architecture remain poorly documented. At the Castle Creek study area, strata of the Neoproterozoic Isaac Formation (Windermere Supergroup) crop out superbly in a kilometre-scale section through a sinuous deep-water channel-levee system (ICC3). Levee deposits near the outer bend of the channel consist of sandstone-rich (sandstone-to-mudstone ratio of 68:42), medium- to thick-bedded turbidites interstratified with thinly-bedded turbidites. Structureless sandstone (T a), planar laminated sandstone (Tb), non-climbing ripple cross-stratified sandstone (Tc) and massive and laminated siltstone (Td) are common. Thick beds generally thicken and then thin and fine laterally over about 300 m. Thin-bedded strata, in contrast, thin and fine negligibly over similar distances. In the distal part of the outer-bend levee (up to 700 m laterally away from the channel) strata consist predominantly of thin-bedded Tcd turbidites with a much lower sandstone-to-mudstone ratio (35:65). On the opposite side of the channel, inner-bend levee deposits are mudstone-rich, locally as low as 15:85, and consist mostly of thin-bedded, Tcd turbidites, although thicker-bedded, Ta-d turbidites are more common in the lower part of the section. Lateral thinning and fining of beds is more rapid than their outer-bend counterpart. Levee deposits of ICC3 comprise three stacked decametre-scale upward-thinning and -fining successions. Each is interpreted to record a depositional history consisting of lateral channel migration, levee deposition, channel filling, and distal levee deposition. During the early stage of increasing levee relief it is proposed that the termini of individual beds progressively backstep towards the channel margin resulting in an overall lateral thinning of the stratal profile. This interpretation notably contrasts the common

  8. Depositional characteristics and spatial distribution of deep-water sedimentary systems on the northwestern middle-lower slope of the Northwest Sub-Basin, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Xie, Xinong; Van Rooij, David; Vandorpe, Thomas; Huang, Li; Guo, Laiyuan; Su, Ming

    2013-12-01

    Based upon 2D seismic data, this study confirms the presence of a complex deep-water sedimentary system within the Pliocene-Quaternary strata on the northwestern lower slope of the Northwest Sub-Basin, South China Sea. It consists of submarine canyons, mass-wasting deposits, contourite channels and sheeted drifts. Alongslope aligned erosive features are observed on the eastern upper gentle slopes (<1.2° above 1,500 m), where a V-shaped downslope canyon presents an apparent ENE migration, indicating a related bottom current within the eastward South China Sea Intermediate Water Circulation. Contourite sheeted drifts are also generated on the eastern gentle slopes (~1.5° in average), below 2,100 m water depth though, referring to a wide unfocused bottom current, which might be related to the South China Sea Deep Water Circulation. Mass wasting deposits (predominantly slides and slumps) and submarine canyons developed on steeper slopes (>2°), where weaker alongslope currents are probably dominated by downslope depositional processes on these unstable slopes. The NNW-SSE oriented slope morphology changes from a three-stepped terraced outline (I-II-III) east of the investigated area, into a two-stepped terraced (I-II) outline in the middle, and into a unitary steep slope (II) in the west, which is consistent with the slope steepening towards the west. Such morphological changes may have possibly led to a westward simplification of composite deep-water sedimentary systems, from a depositional complex of contourite depositional systems, mass-wasting deposits and canyons, on the one hand, to only sliding and canyon deposits on the other hand.

  9. Archean deep-water depositional system: interbedded and banded iron formation and clastic turbidites in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentner, Danielle; Lowe, Donald

    2013-04-01

    The 3.23 billion year old sediments in the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa include some of the world's oldest known deep-water deposits. Unique to this locality are turbidites interbedded with banded iron formation (BIF) and banded ferruginous chert (BFC). This unusual association may provide clues for reconstructing Archean deep-water depositional settings. For our study we examined freshly drilled core in addition to measuring ~500 m of outcrop exposures along road cuts. The stacking pattern follows an overall BIF to BFC to amalgamated turbidite succession, although isolated turbidites do occur throughout the sequence. The turbidites are predominately massive, and capped with thin, normally graded tops that include mud rip-ups, chert plates, and ripples. The lack of internal stratification and the amalgamated character suggests emplacement by surging high-density turbidity currents. Large scours and channels are absent and bedding is tabular: the flows were collapsing with little turbulence reaching the bed. In contrast, field evidence indicates the BIF and BFC most likely precipitated directly out of the water column. Preliminary interpretations indicate the deposits may be related to a pro-deltaic setting. (1) Deltaic systems can generate long-lived, high volume turbidity currents. (2) The contacts between the BIF, BFC, and turbidite successions are gradual and inter-fingered, possibly representing lateral facies relationships similar to modern pro-delta environments. (3) Putative fan delta facies, including amalgamated sandstone and conglomerate, exist stratigraphically updip of the basinal sediments.

  10. Shallow to deep-water deposition in a Cratonic basin: an example from the Proterozoic Penganga Group, Pranhita Godavari Valley, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Joydip; Chaudhuri, Asru K.

    2003-03-01

    The unmetamorphosed Proterozoic succession dominated by deep-water lithographic limestone and shale in the western flank of the Pranhita-Godavari Valley is designated as the Penganga Group. The succession in different parts of the Valley includes the Pranhita Sandstone (25-400 m), the Chanda Limestone (300 m), and the Sat Nala Shale (>2000 m) in ascending order. The Pranhita Sandstone and the Chanda Limestone reveal considerable variations in the character of the stratal packages and depositional settings from Mancherial in the south to Adilabad in the north. The Sat Nala Shale in both southern and northern outcrop belts is completely devoid of sand. It is brown to purple in colour and resembles present-day deep-water mud deposits. In the Mancherial area, the Pranhita Sandstone consists of 25-400 m thick conglomerate, pebbly red arkose and quartzose sandstone succession of coastal alluvial fan to shallow shelf origin. The Chanda Limestone is micritic and locally includes interbedded lenses of cross-stratified quartzose sandstone in the lower part. The depositional milieu varies from shallow shelf to below wave base outer ramp carbonate platform. Around Adilabad, the Pranhita Sandstone (25 m) lacks the conglomerate-pebbly arkose association at the base and comprises only quartzose sandstone and shale of shoreface to muddy shelf settings. The Chanda Limestone is essentially micritic but, in contrast to the Mancherial area, includes several interbedded intervals of slope-related, autoclastic debris flow limestone conglomerates and calciturbidites, and represents deep, outer ramp to slope and basinal settings. A predominantly deep-water micritic limestone and deep-water shale succession suggests that the Penganga basin evolved to a vast, deep epicratonic sea connected to an open ocean. The absence of a coastal alluvial fan association at the lower part of the Pranhita Sandstone and presence of a slope to basinal association in the Chanda Limestone in the northern

  11. Channel Extension in Deep-Water Distributive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyal, D. C.; Sheets, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    acceleration to Fr'-critical conditions and the formation of a depositional hydraulic jump, which perturbs sediment transport and ends channel extension. Similar morphodynamic length scale controls are observed in shallow water fan-delta experiments (e.g., SAFL DB-03) and in 2-D depositional cyclic steps. The experiments seem to explain two interesting observations from the earlier self-organized fan experiments and from real submarine fans. Firstly, the observation of 'perched' fills at the steep entrances to salt withdrawal minibasins (e.g., in the Gulf of Mexico) suggesting higher sedimentation rates (or inefficient sediment transport) on higher slopes (initially higher than at the slope break downstream). Secondly, strong progradation as the fan evolves and slope decreases in 'perched' fans suggests increasing flow efficiency on lower slopes, at least over a certain window of parameter space. Apparently deep water systems have a tendency to self-regulate even when flows differ significantly in initial density. The observed modulation to Fr'-critical flow appears to be an important control on length scales in deep- water distributive channel systems, potentially explaining strong deepwater progradation or 'delta-like' patterns that have remained paradoxical. Near critical conditions have been inferred from observations of many active submarine fans but the extent to which these results from conservative density currents apply to non-conservative and potentially 'ignitive' turbidity currents is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  12. Modeling Stratigraphic Architecture of Deep-water Deposits Using a Small Unmanned Aircraft: Neogene Thin-bedded Turbidites, East Coast Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminski, N.; Graham, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the outstanding challenges of field geology is inaccessibility of exposure. The ability to view and characterize outcrops that are difficult to study from the ground is greatly improved by aerial investigation. Detailed stratigraphic architecture of such exposures is best addressed by using advances and availability of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) that can safely navigate from high-altitude overviews of study areas to within a meter of the exposure of interest. High-resolution photographs acquired at various elevations and azimuths by sUAS are then used to convert field measurements to digital representations in three-dimensions at a fine scale. Photogrammetric software is used to capture complex, detailed topography by creating digital surface models with a range imaging technique that estimates three-dimensional structures from two-dimensional image sequences. The digital surface model is overlain by detailed, high-resolution photography. Pairing sUAS technology with readily available photogrammetry software that requires little processing time and resources offers a revolutionary and cost-effective methodology for geoscientists to investigate and quantify stratigraphic and structural complexity of field studies from the convenience of the office. These methods of imaging and modeling remote outcrops are demonstrated in the East Coast Basin, New Zealand, where wave-cut platform exposures of Miocene deep-water deposits offer a unique opportunity to investigate the flow processes and resulting characteristics of thin-bedded turbidite deposits. Stratigraphic architecture of wavecut platform and vertically-dipping exposures of these thin-bedded turbidites is investigated with sUAS coupled with Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry software. This approach allows the geometric and spatial variation of deep-water architecture to be characterized continuously along 2,000 meters of lateral exposure, as well as to measure and quantify cyclic

  13. Super-High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection-Based Analysis of the Late Pleistocene- Holocene Highstand-Active Newport Channel and Its Distributaries, Southern California Borderland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temeng, A.; Covault, J. A.; Paull, C. K.; Ryan, H.; Sliter, R.; Graham, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Super-high-resolution multibeam bathymetry (vertical resolution of 0.15-m and horizontal resolution of 1 m at 50 m survey altitude) and chirp seismic-reflection profiles (3.5 kHz; vertical resolution of 0.11 m) were collected by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) in order to examine fine-scale details of the Holocene-active Newport channel and its distributaries offshore southern California. The resolution afforded by these data greatly exceeds industry-standard multichannel seismic- reflection data (typically 10 to 25 m vertical resolution). Recently acquired sparker data (100 to 4000 Hz), older Huntec deep-tow boomer (800 to 1200 Hz) and WesternGeco multichannel seismic-reflection data collected since the 1970's are available to analyze coarser-scale channel geometry and longer-term depositional evolution. As many as 48 radiocarbon ages from 16 piston cores are available in order to establish a chronostratigraphic framework for the latest Pleistocene and Holocene. Data show up to three coalescing, southwestward-trending, low-relief distributary channels at 800 m water depth in the western survey, whose features stand in sharp contrast with gentle, nearly flat topography in the eastern survey. The surveys are separated by the left-lateral Carlsbad Ridge Fault. Chirp profiles show the cut-and-fill organization of distributary channel-filling turbidites, which have an average thickness of ~ 2 m. Distributary channels are depressions < 1 km wide, with relief < 4 m from channel floor to levee top. The aim of this research is to study the stratigraphic architecture of these coalescing distributary channels and characterize their avulsion and depositional history and relationship to the main Newport channel. Additionally, the fine-scale stratigraphic architecture will be correlated with well-documented southern California allogenic influences of sedimentation, including climate, basin tectonics and sea level. This study

  14. Facies variability of transgressive and regressive systems of gravity deposits in deep-water carbonates (Mesozoic, French Alps)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, S.; Dromart, G. )

    1991-03-01

    From the several tens of depositional sequences that can be platform-to-basin traced in the Mesozoic of the Vocontian Trough and nearby platforms, the following rules may be set: (1) there are two basic systems of gravity deposits - a regressive one and a transgressive one - but unequally developed depending on sequences; (2) thick bundles of bioclastic turbidites, tied to parasequence channels and representing 'shingled turbidites,' are emplaced mainly at the basis of lowstand systems tracts, but may last the whole low stand; the complex organization of siliciclastic fans is not found; (3) debris-flow deposits, as a result of catastrophic margin collapses, are almost always within transgressive systems tracts; (4) slumps deposits are scattered throughout when frequent; when scarce, they are mainly within transgressive systems tracts, and replace debris flow deposits; (5) Upper Jurassic to Berriasian 'resedimentation breccias,' a peculiar type of gravity deposits, are emplaced at both rises and falls in relative sea level, and cannot be used as reliable markers of sequence boundaries; and (6) both transgressive and regressive gravity systems are more developed during second order lowstands in sea level marked by strong carbonate platform progradation. As a whole, third order transgressive gravity systems are often more developed than regressive ones. Comparisons with siliciclastic depositional systems suggest that sandstone turbidites could be transgressive systems, as a result of stronger parasequential ( glacio-eustatic) high-frequency oscillations during third order rises in relative sea level.

  15. Impact of structural and autocyclic basin-floor topography on the depositional evolution of the deep-water Valparaiso forearc basin, central Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laursen, J.; Normark, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Valparaiso Basin constitutes a unique and prominent deep-water forearc basin underlying a 40-km by 60-km mid-slope terrace at 2.5-km water depth on the central Chile margin. Seismic-reflection data, collected as part of the CONDOR investigation, image a 3-3.5-km thick sediment succession that fills a smoothly sagged, margin-parallel, elongated trough at the base of the upper slope. In response to underthrusting of the Juan Ferna??ndez Ridge on the Nazca plate, the basin fill is increasingly deformed in the seaward direction above seaward-vergent outer forearc compressional highs. Syn-depositional growth of a large, margin-parallel monoclinal high in conjunction with sagging of the inner trough of the basin created stratal geometries similar to those observed in forearc basins bordered by large accretionary prisms. Margin-parallel compressional ridges diverted turbidity currents along the basin axis and exerted a direct control on sediment depositional processes. As structural depressions became buried, transverse input from point sources on the adjacent upper slope formed complex fan systems with sediment waves characterising the overbank environment, common on many Pleistocene turbidite systems. Mass failure as a result of local topographic inversion formed a prominent mass-flow deposit, and ultimately resulted in canyon formation and hence a new focused point source feeding the basin. The Valparaiso Basin is presently filled to the spill point of the outer forearc highs, causing headward erosion of incipient canyons into the basin fill and allowing bypass of sediment to the Chile Trench. Age estimates that are constrained by subduction-related syn-depositional deformation of the upper 700-800m of the basin fill suggest that glacio-eustatic sea-level lowstands, in conjunction with accelerated denudation rates, within the past 350 ka may have contributed to the increase in simultaneously active point sources along the upper slope as well as an increased

  16. The Porcupine Bank Canyon coral mounds: oceanographic and topographic steering of deep-water carbonate mound development and associated phosphatic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, A.; Akhmetzhanov, A.; Monteys, X.; Ivanov, M.

    2012-06-01

    . Evidently, slope breaks such as escarpments and deep-water canyon headwalls are important structural elements in the development of mature carbonate mounds induced by deep-water coral growth. Stable isotope data show no evidence of methane-derived carbon in the carbonates and lithified sediments of the Porcupine Bank Canyon mounds.

  17. Depositional environments of late glacial to Holocene sediments on the deep water levees of Setúbal and Nazaré Canyons, offshore Portugal: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoletti, F. C.; Masson, D.; Innocenti, C.

    2010-12-01

    The west Iberian margin is indented by a network of submarine canyons that create rugged seafloor morphology and act as major pathways for the transport of sediment from land to the abyssal plains. The Setúbal and Nazaré Canyons are part of this complex environment and strongly influence sediment distribution, capturing sediments from the Tagus River and the littoral cell transport respectively. Deep submarine sedimentary sequences thus reflect changes in sediment input and depositional environments. The high-resolution sedimentological study here presented was applied in four cores of the deep water levees of Nazaré and Setúbal Canyons in order to explore how sediment input to the canyons changed during the last glacial - interglacial transition, and how this reflects changing environmental conditions on land. By means of non-destructive corelogger measurements and analyses of spectral signatures, geochemical compositions and colour variations, it was possible to identify ice-rafted debris (IRD) deposits, to characterize hemipelagic and turbidite layers and to investigate terrestrial-derived sediments input variation during the last 26 ka. Preliminary results from the sedimentological and turbidite frequency analyses show that highest turbidite occurrence is recorded during the glacial stage, confirming that the generation of turbidity flows in submarine canyons is tightly related to low sea-level stands. We found that major peaks in frequency and thickness of turbidite deposits in the deep Portuguese margin are mainly coeval with abrupt climatic (H2 and 1) and sea-level changes (~ 19 and ~ 23 ka BP), as a consequence of which a major amount of continentally-derived material was transported into the deep sea. During the Holocene, the inception of sea-level rises, independent of their magnitude, has been found to be sufficient to generate turbidity currents, particularly in the Nazaré system. Moreover, a multiple regression analysis was attempted in order to

  18. Interplay between river discharge and tides in a delta distributary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Nicoletta; Kolker, Alexander S.; Fagherazzi, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    The hydrodynamics of distributary channels has tremendous impact on nutrient and dissolved oxygen circulation, transport of sediments, and delta formation and evolution; yet many processes acting at the river-marine interface of a delta are poorly understood. This paper investigates the combined effect of river hydrograph and micro-tides on the hydrodynamics of a delta distributary. As the ratio between river flow to tidal flow increases, tidal flood duration at the distributary mouth decreases, up to the point when flow reversal is absent. Field measurements in a distributary of the Apalachicola Delta, Florida, USA, reveal that, once the flow becomes unidirectional, high-discharge events magnify tidal velocity amplitudes. On the contrary, while the flow is bidirectional, increasing fluvial discharge decreases tidal velocity amplitudes down to a minimum value, reached at the limit between bidirectional and unidirectional flow. Due to the different response of the system to tides, the transition from a bidirectional to a unidirectional flow triggers a change in phase lag between high water and high water slack. In the presence of high riverine flow, tidal dynamics also promote seaward directed Eulerian residual currents. During discharge peaks, these residual currents almost double mean velocity values. Our results show that, even in micro-tidal environments, tides strongly impact distributary hydrodynamics during both high and low fluvial discharge regimes.

  19. Integrated biostratigraphy of foraminifers, radiolarians and conodonts in shallow and deep water Middle Permian (Capitanian) deposits of the "Rader slide", Guadalupe Mountains, West Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestell, M.K.; Nestell, G.P.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Sweatt, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    A diverse assemblage of microfossils is present in a 6m thick sequence of three debris flow deposits interbedded with thin turbidite limestone beds and fine grained siliciclastics exposed above the megaconglomerate in a section (known as the "Rader Slide" in numerous guidebook stops) of the Rader Limestone Member of the Bell Canyon Formation of Capitanian age (Middle Permian) in the Guadalupe Mountains of West Texas. Each debris flow, derived from nearby Capitan Reef shelf-margin and slope deposits, contains a distinct microfossil assemblage. Small foraminifers and fusulinaceans, conodonts, radiolarians, sponge spicules, fish dermal plates and teeth, and other fragmental fossils are present in this sequence. Conodonts are relatively scarce in the first (or lowest) debris flow, except in its upper part, but they are common to abundant in the other two debris flows, and very abundant in several of the thin turbidite limestone beds. All of the conodonts present appear to be morphotypes of one population of the species Jinogondolella postserrata, except for one new conodont species, and the Jinogondolella postserrata Zone is clearly documented in this sequence. The debris flows contain the fusulinaceans Rauserella, rare Codonofusiella, Polydiexodina, Leella? and various species of the small foraminifers Globivalvulina, Hemigordius, Baisalina, Abadehella, Deckerella, Neoendothyranella, Vachardella, Geinitzina, and Polarisella. Some of the thin turbidite limestone beds contain a foraminiferal assemblage similar to that found in the debris flows, but with lower diversity. Many small foraminiferal species appear to be endemic, although a few are closely related to species known in Permian age strata in Italy, Greenland, the Russian Far East, northeastern part of Russia (Omolon massif), and the Zechstein of Germany and the Baltic area. Two thin limestone beds above the second debris flow contain primarily radiolarian species known from the Follicucullus japonicus Zone of

  20. Post-rift tectonic reactivation and its effect on deep-water deposits in the Qiongdongnan Basin, northwestern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Kainan; Xie, Xinong; Xie, Yuhong; Ren, Jianye; Chen, Hui

    2015-09-01

    The post-rift evolution of extensional basins is traditionally thought to be dominated by thermal subsidence due to cessation of the major fault activity during the post-rift stage. The Qiongdongnan Basin, which is located in the northwestern continental margins of the South China Sea, has exhibited significant deviations from typical post-rift characteristics. In the basin, a distinct tectonic reactivation occurred since the Late Miocene (11.6 Ma). Three notable aspects of the observed tectonic reactivation during the post-rift stage include, (1) pre-existing fault reactivation, (2) multiple large-scale magmatic intrusions, and (3) rapid post-rift subsidence. During this period the basin infill significantly changed in depositional environments shifting rapidly from littoral-neritic to bathyal-abyssal environments since Late Miocene. The pre-existing fault activity along the No. 2 fault of the basin resulted in the formation of initial shelf breaks and led to the development of continental slope. In addition, the pre-existing faults along the Central Depression zone created a small sub-basin with distinctive axial negative topography characteristics formed between structural highs. These geomorphological changes led to the formation of the Central Canyon. Large-scale magmatic intrusions occurred along the fault zone in the Central Depression of the basin during the post-rift stage. Those deviations, as evidenced from pre-existing fault reactivation, magmatic intrusions, and rapid post-rift subsidence in the Qiongdongnan Basin is believed to be related to the Hainan Plume event.

  1. Deep water recycling through time

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Valentina; Bouilhol, Pierre; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dehydration processes in subduction zones and their implications for the water cycle throughout Earth's history. We use a numerical tool that combines thermo-mechanical models with a thermodynamic database to examine slab dehydration for present-day and early Earth settings and its consequences for the deep water recycling. We investigate the reactions responsible for releasing water from the crust and the hydrated lithospheric mantle and how they change with subduction velocity (vs), slab age (a) and mantle temperature (Tm). Our results show that faster slabs dehydrate over a wide area: they start dehydrating shallower and they carry water deeper into the mantle. We parameterize the amount of water that can be carried deep into the mantle, W (×105 kg/m2), as a function of vs (cm/yr), a (Myrs), and Tm (°C):. We generally observe that a 1) 100°C increase in the mantle temperature, or 2) ∼15 Myr decrease of plate age, or 3) decrease in subduction velocity of ∼2 cm/yr all have the same effect on the amount of water retained in the slab at depth, corresponding to a decrease of ∼2.2×105 kg/m2 of H2O. We estimate that for present-day conditions ∼26% of the global influx water, or 7×108 Tg/Myr of H2O, is recycled into the mantle. Using a realistic distribution of subduction parameters, we illustrate that deep water recycling might still be possible in early Earth conditions, although its efficiency would generally decrease. Indeed, 0.5–3.7 × 108 Tg/Myr of H2O could still be recycled in the mantle at 2.8 Ga. Key Points Deep water recycling might be possible even in early Earth conditions We provide a scaling law to estimate the amount of H2O flux deep into the mantle Subduction velocity has a a major control on the crustal dehydration pattern PMID:26321881

  2. Early Oligocene initiation of North Atlantic Deep Water formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard; Cartwright, Joseph; Pike, Jennifer; Line, Charles

    2001-04-01

    Dating the onset of deep-water flow between the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans is critical for modelling climate change in the Northern Hemisphere and for explaining changes in global ocean circulation throughout the Cenozoic era (from about 65 million years ago to the present). In the early Cenozoic era, exchange between these two ocean basins was inhibited by the Greenland-Scotland ridge, but a gateway through the Faeroe-Shetland basin has been hypothesized. Previous estimates of the date marking the onset of deep-water circulation through this basin-on the basis of circumstantial evidence from neighbouring basins-have been contradictory, ranging from about 35 to 15 million years ago. Here we describe the newly discovered Southeast Faeroes drift, which extends for 120km parallel to the basin axis. The onset of deposition in this drift has been dated to the early Oligocene epoch (~35 million years ago) from a petroleum exploration borehole. We show that the drift was deposited under a southerly flow regime, and conclude that the initiation of deep-water circulation from the Norwegian Sea into the North Atlantic Ocean took place much earlier than is currently assumed in most numerical models of ancient ocean circulation.

  3. Early Oligocene initiation of North Atlantic Deep Water formation.

    PubMed

    Davies, R; Cartwright, J; Pike, J; Line, C

    2001-04-19

    Dating the onset of deep-water flow between the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans is critical for modelling climate change in the Northern Hemisphere and for explaining changes in global ocean circulation throughout the Cenozoic era (from about 65 million years ago to the present). In the early Cenozoic era, exchange between these two ocean basins was inhibited by the Greenland-Scotland ridge, but a gateway through the Faeroe-Shetland basin has been hypothesized. Previous estimates of the date marking the onset of deep-water circulation through this basin-on the basis of circumstantial evidence from neighbouring basins-have been contradictory, ranging from about 35 to 15 million years ago. Here we describe the newly discovered Southeast Faeroes drift, which extends for 120 km parallel to the basin axis. The onset of deposition in this drift has been dated to the early Oligocene epoch ( approximately 35 million years ago) from a petroleum exploration borehole. We show that the drift was deposited under a southerly flow regime, and conclude that the initiation of deep-water circulation from the Norwegian Sea into the North Atlantic Ocean took place much earlier than is currently assumed in most numerical models of ancient ocean circulation. PMID:11309613

  4. Surface water-groundwater connectivity in deltaic distributary channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Audrey H.; Edmonds, Douglas A.; Knights, Deon

    2015-12-01

    Delta distributary channel networks increase river water contact with sediments and provide the final opportunity to process nutrients and other solutes before river water discharges to the ocean. In order to understand surface water-groundwater interactions at the scale of the distributary channel network, we created three numerical deltas that ranged in composition from silt to sand using Delft3D, a morphodynamic flow and sediment transport model. We then linked models of mean annual river discharge to steady groundwater flow in MODFLOW. Under mean annual discharge, exchange rates through the numerical deltas are enhanced relative to a single-threaded river. We calculate that exchange rates across a <10 km2 network are equivalent to exchange through ~10-100 km of single-threaded river channel. Exchange rates are greatest in the coarse-grained delta due to its permeability and morphology. Groundwater residence times range from hours to centuries and have fractal tails. Deltas are vanishing due to relative sea level rise. River diversion projects aimed at creating new deltaic land should also aim to restore surface water-groundwater connectivity, which is critical for biogeochemical processing in wetlands. We recommend designing diversions to capture more sand and thus maximize surface water-groundwater connectivity.

  5. Biology of deep-water chondrichthyans: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, C. F.; Grubbs, R. D.

    2015-05-01

    Approximately half of the known chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays, and chimaeras), 575 of 1207 species (47.6%, Table 1), live in the deep ocean (below 200 m), yet little is known of the biology or life histories of most of these fishes (Kyne and Simpfendorfer, 2007). The limited information available for deep-water chondrichthyans is compounded by their rarity, as well as the prevalent uncertainty in the alpha taxonomy of deep-water species. Many species are known only from the type materials, which are generally limited to nondestructive sampling, e.g., morphometrics, imaging (X-ray, MRI, CT scanning). Thus, research has been hindered by a lack of specimens available for investigation that requires destructive sampling or live specimens (e.g., life history, diet, telemetry). The need for more research and dissemination of information about deep-water chondrichthyans has become imperative as fisheries worldwide continue to expand into deeper waters and exploit deep-water stocks, usually in the absence of data required for appropriate management (Morato et al., 2006; Kyne and Simpfendorfer, 2010).

  6. Controlling Deep Water Renewal in Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimitri, C.; Schmid, M.; Wuest, A.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Baikal is the most voluminous and deepest fresh water body on earth. Despite its great depth, about 1.6 Km and its permanent stratification below ~300 m, the lake supports a remarkable biodiversity with a major deep-water fauna composed almost entirely of endemic species. A key element contributing to this unique ecosystem is the high oxygen concentration observed throughout the water column. This extraordinary feature is sustained by regular deep water renewal. The South Basin of the lake has been monitored with moored thermistors for more than a decade. By analyzing the obtained data series we investigate the importance of coastal downwelling and of the subsequent thermobaric instability to the renewal. We study how the local wind field, the ice coverage and the stratification of the upper water layers can control the deep water state. Understanding the deep water renewal mechanism is an important prerequisite for studying biochemical cycles, for predicting the effects of climate change on this unique ecosystem and for evaluating the local climate history from the extraordinary sedimentary record of Lake Baikal.

  7. Potential flood hazards and hydraulic characteristics of distributary-flow areas in Maricopa County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hjalmarson, H.W.

    1994-01-01

    Flood hazards of distributary-flow areas in Maricopa County, Arizona, can be distinguished on the basis of morphological features. Five distributary-flow areas represent the range of flood-hazard degree in the study area. Descriptive factors, including the presence of desert varnish and the absence of saguaro cactus, are more useful than traditional hydraulic-based methods in defining hazards. The width, depth, and velocity exponents of the hydraulic-geometry relations at the primary diffluences of the sites are similar to theoretical exponents for streams with cohesive bank material and the average exponents of stream channels in other areas in the United States. Because of the unexplained scatter of the values of the exponent of channel width, however, the use of average hydraulic-geometry relations is con- sidered inappropriate for characterizing flood hazards for specific distributary-flow in Maricopa County. No evidence has been found that supports the use of stochastic modeling of flows or flood hazards of many distributary-flow areas. The surface of many distributary-flow areas is stable with many distributary channels eroded in the calcreted surface material. Many distributary- flow areas do not appear to be actively aggrading today, and the paths of flow are not changing.

  8. Hawaii Deep Water Cable Program: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1990-09-01

    The Hawaii Deep Water Cable Program has succeeded unequivocally in determining the feasibility of deploying a submarine power cable system between the islands of Hawaii and Oahu. Major accomplishments of the program include designing, fabricating and testing an appropriate power cable, developing an integrated system to control all aspects of the cable laying operation, and testing all deployment systems at sea in the most challenging sections of the route.

  9. ROV drilling support for deep water

    SciTech Connect

    Shatto, H.L.

    1984-05-01

    A neutrally buoyant, cage deployed, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was selected to provide drilling support for Shell's deep water exploration program with the Discoverer Seven Seas. This dual vehicle system, designed for severe currents, rough seas and more than twice the water depth of previous such systems, was in operation one year after the request for quote. The basis for its selection and its performance and evaluation for the first seven months of operation are covered here.

  10. Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G. )

    1996-01-01

    The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T[sub a], T[sub b], T[sub c], T[sub d], and T[sub e] divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub a][close quotes]) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., [open quotes]T[sub b], T[sub c] and T[sub d][close quotes]). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term [open quotes]high-density turbidity current[close quotes] commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies

  11. Perception vs. reality in deep-water exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1996-12-31

    The common perception in exploration is that deep-water sands are predominantly a product of low- and high-density turbidity currents, and that submarine-fan models with channel/levee and lobe elements are the norm. The reality, however, is that deep-water systems are extremely complex and variable in terms of depositional processes and sand-body geometries. For example, the Bourna Sequence, composed of T{sub a}, T{sub b}, T{sub c}, T{sub d}, and T{sub e} divisions, is believed to be the product of a turbidity current. However, recent core and outcrop studies show that the complete and partial Bouma sequences also can be explained by processes other than turbidity currents, such as sandy debris flows (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub a}{close_quotes}) and bottom-current reworking (i.e., {open_quotes}T{sub b}, T{sub c} and T{sub d}{close_quotes}). Massive sands are interpreted routinely as high-density turbidites, but the reality is that the term {open_quotes}high-density turbidity current{close_quotes} commonly refers to sandy debris flow in terms of flow theology and sediment-support mechanism. Deep-water sequences in the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Offshore Gabon, Offshore Nigeria, Gulf of Mexico, and the Ouachita Mountains are generally considered to be turbidite-rich submarine fans. However, the reality is that these sequences are composed predominantly of sandy slumps and debris flows, not turbidites. Fan models are attractive to explorationists because of their predictable sheet-like geometries; however, these simplistic conceptual models are obsolete because they defy reality. Although the turbidite paradigm is alive and well for now in the minds of many sedimentologists and sequence stratigraphers, the turbidites themselves that form the foundation for fan models are becoming an endangered facies!

  12. Delta distributary dynamics in the Skagit River Delta (Washington, USA): Extending, testing, and applying avulsion theory in a tidal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, W. Gregory

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of historical aerial photos shows that Skagit Delta (Washington, USA) distributary dynamics are consistent with the Slingerland and Smith model of avulsion dynamics where the ratio of the water surface slopes of the two branches of a bifurcation predicts avulsion stability. This model was extended to predict distributary inlet (upstream) width and bankfull cross-sectional area. The water surface gradient ratio for a bifurcation pair predicted distributary width well; the lowest R2 was 0.61 for the 1937 data points, but R2 ranged from 0.83 to 0.90 for other year-specific regression lines. Gradient ratios were not constant over the historical record; from 1937 to 1972 the mainstem river channel lengthened by 1250 m in the course of marsh progradation, while distributary lengthening was comparatively negligible. Consequently, the gradient advantage of the distributaries increased and their channels widened. After the mainstem river terminus stabilized from 1972 to the present, the distributaries continued to lengthen with marsh progradation, so that distributary gradient advantage steadily declined and the distributaries narrowed. While distributary cross sections were not available for the historical period, they were surveyed in 2007 near the distributary inlets. Gradient ratio was more closely related to distributary inlet bankfull cross-sectional area ( R2 = 0.95) than to minimum distributary width for any photo year examined. Applying this form of analysis to Skagit Delta distributaries that have been dammed in the course of agricultural development suggests that their restoration to stabilize eroding marshes at their outlets and recover salmon migration pathways would be feasible without significant risk of full river avulsion.

  13. Hydraulic and sediment transport properties of autogenic avulsion cycles on submarine fans with supercritical distributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul B.; Strom, Kyle B.; Hoyal, David C. J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Submarine fans, like other distributive systems, are built by repeated avulsion cycles. However, relative to deltas and alluvial fans, much less is known about avulsions in subaqueous settings. In this study, we ran a set of subaqueous fan experiments to investigate the mechanics associated with autogenic avulsion cycles of self-formed channels and lobe deposits on steep slopes. The experiments used saline density currents with crushed plastic to emulate sustained turbidity currents and bed load transport. We collected detailed hydraulic and bathymetric measurements and made use of a 1-D laterally expanding density current model to better understand different aspects of the avulsion cycle. Our results reveal three major components of the avulsion cycles: (1) distributary channel incision, extension, and stagnation; (2) mouth bar aggradation and hydraulic jump initiation; and (3) hydraulic jump sedimentation and upstream retreat. Interestingly, in all but one experiment, the avulsion cycles led to fans that remained perched above the basin slope break. Experimental data and hydraulic theory were used to unravel actual mechanics associated with cycles. We found that channels stopped extending into the basin due to a decay in sediment transport capacity relative to sediment supply and that the reduction in capacity was primarily an outcome of expansion-driven velocity reduction; dilution played a secondary role. Once channel extension ceased, mouth bar deposits aggraded to a thickness approximately equal to the critical step height needed to create a choked flow condition. The choke then initiated a hydraulic jump on the upstream side of the bar. Once formed, the jump detained a majority of the incoming sediment and forced the channel-to-lobe transition upstream, filling the channel with steep backset bedding and capping the entire channel with a mounded lobate deposit. These intrinsic processes repeated through multiple avulsion cycles to build the fan.

  14. Deep water riser system for offshore drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, H.L.

    1984-05-15

    A buoyant riser system for use in a deep water offshore drilling environment is anchored by a system of compliant guys below the active weather zone of the sea. A controllably buoyant housing of the system is submerged at a depth that is readily accessible to divers and includes a blow-out preventer (BOP) from which a suspended sub-riser leads to a well bore to which the sub-riser is coupled. Above the housing, a riser suspended from a floating drill rig is coupled to the BOP thereby communicating the drill rig directly with the well bore for drilling and well completion operations.

  15. Reservoir compartmentalization of deep-water Intra Qua Iboe sand (Pliocene), Edop field, offshore Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Hermance, W.E.; Olaifa, J.O.; Shanmugam, G.

    1995-08-01

    An integration of 3-D seismic and sedimentological information provides a basis for recognizing and mapping individual flow units within the Intra Qua Iboe (IQI) reservoir (Pliocene), Edop Field, offshore Nigeria. Core examination show the following depositional facies: A-Sandy slump/mass flow, B-Muddy slump/mass flow, C. Bottom current reworking. D-Non-channelized turbidity currents, E. Channelized (coalesced) turbidity currents. F-Channelized (isolated) turbidity currents, G-Pelagic/hemipelagic, H-Levee, I-Reworked slope, J-Wave dominated, and K-Tide dominated facies. With the exception of facies J and K, all these facies are of deep-water affinity. The IQI was deposited on an upper slope environment in close proximity to the shelf edge. Through time, as the shelf edge migrated scaward, deposition began with a channel dominated deep-water system (IQI 1 and 2) and progressed through a slump/debris flow dominated deep-water system (IQI 3, the principle reservoir) to a tide and wave dominated shallow-water system (IQI 4). Compositional and textural similarities between the deep-water facies result in similar log motifs. Furthermore, these depositional facies are not readily apparent as distinct seismic facies. Deep-water facies A, D, E, and F are reservoir facies, whereas facies B, C, G, H, and I are non-reservoir facies. However, Facies G is useful as a seismically mappable event throughout the study area. Mapping of these non-reservoir events provides the framework for understanding gross reservoir architecture. This study has resulted in seven defined reservoir units within the IQI, which serves as the architectural framework for ongoing reservoir characterization.

  16. Deep-water Circulation: Processes & Products (16-18 June 2010, Baiona): introduction and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Molina, Francisco Javier; Stow, Dorrik A. V.; Llave, Estefanía; Rebesco, Michele; Ercilla, Gemma; van Rooij, David; Mena, Anxo; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Voelker, Antje H. L.

    2011-12-01

    Deep-water circulation is a critical part of the global conveyor belt that regulates Earth's climate. The bottom (contour)-current component of this circulation is of key significance in shaping the deep seafloor through erosion, transport, and deposition. As a result, there exists a high variety of large-scale erosional and depositional features (drifts) that together form more complex contourite depositional systems on continental slopes and rises as well as in ocean basins, generated by different water masses flowing at different depths and at different speeds either in the same or in opposite directions. Yet, the nature of these deep-water processes and the deposited contourites is still poorly understood in detail. Their ultimate decoding will undoubtedly yield information of fundamental importance to the earth and ocean sciences. The international congress Deep-water Circulation: Processes & Products was held from 16-18 June 2010 in Baiona, Spain, hosted by the University of Vigo. Volume 31(5/6) of Geo-Marine Letters is a special double issue containing 17 selected contributions from the congress, guest edited by F.J. Hernández-Molina, D.A.V. Stow, E. Llave, M. Rebesco, G. Ercilla, D. Van Rooij, A. Mena, J.-T. Vázquez and A.H.L. Voelker. The papers and discussions at the congress and the articles in this special issue provide a truly multidisciplinary perspective of interest to both academic and industrial participants, contributing to the advancement of knowledge on deep-water bottom circulation and related processes, as well as contourite sedimentation. The multidisciplinary contributions (including geomorphology, tectonics, stratigraphy, sedimentology, paleoceanography, physical oceanography, and deep-water ecology) have demonstrated that advances in paleoceanographic reconstructions and our understanding of the ocean's role in the global climate system depend largely on the feedbacks among disciplines. New insights into the link between the biota of

  17. Characterization of the Distributary Fan in Holden NE Crater Using Stereo Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Aharonson, O.

    2004-03-01

    Here we present the results of our analysis of the distributary fan discovered in Holden NE crater by Malin and Edgett in 2003. We used stereopairs of MOC Narrow Angle images to derive topography on the 10-meter scale for this feature.

  18. Recharge mixing in a complex distributary spring system in the Missouri Ozarks, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toronto Springs is a complex distributary karst spring system with 11 perennial springs in the central Missouri Ozarks, USA. Carroll Cave (CC) and Wet Glaize Creek (WG) were previously identified as principal recharge sources. This study 1) characterized physical and chemical properties of the sprin...

  19. Pipelaying in deep water uses novel techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that laying crude oil pipelines in the deep waters off the coast of California required the use of a number of innovative construction techniques. From December 1991 to February 1992, Allseas Engineering BV, Delft, the Netherlands, installed a number of 12-, 14-, and 20-in. pipelines off the coast of California. The extreme water depth of more than 1,000 ft precluded the use of divers and required the use of a number of innovative installation techniques. The work was part of the Exxon-Santa Ynez project off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif. The field is located in depths to 1,200 ft. Novel installation techniques used in the pipelaying project included: Three diverless connection made in 1,155-ft of water using the deflect-to-connect method; Single-point lift made to allow connection of a flexible line; New type of I-tube was installed; An extensive testing program was conducted to prove the construction methods.

  20. Suspended sediment transport in distributary channel networks and its implication on the evolution of delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suying, Ou; hao, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Suspended sediment (SS) transport in distributary channels play an important role on the evolution of deltas and estuaries. Under the interactions between river discharge, tide, and bathymetry of Pearl River delta (PRD) in south China, the spatial and temporal characteristics of suspended sediment transport are investigated by using the field data of July 16 to 25, 1999 and February 7 to 15, 2001. The PRD, as one of the most complex tributary system in the world and composed of 324 transversal and longitudinal tributaries, with eight outlets to the three sub-estuaries, has higher suspended sediment load in middle delta including six outlets than in right and left tidal dominant channels of PRD, that is Humen channel and Yamen channel system. Under large river discharge of one flood in summer, the tidal averaged SS transport from channel to the estuaries, the SS concentration of middle delta is 10~20 times and the transport rate is 100~500 times of dry season. But the transport rate changes little between flood season and dry season in the upper channel system of Yamen and Humen, and in dry season the tidal averaged transport change direction from estuary to these channel systems. About 70~85% of total Pearl River SS load transport along the main channel of West River, then transport about 45~55% into the lower West river delta, about 30% of total SS load flushed into the Modaomen outlets. Under the bathymetry of branched channels, SS load which advected from the Pearl River and resuspended from bed, redistributed 4~8 times in the PRD and then cause the different changes of channels. It found that in flood season, the suspended sediment load from Pearl River including East, West, North River and Tanjiang, Liuxi River into the PRD is less than that discharged into the estuaries through eight outlets, which indicated the erosion in the channels of PRD especially in the lower part of PRD. Suspended sediment budget in dry season during neap-spring cycle indicated that

  1. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  2. Deep water dissolution in Marine Isotope Stage 3 from the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.

    2015-12-01

    The production, transport, deposition, and dissolution of carbonate profoundly implicate the global carbon cycle affect the inventory and distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DIC) and alkalinity (ALK), which drive atmospheric CO2 change on glacial-interglacial timescale. the process may provide significant clues for improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the global climate system. In this study, we calculate and analyze the foraminiferal dissolution index (FDX) and the fragmentation ratios of planktonic foraminifera over 60-25 ka based on samples from 17924 and ODP 1144 in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS) to reconstruct the deep water carbonate dissolution during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3). Result shows that the dissolution of carbonate increases gradually at 17924 but keeps stable at ODP 1144. The changes of FDX coincidence with that of fragmentation ratios at 17924 and ODP 1144 suggest both indexes can be used as reliable dissolving proxies of planktonic foraminifera. Comparing FDX and fragmentation ratios at both sites, we find the FDX and fragmentation ratios at 17924 are higher than those at 1144, indicating that carbonate dissolution is intenser in 17924 core during MIS 3. The increasing total percentage of both N. dutertrei and G. bulloides during MIS 3 reveals the rising primary productivity that may lead to deep water [CO32-] decrease. The slow down of thermohaline circulation may increase deep water residence time and accelerate carbonate dissolution. In addition, the covering of ice caps, iron supply and increased surface-water stratification also contribute to atmosphere CO2 depletion and [CO32-] decrease in deep water. In the meanwhile, regression result from colder temperature increases the input of ALK and DIC to the deep ocean and deepens the carbonate saturation depth, which makes the deep water [CO32-] rise. In ODP Site 1144, the decrease in [CO32-] caused by more CO2 restored in deep water is equal to the increase in

  3. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-08-12

    We are now entering the final stages of our ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342). We have now developed several techniques to help distinguish economic hydrocarbon deposits from false ''Fizz'' gas signatures. These methods include using the proper in situ rock and fluid properties, evaluating interference effects on data, and doing better constrained inversions for saturations. We are testing these techniques now on seismic data from several locations in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, we are examining the use of seismic attenuation as indicated by frequency shifts below potential reservoirs. During this quarter we have: Began our evaluation of our latest data set over the Neptune Field; Developed software for computing composite reflection coefficients; Designed and implemented stochastic turbidite reservoir models; Produced software & work flow to improve frequency-dependent AVO analysis; Developed improved AVO analysis for data with low signal-to-noise ratio; and Examined feasibility of detecting fizz gas using frequency attenuation. Our focus on technology transfer continues, both by generating numerous presentations for the upcoming SEG annual meeting, and by beginning our planning for our next DHI minisymposium next spring.

  4. Distributary-mouth bar development and role of submarine landslides in delta growth, South Pass, Mississippi delta

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, J.F.; Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.

    1984-11-01

    Submarine landslides play a major role in the development of distributary-mouth bars and are of major importance in transporting sediment from the bar front to deeper water along the Mississippi delta front. Historic maps of the South Pass of the Mississippi delta show that the bar advanced seaward more than 1 mi (1.6 km) between 1867 and 1953. Details of the growth of the bar have been elucidated using an elaborate computer modeling program to analyze these historic maps. The analysis has shown that the geometry of the bar was controlled by the dynamics of the freshwater plume of river water as it mixed with saline Gulf water. Approximately half the sediment deposited on the bar was moved into deeper water by submarine landslides. The underlying causes of bar failure were established during major floods with the deposition of thick blankets of unstable, watersaturated sediments on the bar front. Failure occurred one to four years later in response to a variety of triggering mechanisms, which either changed the shear strength of the sediment or modified local bottom slope. The triggering mechanisms include: major storms and hurricanes, mudlump activity, and possibly, increased pore pressures resulting from generation of biogenic gas. Bar growth and basinward movement of sediment thus represent a multilvariate problem that can be approached by means of a computer analysis of bathymetric data.

  5. Connectivity between surface and deep waters determines prokaryotic diversity in the North Atlantic Deep Water.

    PubMed

    Frank, Alexander H; Garcia, Juan A L; Herndl, Gerhard J; Reinthaler, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    To decipher the influence of depth stratification and surface provincialism on the dark ocean prokaryotic community composition, we sampled the major deep-water masses in the eastern North Atlantic covering three biogeographic provinces. Their diversity was evaluated using ordination and canonical analysis of 454 pyrotag sequences. Variance partitioning suggested that 16% of the variation in the bacterial community composition was based on depth stratification while 9% of the variation was due to geographic location. General linear mixed effect models showed that the community of the subsurface waters was connected to the dark ocean prokaryotic communities in different biogeographic provinces. Cluster analysis indicated that some prokaryotic taxa are specific to distinct regions in bathypelagic water masses. Taken together, our data suggest that the dark ocean prokaryotic community composition of the eastern North Atlantic is primed by the formation and the horizontal transport of water masses. PMID:26914787

  6. Partitioning of Water Discharge by Distributary Channels in the Prograding, Wax Lake Delta, Coastal Louisiana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttles, J.; Mohrig, D.; Nittrouer, J.; McElroy, B.; Baitis, E.; Allison, M.; Paola, C.; Parker, G.; Kim, W.

    2007-12-01

    How water and sediment is routed through distributary networks on river deltas is incompletely known and a topic of much active research. We have undertaken a study to determine the controls on partitioning of water and sediment discharge in distributary channels of the Wax Lake Delta and to connect these transport processes to the land building associated with the growth of islands that separate distributary channels from each other. Here we present first results from the field project that defines how water from the upstream primary channel is partitioned between the first set of five distributary channels. Measurements of water discharge and channel bathymetry were collected using a 22-ft research vessel equipped with an acoustic Doppler velocity profiler, a swath bathymetry profiler and dual differential GPS antennas. Wax Lake Delta is situated at the downstream end of Wax Lake Outlet, a man-made channel that diverts water and sediment from the lower Atchafalaya River, roughly 20 km upstream from Morgan City, LA. The subaerial delta has been building out into Atchafalaya Bay since roughly 1973 with a delta-front advance rate of about 0.27 km/yr. Associated with this growth has been development of a distributary network of channels that continues to evolve as the delta progrades seaward. Measurements collected in May, 2007 define properties of the upstream channel and the first set of five distributary channels. Characteristic width, depth and water discharge for the upstream channel are 420 m, 21.2 m, and 2900 m3/s. Characteristic values for width, depth and water discharge for the five distributary channels are 1) 270 m, 6.7 m, and 310 m3/s, 2) 300 m, 6.5 m, and 350 m3/s, 3) 650 m, 6.8 m, and 820 m3/s, 4) 395 m, 6.5 m, and 560 m3/s, and 5) 440 m, 6.0 m, and 440 m3/s. These data highlight a number of interesting points regarding the initial set of bifurcations. First, the transition from one to five channels is associated with a two-thirds reduction in

  7. Response of the distributary channel of the Huanghe River estuary to water and sediment discharge regulation in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanyan; Li, Guangxue; Ye, Siyuan; Zhang, Zhiheng; Zhao, Guangming; Li, Jingyang; Zhou, Chunyan; Ding, Wenjie; Yang, Xin

    2010-11-01

    The water and sediment discharge regulation (WSDR) project, which has been performed since 2002 before flood season every year, is of great significance to the river management in China. Until 2007, six experiments have been fulfilled to evaluate the effect of the project on the natural environment. To fill the gap of investigations, a study on flood and suspended sediment transportation and channel changing along the distributary channel of the Huanghe (Yellow) River was conducted during the WSDR project period in 2007. The lower channel was scoured rapidly and the channel became unobstructed gradually several days after the flood peak water was discharged from the Xiaolangdi Reservoir. Within four days after the flood peak at 3 000 m3/s entered the distributary, the channel in the river mouth area was eroded quickly. Both the mean values of area and depth of the main channel were tripled, and the maximum flood carrying capacity increased to 5 500 m3/s or more. Then, the river channel was silted anew in a very short time after completion of the WSDR. Favored by the WSDR project, the river status in April 2008 became better than that of the year before. The adjustment ranges of main channel parameters were about 30%, 10%, and 10% at sections C2, Q4, and Q7, respectively. The process of rapid erosion-deposition was more active 15 km away in the channel from the river mouth due to the marine influence. It is reasonable for discharging sediment at concentration peak from Xiaolangdi Reservoir at the end of the flood peak. As a result, the sediment peak reached the river mouth about two days later than that of the water current. In addition, the WSDR project has improved the development of the estuarine wetland. Wetland vegetation planted along the river banks restrained the water flow as a strainer and improved the main channel stability. It is suggested to draw water at mean rate of 150 m3/s from the Huanghe River during flood periods, because at the rate the water in

  8. Deep-water anoxygenic photosythesis in a ferruginous chemocline.

    PubMed

    Crowe, S A; Maresca, J A; Jones, C; Sturm, A; Henny, C; Fowle, D A; Cox, R P; Delong, E F; Canfield, D E

    2014-07-01

    Ferruginous Lake Matano, Indonesia hosts one of the deepest anoxygenic photosynthetic communities on Earth. This community is dominated by low-light adapted, BChl e-synthesizing green sulfur bacteria (GSB), which comprise ~25% of the microbial community immediately below the oxic-anoxic boundary (OAB; 115-120 m in 2010). The size of this community is dependent on the mixing regime within the lake and the depth of the OAB-at ~117 m, the GSB live near their low-light limit. Slow growth and C-fixation rates suggest that the Lake Matano GSB can be supported by sulfide even though it only accumulates to scarcely detectable (low μm to nm) concentrations. A model laboratory strain (Chlorobaculum tepidum) is indeed able to access HS- for oxidation at nm concentrations. Furthermore, the GSB in Lake Matano possess a full complement of S-oxidizing genes. Together, this physiological and genetic information suggests that deep-water GSB can be supported by a S-cycle, even under ferruginous conditions. The constraints we place on the metabolic capacity and physiology of GSB have important geobiological implications. Biomarkers diagnostic of GSB would be a good proxy for anoxic conditions but could not discriminate between euxinic and ferruginous states, and though GSB biomarkers could indicate a substantial GSB community, such a community may exist with very little metabolic activity. The light requirements of GSB indicate that at light levels comparable to those in the OAB of Lake Matano or the Black Sea, GSB would have contributed little to global ocean primary production, nutrient cycling, and banded iron formation (BIF) deposition in the Precambrian. Before the proliferation of oxygenic photosynthesis, shallower OABs and lower light absorption in the ocean's surface waters would have permitted greater light availability to GSB, potentially leading to a greater role for GSB in global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:24923179

  9. Benthic foraminiferal distribution in deep-water periplatform carbonate environments

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    In contrast to clastic depositional environments, bathymetric distribution of benthic foraminifera in deep-water carbonate environments has been largely neglected. Approximately 260 species and morphotypes of benthic foraminifera were identified from 12 sediment samples (piston core top and grab) collected along two transverses approximately 25 km apart across the northern (windward) margin of Little Bahama Bank at depths of 275 to 1135 m. Most species exhibit great variation in abundance with depth. However, Globocassidulina subglobosa, Cibicides rugosus, and Cibicides wuellerstorfi are all reliable depth indicators (Spearman's r > 0.91; p < 0.005), being most abundant at depths > 1000 m, and correspond to lower slope (> 900 m) periplatform aprons. Individual foraminiferal suborders (Miliolina, Rotaliina, Textulariina) show no consistent depth-related trends. However, certain operational taxonomic groups, such as reef-dwelling peneroplids and soritids (suborder Miliolina) and rotaliines (suborder Rotaliina) are significant more abundant at depths < 300 m (95% C.I.: 2.6 +/- 2.2% and 6.9 +/- 2.7%, respectively) than at greater depths (95% C.I.: 0.3 +/- 0.2% and 2.0 +/- 0.8%; Mann-Whitney U, p < 0.01), reflecting downslope bottom transport in proximity to bank-margin reefs. Small miliolines (i.e., suborder Miliolina minus peneroplids and soritids) and rosalinids and discorbids (suborder Rotaliina) are also more abundant at depths < 300 m (95% C.I.: 27.5 +/- 7.4% and 32.6 +/- 8.5%, respectively) than at greater depths (95% C.I.: 10.0 +/- 3.9% and 1.5 +/- 1.6%; Mann-Whitney U, p < 0.01) and are winnowed from the carbonate platform. Assemblages exhibit greatest variation in diversity (species number, s; Shannon-Weaver, H'; evenness, J') at depths > 900 m; indices for shallower assemblages tend to be grouped more tightly at relatively high values.

  10. Geology of Sarawak deep water and its surroundings

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.I.; Mohamad, A.M.; Ganesan, M.S.; Aziz, S.A. )

    1994-07-01

    A geological and geophysical investigation based primarily on seismic data indicates that four tectonostratigraphic zonations are recognizable in the Sarawak deep water and its surroundings. Zone A is a 7-8-km-thick Tertiary sedimentary basin in Sarawak deep water characterized by north-south-trending buried hills, extensional fault-bounded features, and local occurrences of compressional structures, and is separated from the northwest Sabah platform (zone B) by a major north-south-trending basin margin fault. This margin fault is distinct from the northwest-southeast transform fault known as Baram-Tinjar Line. The northwest Sabah platform, an attenuated continental crust that underwent late Mesozoic-Tertiary crystal stretching and rifting, is characterized by northeast-southwest-tending rift systems and generally up to 4 km-thick sedimentary cover. The leading edge of the northwest Sabah platform that was subducted beneath the northwest Borneo crust is marked by the Sabah trough (zone C). The western Sarawak deep water is occupied by a 13-km-thick, north-south-trending basin, the west Luconia delta province (zone D), demonstrating post mid-Miocene deltaic growth faults and toe-thrusts. Crustal offsets of the South China Sea Basin, north-south-trending basin margin fault between zones A and B, and extensional and compressional structures in zone A are evidence for north-south-directed transform motions leading to the development of the Sarawak deep-water Tertiary basin. Four main sedimentation phases describe the sedimentation history in Sarawak deep water and its surroundings. Oligocene-Miocene coastal plain sediments form the main hydrocarbon plays in the Sarawak deep water, and the numerous occurrences of amplitude anomalies clearly suggest a working hydrocarbon charge system.

  11. Insulated flowline technology for deep water

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, R.N.; Hays, P.R.; Antani, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    Deepwater fields are economically developed using subsea completions, with hydrocarbon fluids typically conveyed via multiphase pipelines and flowlines to an existing shallow water host facility. These flowlines operate in a low ambient temperature, high external pressure environment, conducive to the formation of paraffin deposits or hydrates. The leading strategy to circumvent these deleterious effects is to minimize heat loss from the system using insulation. Since the experience base for such deepwater insulated flowlines is limited, the DeepStar 600 Committee on Pipelines, Flowlines, and Umbilicals initiated several studies during 1994--95, addressing three major categories of insulation systems: pipe-in-pipe systems, integrated towed flowline bundles, and non-jacketed systems. This paper helps to identify potentially viable systems, design techniques, emerging technologies, feasible materials, and technical limitations. The proper design of flowline insulation requires a balance among the high cost of the insulation, the intended operability of the system, and the acceptable risk level. The following information is presented to aid development planners and subsea flowline engineers interested in the development, applicability, and availability of this technology.

  12. Three new records of deep-water goniasterids (Echinodermata: Asteroidea: Goniasteridae) from China seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ning; Liao, Yulin

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, three deep-water species of the family Goniasteridae, Ceramaster misakiensis (Goto, 1914), Nymphaster arthrocnemis Fisher, 1913 and Pontioceramus grandis Fisher, 1911, are recorded for the first time from Chinese waters based on collections deposited in the Marine Biological Museum, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The specimens examined were collected during the period 1956 to 1978 from the East China and South China Seas at depths of 184 to 472 m. Diagnosis, detailed figures, and the geographic distributions are provided. A revised list of Goniasteridae recorded from Chinese waters is proposed.

  13. Recharge mixing in a complex distributary spring system in the Missouri Ozarks, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Benjamin V.; Lerch, Robert N.; Groves, Christopher G.; Polk, Jason S.

    2015-05-01

    Toronto Springs is a complex distributary karst spring system with 11 perennial springs in the Missouri Ozarks, USA. Carroll Cave (CC) and Wet Glaize Creek (WG) were previously identified as principal recharge sources. This study (1) characterized physical and chemical properties of springs and recharge sources; (2) developed end-member mixing models to estimate contributing proportions of CC and WG; and (3) created a conceptual model for the system. Samples analyzed for major ions and specific conductivity, in conjunction with a rotating continuous monitoring program to identify statistically comparable baseflow conditions, were used to assess differences among the sites. Monitoring data showed that the springs differed depending upon recharge proportions. Cluster analysis of average ion concentrations supported the choice of CC and WG as mixing model end members. Results showed a range in the proportions of the recharge sources, from surface-water to groundwater dominated. A conceptual model suggests that a system of distinct conduits beneath the WG flood plain transmits water to the individual springs. These conduits controlled the end-member recharge contributions and water chemistry of the springs. Interpretation of relative proportions of recharge contributions extends existing knowledge of karst hydrologic geometry beyond that of point-to-point connections to revealing complex surface-water/groundwater mixing in heterogeneous distributary spring systems.

  14. Early colonization of metazoans in the deep-water: Evidences from the lowermost Cambrian black shales of South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M.-Y.; Yang, A.-H.; Zhang, J.-M.; Li, G.-X.; Yang, X.-L.

    2003-04-01

    Diversity of metazoans is high in the deep-water of the present ocean. But it is unknown that when the metazoans began to colonize in the deep-water and what kinds of metazoans first colonized in the deep-water since origin and radiation of metazoans during the Precambrian-Cambrian transition interval. Up to the present, colonization of the deep-sea began in the Ordovician. Although it is suggested that animals were penetrated into the intermediate water depth during the Precambrian, evidences support such suggestion are based on the problematic Ediacaran-grade fossils. However, almost fossil materials that support the Cambrian Explosion hypothesis were discovered from the lowermost Cambrian shallow-water deposits. The abundant earliest Cambrian mineralized small shelly fossils (SSF) are globally from the shallow-water deposits, and the well-known Chengjiang fauna that may records most complete features of metazoans in the ocean after the Cambrian Explosion, occurs as well in the shallow basin near an old land on the Yangtze Platform. In order to understand ecology of the Cambrian Explosion time interval and how happened of the onshore-offshore trends of metazoans, we focused our attention on collecting fossils in the lowermost Cambrian deposits under the varied facies on the Yangtze Platformm during recent years. Investigations of the shallow-water carbonate facies and the oxygen-depleted deep-water black shale facies revealed additional biological and ecological information that are not recorded in the Chengjiang fauna in the siliclastic shallow-water facies. Here we report our discovery of a particular fossil association from more than 10 sections in the deep-water black shales (Qiongzhusian) in the out shelf and slope area of the Yangtze Platform. The fossil association is composed of pelagic and sessile organisms, including abundant sponges, 3 types of bivalved arthropods, 3 types of tubular animals and few problematic organisms. The fossils have either

  15. Composition and ecology of deep-water coral associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühlmann, D. H. H.

    1983-06-01

    Between 1966 and 1978 SCUBA investigations were carried out in French Polynesia, the Red Sea, and the Caribbean, at depths down to 70 m. Although there are fewer coral species in the Caribbean, the abundance of Scleractinia in deep-water associations below 20 m almost equals that in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The assemblages of corals living there are described and defined as deep-water coral associations. They are characterized by large, flattened growth forms. Only 6 to 7 % of the species occur exclusively below 20 m. More than 90 % of the corals recorded in deep waters also live in shallow regions. Depth-related illumination is not responsible for depth differentiations of coral associations, but very likely, a complex of mechanical factors, such as hydrodynamic conditions, substrate conditions, sedimentation etc. However, light intensity determines the general distribution of hermatypic Scleractinia in their bathymetric range as well as the platelike shape of coral colonies characteristic for deep water associations. Depending on mechanical factors, Leptoseris, Montipora, Porites and Pachyseris dominate as characteristic genera in the Central Pacific Ocean, Podabacia, Leptoseris, Pachyseris and Coscinarea in the Red Sea, Agaricia and Leptoseris in the tropical western Atlantic Ocean.

  16. A system of automated processing of deep water hydrological information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romantsov, V. A.; Dyubkin, I. A.; Klyukbin, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for primary and scientific analysis of deep water hydrological information is presented. Primary processing of the data in this system is carried out on a drifting station, which also calculates the parameters of vertical stability of the sea layers, as well as their depths and altitudes. Methods of processing the raw data are described.

  17. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-01-22

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  18. Seismic Evaluation of Hydorcarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-10-31

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  19. Productive lower Wilcox distributary channel sands of Hallettsville embayment, Lavaca County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Chuber, S.; Howell, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    Whole-core petrographic and micropaleontological analyses from four wells and subsurface studies in three new fields of the Hallettsville area define a heretofore unsuspected deltaic suite of facies in the lower Wilcox. Massive distributary channel sands up to 250 ft thick are interbedded with overbank silts and shales as well as marsh, crevasse-splay, and natural levee sediments. Sparse microfauna indicate a restricted marine, shallow neritic, or nonmarine facies with reworked Cretaceous forms. Three channels have been productive to date: the Renger and Golsch (gas bearing) and the Hathaway (oil bearing). Even with dipmeter, whole-core, and abundant seismic data available, the narrow, sinuous channel sands are difficult to locate. Once penetrated, however, the sands produce either oil or condensate-rich gas in copious amounts.

  20. Buried Distributaries as a Conduit for Groundwater Flow in Barataria Bay, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breaux, A.; Schneider, A.; Kolker, A.; Telfeyan, K.; Kim, J.; Johannesson, K. H.; Cable, J. E.; Coleman, D.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have focused on hydrological and geochemical fluxes to the ocean from land to the ocean via submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), however few have assessed these contributions of SGD in deltaic settings. The Mississippi River delta is the largest delta in North America, and the magnitude of groundwater that discharges from the River into its delta is relatively unknown. Hydrological budgets have indicated that there is a large magnitude of water lost in the Mississippi's Delta. Recent evidence in our study indicates that paleochannels, or semi-permeable buried sandy channels that were former distributaries of the River, allow for water to discharge out of the Mississippi's main channel and into its Delta. Our study uses geophysical data, including CHIRP and resistivity methods, to detect the location of these paleochannels in Barataria Bay, a coastal bay located in the Mississippi Delta. CHIRP data shows that these paleochannel features are ubiquitous in the Mississippi Delta, while resistivity data indicates that lower salinity water is found during high river flow in bays proximate to the River. Sediment core analysis is also used to characterize the area of study, as well as further understand the regional geology of the Mississippi Delta. The geophysical and sediment core data will be used to contextualize geochemical data collected in the field, which includes an assessment of major cations and anions, as well as in situ Rn-222 activities, a method that has been proven to be useful as a tracer of groundwater movement. The results may be useful in understanding potential global magnitude of hydrological and geochemical fluxes of other large rivers with abandoned distributaries.

  1. The Circulation of Newly Formed Deep Water in the Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhein, M.; Kieke, D.; Steinfeldt, R.

    2012-04-01

    The circulation of newly formed deep water masses (Labrador Sea Water, LSW, and Denmark Strait Overflow Water, DSOW) is examined by discussing the distribution of two parameters (age τ and fraction F of young water) calculated from the chlorofluorocarbon data measured between 1980 and 2005 in the Atlantic. Compared to previous studies, a much larger data set was used with an improved gridding procedure, allowing to resolve the distributions in more detail.

  2. Deep-sea channel/submarine-yazoo system of the Labrador Sea: A new deep-water facies model

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, R.; Rakofsky, A. )

    1992-05-01

    The deep-sea channel/submarine-yazoo system is a newly recognized deep-water depositional environment that is significantly different from previously documented turbidite environments. The new system is in many ways the antithesis of classical deep-sea fans. The purpose of this paper is to present the characteristics and elements of the system, develop a facies model for it, establish the system variables, and discuss its possible significance in the geologic record and in subsurface exploration. Previous investigators of deepwater turbidite sediments often faced difficulties in trying to fit their sequences into traditional single-source, deep-sea fan models. The present model fills part of an obvious gap in interpretation schemes for deep-water clastic sediments.

  3. Unidirectionally migrating deep-water channels: Architectural styles and flow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C.; Steel, R. J.; Wang, Y.; Xu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    3D seismic data are used to investigate flow processes and sedimentation in deep-water slope channels of an alternate type characterized by short and straight channel courses, a lack of levees, and absence of any coeval fans. The study allows a picture of unusual flow processes in submarine channels. The studied channels can be divided into two discrete segments: (1) Upper segments are characterized by low aspect ratio(W/T), little lateral offset (Lm), and low migration/aggradation ratios (Lm/Va). These upper segment channels build vertically-stacked channel-complex sets (CCSs), each of which is characterized by a facies transition from fine-grained sands in the lower part overlain by debris flow deposits and then shale drapes. Energetic sediment density flows triggered by fluid escape and/or strong wave action were well able to bypass sediment and to mask relatively weak bottom currents, yielding deep-water channels characterized by little lateral offset and dominantly aggradational stacking patterns. (2) Lower segments are characterized by higher W/T, wide lateral offset (Lm), and high Lm/Va. They consist of laterally-migrated CCSs, each of which consists of fine-grained reworked sands in the lower part overlain by debris flow deposits and, finally, shale drapes. Bottom currents restricted within the channels would have induced a tilt of the interface between turbidity currents and the overriding bottom currents (Wedderburn number > 1). This would have deflected turbidity currents downward and back toward the gentle channel bank, thus causing channel migration (the steep bank) by ~2° to 15°, and yielding a helical flow circulation composed of a high-velocity zone along the steep bank and a low-velocity zone along the gentle bank. This bottom current-induced helical flow circulation promoted deposition on the gentle bank, but it favored erosion on the steep banke, yielding deep-water channels exhibiting wide lateral offset and dominantly laterally

  4. Is Centrophorus squamosus a highly migratory deep-water shark?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cabello, Cristina; Sánchez, Francisco

    2014-10-01

    Deep-water sharks are considered highly vulnerable species due to their life characteristics and very low recovery capacity against overfishing. However, there is still limited information on the ecology or population connectivity of these species. The aim of this study was to investigate if the species Centrophorus squamosus could make long displacements and thus confirm the existence of connectivity between different deep-water areas. In addition, the study was the first attempt to use tagging techniques on deep-water sharks, since it has never been undertaken before. Five C. squamosus were tagged with satellite tags (PAT) in the El Cachucho Marine Protected Area (Le Danois Bank) located in waters of the North of Spain, Cantabrian Sea (NE Atlantic). Data from four of these tags were recovered. One of the sharks travelled approximately 287 nm toward the north east (French continental shelf) hypothetically following the continental slope at a mean depth of 901±109 m for 45 days. Two other sharks spent almost 4 months traveling, in which time they moved 143 and 168 nm, respectively, to the west (Galician coast). Finally, another leafscale gulper shark travelled to the NW (Porcupine Bank) during a period of 3 months at a mean depth of 940±132 m. Depth and temperature preferences for all the sharks are discussed. Minimum and maximum depths recorded were 496 and 1848 m, respectively. The temperature range was between 6.2 and 11.4 °C, but the mean temperature was approximately 9.9±0.7 °C. The sharks made large vertical displacements throughout the water column with a mean daily depth range of 345±27 m. These preliminary results support the suggestion of a whole population in the NE Atlantic and confirm the capacity of this species to travel long distances.

  5. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2006-01-30

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), our efforts have become focused on technology transfer. To this end, we completing our theoretical developments, generating recommended processing flows, and perfecting our rock and fluid properties interpretation techniques. Some minor additional data analysis and modeling will complete our case studies. During this quarter we have: Presented findings for the year at the DHI/FLUIDS meeting at UH in Houston; Presented and published eight papers to promote technology transfer; Shown how Rock and fluid properties are systematic and can be predicted; Shown Correct values must be used to properly calibrate deep-water seismic data; Quantified and examined the influence of deep water geometries in outcrop; Compared and evaluated hydrocarbon indicators for fluid sensitivity; Identified and documented inappropriate processing procedures; Developed inversion techniques to better distinguish hydrocarbons; Developed new processing work flows for frequency-dependent anomalies; and Evaluated and applied the effects of attenuation as an indicator. We have demonstrated that with careful calibration, direct hydrocarbon indicators can better distinguish between uneconomic ''Fizz'' gas and economic hydrocarbon reservoirs. Some of this progress comes from better characterization of fluid and rock properties. Other aspects include alternative techniques to invert surface seismic data for fluid types and saturations. We have also developed improved work flows for accurately measuring frequency dependent changes in seismic data that are predicted by seismic models, procedures that will help to more reliably identify anomalies associated with hydrocarbons. We have been prolific in publishing expanded abstracts and presenting results, particularly at the SEG. This year, we had eight such papers to promote technology transfer

  6. Laminated rubber articulated joint for the Deep Water Gravity Tower

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillot, F.; Stevenson, A.

    1983-12-01

    The Deep Water Gravity Tower is an articulated structure resting on a fixed base through an articulated joint which is composed of curved laminated rubber pads, made from alternate layers of rubber and metallic shims. The paper first outlines the main design concept with the articulated joint. Some analysis is then provided of the response to imposed rotation and vertical load. This includes a brief description of the results of a finite element analysis. The paper then reviews the test performed on laminated rubber during 1980 and 1981 to assess the feasibility of the articulation: fatigue tests; environmental tests (effect of sea water, temperature, pressure).

  7. Tidal impact on the division of river discharge over distributary channels in the Mahakam Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Maximiliano G.; Hoitink, A. J. F.; de Brye, Benjamin; Vermeulen, Bart; Deleersnijder, Eric

    2011-12-01

    Bifurcations in tidally influenced deltas distribute river discharge over downstream channels, asserting a strong control over terrestrial runoff to the coastal ocean. Whereas the mechanics of river bifurcations is well-understood, junctions in tidal channels have received comparatively little attention in the literature. This paper aims to quantify the tidal impact on subtidal discharge distribution at the bifurcations in the Mahakam Delta, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. The Mahakam Delta is a regular fan-shaped delta, composed of a quasi-symmetric network of rectilinear distributaries and sinuous tidal channels. A depth-averaged version of the unstructured-mesh, finite-element model second-generation Louvain-la-Neuve Ice-ocean Model has been used to simulate the hydrodynamics driven by river discharge and tides in the delta channel network. The model was forced with tides at open sea boundaries and with measured and modeled river discharge at upstream locations. Calibration was performed with water level time series and flow measurements, both spanning a simulation period. Validation was performed by comparing the model results with discharge measurements at the two principal bifurcations in the delta. Results indicate that within 10 to 15 km from the delta apex, the tides alter the river discharge division by about 10% in all bifurcations. The tidal impact increases seaward, with a maximum value of the order of 30%. In general, the effect of tides is to hamper the discharge division that would occur in the case without tides.

  8. Offshore oil & gas: Deep waters dominate in 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Pagano, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    Deep water exploration and field development dominate the energy market as 1997 begins. All indicators point that a turnaround in the oil and gas industry is in full swing. Strong market fundamentals are in place: the worldwide offshore mobile rig fleet is approaching full utilization of marketed rigs, which has tightened the supply/demand balance and boosted day rates for all types of drilling units. The exploration and production niche is in its healthiest shape in more than 15 years with a growth spurt in progress. The excess rig supply has disappeared and some market observers believe the present supply of deep water rigs needs to triple just to meet demand in the Gulf of Mexico market alone. There is evidence that some energy companies are delaying drilling programs because suitable rigs simply are not available. Floating rigs generally are working longer-term contracts with some units under contract until late in the decade. Analysts forecast a heated market over the next 12 to 18 months. Gas prices are expected to remain strong through 1997 and crude prices should hold steady.

  9. Deep water drilling risers in calm and harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Olufsen, A.; Nordsve, N.T.

    1994-12-31

    The overall objective of the work presented in this paper is to increase the knowledge regarding application of deep water drilling risers in different environmental conditions. Identification of key parameters and their impact on design and operation of deep water drilling risers are emphasized. Riser systems for two different cases are evaluated. These are: drilling offshore Nigeria in 1,200 m water depth; drilling at the Voering Plateau offshore Northern Norway in 1,500 m water depth. The case studies are mainly referring to requirements related to normal drilling operation of the riser. They are not complete with respect to describe of total riser system design. The objectives of the case studies have been to quantify the important of various parameters and to establish limiting criteria for drilling. Dynamic riser analyses are also performed. For the Nigeria case, results for a design wave with 100 years return period show that the influence of dynamic response is only marginal (but it may of course be significant for fatigue damage/life time estimation). The regularity of the drilling operation is given as the probability that jointly occurring wave heights and current velocities are within the limiting curve.

  10. North Atlantic Deep Water and the World Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) by being warmer and more saline than the average abyssal water parcel introduces heat and salt into the abyssal ocean. The source of these properties is upper layer or thermocline water considered to occupy the ocean less dense than sigma-theta of 27.6. That NADW convects even though it's warmer than the abyssal ocean is obviously due to the high salinity. In this way, NADW formation may be viewed as saline convection. The counter force removing heat and salinity (or introducing fresh water) is usually considered to to take place in the Southern Ocean where upwelling deep water is converted to cold fresher Antarctic water masses. The Southern ocean convective process is driven by low temperatures and hence may be considered as thermal convection. A significant fresh water source may also occur in the North Pacific where the northward flowing of abyssal water from the Southern circumpolar belt is saltier and denser than the southward flowing, return abyssal water. The source of the low salinity input may be vertical mixing of the low salinity surface water or the low salinity intermediate water.

  11. Flexible riser configuration for a FPSO in deep waters

    SciTech Connect

    Karunakaran, D.; Leira, B.J.; Olufsen, A.; Nordsve, N.T.

    1995-12-31

    Throughout the world development of oil and gas fields in deep and ultra deep waters is being considered. Floating systems offer an efficient alternative for development of such fields. Flexible risers will in general form an important part of such floating production system. Presently, the flexible risers are designed by application of factor of safety, which is based on experience from laboratory tests, theoretical pipe mechanics and engineering know-how. Generally, it is not based on reliability calculations and risk assessment. Hence it is very important to assess the safety level in current design practice and to aim at a rational and safe design procedure. In this paper, a reliability analysis procedure for flexible riser systems based on a response surface methodology and FORM/SORM methods is outlined. It is applied to a deep water riser system. In this case only a failure criterion at the top end is considered. This location is critical for this riser with respect to Ultimate Limit State (ULS). The results indicate a sufficient safety level for the top end of the riser. However, it is emphasized that this is not a conclusive result with respect to riser safety in general. A more comprehensive study is required to assess the overall safety level for flexible riser systems. Such a study should include a number of different riser configurations and limit states, specifically FLS criteria, to arrive at more general conclusions.

  12. High resolution sequence stratigraphy of Miocene deep-water clastic outcrops, Taranaki coast, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    King, P.R.; Browne, G.H.; Slatt, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    Approximately 700m of deep water clastic deposits of Mt. Messenger Formation are superbly exposed along the Taranaki coast of North Island, New Zealand. Biostratigraphy indicates the interval was deposited during the time span 10.5-9.2m.y. in water depths grading upward from lower bathyal to middle-upper bathyal. This interval is considered part of a 3rd order depositional sequence deposited under conditions of fluctuating relative sea-level, concomitant with high sedimentation rates. Several 4th order depositional sequences, reflecting successive sea-level falls, are recognized within the interval. Sequence boundaries display a range of erosive morphologies from metre-wide canyons to scours several hundred metres across. All components of a generic lowstand systems tract--basin floor fan, channel-levee complex and progading complex--are present in logical and temporal order. They are repetitive through the interval, with the relatively shallower-water components becoming more prevalent upward. Basin floor fan lithologies are mainly m-thick, massive and convolute-bedded sandstones that alternate with cm- and dm-thick massive, horizontally-stratified and ripple-laminated sandstones and bioturbated mudstones. Channel-levee deposits consist of interleaving packages of thin-bedded, climbing-rippled and parallel-laminated sandstones and millstones; infrequent channels are filled with sandstones and mudstones, and sometimes lined with conglomerate. Thin beds of parallel to convoluted mudstone comprise prograding complex deposits. Similar lowstand systems tracts can be recognized and correlated on subsurface seismic reflection profiles and wireline logs. Such correlation has been aided by a continuous outcrop gamma-ray fog obtained over most of the measured interval. In the adjacent Taranaki peninsula, basin floor fan and channel-levee deposits comprise hydrocarbon reservoir intervals. Outcrop and subsurface reservior sandstones exhibit similar permeabilities.

  13. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle

    2006-04-30

    During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our

  14. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial–interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  15. Deep-water antipatharians: Proxies of environmental change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.; Risk, Michael J.; Ross, S.W.; Sulak, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Deep-water (307-697 m) antipatharian (black coral) specimens were collected from the southeastern continental slope of the United States and the north-central Gulf of Mexico. The sclerochronology of the specimens indicates that skeletal growth takes place by formation of concentric coeval layers. We used 210Pb to estimate radial growth rate of two specimens, and to establish that they were several centuries old. Bands were delaminated in KOH and analyzed for carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. Carbon values ranged from -16.4??? to -15.7???; oldest specimen displayed the largest range in values. Nitrogen values ranged from 7.7??? to 8.6???. Two specimens from the same location and depth had similar 15N signatures, indicating good reproducibility between specimens. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  16. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-06-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters.

  17. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Howe, Jacob N W; Piotrowski, Alexander M; Noble, Taryn L; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ(13)C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  18. Deep water source cooling: An un-tapped resource

    SciTech Connect

    Burford, H.E.; Wiedemann, L.; Joyce, W.S.; McCabe, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Deep water source cooling (DWSC) refers to the renewable use of a large body of naturally cold water as a heat sink for process and comfort space cooling. Water at a constant 40-50{degrees}F or less is withdrawn from deep areas within lakes, oceans, aquifers and rivers and is pumped through the primary side of a heat exchanger. On the secondary side, clean chilled water is produced with one tenth the average energy required by conventional, chiller based systems. Coincident with significant energy and operating cost savings, DWSC offers reductions in air-borne pollutants and the release of environmentally harmful refrigerants. This paper discusses the basic design concepts, environmental considerations and performance related to the application of lake and ocean DWSC systems.

  19. A new approach to pipelaying in deep water

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, E.

    1994-12-31

    The last two decades the pipelaying industry has been moving into ever deeper waters. In the beginning of the Seventies the Norwegian trench with a depth of more than 300 m was considered a technical challenge. Now that trench has been crossed a number of times, and pipelines have been installed in a water depth of 600 m while plans are being made to lay in even deeper waters. Platforms have been installed in a depth of 350 m, and the pull-in of pipelines into the J-tubes of such platforms has almost become routine. Previous studies into the laying of pipelines indicated that the J-lay method would be the most suitable for the installation of pipelines in deep water. However, by using more realistic limits on the bending strain than have been customary until now, the S-lay method can be extended to much greater depths, especially with the advent of dynamically positioned lay vessels with long fixed stingers. This method has the advantage that higher laying speeds can be achieved and that conventional welding and NDE methods can be applied. This paper gives a review of the effect of higher strain levels on the laying capabilities of S-lay vessels and describes work that is being done to come to the verification of actual strain levels in pipelines during the laying process. It further presents a discussion of experience gained with the connection of pipelines by the Deflect-to-Connect (DTC) method and the diverless installation of Small PipeLine End Manifolds (PLEMS) in deep water. Finally, a description is given of a diverless method of repairing pipelines.

  20. Cestodes from deep-water squaliform sharks in the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caira, Janine N.; Pickering, Maria

    2013-12-01

    The majority of our knowledge on marine tapeworms (cestodes) is limited to taxa that are relatively easy to obtain (i.e., those that parasitize shallower-water species). The invitation to participate in a deep-water research survey off the Condor seamount in the Azores offered the opportunity to gain information regarding parasites of the less often studied sharks of the mesopelagic and bathypelagic zone. All tapeworms (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda) found parasitizing the spiral intestine of squaliform shark species (Elasmobranchii: Squaliformes) encountered as part of this survey, as well as some additional Azorean sampling from previous years obtained from local fishermen are reported. In total, 112 shark specimens of 12 species of squaliform sharks representing 4 different families from depths ranging between 400 and 1290 m were examined. Cestodes were found in the spiral intestines from 11 of the 12 squaliform species examined: Deania calcea, D. cf. profundorum, D. profundorum, Etmopterus princeps, E. pusillus, E. spinax, Centroscyllium fabricii, Centroscymnus coelolepis, C. cryptacanthus, C. crepidater, and Dalatias licha. No cestodes were found in the spiral intestines of Centrophorus squamosus. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed several potentially novel trypanorhynch and biloculated tetraphyllidean species. Aporhynchid and gilquiniid trypanorhynchs dominated the adult cestode fauna of Etmopterus and Deania host species, respectively, while larval phyllobothriids were found across several host genera, including, Deania, Centroscyllium, and Centroscymnus. These results corroborate previous findings that deep-water cestode faunas are relatively depauperate and consist primarily of trypanorhynchs of the families Gilquiniidae and Aporhynchidae and larval tetraphyllideans. A subset of specimens of most cestode species was preserved in ethanol for future molecular analysis to allow more definitive determinations of the identification of the

  1. Implementation and testing of a Deep Water Correlation Velocity Sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.R.; Bookheimer, W.C.; Rhoades, K.W.

    1983-05-01

    The paper describes a new sonar designated the Magnavox MX 810 Deep Water Correlation Sonar which is under development by the General Electric Company and the Magnavox Advanced Products and Systems Company. The sonar measures ship's velocity relative to the bottom but instead of using the conventional doppler effect, it uses the correlation method described by Dickey and Edward in 1978. In this method, the narrow beams required for doppler are not needed and a low frequency that penetrates to the bottom in deep water is used. The sonar was designed with the constraint that it use a transducer that mounts through a single 12 inch gate valve. Most offshore geophysical surveys at present make use of an integrated navigation system with bottom referenced velocity input from a doppler sonar which, because of limitations on the sonar bottomtracking range, has difficulty in areas where the water depth is greater than about 500 meters. The MX 810 provides bottom tracking in regions of much greater water depth. It also may be applied as an aid in continuous positioning of a vessel over a fixed location. It also should prove useful as a more general navigation aid. The sonar is undergoing a series of tests using Magnavox's facilities for the purpose of verifying the performance and obtaining data to support and quantify planned improvements in both software and hardware. A prototype transducer of only 5 watts power output was used, but in spite of this low power, successful operation to depths of 1900 meters was obtained. Extrapolation to system parameters to be implemented in production models predicts operation to depths of 5000 meters.

  2. Tide and river influences on distributary channels of the Mekong River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Nguyen, V. L.; Ta, T. K. O.; Tamura, T.; Kanai, Y.; Nakashima, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Mekong River delta, one of the world's largest deltas, has extended from Phnom Penh in Cambodia (apex) to the coast from the Saigon River mouth to Cape Camau in Vietnam with a triangular-shape area of more than 60,000 km2. The delta has prograded more than 200 km over at least the last 6-7 ka. The river-mouth area of the delta is meso-tidal with the mean tidal range of 2.5 ± 0.1 m and the maximum tidal range is 3.2-3.8 m. The mean wave height is 0.9 m. Its water discharge is 470 km3/y and its sediment discharge is 160 million t/y, or tenth and ninth largest in the world, respectively. The water discharge varies by season because most of the drainage area is under a monsoonal tropical regime. The flow at Phnom Penh, Cambodia, reaches a maximum in October (typically 39,000 m3/s) and a minimum in May (about 1700 m3/s). Tidal water-level changes are observed in Cambodia, more than 200 km upstream from the river mouth. To understand the combined influenced of river and tide on river bottom sediments, we have collected ~210 surface samples from river bottoms of the whole Mekong River delta in Vietnam, covering five distributaries during dry season from January to May 2015. Sediment characteristics show clearly tide- and river-influenced areas, which are closely linked with river morphology.

  3. Seismic sequence stratigraphy of Tertiary sediments, offshore Sarawak deep-water area

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, A.M. )

    1994-07-01

    Tectonic processes and sea level changes are the main key factors that have strongly influenced clastic and carbonate sedimentations in the Sarawak deep-water area. A seismic sequence stratigraphy of Tertiary sediments was conducted in the area with the main objective of developing a workable genetic chronostratigraphic framework that defines the sequence and system tracts boundaries within which depositional systems and lithofacies can be identified, mapped and interpreted. This study has resulted in the identification of eight major depositional sequences that are bounded by regional unconformities and correlative conformities. These sequences can generally be grouped into four megasequences, based on the main tectonic events observed in the area. Three system tracts of a type-1, third-order sequence boundary were recognized in most of the sequences: lowstand, transgressive, and highstand systems tracts. The lowstand system tract includes basin-floor fans, slope fans, and lowstand prograding wedges. Paleoenvironmental distribution maps constructed for each of the sequences using seismic facies analysis and nearby well control suggest that the sequence intervals are predominantly transgressive units that have been intermittently interrupted by regressive pulses brought about by changes in eustatic sea level. The trend of paleocoastline observed during Oligocene to Miocene times changes from northwest-southeast orientation to a position roughly parallel to the present coastline. Seismic facies maps generated from late Oligocene to early Miocene indicate the depositional environment was coastal to coastal plain in the western and the middle part of the study area, becoming more marine toward the east and northeast.

  4. Slab dehydration and deep water recycling through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magni, Valentina; Bouilhol, Pierre; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    The fate of water in subduction zones is a key feature that influences the magmatism of the arcs, the rheology of the mantle, and the recycling of volatiles. We investigate the dehydration processes in subduction zones and their implications for the water cycle throughout Earth's history. We use a numerical tool that combines thermo-mechanical models with a thermodynamic database to examine slab dehydration for present-day and early Earth settings and its consequences for the deep water recycling. We investigate the reactions responsible for releasing water from the crust and the hydrated lithospheric mantle and how they change with subduction velocity, slab age, and mantle potential temperature. Our results show that faster slabs dehydrate over a wide area: they start dehydrating shallower and they carry water deeper into the mantle. A hotter mantle (i.e., early Earth setting) drives the onset of crustal dehydration slightly shallower, but, mostly, dehydration reactions are very similar to those occurring in present-day setting. However, for very fast slabs and very hot mantle epidote is involved as a dehydrating crustal phase. Moreover, we provide a scaling law to estimate the amount of water that can be carried deep into the mantle. We generally observe that a 1) 100°C increase in the mantle temperature, or 2) ~15 Myr decrease of plate age, or 3) decrease in subduction velocity of ~2 cm/yr all have the same effect on the amount of water retained in the slab at depth, corresponding to a decrease of ~2.2x105 kg/m2 of H2O. We estimate that for present-day conditions ~26% of the global influx water, or 7x108 Tg/Myr of H2O, is recycled into the mantle. Using a realistic distribution of subduction parameters, we illustrate that deep water recycling might still be possible in early Earth conditions, although its efficiency would generally decrease. Indeed, 0.5-3.7x108 Tg/Myr of H2O could still be recycled in the mantle at 2.8 Ga.

  5. Hydrologic Modeling of a Tropical River Delta by Applying Remote Sensing Data: the Niger Delta and its Distributaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, M. T.; Syvitski, J. P.; Kettner, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    Delta regions offer rich resources to coastal human populations with their large upstream freshwater sources. Tropical deltas such as the Niger, Nigeria, whose drainage basin incorporates arid regions, receive a significant portion of their runoff from precipitation falling directly on the delta. Between 1970 and 2006, the Niger discharged (Lokoja station) 5000 ± 890 m3/s into upper delta. Here we apply Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) based precipitation estimates (SB42), with a 0.25° x 0.25° spatial resolution (~100 grid points across the Niger Delta at 3 hourly intervals 1998-2008), and MODIS evapotranspiration (ET) estimates (MOD16), to determine the impact of massive local precipitation events on the routing of water and sediment flux through the Niger Delta's distributaries. The Niger delta receives 2275 mm/y ± 264 mm/y of rainfall with the SE area exceeding 3500 mm/y. The delta's ET varies seasonally between 45 and 65 mm/mo. The in situ generated hydrological runoff is 1675 mm/y, or an equivalent of a discharge 73% the size of the river flux entering the delta. With maximum annual daily discharge from the Niger often exceeding 15,000 m3/s, in combination with the significant in situ runoff, much of the delta's surface is seasonally under floodwaters. LandSat7 imagery indicates delta distributaries that are disconnected from the Niger River, and only drain local precipitation events. This disconnection plays into the discharge and sediment fluxes of these distributaries.

  6. 75 FR 34929 - Safety Zones: Neptune Deep Water Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones: Neptune Deep Water Port, Atlantic Ocean... comment at the Web site http://www.regulations.gov . These safety zones are needed pending implementation... Deep Water Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, MA; Final Rule (USCG-2009-0589), to protect vessels from...

  7. Deep-water hydrocarbon potential of Georges Bank Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Levie, D.S. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Characterization of the petroleum potential for Georges Bank Trough has been based primarily on limited organic geochemical data that indicate the area of recent drilling activity behind the paleoshelf edge to be poor in organic carbon and C/sub 15/ + extract values, with predominantly terrestrial kerogen types. Maturation data also suggest an inadequate thermal history for hydrocarbon generation in the area. It is possible that the effects of heat flow from the New England Seamount Chain may contribute to hydrocarbon generation in the Georges Bank Trough - a relationship that may also exist between the Newfoundland Seamount Chain and the Hibernia area of the Grand Banks. Also, comparisons can be drawn between the Atlantic Fracture Zone bordering the Georges Bank Trough and the Romanche-St. Paul Fracture Zone off the Ivory Coast. In the latter region, restricted anoxic environments with sediments rich in marine kerogen types have been identified, as have both structural and stratigraphic trapping mechanisms. Within this rhombochasm configuration, reservoir lithologies of sandstone and carbonate turbidites, fractured deep-water chalks, and reefal limestones should occur. The relationships of seamount to fracture zone, as applied to the rhombochasm model for the Georges Bank Trough, should enhance the hydrocarbon potential of the lower Mesozoic sediments seaward of the paleoshelf edge and thus classify this area as a future major hydrocarbon province.

  8. Climatically induced sedimentary cycles in Pliocene deep-water carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Gardulski, A.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Two DSDP sites (86 and 94) on the Campeche ramp in the southern Gulf of Mexico penetrated more than 100 m of Pliocene pelagic ooze. The ooze is primarily carbonate, with a much smaller volcanic ash component than occurs in some Pleistocene sediments at these sites. Cores recovered from these holes display variations in carbonate mineralogy as well as total carbonate and sand abundances that are correlated with the oxygen isotope stratigraphy. Diagenetic loss of Mg-calcite is complete by the base of the Pleistocene, but aragonite, especially high-Sr aragonite forming algal needles that were transported off the shelf to the slope, persists through upper Pliocene cores. Variations in oxygen isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera occur throughout the Pliocene, although the amplitude of those cycles is smaller than for the Pleistocene, with its more dramatic glacial-interglacial contrasts. As in overlying Pleistocene slope sediments, cooler intervals correspond with greater abundances of aragonite in the upper Pliocene section, reflecting a shift of the shallow, productive shelf seaward across the ramp surface during times of relatively low sea level. However, the aragonite abundances in the Pliocene are reduced on average compared to the Pleistocene. This difference is due in part to diagenetic loss, but also it likely reflects the overall higher sea level that apparently characterized Pliocene oceans, trapping more algal aragonite landward. Although sea level and climatic fluctuations were indeed less extreme in the Pliocene, they were still sufficient to generate sedimentary cycles in deep-water carbonates.

  9. Influence of Reservoir Infill on Coastal Deep Water Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Linker, Lewis C; Batiuk, Richard A; Cerco, Carl F; Shenk, Gary W; Tian, Richard; Wang, Ping; Yactayo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    Ecological restoration of the Chesapeake through the Chesapeake Bay total maximum daily load (TMDL) requires the reduction of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads in the Chesapeake watershed because of the tidal water quality impairments and damage to living resources they cause. Within the Chesapeake watershed, the Conowingo Reservoir has been filling in with sediment for almost a century and is now in a state of near-full capacity called . The development of the Chesapeake TMDL in 2010 was with the assumption that the Conowingo Reservoir was still effectively trapping sediment and nutrients. This is now known not to be the case. In a TMDL, pollutant loads beyond the TMDL allocation, which are brought about by growth or other conditions, must be offset. Using the analysis tools of the Chesapeake TMDL for assessing the degree of water quality standard attainment, the estimated nutrient and sediment loads from a simulated dynamic equilibrium infill condition of the Conowingo Reservoir were determined. The influence on Chesapeake water quality by a large storm and scour event of January 1996 on the Susquehanna River was estimated, and the same storm and scour events were also evaluated in the more critical living resource period of June. An analysis was also made on the estimated influence of more moderate high flow events. The infill of the Conowingo reservoir had estimated impairments of water quality, primarily on deep-water and deep-channel dissolved oxygen, because of increased discharge and transport of organic and particulate inorganic nutrients from the Conowingo Reservoir. PMID:27136155

  10. New Insights on Jupiter's Deep Water Abundance from Disequilibrium Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Gierasch, Peter; Lunine, Jonathan; Mousis, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    The bulk water abundance on Jupiter potentially constrains the planet's formation conditions. We aim to improve the chemical constraints on Jupiter's deep water abundance in this paper. The eddy diffusion coefficient is used to model vertical mixing in planetary atmosphere, and based on laboratory studies dedicated to turbulent rotating convection, we propose a new formulation of eddy diffusion coefficient. The new formulation predicts a smooth transition from slow rotation regime (near the equator) to the rapid rotation regime (near the pole). We estimate an uncertainty for newly derived coefficient of less than 25%, which is much better than the one order of magnitude uncertainty used in the literature. We then reevaluate the water constraintprovided by CO, using the newer eddy diffusion coefficient. We considered two updated CO kinetic models, one model constrains the water enrichment (relative to solar) between 0.1 and 0.75, while the other one constrains the water enrichment between 7 and 23. This difference calls for a better assessment of CO kinetic models.

  11. New insights on Jupiter's deep water abundance from disequilibrium species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Gierasch, Peter J.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Mousis, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The bulk water abundance on Jupiter potentially constrains the planet's formation conditions. We improve the chemical constraints on Jupiter's deep water abundance in this paper. The eddy diffusion coefficient is used to model vertical mixing in planetary atmosphere, and based on laboratory studies dedicated to turbulent rotating convection, we propose a new formulation of the eddy diffusion coefficient for the troposphere of giant planets. The new formulation predicts a smooth transition from the slow rotation regime (near the equator) to the rapid rotation regime (near the pole). We estimate an uncertainty for the newly derived coefficient of less than 25%, which is much better than the one order of magnitude uncertainty used in the literature. We then reevaluate the water constraint provided by CO, using the newer eddy diffusion coefficient. We considered two updated CO kinetic models, one model constrains the water enrichment (relative to solar) between 0.1 and 0.75, while the other constrains the water enrichment between 3 and 11.

  12. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    M. Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; O. Djordjevic

    2003-03-20

    The ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342) began September 1, 2002. During this second quarter: A Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator (DHI) symposium was held at UH; Current DHI methods were presented and forecasts made on future techniques; Dr. Han moved his laboratory from HARC to the University of Houston; Subcontracts were re-initiated with UH and TAMU; Theoretical and numerical modeling work began at TAMU; Geophysical Development Corp. agreed to provide petrophysical data; Negotiations were begun with Veritas GDC to obtain limited seismic data; Software licensing and training schedules were arranged with Paradigm; and Data selection and acquisition continues. The broad industry symposium on Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators was held at the University of Houston as part of this project. This meeting was well attended and well received. A large amount of information was presented, not only on application of the current state of the art, but also on expected future trends. Although acquisition of appropriate seismic data was expected to be a significant problem, progress has been made. A 3-D seismic data set from the shelf has been installed at Texas A&M University and analysis begun. Veritas GDC has expressed a willingness to provide data in the deep Gulf of Mexico. Data may also be available from TGS.

  13. Floating production system for deep waters, marginal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    Concrete platform expertise developed by Norwegian Contractors has been applied to a floating production concept thought to offer considerable potential for marginal and deep-water oil fields. The design is based on a multicell Monotower solution and represents the outcome of studies reaching back to 1978. This work has focused chiefly on devising a production system for Gulf's gas/condensate discovery in 380 m water on Norwegian North Sea Block 35/8. Components covered by the conceptual design study include the catenary anchored concrete floater with condensate storage, subsea and riser systems for high-pressure gas production and topside facilities for gas and condensate treatment. A system also has been developed for periodic direct loading of condensate into a shuttle tanker, which is allowed to weathervane through 360/sup 0/ around the platform. Claimed to offer better motion characteristics than a conventional semisubmersible, the weight-stable platform comprises a series of cylindrical columns arranged in a circle, an inner ring of moonpool cells and a cantilevered base for storage.

  14. Turbidite systems in deep-water basin margins classified by grain size and feeder system

    SciTech Connect

    Reading, H.G. ); Richards, M. )

    1994-05-01

    Depositional system in deep-water basin margins can be classified on the basis of grain size and feeder system into 12 classes: mud-rich, mud/sand-rich, sand-rich, and gravel-rich [open quotes]point-source submarine fans,[close quotes] mud-rich, mud/sand-rich, sand-rich, and gravel-rich [open quotes]multiple-source submarine ramps;[close quotes] and mud-rich, mud/sand-rich, sand-rich, and gravel-rich [open quotes]linear-source slope aprons.[close quotes] The size and stability of channels and the organization of the depositional sequences decreases toward a linear source as does the length:width ratio of the system. As grain size increases, so does slope gradient, impersistence of channel systems, and tendency for channels to migrate. As grain size diminishes, there is an increase in the size of the source area, the size of the depositional system, the downcurrent length, the persistence and size of flows, fan channels, channel-levee systems, and in the tendency to meander and for major slumps and sheet sands to reach the lower fan and basin plan. The exact positioning of any one depositional system within the scheme cannot always be precise and the position may be altered by changes in tectonic, climate, supply, and sea level. The models derived from each system are sufficiently different to significantly affect the nature of petroleum prospectivity and reservoir pattern. Understanding and recognizing this variability is crucial to all elements of the exploration-production chain. In exploration, initial evaluations of prospectivity and commerciality rely on the accurate stratigraphic prediction of reservoir facies, architecture, and trapping styles. For field appraisal and reservoir development, a similar appreciation of variability aids reservoir description by capturing the distribution and architecture of reservoir and nonreservoir facies and their impact on reservoir delineation, reservoir behavior, and production performance. 161 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Fluvial ecosystem services in the Rhine delta distributaries between 1995 and 2035

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Kleinhans, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Mapping of ecosystem services (ES) and documenting their change over time provides important information for the societal debate and decision making on river management. Large and Gilvear (2014) showed how to score fluvial ES using imagery and tools available through Google Earth, linking observable features, or landcover to ES through inferred fluvial processes, and natural ecosystem functions. While the use of Google Earth enables application anywhere on the globe, their method is labor intensive, and involves subjective judgement as not all parameters are easily observable in spectral data, e.g. the location of embankments. In addition, the method does not take advantage of readily available spatial databases, and existing hydrodynamic model parameterizations, nor can it be used in scenario studies of future fluvial landscapes. Therefore, we aimed at the development of a generic GIS routine to extract the ecosystem services from existing spatial and hydrodynamic model data, and its application to historic and future fluvial landscapes in the Rhine delta. Here, we consider the Rhine distributaries, sized 400 km2, where river restoration measures were carried out between 1995 and 2015 to reduce flood risk reduction and simultaneously improve the ecological status. We computed ES scores for provisioning ES (fisheries, agriculture, timber, water supply), regulating ES (flood mitigation, carbon sequestration, water quality), and supporting ES (biodiversity). Historic ES were derived for the years 1997, 2005, and 2012, based on ecotope maps for these respective years, combined with a water levels and flow velocities derived from a calibrated 2D hydrodynamic model (WAQUA). Ecotopes are defined as 'spatial landscape units that are homogeneous as to vegetation structure, succession stage, and the main abiotic factors that are relevant to plant growth'. ES for 2035 were based on scenarios of landscaping measures. Suitable locations for the measures were determined

  16. Mechanical stratigraphy of deep-water sandstones: insights from a multisciplinary field and laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; di Celma, Claudio; Tondi, Emanuele; Corradetti, Amerigo; Cantalamessa, Gino

    2010-05-01

    -perpendicular joint spacing/bed thickness (S/T) relationships on sandstone bodies that experienced similar diagenetic and tectonic histories. The field area is located in the Periadriatic foreland basin, eastern central Italy, which show late Pliocene slope turbidites in excellent 3d views. The Periadriatic foreland basin is an elongated, roughly N-S oriented trough located immediately east of the Apennines fold-thrust belt. The basin fill mostly consists of deepwater Plio-Pleistocene sediments partially incorporated into the frontal part of the orogenic wedge. During the late Pliocene, gravel and sand originated from the uplifting Apennines were abundantly supplied to the deep-water basin through a series of erosional conduits that, in the rock record, appear as a series of N-S oriented slope submarine canyon systems deeply incised into the hemipelagic mudstones of the adjacent slope. The studied exposure allows direct observation of spatial and temporal relationships among the various depositional elements comprising the canyon system and related lithofacies, as well as the bed-perpendicular joint density within each lithofacies. We performed a multidisciplinary work involving the following tasks: (i) 3D stratigraphic model of the depositional architecture of the Castignano and Ascensione canyon systems (Marche region, Italy); (ii) 2D scanline survey of several outcrops displaying bed-perpendicular joints; (iii) digital image analysis of selected thin-section obtained from oriented hand samples to characterize the 3D intergranualr porosity; (iv) Stiffness analysis of representative sandstone bodies by mean of Schmidt hammer tests. The first results of this ongoing study on the mechanical stratigraphy of the two Late Pliocene canyon systems are consistent with the joint density being effected by both geometrical (i.e., bed thickness) and mechanical properties. This data set will help field and experimental geologists to better define common strategies to assess the controlling

  17. 76 FR 39790 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... GOA (76 FR 11111, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.82(d)(9)(i)(B), the Administrator... comprise the deep-water species fishery for the sideboard limit include deep-water flatfish, rex sole,...

  18. 75 FR 38937 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.82(d)(9)(i)(B), the Administrator... comprise the deep-water species fishery for the sideboard limit include deep-water flatfish, rex sole,...

  19. A Possible Role for Agglutinated Foraminifers in the Growth of Deep-Water Coral Bioherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messing, C. G.; Reed, J. K.; Brooke, S. D.

    2008-05-01

    Exploration of deep-water bioherms dominated by the scleractinian corals Lophelia pertusa and Enallopsammia profunda along the east coast of Florida in ~400-800 m depth reveals an often dense and rich assemblage of small (~1-30 mm) epifauna on dead coral branches, which is often dominated by agglutinated astrorhizacean foraminifers accompanied by thecate and athecate hydroids, sponges, stylasterids, anemones and barnacles. The dominant agglutinated foraminifer is an arborescent form up to 15 mm tall, consisting of a basal tube that gives rise to branchlets of successively decreasing diameter and thickly coated with fine-grained material including coccoliths and diatom frustules. The large numbers of foraminifers generate an enormous adhesive, sediment-trapping surface area and may represent an important accelerated route for sediment deposition and bioherm growth relative to baffling of suspended sediment particles by the coral branches themselves. These foraminifers also occur on still living coral, suggesting that they may either contribute to coral death or invade stressed colonies. They may thus be responsible for or contribute to the small percent of living corals observed in many of these habitats. Other epifauna appear to colonize after the coral has died.

  20. Alba field - middle Eocene deep-water channel in U. K. North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, S.R.; Bretthauer, H.H.; Mattingly, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    The Alba field is located in the Witch Ground graben between the Fladen Ground spur to the north and the Renee Ridge to the south, entirely in UKCS Block 16/26. In 1985, oil was discovered in the middle Eocene sands of the Horda formation at a depth of 6100 ft subsea. Twelve additional wells, including sidetracks, have been drilled appraise the discovery. This drilling indicates the Alba field is a stratigraphic trap covering an area of 3600 ac. The Alba sands represent a brief interruption in the hemipelagic sedimentation that dominated this part of the Witch Ground graben during the middle Eocene. Sediment was supplied intermittently from a shelf area to the northwest into a deep-water environment. Well correlations, seismic facies analysis, and core analysis indicate that these sands were deposited as part of a constructional channel/levee complex within a mud-rich, shelf-sourced submarine fan system. The cap and the updip and lateral seals to the reservoir are shale. The Alba reservoir is predominantly a homogeneous, fine-grained, unconsolidated sand. The average reservoir porosity is 33% and the average permeability is 2.8 darcys. Oil in place is estimated to be 1.1 billion bbl of 20/degrees/ API crude.

  1. Formation of carbonate chimneys in the Mediterranean Sea linked to deep-water oxygen depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayon, Germain; Dupré, Stéphanie; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Etoubleau, Joël; Chéron, Sandrine; Pierre, Catherine; Mascle, Jean; Boetius, Antje; de Lange, Gert J.

    2013-09-01

    Marine sediments at ocean margins vent substantial amounts of methane. Microbial oxidation of the methane released can trigger the precipitation of carbonate within sediments and support a broad diversity of seafloor ecosystems. The factors controlling microbial activity and carbonate precipitation associated with the seepage of submarine fluid over geological time remain poorly constrained. Here, we characterize the petrology and geochemistry of rocks sampled from metre-size build-ups of methane-derived carbonate chimneys located at the Amon mud volcano on the Nile deep-sea fan. We find that these carbonates comprise porous structures composed of aggregated spherules of aragonite, and closely resemble microbial carbonate reefs forming at present in the anoxic bottom waters of the Black Sea. Using U-series dating, we show that the Amon carbonate build-ups formed between 12 and 7 thousand years ago, contemporaneous with the deposition of organic-rich sediments in the eastern Mediterranean, the so-called sapropel layer S1. We propose that the onset of deep-water suboxic or anoxic conditions associated with sapropel formation resulted in the development of intense anaerobic microbial activity at the sea floor, and thus the formation of carbonate chimneys.

  2. 33 CFR 207.640 - Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sacramento Deep Water Ship... REGULATIONS § 207.640 Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and navigation. (a) Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals;...

  3. 33 CFR 207.640 - Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sacramento Deep Water Ship... REGULATIONS § 207.640 Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and navigation. (a) Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals;...

  4. 33 CFR 207.640 - Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sacramento Deep Water Ship... REGULATIONS § 207.640 Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and navigation. (a) Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals;...

  5. 33 CFR 207.640 - Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sacramento Deep Water Ship... REGULATIONS § 207.640 Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and navigation. (a) Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals;...

  6. 33 CFR 207.640 - Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sacramento Deep Water Ship... REGULATIONS § 207.640 Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals; use, administration, and navigation. (a) Sacramento Deep Water Ship Channel Barge Lock and Approach Canals;...

  7. New records of Primnoidae (Cnidaria: Octocorallia) in Brazilian deep waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantes, Renata C. M.; Loiola, Livia L.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of octocorals occurring in Brazilian deep waters is still lacking, with only a few studies conducted so far, most of which focused on large-scale marine habitats characterization. Primnoidae are common and characteristic of seamounts and deepwater coral banks, often providing habitat for other marine species. Although primnoids occur in all ocean basins, only Primnoella and Plumarella species were recorded along the Brazilian coast before this study. Primnoid specimens were obtained through dredging and remotely operated vehicles (ROV) sampling, collected by research projects conducted off the Brazilian coast, between 15 and 34°S. Taxonomic assessment resulted in 5 new records of Primnoidae genera in Brazil: Calyptrophora, Candidella, Dasystenella, Narella and Thouarella. The occurrences of Narella-off Salvador and Vitória, and in Campos Basin (935-1700 m), and Calyptrophora-in Campos Basin (1059-1152 m), are herein reported for the first time in the South Atlantic. Calyptrophora microdentata was previously known in Lesser Antilles, New England and Corner Rise Seamounts, between 686 and 2310 m. Candidella imbricata geographical distribution includes Western and Eastern Atlantic (514-2063 m and 815-2139 m, respectively), being registered herein in Campos Basin, between 1059 and 1605 m. Dasystenella acanthina collected off Rio Grande do Sul state (810 m) and occurs also off Argentina and Southern Ocean, between 150 and 5087 m. Plumarella diadema, which type locality is off São Sebastião, Brazil, has its geographical range extended northwards, occurring in Campos Basin (650 m). Thouarella koellikeri previously known for Patagonia and Antartic Peninsula, is registered for the off Brazil for the first time, in Campos Basin and off São Sebastião (609-659 m). There is a lot of work yet to be done in terms of taxonomic knowledge of Brazilian deep-sea octocorals. Research projects focusing on the investigations, including ROV sampling, of other

  8. Computational fracture mechanics estimation of the strength of deep-water welded constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, A. V.; Filin, V. Yu.

    2013-04-01

    The principles of estimating the strength of deep-water engineering constructions using the brittle fracture prevention criterion are presented. They are based on the experimental results and theoretical developments accumulated in our works.

  9. Morphological divergence between three Arctic charr morphs - the significance of the deep-water environment.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Sigrid; Siwertsson, Anna; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Knudsen, Rune

    2015-08-01

    Morphological divergence was evident among three sympatric morphs of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus (L.)) that are ecologically diverged along the shallow-, deep-water resource axis in a subarctic postglacial lake (Norway). The two deep-water (profundal) spawning morphs, a benthivore (PB-morph) and a piscivore (PP-morph), have evolved under identical abiotic conditions with constant low light and temperature levels in their deep-water habitat, and were morphologically most similar. However, they differed in important head traits (e.g., eye and mouth size) related to their different diet specializations. The small-sized PB-morph had a paedomorphic appearance with a blunt head shape, large eyes, and a deep body shape adapted to their profundal lifestyle feeding on submerged benthos from soft, deep-water sediments. The PP-morph had a robust head, large mouth with numerous teeth, and an elongated body shape strongly related to their piscivorous behavior. The littoral spawning omnivore morph (LO-morph) predominantly utilizes the shallow benthic-pelagic habitat and food resources. Compared to the deep-water morphs, the LO-morph had smaller head relative to body size. The LO-morph exhibited traits typical for both shallow-water benthic feeding (e.g., large body depths and small eyes) and planktivorous feeding in the pelagic habitat (e.g., streamlined body shape and small mouth). The development of morphological differences within the same deep-water habitat for the PB- and PP-morphs highlights the potential of biotic factors and ecological interactions to promote further divergence in the evolution of polymorphism in a tentative incipient speciation process. The diversity of deep-water charr in this study represents a novelty in the Arctic charr polymorphism as a truly deep-water piscivore morph has to our knowledge not been described elsewhere. PMID:26357540

  10. Morphological divergence between three Arctic charr morphs – the significance of the deep-water environment

    PubMed Central

    Skoglund, Sigrid; Siwertsson, Anna; Amundsen, Per-Arne; Knudsen, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Morphological divergence was evident among three sympatric morphs of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus (L.)) that are ecologically diverged along the shallow-, deep-water resource axis in a subarctic postglacial lake (Norway). The two deep-water (profundal) spawning morphs, a benthivore (PB-morph) and a piscivore (PP-morph), have evolved under identical abiotic conditions with constant low light and temperature levels in their deep-water habitat, and were morphologically most similar. However, they differed in important head traits (e.g., eye and mouth size) related to their different diet specializations. The small-sized PB-morph had a paedomorphic appearance with a blunt head shape, large eyes, and a deep body shape adapted to their profundal lifestyle feeding on submerged benthos from soft, deep-water sediments. The PP-morph had a robust head, large mouth with numerous teeth, and an elongated body shape strongly related to their piscivorous behavior. The littoral spawning omnivore morph (LO-morph) predominantly utilizes the shallow benthic–pelagic habitat and food resources. Compared to the deep-water morphs, the LO-morph had smaller head relative to body size. The LO-morph exhibited traits typical for both shallow-water benthic feeding (e.g., large body depths and small eyes) and planktivorous feeding in the pelagic habitat (e.g., streamlined body shape and small mouth). The development of morphological differences within the same deep-water habitat for the PB- and PP-morphs highlights the potential of biotic factors and ecological interactions to promote further divergence in the evolution of polymorphism in a tentative incipient speciation process. The diversity of deep-water charr in this study represents a novelty in the Arctic charr polymorphism as a truly deep-water piscivore morph has to our knowledge not been described elsewhere. PMID:26357540

  11. A new pathway for Deep water exchange between the Natal Valley and Mozambique Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, Errol; Green, Andrew; Watkeys, Mike; Jokat, Wilfried; Krocker, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    Although global thermohaline circulation pathways are fairly well known, the same cannot be said for local circulation pathways. Within the southwest Indian Ocean specifically there is little consensus regarding the finer point of thermohaline circulation. We present recently collected multibeam bathymetry and PARASOUND data from the northern Natal Valley and Mozambique Ridge, southwest Indian Ocean. These data show the Ariel Graben, a prominent feature in this region, creates a deep saddle across the Mozambique Ridge at ca. 28°S connecting the northern Natal Valley with the Mozambique Basin. Results show a west to east change in bathymetric and echo character across the northern flank of the Ariel Graben. Whereby eroded plastered sediment drifts in the west give way to aggrading plastered sediment drift in the midgraben, terminating in a field of seafloor undulations in the east. In contrast, the southern flank of the Ariel Graben exhibits an overall rugged character with sediments ponding in bathymetric depressions in between rugged sub/outcrop. It is postulated that this change in sea-floor character is the manifestation of deep water flow through the Ariel Graben. Current flow stripping, due to increased curvature of the graben axis, results in preferential deposition of suspended load in an area of limited accommodation space consequently developing an over-steepened plastered drift. These deposited sediments overcome the necessary shear stresses, resulting in soft sediment deformation in the form of down-slope growth faulting (creep) and generation of undulating sea-floor morphology. Contrary to previous views, our works suggests that water flows from west to east across the Mozambique Ridge via the Ariel Graben.

  12. Source rock in the lower Tertiary and Cretaceous, deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, B.E.; Sofer, Z.; Claxton, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The MC-84 (King) well was drilled in the deep-water Gulf of Mexico in 1993, in Mississippi Canyon Block 84 in a water depth of 5,149 ft. This well drilled an anticlinal feature. The well penetrated an Upper Cretaceous section and crossed Middle Cretaceous Unconformity with final total depth in the Lower Cenomanian. Numerous sidewall cores were taken throughout the Lower Tertiary and Cretaceous. Six of the sidewall cores (from 14,230 to 15,170 ft subsea) are organic rich and contain Type II oil-prone kerogen (TOC values from 2.6 to 5.2% and hydrogen indices from 360 to 543 ppm). The Lower Tertiary through Lower Cenomianian section is thermally immature for oil generation, on the basis of biomarker ratios and vitrinite reflectance measurements. Organic extracts from cores in the Cretaceous section had biomarker characteristics similar to oil recovered from the Miocene in the MC-84 well. The oil was generated from a similar but more mature source rock, probably of Early Cretaceous age. Results of thermal modeling indicate that the only section thermally mature for oil generation is in the lower portion of the Lower Cretaceous, below the total depth of the well. The model also indicates that the organic-rich section equivalent to that penetrated by the MC-84 well could be mature farther to the north, where water depths are shallower, overburden thickness is greater, and heat flow is higher. Late Tertiary sediment loading in this area, primarily during the Miocene, is probably the driving mechanism for hydrocarbon generation from the Cretaceous (and possibly the Lower Tertiary) potential source rocks. This offers a favorable geological setting for capturing hydrocarbons because reservoirs and traps associated with Miocene deposition and subsequent loading-induced salt movement had formed prior to the onset of oil generation and migration.

  13. Changes in the deep-water benthos of eastern Lake Erie between 1979 and 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dermott, R.; Kerec, D.

    1995-06-01

    In order to examine changes of the benthic community and benthic biomass as a result of mussel colonization, a survey of the deep-water benthic fauna in eastern Lake Erie was repeated in 1993 using the same sites and methods as in a 1979 survey. During 1979, the community beyond 30 m was dominated by oligochaete worms and the burrowing amphipod Diporeia, which represented 50 and 40% of the total benthic biomass respectively. By 1993, quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis) formed over 90% of the benthic biomass. Mussels were present at all 13 sites. Densities of individuals >2 mm in length averaged 3,241 mussels m{sup -2}. Of these mussels, 97% were quagga mussels. Total density of all sizes retained on a 180 {mu}m sieve averaged 34,800 mussels m{sup -2} but total biomass decreased from 1.58 to 0.98 g m{sup -2}. The density of the amphipod Diporeia was reduced from 1,844 in 1979 to 218 m{sup -2} in 1993. While present at all sites during 1979, Diporeia remained common only at two sites and were absent at 8 of the 13 sites in 1993. The native fingernail clams, Pisidium spp., were reduced from 327 to 82 m{sup -2}. No significant reduction occurred in the worm and chironomid populations, however the dry biomass of the chironomids was reduced from 0.07 to 0.0008 g m{sup -2}. These reductions may be due to competition with the mussels for freshly settling algae. The meiofauna, which included small nematodes, ostracods, and harpacticoids retained on a 180 {mu}m sieve, all increased in density. Perhaps they benefited from an increase in the detritus deposited as pseudofeces around the mussels.

  14. Deep-water facies and petrography of the Galoc clastic unit, offshore Palawan, Philippines (south China Sea)

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Helmold, K.P.

    1988-02-01

    The lower Miocene Galoc clastic unit, offshore Palawan, Philippines, is about 500-600 ft thick. The unit overlies the Galoc Limestone and is overlain by the Pelitic Pagasa Formation. The Galoc clastic unit consists of alternating quartzose sandstone, mudstone, and resedimented carbonate deposited at bathyal depths, mainly as turbidites. The deep-water deposits are confined to the axis of a northeast-trending trough in which slope, submarine channel, interchannel, depositional lobe, slump, and basinal facies are recognized. Eroded shallow-marine carbonate lithoclasts are commonly incorporated within the siliciclastic turbidites. The main reservoir sandstones occur in submarine channels and depositional lobes. The sandstones are texturally submature, very fine to medium-grained feldspathic litharenites and subarkoses. The sandstones have detrital modes of Q78:F11:L11 and Qm51:F11:Lt38, with partial modes of the monocrystalline components of Qm82:P13:K5. Lithic fragments include chert, shale, schist, volcanic rock fragments, and minor plutonic rock fragments. Porosity in the better reservoir sandstones ranges from 11 to 25%, and calcite is the dominant cement. Dissolution textures and inhomogeneity of calcite distribution suggest that at least half of the porosity in the sandstones has formed through the leaching of calcite cement and labile framework grains. A source terrain of quartzo-feldspathic sediments and metasediments, chert, volcanics, and acid-intermediate plutonic rocks is visualized.

  15. Seismic blanking zones in the deep-water Ullung Basin, East Sea of Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Riedel, Michael; Yoo, Dong-Geun

    2015-04-01

    A total 12366.395 L.km of 2D multichannel seismic data were acquired by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) for detecting and mapping seismic indicators for the presence of gas hydrate in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea. The seismic data were acquired using Trilogy System of Geco-Prakla, Bolt Air-gun System onboard the R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM during the years of 2000 to 2004. The seismic faices of shallow sediments were also analyzed to understand the sedimentary strata developed in the basin. Seismic data were processed to define gas hydrate indicators such as bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) and seismic blank zones. The BSR was identified by (a) its polarity opposite to the seafloor, (b) its seafloor-parallel reflection behavior, and (c) its occurrence at a sub-bottom depth corresponding to the expected base of gas hydrate stability zone, on heat flow and other thermal data for the region and on seismic velocity data. The seismic velocity analysis was also conducted for determining the velocity deviation effect of high-velocity gas hydrate and underlying low-velocity free gas. The BSRs occur mainly in the southern part of the basin where mass transport deposits are widely occurring. A number of vertical to sub-vertical seismic blanking zones were identified in the basin. The blanking zones are near-vertical broad chimney-like structures of reduced seismic reflectivity. They may be formed by gas and/or fluid upwelling through fractures and faults. Many of the blanking zones show apparent velocity pull-up effects of sediment layering structures that are interpreted to be a result of higher velocity gas hydrate. The presence of substantial amounts of gas hydrate in the blank zones were first found by piston coring in 2007, and subsequently confirmed by two deep-drilling expeditions in 2007 and 2010. Most of the blanking zones occur in well-bedded turbidite/hemi-pelagic sediments in the northern deep basin. The

  16. North Atlantic deep water in the south-western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aken, Hendrik M.; Ridderinkhof, Herman; de Ruijter, Wilhelmus P. M.

    2004-06-01

    The circulation of deep water in the south-western Indian Ocean has been studied from hydrographic observations and current measurements, obtained during the Dutch-South African Agulhas Current Sources Experiment programme, and from similar public data from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment. The three major water masses involved are the saline North Atlantic deep water (NADW), its derivative in the Antarctic circumpolar current, lower circumpolar deep water (LCDW), and the aged variety of deep water, North Indian deep water (NIDW). Although bound by the shallow topography near Madagascar, about 2×10 6 m 3/s from the upper half of the NADW core appears to flow across the sill in the Mozambique Channel into the Somali Basin, while the remaining NADW flows east at about 45°S and is transformed to LCDW by lateral and diapycnal mixing. East of Madagascar the deep circulation is dominated by the southward flow of NIDW. Northward inflow of LCDW into the Indian Ocean therefore can take place only in the eastern half of the Indian Ocean, along the Southeast Indian Ridge and the Ninetyeast Ridge.

  17. Deep-water riser fatigue monitoring systems based on acoustic telemetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baojun; Wang, Haiyan; Shen, Xiaohong; Yan, Yongsheng; Yang, Fuzhou; Hua, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Marine risers play a key role in the deep and ultra-deep water oil and gas production. The vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of marine risers constitutes an important problem in deep water oil exploration and production. VIV will result in high rates of structural failure of marine riser due to fatigue damage accumulation and diminishes the riser fatigue life. In-service monitoring or full scale testing is essential to improve our understanding of VIV response and enhance our ability to predict fatigue damage. One marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is proposed and an engineering prototype machine has been developed to monitor deep and ultra-deep water risers' fatigue and failure that can diminish the riser fatigue life and lead to economic losses and eco-catastrophe. Many breakthroughs and innovation have been achieved in the process of developing an engineering prototype machine. Sea trials were done on the 6th generation deep-water drilling platform HYSY-981 in the South China Sea. The inclination monitoring results show that the marine riser fatigue acoustic telemetry scheme is feasible and reliable and the engineering prototype machine meets the design criterion and can match the requirements of deep and ultra-deep water riser fatigue monitoring. The rich experience and field data gained in the sea trial which provide much technical support for optimization in the engineering prototype machine in the future.

  18. A possible 20th-century slowdown of southern ocean deep water formation

    PubMed

    Broecker; Sutherland; Peng

    1999-11-01

    Chlorofluorocarbon-11 inventories for the deep Southern Ocean appear to confirm physical oceanographic and geochemical studies in the Southern Ocean, which suggest that no more than 5 x 10(6) cubic meters per second of ventilated deep water is currently being produced. This result conflicts with conclusions based on the distributions of the carbon-14/carbon ratio and a quasi-conservative property, PO(4)(*), in the deep sea, which seem to require an average of about 15 x 10(6) cubic meters per second of Southern Ocean deep ventilation over about the past 800 years. A major reduction in Southern Ocean deep water production during the 20th century (from high rates during the Little Ice Age) may explain this apparent discordance. If this is true, a seesawing of deep water production between the northern Atlantic and Southern oceans may lie at the heart of the 1500-year ice-rafting cycle. PMID:10550046

  19. Upwelling at the ice edge - A mechanism for deep water formation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa

    1987-01-01

    This study sets forward a hypothesis which anticipates deep water formation due to ice edge upwelling. The upwelling can raise thermocline waters (the lower Arctic Intermediate Water) to the surface or near it, where the water is exposed to cooling, evaporation, mixing, and oxygenation. Thus, upwelling can act as a preconditioning mechanism for deep convection. The conjecture would also explain the salinity range of the Greenland Sea Deep Water if the upper and lower Arctic Intermediate Water masses are mixed so that the latter has at least an 80-percent contribution. It is also anticipated that the convection events induced by ice edge upwelling during winter season could give rise to a new deep water annual production rate consistent with observations.

  20. Are high p-wave velocity sediments on thin Tethyan crust, deep-water carbonates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Graindorge, David; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Dellong, David; Kopp, Heidrun; Sallares, Valenti; Bartolome, Rafael; Gallais, Flora

    2016-04-01

    Seismic reflection profiles from the Central Mediterranean and Gulf of Cadiz regions indicate the widespread presence of a seismic unit, marked by strong continuous reflectors, directly overlying the basement. Seismic velocity analysis from seismic reflection and refraction studies indicate high p-wave velocities of 3.5 - 4.5 km/s in this layer. These same seismic studies image a thin crust, typically 6-9 km thick, in most cases thought to be oceanic in nature and related to the Tethys oceanic domain separating Africa (Gondwana) from Laurussia. We interpret this 2-3 km thick reflective layer to be carbonates, deposited in the late Triassic, Jurassic and early Cretaceous in the Tethys Ocean, in deep marine basins. Few drilling studies have penetrated into this layer. In one case (DSDP site 135, drilled at 4152 m water depth on Coral Patch Ridge in the western Gulf of Cadiz), Aptian (early Cretaceous) marls and limestone were drilled (560-689 m sub-seafloor depth). The Calcite compensation depth during the Jurassic to Early Cretaceous was about 4000 m to 3500 m according to compilations from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and is consistent with deposition of deep-water carbonates. For the NW Moroccan margin (Mazagan transect near El Jadida) there is a 2 km thick sedimentary layer with p-wave velocities of 4.0 - 4.5 km/s at the base of a 4 - 6 km thick sedimentary section. This layer extends from seafloor thought to be oceanic crust (west of the West African Coast magnetic anomaly) across a domain of thin/transitional crust with abundant Triassic salt diapirs to the foot of the margin. This reflective basal layer is also observed in reflection and refraction profiles from the Seine abyssal plain, below the toe of the Cadiz accretionary wedge (S. Algarve margin), in the Ionian abyssal plain and below the toe of the Calabrian accretionary wedge, all regions floored by this thin Tethyan crust. Work is in progress to determine the exact nature of this crust.

  1. The Role of Ceased Deep Water Ventilation in Massive Organic Carbon Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, G.; Rohling, E. J.; Rijpstra, I. W.; Sangiorgi, F.; Brinkhuis, H.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    Sapropels reflect periods of widespread deposition of organic-carbon in the eastern Mediterranean (eMed) in response to positive shifts in the freshwater budget of the basin driven by distinct minima in the precession cycle that led to increased primary productivity and/or improved organic matter preservation. Last interglacial sapropel S5 is intensively developed and holds excellent potential for high-resolution studies. This is essential to track the major changes that led the eMed thermohaline circulation to its sapropel mode and, in turn, to the massive organic sedimentation. However, to date, no S5 has been recovered and studied from the marginal basins of the eMed (Adriatic and the Aegean Sea), which currently play a critical role in the basin's deep-water ventilation. Here we present the first systematic high-resolution multi-proxy study of an extremely organic-rich (up to 14% Corg) sapropel S5 from the Aegean Sea (core LC21) and discuss it in the context of previously described contemporaneous records from key locations in the open eMed. Our results unequivocally support the previous notion that the increased runoff (160-300% greater than today), largely discharged into the open eMed along the North African margin, crucially forced the anoxic event with profound oceanographic and biotic reorganizations throughout the basin. The Aegean subsurface circulation collapsed shortly after the onset of the freshwater flooding, as indicated by the sudden disappearance of benthic fossils and major increase in the organic carbon accumulation. In a few centuries, the occurrence of large amounts of isorenieratene marks the development of euxinic conditions throughout the Aegean water-column up to 200 m or shallower. Similar conditions successively spread over the open eMed. This reconstruction provides an unprecedented decadal-scale insight into the actual processes involved in the S5 deposition and, in a more general sense, in other episodes of massive carbon burial (e

  2. Changes in deep-water epibenthic megafaunal assemblages in relation to seabed slope on the Nigerian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel O. B.; Mrabure, Charles O.; Gates, Andrew R.

    2013-08-01

    Local-scale habitat heterogeneity associated with changes in slope is a ubiquitous feature of bathyal continental margins. The response of deep-sea species to high habitat heterogeneity is poorly known and slope can be used as a proxy for many important ecological variables, such as current flow, sedimentation and substratum type. This study determines how slope angle effects megafaunal species density and diversity at the Usan field, offshore Nigeria, between 740 and 760 m depth. This deep-water area is increasingly exploited for hydrocarbons, yet lacking in baseline biological information. Replicated remotely operated vehicle video transect surveys were carried out using industry infrastructure (through the SERPENT Project) at a representative range of slopes (1°, 3°, 11° and 29°). Twenty-four species of benthic megafaunal invertebrate were found, numerically dominated by the echinoid Phormosoma placenta, and nine species of fish were observed. Megafaunal invertebrate deposit feeder density decreased significantly with increasing slope (density range 0.503-0.081 individuals m-2). Densities of megafaunal suspension feeders were very low except at the highest slope site (mean density 0.17 m-2). Overall species richness was greater on steeper slopes, although the richness of deposit feeders was not affected. Reduced labile organic matter in sediments on steeper slopes likely reduced deposit feeder densities, but increased current flow at higher slopes allowed both increased richness and density of suspension feeders.

  3. Understanding how gravity flows shape deep-water channels. The Rhone delta canyon (Lake Geneva, Switzerland/France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corella, Juan Pablo; Loizeau, Jean Luc; Hilbe, Michael; le Dantec, Nicolas; Sastre, Vincent; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2014-05-01

    Deep-water marine channels are highly dynamic environments due to the erosive power of sediment-laden currents that are continuously reshaping the morphology of these major sediment conduits. Proximal levees are prone to scarp failures generating gravity flows that can be transported thousands of kilometres from the original landslide. Nevertheless, the evolution of these underflows is still poorly understood because of the spatial scale of the processes and their difficult monitoring. For this reason, the smaller size, well-known boundary conditions and detailed bathymetric data makes Lake Geneva's sub-aquatic canyon in the Rhone delta an excellent analogue to understand these types of sedimentary processes that usually occur in deep-water channels in the marine realm. A multidisciplinary research strategy including innovative coring via MIR submersibles, in-situ geotechnical tests, geophysical and sedimentological analyses, as well as acquisition of different multibeam bathymetric data sets, were applied to understand the triggering processes, transport mechanisms and deposit features of gravity flows throughout the Rhone delta active canyon. The difference between two bathymetric surveys in 1986 and 2000 revealed an inversion in the topography of the distal active canyon, as a former distal canyon was transformed into a mound-like structure. A 12 m-thick layer was deposited in the canyon and modified the sediment transfer conduit. Sediment cores from this deposit were retrieved in-situ in 2002 and 2011 via the "F.-A. Forel" and Russian MIR submersibles, respectively. These cores contained a homogeneous, sandy material. Its sediment texture, grain-size, high density and shear strength, and low water content suggests that it corresponds to a debris-flow deposit that possibly took place after the initiation of a mass movement due to a scarp failure in proximal areas of the canyon. In addition, in-situ geotechnical tests on the modern canyon floor have shown a soft

  4. High-Resolution Glacial Discharge Records From Deep-Water Tidal Rhythmites in an Alaskan Fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackolski, C. L.; Cowan, E. A.; Jaeger, J. M.; Powell, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    In this study we have compiled and analyzed two high-resolution records of deep-water tidal rhythmites derived from glacial discharges. The rhythmites contain an average of 1 cm of sediment thickness per week during the melt-season. Two sediment cores over 17-m-long were collected from Muir Inlet, Glacier Bay National Park, Southeast Alaska, aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing in 2004 (EW0408). One core (core 60JC) was collected just north of the mouth of Wachusett Inlet. The other (core 62JC) was collected 3.8 km due north of 60JC in a separate basin more proximal to Muir and McBride Glaciers. In Glacier Bay, glacial retreat since the Little Ice Age Maximum is well constrained by historical mapping of glacial temini, and local climate records exist as well. The next step after establishing glacial discharge records is to test hypotheses relating glacial discharge to temperature and rainfall. The cores were subsampled with ODP-style u-channels and scanned for magnetic susceptibility and bulk density. X-radiographs of u-channels were collected to observe small-scale (42 microns/pixel) density differences between silt and mud laminae. Spring-neap tidal packages, representing 2-week periods during summer, are visible because of closely-spaced bounding silt laminae. Seasonality is marked by winter gravelly mud (diamicton) beds and/or spring plankton blooms. Spring-neap packages and seasonal markers were considered jointly in order to construct two mostly continuous records of spring-neap packages and melt- season deposits in each core. Secondarily, melt-season duration, which we define as the number of spring- neap packages occurring in a melt-season, was determined. We found that core 60JC extends back 83 years. 75 of those years were identified as having complete, contiguous melt-season deposits that are, on average, 17 cm thick and contain 8.3 spring-neap packages. Core 62JC extends back 62 years. 57 of those years were identified as having complete, contiguous melt

  5. Deep-water kelp refugia as potential hotspots of tropical marine diversity and productivity.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael H; Kinlan, Brian P; Druehl, Louis D; Garske, Lauren E; Banks, Stuart

    2007-10-16

    Classic marine ecological paradigms view kelp forests as inherently temperate-boreal phenomena replaced by coral reefs in tropical waters. These paradigms hinge on the notion that tropical surface waters are too warm and nutrient-depleted to support kelp productivity and survival. We present a synthetic oceanographic and ecophysiological model that accurately identifies all known kelp populations and, by using the same criteria, predicts the existence of >23,500 km(2) unexplored submerged (30- to 200-m depth) tropical kelp habitats. Predicted tropical kelp habitats were most probable in regions where bathymetry and upwelling resulted in mixed-layer shoaling above the depth of minimum annual irradiance dose for kelp survival. Using model predictions, we discovered extensive new deep-water Eisenia galapagensis populations in the Galápagos that increased in abundance with increasing depth to >60 m, complete with cold-water flora and fauna of temperate affinities. The predictability of deep-water kelp habitat and the discovery of expansive deep-water Galápagos kelp forests validate the extent of deep-water tropical kelp refugia, with potential implications for regional productivity and biodiversity, tropical food web ecology, and understanding of the resilience of tropical marine systems to climate change. PMID:17913882

  6. Development of study on the dynamic characteristics of deep water mooring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, You-Gang; Zhang, Su-Xia; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Liu, Hai-Xiao

    2007-09-01

    To meet the needs of those exploiting deepwater resources, TLP and SPAR platforms are used in some areas and are considered excellent platforms in deep water. However, many problems remain to be resolved. The design of mooring systems is a key issue for deep water platforms. Environmental loads in deep water effect the physical characteristics of mooring line materials. The configuration and analysis of mooring systems involve nonlinearity due to this fluid-solid coupling, nonlinear hydrodynamic forces, and their effects on stability of motion. In this paper, some pivotal theories and technical questions are presented, including modeling of mooring lines, the theory and method of coupled dynamics analysis on the mooring system, and the development of methodologies for the study of nonlinear dynamics of mooring systems. Further study on mooring systems in deep water are recommended based on current knowledge, particularly dynamic parameters of different materials and cable configuration, interactions between seabed and cable, mechanisms of mooring system response induced by taut/slack mooring cables, discontinuous stiffness due to system materials, mooring construction, and motion instability, etc.

  7. Eastern-Mediterranean ventilation variability during sapropel S1 formation, evaluated at two sites influenced by deep-water formation from Adriatic and Aegean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidi, A.; Triantaphyllou, M. V.; De Lange, G. J.

    2016-07-01

    Present-day bottom-water ventilation in the Eastern Mediterranean basin occurs through deep-water convection originating from the two marginal basins, i.e. Adriatic and Aegean Seas. In the paleo record, long periods of enhanced deep-water formation have been alternating with shorter periods of reduced deep-water formation. The latter is related mainly to low-latitude humid climate conditions and the enhanced deposition and preservation of organic-rich sediment units (sapropels). This study focuses on sedimentary archives of the most-recent sapropel S1, retrieved from two sites under the direct influence of the two deep-water formation areas. Restricted oxygen conditions have developed rapidly at the beginning of S1 deposition in the Adriatic site, but bottom-water conditions have not persistently remained anoxic during the full interval of sapropel deposition. In fact, the variability in intensity and persistence of sedimentary redox conditions at the two deep-water formation sites is shown to be related to brief episodes of climate cooling. In the Adriatic site, sapropel deposition appears to have been interrupted twice. The 8.2 ka event, only recovered at the Adria site, is characterized by gradually increasing suboxic to possibly intermittently oxic conditions and decreasing Corg fluxes, followed by an abrupt re-establishment of anoxic conditions. Another important event that disrupted sapropel S1 formation, has taken place at ca. 7.4 cal ka BP. The latter event has been recovered at both sites. In the Adriatic site it is followed by a period of sedimentary conditions that gradually change from suboxic to more permanently oxic, as deduced from the Mn/Al pattern. Using the same proxy for suboxic/oxic sedimentary redox conditions, we observe that conditions in the Aegean Sea site shift to more permanently oxic from the 7.4 ka event onwards. However, at both sites the accumulation and preservation of enhanced amounts of organic matter have continued under these

  8. Deep water geomorphology of the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system, Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Jason M.; Daniell, James J.; Droxler, André W.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Bentley, Samuel J.; Peterson, Larry C.; Opdyke, Bradley N.; Beaufort, Luc

    2008-03-01

    Trough contains a large axial submarine channel that extends almost the entire length of the intraslope basin. In addition, an extensive system of canyons lines the NE margin of Moresby Trough. Mass-transport deposits have been fed from the canyons and in one case deposited a large (˜2000 km2) mass-transport complex. Fold-and-thrust-belt ridges also extend into Moresby Trough. Here they trend perpendicular to slope and catch gravity flow deposits on their updip side. GoP carbonate platforms/atolls all display very pronounced scalloped-margin morphology, which may indicate pervasive mass-wasting processes on carbonate margins. Northwest Eastern Plateau is dominantly carbonate and displays the characteristic scalloped margin morphology; however, most of the plateau is characterized by parallel seismic reflectors. These seismic observations in conjunction with core data indicate that accumulation on Eastern Plateau is primarily mixed pelagic and hemipelagic sediment. Observations and interpretations of the bathymetry have revealed the deep water GoP to contain very diverse geomorphology and suggest it is a dynamic system influenced by a variety of sediment transport processes, particularly mass wasting and other gravity flow processes.

  9. Insight into the microbial community structure of a Norwegian deep-water coral reef environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Neufeld, Josh D.; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Hovland, Martin; Murrell, J. Colin

    2008-11-01

    Deep-water coral reefs support rich biological communities below the photic zone of fjords and continental shelves around the world. In this environment, life is enclosed within cold permanent darkness, in stark contrast to life in tropical coral reefs. We collected samples of water, sediment and a Desmacidon sp. sponge from a deep-water coral reef off the coast of Norway, and characterised bacterial communities with focus on primary producers in the dark. Following DNA extraction, PCR amplification and 16S rRNA gene library sequencing, bioinformatic analyses demonstrated significant differences between bacterial communities associated with the three samples. The finding that 50% of the clones showed <90% identity to cultured bacteria reflects the novel and uncharacterised diversity associated with these deep-water coral reefs. A total of 13 bacterial phyla were identified. Acidobacteria dominated the sponge library and Proteobacteria dominated the bacterioplankton and sediment libraries. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a possible new clade of sponge-associated Acidobacteria, which includes representatives from the Desmacidon sp. (Norway), Rhopaloeides odorabile (Australia) and Discodermia dissoluta (Curacao). Furthermore, the targeted recovery of a particulate methane monooxygenase ( pmoA) gene from the Desmacidon sp. DNA extract suggests that as yet uncultivated type I methanotrophs may mediate methane oxidation in this deep-water coral reef. Methanotrophs were not identified in the 16S rRNA gene libraries, but the presence of a high number (8%) of clones related to sulfide-, nitrite- and iodide-oxidising bacteria suggests chemosynthesis to be involved with maintenance of the deep-water coral reef ecosystem.

  10. Messinian deep-water turbidites and glacioeustatic sea-level changes in the North Atlantic: Linkage to the Mediterranean Salinity Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jijun; Scott, David B.

    1996-06-01

    Our benthic foraminiferal data clearly indicate eight layers of deep-water turbidites during the Messinian (MTL 1-8) and one in the early Pliocene (PTL 1) in Ocean Drilling Program Leg 105, Site 646B. These deep-water tuibidite deposits are characterized by highly concentrated agglutinated marsh benthic foraminifera (e.g., Trochammina cf. squamata, Ammotium sp. A, Miliammina fusca), rounded quartz, polished thick-walled benthic foraminifera, wood fragments, plant seeds, plant fruit, and highly concentrated mica and are interbedded with sediments containing deep-water benthic faunas. We suggest these turbidites deposited during sea-level low stands (˜80-100 m below sea level), and their ages are tentatively correlated to 6.59, 6.22, 6.01, 5.89, 5.75, 5.7, 5.65, 5.60, and 5.55 Ma, respectively, based on the Messinian oxygen isotope enrichments at Site 552A of Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 81. The turbidites layers during the late Messinian, coeval with frequent climate changes suggested by six oxygen enrichment excursions of Site 552A, may have been in part linked to the late Messinian evaporite deposits in the Mediterranean Basin. The most profound climate changes at 5.75 and 5.55 Ma may have been related to the Lower and Upper Evaporites in the Mediterranean Basin. An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on adiskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS .AGU.ORG, (LOGIN toAGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the username and GUESTas the password. Go to the right directory by typing CD APEND. TypeLS to see what files are available. Type GET and the name of the file toget it. Finally, type EXIT to leave the system. (Paper 96PA00572,Messinian deep-water turbidites and glacioeustatic sea-level changes inthe North Atlantic: Linkage to the Mediterranean Salinity Crisis, JijunZhang and David B. Scott). Diskette may be ordered from AmericanGeophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.20009; $15.00. Payment must accompany order.

  11. Gas hydrates in the deep water Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae

    2016-04-01

    Studies on gas hydrates in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea, Korea was initiated by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) to secure the future energy resources in 1996. Bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) were first identified on seismic data collected in the southwestern part of the basin from 1998 to 1999. Regional geophysical surveys and geological studies of gas hydrates in the basin have been carried out by KIGAM from 2000 to 2004. The work included 12,367 km of 2D multi-channel seismic reflection lines and 38 piston cores 5 to 8 m long. As a part of the Korean National Gas Hydrate Program that has been performed since 2005, 6690 km of 2D multi-channel reflection seismic lines, 900 km2 of 3D seismic data, 69 piston cores and three PROD cores were additionally collected. In addition, two gas hydrate drilling expeditions were performed in 2007 and 2010. Cracks generally parallel to beddings caused by the dissociation of gas hydrate were often observed in cores. The lack of higher hydrocarbons and the carbon isotope ratios indicate that the methane is primarily biogenic. The seismic data showed clear and wide-spread bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs). The BSR was identified by (a) its polarity opposite to the seafloor, (b) its seafloor-parallel reflection behavior, and (c) its occurrence at a sub-bottom depth corresponding to the expected base of gas hydrate stability zone. Several vertical to sub-vertical chimney-like blank zones up to several kilometers in diameter were also identified in the study area. They are often associated with velocity pull-up structures that are interpreted due to higher velocity in gas hydrate-bearing deposits. Seismic velocity analysis also showed a high velocity anomaly within the pull-up structure. Gas hydrate samples were collected from the shallow sedimentary section of blanking zone by piston coring in 2007. BSRs mainly occur in the southern part of the basin. They also locally observed in the

  12. Habitat, Fauna, and Conservation of Florida's Deep-Water Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. K.; Pomponi, S. A.; Messing, C. G.; Brooke, S.

    2008-05-01

    Various types of deep-water coral habitats are common off the southeastern United States from the Blake Plateau through the Straits of Florida to the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Expeditions in the past decade with the Johnson-Sea- Link manned submersibles, ROVs, and AUVs have discovered, mapped and compiled data on the status, distribution, habitat, and biodiversity for many of these relatively unknown deep-sea coral ecosystems. We have discovered over three hundred, high relief (15-152-m tall) coral mounds (depth 700-800 m) along the length of eastern Florida (700 km). The north Florida sites are rocky lithoherms, whereas the southern sites are primarily classic coral bioherms, capped with dense 1-2 m tall thickets of Lophelia pertusa and Enallopsammia profunda. Off southeastern Florida, the Miami Terrace escarpment (depth 300-600 m) extends nearly 150 km as a steep, rocky slope of Miocene-age phosphoritic limestone, which provides habitat for a rich biodiversity of fish and benthic invertebrates. Off the Florida Keys, the Pourtalès Terrace (depth 200- 460 m) has extensive high-relief bioherms and numerous deep-water sinkholes to depths of 250-610 m and diameters up to 800 m. The dominant, deep-water, colonial scleractinian corals in this region include Oculina varicosa, L. pertusa, E. profunda, Madrepora oculata, and Solenosmilia variabilis. Other coral species include hydrozoans (Stylasteridae), bamboo octocorals (Isididae), numerous other gorgonians, and black corals (Antipatharia). These structure-forming taxa provide habitat and living space for a relatively unknown but biologically rich and diverse community of crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, polychaete and sipunculan worms, and associated fishes. We have identified 142 taxa of benthic macro-invertebrates, including 66 Porifera and 57 Cnidaria. Nearly 100 species of fish have been identified to date in association with these deep-water coral habitats. Paull et al. (2000) estimated that over 40

  13. Atlantic Ocean Circulation during the Latest Cretaceous and Early Paleogene: Progressive Deep Water Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, Sietske J.; Voigt, Silke; Friedrich, Oliver; Osborne, Ann; Frank, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The Atlantic deep ocean circulation in the Latest Cretaceous (75-66 Ma) was dominated by regional processes, as indicated by the presence of distinct deep water masses. Due to the opening of the Atlantic Ocean, its different sub-basins became progressively connected and a global mode of ocean circulation commenced in the early Paleogene, ~60 Ma. To understand the evolution of deep water formation and exchange, Nd-isotope data and δ13C stratigraphies are generated for a range of sites in the North and South Atlantic. These permit to identify different intermediate and deep-water masses, to recognize their potential source regions and to determine the exact timing of deep water connection. The carbonate-rich pelagic sediments of Site U1403 near Newfoundland can be astronomically tuned and correlated to the global δ13C framework. Relatively negative seawater ɛNd(t) signatures in the 67-62 Ma interval at Site U1403 of ~-10 are distinct from those recorded further south in the North Atlantic. Possible explanations could include elevated non-radiogenic weathering inputs from the North American craton. In the latest Maastrichtian, the Site U1403 ɛNd(t) record displays a short-term positive excursion before the K/Pg boundary (67-66 Ma) followed by a sudden drop to unradiogenic values at the boundary. Changes in ocean circulation might be related to climatic changes in the pre-extinction interval and the impact itself. The ɛNd(t) records at Sites 1267 and 525 at Walvis Ridge show that an early Maastrichtian excursion to highly radiogenic values reflects a brief interval at 72-70 Ma, related to a period of increased hot-spot volcanism. Concomitant measurements of ɛNd(t) values in three different archives, fish teeth, ferromanganese coatings of bulk sediments and of foraminifera, provide a test for the partial influence of detrital particles on the isotopic composition of coatings. The first data of Sites U1403, 1267 and 525 indicate the occurrence of a common deep-water

  14. Age Determination and Growth Rates in Deep-Water Bamboo Corals (Isididae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, S. J.; Thresher, R.; Sherwood, O.

    2009-12-01

    Gorgonians are a major element of the fauna of deep-water coral reefs and very long-lived recorders of deep-water paleo-oceanography. Both ecological studies and paleo-analyses require accurate age determination and dating of colony formation, but because of the depths at which they occur (typically 1-3 km), direct validation by tagging of aging methods is logistically difficult. Radiocarbon analysis of both the node organic tissue and internode calcite provided apparently robust age and date information. Growth rates ranged from 40 to ~140 microns per year in samples collected from 600 to 1600m water depth. Following these analyses, we compiled the robust growth-rate data for recent material, and report on a first-pass analysis of ecological and regional effects on isidid growth rates.

  15. Geochemical evidence for anoxic deep water in the Arabian Sea during the last glaciation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Bhattacharya, S.K.; Sarin, M.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Various paleoceanographic studies have indicated that the deep ocean was probably depleted in dissolved oxygen during the last glacial period ([approximately]18 kyr B.P.; [delta][sup 18]O, stage 2) compared to present time. However, direct evidence of low oxygen content in the deep waters has been lacking. Here, the authors report geochemical evidence of near anoxic conditions in the deep Arabian Sea during the entire last glacial cycle ([delta][sup 18]O; stages 2, 3, and 4). Anoxia is inferred from the concomitant enrichment of organic carbon and authigenic uranium in the glacial sections of a core from the deep eastern Arabian Sea. The anoxic conditions during the last glacial period, probably caused by a change in deep water circulation, evidently enhanced preservation of organic matter and simultaneous removal of uranium from seawater. 57 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Halogenated persistent organic pollutants in deep water fish from waters to the west of Scotland.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynda; Walsham, Pam; Russell, Marie; Hussy, Ines; Neat, Francis; Dalgarno, Eric; Packer, Gill; Scurfield, Judith A; Moffat, Colin F

    2011-04-01

    Halogenated persistent organic pollutants [polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)] along with total lipid, were measured in the liver and muscle of three species of deep water fish (black scabbard, black dogfish (liver only) and roundnose grenadier) collected from the Rockall fishing area, to the west of Scotland, between 2006 and 2008. Both contaminant groups were detected in the muscle and liver, with concentrations of PCBs being higher than PBDEs. There were no significant differences in the PCB or PBDE concentrations between the three species, or different sampling locations in the Rockall fishing area. PCB concentrations (ΣICES (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea)7 PCBs) greater than 500 μg kg(-1) lipid weight were found in 26 of the 106 liver samples. PCB concentrations were compared to OSPAR assessment criteria, concentrations were above background but below Environmental Assessment Criteria. Estimated Toxic Equivalent (TEQ) concentrations, calculated using published models, in the fish muscle and liver indicated that consumption of deep water fish is unlikely to represent a risk to human health. The high squalene content in some of the black dogfish liver necessitated an additional clean-up step, involving gel permeation chromatography, when analyzing for PBDEs. Concentrations of PBDEs were low with many congeners being below detection limits, particularly in the muscle. There are currently no assessment criteria available for PBDEs. Furthermore, there is only very limited data on PBDEs in deep water fish. However, the concentrations observed in this study were similar to the concentrations recently reported in Mediterranean deep water fish. PMID:21421255

  17. Possible deep-water gas hydrate accumulations in the Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, Ginger A.; Scholl, David W.; Childs, Jonathan R.

    2006-01-01

    Seismic reflection images from the deep-water Aleutian and Bowers Basins of the Bering Sea contain many hundreds of acoustic Velocity-AMPlitude (VAMP) anomalies, each of which may represent a large accumulation of natural gas hydrate. Against a backdrop of essentially horizontal sedimentary reflections, the VAMP anomalies stand out as both high-amplitude bright spots and zones of vertically aligned horizon distortions. The VAMPs are interpreted as natural gas chimneys overlain by concentrated hydrate caps.

  18. First description of deep-water elasmobranch assemblages in the Exuma Sound, The Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Edward J.; Brooks, Annabelle M. L.; Williams, Sean; Jordan, Lance K. B.; Abercrombie, Debra; Chapman, Demian D.; Howey-Jordan, Lucy A.; Grubbs, R. Dean

    2015-05-01

    Deep-sea chondrichthyans, like many deep-water fishes, are very poorly understood at the most fundamental biological, ecological and taxonomic levels. Our study represents the first ecological investigation of deep-water elasmobranch assemblages in The Bahamas, and the first assessment of species-specific resilience to capture for all of the species captured. Standardised deep-water longline surveys (n=69) were conducted September to December 2010 and 2011 between 472 m and 1024 m deep, resulting in the capture of 144 sharks from 8 different species. These included the Cuban dogfish, Squalus cubensis, the bigeye sixgill shark, Hexanchus nakamurai, the bluntnose sixgill shark, Hexanchus griseus, the smooth dogfish, Mustelus canis insularis, the roughskin dogfish, Centroscymnus owstoni, Springer's sawtail catshark, Galeus springeri and the false catshark, Pseudotriakis microdon. Preliminary genetic analysis indicated two or more species of gulper sharks, Centrophorus spp.; however, for the present study they were treated as a single species complex. Water depth and distance from the rocky structure of the Exuma Sound wall were inversely correlated with species richness, whereas seabed temperature was directly correlated with species richness. These variables also had a significant influence on the abundance and distribution of many species. Expanded depth ranges were established for S. cubensis and H. nakamurai, which, in the case of S. cubensis, is thought to be driven by thermal preferences. At-vessel mortality rates increased significantly with depth, and post-release mortality was thought to be high for some species, in part due to high post-release predation. This study highlights the importance of utilising strategic geographic locations that provide easy access to deep water, in combination with traditional expedition-based deep-ocean science, to accelerate the acquisition of fundamental ecological and biological insights into deep-sea elasmobranchs.

  19. Effects of two deep water training programs on cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kanitz, Ana Carolina; Delevatti, Rodrigo Sudatti; Reichert, Thais; Liedtke, Giane Veiga; Ferrari, Rodrigo; Almada, Bruna Pereira; Pinto, Stephanie Santana; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two deep water training programs on cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adults. Thirty-four older adults men were placed into two groups: deep water endurance training (ET; n = 16; 66 ± 4 years) and deep water strength prior to endurance training (concurrent training: CT; n = 18; 64 ± 4 years). The training period lasted 12 weeks, with three sessions a week. The resting heart rate and the oxygen uptake at peak (VO2peak) and at the second ventilatory threshold (VO2VT2) were evaluated during a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer before and after training. In addition, maximal dynamic strength (one repetition maximum test--1RM) and local muscular resistance (maximum repetitions at 60% 1RM) of the knee extensors and flexors were evaluated. After the training period, the heart rate at rest decreased significantly, while the VO2peak and VO2VT2 showed significant increases in both groups (p<0.05). Only the VO2VT2 resulted in significantly greater values for the ET compared to the CT group after the training (p<0.05). In addition, after training, there was a significant increase in the maximal dynamic strength of the knee extensors and the local muscular endurance of the knee extensors and flexors, with no difference between the groups (p > 0.05). In summary, the two training programs were effective at producing significant improvements in cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adult men. However, deep water endurance training at high intensities provides increased cardiorespiratory responses compared to CT and results in similar muscular strength responses. PMID:25700846

  20. The distribution of anthropogenic REE in the Dutch distributaries of the Rhine: the role of suspended matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskam, Gerlinde; Verheul, Marc; Klaver, Gerard; Bakker, Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    In nature rare earth elements (REE) occur in fixed ratios; contamination with a single rare earth element causes a clear deviation from the natural NASC normalized REE-patterns: an anomaly. REE are progressively used in many high technology products and processes. For example, gadolinium-containing chelates have been used since the '80s as contrasting agent in MRI-imaging. The pertaining anomaly is currently used as a tracer for distinguishing waste water from water unaffected by anthropogenic contamination. In the Dutch monitoring program in the Rhine-Meuse distributaries, total (10% HNO3 digested) and dissolved (< 0.45 µm) fractions in surface water are routinely analysed, and with two-week intervals suspended matter samples are collected with a centrifuge. Since 2008, the set of analysed elements was extended with REE, enabling this study. Lobith, the entry point of the River Rhine in The Netherlands, shows an annual oscillation in the magnitude of the lanthanum (La) anomaly. This positive La-anomaly was reported by Kulaksiz and Bau in 2011; they identified the point source as a production plant for catalysts used in petroleum refining in the German city of Worms. Since the spring of 2011, samarium (Sm) is used in the same process, resulting in matching La- and Sm-anomalies. The anthropogenic La and Sm concentrations are predominantly present in the total fraction, which suggests that the anthropogenic La and Sm concentrations are associated with suspended matter. The anthropogenic La and Sm concentrations are lower in the suspended matter samples collected with the centrifuge, suggesting a bias of these La and Sm concentrations in the finer fraction of the suspended matter. The anthropogenic La en Sm concentrations remain relatively constant throughout the rivers, but close to Lake IJsselmeer and the North Sea, sedimentation causes a sharp decrease in the anthropogenic concentrations. Detailed sampling of sediments, suspended matter and water could give a

  1. Deep-sea floor instability to cause of deep-water cable fault, off East Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, W.; Machiyama, H.; Shiraishi, Y.; Kasahara, J.

    2007-12-01

    In 2002 to 2003 years, many deep-water cable faults were taken place in the sites deeper than 4,700 m of water depth, off east Taiwan to the Okinawa Trench. Many commercial base cables were seriousely brocken in the events. To investgate the cause of the cable fault in the deep water environment we examined the location and timing of the cable faults and compared them with data/records of the bathymetry, sesimic records and precipitation of the coast range of Taiwan. Because the events were most likely to be caused by turbidite flows that run and developed along the submarine channels such as Taitung and Hualien Channels. Velocity of the turbidites reached 10 to 12 m/s on an average in the setting. The turbidtes were not hyperpicnal flow being caused by onland food event but seismoturbidite. The events were taken place just after earthqaukes ranging from 5.0 to 6.0, and the depths of the EQ sources were shallower than 23 km in and around the coast range of Taiwan. What we learn from this case is that the cable fault may be happened if the condition (or rule) is satisfied. If it is true, the cable fault in the deep water environment in the region can be predicted.

  2. Pacific-Atlantic Circumpolar Deep Water coupling during the last 500 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullermann, Johannes; Lamy, Frank; Ninnemann, Ulysses; Lembke-Jene, Lester; Gersonde, Rainer; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Investigating the interbasin deepwater exchange between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans over glacial-interglacial climate cycles is important for understanding circum-Antarctic Southern Ocean circulation changes and their impact on the global Meridional Overturning Circulation. We use benthic foraminiferal δ13C records from the southern East Pacific Rise to characterize the δ13C composition of Circumpolar Deep Water in the South Pacific, prior to its transit through the Drake Passage into the South Atlantic. A comparison with published South Atlantic deepwater records from the northern Cape Basin suggests a continuous water mass exchange throughout the past 500 ka. Almost identical glacial-interglacial δ13C variations imply a common deepwater evolution in both basins suggesting persistent Circumpolar Deep Water exchange and homogenization. By contrast, deeper abyssal waters occupying the more southern Cape Basin and the southernmost South Atlantic have lower δ13C values during most, but not all, stadial periods. We conclude that these values represent the influence of a more southern water mass, perhaps Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). During many interglacials and some glacial periods, the gradient between Circumpolar Deep Water and the deeper southern Cape Basin bottom water disappears suggesting either no presence of AABW or indistinguishable δ13C values of both water masses.

  3. Reduced North Atlantic Deep Water flux to the glacial Southern Ocean inferred from neodymium isotope ratios

    PubMed

    Rutberg; Hemming; Goldstein

    2000-06-22

    The global circulation of the oceans and the atmosphere transports heat around the Earth. Broecker and Denton suggested that changes in the global ocean circulation might have triggered or enhanced the glacial-interglacial cycles. But proxy data for past circulation taken from sediment cores in the South Atlantic Ocean have yielded conflicting interpretations of ocean circulation in glacial times--delta13C variations in benthic foraminifera support the idea of a glacial weakening or shutdown of North Atlantic Deep Water production, whereas other proxies, such as Cd/Ca, Ba/Ca and 231Pa/230Th ratios, show little change from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene epoch. Here we report neodymium isotope ratios from the dispersed Fe-Mn oxide component of two southeast Atlantic sediment cores. Both cores show variations that tend towards North Atlantic signatures during the warm marine isotope stages 1 and 3, whereas for the full glacial stages 2 and 4 they are closer to Pacific Ocean signatures. We conclude that the export of North Atlantic Deep Water to the Southern Ocean has resembled present-day conditions during the warm climate intervals, but was reduced during the cold stages. An increase in biological productivity may explain the various proxy data during the times of reduced North Atlantic Deep Water export. PMID:10879531

  4. Late Quaternary Variability in the Deep Water Exchange Between South Atlantic, Southern and Indian Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuschner, D. C.; Krueger, S.; Ehrmann, W.; Schmiedl, G.; Kuhn, G.; Mackensen, A.; Diekmann, B.

    2005-12-01

    The Southern Ocean, south of Africa, is an important mixing region for northern and southern derived deep-water masses. In this region, the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) extends southward into the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) dividing it into an upper (UCDW) and a lower (LCDW) layer. Thus, marine sediments from this area are a sensitive recorder for changes of the paleocirculation and relative variations in the deep-water formation in both, the northern Atlantic and Antarctic regions. Here we present results from the EXCHANGE Project which is located in this transition zone of the South Atlantic, the Southern Ocean and the Indian Ocean. In this project we investigate six sediment cores taken along a transect from continental slope at the southern tip of Africa towards the Conrad Rise. Pronounced glacial/interglacial variations in the dominance of NADW and LCDW across the transect are reflected in the clay mineral assemblage and carbon isotope composition of benthic foraminifera. High kaolinite/chlorite-ratios associated with high stable carbon isotope ratios indicate stronger influence of NADW during interglacials. In contrast, glacials are dominated by southern-derived LCDW. Our results suggest a fast southward advance of NADW-dominance during the last two terminations while the northward retreat of NADW, with the onset of glacial conditions, is more gradual. In general, interglacial sediments are also characterized by higher mean grain size diameters in the terrigenous silt fraction (10 to 63 microns), thus indicating stronger bottom currents. However, maximum grain size and sortable silt values are reached at the early stages of the last two glacial periods. Due to the generally weakened bottom current strength, as a result of reduced deep water formation, we would expect smaller values when compared with interglacial conditions. We therefore assume that eolian dust input from the Patagonian region plays a significant role especially in the early glacial

  5. Transport of sludge-derived organic pollutants to deep-sea sediments at deep water dump site 106

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takada, H.; Farrington, J.W.; Bothner, Michael H.; Johnson, C.G.; Tripp, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), coprostanol and epi-coprostanol, were detected in sediment trap and bottom sediment samples at the Deep Water Dump Site 106 located 185 km off the coast of New Jersey, in water depths from 2400 to 2900 m. These findings clearly indicate that organic pollutants derived from dumped sludge are transported through the water column and have accumulated on the deep-sea floor. No significant difference in LABs isomeric composition was observed among sludge and samples, indicating little environmental biodegradation of these compounds. LABs and coprostanol have penetrated down to a depth of 6 cm in sediment, indicating the mixing of these compounds by biological and physical processes. Also, in artificially resuspended surface sediments, high concentrations of LABs and coprostanols were detected, implying that sewage-derived organic pollutants initially deposited on the deep-sea floor can be further dispersed by resuspension and transport processes. Small but significant amounts of coprostanol were detected in the sediment from a control site at which no LABs were detected. The coprostanol is probably derived from feces of marine mammals and sea birds and/or from microbial or geochemical transformations of cholesterol. Polcyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediment trap samples from the dump site were largely from the sewage sludge and had a mixed petroleum and pyrogenic composition. In contrast, PAHs in sediments in the dump site were mainly pyrogenic; contributed either from sewage sludge or from atmospheric transport to the overlying waters. & 1994 American Chemical Society.

  6. Inter-annual variability and potential for selectivity in the diets of deep-water Antarctic echinoderms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigham, B. D.; Galley, E. A.; Smith, C. R.; Tyler, P. A.

    2008-11-01

    The continental shelf of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is a highly productive region but also unusually deep as a result of isostatic depression by the polar ice cap. The close coupling of surface processes with those of the benthos would be expected in such a seasonally variable environment; however, the cold, deep conditions of the WAP shelf may allow for the persistence of organic material in the sediments as a "food bank". Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments were determined from the gut contents of seven species of echinoderm and from the surficial sediment on the bathyal continental shelf. Samples were collected as part of the FOODBANCS programme during successive cruises in austral spring (October 2000) and austral autumn (March 2001). Pigments were identified and quantified using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A lack of qualitative selectivity was observed among species, compared to that observed for deep-water assemblages at temperate latitudes, supporting the theory of a persistent "food bank". However, significant quantitative differences were observed among species and between years and sampling location on the shelf. Species differences were marked between those we classified as "true" deposit feeders and those species whose diet also may be supplemented by scavenging and/or grazing.

  7. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

  8. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

  9. Depositional architecture and evolution of inner shelf to shelf edge delta systems since the Late Oliocene and their respone to the tectonic and sea level change, Pear River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Changsong; Zhang, Zhongtao; liu, Jingyan; Jiang, Jing

    2016-04-01

    The Pear River Mouth Basin is located in the northern continent margin of the South China Sea. Since the Late Oligocene, the long-term active fluvial systems (Paleo-Zhujiang) from the western basin margin bebouched into the northern continental margin of the South China Sea and formed widespread deltaic deposits in various depositional geomorphologies and tectonic settings. Based of integral analysys of abundant seismic, well logging and drilling core data, Depositional architecture and evolution of these delta systems and their respone to the tectonic and sea level change are documented in the study. There are two basic types of the delta systems which have been recognized: inner shelf delta deposited in shallow water enviroments and the outer shelf or shelf-edge delta systems occurred in deep water settings. The paleowater depths of these delta systems are around 30 to 80m (inner shelf delta) and 400-1000m (shelf-edge delta) estimated from the thickness (decompaction) of the delta front sequences. The study shows that the inner shelf delta systems are characterized by relatively thin delta forests (20-40m), numereous stacked distributary channel fills, relative coarse river mouth bar deposits and thin distal delta front or distal bar and prodelta deposits. In contrast, the outer shelf or shelf edge delta systems are characteristic of thick (300-800m) and steep (4-60) of deltaic clinoforms, which commonly display in 3D seismic profiles as "S" shape reflection. Large scale soft-sediment deformation structures, slump or debris flow deposits consisting mainly of soft-sediment deformed beds, blocks of sandstones and siltstones or mudstones widely developed in the delta front deposits. The shelf edge delta systems are typically associated with sandy turbidite fan deposits along the prodelta slopes, which may shift basinwards as the progradation of the delta systems. The delta systems underwent several regional cycles of evolution from inner shelf deltas to shelf edge

  10. 75 FR 23189 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-03

    ... the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., April 1, 2010, through 1200..., deep-water flatfish, rex sole, and arrowtooth flounder. This closure does not apply to fishing...

  11. 75 FR 38939 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Catcher...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ...(d), the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12... deep-water flatfish, rex sole, and arrowtooth flounder. After the effective date of this closure...

  12. 77 FR 46338 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... groundfish of the GOA (77 FR 15194, March 14, 2012), for the period 1200 hrs, A.l.t., July 1, 2012, through..., rockfish, deep-water flatfish, rex sole, and arrowtooth flounder. This closure does not apply to fishing...

  13. 78 FR 30242 - Fisheries of the Economic Exclusive Zone Off Alaska; Deep-Water Species Fishery by Vessels Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... the GOA (78 FR 13162, February 26, 2013), for the period 1200 hours, A.l.t., April 1, 2013, through..., rockfish, deep-water flatfish, rex sole, and arrowtooth flounder. This closure does not apply to fishing...

  14. Distribution of deep-water corals along the North American continental margins: Relationships with environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Tanya L.; Metaxas, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Despite the increasing attention to assemblages of deep-water corals in the past decade, much of this research has been focused on documenting and enumerating associated fauna. However, an understanding of the distribution of most species of coral and the ecological processes associated with these assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we qualitatively and quantitatively described the habitats of two families of deep-water corals in relation to six oceanographic factors (depth, slope, temperature, current, chlorophyll a concentration and substrate) on the Pacific and Atlantic Continental Margins of North America (PCM and ACM study areas, respectively). This study focused primarily on the distributions of Primnoidae and Paragorgiidae because of the large number of documented occurrences. For each environmental factor, deep-water coral locations were compared to the surrounding environment using χ2 tests. On both continental margins, coral locations were found to be not randomly distributed within the study areas, but were within specific ranges for most environmental factors. In the PCM study area, Paragorgiidae and Primnoidae locations were found in areas with slopes ranging from 0° to 10.0°, temperature from -2.0 to 11.0 °C and currents from 0 to 143 cm s -1. In the ACM study area, Paragorgiidae and Primnoidae locations were found in areas with slopes ranging from 0° to 1.4°, temperature ranging from 0 to 11.0 °C and currents ranging from 0 to 207 cm s -1. Although the patterns in habitat characteristics were similar, differences existed between families with respect to particular environmental factors. In both study areas, most environmental parameters in locations where corals occurred were significantly different from the average values of these parameters as determined with χ2 tests ( p<0.05) except for substrate in Paragorgiidae locations and depth in Primnoidae locations on the PCM. This is the first study to show coral distributional patterns

  15. Multidecadal freshening and lightening in the deep waters of the Bransfield Strait, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotto, Tiago S.; Kerr, Rodrigo; Mata, Mauricio M.; Garcia, Carlos A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The deep waters of the Bransfield Strait receive considerable amounts of water from the Weddell Sea continental shelf. The restricted connections to the surrounding ocean and relatively easier access makes the Bransfield Strait an important proxy region for monitoring changes in the dense Weddell Sea shelf water masses, which are an important precursor of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Long-term hydrographic data from the period 1960s-2010s showed freshening and lightening of the deep water masses of the Bransfield Strait, which was likely caused by large freshwater inputs originating from the western shelf of the Weddell Sea. The rates of freshening and lightening were -0.0010 ± 0.0005 yr-1 and -0.0016 ± 0.0014 kg m-3 yr-1 for the central basin, respectively, and -0.0010 ± 0.0006 yr-1 and -0.0029 ± 0.0013 kg m-3 yr-1 for the eastern basin, respectively. The deep waters showed a high degree of interannual thermohaline variability, which appeared to be caused by changes in the proportions of source water mass mixing between the years. Statistically significant negative correlations between salinity/neutral density fields and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) were observed (-0.56 and -0.62 for the central basin, respectively, and -0.58 and -0.68 for the eastern basin, respectively) between 1980 and 2014. During SAM positive phases, communication between the Weddell Sea and the Bransfield Strait is reduced, which leads to less saline and lighter water masses in the Bransfield Strait; however, the opposite trends are observed during SAM negative phases.

  16. Distal and proximal controls on the silicon stable isotope signature of North Atlantic Deep Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Gregory F.; Slater, Richard D.; Hain, Mathis P.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    It has been suggested that the uniquely high δ30Si signature of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) results from the contribution of isotopically fractionated silicic acid by mode and intermediate waters that are formed in the Southern Ocean and transported to the North Atlantic within the upper limb of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). Here, we test this hypothesis in a suite of ocean general circulation models (OGCMs) with widely varying MOCs and related pathways of nutrient supply to the upper ocean. Despite their differing MOC pathways, all models reproduce the observation of a high δ30Si signature in NADW, as well showing a major or dominant (46-62%) contribution from Southern Ocean mode/intermediate waters to its Si inventory. These models thus confirm that the δ30Si signature of NADW does indeed owe its existence primarily to the large-scale transport of a distal fractionation signal created in the surface Southern Ocean. However, we also find that more proximal fractionation of Si upwelled to the surface within the Atlantic Ocean must also play some role, contributing 20-46% of the deep Atlantic δ30Si gradient. Finally, the model suite reveals compensatory effects in the mechanisms contributing to the high δ30Si signature of NADW, whereby less export of high-δ30Si mode/intermediate waters to the North Atlantic is compensated by production of a high-δ30Si signal during transport to the NADW formation region. This trade-off decouples the δ30Si signature of NADW from the pathways of deep water upwelling associated with the MOC. Thus, whilst our study affirms the importance of cross-equatorial transport of Southern Ocean-sourced Si in producing the unique δ30Si signature of NADW, it also shows that the presence of a deep Atlantic δ30Si gradient does not uniquely constrain the pathways by which deep waters are returned to the upper ocean.

  17. Deep South Atlantic carbonate chemistry and increased interocean deep water exchange during last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jimin; Anderson, Robert F.; Jin, Zhangdong; Menviel, Laurie; Zhang, Fei; Ryerson, Fredrick J.; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2014-04-01

    Carbon release from the deep ocean at glacial terminations is a critical component of past climate change, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We present a 28,000-year high-resolution record of carbonate ion concentration, a key parameter of the global carbon cycle, at 5-km water depth in the South Atlantic. We observe similar carbonate ion concentrations between the Last Glacial Maximum and the late Holocene, despite elevated concentrations in the glacial surface ocean. This strongly supports the importance of respiratory carbon accumulation in a stratified deep ocean for atmospheric CO2 reduction during the last ice age. After ˜9 μmol/kg decline during Heinrich Stadial 1, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion concentration rose by ˜24 μmol/kg from the onset of Bølling to Pre-boreal, likely caused by strengthening North Atlantic Deep Water formation (Bølling) or increased ventilation in the Southern Ocean (Younger Drays) or both (Pre-boreal). The ˜15 μmol/kg decline in deep water carbonate ion since ˜10 ka is consistent with extraction of alkalinity from seawater by deep-sea CaCO3 compensation and coral reef growth on continental shelves during the Holocene. Between 16,600 and 15,000 years ago, deep South Atlantic carbonate ion values converged with those at 3.4-km water depth in the western equatorial Pacific, as did carbon isotope and radiocarbon values. These observations suggest a period of enhanced lateral exchange of carbon between the deep South Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, probably due to an increased transfer of momentum from southern westerlies to the Southern Ocean. By spreading carbon-rich deep Pacific waters around Antarctica for upwelling, invigorated interocean deep water exchange would lead to more efficient CO2 degassing from the Southern Ocean, and thus to an atmospheric CO2 rise, during the early deglaciation.

  18. Deep water temperature, carbonate ion, and ice volume changes across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusz, A. E.; Thunell, R. C.; Miller, K. G.

    2011-06-01

    Paired benthic foraminiferal stable isotope and Mg/Ca data are used to estimate bottom water temperature (BWT) and ice volume changes associated with the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT), the largest global climate event of the past 50 Myr. We utilized ODP Sites 1090 and 1265 in the South Atlantic to assess seawater δ18O (δw), Antarctic ice volume, and sea level changes across the EOT (˜33.8-33.54 Ma). We also use benthic δ13C data to reconstruct the sources of the deep water masses in this region during the EOT. Our data, together with previously published records, indicate that a pulse of Northern Component Water influenced the South Atlantic immediately prior to and following the EOT. Benthic δ18O records show a 0.5‰ increase at ˜33.8 Ma (EOT-1) that represents a ˜2°C cooling and a small (˜10 m) eustatic fall that is followed by a 1.0‰ increase associated with Oi-1. The expected cooling of deep waters at Oi-1 (˜33.54 Ma) is not apparent in our Mg/Ca records. We suggest the cooling is masked by coeval changes in the carbonate saturation state (Δ[CO32-]) which affect the Mg/Ca data. To account for this, the BWT, ice volume, and δw estimates are corrected for a change in the Δ[CO32-] of deep waters on the basis of recently published work. Corrected BWT at Sites 1090 and 1265 show a ˜1.5°C cooling coincident with Oi-1 and an average δw increase of ˜0.75‰. The increase in ice volume during Oi-1 resulted in a ˜70 m drop in global sea level and the development of an Antarctic ice sheet that was near modern size or slightly larger.

  19. AUV Reveals Deep-Water Coral Mound Distribution, Morphology and Oceanography in the Florida Straits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmueck, M.; Eberli, G. P.; Viggiano, D. A.; Correa, T.; Rathwell, G.; Luo, J.

    2006-12-01

    Since the 1960's dredge sampling and submersible dives have discovered numerous mound-forming deep- water corals in water depths of 400-800 m in the Straits of Florida. This extensive collection of samples and observations however can not be put into a geomorphologic context as existing bathymetric charts do not resolve coral mounds. To make progress in understanding the distribution and genesis of coral mounds, maps of morphology and oceanographic conditions resolving features at the 1-10 m scale are needed. On 11-18 December 2005 the C-Surveyor II(TM) mapped five sites ranging from 14-48 km2 in 590-875 m water acquiring 1-3 m resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter together with subbottom profiles, current vectors, salinity, and temperature. The areas mapped with the AUV contain hundreds of coral mounds with heights of 1-120 m. Mound distribution, morphology and currents are different for each survey site. Coral mounds develop on off-bank transported sediment ridges and slump features at the toe-of-slope of Great Bahama bank, while chevron pattern ridges and sinusoidal ridges are found further east in the Straits. Currents range from 0.1-0.5 m/s. At two sites currents reversed every 6 hours indicating tidal control. The AUV surveys and subsequent ground truthing with a drop camera and a submersible revealed a surprising abundance and diversity of deep-water coral habitats. The boundaries between mound fields and the barren muddy or sandy seafloor are sharp. Hull- mounted multi-beam reconnaissance mapping helped us select the most promising coral mound areas to optimize the use of valuable AUV time. Such combined use of hull-mounted and AUV-based mapping enables efficient environmental characterization of large deep-water regions such as the Florida Straits. The synoptic high-resolution datasets acquired by the multiple sensors on board the AUV enable for the first time a comprehensive assessment of deep-water coral mound ecosystems. Utilization of such

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water masses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, J. G.; Herguera, J. C.; Ferreira-Bartrina, V.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.

    2014-12-01

    This study provides new data for the establishment of a carbon biogeochemical dynamics baseline in the deep Gulf of Mexico (GM) based on carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon. Water samples from 40 deep-water stations south of 25˚N were collected during XIXIMI-2 cruise, July 2011, aboard BO/Justo Sierra. Vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were further measured in each station. In the Stable Isotopes Laboratory at CICESE we determined the carbon isotopic composition of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (δ13CDIC). Remarkably, density, DO and δ13CCID profiles showed a clear difference between the Loop current and the deep-waters of the GM south of 25˚N. We found the following average δ13CCID values in the Loop current and in the deep-waters of the Gulf: subtropical underwater (SUW): 0.73±0.06‰ and 0.86±0.04‰; 18 degree water (18W): 0.76 ± 0.08‰ and 0.58± 0.06‰; North Atlantic central water (NACW): 0.77 ± 0.05‰ and 0.71 ± 0.09‰; South Atlantic central water (SACW): 0.80 ± 0.08‰ and 0.77 ± 0.07‰; Antartic intermediate water (AAIW): 1.00 ± 0.06‰ and 0.90 ± 0.08‰; North Atlantic deep water (NADW): 1.03 ± 0.06‰ and 1.01 ± 0.10‰. We will discuss how the biological component, δ13CCID-BIO, of subsurface water masses match very closely the apparent oxygen utilization relation described by Kroopnick, 1985, with the exception of SUW, and as a consequence the 18W is probably the water mass most affected by organic carbon remineralization processes in the GM south of 25˚N. We further show how these waters seem to store a larger proportion of anthropogenic carbon than the deeper water masses.

  1. Seismic characterization of deep-water pipe structures in the Levant Basin, SE Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eruteya, Ovie Emmanuel; Waldmann, Nicolas; Schalev, Dagan; Makovsky, Yizhaq; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of a new deep-water (1100 m - 1500 m) high resolution 3D seismic dataset covering part of the central Levant Basin, offshore Israel reveals previously undocumented evidences for subsurface fluid flow in the post-Messinian overburden manifested as pipe structures. Interestingly, these pipe structures are genetically and spatially contextualized east and west of the study area, all emanating from the Messinian evaporite substratum. Pipes in the western group accounts for 83% of the pipe population, are crudely cylindrical, oval to elliptical in planform, with diameter and height ranging ca. 350 m - 2000 m and 320 m - 420 m, respectively. Internal configuration within this group varies from chaotic to concave upward reflections diagnostic of fluid induced collapse. Pipes in the eastern group are seepage pipes appearing conical in shape, with height of ~350 m - 510 m and diameter of 320 m - 420 m. The western group indicates an episode of fluid flow till the mid-Pliocene, compared to late Pliocene in the eastern group where successive mass wasting events during the late Pliocene plugged piping. A conceptual model for the pipes in the western group is proposed to have occurred from subjacent dissolution of the Messinian evaporite under deep-water marine conditions during the Pliocene by vertically focused fluid flow from intra-Messinian realm dissolving the top evaporites and inducing systematic collapse in the overburden. The onset of which may have been triggered by seismicity. Conversely, pipes in the eastern group are proposed to develop from breaching the top evaporite by pressurized fluids that developed from lateral pressure transfer due to differential loading of the overburden and salt tectonics. Most likely, these fluids are biogenic gas since the major gas fields in deep-waters offshore Israel and close to the study area are of this composition. The pipe structures identified in the study area extend the current understanding of fluid flow subsequent

  2. CP survey of deep water structures and subsea installations using an ROV

    SciTech Connect

    Leask, L.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The successful and efficient CP survey of a deep water structure using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has remained an enigma to many corrosion engineers in oil companies. The location of the corrosion group within the company structure often plays a major role in the success of the project. Operators locate their corrosion departments in different groups, some in the offshore/onshore operations and others in the design group. This location often has a bearing on the financial and operational approach to the project. This paper discusses how a successful CP survey is both an achievable and exciting project with experienced pre- planning and selection of the correct equipment.

  3. Deep water challenges: Oil industry moves off continental shelf; meets new oceanographic data-gathering challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Mardell, G.; Flynn, J.

    1995-08-01

    While offshore oil industry activities move from the continental shelves to the continental slope and even onto the abyssal plains of the deep oceans, new oceanographic problems arise - from riser-deforming internal waves to ocean-floor avalanches. As well as soliton-induced currents, other subsurface flows need to be monitored to provide data in support of wide ranging underwater activities, including exploration drilling, deployment of subsea systems, diver and ROV operations, and pipe design, lay and inspection. This article examines some of the work carried out over the past year or so with data-gathering deep water moorings.

  4. Cathodic protection survey of deep-water structures and subsea installations

    SciTech Connect

    Leask, L.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The successful and efficient cathodic protection (CP) survey of a deep water structure using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) has remained an enigma to many corrosion engineers in oil companies. The location of the corrosion group within the company structure often plays a major role in the success of the project. Operators locate their corrosion departments in different groups, some in the offshore/onshore operations and others in the design group. This location often has a bearing on the financial and operational approach to the project. The author discusses how a successful CP survey is both an achievable and exciting project with experienced preplanning and selection of the correct equipment.

  5. On the synoptic hydrography of intermediate and deep water masses in the Iceland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Aken, H. M.; De Boer, C. J.

    1995-02-01

    The hydrography of intermediate deep water masses in the Iceland Basin is studied from quasi-synoptic surveys carried out in 1990 and 1991. The general water mass structure was identical for both years. The interaction and mixing of the different water types present in the basin is reviewed by means of property-property plots, vertical tracer sections and isopycnal analyses. It appears that overflow waters from the Norwegian Sea are modified in successive stages during their descent into the deep Iceland Basin. They mix with Sub-Polar Mode Water at short distances from the sills in the Faroe Bank Channel and on the Iceland-Faroe Ridge, thereby forming Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water. This water type entrains Labrador Sea water during the descent into the deep Iceland Basin, where Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water is further modified mainly by diapycnal mixing with overlying Lower Deep Water, which contains a large fraction of Antarctic Bottom Water. At intermediate levels Labrador Sea Water and Intermediate Water appear to mix laterally with a slope water mass flowing along the Icelandic and Reykjanes slopes. This slope water is formed by the direct mixing of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water with Sub-Polar Mode Water and differs from the water mass, encountered in the central Iceland Basin. The intermediate and deep circulation in the Iceland Basin has a cyclonic character with smaller-scale variations due to topographic steering along ridges on the Icelandic slope.

  6. Deep-water fossorial shrimps from the Oligocene Kiscell Clay of Hungary: Taxonomy and palaeoecology

    PubMed Central

    HYŽNÝ, MATÚŠ; DULAI, ALFRÉD

    2015-01-01

    We describe deep-water ghost shrimp assemblages from the otherwise well known Oligocene Kiscell Clay in Hungary. The described fossorial shrimps (Decapoda: Callianassidae and Ctenochelidae) include: Ctenocheles rupeliensis (younger synonym Callianassa nuda) and Lepidophthalmus crateriferus (younger synonym Callianassa brevimanus). The fossil material of the former species is assigned to Ctenocheles based on the morphology of the major cheliped, particularly the pectinate fingers, bulbous propodus, cup-shaped carpus and elongated merus. Lepidophthalmus crateriferus from the Oligocene of Hungary is the first unequivocal fossil record of the genus, which is distinguished in the fossil record on the basis of the presence of a meral blade and meral hook on the major cheliped. Lepidophthalmus is today known exclusively from shallow-water environments. The finding of a deep-water fossil representative of Lepidophthalmus therefore appears to be a reverse of the common pattern of groups shifting environments from onshore to offshore over geological time, as seen in many taxa. The presence of Lepidophthalmus crateriferus comb. nov. in the Kiscell Clay therefore suggests different ecological requirements for at least some populations of this genus in the geological past. PMID:25908897

  7. A new deep-water Astyris species (Buccinoidea: Columbellidae) from the southeastern Pacific.

    PubMed

    Araya, Juan Francisco; Catalán, Ricardo; Aliaga, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Marine mollusks from northern Chile and from the Región de Atacama in particular have been sparsely documented, and only a few works have reviewed the area (see Araya & Araya, 2015; Labrín et al. 2015; Araya & Valdés 2016). Mollusks from deep water and offshore areas are one of the least known groups and, apart from some classic works from the 19th century, only McLean (1970), Bernard (1983), Véliz and Vásquez (2000), Fraussen & Haddorn (2000), Houart (2003), Vilvens & Sellanes (2010), and Araya (2013) have included deep-water molluscan species from northern Chile. Among the Neogastropoda, the Columbellidae constitute a quite diverse and well-distributed family of small snails, with about seven hundred extant species distributed in 70 genera (deMaintenon, 2014). Most columbellids are active epibenthic carnivores or scavengers; their shells are small, normally between 3 and 20 mm in height and they can have determinate growth, with many adult shells presenting a thickened outer lip with denticles on the interior surface (Squires, 2015). In the southeastern Pacific off Chile this family is represented by only 14 species, all from shallow water, mostly found in the northern and central parts of the country (Valdovinos, 1999). PMID:27470793

  8. A new deep-water goatfish of the genus Upeneus (Mullidae) from Vanuatu, South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Uiblein, Franz; Causse, Romain

    2013-01-01

    A new goatfish, Upeneus vanuatu (Mullidae), is described based on five specimens collected off two islands of Vanuatu (South Pacific), at depths of 191-321 m, and compared with five closely related species: Upeneus davidaroni (Red Sea), U. mascareinsis (Western Indian Ocean), U. stenopsis (northern Australia, Philippines, 127-275 m), and the more shallow-occurring Indo-West Pacific species U. subvittatus (26-120 m) and U. vittatus (deep-water Upeneus species, the so-called "stenopsis" species group can be distinguished from four other species groups that were established in earlier studies in order to facilitate intrageneric comparisons. The ecological and evolutionary significance of deep-water goatfishes is briefly discussed. PMID:26217854

  9. Environmental risk management and preparations for the first deep water well in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, F.

    1996-12-31

    Statoil is among the leaders in protecting health, environment and safety in all aspects of the business. The evaluations of business opportunities and development of blocks opened by authorities for petroleum exploration, are assessed in accordance with the goals for environmental protection. Progressive improvement of environmental performance is secured through proper environmental risk management. In 1995, Statoil, the technical operator on Block 210 off the Nigerian coast, was the first company to drill in deep waters in this area. An exploration well was drilled in a water depth of about 320 meters. The drilling preparations included environmental assessment, drillers Hazop, oil spill drift calculations, oil spill response plans and environmental risk analysis. In the environmental preparations for the well, Statoil adhered to local and national government legislation, as well as to international guidelines and company standards. Special attention was paid to the environmental sensitivity of potentially affected areas. Statoil co-operated with experienced local companies, with the authorities and other international and national oil companies. This being the first deep water well offshore Nigeria, it was a challenge to co-operate with other operators in the area. The preparations that were carried out, will set the standard for future environmental work in the area. Co-operation difficulties in the beginning were turned positively into a attitude to the environmental challenge.

  10. Use of deep water lagoons for reducing sewage toxicity prior to wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.R.; Zuiderveen, J.A.; Belcher, B.; McGinley, P.; Birge, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Investigations were conducted to determine the effectiveness of deep lagoons as a means of wastewater pretreatment. A lagoon system associated with a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was selected for study and parameters identified for monitoring included toxicity, metals, total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia. This system included two lagoons, with 7--15 day hydraulic retention times, fed sequentially with untreated water. Toxicity and other parameters were measured for raw influent water, the two lagoon outfalls, and the final WWTP effluent. In seven-day chronic tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia, the NOEC of influent water was as low as 20%, and 100% mortality occurred at 40%. Outfall from the first deep water lagoon showed reduced toxicity. The NOEC was > 50% but complete mortality occurred in undiluted effluent. Further reduction in toxicity occurred in the second lagoon. Its undiluted effluent had no effect on survival, but did markedly reduce fecundity. The final effluent discharged from the treatment plant affected neither survival nor fecundity. Results of this investigation support the use of deep water lagoons as an effective and economical means of pretreating wastewater. This approach offers promise for municipal waters, industrial effluents and stormwater runoff.

  11. Renewal rates of east Atlantic deep water estimated by inversion of /sup 14/C data

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitzer, R.

    1987-03-15

    The renewal of the deep water of the East Atlantic and its large-scale internal circulation are studied on the basis of the distributions of potential temperature, silicate, ..sigma..CO/sub 2/, and /sup 14/C. An isopycnal multibox model including advection, mixing, and sources and sinks is set up and described. Tracer data are input for the model, and balance equations for the various properties for the boxes of the model serve as constraints for the determination of water fluxes, mixing coefficients, and source parameters. Extremal values for various model parameters that are consistent with the tracer data (satisfy the balance equations within the estimated tolerances) are calculated by linear programming techniques. /sup 14/C data are seen to be valuable in determining absolute flow rates. Model results confirm the importance of the Romanche Fracture Zone for the renewal of east Atlantic deep water. Eastward flows through the Romanche Fracture Zone were found to be between 2.6 and 5.1 Sv. Flows through the Vema Fracture Zone amount to at most 20% of the Romanche Fracture Zone inflow. Contributions of Antarctic Bottom Water at the southern end of the East Atlantic and of Iceland Scotland Overflow Water at the northern end are very small (<5% of equatorial inflow). Diapycnal mixing coefficients are between 1 and 10 cm/sup 2//s, and values for the dissolution rates of silicate and carbon are in the expected range.

  12. Atlantic Deep-water Response to the Early Pliocene Shoaling of the Central American Seaway

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David B.; Jung, Simon J. A.; Kroon, Dick; Hodell, David A.; Lourens, Lucas J.; Raymo, Maureen E.

    2015-01-01

    The early Pliocene shoaling of the Central American Seaway (CAS), ~4.7–4.2 million years ago (mega annum-Ma), is thought to have strengthened Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The associated increase in northward flux of heat and moisture may have significantly influenced the evolution of Pliocene climate. While some evidence for the predicted increase in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation exists in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic, similar evidence is missing in the wider Atlantic. Here, we present stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope records from the Southeast Atlantic-a key region for monitoring the southern extent of NADW. Using these data, together with other δ13C and δ18O records from the Atlantic, we assess the impact of the early Pliocene CAS shoaling phase on deep-water circulation. We find that NADW formation was vigorous prior to 4.7 Ma and showed limited subsequent change. Hence, the overall structure of the deep Atlantic was largely unaffected by the early Pliocene CAS shoaling, corroborating other evidence that indicates larger changes in NADW resulted from earlier and deeper shoaling phases. This finding implies that the early Pliocene shoaling of the CAS had no profound impact on the evolution of climate. PMID:26193070

  13. Impact of deep-water fish farms on benthic macrofauna communities under different hydrodynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Valdemarsen, Thomas; Hansen, Pia Kupka; Ervik, Arne; Bannister, Raymond J

    2015-12-30

    In this study the environmental impacts of two fish farms located over deep water (180-190 m) were compared. MC-Farm was located at a site with slightly higher water currents (mean current speed 3-5 cms(-1)) than LC-farm (<2 cms(-1)). Macrofauna composition, bioirrigation and benthic fluxes (CO2 and NH4(+)) were quantified at different stages of the production cycle, revealing very different impact of the two farms. Macrofauna abundance and bioirrigation were stimulated compared to a non-impacted reference site at MC-farm, while macrofauna diversity was only moderately reduced. In contrast, macrofauna communities and related parameters were severely impoverished at LC-Farm. This study suggests that deep-water fish farms should not be sited in low current areas (<2 cms(-1)), since this will hamper waste dispersal and aggravate environmental impacts. On the other hand, fish farming at slightly more dynamic sites can lead to stimulated benthic macrofauna communities and only moderate environmental impacts. PMID:26443387

  14. Atlantic Deep-water Response to the Early Pliocene Shoaling of the Central American Seaway.

    PubMed

    Bell, David B; Jung, Simon J A; Kroon, Dick; Hodell, David A; Lourens, Lucas J; Raymo, Maureen E

    2015-01-01

    The early Pliocene shoaling of the Central American Seaway (CAS), ~4.7-4.2 million years ago (mega annum-Ma), is thought to have strengthened Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The associated increase in northward flux of heat and moisture may have significantly influenced the evolution of Pliocene climate. While some evidence for the predicted increase in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation exists in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic, similar evidence is missing in the wider Atlantic. Here, we present stable carbon (δ(13)C) and oxygen (δ(18)O) isotope records from the Southeast Atlantic-a key region for monitoring the southern extent of NADW. Using these data, together with other δ(13)C and δ(18)O records from the Atlantic, we assess the impact of the early Pliocene CAS shoaling phase on deep-water circulation. We find that NADW formation was vigorous prior to 4.7 Ma and showed limited subsequent change. Hence, the overall structure of the deep Atlantic was largely unaffected by the early Pliocene CAS shoaling, corroborating other evidence that indicates larger changes in NADW resulted from earlier and deeper shoaling phases. This finding implies that the early Pliocene shoaling of the CAS had no profound impact on the evolution of climate. PMID:26193070

  15. High Biodiversity on a Deep-Water Reef in the Eastern Fram Strait

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kirstin S.; Soltwedel, Thomas; Bergmann, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We report on the distribution and abundance of megafauna on a deep-water rocky reef (1796–2373 m) in the Fram Strait, west of Svalbard. Biodiversity and population density are high, with a maximum average of 26.7±0.9 species m−2 and 418.1±49.6 individuals m−2 on the east side of the reef summit. These figures contrast with the surrounding abyssal plain fauna, with an average of only 18.1±1.4 species and 29.4±4.3 individuals m−2 (mean ± standard error). The east side of the reef summit, where the highest richness and density of fauna are found, faces into the predominant bottom current, which likely increases in speed to the summit and serves as a source of particulate food for the numerous suspension feeders present there. We conclude that the observed faunal distribution patterns could be the result of hydrodynamic patterns and food availability above and around the reef. To our knowledge, this study is the first to describe the distribution and diversity of benthic fauna on a rocky reef in deep water. PMID:25153985

  16. Similar glacial and Holocene deep water circulation inferred from southeast Pacific benthic foraminiferal carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Katsumi; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    1999-04-01

    We present Holocene and last glacial maximum (LGM) oxygen and carbon isotope measurements on Planulina wuellerstorfi in six southeast Pacific cores. Sedimentation rates are low in this part of the ocean, and measurements were made on individual foraminiferal shells in order to identify the Holocene and glacial individuals on the basis of their extreme δ18O. The new δ13C data were combined with previous P. wuellerstorfi data for interpretation of global thermohaline circulation. Data from the Southern Ocean were examined closely for regional coherency and a few anomalous δ13C values suspected of having productivity overprint were removed. The resulting global δ13C distributions and gradients indicate that the deep water circulation was similar during the Holocene and LGM. This interpretation brings δ13C data to a better agreement with Cd/Ca data and marks a sharp contrast with a widely held view based on δ13C measurements that the glacial Southern Ocean was the terminus of the thermohaline circulation. The proposed presence of glacial North Atlantic Deep Water does not necessarily contradict the postulated presence of Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water.

  17. Deep-water carbonate slope failure events in a newly discovered Silurian basin, Blue Ridge province, southern Appalachians, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Unrug, R. )

    1991-03-01

    Siliciclastic deep-water turbidites of the Walden Creek Group, Ocoee Supergroup, underlying the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, contain olistolith blocks and olistostromal debris-flow breccia beds. Paleozoic fossils discovered recently in the olistoliths indicate Silurian age of the carbonates. The Walden Creek Group is therefore Silurian or younger, not late Proterozoic in age, as believed previously. The carbonate olistoliths and breccias formed by collapse of post-Taconic Silurian carbonate-dominated basin present in the Blue Ridge province of the Southern Appalachians into the younger basin of the Walden Creek Group. Two modes of occurrence of the olistoliths are present: (1) discrete horizons in which olistoliths are sitting spaced ten to hundreds of meters apart underneath a widespread conglomerate bed and (2) accumulations of olistoliths in localized stacked horizons in the vertical sequence of the enclosing siliciclastic rocks. Both modes can be related to failure of active fault scarps. Rocks of the olistolith are lithologically varied and record an older event of slope failure within the Silurian carbonate-dominated basin. Three facies assemblages representing two sedimentary environments are present in the olistoliths. Facies assemblage A includes oolitic limestone, stromatolite, carbonate breccia encrusted by stromatolite, and massive sandy limestone. It represents a high-energy, shallow-water, carbonate platform environment. Facies assemblage B consists of bedded dark limestone, alternating with black shale, and represents sediments of the carbonate platform slope. Facies assemblage C includes carbonate breccias intercalated in the bedded limestones and shales and is interpreted as deposits of the lower slope formed by failure of the carbonate platform margin.

  18. Salt tectonics and structural styles in the deep-water province of the Cabo Frio Region, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Mohriak, W.U.; Macedo, J.M.; Castellani, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Cabo Frio region, offshore Rio de Janeiro, lies between two of the most prolific Brazilian oil provinces, the Campos and Santos basins. Major geologic features have been identified using a multidisciplinary approach integrating seismic, gravity, petrographic, and borehole data. The Cabo Frio frontier region is characterized by marked changes in stratigraphy and structural style and is unique among the Brazilian marginal basins. Major geologic features include the deflection of the coastline and pre-Aptian hings line from northeast to east; a large east-striking offshore graben related to salt tectonics; a northwest-trending lineament extending from oceanic crust to the continent; basement-involved landward-dipping (antithetic) normal faults in shallow water; a stable platform in the southern Campos Basin; a thick sequence of postbreakup intrusive and extrusive rocks; and, near the Santos Basin, a mobilized sequence of deep-water postrift strata affected by landward-dipping listric normal faults. These faults are unusual in salt-related passive margins in that they dip landward, apparently detach on the Aptian salt, and show large late Tertiary offsets. Locally, the older sequences do not show substantial growth in the downthrown blocks. South of the Rio de Janeiro coast, a phenomenal landward-dipping fault system detaches blocks of the Albian platform to the north and, to the south, coincides with the depositional limit of the Albian platform. Two end-member processes of salt tectonics in the Cabo Frio region result in either synthetic or antithetic basal shear along the fault weld under the overburden: (1) thin-skinned processes, in which the listric faults were caused by salt flow in response to gravity forces related to massive clastic progradation from the continent; and (2) thick-skinned processes, in which faulting was indirectly triggered by diastrophic causes or disequilibrium in the basement topography.

  19. Reconstructing late Quaternary deep-water masses in the eastern Arctic Ocean using benthonic Ostracoda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, R. Ll; Whatley, R.C.; Cronin, T. M.; Dowsett, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of Ostracoda in three long cores from the deep eastern Arctic Ocean was studied to determine the palaeoceanographical history of the Eurasian Basin during the late Quaternary. The samples for this study were obtained from the Lomonosov Ridge, Morris Jesup Rise and Yermak Plateau during the Arctic 91 expedition. Ostracoda previously studied in coretops at the same sites as the present study have shown that individual species have a strong association with different water masses and bathymetry. Throughout the late Quaternary, cores exhibit ostracod-rich layers separated by barren intervals. On the basis of biostratigraphical, isotopic and palaeomagnetic data the fossiliferous levels are interpreted as representing interglacial stages. The twenty most significant species were selected for subsequent quantitative investigation using Cluster and Factor analyses, in order to determine similarity and variance between the assemblages. An additional statistical method employing Modern Analogues and the Squared Chord Distance dissimilarity coefficient was utilized to compare the present late Quaternary fossil samples with a modern Arctic database. The results reveal a major faunal division within the Arctic Ocean Deep Water (AODW). Highly abundant and diverse assemblages within the cores were found to group and have good analogues with the Recent bathyal depth (1000-2500 m) upper AODW assemblages. Conversely, assemblages with low abundance and diversity correlate well with abyssal depth (> 3000 m) lower AODW assemblages. The palaeoceanographical history is complicated by the influence of adjacent water masses such as Canada Basin Deep Water (CBDW), Greenland Sea Deep Water (GSDW) and most importantly, Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW), which all had an influence on the ostracod assemblages during the late Quaternary. An enhanced flow of warm saline AIW into the Eurasian Basin results in species-rich upper AODW assemblages having good analogues down to 2750 m

  20. Estimation of the denitrification in Baltic Sea deep water from gas tension measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, Annekatrin; Schmidt, Martin; Schneider, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Denitrification is considered to be the most important process removing nitrogen in oceanic waters. 50-70% of marine denitrification occurs in organic rich sediments and oxygen depleted water bodies of continental shelf regions or marginal seas like the Baltic Sea, where a high percentage of riverine discharge of nitrogen is denitrified before entering the open ocean. Measurements of the gas tension (= sum of the partial pressures of all dissolved gases in the water) provide a new experimental way for the quantification of denitrification by directly measuring the reaction product of this process. Continuous pumping of water from a defined depth trough the gas tension device with a pump-CTD allows getting integrated results. Changes in N2 concentrations were calculated from gas tension by subtracting the partial pressures of the most important other dissolved gases (O2, Ar, CO2, H2S, water vapor). The pO2, pCO2 and H2S-concentrations were measured; other parameters (pAr, pH2O, solubility coefficients) were obtained from temperature and salinity. The method allows the estimation of N2-concentrations with a maximum error of 0.5%, corresponding to a standard error of 1.5 μmol L-1. Results of gas tension measurements and calculation of N2 concentrations in the Gotland Basin deep water, central Baltic Sea, from 2008 and 2009 are presented. In the deep water below the permanent halocline the estimated N2 partial pressure is continuously rising towards the oxygen depleted water layers. The calculated N2 excess compared to equilibrium concentration reached values up to 20 μmol N2 L-1 in the stagnant anoxic water layer, indicating a mean N release of 10 μmol N L-1 y-1 after 4 years of stagnation. The increase of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (due to the N2 excess and formation of ammonium in the deep water) in relation to nitrogen background values was compared with the increase of total inorganic carbon due to mineralization processes. The resulting C:N ratios were

  1. Simulation of Deep Water Renewal in Crater Lake, Oregon, USA under Current and Future Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Wood, T. M.; Wherry, S.; Girdner, S.

    2015-12-01

    We applied a 1-dimensional lake model developed to simulate deep mixing related to thermobaric instabilities in temperate lakes to Crater Lake, a 590-m deep caldera lake in Oregon's Cascade Range known for its stunning deep blue color and extremely clear water, in order to determine the frequency of deep water renewal in future climate conditions. The lake model was calibrated with 6 years of water temperature profiles, and then simulated 10 years of validation data with an RMSE ranging from 0.81°C at 50 m depth to 0.04°C at 350-460 m depth. The simulated time series of heat content in the deep lake accurately captured extreme years characterized by weak and strong deep water renewal. The lake model uses wind speed and lake surface temperature (LST) as boundary conditions. LST projections under six climate scenarios from the CMIP5 intermodel comparison project (2 representative concentration pathways X 3 general circulation models) were evaluated with air2water, a simple lumped model that only requires daily values of downscaled air temperature. air2water was calibrated with data from 1993-2011, resulting in a RMSE between simulated and observed daily LST values of 0.68°C. All future climate scenarios project increased water temperature throughout the water column and a substantive reduction in the frequency of deepwater renewal events. The least extreme scenario (CNRM-CM5, RCP4.5) projects the frequency of deepwater renewal events to decrease from about 1 in 2 years in the present to about 1 in 3 years by 2100. The most extreme scenario (HadGEM2-ES, RCP8.5) projects the frequency of deepwater renewal events to be less than 1 in 7 years by 2100 and lake surface temperatures never cooling to less than 4°C after 2050. In all RCP4.5 simulations the temperature of the entire water column is greater than 4°C for increasing periods of time. In the RCP8.5 simulations, the temperature of the entire water column is greater than 4°C year round by the year 2060 (HadGEM2

  2. Deciduous and Evergreen Trees Rely on Deep Water Throughout the Year in a Subtropical Seasonal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellsworth, P.

    2010-12-01

    In subtropical and tropical seasonal forests, trees have adapted to low shallow soil water availability during the dry season by modifying root density, rooting depth, and leaf phenology. Here we test the well known hypothesis that water uptake in deciduous trees is restricted to the shallow soil layer, which prevents them from sustaining transpiring leaves during the dry season. Evergreens, on the other hand, access perennially available deep water sources, allowing them to maintain their transpiring leaves during the dry season. To determine where in the soil profile deciduous and evergreen trees take up water, we used stable isotope analysis to measure water source use of two deciduous and three evergreen species for a period of 13 months. In addition, to test the possibility that leaflessness could alter the isotopic composition of stem water, we measured the isotopic variation in stem water caused by artificial defoliation of an evergreen species. Deciduous and evergreen trees took up water from the same depths in both the wet and dry seasons. Deciduous and evergreen trees used approximately 51% deep water (50-150cm) throughout the year, while soil from 0-20cm was the least important water source with 24 and 6% of water uptake for wet and dry seasons, respectively. Low use of shallow water (0-20cm) in the wet season was due to inconstant water availability. Though the top 20cm of soil is the location of most nutrients, the soil’s limited water availability requires plants to have access to a more reliable deep water source to meet both their dry and wet season transpirational demands. This apparent spatial uncoupling in water and nutrient uptake denotes separate resource allocation for nutrient and water acquisition. Deciduous trees showed isotopic enrichment of stem water compared to evergreen plants only during the period that deciduous trees were leafless. We explain this as isotopic enrichment of fixed pool of stem water by evaporation as our defoliation

  3. Plastic debris ingested by deep-water fish of the Ionian Sea (Eastern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasopoulou, Aikaterini; Mytilineou, Chryssi; Smith, Christopher J.; Papadopoulou, Konstantia N.

    2013-04-01

    Debris has been recognized as a global environmental problem including within deep habitats. From 26 fish species (1504 specimens) caught in the Eastern Ionian Sea during deep-water long-line surveys, plastic debris was found in 24 individuals of Galeus melastomus (3.2%) and single individuals of Pteroplatytrygon violacea, Squalus blainville, Etmopterus spinax, and Pagellus bogaraveo. The occurrence of debris among their food was infrequent. Ingested debris included primarily plastics (86.5%) and to a lesser extent pieces of metal and wood. Among ingested plastics, fragments of hard plastic material constituted the highest proportion (56.0%), followed by plastic bag fragments (22.0%), fragments of fishing gears (19.0%) and textile fibers (3.0%). Among the species with ingested debris, G. melastomus swallowed all debris categories; P. violacea and S. blainville ingested plastic bag fragments, whereas pieces of hard plastics were found in E. spinax and P. bogaraveo.

  4. Seamount egg-laying grounds of the deep-water skate Bathyraja richardsoni.

    PubMed

    Henry, L-A; Stehmann, M F W; De Clippele, L; Findlay, H S; Golding, N; Roberts, J M

    2016-08-01

    Highly localized concentrations of elasmobranch egg capsules of the deep-water skate Bathyraja richardsoni were discovered during the first remotely operated vehicle (ROV) survey of the Hebrides Terrace Seamount in the Rockall Trough, north-east Atlantic Ocean. Conductivity-temperature-depth profiling indicated that the eggs were bathed in a specific environmental niche of well-oxygenated waters between 4·20 and 4·55° C, and salinity 34·95-35·06, on a coarse to fine-grained sandy seabed on the seamount's eastern flank, whereas a second type of egg capsule (possibly belonging to the skate Dipturus sp.) was recorded exclusively amongst the reef-building stony coral Solenosmilia variabilis. The depths of both egg-laying habitats (1489-1580 m) provide a de facto refuge from fisheries mortality for younger life stages of these skates. PMID:27350418

  5. Diversity-based acoustic communication with a glider in deep water.

    PubMed

    Song, H C; Howe, Bruce M; Brown, Michael G; Andrew, Rex K

    2014-03-01

    The primary use of underwater gliders is to collect oceanographic data within the water column and periodically relay the data at the surface via a satellite connection. In summer 2006, a Seaglider equipped with an acoustic recording system received transmissions from a broadband acoustic source centered at 75 Hz deployed on the bottom off Kauai, Hawaii, while moving away from the source at ranges up to ∼200 km in deep water and diving up to 1000-m depth. The transmitted signal was an m-sequence that can be treated as a binary-phase shift-keying communication signal. In this letter multiple receptions are exploited (i.e., diversity combining) to demonstrate the feasibility of using the glider as a mobile communication gateway. PMID:24606244

  6. Eocene to Miocene Southern Ocean Deep Water Circulation Revealed From Fossil Fish Teeth Nd Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scher, H.; Martin, E. E.

    2001-12-01

    We have evaluated Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of cleaned fossil fish teeth for the late Eocene to early Miocene from ODP site 1090 (43° S, 9° E, 3599 m) in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Using an age model based on biostratigraphy and paleomagnetics, Sr isotopic values from the fossil fish teeth tend to plot slightly below the seawater curve. This offset may be due to early diagenetic reactions, but overall the seawater trace metal chemistry appears to be well preserved in these samples. At site 1090, \\epsilonNd values increase from ~-7.5 at 39 Ma to ~-6 at 35 Ma and stay at this value until ~28.5 Ma. A high resolution Nd isotope record demonstrates steadily decreasing \\epsilonNd values from -6 to -8 between 28.5 and 23 Ma. Sampling during this interval reveals two rapid oscillations (<.5 Myr) in \\epsilonNd values superimposed on this decreasing trend; a one \\epsilonNd unit decrease at ~26 Ma and a one \\epsilonNd unit increase at ~23 Ma. Bottom water Nd composition is controlled by deep-water circulation, dissolved and particulate riverine inputs, and eolian inputs. In the late Eocene, bottom waters at site 1090 became increasingly radiogenic as benthic \\delta18O values began to reflect cooler deep-sea temperatures and the growth of ice sheets on Antarctica. It has been speculated that deep water in the Southern Ocean during the Eocene may have had a Tethyan origin. The shift toward radiogenic values at Site 1090 may reflect decreasing flow of nonradiogenic seawater from this low latitude deepwater source (modern Mediterranean \\epsilonNd ~-9). It may also be a result of the emergence of ice sheets on Antarctica, which reduced chemical weathering of nonradiogenic material into Southern Ocean. Although we anticipated that the opening of Drake Passage would introduce radiogenic Pacific waters into the Southern Atlantic, decreasing \\epsilonNd values coincide with age estimates for the opening based on geophysical data. Ocean circulation models

  7. Reduced North Atlantic deep water coeval with the glacial Lake Agassiz freshwater outburst.

    PubMed

    Kleiven, Helga Kikki Flesche; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Ninnemann, Ulysses S; Richter, Thomas O; Cortijo, Elsa

    2008-01-01

    An outstanding climate anomaly 8200 years before the present (B.P.) in the North Atlantic is commonly postulated to be the result of weakened overturning circulation triggered by a freshwater outburst. New stable isotopic and sedimentological records from a northwest Atlantic sediment core reveal that the most prominent Holocene anomaly in bottom-water chemistry and flow speed in the deep limb of the Atlantic overturning circulation begins at approximately 8.38 thousand years B.P., coeval with the catastrophic drainage of Lake Agassiz. The influence of Lower North Atlantic Deep Water was strongly reduced at our site for approximately 100 years after the outburst, confirming the ocean's sensitivity to freshwater forcing. The similarities between the timing and duration of the pronounced deep circulation changes and regional climate anomalies support a causal link. PMID:18063758

  8. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  9. Increased reservoir ages and poorly ventilated deep waters inferred in the glacial Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente, Maria; Skinner, Luke; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles; Cacho, Isabel

    2015-07-01

    Consistent evidence for a poorly ventilated deep Pacific Ocean that could have released its radiocarbon-depleted carbon stock to the atmosphere during the last deglaciation has long been sought. Such evidence remains lacking, in part due to a paucity of surface reservoir age reconstructions required for accurate deep-ocean ventilation age estimates. Here we combine new radiocarbon data from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) with chronostratigraphic calendar age constraints to estimate shallow sub-surface reservoir age variability, and thus provide estimates of deep-ocean ventilation ages. Both shallow- and deep-water ventilation ages drop across the last deglaciation, consistent with similar reconstructions from the South Pacific and Southern Ocean. The observed regional fingerprint linking the Southern Ocean and the EEP is consistent with a dominant southern source for EEP thermocline waters and suggests relatively invariant ocean interior transport pathways but significantly reduced air-sea gas exchange in the glacial southern high latitudes.

  10. Neopetrosiquinones A and B, sesquiterpene benzoquinones isolated from the deep-water sponge Neopetrosia cf. proxima.

    PubMed

    Winder, Priscilla L; Baker, Heather L; Linley, Patricia; Guzmán, Esther A; Pomponi, Shirley A; Diaz, M Cristina; Reed, John K; Wright, Amy E

    2011-11-15

    Two new marine-derived sesquiterpene benzoquinones which we designate as neopetrosiquinones A (1) and B (2), have been isolated from a deep-water sponge of the family Petrosiidae. The structures were elucidated on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibit the in vitro proliferation of the DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line with IC(50) values of 3.7 and 9.8 μM, respectively, and the PANC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cell line with IC(50) values of 6.1 and 13.8 μM, respectively. Neopetrosiquinone A (1) also inhibited the in vitro proliferation of the AsPC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cell line with an IC(50) value of 6.1 μM. The compounds are structurally related to alisiaquinone A, cyclozonarone, and xestoquinone. PMID:22014756

  11. Neopetrosiquinones A and B, Sesquiterpene Benzoquinones Isolated from the Deep-water Sponge Neopetrosia cf. proxima

    PubMed Central

    Winder, Priscilla L.; Baker, Heather L.; Linley, Patricia; Guzmán, Esther; Pomponi, Shirley A.; Diaz, M. Cristina; Reed, John K.; Wright, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Two new marine-derived sesquiterpene benzoquinones which we designate as neopetrosiquinone A (1) and B (2), have been isolated from a deep-water sponge of the family Petrosiidae. The structures were elucidated on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibit the in vitro proliferation of the DLD-1 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line with IC50 values of 3.7 and 9.8 μM, respectively, and the PANC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cell line with IC50 values of 6.1 and 13.8 μM, respectively. Neopetrosiquinone A (1) also inhibited the in vitro proliferation of the AsPC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cell line with an IC50 value of 6.1 μM. The compounds are structurally related to alisiaquinone A, cyclozonarone and xestoquinone. PMID:22014756

  12. Contributions of the Siberian shelf polynyas to the Arctic Ocean intermediate and deep water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Seelye; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of Siberian Shelf polynyas in water mass formation, and that of Whalers Bay in the cooling of the West Spitsbergen Current, satellite observations from the Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer are used to determine the size and location of polynyas for November-March, 1978-1982. If salt contributes only to the Arctic Intermediate Water, the results show that the continental shelves can produce 20-60 percent of this water. Alternatively, if the salt contributes only to the deep water of the Eurasian Basin, then without consideration of the mixing of the bottom water with the Greenland and Norwegian Sea water, the contribution from the shelves yields a renewal time of about 100 years. These results imply that there is insufficient water produced in the shelf polynyas to perform all of the roles that have historically been assigned to it.

  13. Increased reservoir ages and poorly ventilated deep waters inferred in the glacial Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Maria; Skinner, Luke; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles; Cacho, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Consistent evidence for a poorly ventilated deep Pacific Ocean that could have released its radiocarbon-depleted carbon stock to the atmosphere during the last deglaciation has long been sought. Such evidence remains lacking, in part due to a paucity of surface reservoir age reconstructions required for accurate deep-ocean ventilation age estimates. Here we combine new radiocarbon data from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) with chronostratigraphic calendar age constraints to estimate shallow sub-surface reservoir age variability, and thus provide estimates of deep-ocean ventilation ages. Both shallow- and deep-water ventilation ages drop across the last deglaciation, consistent with similar reconstructions from the South Pacific and Southern Ocean. The observed regional fingerprint linking the Southern Ocean and the EEP is consistent with a dominant southern source for EEP thermocline waters and suggests relatively invariant ocean interior transport pathways but significantly reduced air–sea gas exchange in the glacial southern high latitudes. PMID:26137976

  14. Sound of shallow and deep water lobsters: Measurements, analysis, and characterization (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, G.; Senthilvadivu, S.; Venkatesan, R.; Rajendran, V.

    2005-05-01

    Study of sound made by marine species aid in ambient noise studies and characterization. This letter presents the work carried out on measurement of sound made by lobsters in a controlled environment and the data processing and the spectral analysis to identify the frequency contents. Lobsters collected in the shallow waters as well as deep waters in the ocean have been used for the sound measurement. The Panulirus Homarus and Palinustur Waguersis species were kept in a tank in a laboratory and measurements were made. Their fundamental frequencies, harmonics, and peaks are analyzed in the band 3 to 100 kHz under different conditions such as molting and nonmolting states. Analysis with respect to diurnal variations is also carried out. The results show that lobsters produce sound like musical instruments, which agree with the observations of Patek [Nature (London) 411, 153-154 (2001)]. .

  15. Impact of water mass mixing on the biogeochemistry and microbiology of the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinthaler, Thomas; Álvarez Salgado, Xosé Antón; Álvarez, Marta; Aken, Hendrik M.; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2013-12-01

    The extent to which water mass mixing contributes to the biological activity of the dark ocean is essentially unknown. Using a multiparameter water mass analysis, we examined the impact of water mass mixing on the nutrient distribution and microbial activity of the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water (NEADW) along an 8000 km long transect extending from 62°N to 5°S. Mixing of four water types (WT) and basin scale mineralization from the site where the WT where defined to the study area explained up to 95% of the variability in the distribution of inorganic nutrients and apparent oxygen utilization. Mixing-corrected average O2:N:P mineralization ratios of 127(±11):13.0(±0.7):1 in the core of the NEADW suggested preferential utilization of phosphorus compounds while dissolved organic carbon mineralization contributed a maximum of 20% to the oxygen demand of the NEADW. In conjunction with the calculated average mineralization ratios, our results indicate a major contribution of particulate organic matter to the biological activity in the NEADW. The variability in prokaryotic abundance, high nucleic acid containing cells, and prokaryotic heterotrophic production in the NEADW was explained by large scale (64-79%) and local mineralization processes (21-36%), consistent with the idea that deep-water prokaryotic communities are controlled by substrate supply. Overall, our results suggest a major impact of mixing on the distribution of inorganic nutrients and a weaker influence on the dissolved organic matter pool supporting prokaryotic activity in the NEADW.

  16. Environmental setting of deep-water oysters in the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rooij, D.; De Mol, L.; Le Guilloux, E.; Wisshak, M.; Huvenne, V. A. I.; Moeremans, R.; Henriet, J.-P.

    2010-12-01

    We report the northernmost and deepest known occurrence of deep-water pycnodontine oysters, based on two surveys along the French Atlantic continental margin to the La Chapelle continental slope (2006) and the Guilvinec Canyon (2008). The combined use of multibeam bathymetry, seismic profiling, CTD casts and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) made it possible to describe the physical habitat and to assess the oceanographic control for the recently described species Neopycnodonte zibrowii. These oysters have been observed in vivo in depths from 540 to 846 m, colonizing overhanging banks or escarpments protruding from steep canyon flanks. Especially in the Bay of Biscay, such physical habitats may only be observed within canyons, where they are created by both long-term turbiditic and contouritic processes. Frequent observations of sand ripples on the seabed indicate the presence of a steady, but enhanced bottom current of about 40 cm/s. The occurrence of oysters also coincides with the interface between the Eastern North Atlantic Water and the Mediterranean Outflow Water. A combination of this water mass mixing, internal tide generation and a strong primary surface productivity may generate an enhanced nutrient flux, which is funnelled through the canyon. When the ideal environmental conditions are met, up to 100 individuals per m² may be observed. These deep-water oysters require a vertical habitat, which is often incompatible with the requirements of other sessile organisms, and are only sparsely distributed along the continental margins. The discovery of these giant oyster banks illustrates the rich biodiversity of deep-sea canyons and their underestimation as true ecosystem hotspots.

  17. The deep water cycle and origin of cratonic flood basalts: two examples from the Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    Cratonic flood basalt volcanism is the most puzzling phenomenon compared to all other types of intraplate volcanism. Cratons are thick and cold; the two parameters which suppress melting of either sublithospheric or lithospheric mantle in dry conditions. Fusible eclogites at hot plume geotherm start to melt in sublithospheric depth (~ 230 km), but geochemical arguments require that, in addition to eclogitic component, significant volume of flood basalts are from peridotitic mantle. Dry peridotitic mantle cannot be melted unless the lithospheric thickness reduced to about 60 km. That is why modern plume models incorporate lithospheric delamination and/or initially thinned lithosphere to explain cratonic flood basalts. However, if lithosphere remained thick, which was the case for the Siberian craton by the time of formation of its Devonian (Vilyui) and Permo-Triassic (Siberian) flood basalt provinces, then plume model is unable to explain the flood basalt volcanism. If mantle is wet, the peridotitic solidus lowered such as it can start to melt at sublithospheric depth (for example, 2 wt. % H2O-bearing peridotite starts to melt at ~320 km depth even at a normal mantle geotherm). In this presentation I will show that fluxing of mantle via the deep water cycle process may explain the Siberian craton flood basalts and many other continental flood basalts. According to the deep water cycle model, water is carried to the mantle transition zone by fast subducting slabs (may be in form of solid ice VII), then water is released from the slabs due to warming to the ambient mantle temperature, then localized hydration creates buoyant wet diapirs (or melt-bearing diapirs), the diapirs raise up to the sublithosheric depth were melt accumulates for the following tectonically triggered flood basalt eruptions.

  18. Early life history of deep-water gorgonian corals may limit their abundance.

    PubMed

    Lacharité, Myriam; Metaxas, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Deep-water gorgonian corals are long-lived organisms found worldwide off continental margins and seamounts, usually occurring at depths of ∼200-1,000 m. Most corals undergo sexual reproduction by releasing a planktonic larval stage that disperses; however, recruitment rates and the environmental and biological factors influencing recruitment in deep-sea species are poorly known. Here, we present results from a 4-year field experiment conducted in the Gulf of Maine (northwest Atlantic) at depths >650 m that document recruitment for 2 species of deep-water gorgonian corals, Primnoa resedaeformis and Paragorgia arborea. The abundance of P. resedaeformis recruits was high, and influenced by the structural complexity of the recipient habitat, but very few recruits of P. arborea were found. We suggest that divergent reproductive modes (P. resedaeformis as a broadcast spawner and P. arborea as a brooder) may explain this pattern. Despite the high recruitment of P. resedaeformis, severe mortality early on in the benthic stage of this species may limit the abundance of adult colonies. Most recruits of this species (∼80%) were at the primary polyp stage, and less than 1% of recruits were at stage of 4 polyps or more. We propose that biological disturbance, possibly by the presence of suspension-feeding brittle stars, and limited food supply in the deep sea may cause this mortality. Our findings reinforce the vulnerability of these corals to anthropogenic disturbances, such as trawling with mobile gear, and the importance of incorporating knowledge on processes during the early life history stages in conservation decisions. PMID:23762358

  19. Early Life History of Deep-Water Gorgonian Corals May Limit Their Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Lacharité, Myriam; Metaxas, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Deep-water gorgonian corals are long-lived organisms found worldwide off continental margins and seamounts, usually occurring at depths of ∼200–1,000 m. Most corals undergo sexual reproduction by releasing a planktonic larval stage that disperses; however, recruitment rates and the environmental and biological factors influencing recruitment in deep-sea species are poorly known. Here, we present results from a 4-year field experiment conducted in the Gulf of Maine (northwest Atlantic) at depths >650 m that document recruitment for 2 species of deep-water gorgonian corals, Primnoa resedaeformis and Paragorgia arborea. The abundance of P. resedaeformis recruits was high, and influenced by the structural complexity of the recipient habitat, but very few recruits of P. arborea were found. We suggest that divergent reproductive modes (P. resedaeformis as a broadcast spawner and P. arborea as a brooder) may explain this pattern. Despite the high recruitment of P. resedaeformis, severe mortality early on in the benthic stage of this species may limit the abundance of adult colonies. Most recruits of this species (∼80%) were at the primary polyp stage, and less than 1% of recruits were at stage of 4 polyps or more. We propose that biological disturbance, possibly by the presence of suspension-feeding brittle stars, and limited food supply in the deep sea may cause this mortality. Our findings reinforce the vulnerability of these corals to anthropogenic disturbances, such as trawling with mobile gear, and the importance of incorporating knowledge on processes during the early life history stages in conservation decisions. PMID:23762358

  20. Advection of North Atlantic Deep Water from the Labrador Sea to the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhein, Monika; Kieke, Dagmar; Steinfeldt, Reiner

    2015-04-01

    Recently formed Labrador Seawater (LSW) and overflow water from Denmark Strait (DSOW) are main components of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Both exhibit a distinct chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) maximum. Here we use 25 years of CFC observations in the Atlantic to study the main features of the circulation of LSW and DSOW. From the CFC data, the age and fraction of young deep water are inferred. Due to the superior spatial data resolution compared to former attempts, regional differences in the spreading velocity and pathways of young deep water become evident, dependent on the regional circulation. The observed distributions of young LSW and DSOW showed that the DWBC is the fastest pathway to reach the southern hemisphere. The downstream decrease of the fractions of young LSW in the DWBC is slower compared to model studies. From 47°N to 42°N, DWBC transports of young LSW and DSOW decrease by 44% and 49%, respectively. At 26°N, the DWBC transport of young water is still 39% of the LSW formation rate and 44% of the DSOW overflow transport. Interior pathways also exist, especially in the subpolar North Atlantic and in the transition zone between the subpolar and subtropical gyre. Compared to DSOW, the distributions indicate a higher tendency for LSW to follow additional interior pathways. North of 45°N the major part of LSW is younger than 20 years. The general weakening of new LSW formation since the 1990s worked toward a homogenization between the LSW in the western and the eastern subpolar North Atlantic.

  1. Use of deep water lagoons for reducing sewage toxicity prior to wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.R.; Zuiderveen, J.A.; Belcher, B.; McGinley, P.; Birge, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations were conducted to determine the effectiveness of deep lagoons as a means of minimizing toxicity and reducing wastewater parameters. A lagoon system associated with a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was selected for study and parameters identified for monitoring included toxicity, metal concentrations, total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia. This system included two lagoons, with 7--15 day hydraulic retention times, which received municipal waste. Toxicity and other parameters were measured for raw influent water, the two lagoon outfalls, and the final WWTP effluent. In a definitive seven-day chronic test with Ceriodaphnia dubia, the NOEC of influent water was 20%, and the IC{sub 50} for reproduction was 22.3%. Outfall from the first deep water lagoon showed reduced toxicity. The NOEC and IC{sub 50} were 80 and 71.8%, respectively. Further reduction in toxicity occurred in the second lagoon. The NOEC was 80% and the IC{sub 50} was 75.9. The final effluent discharged from the treatment plant affected neither survival nor fecundity. A 7-day embryo larval test conducted with Pimephales promelas yielded similar results. NOEC values increased through the lagoon system and were 2.5, 40.0, 40.0 and 100%, respectively. Acute TIE procedures implicated both metals and ammonia as primary toxicants. In all tests a sequential reduction in toxicity was observed through the lagoons. Results of this investigation support the use of deep water lagoons as an effective and economical means of pretreating wastewater. This approach offers promise for municipal waters, industrial effluents and stormwater runoff.

  2. Impact of water mass mixing on the biogeochemistry and microbiology of the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water

    PubMed Central

    Reinthaler, Thomas; Salgado, Xosé Antón Álvarez; Álvarez, Marta; van Aken, Hendrik M.; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which water mass mixing contributes to the biological activity of the dark ocean is essentially unknown. Using a multiparameter water mass analysis, we examined the impact of water mass mixing on the nutrient distribution and microbial activity of the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water (NEADW) along an 8000 km long transect extending from 62°N to 5°S. Mixing of four water types (WT) and basin scale mineralization from the site where the WT where defined to the study area explained up to 95% of the variability in the distribution of inorganic nutrients and apparent oxygen utilization. Mixing-corrected average O2:N:P mineralization ratios of 127(±11):13.0(±0.7):1 in the core of the NEADW suggested preferential utilization of phosphorus compounds while dissolved organic carbon mineralization contributed a maximum of 20% to the oxygen demand of the NEADW. In conjunction with the calculated average mineralization ratios, our results indicate a major contribution of particulate organic matter to the biological activity in the NEADW. The variability in prokaryotic abundance, high nucleic acid containing cells, and prokaryotic heterotrophic production in the NEADW was explained by large scale (64–79%) and local mineralization processes (21–36%), consistent with the idea that deep-water prokaryotic communities are controlled by substrate supply. Overall, our results suggest a major impact of mixing on the distribution of inorganic nutrients and a weaker influence on the dissolved organic matter pool supporting prokaryotic activity in the NEADW. PMID:24683294

  3. Deep water renewal in Lake Baikal: A model for long-term analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, Sebastiano; Toffolon, Marco

    2013-12-01

    The phenomenon of deep water renewal in the South Basin of Lake Baikal is investigated by means of a simplified one-dimensional model. The downwelling process, whereby large volumes of superficial, cold, and oxygenated water periodically sink to the lake bottom (>1400m) due to thermobaric instability, is simulated by means of three main submodules: a reaction-diffusion equation for temperature and other tracers, and two Lagrangian algorithms, the first for the vertical stabilization of unstable density regions (including thermobaric effects) and the second handling the downwelling mechanism. A self-consistent procedure for the dynamical reconstruction of the diapycnal diffusivity profile is included to account for the effect of the variability of external conditions. The model has been developed aimed at providing a detailed description of deep-ventilation and a quantification of its consequences at the basin scale; the core algorithms have been designed suitably to perform long-term simulations (hundreds of years) and to deal with a limited amount of information about boundary conditions, which are expressed in terms of wind forcing and surface water temperature. The main parameters have been calibrated using measured profiles of temperature and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-12) concentration over a 40 year historical period. A long-term simulation (one millennium), in which the current meteorological conditions have been kept statistically unchanged, has been used to determine the asymptotic dynamics. The results are consistent with previous measurements and estimates, suggesting that the model is suitable to qualitatively and quantitatively simulate deep water renewal in deep, temperate lakes, capturing the relative contribution and interaction of the different processes involved.

  4. Deep-Water Benthic Foraminifers from the Paleocene and Eocene of the North Pacific Region: Paleontology, Biostratigraphy, and Paleoceanological Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshanetskiy, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    A zonal scheme for the Lower Paleogene of the northern Pacific Ocean is proposed on the basis of the stratigraphic distribution of benthic foraminifers in the lower bathyal-abyssal beds studied in boreholes in the North and South Pacific regions. This scheme includes eight subdivisions (six zones and two subzones). The boundaries of the benthic zonal subdivisions are defined by bioevents (appearance or disappearance of stratigraphically important taxa) and are linked to the zonal scales based on planktonic foraminifers and calcareous nannoplankton. It is established that most of these bioevents are recognized subglobally. Apart from the evolutionary events, changes in the deep-water benthic foraminiferal assemblages were caused by changes in the paleooceanological environment. This allowed detailed characterization of a global mass extinction of assemblages of deep-water benthic foraminifers in the region studied. It is also established that changes in the assemblages of deep-water benthic foraminifers, observed in either change in their taxonomic composition or changes in abundance and diversity, resulted from the presence of different deep-water masses in the region.

  5. Reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to the deep central South Pacific during the last two glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Kescher, Mario; Frank, Martin; Tapia, Raúl; Ronge, Thomas A.; Nürnberg, Dirk; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The South Pacific is a sensitive location for the variability of the global oceanic thermohaline circulation given that deep waters from the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and the Pacific Basin are exchanged. Here we reconstruct the deep water circulation of the central South Pacific for the last two glacial cycles (from 240,000 years ago to the Holocene) based on radiogenic neodymium (Nd) and lead (Pb) isotope records complemented by benthic stable carbon data obtained from two sediment cores located on the flanks of the East Pacific Rise. The records show small but consistent glacial/interglacial changes in all three isotopic systems with interglacial average values of -5.8 and 18.757 for ɛNd and 206Pb/204Pb, respectively, whereas glacial averages are -5.3 and 18.744. Comparison of this variability of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) to previously published records along the pathway of the global thermohaline circulation is consistent with reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to CDW during cold stages. The absolute values and amplitudes of the benthic δ13C variations are essentially indistinguishable from other records of the Southern Hemisphere and confirm that the low central South Pacific sedimentation rates did not result in a significant reduction of the amplitude of any of the measured proxies. In addition, the combined detrital Nd and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope signatures imply that Australian and New Zealand dust has remained the principal contributor of lithogenic material to the central South Pacific.

  6. Reproductive biology of the deep-water coral Acanella arbuscula (Phylum Cnidaria: Class Anthozoa: Order Alcyonacea), northwest Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beazley, Lindsay I.; Kenchington, Ellen L.

    2012-10-01

    Knowledge of the reproductive life-history of deep-water corals is important for assessing their vulnerability to anthropogenic impacts. Yet, the reproductive biology of many deep-water corals, especially members of the subclass Octocorallia, has not been examined. We used histological techniques to describe the reproductive biology of the deep-water gorgonian coral Acanella arbuscula from the northwest Atlantic. All colonies examined were gonochoric, and no embryos or planula larvae were observed in the polyps. Mean polyp-level fecundity (females: 21.0±17.5 oocytes polyp-1, and males: 13.9±13.5 sperm sacs polyp-1) is high compared to other deep-water gorgonians, and polyps closer to the branch tips had the highest fecundities in both females and males. The presence of large oocytes (maximum diameter 717.8 μm) suggests that A. arbuscula produces lecithotrophic larvae. Despite the potentially high fecundity and small size at first reproduction, the paucity of information on dispersal and recruitment, combined with its longevity, vulnerability to bottom fishing gear, and ecological role as a structure-forming species, still warrants the classification of A. arbuscula as a vulnerable marine ecosystem indicator.

  7. Structural style and Basin Formation in Deep-water Area of Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di, Z.; Zhen, S.; Xiong, P.; Min, C. C.

    2007-12-01

    In the deep-water area of northern South China Sea (SCS) developed a series of sedimentary basins. Active exploration for deep-water hydrocarbon has begun in these areas since this century. The well LW3-1-1 at water depth of 1480m in the BaiYun Sag (BYS) of the Pearl River Mouth Basin in 2006 discovered 56m layer of pure gas, demonstrated the good hydrocarbon potential of the area. Wide-angle seismic profiling has verified the transitional type of crust in the slope areas. The Moho surface shoals step-by-step from 30-29km under the shelf, ~15 km under the slope, and ~12km under the abyssal plain. Moho also rises beneath depocenters, mirroring the shape of sedimentary basement. The crustal thickness at the center of the BYS is <7km. Lower crustal high velocity layer is found in the eastern and central portions of the northern SCS. The pre-Cenozoic basement in northern SCS is the extension of the inland basement and consists of mainly metamorphosed Paleozoic and Mesozoic marine and continental strata, complicated by Yanshanian (J-K) intrusive and extrusive rocks. From geophysical data we inferred that a SW-NE Mesozoic trench-arc system exists beneath the Cenozoic sediments in the northeastern SCS, related to the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Ocean towards the East Eurasian margin. The stress field in the East Eurasian margin changed abruptly in Late Cretaceous. Rifting started in the entire margin and eventually led to the opening of the SCS in late Early Oligocene. Large sedimentary basins developed in the margins of the SCS. Paleogene lacustrine sediments contain hydrocarbon sources, while traps are mostly found in Neogene marine strata. The structure of the northern SCS shows clear W-E variation, divided into NE-, NEE-, and NE-trending segments by two major NW-SE transfer faults. The Southern Depression of the Qiongdongnan Basin to the west is characterized by NE-trending half grabens. The BYS at the central segment is characterized by NEE-trending composite

  8. Suborbital timescale variability of North Atlantic Deep Water during the past 200,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppo, Delia W.; Lehman, Scott J.

    1995-10-01

    We generated ˜200-kyr-long proxy records of surface and deepwater variability from a subpolar North Atlantic core (V29-202), enabling us to assess the linkage between surface and deepwater changes on suborbital timescales. In particular, we used a benthic δ13C record to evaluate the deep water response to Dansgaard-Oeschger temperature oscillations and to Heinrich events, times of massive iceberg delivery to the North Atlantic. We found that the reduction of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) production was generally associated with cold or dropping sea surface temperatures (SSTs) as indicated by planktonic foraminiferal assemblages. The NADW contribution to the site did not drop appreciably during Heinrich events H4 through H2, probably because these events followed intervals of prolonged surface cooling already characterized by low rates of NADW production. By contrast NADW reduction appears to have been synchronous with H5. SST rise associated with both Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations and Heinrich events was usually accompanied by increasing NADW strength. In a few cases the NADW recovery appeared to lag the SST rise; however, the apparent delay is most likely an artefact of the sedimentary record (low concentrations of benthic foraminifera). As a result of low benthic foraminiferal abundances during stage 6, the stage 6 benthic foraminiferal δ13C record is of lower resolution than the younger part of the record. The stage 6 proxy records for surface hydrography nevertheless reveal millennial-scale oscillations similar to those seen in stage 3. The available δ13C data suggest that NADW weakened in association with the cold portions of stage 6 SST oscillations. We also sought to confirm a recent study which concluded that there was little NADW variability during the peak of the last interglaciation, marine oxygen isotope substage 5e (Eemian). Isotope stage 5 was marked by a trend of increasing benthic δ13C in V29-202. Rising δ13C through isotope stage 5 is

  9. Occurrence and turnover of DMSP and DMS in deep waters of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rellinger, Alison N.; Kiene, Ronald P.; del Valle, Daniela A.; Kieber, David J.; Slezak, Doris; Harada, Hyakubun; Bisgrove, John; Brinkley, Jordan

    2009-05-01

    High concentrations of the phytoplankton metabolite dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and its degradation product dimethylsulfide (DMS) are associated with blooms of Phaeocystis antarctica in the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Episodic and rapid vertical export of Phaeocystis biomass to deep water has been reported for the Ross Sea, therefore we examined the distribution and microbial consumption rates of DMSP and DMS throughout the sub-euphotic water column. Total DMSP (dissolved+particulate; DMSPt) was present at 0.5-22 nM at depths between 70 and 690 m during both the early bloom (November) and the late bloom (January). Sub-euphotic peaks of DMSP were sometimes associated with mid-water temperature maxima, and elevated DMSP below 70 m was found mainly in water masses characterized as Modified Circumpolar Deep Water or Antarctic Shelf Water. Overall, 50-94% of the integrated water-column DMSPt was found below the euphotic zone. At one station during the early bloom, local maxima of DMSPt (14 nM) and DMS (20 nM) were observed between 113 and 240 m and these maxima corresponded with high chlorophyll a concentrations, P. antarctica cell numbers, and Fv/Fm (the quantum yield of photosystem II). During the late bloom, a sub-euphotic maximum of DMSPt (15.8 nM) at 250 m cooccurred with peaks of chlorophyll a concentration, DMSP lyase activity, bacterial production and dissolved DMSP consumption rates. DMSP turnover contributed ˜12% of the bacterial carbon demand between 200 and 400 m. DMS concentrations peaked at 286 m but the maximum concentration (0.42 nM) was far lower than observed during the early bloom, probably because of relatively rapid biological consumption of DMS (1-3 turnovers per day) which, in turn, contributed to elevated dissolved dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) concentrations. Relatively stable DMSPt distributions at some sites suggest that rapid sinking of Phaeocystis biomass is probably not the major mechanism responsible for mesopelagic DMSP accumulations. Rather

  10. Photosynthetic use of inorganic carbon in deep-water kelps from the Strait of Gibraltar.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Fernández, José Antonio; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Mechanisms of inorganic carbon assimilation were investigated in the four deep-water kelps inhabiting sea bottoms at the Strait of Gibraltar; these species are distributed at different depths (Saccorhiza polysiches at shallower waters, followed by Laminaria ochroleuca, then Phyllariopsis brevipes and, at the deepest bottoms, Phyllariopsis purpurascens). To elucidate the capacity to use HCO3 (-) as a source of inorganic carbon for photosynthesis in the kelps, different experimental approaches were used. Specifically, we measured the irradiance-saturated gross photosynthetic rate versus pH at a constant dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration of 2 mM, the irradiance-saturated apparent photosynthesis (APS) rate versus DIC, the total and the extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CAext), the observed and the theoretical photosynthetic rates supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3 (-) to CO2, and the δ(13)C signature in tissues of the algae. While S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca showed photosynthetic activity at pH 9.5 (around 1.0 µmol O2 m(-2) s(-1)), the activity was close to zero in both species of Phyllariopsis. The APS versus DIC was almost saturated for the DIC values of natural seawater (2 mM) in S. polyschides and L. ochroleuca, but the relationship was linear in P. brevipes and P. purpurascens. The four species showed total and CAext activities but the inhibition of the CAext originated the observed photosynthetic rates at pH 8.0 to be similar to the theoretical rates that could be supported by the spontaneous dehydration of HCO3 (-). The isotopic (13)C signatures ranged from -17.40 ± 1.81 to -21.11 ± 1.73 ‰ in the four species. Additionally, the δ(13)C signature was also measured in the deep-water Laminaria rodriguezii growing at 60-80 m, showing even a more negative value of -26.49 ± 1.25 ‰. All these results suggest that the four kelps can use HCO3 (-) as external carbon source for photosynthesis mainly by the action of

  11. Can Plume-Forming Asteroid Airbursts Generate Meteotsunami in Deep Water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boslough, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrocode simulations suggest that the 1908 Tunguska explosion was a plume-forming airburst analogous to those caused by Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) collisions with Jupiter in 1994. A noctilucent cloud that appeared over Europe following the Tunguska event is similar to post-impact features on Jupiter, consistent with a collapsed plume containing condensation from the vaporized asteroid. Previous workers treated Tunguska as a point explosion and used seismic records, barograms, and extent of fallen trees to determine explosive yield. Estimates were based on scaling laws derived from nuclear weapons data, neglecting directionality, mass, and momentum of the asteroid. This point-source assumption, with other simplifications, led to a significant overestimate. Tunguska seismic data were consistent with ground motion from a vertical point impulse of 7×1018dyn sec caused by the downward blast wave of a 12.5-megaton nuclear explosion at an altitude of 8.5 km for an effective momentum multiplication factor (β) of ~80. However, simulations of a 3-megaton collisional airburst reveal that the upward-directed momentum contained in a ballistic plume can reach this level within the first minute after the explosion (β≈300). The reaction impulse from such an airburst is therefore similar to a much larger non-plume-forming nuclear explosion. Momentum is coupled through the atmosphere to the surface, generating disproportionately large seismic signatures. This result suggests that coupling from an over-water plume-forming airburst could be a more efficient tsunami source mechanism than a collapsing impact cavity or direct air blast because the characteristic time of the plume is closer to that of a long-period wave in deep water. As the plume accelerates upward, it creates a slowly-rising and sustained overpressure with a ramp wave that propagates outward at the speed of sound, generating a tsunami in deep ocean by the same mechanism that yields slower meteotsunami in shallow

  12. North Atlantic Surface and Deep-Water Hydrography during the Early Pliocene Warm Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, A. H. L.; Evans, H. F.; Naafs, B. D.; Cavaleiro, C. D.; Rebotim, A.; Ventura, C.; Stein, R. H.; Channell, J. E. T.

    2014-12-01

    The early Pliocene, with atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations at levels similar to today, is seen as a case study for Earth's future climate evolution. During this period the progressive closing of the Central American Seaway led to increased poleward heat and salt transport within the Atlantic with North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) becoming warmer and saltier and resulting in an enhanced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). In order to understand how stable the AMOC really was we produced millennial-scale (1-2 kyr) surface and deep-water records for IODP Site U1313 (41°N, 33°W, 3412m) for the interval from 3.4 to 4.1 Ma. This site is ideally located to monitor past AMOC changes with North Atlantic Drift waters at the surface and NADW in the deep. Although interglacial/glacial cycles are visible, the higher frequency oscillations recorded in both the planktonic G. ruber (white) and benthic Cibicidoides sp. δ18O records impede tuning to the LR04 stack (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005). We therefore exploit a different approach: using the magnetic polarity chrons (Gilbert, Cochiti) as recorded at Site U1313 as framework, we tune our benthic δ18O record to that of ODP Site 1085 (on LR04 ages). The benthic δ13C record shows millennial-scale oscillations, and the values indicate nearly continuous NADW presence and confirm a strong AMOC, also during most of the glacial periods. Varying surface water conditions, especially during the younger interglacial periods, are reflected in the G. ruber isotope data and appear to be linked to salinity changes since they are not recorded in the alkenone sea-surface temperature data. Although glacial stages Gi 2 and Gi 4 show the expected higher benthic δ18O values, Gi 6 was the glacial period with the strongest impact on the AMOC as revealed by cooler, less ventilated surface waters and a less ventilated NADW. Overall, the AMOC was strong throughout, but experienced high frequency oscillations at a level similar to

  13. Stochastic Plume Simulations for the Fukushima Accident and the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, E.; Peggion, G.; Rowley, C.; Hogan, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant suffered damage leading to radioactive contamination of coastal waters. Major issues in characterizing the extent of the affected waters were a poor knowledge of the radiation released to the coastal waters and the rather complex coastal dynamics of the region, not deterministically captured by the available prediction systems. Equivalently, during the Gulf of Mexico Deep Water Horizon oil platform accident in April 2010, significant amounts of oil and gas were released from the ocean floor. For this case, issues in mapping and predicting the extent of the affected waters in real-time were a poor knowledge of the actual amounts of oil reaching the surface and the fact that coastal dynamics over the region were not deterministically captured by the available prediction systems. To assess the ocean regions and times that were most likely affected by these accidents while capturing the above sources of uncertainty, ensembles of the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) were configured over the two regions (NE Japan and Northern Gulf of Mexico). For the Fukushima case tracers were released on each ensemble member; their locations at each instant provided reference positions of water volumes where the signature of water released from the plant could be found. For the Deep Water Horizon oil spill case each ensemble member was coupled with a diffusion-advection solution to estimate possible scenarios of oil concentrations using perturbed estimates of the released amounts as the source terms at the surface. Stochastic plumes were then defined using a Risk Assessment Code (RAC) analysis that associates a number from 1 to 5 to each grid point, determined by the likelihood of having tracer particle within short ranges (for the Fukushima case), hence defining the high risk areas and those recommended for monitoring. For the Oil Spill case the RAC codes were determined by the likelihood of reaching oil concentrations as defined in the Bonn Agreement

  14. Occurrence and biogeography of hydroids (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa) from deep-water coral habitats off the southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Lea-Anne; Nizinski, Martha S.; Ross, Steve W.

    2008-06-01

    Deep-water coral habitats off the southeastern USA (SEUS) support diverse fish and invertebrate assemblages, but are poorly explored. This study is the first to report on the hydroids collected from these habitats in this area. Thirty-five species, including two species that are likely new to science, were identified from samples collected primarily by manned submersible during 2001-2005 from deep-water coral habitats off North Carolina to east-central Florida. Eleven of the species had not been reported since the 19th to mid-20th century. Ten species, and one family, the Rosalindidae, are documented for the first time in the SEUS. Latitudinal ranges of 15 species are extended, and the deepest records in the western North Atlantic for 10 species are reported. A species accumulation curve illustrated that we continue to add to our knowledge of hydroid diversity in these habitats. Sexually mature individuals were collected for 19 species during the summer to early autumn months. Most of the observed species (89%) liberate planula larvae as part of their life cycles, suggesting that these species exhibit a reproductive strategy that reduces the risk of dispersal to sub-optimal habitats. Hydroids occurred across various substrata including coral rubble, live corals, rock and other animal hosts including hydroids themselves. All observed species were regionally widespread with typically deep-neritic to bathyal sub-tropical/tropical distributions. Hydroid assemblages from deep-water SEUS coral habitats were most similar to those from adjacent deep-water habitats off the SEUS (17 shared species), and those in the Straits of Florida/Bahamas and Caribbean/West Indian regions (14 and 8 shared species, respectively). The similarity to sub-tropical and tropical assemblages and the richness of plumularioids in the SEUS deep-water coral habitats support the idea of a Pleistocene intrusion of tropical species northwards following an intensification of the Gulf Stream from the

  15. Glacial/Interglacial changes of southwest Pacific intermediate- and deep-water circulation over the last 350,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronge, Thomas; Tiedemann, Ralf; Prange, Matthias; Merkel, Ute; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lamy, Frank

    2015-04-01

    On glacial/interglacial timescales, Southern Ocean air-sea gas exchange is considered to be an important factor, driving the variability of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. To understand the role of oceanic variability in the global carbon cycle, it is necessary to reconstruct changes in deep- and intermediate-water circulation and chemistry of Southern Ocean water masses. In this context, our study aims on the reconstruction of glacial/interglacial changes in the vertical expansion of southwest Pacific Antarctic Intermediate Water. For our study, we compared isotope records (δ13C and δ18O) measured on the epibenthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi from the Antarctic Intermediate Water and the Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (943 - 2066 m water depth) off New Zealand. We used two sediment cores from the Tasman Sea (MD06-2990 and MD06-2986), retrieved during R/V Marion Dufresne cruise MD152, and three sediment cores from the Bounty Trough east of New Zealand (MD97-2120, SO 213-82-1 and SO 213-84-1). Comparing these records, we can monitor changes in southwest Pacific water mass circulation over the past 350,000 years. Over this time period, we record a significant shoaling of the boundary between Antarctic Intermediate Water and Upper Circumpolar Deep Water during all glacial stages. We propose that freshwater input by melting sea ice into the glacial intermediate-water increased the buoyancy difference to underlying deep-waters, thus hampering the downward expansion of southwest Pacific Antarctic Intermediate Water during glacials. This interpretation is consistent with our modeling results, based on the Community Climate System model version 3, which also indicate a shoaling of glacial intermediate waters due to the input of meltwater. The glacial upward displacement of the water mass boundary significantly increased the vertical extent of circumpolar deep-waters, consequently extending the volume of the proposed glacial deep-water carbon pool.

  16. 30 CFR 203.60 - Who may apply for royalty relief on a case-by-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or offshore of Alaska? 203.60 Section 203.60 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... for royalty relief on a case-by-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or offshore of...

  17. 30 CFR 203.60 - Who may apply for royalty relief on a case-by-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or offshore of Alaska? 203.60 Section 203.60 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE... royalty relief on a case-by-case basis in deep water in the Gulf of Mexico or offshore of Alaska? You...

  18. Diversity and taphonomic gradients from shoreface to deep water: Case studies based on sea urchin assemblages from the Miocene of Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebelsick, James; Mancosu, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Echinoid faunas from Miocene sediments from Sardinia allow diversity to be correlated to variations in depositional environments as well as taphonomic pathways. Taxonomic richness and preservation potentials vary among both carbonate and siliciclastic dominated shelf environments. Studies include detailed investigation of stratigraphy, sedimentology, palaeontology and taphonomy in both the field and in the laboratory. Environmental Interpretations are based on composition and diversity of taxa, functional morphological interpretation of life habits as well as taphonomic signatures. These investigations have revealed: 1) various mass accumulations of clypeasteroid echinoids ranging from autochthonous assemblages to multiple in situ reworked accumulations in shore face environments, 2) the distribution of morphotypes of the common genus Clypeaster, 3) echinoid assemblages dominated by both irregular and regular echinoids in siliciclastic and carbonate shelf environments, 4) spatangoid assemblages in heavily bioturbated coarse sands, and 5) monotypic shell beds of well-preserved regular echinoids and spatangoid from deeper siliciclastic environments. Variations in the diversity of echinoid taxa are correlated to biotic and abiotic ecological factors in specific depositional environments. Preservation potentials vary highly as determined by ambient environmental conditions and skeletal architectures. A synthesis of faunal diversities and preservation potentials along shelf gradient ranging from shoreface to deep water is presented.

  19. AN EARLY MIOCENE DEEP-WATER DECAPOD CRUSTACEAN FAUNULE FROM THE SLOVENIAN PART OF THE STYRIAN BASIN, AND ITS PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL AND PALAEOBIOGEOGRAPHICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    PubMed Central

    GAŠPARIČ, ROK; HYŽNÝ, MATÚŠ

    2015-01-01

    A new decapod crustacean faunule is described from the early Miocene of the Slovenian part of the Styrian Basin. The Ivnik Beds exposed at the Činžat locality contain seven species: Calliax michelottii (Axiidea: Callianassidae), Lepidophthalmus paratethyensis sp. nov. (Axiidea: Callianassidae), Jaxea kuemeli (Gebiidea: Laomediidae), Styrioplax exiguus (Brachyura: Chasmocarcinidae), Goneplax gulderi (Brachyura: Goneplacidae), Neopilumnoplax pohorjensis sp. nov. (Brachyura: Mathildellidae) and Retropluma slovenica sp. nov. (Brachyura: Retroplumidae). Numerous specimens of well-preserved Styrioplax exiguus permitted its redescription and re-assignment of its familial placement to Chasmocarcinidae. Neopilumnoplax pohorjensis sp. nov. constitutes the first fossil occurrence of the genus known to date. The decapod association, as well as other faunal elements, suggests low-energy deep-water depositional environment with epibathyal water depth of more than 125 m. The studied locality is situated in the Ribnica–Selnica graben filled with sediments once deposited in the Central Paratethys sea. Based on the affinities of decapod genera of the Central Paratethys and the Proto-Mediterranean, we conclude that the exchange of decapod faunas between these regions was probably regulated by an anti-estuarine circulation permitting an easier incursion of species from the Proto-Mediterranean into the Paratethys and simultaneous hindering the Paratethyan endemics (Styrioplax) from entering the Mediterranean. PMID:26689949

  20. Detection of deep water formation from remote sensing chlorophyll in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardello, Raffaele; Bahamon, Nixon; Ahumada, Miguel-Angel; Martin, Adrian; Henson, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    The Northwestern Mediterranean Sea is one of the few regions in the world where Deep Water Formation (DWF) occurs. During wintertime cold and dry winds that typically occur in strong bursts lasting a few days, are able to erode the near-surface stability over this area, exposing the weakly stratified underwaters and initiate a phase of violent mixing and deep convection. DWF is not a steady-state process that recurs every year. Variations in wind stress and heat flux over the winter can induce a marked interannual variability: during some years the process is specially intense and completely absent during others. The extent of the area over which DWF occurs is also uncertain. The interannual variability of the DWF process is also associated to the variability in the seasonal phytoplankton dynamics over the area. The extent of the vertical mixing set the total amount of nutrients available for the phytoplankton during the following spring bloom. However, before the bloom, when deep convection is still active, surface chlorophyll (an index for phytoplankton biomass) is vertically diluted showing low surface concentration. The occurrence of these patches of anomalously low chlorophyll concentration can, in principle, be associated to the presence of active deep convection. In this study we investigate the possibility of exploiting such association in order to quantify the duration of deep convection and the extent of the area over which it occurs. These goals will be achieved through the analysis of remote sensing chlorophyll data and in-situ Argo-floats profiles.

  1. Evidence for the bioerosion of deep-water corals by echinoids in the Northeast Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Angela; Rocha, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    In situ video observations of echinoids interacting with deep-sea coral are common in the deep-sea, but paradoxically the deep-sea literature is devoid of reports of bioerosion by extant echinoids. Here we present evidence of contemporary bioerosion of cold-water coral by four species of deep-sea echinoids, Gracilechinus elegans, Gracilechinus alexandri, Cidaris cidaris, and Araeosoma fenestratum, showing that they actively predate on the living framework of reef building corals, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, in the NE Atlantic. Echinoid specimens were collected in six canyons located in the Bay of Biscay, France and two canyons on the north side of the Porcupine Bank and Goban Spur, Ireland. A total of 44 live specimens from the four taxa (9 of G. elegans, 4 of G. alexandri, 21 of C. cidaris and 10 of A. fenestratum) showed recent ingestion of the coral infrastructure. Upon dissection, live coral skeleton was observed encased in a thick mucus layer within the gastrointestinal tract of G. elegans and G. alexandri while both live and dead coral fragments were found in C. cidaris and A. fenestratum. Echinoid bioerosion limits the growth of shallow-water reefs. Our observations suggest that echinoids may also play an important role in the ecology of deep-water coral reefs.

  2. Packaged FBG sensors for real-time stress monitoring on deep-water riser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Yang, Dexing; Jiang, Yajun; Wang, Meirong; Zhai, Huailun; Bai, Yang

    2014-11-01

    The safety of under-water risers in drilling platform is of great significance. A packaged fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for real-time stress monitoring is designed for the applications on oil drilling risers under 3000 meters deep water. A copper tube which is the main component of the sensor has a small hole along its axes and a groove at its each end. The bare FBG is passed through the small hole and fixed to its ends by epoxy resin. Then the copper tube is packaged by filling the groove with structural adhesive. In order to avoid that the outer water-pressure is applied on the epoxy resin through the structural adhesive, a gap between the two types of glues is left. The relationships between the stress of the riser and the tension, pressure, temperature of the single sensor are discussed, respectively. The measured tension sensitivity is 136.75 pm/KN while the minimum R-square value is 0.99997. The experimental results also show that there is a good linear response between water-pressure and the Bragg wavelength from 0 to 30MPa, and the sensor can even survive under the pressure more than 30MPa. In addition, the Bragg wavelength shifts linearly with the increasing temperature from 0 to 40°C. So, the pressure and temperature can be easily compensated if another sensor without tension is used.

  3. Pigmentation and Spectral Absorbance Signatures in Deep-Water Corals from the Trondheimsfjord, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Elde, Anette C.; Pettersen, Ragnhild; Bruheim, Per; Järnegren, Johanna; Johnsen, Geir

    2012-01-01

    The pigmentation and corresponding in vivo and in vitro absorption characteristics in three different deep-water coral species: white and orange Lophelia pertusa, Paragorgia arborea and Primnoa resedaeformis, collected from the Trondheimsfjord are described. Pigments were isolated and characterized by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LC-TOF MS). The main carotenoids identified for all three coral species were astaxanthin and a canthaxanthin-like carotenoid. Soft tissue and skeleton of orange L. pertusa contained 2 times more astaxanthin g−1 wet weight compared to white L. pertusa. White and orange L. pertusa were characterized with in vivo absorbance peaks at 409 and 473 nm, respectively. In vivo absorbance maxima for P. arborea and P. resedaeformis was typically at 475 nm. The shapes of the absorbance spectra (400–700 nm) were species-specific, indicated by in vivo, in vitro and the corresponding difference spectra. The results may provide important chemotaxonomic information for pigment when bonded to their proteins in vivo, bio-prospecting, and for in situ identification, mapping and monitoring of corals. PMID:22822381

  4. The first experience the transportation of deep-water methane hydrates in a container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. V.; Rimskii-Korsakov, N. A.; Rozhkov, A. N.; Chernyaev, E. S.

    2011-04-01

    Deep-water experiments on the transportation of collected samples of methane hydrates from a lake's bottom to a support container were carried out as part of the MIRY na Baikale (2008-2009) expedition run by the Russian Academy of Sciences. High pressures and low temperatures are necessary for gas hydrates stability. As a sample of the hydrate is lifted to the water's surface, it intensively decomposes into water and methane gas. To reduce the decomposition, we used a container in which the hydrate's sample occurs in a gas medium rather than in water, which results in a substantial reduction in the rate of the heat exchange. At that, the gas for the container's filling was supplied by the hydrate itself due to its partial decomposition. To estimate the method's efficiency, we observed the hydrate's decomposition during lifting from a depth of 1400 m using different transportation techniques such as gas- or water-filled containers or fixing the sample in the manipulator's arm of the submersible. The sample in the gaseous medium was the only one that was safely delivered on board the support container, while the two others completely decomposed during the transportation. It is remarkable that all the samples started to decompose simultaneously at a depth of 380 m but their decomposition occurred at different rates.

  5. Calculation and experiment for dynamic response of bridge in deep water under seismic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-guang; Sun, Guo-shuai

    2014-08-01

    The fluid-structure interaction under seismic excitation is very complicated, and thus the damage identification of the bridge in deep water is the key technique to ensure the safe service. Based on nonlinear Morison equation considering the added mass effect and the fluid-structure interaction effect, the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure is analyzed. A series of underwater shaking table tests are conducted in the air and in water. The dynamic characteristics affected by hydrodynamic pressure are discussed and the distribution of hydrodynamic pressure is also analyzed. In addition, the damage of structure is distinguished through the natural frequency and the difference of modal curvature, and is then compared with the test results. The numerical simulation and test of this study indicate that the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure should not be neglected. It is also found that the presence of the damage, the location of the damage and the degree of the severity can be judged through the variation of structure frequency and the difference of modal curvature.

  6. Glider observations of the biological response to Modified Circumpolar Deep Water Variability in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, D.; Kaufman, D.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Smith, W.

    2011-12-01

    The Ross Sea is the most productive area within the Southern Ocean, and is believed to play a significant role in the global marine carbon cycle. This region is also characterized by strong spatial and temporal variability in both physical and biogeochemical conditions; however this variability occurs on spatial and temporal scales that are difficult to resolve with traditional data sources. In order to better understand this variability, two gliders were deployed in the Ross Sea in late November 2010 during the early stages of the summer plankton bloom. Together, the two gliders made over 1500 dives and collected data (salinity, temperature, fluorescence and oxygen) throughout the water column for roughly two months. The data from these gliders were used to identify the presence of the relatively high-nutrient Modified Circumpolar Deep Water (MCDW), which has been hypothesized to be a significant factor affecting the spatial and temporal extent of the summer plankton blooms. Preliminary data analyses indicate a positive correlation between areas of MCDW and high chlorophyll concentrations. The glider data were also compared to contemporaneous cruise data and satellite data and were found to fit well with these other data, yet were better able to resolve the high temporal and spatial variability of this region. Specifically, the lower resolution of the cruise data, as compared to the glider data, made it difficult to resolve the correlation of MCDW to high chlorophyll from the cruise data alone.

  7. Near-bottom pelagic bacteria at a deep-water sewage sludge disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, M.; Straube, W.L.; Hill, R.T.; Colwell, R.R.

    1994-01-01

    The epibenthic bacterial community at deep-ocean sewage sludge disposal site DWD-106, located approximately 106 miles (ca. 196 km) off the coast of New Jersey, was assessed for changes associated with the introduction of large amounts of sewage sludge. Mixed cultures and bacterial isolates obtained from water overlying sediment core samples collected at the deep-water (2,500 m) municipal sewage disposal site were tested for the ability to grow under in situ conditions of temperature and pressure. The responses of cultures collected at a DWD-106 station heavily impacted by sewage sludge were compared with those of samples collected from a station at the same depth which was not contaminated by sewage sludge. Significant differences were observed in the ability of mixed bacterial cultures and isolates from the two sites to grow under deep-sea pressure and temperature conditions. The levels of sludge contamination were established by enumerating Clostridium perfringens, a sewage indicator bacterium, in sediment samples from the two sites. (Copyright (c) 1993, American Society for Microbiology.)

  8. Basin-wide N2 fixation in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Mar; Bonnet, Sophie; Hernández, Nauzet; Martínez-Pérez, Alba María.; Nieto-Cid, Mar; Álvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón; Baños, Isabel; Montero, María. F.; Mazuecos, Ignacio P.; Gasol, Josep M.; Osterholz, Helena; Dittmar, Thorsten; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Arístegui, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings indicate that N2 fixation is significant in aphotic waters, presumably due to heterotrophic diazotrophs depending on organic matter for their nutrition. However, the relationship between organic matter and heterotrophic N2 fixation remains unknown. Here we explore N2 fixation in the deep chlorophyll maximum and underneath deep waters across the whole Mediterranean Sea and relate it to organic matter composition, characterized by optical and molecular methods. Our N2 fixation rates were in the range of those previously reported for the euphotic zone of the Mediterranean Sea (up to 0.43 nmol N L-1 d-1) and were significantly correlated to the presence of relatively labile organic matter with fluorescence and molecular formula properties representative for peptides and unsaturated aliphatics and associated with the presence of more oxygenated ventilated water masses. Finally, and despite that the aphotic N2 fixation contributes largely to total water column diazotrophic activity (>50%), its contribution to overall nitrogen inputs to the basin is negligible (<0.5%).

  9. A trophic ecology of two grenadier species (Macrouridae, Pisces) in deep waters of the Southwest Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptikhovsky, V. V.

    2005-08-01

    The feeding habits of slope-dwelling macrourid fishes from the southern Southwest Atlantic is unknown. In this study the feeding ecology of the two most abundant species, Macrourus carinatus and M. holotrachys, was investigated. Both these grenadiers fed on a variety of prey, including gelatinous plankton, crustaceans, mesopelagic and benthic fish and cephalopods, echinoderms, as well as fishery discards. M. carinatus forage mostly in depths shallower than 900 m and its feeding spectrum and hunting strategy display important seasonal variability. It consumes more pelagic fish, squid and crustaceans than M. holotrachys, which probably indicates occasional feeding in the water column and higher availability of pelagic prey. M. holotrachys forages mostly in depths deeper than 1100 m and is a specialised bottom feeder. Macrourids are able to switch their feeding strategy from browsing on abundant food sources in summer and autumn (a narrow niche breadth and high number of prey per stomach) to hunting occasional prey in winter and spring (a wide niche breadth, low number of prey per stomach). Both species are of similar size and hard to distinguish morphologically, but in deep water M. holotrachys males are smaller than, and females larger than, those of M. carinatus. A probable reason for such energy re-distribution within a population in M. holotrachys is to achieve a higher reproductive output in a food-poor and harsh deep-sea environment.

  10. High diversity of microplankton surrounds deep-water coral reef in the Norwegian Sea.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sigmund; Bourne, David G; Hovland, Martin; Murrell, J Colin

    2012-10-01

    Coral reefs that exist in the depths of the oceans are surrounded by Eukarya, Archaea and bacterial communities that may play an important role in the nutrition and health of the reef. The first interdomain community structure of planktonic organisms in seawater from a deep-water coral reef is described. Community profiling and analysis of ribosomal RNA gene sequences from a coral reef system at 350 m depth in the Norwegian Sea revealed a rich diversity of Eukarya and Bacteria and a moderate diversity of Archaea. Most sequences affiliated with marine microplankton from deep-sea to cold-surface regions, with many sequences being similar to those described in studies of mesopelagic and oxygen minimum zones. Dominant phylotypes belonged to the Alveolata (group I, II, dinoflagellates), Stramenopiles (silicoflagellates), Alphaproteobacteria (Pelagibacter ubique), Gammaproteobacteria (ARCTIC96BD-19), Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteria) and mesophilic Crenarchaeota (Nitrosopumilus maritimus). Several rare and novel members of the community fell into distinct phylogenetic groups. The inferred function of dominant community members suggested autotrophs that utilise light, ammonium or sulphide, and lifestyles based on host associations. The high diversity reflected a microplankton community structure, which is significantly different from that of microplankton collected at the same depth at a pelagic station away from reefs. PMID:22571287

  11. Investigation of jack-up leg extension for deep water operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welaya, Yousri M. A.; Elhewy, Ahmed; Hegazy, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Since the first jack-up was built, jackups have become the most popular type of mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU) for offshore exploration and development purposes in shallow water. The most pivotal component of the jack-up unit is the leg, which can directly affect the global performance of the unit. In this paper, an investigation into extending the length of the jack up leg is carried out in order to study the enhancement of the rig capability to drill in deeper water approaching the range of the Semisubmersible Drilling Unit (SSDU) (300-1000ft). A study of the performance of a deep-water jack-up unit is performed with different leg lengths. Typical leg scantling dimensions and identical external loads are assigned, and then a detailed Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model is created in order to simulate the jack-up leg unit's structural behavior. A Multi-point Constraint (MPC) element together with the spring element is used to deal with the boundary conditions. Finally, a comparative analysis for five leg lengths is carried out to illustrate their performance, including the ultimate static strength, and weight.

  12. On the difficulty of modeling Circumpolar Deep Water intrusions onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Timmermann, R.; Schröder, M.; Hellmer, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    In the Amundsen Sea, warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) intrudes onto the continental shelf and flows into the ice shelf cavities of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, resulting in high basal melt rates. However, none of the high resolution global models resolving all the small ice shelves around Antarctica can reproduce a realistic CDW flow onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf, and previous studies show simulated bottom potential temperature at the Pine Island Ice Shelf front of about -1.8 °C. In this study, using the Finite-Element Sea ice-ice shelf-Ocean Model (FESOM), we reproduce warm CDW intrusions onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf and realistic melt rates of the ice shelves in West Antarctica. To investigate the importance of horizontal resolution, forcing, horizontal diffusivity, and the effect of grounded icebergs, eight sensitivity experiments are conducted. To simulate the CDW intrusion realistically, a horizontal resolution of about 5 km or smaller is required. The choice of forcing is also important and the cold bias in the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis over the eastern Amundsen Sea prevents warm CDW from intruding onto the continental shelf. On the other hand, the CDW intrusion is not highly sensitive to the strength of horizontal diffusion. The effect of grounded icebergs located off Bear Peninsula is minor, but may act as a buffer to an anomalously cold year.

  13. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers. PMID:24116529

  14. Navy Fan, California Borderland: Growth pattern and depositional processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Piper, D.J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Navy Fan is a Late Pleistocene sand-rich fan prograding into an irregularly shaped basin in the southern California Borderland. The middle fan, characterized by one active and two abandoned 'distributary' channels and associated lobe deposits, at present onlaps part of the basin slope directly opposite from the upper-fan valley, thus dividing the lower-fan/basin-plain regions into two separate parts of different depths. Fine-scale mesotopographic relief on the fan surface and correlation of individual turbidite beds through nearly 40 cores on the middle and lower fan provide data for evaluating the Late Pleistocene and Holocene depositional processes. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  15. Allochthonous deep-water basin deposits of the western US: Implications for Paleozoic paleogeography and plate margin tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.L. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The stratigraphy and sedimentology of the lower Paleozoic Roberts Mts. and upper Paleozoic Golconda allochthons can be used to reconstruct their general paleogeographic setting in the Paleozoic. Basalt pillow lavas and radiolarian chert, were once considered straightforward evidence that the allochthons represented imbricated ocean crust formed at sites far removed from continental influences. Better stratigraphic definition, provenance studies and geochemistry of lavas now indicate that clastic components were derived from the continental shelf or interior and basalts in the Roberts Mountains allochthon were erupted in an intraplate setting through thinned continental crust (Madrid, 1987). Both in the earliest Mississippian and in the Late Permian, the Antler Basin (Roberts Mts.) and the Havallah Basin (Golconda) received proximal detritus from island arc sources to the west, immediately prior to closure of the basins by thrust-faulting. These data suggest that both systems of basins formed as marginal basins by rifting on the continental shelf (Antler Basin) and along the continental margin (Havallah Basin) and were flanked to the west by active island arcs at least during part of their history. As such, their stratigraphy provides a great deal of insight regarding tectonism along the western plate margin of North America during the Paleozoic.

  16. Impact of sedimentary degradation and deep water column production on GDGT abundance and distribution in surface sediments in the Arabian Sea: Implications for the TEX86 paleothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengger, Sabine K.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    the sinking through the water column, or differential degradation of IPL-GDGTs per head group could be the causes for the observed change in TEX86 values. The effect of differential degradation might cause differences between oxic and anoxically deposited sediments, and, together with a potential deep water contribution on TEX86 values, could translate into changes in reconstructed temperature of <3 °C, which might have to be accounted for in TEX86 calibration and paleotemperature studies of deep water sedimentary records.

  17. Six new deep-water sternaspid species (Annelida, Sternaspidae) from the Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I.; Buzhinskaja, Galina

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Most sternaspid species have been described from shallow water, and Caulleryaspis Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 includes one deep water species: C. gudmundssoni Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 from Iceland. In Sternaspis Otto, 1821, the most speciose genus, most species were described from shallow water and only three thrive in deep water: S. maior Chamberlin, 1919 from the Gulf of California, S. princeps Selenka, 1885 from New Zealand, and S. riestchi Caullery, 1944 from Indonesia. The study of some deep sea sternaspids from the Pacific Ocean in the collections of six research institutions resulted in the discovery of six undescribed species, and for three of them there were abundant materials showing ventro-caudal shield development. Caulleryaspis fauchaldi sp. n. is described based on specimens from Oregon and California; it differs from the known species because it has a shield with rounded anterior margins and its peg chaetae form thin, small spines. Caulleryaspis nuda sp. n. was collected off Oregon; it is unique because its shield lacks a layer of sediment particles firmly attached, but has instead a thin layer of small particles loosely attached. Four other species are newly described in Sternaspis: S. annenkovae sp. n. was collected east off the northern Kurile Islands in about 4,000 m depth; it differs from other species by having a bicolored body, with the introvert darker than the abdomen, and its ventro-caudal shield plates are divergent resulting in a divided fan. The second species, S. maureri sp. n. was found off Peru in 1296–6489 m water depths and in the Southwestern Pacific in 795–3830 m; it resembles S. williamsae sp. n. but differs because its shield has better-developed ribs, the fan has a shallow or indistinct median notch and has lateral notches well-developed. The third species, S. uschakovi sp. n., was found in the Okhotsk Sea in 592–1366 m, off California in 1585 m, Gulf of California in 1200–1274 m, and Western Mexico

  18. Growth response of a deep-water ferromanganese crust to evolution of the Neogene Indian Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banakar, V.K.; Hein, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    A deep-water ferromanganese crust from a Central Indian Ocean seamount dated previously by 10Be and 230Th(excess) was studied for compositional and textural variations that occurred throughout its growth history. The 10Be/9Be dated interval (upper 32 mm) yields an uniform growth rate of 2.8 ?? 0.1 mm/Ma [Frank, M., O'Nions, R.K., 1998. Sources of Pb for Indian Ocean ferromanganese crusts: a record of Himalayan erosion. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 158, pp. 121-130.] which gives an extrapolated age of ~ 26 Ma for the base of the crust at 72 mm and is comparable to the maximum age derived from the Co-model based growth rate estimates. This study shows that Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide precipitation did not occur from the time of emplacement of the seamount during the Eocene (~ 53 Ma) until the late Oligocene (~ 26 Ma). This paucity probably was the result of a nearly overlapping palaeo-CCD and palaeo-depth of crust formation, increased early Eocene productivity, instability and reworking of the surface rocks on the flanks of the seamount, and lack of oxic deep-water in the nascent Indian Ocean. Crust accretion began (older zone) with the formation of isolated cusps of Fe-Mn oxide during a time of high detritus influx, probably due to the early-Miocene intense erosion associated with maximum exhumation of the Himalayas (op. cit.). This cuspate textured zone extends from 72 mm to 42 mm representing the early-Miocene period. Intense polar cooling and increased mixing of deep and intermediate waters at the close of the Oligocene might have led to the increased oxygenation of the bottom-water in the basin. A considerable expansion in the vertical distance between the seafloor depth and the CCD during the early Miocene in addition to the influx of oxygenated bottom-water likely initiated Fe-Mn crust formation. Pillar structure characterises the younger zone, which extends from 40 mm to the surface of the crust, i.e., ~ 15 Ma to Present. This zone is characterised by > 25% higher

  19. Cleavage of a Gulf of Mexico Loop Current eddy by a deep water cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, D. C.; Fargion, G. S.; Hamilton, P.; Leben, R. R.

    1996-09-01

    Eddy Triton, an anticyclonic eddy shed by the Loop Current in late June 1991, drifted SW across the central Gulf of Mexico in the first 6 months of 1992, along the ``southern'' of the three characteristic drift paths described by Vukovich and Crissman [1986] from their analyses of 13 years of advanced very high resolution radiometer sea surface temperature data. An expendable bathythermograph (XBT) and conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) transect of opportunity through Triton at eddy age 7 months in January 1992 found that eddy interior stood 23 dyn. cm higher than periphery; this gradient drove an anticyclonic swirl transport of 9-10 Sv relative to 800 dbar. At eddy age 9-10 months and while this eddy was in deep water near 94°W, it interacted with a mesoscale cyclonic circulation and was cleaved into two parts. The major (greater dynamic centimeters) piece drifted NW to end up in the ``eddy graveyard'' in the NW corner of the gulf, while the minor piece drifted SW and reached the continental margin of the western gulf off Tuxpan. This southern piece of Eddy Triton then turned north to follow the 2000-m isobath to about 24°N and later coalesced with what remained of the major fragment. Because Eddy Triton's cleavage took place just before the start of marine mammals (GulfCet) and Louisiana-Texas physical oceanography (LATEX) field programs, the closely spaced CTD, XBT, and air dropped XBT (AXBT) data that were gathered on the continental margin north of 26°N in support of these programs allow a detailed look at the northern margin of the larger fragment of this eddy. Supporting data from the space-borne altimeters on ERS 1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON allow us to track both pieces of Eddy Triton in the western Gulf and follow their spin down in dynamic height, coalescence, and ultimate entrainment in January 1993 into another anticyclonic eddy (Eddy U).

  20. Eddy-Mediated Transport of Circumpolar Deep Water Across the Antarctic Shelf Break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, A.; Thompson, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The continental shelves of Antarctica produce the ocean's densest water, Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), which ventilates over 50% of the sub-surface global ocean. The heat needed to melt marine-terminating Antarctic ice sheets and produce dense water is supplied by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), a relatively warm, mid-depth water mass found offshore. The onshore transport of CDW is obstructed by the Antarctic Slope Front (ASF), a westward current at the continental shelf break that almost completely encircles the continent. Relatively little is understood about the processes that control the exchange of water masses and shoreward heat transport across the ASF, due to a scarcity of observations and the prohibitive cost of simulating turbulent flows in this region. Using a process model of the ASF that resolves the mesoscale eddies at the shelf break, we show that the ASF is shaped by an interplay between the surface wind forcing, transport by mesoscale eddies, and the geometry of the continental shelf. Consequently the onshore transport of CDW and the properties of the outflowing AABW are strongly sensitive to the wind and buoyancy forcing at the ocean surface, and to the geometry of the continental shelf. The onshore mass transport of CDW occurs through an eddy thickness flux. We develop a scaling for this transport that accurately captures the strong sensitivity to forcing and geometry, which is largely controlled by the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) over the continental slope. We find that the EKE is enhanced in the CDW density classes over the continental slope, but cross-slope mixing is constrained by the strong topographic potential vorticity gradient. Our results offer an explanation for the substantial changes in the structure of the ASF around Antarctica, and provide insight into future rates of dense water production and shoreward heat transport around Antarctica.

  1. From circumpolar deep water to the glacial meltwater plume on the eastern Amundsen Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Schröder, M.; Hellmer, H. H.

    2013-07-01

    The melting of Pine Island Ice Shelf (PIIS) has increased since the 1990 s, which may have a large impact on ice sheet dynamics, sea-level rise, and changes in water mass properties of surrounding oceans. The reason for the PIIS melting is the relatively warm (˜1.2°C) Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) that penetrates into the PIIS cavity through two submarine glacial troughs located on the Amundsen Sea continental shelf. In this study, we mainly analyze the hydrographic data obtained during ANTXXVI/3 in 2010 with the focus on pathways of the intruding CDW, PIIS melt rates, and the fate of glacial meltwater. We analyze the data by dividing CTD profiles into 6 groups according to intruding CDW properties and meltwater content. From this analysis, it is seen that CDW warmer than 1.23 °C (colder than 1.23 °C) intrudes via the eastern (central) trough. The temperature is controlled by the thickness of the intruding CDW layer. The eastern trough supports a denser CDW layer than the water mass in Pine Island Trough (PIT). The eastern intrusion is modified on the way into PIT through mixing with the lighter and colder CDW from the central trough. Using ocean transport and tracer transport calculations from the ice shelf front CTD section, the estimated melt rate in 2010 is ˜30myr-1, which is comparable to published values. From spatial distributions of meltwater content, meltwater flows along the bathymetry towards the west. When compared with earlier (2000) observations, a warmer and thicker CDW layer is observed in Pine Island Trough for the period 2007-2010, indicating a recent thickening of the CDW intrusion.

  2. Source rock in the Lower Tertiary and Cretaceous, deep-water Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, B.E.; Sofer, Z.; Claxton, B.L.

    1994-09-01

    Amoco drilled three wells in the deep-water Gulf of Mexico in 1993. One well, in Mississippi Canyon Block 84 (W.D. 5200 ft), drilled a structural feature. The well penetrated Cretaceous section and crossed the middle Cenomanian unconformity. Six sidewall cores from 14,230-15,200 ft (subsea) contained TOC values from 2.6 to 5.2% with hydrogen indices front 360 to 543 ppm in lower Tertiary and Cretaceous shales. All six cores were thermally immature, for oil generation, based on biomarker ratios and vitrinite reflectance measurements. Organic extracts from cores in the Cretaceous had biomarker characteristics similar to oil reservoired in the Miocene. The oil was probably generated from a similar, but more mature, source rock. The high structural position of the well prevented the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous section from entering the oil window at this location. There are over 2000 ft of structural relief and an additional 6000-8000 ft of Lower Cretaceous section below the level penetrated by the well. It is probable that an equivalent section off structure is in the oil window. Prior to drilling, estimates of expected thermal maturities and temperatures were made using {sub BASINMOD}, a hydrocarbon generation/expulsion modeling package. The model predicted higher well temperatures (e,g., 225{degrees}F vs. 192{degrees}F) and lower vitrinite maturity (0.44% vs. 0.64%) than encountered in the well. Vitrinite reflectance equivalents of 0.41% and 0.43% were calculated from biomarker ratios of the Cretaceous core extracts, matching the {sub BASINMOD} predicted value of 0.44%.

  3. Footprint of Deepwater Horizon blowout impact to deep-water coral communities.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Charles R; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Kaiser, Carl L; Yoerger, Dana R; Roberts, Harry H; Shedd, William W; Cordes, Erik E; Shank, Timothy M; Berlet, Samantha P; Saunders, Miles G; Larcom, Elizabeth A; Brooks, James M

    2014-08-12

    On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout occurred, releasing more oil than any accidental spill in history. Oil release continued for 87 d and much of the oil and gas remained in, or returned to, the deep sea. A coral community significantly impacted by the spill was discovered in late 2010 at 1,370 m depth. Here we describe the discovery of five previously unknown coral communities near the Macondo wellhead and show that at least two additional coral communities were impacted by the spill. Although the oil-containing flocullent material that was present on corals when the first impacted community was discovered was largely gone, a characteristic patchy covering of hydrozoans on dead portions of the skeleton allowed recognition of impacted colonies at the more recently discovered sites. One of these communities was 6 km south of the Macondo wellhead and over 90% of the corals present showed the characteristic signs of recent impact. The other community, 22 km southeast of the wellhead between 1,850 and 1,950 m depth, was more lightly impacted. However, the discovery of this site considerably extends the distance from Macondo and depth range of significant impact to benthic macrofaunal communities. We also show that most known deep-water coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico do not appear to have been acutely impacted by the spill, although two of the newly discovered communities near the wellhead apparently not impacted by the spill have been impacted by deep-sea fishing operations. PMID:25071200

  4. Noble gas tracers of ventilation during deep-water formation in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. P.; Khatiwala, S.; Heimbach, P.

    2016-05-01

    To explore the dynamics and implications of incomplete air-sea equilibration during the formation of abyssal water masses, we simulated noble gases in the Estimating the Circulation & Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) global ocean state estimate. A novel computation approach utilizing a matrix-free Newton-Krylov (MFNK) scheme was applied to quickly compute the periodic seasonal solutions for noble gas tracers. MFNK allows for quick computation of a cyclo-stationary solution for tracers (i.e., a spun-up, repeating seasonal cycle), which would otherwise be computationally infeasible due to the long time scale of dynamic adjustment of the abyssal ocean (1000’s of years). A suite of experiments isolates individual processes, including atmospheric pressure effects, the solubility pump and air-sea bubble fluxes. In addition to these modeled processes, a volumetric contribution of 0.28 ± 0.07% of glacial melt water is required to reconcile deep-water observations in the Weddell Sea. Another primary finding of our work is that the saturation anomaly of heavy noble gases in model simulations is in excess of two-fold more negative than is suggested from Weddell Sea observations. This result suggests that model water masses are insufficiently ventilated prior to subduction and thus there is insufficient communication between atmosphere and ocean at high latitudes. The discrepancy between noble gas observations and ECCO simulations highlights that important inadequacies remain in how we model high-latitude ventilation with large implications for the oceanic uptake and storage of carbon.

  5. Large-scale geographic variation in distribution and abundance of Australian deep-water kelp forests.

    PubMed

    Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Williams, Stefan B; Babcock, Russell C; Barrett, Neville S; Johnson, Craig R; Jordan, Alan; Kendrick, Gary A; Pizarro, Oscar R; Smale, Dan A; Steinberg, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Despite the significance of marine habitat-forming organisms, little is known about their large-scale distribution and abundance in deeper waters, where they are difficult to access. Such information is necessary to develop sound conservation and management strategies. Kelps are main habitat-formers in temperate reefs worldwide; however, these habitats are highly sensitive to environmental change. The kelp Ecklonia radiate is the major habitat-forming organism on subtidal reefs in temperate Australia. Here, we provide large-scale ecological data encompassing the latitudinal distribution along the continent of these kelp forests, which is a necessary first step towards quantitative inferences about the effects of climatic change and other stressors on these valuable habitats. We used the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) facility of Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS) to survey 157,000 m2 of seabed, of which ca 13,000 m2 were used to quantify kelp covers at multiple spatial scales (10-100 m to 100-1,000 km) and depths (15-60 m) across several regions ca 2-6° latitude apart along the East and West coast of Australia. We investigated the large-scale geographic variation in distribution and abundance of deep-water kelp (>15 m depth) and their relationships with physical variables. Kelp cover generally increased with latitude despite great variability at smaller spatial scales. Maximum depth of kelp occurrence was 40-50 m. Kelp latitudinal distribution along the continent was most strongly related to water temperature and substratum availability. This extensive survey data, coupled with ongoing AUV missions, will allow for the detection of long-term shifts in the distribution and abundance of habitat-forming kelp and the organisms they support on a continental scale, and provide information necessary for successful implementation and management of conservation reserves. PMID:25693066

  6. On triad nonlinear resonant interactions of deep water waves trapped by jet currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrira, Victor; Slunyaev, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    We derive an asymptotic description of weakly nonlinear wave interactions between waves trapped by opposing jet currents by extending the asymptotic modal approach developed in Shrira & Slunyaev (2014). It is widely believed that to the leading order the nonlinear interactions between water waves in deep water are always quartic and potential. We show that for waves trapped on the jet currents it is not true: triad resonant interactions between trapped modes are always allowed. Moreover, the nonlinear evolution of the wave field is to the leading order determined by these triad interactions if the current is sufficiently strong or wave field nonlinearity is appropriately weak. To the leading order the corresponding interaction coefficients are controlled by the background vorticity due to the jet. More specifically, we consider waves upon a longitudinally uniform jet current; the current is assumed to be stationary and without vertical shear. The approximate separation of variables allows us to find the two-dimensional mode structure by means of one-dimensional boundary value problem (BVP) for wave Fourier harmonics along the current. The asymptotic weakly nonlinear theory taking into account quadratic nonlinearity for broad but not necessary weak currents is developed. The evolution equations for three interacting modes are written explicitly, the nonlinear interaction coefficients are computed. The three-wave interactions weaken when the current is weak. When the ratio of the current magnitude to wave celerity is of order of wave steepness the effects of 3-wave and 4-wave resonances appear at the same asymptotic order. These regimes, as well as the identified regimes where triad resonant interactions between trapped waves are dominant, lead to a qualitatively new wave dynamics which remains to be explored yet. V.I. Shrira, A.V. Slunyaev, Trapped waves on jet currents: asymptotic modal approach. J. Fluid Mech. 738, 65-104 (2014).

  7. Reversed flow of Atlantic deep water during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Negre, César; Zahn, Rainer; Thomas, Alexander L; Masqué, Pere; Henderson, Gideon M; Martínez-Méndez, Gema; Hall, Ian R; Mas, José L

    2010-11-01

    The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) of the Atlantic Ocean is considered to be one of the most important components of the climate system. This is because its warm surface currents, such as the Gulf Stream, redistribute huge amounts of energy from tropical to high latitudes and influence regional weather and climate patterns, whereas its lower limb ventilates the deep ocean and affects the storage of carbon in the abyss, away from the atmosphere. Despite its significance for future climate, the operation of the MOC under contrasting climates of the past remains controversial. Nutrient-based proxies and recent model simulations indicate that during the Last Glacial Maximum the convective activity in the North Atlantic Ocean was much weaker than at present. In contrast, rate-sensitive radiogenic (231)Pa/(230)Th isotope ratios from the North Atlantic have been interpreted to indicate only minor changes in MOC strength. Here we show that the basin-scale abyssal circulation of the Atlantic Ocean was probably reversed during the Last Glacial Maximum and was dominated by northward water flow from the Southern Ocean. These conclusions are based on new high-resolution data from the South Atlantic Ocean that establish the basin-scale north to south gradient in (231)Pa/(230)Th, and thus the direction of the deep ocean circulation. Our findings are consistent with nutrient-based proxies and argue that further analysis of (231)Pa/(230)Th outside the North Atlantic basin will enhance our understanding of past ocean circulation, provided that spatial gradients are carefully considered. This broader perspective suggests that the modern pattern of the Atlantic MOC-with a prominent southerly flow of deep waters originating in the North Atlantic-arose only during the Holocene epoch. PMID:21048764

  8. Footprint of Deepwater Horizon blowout impact to deep-water coral communities

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Charles R.; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Kaiser, Carl L.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Roberts, Harry H.; Shedd, William W.; Cordes, Erik E.; Shank, Timothy M.; Berlet, Samantha P.; Saunders, Miles G.; Larcom, Elizabeth A.; Brooks, James M.

    2014-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout occurred, releasing more oil than any accidental spill in history. Oil release continued for 87 d and much of the oil and gas remained in, or returned to, the deep sea. A coral community significantly impacted by the spill was discovered in late 2010 at 1,370 m depth. Here we describe the discovery of five previously unknown coral communities near the Macondo wellhead and show that at least two additional coral communities were impacted by the spill. Although the oil-containing flocullent material that was present on corals when the first impacted community was discovered was largely gone, a characteristic patchy covering of hydrozoans on dead portions of the skeleton allowed recognition of impacted colonies at the more recently discovered sites. One of these communities was 6 km south of the Macondo wellhead and over 90% of the corals present showed the characteristic signs of recent impact. The other community, 22 km southeast of the wellhead between 1,850 and 1,950 m depth, was more lightly impacted. However, the discovery of this site considerably extends the distance from Macondo and depth range of significant impact to benthic macrofaunal communities. We also show that most known deep-water coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico do not appear to have been acutely impacted by the spill, although two of the newly discovered communities near the wellhead apparently not impacted by the spill have been impacted by deep-sea fishing operations. PMID:25071200

  9. New glass sponges (Porifera: Hexactinellida) from deep waters of the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Reiswig, Henry M; Stone, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Hexactinellida from deep-water communities of the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska, are described. They were mostly collected by the remotely operated vehicle 'Jason II' from 494–2311 m depths during a 2004 RV 'Roger Revelle' expedition, but one shallow-water species collected with a shrimp trawl from 155 m in the same area is included. The excellent condition of the ROV-collected specimens enabled valuable redescription of some species previously known only from badly damaged specimens. New taxa include one new genus and eight new species in five families. Farreidae consist of two new species, Farrea aleutiana and F. aspondyla. Euretidae consists of only Pinulasma fistulosum n. gen., n. sp. Tretodictyidae include only Tretodictyum amchitkensis n. sp. Euplectellidae consists of only the widespread species Regadrella okinoseana Ijima, reported here over 3,700 km from its closest previously known occurrence. The most diverse family, Rossellidae, consists of Aulosaccus ijimai (Schulze), Aulosaccus schulzei Ijima, Bathydorus sp. (young stage not determinable to species), Caulophacus (Caulophacus) adakensis n. sp., Acanthascus koltuni n. sp., Staurocalyptus psilosus n. sp., Staurocalyptus tylotus n. sp. and Rhabdocalyptus mirabilis Schulze. We present argument for reinstatement of the abolished rossellid subfamily Acanthascinae and return of the subgenera  Staurocalyptus Ijima and Rhabdocalyptus Schulze to their previous generic status. These fauna provides important complexity to the hard substrate communities that likely serve as nursery areas for the young stages of commercially important fish and crab species, refuge from predation for both young and adult stages, and also as a focal source of prey for juvenile and adult stages of those same species. PMID:25325089

  10. Lytic viral infection of bacterioplankton in deep waters of the western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luo, T.; Sun, J.; Cai, L.; Liang, Y.; Jiao, N.; Zhang, R.

    2014-05-01

    As the most abundant biological entities in the ocean, viruses influence host mortality and nutrient recycling mainly through lytic infection. Yet, the ecological characteristics of virioplankton and viral impacts on host mortality and biogeochemical cycling in the deep sea are largely unknown. In the present study, viral abundance and lytic infection were investigated throughout the water column in the western Pacific Ocean. Both the prokaryotic and viral abundance and production showed a significantly decreasing trend from epipelagic to meso- and bathypelagic waters. Viral abundance decreased from 0.36-1.05 × 1010 particles L-1 to 0.43-0.80 × 109 particles L-1, while the virus : prokaryote ratio varied from 7.21 to 16.23 to 2.45-23.40, at the surface and 2000 m, respectively. Lytic viral production rates in surface and 2000 m waters were, on average, 1.03 × 1010 L-1 day-1 and 5.74 × 108 L-1 day-1. Relatively high percentages of prokaryotic cells lysed by viruses at 1000 and 2000 m were observed, suggesting a significant contribution of viruses to prokaryotic mortality in the deep ocean. The carbon released by viral lysis in deep western Pacific Ocean waters was from 0.03 to 2.32 μg C L-1 day-1. Our findings demonstrated a highly dynamic and active viral population in these deep waters and suggested that virioplankton play an important role in the microbial loop and subsequently biogeochemical cycling in deep oceans.