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Sample records for distributed bragg reflector

  1. Monolithically integrated distributed bragg reflector laser

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, K.

    1984-08-07

    In a heterostructure distributed Bragg reflector laser, at least one multilayer waveguide substantially comprised of a silicon dielectric compound is monolithically integrated with an active semiconductor heterostructure medium. Bragg reflectors are properly disposed within the waveguide.

  2. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  3. Ideal distributed Bragg reflectors and resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.J.

    1988-05-17

    The method of designing an ideal distributed-Bragg reflector for a microwave waveguide is described comprising the steps of: selecting a signal waveform for propagation as a symmetric traveling wave within the reflector; and determining those surfaces which do not interfere with the symmetric traveling wave having a transverse magnetic polarization by solving the equation sin(k/sub y/Y)=sin(ky..delta..)sinP(k/sub x/x) for horizontally aligned surfaces and the equation sin(k/sub x/x)=sin(k/sub x/..delta..)sin/sup r/(k/sub y/Y) for vertically aligned surfaces; where k/sub y/ is the transverse wave number, k/sub x/ is the axial wave number, p=ky/kx, r=kx,ky, and ..delta.. is set equal to the amplitude of the corrugation, being the transverse spacing at a surface boundary between adjacent horizontally aligned surfaces.

  4. Solgel grating waveguides for distributed Bragg reflector lasers.

    PubMed

    Fardad, M A; Luo, H; Beregovski, Y; Fallahi, M

    1999-04-01

    Solgel grating waveguides and their application to the fabrication of external-cavity distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers are demonstrated. A new composition of aluminosilicate material is developed for the fabrication of single-mode waveguides and Bragg reflectors. An average loss of <0.2 dB/cm is measured in the single-mode waveguides at 1550 nm. The reflectors show filtering greater than 97% near 1530 nm, with a bandwidth of ~0.6 nm . The Bragg reflectors are used as feedback resonators for DBR lasers. Single-mode lasing with a sidemode suppression of better than 25 dB is demonstrated. PMID:18071539

  5. Distributed Bragg reflector laser for frequency modulated communication systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chraplyvy, A.R.; Koch, T.L.; Tkach, R.W.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a lightwave transmitter. It includes a distributed Bragg reflector laser and means for frequency modulating said laser. The laser comprises first and second semiconductor heterostructure regions.

  6. Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B. )

    1992-06-01

    A Bragg reflector composed of periodic cylindrically symmetric corrugations can provide a reflection of nearly unity through the principles of constructive interference, allowing the formation of a frequency selective resonator. Mode conversion will occur, but can be reduced by tapering the amplitude of the corrugations. In this paper reflection measurements are compared with theoretical predictions for untapered sinusoidal and rectangular corrugation as well as a reflector tapered according to the Hamming-window prescription. Measurements of Bragg resonators are also presented.

  7. Unstable-Resonator Distributed-Bragg-Reflector Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) semiconductor laser has wide curved gratings favoring single-mode operation, even with relatively wide laser stripe, enabling use of higher power. Consists of semiconductor double heterostructure laser bounded at each end by region of passive waveguide.

  8. AlP/GaP distributed Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Emberger, Valentin; Hatami, Fariba; Ted Masselink, W.; Peters, Sven

    2013-07-15

    Distributed Bragg reflectors with high reflectivity bands centered at wavelengths from 530 to 690 nm (green to red) based on AlP/GaP quarter-wave stacks are prepared on (001)GaP using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy. Additionally, the complex refractive index of AlP is measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry within the range of 330-850 nm in order to facilitate an accurate reflector design. Structures consisting of 15 quarter-wave stacks reach a peak reflectance between 95% and 98%, depending on the spectral position of the maximum.

  9. Conductive Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Distributed Bragg Reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Hu, Yun; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    A conductive hybrid distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is demonstrated, consisting of inorganic and organic semiconductor films and assembled by a thermal deposition technique. A maximum reflectance of 92.2% and a wide spectral width of more than 70 nm are achieved. The hybrid DBR shows good electrical conductivity, which provides the possibility of practical applications in novel optoelectronic devices, such as electrically pumped organic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. PMID:26422597

  10. Distributed bragg reflector using AIGaN/GaN

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Lee, Stephen R.; Han, Jung

    2004-08-10

    A supported distributed Bragg reflector or superlattice structure formed from a substrate, a nucleation layer deposited on the substrate, and an interlayer deposited on the nucleation layer, followed by deposition of (Al,Ga,B)N layers or multiple pairs of (Al,Ga,B)N/(Al,Ga,B)N layers, where the interlayer is a material selected from AlN, Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N, and AlBN with a thickness of approximately 20 to 1000 angstroms. The interlayer functions to reduce or eliminate the initial tensile growth stress, thereby reducing cracking in the structure. Multiple interlayers utilized in an AlGaN/GaN DBR structure can eliminate cracking and produce a structure with a reflectivity value greater than 0.99.

  11. Widely Tunable Distributed Bragg Reflectors Integrated into Nanowire Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Fu, Anthony; Gao, Hanwei; Petrov, Petar; Yang, Peidong

    2015-10-14

    Periodic structures with dimensions on the order of the wavelength of light can tailor and improve the performance of optical components, and they can enable the creation of devices with new functionalities. For example, distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), which are created by periodic modulations in a structure's dielectric medium, are essential in dielectric mirrors, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, fiber Bragg gratings, and single-frequency laser diodes. This work introduces nanoscale DBRs integrated directly into gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire waveguides. Photonic band gaps that are tunable across the visible spectrum are demonstrated by precisely controlling the grating's parameters. Numerical simulations indicate that in-wire DBRs have significantly larger reflection coefficients in comparison with the nanowire's end facet. By comparing the measured spectra with the simulated spectra, the index of refraction of the GaN nanowire waveguides was extracted to facilitate the design of photonic coupling structures that are sensitive to phase-matching conditions. This work indicates the potential to design nanowire-based devices with improved performance for optical resonators and optical routing. PMID:26379092

  12. High Q-factor distributed bragg reflector resonators with reflectors of arbitrary thickness.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Tobar, Michael E; Cros, Dominique; Krupka, Jerzy

    2007-12-01

    The Bragg reflection technique improves the Q-factor of a resonator by reducing conductor and dielectric losses. This is achieved by designing a low-loss inner resonant region (usually free space) surrounded by an outer anti-resonant region made of distributed Bragg reflector layers. In this paper we develop a simple non-Maxwellian model and apply it to design three distinct cylindrical Bragg resonators based on the same set of single-crystal sapphire plates and rings by changing only the dimension of the cavity that supports the structure. To accomplish this, the simple model allows an arbitrary thickness for either the horizontal or the cylindrical dielectric reflectors by relaxing the condition that they must be lambda/4 thick. The model also allows for higher-order field variations in both the resonant and the anti-resonant regions. The resonators were constructed and experimental results were compared with the simple model and the rigorous method of lines analysis. For the fundamental mode, an unloaded Q-factor of 234,000 at 9.7 GHz was obtained. This is larger than that for a whispering gallery mode resonator. The resonator also exhibited a greatly reduced spurious mode density when compared to an overmoded whispering gallery mode resonator. PMID:18276575

  13. Apparatus For Linewidth Reduction in Distributed Feedback or Distributed Bragg Reflector Semiconductor Lasers Using Vertical Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony L. (Inventor); Hendricks, Herbert D. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The linewidth of a distributed feedback semiconductor laser or a distributed Bragg reflector laser having one or more second order gratings is reduced by using an external cavity to couple the vertical emission back into the laser. This method and device prevent disturbance of the main laser beam, provide unobstructed access to laser emission for the formation of the external cavity, and do not require a very narrow heat sink. Any distributed Bragg reflector semiconductor laser or distributed feedback semiconductor laser that can produce a vertical emission through the epitaxial material and through a window in the top metallization can be used. The external cavity can be formed with an optical fiber or with a lens and a mirror or grating.

  14. Emission properties of surface-emitting distributed-feedback and distributed-Bragg-reflector semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dziura, T. G.; Wang, S. C.

    1989-05-15

    We use a single-mode transfer equation model to study the performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting distributed-feedback (DFB) and distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) semiconductor lasers above threshold. We find that DBR lasers exhibit less envelope spatial hole burning than both single and double phase-shifted DFB lasers and therefore may achieve more stable single-longitudinal-mode operation.

  15. Tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The longwave phenomenological model is used to make simple and precise calculations of various physical quantities such as the vibrational energy density, the vibrational energy, the relative mechanical displacement, and the one-dimensional stress tensor of a porous silicon distributed Bragg reflector. From general principles such as invariance under time reversal, invariance under space reflection, and conservation of energy density flux, the equivalence of the tunneling times for both transmission and reflection is demonstrated. Here, we study the tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector in porous silicon multilayer structures, and we report the possibility that a phenomenon called Hartman effect appears in these structures. PMID:25237288

  16. Tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Lazcano, Zorayda; Valdés Negrín, Pedro Luis; Villegas, Diosdado; Arriaga, Jesus; Pérez-Álvarez, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The longwave phenomenological model is used to make simple and precise calculations of various physical quantities such as the vibrational energy density, the vibrational energy, the relative mechanical displacement, and the one-dimensional stress tensor of a porous silicon distributed Bragg reflector. From general principles such as invariance under time reversal, invariance under space reflection, and conservation of energy density flux, the equivalence of the tunneling times for both transmission and reflection is demonstrated. Here, we study the tunneling times of acoustic phonon packets through a distributed Bragg reflector in porous silicon multilayer structures, and we report the possibility that a phenomenon called Hartman effect appears in these structures. PMID:25237288

  17. Analysis of surface-emitting. lambda. /4-shifted DFB lasers with a distributed Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, T. )

    1991-01-01

    Threshold current density and differential quantum efficiency are analyzed for surface emitting (SE) {lambda}/4-shifted distributed feedback (DFB) laser consisting of alternating active and passive layers with a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). It is shown that the refractive-index periodicity of the active region in DFB structures give rise to unique performances compared to SE DBR lasers with a homogeneous active region.

  18. Ultrafast switching characteristics of a bistable surface-emitting multiple quantum well distributed Bragg reflector laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, K.; Kyuma, K.; Noda, S.; Ohta, J.; Hamanaka, K.

    1988-03-21

    We describe an ultrafast switching operation of a bistable surface-emitting distributed Bragg reflector laser. The rise time was as small as 12 ps and the fall time was 90 ps. Both are much smaller than those of conventional bistable laser diodes. Ths was realized by the effect of the multiple quantum well structure and a strong detuning.

  19. High power singlemode GaInAs lasers with distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, S.; Parke, R.; Welch, D. F.; Mehuys, D.; Scifres, D.

    1992-01-01

    High power singlemode strained GaInAs lasers have been fabricated which use buried second order gratings as distributed Bragg reflectors. The lasers operate in an edge emitting fashion with CW powers in excess of 110 mW with single longitudinal and transverse mode operation at 971.9 nm up to 42 mW.

  20. Distributed bragg reflector resonators with cylindrical symmetry and extremely high Q-factors.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Michael E; le Floch, Jean-Michel; Cros, Dominique; Hartnett, John G

    2005-01-01

    A simple non-Maxwellian method is presented that allows the approximate solution of all the dimensions of a multilayered dielectric TE0qp mode cylindrical resonant cavity that constitutes a distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) resonator. The analysis considers an arbitrary number of alternating dielectric and free-space layers of cylindrical geometry enclosed by a metal cylinder. The layers may be arranged along the axial direction, the radial direction, or both. Given only the aspect ratio of the cavity, the desired frequency and the dielectric constants of the material layers, the relevant dimensions are determined from only a set of simultaneous equations, and iterative techniques are not required. The formulas were verified using rigorous method of lines (MoL) calculations and previously published experimental work. We show that the simple approximation gives dimensions close to the values of the optimum Bragg reflection condition determined by the rigorous analysis. The resulting solution is more compact with a higher Q-factor when compared to other reported cylindrical DBR structures. This is because it properly takes into account the effect of the aspect ratio on the Bragg antiresonance condition along the z-axis of the resonator. Previous analyses assumed the propagation in the z-direction was independent of the aspect ratio, and the layers of the Bragg reflector were a quarter of a wavelength thick along the z-direction. When the aspect ratio is properly taken into account, we show that the thickness of the Bragg reflectors are equivalent to the thickness of plane wave Bragg reflectors (or quarter wavelength plates). Thus it turns out that the sizes of the reflectors are related to the free-space propagation constant rather than the propagation constant in the z-direction. PMID:15742559

  1. FBG feedback's effects on distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser's polarization modes' beat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunbo; Yu, Kuanglu; Lao, Yiqin; Cheng, Linghao; Wu, Chongqing; Zhao, Yao; Shang, Chao

    2015-09-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber optic laser has recently been extensively explored as a powerful sensor for various measurands, thanks to its high sensitivity, excellent signal-to-noise ratio, and inherent electronic magnetic immunity. The phase noise and linewidth of the laser's beat note limits this sensor's performances. We report in this letter, our recent experiments on noise reduction employing optical feedback from an external FBG. We also investigated the sensitivity reduction of the DBR sensor after feedback is introduced.

  2. Resonant pumped erbium-doped waveguide lasers using distributed Bragg reflector cavities.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Purnawirman, P; Bradley, J D B; Li, N; Magden, E S; Moresco, M; Adam, T N; Leake, G; Coolbaugh, D; Watts, M R

    2016-03-15

    This Letter reports on an optical pumping scheme, termed resonant pumping, for an erbium-doped distributed feedback (DFB) waveguide laser. The scheme uses two mirrors on either side of the DFB laser, forming a pump cavity that recirculates the unabsorbed pump light. Symmetric distributed Bragg reflectors are used as the mirrors and are designed by matching the external and internal quality factors of the cavity. Experimental demonstration shows lasing at an optical communication wavelength of around 1560 nm and an improvement of 1.8 times in the lasing efficiency, when the DFB laser is pumped on-resonance. PMID:26977666

  3. Silicon integrated optical pressure sensor based on distributed Bragg reflector structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Milson T.; Manfrin, Stilante K.

    1995-09-01

    A novel integrated optical pressure sensor based on a distributed Bragg reflector structure was designed and simulated. The wavelength-selective device consist of (lambda) /4 shifted distributed Bragg reflectors defined into the glass rib waveguide and a thin diaphragm anisotropically etched into the silicon substrate beneath the region between the reflectors. Pressure sensing is achieved through the detection of the light intensity change induced by the diaphragm deflection. The multilayered diaphragm structure was simulated by using an improved model and the finite-difference method. The effective index method was utilized for designing the rib waveguide. Numerical results revealed that a 1440 micrometers long device presents 19.5 dB of extinction ratio with an insertion loss of 3.6 dB for TM polarization and an applied pressure difference of 1.8 atm. Tenfold length reduction is achieved with the proposed device in relation to the interferometric sensors. The device can also be operated in tandem which is suitable for applications in wavelength division multiplexing sensor networks.

  4. Single-frequency distributed Bragg reflector Nd doped silica fiber laser at 930 nm.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiang; Xu, Yang; Fu, Shijie; Shi, Wei

    2016-04-15

    We report a single-frequency distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser at 930 nm for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. A ∼2.5 cm long commercial highly neodymium-doped silica fiber was utilized as the gain medium to achieve ∼1.9 mW laser output. The single longitudinal mode operation of this laser was verified by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. This fiber laser is suited for seeding high-power 930 nm narrow-linewidth laser amplifiers, which can be used to generate coherent single-frequency pure blue light through frequency doubling. PMID:27082356

  5. Efficient, narrow-linewidth distributed-Bragg-reflector surface-emitting laser with periodic gain

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, S.W.; Geels, R.S.; Yan, R.H.; Scott, J.W.; Colden, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    Efficient, narrow-line emission from a novel vertical-cavity distributed Bragg reflector surface emitting laser (DBR-SEL) with gain segments periodically placed on standing-wave maxima was obtained. Clean single-longitudinal-mode spectra with <2A line widths, sharp output/input characteristics, and thresholds below that of analogous all-GaAs active-region devices were obtained by optical pumping. Theoretical calculations indicate the optimum number of quantum wells and mirror reflectives for best threshold and efficiency.

  6. High-power distributed Bragg reflector ridge-waveguide diode laser with very small spectral linewidth.

    PubMed

    Paschke, K; Spiessberger, S; Kaspari, C; Feise, D; Fiebig, C; Blume, G; Wenzel, H; Wicht, A; Erbert, G

    2010-02-01

    We manufactured and investigated distributed Bragg reflector ridge-waveguide diode lasers having sixth-order surface gratings and an emission wavelength around 974 nm. The single-mode output power of the lasers with a total length of 4 mm exceeded 1 W. A very small spectral linewidth of 1.4 MHz (3 dB) consisting of a Lorentzian part of 146 kHz and a Gaussian part of 1308 MHz was measured using a self-delayed heterodyne measurement technique. PMID:20125735

  7. Regenerated distributed Bragg reflector fiber lasers for high-temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongzhang; Yan, Aidong; Li, Mingshan; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qingqing; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Chen, Kevin P

    2013-07-15

    This Letter presents distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber lasers for high-temperature operation at 750°C. Thermally regenerated fiber gratings were used as the feedback elements to construct an erbium-doped DBR fiber laser. The output power of the fiber laser can reach 1 mW at all operating temperatures. The output power fluctuation tested at 750°C was 1.06% over a period of 7 hours. The thermal regeneration grating fabrication process opens new possibilities to design and to implement fiber laser sensors for extreme environments. PMID:23939090

  8. 976 nm single-frequency distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiushan; Shi, Wei; Zong, Jie; Nguyen, Dan; Norwood, Robert A; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Peyghambarian, N

    2012-10-15

    A single-frequency distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser at 976 nm was developed with a 2 cm long highly ytterbium-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of silica fiber Bragg gratings. More than 100 mW of linearly polarized output was achieved from the all-fiber DBR laser with a linewidth less than 3 kHz. The outstanding features of this single-frequency laser also include ultralow relative intensity noise and high wavelength stability. This fiber laser is an excellent seeder for high-power 976 nm narrow-linewidth laser amplifiers that can be used for efficient coherent blue-light generation through frequency doubling. PMID:23073399

  9. High performance organic distributed Bragg reflector lasers fabricated by dot matrix holography.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenqiang; Huang, Wenbin; Pu, Donglin; Qiao, Wen; Ye, Yan; Wei, Guojun; Fang, Zongbao; Zhou, Xiaohong; Chen, Linsen

    2015-12-14

    We report distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) polymer lasers fabricated using dot matrix holography. Pairs of distributed Bragg reflector mirrors with variable mirror separations are fabricated and a novel energy transfer blend consisting of a blue-emitting conjugated polymer and a red-emitting one is spin-coated onto the patterned substrate to complete the device. Under optical pumping, the device emits sing-mode lasing around 622 nm with a bandwidth of 0.41 nm. The working threshold is as low as 13.5 μJ/cm² (~1.68 kW/cm²) and the measured slope efficiency reaches 5.2%. The distributed feedback (DFB) cavity and the DBR cavity resonate at the same lasing wavelength while the DFB laser shows a much higher threshold. We further show that flexible DBR lasers can be conveniently fabricated through the UV-imprinting technique by using the patterned silica substrate as the mold. Dot matrix holography represents a versatile approach to control the number, the size, the location and the orientation of DBR mirrors, thus providing great flexibility in designing DBR lasers. PMID:26698984

  10. Method and Apparatus for Linewidth Reduction in Distributed Feedback or Distributed Bragg Reflector Semiconductor Lasers using Vertical Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony L. (Inventor); Hendricks, Herbert D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The linewidth of a distributed feedback semiconductor laser or a distributed Bragg reflector laser having one or more second order gratings is reduced by using an external cavity to couple the vertical emission back into the laser. This method and device prevent disturbance of the main laser beam. provide unobstructed access to laser emission for the formation of the external cavity. and do not require a very narrow heat sink. Any distributed Bragg reflector semiconductor laser or distributed feedback semiconductor laser that can produce a vertical emission through the epitaxial material and through a window in the top metallization can be used. The external cavity can be formed with an optical fiber or with a lens and a mirror of grating.

  11. Performance characteristics of a narrow-linewidth distributed-Bragg-reflector laser for optical remote sensing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Little, L.M.; Beernink, K.J.; Papen, G.C.; Coleman, J.J.

    1996-10-01

    Optical remote sensing systems designed to track pollutants and greenhouse gases have received increasing interest. Here, the performance of a novel ridge-waveguide, distributed-Bragg-reflector laser was tested for spectroscopic remote sensing applications. The laser exhibits a narrow linewidth, excellent side-mode suppression, and flexible, highly repeatable wavelength tuning. These characteristics are significant improvements over current Fabry-Perot lasers, and indicate that distributed-Bragg-reflector lasers are promising candidates for implementing advanced semiconductor-based optical remote sensing systems.

  12. Optical characterization of MEMS-based multiple air-dielectric blue-spectrum distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaderi, M.; Ayerden, N. P.; de Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2015-05-01

    The optical performance of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is typically the determining factor in many optical MEMS devices and is mainly limited by the number of the periods (number of layers) and the refractive index contrast (RIC) of the materials used. The number of suitable available materials is limited and implementing a large number of periods increases the process complexity. Using air as a low-index material improves the RIC by almost 50% as compared with most conventional layer combinations and hence provides a higher optical performance at a given number of layers. This paper presents the design, fabrication, and optical characterization of multiple air-SiO2 Bragg reflectors with two airgap layers designed for the visible spectrum. Alternate polysilicon deposition and silicon-dioxide growth on the wafers followed by the selective etching of polysilicon layers in a TMAH-based solution results in a layer stack according to the optical design. However, unlike the conventional MEMS processes, fabrication of a blue-band airdielectric DBR demands several sacrificial layers in the range of 100 nm. Therefore, a successful release of the membrane after wet-etching is critical to the successful performance of the device. In this study, several DBRs with two periods have been fabricated using a CO2 supercritical drying process. The wide-area reflection measurements showed a peak reflectance of 65% and an FWHM of about 100 nm for a DBR centered at 500 nm. DBRs centered on 400 nm gave a much wider spectral response. This paper presents preliminary optical characterization results and discusses the challenges for a reflector design in the blue-visible range.

  13. High performance near-ultraviolet flip-chip light-emitting diodes with distributed Bragg reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Il-Gyun; Jin, Geun-Mo; Park, Jun-Cheon; Jeon, Soo-Kun; Park, Eun-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    We have fabricated the near-ultraviolet (NUV) flip-chip (FC) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with the high external quantum efficiency (EQE) using distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and compared with conventional FC-LED using silver (Ag) reflector. Reflectance of Ag is very high (90 ~ 95 %) at visible spectrum region, but sharply decrease at NUV region. Therefore we used DBR composed of two different materials which have high-index contrast, such as TiO2 and SiO2. However, to achieve high-performance NUV flip-chip LEDs, we used Ta2O5 instead of TiO2 that absorbs lights of NUV region. Thus, we have designed a DBR composed of twenty pairs of Ta2O5 and SiO2 using optical coating design software. The DBR designed by our group achieves a reflectance of ~99 % in the NUV region (350 ~ 500 nm), which is much better than Ag reflector. Optical power is higher than the Ag-LED up to 22 % @ 390 nm.

  14. Pure frequency modulation of a multielectrode distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, O.; Toba, H. ); Tohmori, Y. )

    1989-07-01

    Intensity-modulation (IM) suppressed frequency modulation (FM) is demonstrated over a 600 MHz bandwidth by using a three-electrode distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser diode (LD). A nonuniform carrier density distribution in the active region is realized by two separated electrodes, whose push-pull modulation yields only a 0.7 percent intensity fluctuation per 1 GHz frequency deviation. This corresponds to a 20 dB FM purity improvement. A third electrode on the DBR region makes it possible to tune the wavelength simultaneously. Because of its wider modulation bandwidth, the LD is suitable for the lightwave oscillator in frequency-shift keyed (FSK) transmissions and for linewidth reduction by electrical feedback.

  15. Fabrication of GaP/Al-oxide distributed Bragg reflectors for the visible spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickrell, G. W.; Lin, H. C.; Chang, K. L.; Hsieh, K. C.; Cheng, K. Y.

    2001-02-01

    Using very-low temperature (VLT) molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE), polycrystalline GaP/Al-oxide distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) have been fabricated. The use of high-energy band gap materials, such as GaP, allows for applications in the visible spectrum with minimal absorption of photons in the DBR. Through the use of VLT-MBE and control of the group-V overpressure, the microstructure can be controlled, resulting in either amorphous or polycrystalline material. Due to the nature of the amorphous material, the requirement of lattice matching is relaxed with no adverse effects to the underlying single crystal material. Two DBRs were fabricated, one reflecting at a wavelength of 550 nm and the other 480 nm. Using six pairs of polycrystalline GaP/Al-oxide, a reflectivity of ˜95% was achieved indicating a high-quality DBR suitable for device use.

  16. Fabrication of high reflectivity nanoporous distributed Bragg reflectors by controlled electrochemical etching of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Min; Kang, Jin-Ho; Lee, June Key; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2016-07-01

    The nanoporous medium is a valuable feature of optical devices because of its variable optical refractive index with porosity. One important application is in a GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser having a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) composed of alternating nanoporous and bulk GaNs. However, optimization of the fabrication process for high reflectivity DBRs having wellcontrolled high reflection bands has not been studied yet. We used electrochemical etching to study the fabrication process of a nanoporous GaN DBR and analyzed the relationship between the morphology and optical reflectivity. Several electrolytes were examined for the formation of the optimized nanoporous structure. A highly reflective DBRs having reflectivity of ~100% were obtained over a wide wavelength range of 450-750 nm. Porosification of semiconductors into nanoporous layers could provide a high reflectivity DBR due to controlled index-contrast, which would be advantages for the construction of a high-Q optical cavity.

  17. High power and high temperature continuous-wave operation of distributed Bragg reflector quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Feng Caneau, Catherine G.; LeBlanc, Herve P.; Ho, Ming-tsung; Wang, Jie; Chaparala, Satish; Hughes, Lawrence C.; Zah, Chung-en

    2014-02-17

    High temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) quantum cascade laser is demonstrated up to a heat sink temperature of 80 °C. A CW output power of 2 W and a single mode operation with side mode suppression ratio of 30 dB around wavelength of 4.48 μm were achieved at 20 °C. The maximum pulsed and CW wall-plug-efficiencies reached 14.7% and 10.3% at 20 °C, respectively. A large tuning range of 5 cm{sup −1} between mode hopping was observed and attributed to the thermal cross-talk from the gain section to the DBR section.

  18. Deep ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors based on graded composition AlGaN alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brummer, Gordie; Nothern, Denis; Nikiforov, A. Yu.; Moustakas, T. D.

    2015-06-01

    Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with peak reflectivity at approximately 280 nm, based on compositionally graded Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N alloys, were grown on 6H-SiC substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. DBRs with square, sinusoidal, triangular, and sawtooth composition profiles were designed with the transfer matrix method. The crystal structure of these DBRs was studied with high-resolution x-ray diffraction of the (1{sup ¯}015) reciprocal lattice point. The periodicity of the DBR profiles was confirmed with cross-sectional Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy. The peak reflectance of these DBRs with 15.5 periods varies from 77% to 56% with corresponding full width at half maximum of 17–14 nm. Coupled mode analysis was used to explain the dependence of the reflectivity characteristics on the profile of the graded composition.

  19. Numerical Study on Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Distributed Bragg Reflector.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Young-Wook; Lee, Hyeon-Gi; Won, Tae-Young

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report a theoretical study on the electronic-optical properties of the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) devices having a multilayer structure which consists of N,N'- bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine (TPD) as a hole transport layer (HTL) and tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) as an electron transport layer (ETL). We investigated the angular dependence of the light density of emission as well as CIE chromaticity for devices with and without a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) between the ITO and the glass wherein the DBR comprise two species of materials with different refractive indices. Our simulation revealed that the insertion of the bottom mirror plays a critical role for the improvement of in the emission efficiency of 17% and the sharper emission characteristics. We found out that the chromaticity as well as the viewing angle improved with the presence of the bottom mirror. PMID:26373071

  20. Noninvasive respiration movement sensor based on distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser with beat frequency interrogation.

    PubMed

    Wo, Jianghai; Wang, He; Sun, Qizhen; Shum, Perry Ping; Liu, Deming

    2014-01-01

    A distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser-based respiration movement monitoring system has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. To fabricate the sensing element for respiration monitoring, a fixture that consists of a plastic plate, a section of elastic textile is employed to experience and transfer the belly expansion induced pressure onto the cross-section of the laser cavity. By tracing the change of the beat signal that generates between two polarization lasing modes, the information of the respiration movement can be extracted in real time. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the system is able to detect both respiration waveform and rate simultaneously. Moreover, the recorded results show that the different gestures as well as the physiology conditions can be distinguished by monitoring the amplitude and period change of the waveform. It is anticipated that the proposed fiber laser-based sensor would be highly suitable for respiratory monitoring. PMID:24441944

  1. Frequency doubling of a passively mode-locked monolithic distributed Bragg reflector diode laser.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczyk, D; Prziwarka, T; Klehr, A; Brox, O; Wenzel, H; Paschke, K; Erbert, G

    2014-05-20

    In this work, frequency doubling of a passively mode-locked 3.5 mm long monolithic distributed Bragg reflector diode laser is investigated experimentally. At 1064 nm, optical pulses with a duration of 12.4 ps are generated at a repetition rate of 13 GHz and a peak power of 825 mW, resulting in an average power of 133 mW. Second-harmonic generation is carried out in a periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO₃ ridge waveguide at a normalized nonlinear conversion efficiency of 930%/W. A maximum average second-harmonic power of 40.9 mW, corresponding to a pulse energy of 3.15 pJ, is reached in the experiment at an opto-optical conversion efficiency of 30.8%. The normalized nonlinear conversion efficiency in mode-locked operation is more than 2 times larger compared to continuous-wave operation. PMID:24922212

  2. High power GaInAs lasers with distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, S.; Parke, R.; Welch, D. F.; Mehuys, D.; Scifres, D.

    1992-01-01

    Single-mode strained-layer lasers have been fabricated which use buried second-order gratings for distributed Bragg reflectors. The lasers contain a strained GaInAs quantum well in the active region and operate in an edge emitting fashion with CW powers in excess of 110 mW. Single longitudinal and transverse mode operation is maintained at about 971.9 nm up to 42 mW. Total power conversion efficiencies as high as 28 percent have been observed. The longitudinal and transverse mode behavior is stable under 90 percent amplitude modulation with 50 percent duty cycle pulses at 10 kHz and 10 MHz. Preliminary life-test data at 40 C also indicate room temperature lifetimes in excess of 45,000 hours.

  3. Long-external-cavity distributed Bragg reflector laser with subkilohertz intrinsic linewidth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Van Camp, Mackenzie A; Zhang, Hao; Jelenković, Branislav; Vuletić, Vladan

    2012-06-01

    We report on a simple, compact, and robust 780 nm distributed Bragg reflector laser with subkilohertz intrinsic linewidth. An external cavity with optical path length of 3.6 m, implemented with an optical fiber, reduces the laser frequency noise by several orders of magnitude. At frequencies above 100 kHz the frequency noise spectral density is reduced by over 33 dB, resulting in an intrinsic Lorentzian linewidth of 300 Hz. The remaining low-frequency noise is easily removed by stabilization to an external reference cavity. We further characterize the influence of feedback power and current variation on the intrinsic linewidth. The system is suitable for experiments requiring a tunable laser with narrow linewidth and low high-frequency noise, such as coherent optical communication, optical clocks, and cavity QED experiments. PMID:22660097

  4. High power and high temperature continuous-wave operation of distributed Bragg reflector quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Feng; Caneau, Catherine G.; LeBlanc, Herve P.; Ho, Ming-tsung; Wang, Jie; Chaparala, Satish; Hughes, Lawrence C.; Zah, Chung-en

    2014-02-01

    High temperature continuous-wave (CW) operation of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) quantum cascade laser is demonstrated up to a heat sink temperature of 80 °C. A CW output power of 2 W and a single mode operation with side mode suppression ratio of 30 dB around wavelength of 4.48 μm were achieved at 20 °C. The maximum pulsed and CW wall-plug-efficiencies reached 14.7% and 10.3% at 20 °C, respectively. A large tuning range of 5 cm-1 between mode hopping was observed and attributed to the thermal cross-talk from the gain section to the DBR section.

  5. Etched distributed Bragg reflectors as three-dimensional photonic crystals: photonic bands and density of states.

    PubMed

    Pavarini, E; Andreani, L C

    2002-09-01

    The photonic band dispersion and density of states (DOS) are calculated for the three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal structure corresponding to a distributed Bragg reflector patterned with a 2D triangular lattice of circular holes. Results for the Si/SiO(2) and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As systems determine the optimal parameters for which a gap in the 2D plane occurs and overlaps the 1D gap of the multilayer. The DOS is considerably reduced in correspondence with the overlap of 2D and 1D gaps. Also, the local density of states (i.e., the DOS weighted with the squared electric field at a given point) has strong variations depending on the position. Both results imply substantial changes of spontaneous emission rates and patterns for a local emitter embedded in the structure and make this system attractive for the fabrication of a 3D photonic crystal with controlled radiative properties. PMID:12366275

  6. Studies of beam expansion and distributed Bragg reflector lasers for fiber optics and optical signal processing. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Garmire, E.M.

    1981-03-03

    Separate studies were performed on beam expansion and on Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) lasers preliminary to monolithic integration on GaAs substrates. These components are proposed for use in optical signal processing, for fiber optic sources and for high-brightness lasers.

  7. Realization of a Distributed Bragg Reflector for Propagating Guided Matter Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Fabre, C. M.; Cheiney, P.; Gattobigio, G. L.; Vermersch, F.; Faure, S.; Mathevet, R.; Lahaye, T.; Guery-Odelin, D.

    2011-12-02

    We report on the experimental study of a Bragg reflector for guided, propagating Bose-Einstein condensates. A one-dimensional attractive optical lattice of finite length created by red-detuned laser beams selectively reflects some velocity components of the incident matter wave packet. We find quantitative agreement between the experimental data and one-dimensional numerical simulations and show that the Gaussian envelope of the optical lattice has a major influence on the properties of the reflector. In particular, it gives rise to multiple reflections of the wave packet between two symmetric locations where Bragg reflection occurs. Our results are a further step towards integrated atom-optics setups for quasi-cw matter waves.

  8. Compact, high-Q, zero temperature coefficient, TE011 sapphire-rutile microwave distributed Bragg reflector resonators.

    PubMed

    Tobar, M E; Cros, D; Blondy, P; Ivanov, E N

    2001-05-01

    Some novel new resonator designs based on the distributed Bragg reflector are presented. The resonators implement a TE011 resonance in a cylindrical sapphire dielectric, which is confined by the addition of rutile and sapphire dielectric reflectors at the end faces. Finite element calculations are utilized to optimize the dimensions to obtain the highest Q-factors and zero frequency-temperature coefficient for a resonator operating near 0 degree C. We show that a Q-factor of 70,000 and 65,000 can be achieved with and without the condition of zero frequency-temperature coefficients, respectively. PMID:11381707

  9. Effect of antimony nano-scale surface-structures on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Husaini, S.; Shima, D.; Ahirwar, P.; Rotter, T. J.; Hains, C. P.; Dang, T.; Bedford, R. G.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2013-02-11

    Effects of antimony crystallization on the surface of GaSb during low temperature molecular beam epitaxy growth are investigated. The geometry of these structures is studied via transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, which show the surface metal forms triangular-shaped, elongated nano-wires with a structured orientation composed entirely of crystalline antimony. By depositing antimony on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector, the field is localized within the antimony layer. Polarization dependent transmission measurements are carried out on these nano-structures deposited on a GaSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflector. It is shown that the antimony-based structures at the surface favor transmission of light polarized perpendicular to the wires.

  10. Distributed Bragg reflectors obtained by combining Se and Te compounds: Influence on the luminescence from CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, J.-G.; Kobak, J.; Janik, E.; Parlinska-Wojtan, M.; Slupinski, T.; Golnik, A.; Kossacki, P.; Nawrocki, M.; Pacuski, W.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the optical properties of structures containing self assembled CdTe quantum dots (QDs) combined with Te and Se based distributed Bragg reflectors either in a half cavity geometry with a relatively broad cavity mode or in a full cavity geometry where the cavity mode is much narrower. We show that for both structures the extraction coefficient of the light emitted from the QDs ensemble is enhanced by more than one order of magnitude with respect to the QDs grown on a ZnTe buffer. However, a single QD line broadening is observed and attributed to an unintentional incorporation of Se in the vicinity of the CdTe QDs. We show that postponing the QDs growth for 24 h after the distributed Bragg reflector deposition allows recovering sharp emission lines from individual QDs. This two step growth method is proven to be efficient also for the structures with CdTe QDs containing a single Mn2+ ion.

  11. Observation of Significant Quantum Efficiency Enhancement from a Polarized Photocathode with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui; Poelker, Matthew; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Chen, Yiqiao; Moy, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    Polarized photocathodes with higher Quantum efficiency (QE) would help to reduce the technological challenge associated with producing polarized beams at milliampere levels, because less laser light would be required, which simplifies photocathode cooling requirements. And for a given amount of available laser power, higher QE would extend the photogun operating lifetime. The distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) concept was proposed to enhance the QE of strained-superlattice photocathodes by increasing the absorption of the incident photons using a Fabry-Perot cavity formed between the front surface of the photocathode and the substrate that includes a DBR, without compromising electron polarization. Here we present recent results showing QE enhancement of a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode made with a DBR structure. Typically, a GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathode without DBR provides a QE of 1%, at a laser wavelength corresponding to peak polarization. In comparison, the GaAs/GaAsP strained-superlattice photocathodes with DBR exhibited an enhancement of over 2 when the incident laser wavelength was tuned to meet the resonant condition for the Fabry-Perot resonator.

  12. Electrically-Tunable Group Delays Using Quantum Wells in a Distributed Bragg Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Thomas R., Jr.; Loehr, John P.; Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer; Jones, Darryl K.; Keys, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the fabrication of semiconductor optical group delay lines for the development of phased arrays of Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). We present a novel structure incorporating In(x)GA(1-x)As quantum wells in the GaAs quarter-wave layers of a GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Application of an electric field across the quantum wells leads to red shifting and peak broadening of the el-hhl exciton peak via the quantum-confined Stark effect. Resultant changes in the index of refraction thereby provide a means for altering the group delay of an incident laser pulse. We discuss the tradeoffs between the maximum amount of change in group delay versus absorption losses for such a device. We also compare a simple theoretical model to experimental results, and discuss both angle and position tuning of the BDR band edge resonance relative to the exciton absorption peak. The advantages of such monolithically grown devices for phased-array VCSEL applications will be detailed.

  13. Ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors via stacked single-crystal silicon nanomembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jaeseong; Mi, Hongyi; Kim, Munho; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Deyin; Zhou, Weidong; Yin, Xin; Wang, Xudong

    2015-05-04

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) via stacked single-crystal silicon (Si) nanomembranes (NMs). Mesh hole-free single-crystal Si NMs were released from a Si-on-insulator substrate and transferred to quartz and Si substrates. Thermal oxidation was applied to the transferred Si NM to form high-quality SiO{sub 2} and thus a Si/SiO{sub 2} pair with uniform and precisely controlled thicknesses. The Si/SiO{sub 2} layers, as smooth as epitaxial grown layers, minimize scattering loss at the interface and in between the layers. As a result, a reflection of 99.8% at the wavelength range from 1350 nm to 1650 nm can be measured from a 2.5-pair DBR on a quartz substrate and 3-pair DBR on a Si substrate with thickness of 0.87 μm and 1.14 μm, respectively. The high reflection, ultra-thin DBRs developed here, which can be applied to almost any devices and materials, holds potential for application in high performance optoelectronic devices and photonics applications.

  14. Ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors via stacked single-crystal silicon nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minkyu; Seo, Jung-Hun; Lee, Jaeseong; Zhao, Deyin; Mi, Hongyi; Yin, Xin; Kim, Munho; Wang, Xudong; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we report ultra-thin distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) via stacked single-crystal silicon (Si) nanomembranes (NMs). Mesh hole-free single-crystal Si NMs were released from a Si-on-insulator substrate and transferred to quartz and Si substrates. Thermal oxidation was applied to the transferred Si NM to form high-quality SiO2 and thus a Si/SiO2 pair with uniform and precisely controlled thicknesses. The Si/SiO2 layers, as smooth as epitaxial grown layers, minimize scattering loss at the interface and in between the layers. As a result, a reflection of 99.8% at the wavelength range from 1350 nm to 1650 nm can be measured from a 2.5-pair DBR on a quartz substrate and 3-pair DBR on a Si substrate with thickness of 0.87 μm and 1.14 μm, respectively. The high reflection, ultra-thin DBRs developed here, which can be applied to almost any devices and materials, holds potential for application in high performance optoelectronic devices and photonics applications.

  15. Fabrication of a substrate-independent aluminum oxide-GaAs distributed Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlert, D.E.; Lin, H.C.; Chang, K.L.; Pickrell, G.W. Jr.; Epple, J.H.; Hsieh, K.C.; Cheng, K.Y. )

    1999-09-01

    We propose a method for forming a top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) during very-low temperature (VLT) molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth that is independent of the substrate being used. By varying the arsenic overpressure during VLT MBE, it was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy and cross-section transmission electron microscopy that alternating layers of polycrystalline GaAs and amorphous (Al,As) can be deposited. Because these layers are not single crystal, they can be grown on any host lattice. After lateral wet oxidation, the polycrystalline GaAs does not undergo any significant changes; whereas the amorphous (Al,As) becomes an amorphous aluminum oxide. An index step of [Delta]n=1.88 is realized between these two layers which makes it possible to fabricate a high efficiency DBR with very few polycrystal-GaAs/amorphous-Al-oxide pairs on GaAs-, GaP-, or InP-based materials. Using reflectivity measurements, we demonstrate a five pair GaAs/AlAs-based DBR grown on an InP substrate that reflects wavelengths between 1.4 and 2.3 [mu]m up to 95[percent]. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Distributed Bragg reflector ring oscillators: A large aperture source of high single-mode optical power

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurko, K.M.; Hardy, A.; Scifres, D.R.; Welch, D.F.; Waarts, R.G.; Lang, R.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) ring oscillators are the first monolithic semiconductor lasers containing broad-area active regions which operate in a single mode to several times their threshold current. Orthogonally oriented diffraction gratings surrounding an unpatterned active region select a single spatial and temporal mode of oscillation. This paper presents both analytic and experimental verification of single mode operation for active dimensions up to 368 [times] 1000 [mu]m. Threshold current densities under 200 A/cm[sup 2] and total differential efficiencies greater than 60% have been measured. DBR ring oscillators have demonstrated over 1 W of single frequency output power, 460 mW of spatially coherent, single frequency output power, and nearly circular diffraction limited output to 4 [times] I[sub th]. The performance potential of these devices is enormous, considering that the output apertures are nearly two orders of magnitude wider than conventional single mode sources which generate up to 0.2 W of coherent output.

  17. Nanoporous TiO2-Based Distributed Bragg Reflectors for Near-Infrared Wavelength Applications.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiang-Yu; Leem, Jung Woo; Yu, Jae Su

    2015-12-01

    We reported the fabrication and characteristics of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), made of titanium dioxide (TiO2) dense/nanoporous film stacks, operating in the near-infrared wavelength region of 0.8-1.1 μm. To form the nanoporous TiO2 films with a low refractive index (low-n), the oblique angle deposition (OAD) technique was employed at a high incident vapor flux angle of 80 degrees. For the fabricated DBRs consisting of TiO2 dense/nanoporous (high-n/low-n) thin films, the high reflectance band was gradually increased and the stop bandwidth was narrowed with increasing the number of DBR pairs. Particularly, the TiO2 DBR with only 6 pairs exhibited a normalized stop bandwidth (Δλ/λ(c)) of -11.6% at a center wavelength (λ(c)) of 0.96 μm as well as high reflectance values of > 95% over a wide mid-infrared wavelength region of 0.9-1.01 μm (i.e., Δλ = 0.111 μm). Furthermore, the reflectance characteristics were investigated at incident light angles of 20-70 degrees for different polarized lights. For theoretical optical analyses, the reflectance calculations were also performed by a rigorous coupled-wave analysis method, showing a similar tendency to the experimentally measured data. PMID:26682392

  18. Optically pumped GaN vertical cavity surface emitting laser with high index-contrast nanoporous distributed Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Gong, Su-Hyun; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ebaid, Mohamed; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2015-05-01

    Laser operation of a GaN vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is demonstrated under optical pumping with a nanoporous distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). High reflectivity, approaching 100%, is obtained due to the high index-contrast of the nanoporous DBR. The VCSEL system exhibits low threshold power density due to the formation of high Q-factor cavity, which shows the potential of nanoporous medium for optical devices. PMID:25969197

  19. Fabrication and optical properties of non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Renchun Kako, Satoshi; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-11

    Using the thermal decomposition technique, non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) microcavities (MCs) with a single quantum well have been fabricated. Atomic force microscopy reveals a locally smooth DBR surface, and room-temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements show cavity modes. There are two modes per cavity due to optical birefringence in the non-polar MCs, and a systematic cavity mode shift with cavity thickness was also observed. Although the structures consist of only 3 periods (top) and 4 periods (bottom), a quality factor of 1600 (very close to the theoretical value of 2100) reveals the high quality of the air-gap DBR MCs.

  20. 0. 04 Hz relative optical-frequency stability in a 1. 5. mu. m distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, O.; Toba, H. ); Tohmori, Y. )

    1989-12-01

    The optical frequency of a 1.5 {mu}m distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser is stabilized against that of a master laser by heterodyne-type frequency locking with a phase-locked loop (PLL). Despite its wide linewidth of 16 MHz, stable PLL operation with an optical hold-in range of 26 GHz is realized, and residual frequency fluctuations are reduced to 0.04 Hz at an averaging time of 500 s. The combination of DBR laser and PLL is, therefore, suitable for future frequency-controlled light sources. The offset error from the settled frequency caused by the band-limited beat spectrum is also discussed.

  1. Mode-hop-free operation of a distributed Bragg reflector diode laser in an external fiber-cavity configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Yuji; Tanaka, Utako; Hayasaka, Kazuhiro; Urabe, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    We report on the mode-hop-free operation of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) diode laser with an external cavity consisting of an optical fiber. A simple method is implemented, using feedback to the DBR drive current, to suppress mode hops due to frequency mismatch between the intrinsic mode of the DBR laser and the resonant mode of the fiber cavity. The error signal is derived from the change in the output power of the whole system. The feedback allows long-term operation over hours without mode hops, as well as continuous frequency scans of about 1 GHz with a reduced short-term linewidth.

  2. Design of chirped distributed Bragg reflector for octave-spanning frequency group velocity dispersion compensation in terahertz quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Ban, Dayan

    2016-06-13

    The strategies and approaches of designing chirped Distributed Bragg Reflector for group velocity compensation in metal-metal waveguide terahertz quantum cascade laser are investigated through 1D and 3D models. The results show the depth of the corrugation periods plays an important role on achieving broad-band group velocity compensation in terahertz range. However, the deep corrugation also brings distortion to the group delay behavior. A two-section chirped DBR is proposed to provide smoother group delay compensation while still maintain the broad frequency range (octave) operation within 2 THz to 4 THz. PMID:27410366

  3. High-temperature-resistant distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser written in Er/Yb co-doped fiber.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bai-Ou; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Hong-Jun; Chen, Da; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2008-03-01

    We present a high-temperature-resistant distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser photowritten in Er/Yb codoped phosphosilicate fiber that is capable of long-term operation at 500 degrees C. Highly saturated Bragg gratings are directly inscribed into the Er/Yb fiber without hydrogen loading by using a 193 nm excimer laser and phase mask method. After annealing at elevated temperature, the remained gratings are strong enough for laser oscillation. The laser operates in robust single mode with output power more than 1 dBm and signal-to-noise ratio better than 70 dB over the entire temperature range from room temperature to 500 degrees C. PMID:18542381

  4. Inhibition and enhancement of the spontaneous emission of quantum dots in micropillar cavities with radial-distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Tomasz; Franke, Helena; Smoleński, Tomasz; Sciesiek, Maciej; Pacuski, Wojciech; Golnik, Andrzej; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius; Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef; Kossacki, Piotr

    2014-10-28

    We present a micropillar cavity where nondesired radial emission is inhibited. The photonic confinement in such a structure is improved by implementation of an additional concentric radial-distributed Bragg reflector. Such a reflector increases the reflectivity in all directions perpendicular to the micropillar axis from a typical value of 15-31% to above 98%. An inhibition of the spontaneous emission of off-resonant excitonic states of quantum dots embedded in the microcavity is revealed by time-resolved experiments. It proves a decreased density of photonic states related to unwanted radial leakage of photons out of the micropillar. For on-resonance conditions, we find that the dot emission rate is increased, evidencing the Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission. The proposed design can increase the efficiency of single-photon sources and bring to micropillar cavities the functionalities based on lengthened decay times. PMID:25181393

  5. GaAs/GaAlAs distributed Bragg reflector laser with a focused ion beam, low dose dopant implanted grating

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.C.; Boenke, M.M.; Wang, S.; Clark W.M. Jr.; Stevens, E.H.; Utlaut, M.W.

    1988-07-25

    We report for the first time, the performance of a GaAs/GaAlAs distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser using a focused ion beam implanted grating (FIB-DBR). Stripes of Si/sup + +/ with a period of 2300 A and a dose approx.10/sup 14/ cm/sup -2/ are directly implanted into the passive large optical cavity layer to provide the distributed feedback. Surface-emitting light from the second-order grating is observed. Threshold current of 110 mA and single DBR mode operation from 20 to 40 /sup 0/C are obtained. The wavelength tuning rate with temperature is 0.8 A//sup 0/C. The coupling coefficient is estimated to be 15 cm/sup -1/. The results show that FIB technology is practical for distributed feedback and DBR lasers and optoelectronic integrated circuits.

  6. GaAs/GaAlAs distributed Bragg reflector laser with a focused ion beam, low dose dopant implanted grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M. C.; Boenke, M. M.; Wang, S.; Clark, W. M., Jr.; Stevens, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of a GaAs/GaAlAs distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser using a focused ion beam implanted grating (FIB-DBR) is reported for the first time. Stripes of Si(2+) with a period of 2300 A and a dose about 10 to the 14th/sq cm are directly implanted into the passive large optical cavity layer to provide the distributed feedback. Surface-emitting light from the second-order grating is observed. Threshold current of 110 mA and single DBR mode operation from 20 to 40 C are obtained. The wavelength tuning rate with temperature is 0.8 A/C. The coupling coefficient is estimated to be 15/cm. The results show that FIB technology is practical for distributed feedback and DBR lasers and optoelectronic integrated circuits.

  7. Use of distributed Bragg reflectors to enhance Fabry-Pérot lasing in vertically aligned ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jieying; Chu, Sheng; Huang, Jian; Olmedo, Mario; Zhou, Weihang; Zhang, Long; Chen, Zhanghai; Liu, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    An optically pumped ZnO nanowire laser with a 10-period SiO2/SiN x distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) was demonstrated. Stimulated emissions with equally distributed Fabry-Pérot lasing modes were observed at pumping powers larger than 121 kW/cm2. This result, when compared to nanowires of the same length and without a DBR structure, shows that a lower threshold of pumping power, higher quality factor, and larger cavity finesse can be achieved due to the high reflectivity of the DBR in the designed wavelength range. A coexistence of stimulated and spontaneous emissions was also observed above threshold and was attributed to partially confined waveguide modes in nanowires with diameters smaller than 100 nm.

  8. Fabrication and Operation of Integrated Distributed Bragg Reflector Thermally Tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Liwei

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) that emit in the mid-infrared (IR) range between 3 and 10 µm of the electromagnetic spectrum play an important role in optical gas sensing and molecular spectroscopic applications because several important environmental molecules such as CO, CO2, CH 4, and NH3 are known to exhibit strong absorption lines in this mid-IR range. To differentiate such fine absorption features as narrow as a few angstroms, a single-mode QCL with an extremely narrow spectral linewidth, broadly tunable over the molecular absorption fingerprints and operating at sufficient optical power at room temperature, is highly desirable. We present, in this dissertation, two major studies on mid-IR QCLs, one being an improvement in device performance through a buried-heterostructure (BH) regrowth study, and the other being a realization of single-mode, tunable QCLs integrated with a distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) grating and thermal tuning mechanism. Efficient heat dissipation in the QCL active region, which is crucial for high optical-power operation, can be effectively achieved using BH waveguides laterally embedded with InP grown by metal-organic chemical vapor disposition (MOCVD). We have experimentally examined the effects of the structural features of mesas, such as the mesa orientation, geometry, sidewall-etched profile, and the length of oxide overhang, on the BH regrowth. We find that the mesa oriented in the [011¯] direction with smoothly etched sidewalls produces a satisfactory planar growth profile and uniform lateral growth coverage and that a mesa-height-to-overhang-length ratio between 2.5 and 3.0 is effective in reducing anomalous growth in the vicinity of oxide edges. As a result, high-power QCLs capable of producing multi-hundred milliwatts at room temperature at ˜4.6 µm and ˜7.9 µm through reproducible BH regrowth results have been demonstrated. We have also demonstrated single-mode tunable QCLs operating at ˜7.9 µm with an

  9. Characterization of 40-GHz all-optical clock recovery based on a distributed Bragg reflector self-pulsating laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuefeng; Cartledge, John C.; Shen, Alexandre; Dijk, Frederic V.; Duan, Guang-Hua

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the characteristics of 40-GHz all-optical clock recovery based on a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) self-pulsating laser. With the injection of a low timing jitter clock signal, the timing jitter characteristics of the DBR self-pulsating laser are investigated using both time domain and frequency domain methods. The results reveal that the cause of the timing jitter in the recovered clock signal depends on the injected clock signal power. The system performance of the clock recovery is investigated by the injection of a 40 Gb/s return-to-zero on-off key (RZ-OOK) signal with a 231 - 1 pseudo random bit sequence (PRBS) pattern.

  10. GaAsP tunable distributed Bragg reflector laser with indium tin oxide thin-film heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemukai, Masahiro; Suhara, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    A GaAsP quantum well tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser with a thin-film heater above a DBR grating was designed and fabricated. As a result of the optimization of the DBR grating to obtain both high reflectivity and sharp wavelength selectivity, single-mode lasing with an output power of 54 mW and a side-mode suppression ratio of 43 dB was obtained. By forming the transparent thin-film heater at a distance of 0.1 µm above the DBR grating, the DBR grating was heated locally and efficiently, and a wide wavelength tuning range of 5.2 nm was achieved by heating with a heater power as low as 160 mW.

  11. Light extraction improvement of blue light-emitting diodes with a Metal-distributed Bragg reflector current blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Yi, Xiaoyan; Wang, Li; Sun, Xuejiao; Liu, Lei; Liu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Junxi; Li, Jinmin

    2015-03-01

    The p-electrode of blue light-emitting diodes (LED) chips has a low transmittance on the blue light spectrum. The blue light emitted from the quantum wells under the p-electrode will be severely absorbed by p-electrode, which cause a decrease in blue light extraction efficiency (LEE). In this study, we first designed a current blocking layer (CBL) structure with the blue light reflection through the simulation software. The simulation results show that this structure can effectively improve blue LEE, and then, this structure was verified by experiment. Electroluminescence measurement results show that LED with Metal-distributed Bragg reflector (M-DBR) CBL exhibited better optical performance than the LED with SiO2 CBL and DBR CBL. It was found that M-DBR CBL can effectively increase the blue light reflectivity and prevent the light absorption from the metal p-electrode to improve LED' blue LEE.

  12. Metamorphic distributed Bragg reflectors for the 1440–1600 nm spectral range: Epitaxy, formation, and regrowth of mesa structures

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A. Yu. Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I.; Babichev, A. V.; Berezovskaya, T. N.; Nevedomskiy, V. N.

    2015-10-15

    It is shown that metamorphic In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/In{sub 0.3}Al{sub 0.7}As distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a reflection band at 1440–1600 nm and a reflectance of no less than 0.999 can be fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on a GaAs substrate. It is demonstrated that mesa structures formed from metamorphic DBRs on a GaAs substrate can be regrown by MBE and microcavities can be locally formed in two separate epitaxial processes. The results obtained can find wide application in the fabrication of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with a buried tunnel junction.

  13. High-spectral-radiance, red-emitting tapered diode lasers with monolithically integrated distributed Bragg reflector surface gratings.

    PubMed

    Feise, David; John, Wilfred; Bugge, Frank; Fiebig, Christian; Blume, Gunnar; Paschke, Katrin

    2012-10-01

    A red-emitting tapered diode laser with a monolithically integrated distributed Bragg reflector grating is presented. The device is able to emit up to 1 W of spectrally stabilized optical output power at 5°C. Depending on the period of the tenth order surface grating the emission wavelengths of these devices from the same gain material are 635 nm, 637 nm, and 639 nm. The emission is as narrow as 9 pm (FWHM) at 637.6 nm. The lateral beam quality is M(2)(1/e(2)) = 1.2. Therefore, these devices simplify techniques such as wavelength multiplexing and fiber coupling dedicating them as light sources for µ-Raman spectroscopy, absolute distance interferometry, and holographic imaging. PMID:23188301

  14. Dual-wavelength Y-branch distributed Bragg reflector diode laser at 785 nanometers for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Martin; Eppich, Bernd; Fricke, Jörg; Ginolas, Arnim; Bugge, Frank; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2014-01-01

    A dual-wavelength Y-branch distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) diode laser at 785 nm is presented as an excitation light source for shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS). The monolithic device was realized with deeply etched surface DBR gratings using one-step epitaxy. An optical output power of 140 mW was obtained in continuous-wave (CW) operation for each laser cavity, with emission wavelengths of the device at 784.50 and 785.12 nm. A spectral width of the laser emission of 30 pm (0.5 cm(-1)), including 95% of optical power, was measured. The mean spectral distance of both excitation lines is 0.63 nm (10.2 cm(-1)) over the whole operating range. Raman experiments using polystyrene as the test sample and ambient light as the interference source were carried out and demonstrate the suitability of the dual-wavelength diode laser for SERDS. PMID:25061785

  15. Electrical and optical characteristics of AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflectors for surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Hafich, M.J.; Klem, J.F.; Lear, K.L.; Chu, S.N.G.

    1995-11-27

    We demonstrate an undoped 20 1/2 pair AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) grown lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.78 {mu}m with a maximum reflectivity exceeding 99%. We also measure current--voltage characteristics in a similar 10 1/2 period {ital p}-type DBR and find that a current density of 1 {ital kA}/{ital cm}{sup 2} produces a 2.5 V drop. Hole mobilities and doping concentrations in AlAsSb and GaAsSb are also reported. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Tuning the photonic stop bands of nanoporous anodic alumina-based distributed bragg reflectors by pore widening.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Marsal, Lluis F; Pallarès, Josep; Ferré-Borrull, Josep

    2013-12-26

    A distributed Bragg reflector based on nanoporous anodic alumina was fabricated using an innovative cyclic anodization voltage approach, which resulted in an in-depth modulation of the pore geometry and the refractive index. The effect of a pore-widening wet-etching step on the structure's photonic stop-band properties was studied. From transmittance measurements, it was shown that by changing the pore-widening time it is possible to modulate the photonic stop band in the range of visible to near infrared. With the help of a theoretical model, we were able to obtain information about the evolution with the pore widening of the material effective refractive indexes. This opens the possibility of obtaining several optoelectronic devices based on nanoporous anodic alumina. PMID:24283602

  17. Air-Hybrid Distributed Bragg Reflector Structure for Improving the Light Output Power in AlGalnP-Based LEDs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hwa Sub; Ryu, Ho-Soung; Park, Sueng Ho; Jeong, Tak; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hyung Joo; Cho, Young Dae; Kwak, Joon-Seop; Baek, Jong Hyeob

    2015-07-01

    We investigated air gap-induced hybrid distributed Bragg reflectors (AH-DBRs) for use in high brightness and reliable AlGalnP-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). An air gap was inserted into the side of DBRs by selectively etching the Al(x),Ga1-xAs DBR structures. With the AH-DBR structures, the optical output power of LEDs was enhanced by 15% compared to LEDs having conventional DBRs, due to the effective reflection of obliquely incident light by the air gap structures. In addition, the electrical characteristics showed that the AH-DBR LED is a desirable structure for reducing the leakage current, as it suppresses unwanted surface recombinations. PMID:26373075

  18. Chirped GaAs-AlAs distributed Bragg reflectors for high brightness yellow-green light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.; Chang, C.S.; Su, Y.K.; Chang, P.T.; Wu, Y.R.; Huang, K.H.; Chen, T.P.

    1997-02-01

    A novel chirped distributed Bragg reflector (CDBR) structure was grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on a GaAs substrate where the optical thickness of each pair decreases monotonically from the bottom of the structure to the top surface. It was found that the fabricated CDBR structure can reflect yellow-green light with a maximum reflectivity of more than 80%, and it can reflect light more efficiently in a wider wavelength range than the conventional DBR structure. Yellow-green AlGaInP LED`s with the CDBR structure and the conventional DBR structure were both fabricated. It was found that by using the CDBR structure, one can achieve a higher luminescence intensity.

  19. Electrically conducting n-type AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuh-Shiuan; Haq, A. F. M. Saniul; Kao, Tsung-Ting; Mehta, Karan; Shen, Shyh-Chiang; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Yoder, P. Douglas; Dupuis, Russell D.; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2016-06-01

    We report an electrically conducting 40-pair silicon doped Al0.12Ga0.88N/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a silicon doped n-type GaN template. Due to the relatively small lattice mismatch between AlGaN and GaN, strain managing layers are not required for crack-free n-DBR growth. The DBR demonstrates a peak reflectivity of 91.6% at 368 nm with stopband of 11 nm. In addition, the 40-pair n-DBR shows the vertical resistance of 5.5 Ω, which corresponds to bulk resistivity of 0.52 Ω cm, near the maximum measured current of 100 mA.

  20. Transmission comb of a distributed Bragg reflector with two surface dielectric gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yongyou; Zhang, Qingyun; Zou, Bingsuo; Schwingenschlogl, Udo

    2016-02-01

    The transmission behaviour of a distributed Bragg reector (DBR) with surface dielectric gratings on top and bottom is studied. The transmission shows a comb-like spectrum in the DBR band gap, which is explained in the Fano picture. The number density of the transmission peaks increases with increasing number of cells of the DBR, while the ratio of the average full width at half maximum to the corresponding average free spectral range, being only few percent for both transversal electric and magnetic waves, is almost invariant. The transmission peaks can be narrower than 0.1 nm and are fully separated from each other in certain wavebands. We further prove that the transmission combs are robust against randomness in the heights of the DBR layers. Therefore, the proposed structure is a candidate for an ultra-narrow-band multichannel filter or polarizer.

  1. Transmission comb of a distributed Bragg reflector with two surface dielectric gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yongyou; Zhang, Qingyun; Zou, Bingsuo; Schwingenschlogl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The transmission behaviour of a distributed Bragg reector (DBR) with surface dielectric gratings on top and bottom is studied. The transmission shows a comb-like spectrum in the DBR band gap, which is explained in the Fano picture. The number density of the transmission peaks increases with increasing number of cells of the DBR, while the ratio of the average full width at half maximum to the corresponding average free spectral range, being only few percent for both transversal electric and magnetic waves, is almost invariant. The transmission peaks can be narrower than 0.1 nm and are fully separated from each other in certain wavebands. We further prove that the transmission combs are robust against randomness in the heights of the DBR layers. Therefore, the proposed structure is a candidate for an ultra-narrow-band multichannel filter or polarizer. PMID:26893069

  2. Transmission comb of a distributed Bragg reflector with two surface dielectric gratings

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yongyou; Zhang, Qingyun; Zou, Bingsuo; Schwingenschlogl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The transmission behaviour of a distributed Bragg reector (DBR) with surface dielectric gratings on top and bottom is studied. The transmission shows a comb-like spectrum in the DBR band gap, which is explained in the Fano picture. The number density of the transmission peaks increases with increasing number of cells of the DBR, while the ratio of the average full width at half maximum to the corresponding average free spectral range, being only few percent for both transversal electric and magnetic waves, is almost invariant. The transmission peaks can be narrower than 0.1 nm and are fully separated from each other in certain wavebands. We further prove that the transmission combs are robust against randomness in the heights of the DBR layers. Therefore, the proposed structure is a candidate for an ultra-narrow-band multichannel filter or polarizer. PMID:26893069

  3. Recent Progress in the Growth of Highly Reflective Nitride-Based Distributed Bragg Reflectors and Their Use in Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butté, R.; Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J.; Christmann, G.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Ilegems, M.

    2005-10-01

    The growth of highly-reflective nitride-based distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and their use in vertical cavity structures is reviewed. We discuss the various nitride material systems employed to design Bragg mirrors and microcavities, namely the Alx(Ga)1-xN/(Al)yGa1-yN and the lattice-matched Al1-xInxN/GaN (xIn˜ 18%)-based systems. An emphasis on particular issues such as strain management, internal absorption, alloy morphology and contribution of leaky modes is carried out. Specific properties of the poorly known AlInN alloy such as the bandgap variation with In content close to lattice-matched conditions to GaN are reported. The superior optical quality of the lattice-matched AlInN/GaN system for the realization of nitride-based DBRs is demonstrated. The properties of nitride-based vertical cavity devices are also described. Forthcoming challenges such as the realization of electrically pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers and strongly coupled quantum microcavities are discussed as well, and in particular critical issues such as vertical current injection.

  4. Efficiency enhancement and angle-dependent color change in see-through organic photovoltaics using distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wan Jae; Lo, Nhat-Truong; Jung, Gwan Ho; Ham, Juyoung; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-01

    A distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is conducted as a bottom reflector in see-through organic photovoltaics (OPVs) with an active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM). The DBR consists of alternative layers of the high- and low-refractive index materials of Ta2O5 (n = 2.16) and SiO2 (n = 1.46). The DBR selectively reflects the light within a specific wavelength region (490 nm-630 nm) where the absorbance of P3HT:PCBM is maximum. The see-through OPVs fabricated on DBR exhibit efficiency enhancement by 31% compared to the device without DBR. Additionally, the angle-dependent transmittance of DBR is analysed using optical simulation and verified by experimental results. As the incident angle of light increases, peak of reflectance shifts to shorter wavelength and the bandwidth gets narrower. This unique angle-dependent optical properties of DBR allows the facile color change of see-through OPVs.

  5. Optimum conditions of the distributed bragg reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Su-Chang; Lee, Byung-Teak; An, Won-Chan; Kim, Dae-Kwang; Jang, In-Kyu; So, Jin-Su; Lee, Hyung-Joo

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for a bottom reflector in 850-nm GaAs infrared light-emitting diodes (Ir-LEDs) was developed and optimized. At an 850-nm wavelength, markedly improved reflection spectra were observed from DBRs consisting of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs materials. In addition, the reflection spectra of Al1-xGaxAs/AlxGa1-xAs-based DBRs was found to increase with increasing difference between the high and the low refractive indices. At multiple layers of 10 pairs, maximal reflection spectra having about a 92% reflectivity were obtained from DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. At 20 pairs, however, outstanding reflection spectra having a higher reflectivity and broader width were clearly observed from DBRs consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As. Some incident light appears to have been absorbed and confined by the narrow bandgap of the GaAs material used in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. This fact could be supported by the decrease in the reflectivity of the shorter wavelength region in DBRs consisting of GaAs/AlAs. For this reason, a remarkable output power could be obtained from the 850-nm GaAs Ir-LED chip having a DBR consisting of Al0.1Ga0.9As/Al0.9Ga0.1As.

  6. Dichroic Bragg reflectors based on birefringent porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, J.; Kunzner, N.; Kovalev, D.; Gross, E.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Polisski, G.; Koch, F.

    2001-06-11

    Multilayers of anisotropically nanostructured silicon (Si) have been fabricated and studied by polarization-resolved reflection measurements. Alternating layers having different refractive indices exhibit additionally a strong in-plane anisotropy of their refractive index (birefringence). Therefore, a stack of layers, acting as a distributed Bragg reflector, has two distinct reflection bands, depending on the polarization of the incident linearly polarized light. This effect is governed by a three-dimensional (in-plane and in-depth) variation of the refractive index. These structures can yield optical effects which are difficult to achieve with conventional Bragg reflectors. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. 100 kHz axial scan rate swept-wavelength OCT using sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Shane; Bernacil, Michael A.; DeKelaita, Andrew; Maher, Ben; Derickson, Dennis

    2009-02-01

    Fast wavelength tunable sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SG-DBR) lasers are used to generate fast, linear, continuous wavelength sweeps. High resolution wavelength sweeps in excess of 45 nm are demonstrated at a 100 kHz repetition rate. The front mirror, back mirror and phase segment tuning segments can be modulated at very fast rates, which allows for very fast wavelength ramp rates. This sweep is generated through three time synchronized current versus time waveforms applied to the back mirror, front mirror and phase sections of the laser. The sweep consists of fifty separate mode-hop-free tuning segments which are stitched together to form a near continuous wavelength ramp. The stitching points require a maximum of 60 ns for amplitude, wavelength, and thermal settling time to allow the laser to equilibrate. Wavelength tuning non-linearities, output power wavelength dependency, and wavelength discontinuities are defects in the wavelength sweep that result from properties of the wavelength tuning mechanism as well as limitations of the signal generators that produce the time varying bias currents. A Michelson Interferometer is used to examine the effects of these defects for optical coherence tomography (OCT). The OCT measurements demonstrate spectral broadening of the source and interference signal reduction as the penetration depth increases. However, these effects are not very severe for delay differences less than 2 mm even without correction for sweep nonlinearities.

  8. High-speed concatenation of frequency ramps using sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector laser diode sources for OCT resolution enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Brandon; Derickson, Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Wavelength tunable sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SG-DBR) lasers used for telecommunications applications have previously demonstrated the ability for linear frequency ramps covering the entire tuning range of the laser at 100 kHz repetition rates1. An individual SG-DBR laser has a typical tuning range of 50 nm. The InGaAs/InP material system often used with SG-DBR lasers allows for design variations that cover the 1250 to 1650 nm wavelength range. This paper addresses the possibility of concatenating the outputs of tunable SGDBR lasers covering adjacent wavelength ranges for enhancing the resolution of OCT measurements. This laser concatenation method is demonstrated by combining the 1525 nm to 1575 nm wavelength range of a "C Band" SG-DBR laser with the 1570nm to 1620 nm wavelength coverage of an "L-Band" SG-DBR laser. Measurements show that SGDBR lasers can be concatenated with a transition switching time of less than 50 ns with undesired leakage signals attenuated by 50 dB.

  9. InGaN Light-Emitting Diodes with an Embedded Nanoporous GaN Distributed Bragg Reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Guo-Yi; Chen, Kuei-Ting; Fan, Feng-Hsu; Huang, Kun-Pin; Hsu, Wei-Ju; Dai, Jing-Jie; Lai, Chun-Feng; Lin, Chia-Feng

    2016-01-01

    InGaN light emitting diodes (LED) structure with an embedded 1/4λ-stack nanoporous-GaN/undoped-GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) structure have been demonstrated. Si-heavily doped GaN epitaxial layers (n(+)-GaN) in the 12-period n(+)-GaN/u-GaN stack structure are transformed into low refractive index nanoporous GaN structure through the doping-selective electrochemical wet etching process. The central wavelength of the nanoporous DBR structure was located at 442.3 nm with a 57 nm linewidth and a 97.1% peak reflectivity. The effective cavity length (6.0λ), the effective penetration depth (278 nm) in the nanoporous DBR structure, and InGaN active layer matching to Fabry-Pérot mode order 12 were observed in the far-field photoluminescence radiative spectra. High electroluminescence emission intensity and line-width narrowing effect were measured in the DBR-LED compared with the non-treated LED structure. Non-linear emission intensity and line-width reducing effect, from 11.8 nm to 0.73 nm, were observed by increasing the laser excited power. Resonant cavity effect was observed in the InGaN LED with bottom nanoporous-DBR and top GaN/air interface. PMID:27363290

  10. InGaN Light-Emitting Diodes with an Embedded Nanoporous GaN Distributed Bragg Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Guo-Yi; Chen, Kuei-Ting; Fan, Feng-Hsu; Huang, Kun-Pin; Hsu, Wei-Ju; Dai, Jing-Jie; Lai, Chun-Feng; Lin, Chia-Feng

    2016-07-01

    InGaN light emitting diodes (LED) structure with an embedded 1/4λ-stack nanoporous-GaN/undoped-GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) structure have been demonstrated. Si-heavily doped GaN epitaxial layers (n+-GaN) in the 12-period n+-GaN/u-GaN stack structure are transformed into low refractive index nanoporous GaN structure through the doping-selective electrochemical wet etching process. The central wavelength of the nanoporous DBR structure was located at 442.3 nm with a 57 nm linewidth and a 97.1% peak reflectivity. The effective cavity length (6.0λ), the effective penetration depth (278 nm) in the nanoporous DBR structure, and InGaN active layer matching to Fabry-Pérot mode order 12 were observed in the far-field photoluminescence radiative spectra. High electroluminescence emission intensity and line-width narrowing effect were measured in the DBR-LED compared with the non-treated LED structure. Non-linear emission intensity and line-width reducing effect, from 11.8 nm to 0.73 nm, were observed by increasing the laser excited power. Resonant cavity effect was observed in the InGaN LED with bottom nanoporous-DBR and top GaN/air interface.

  11. Metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy of narrow-band distributed Bragg reflectors realized by GaN:Ge modulation doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Christoph; Lesnik, Andreas; Zettler, Thomas; Schmidt, Gordon; Veit, Peter; Dadgar, Armin; Bläsing, Jürgen; Christen, Jürgen; Strittmatter, André

    2016-04-01

    We report on metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) applying a periodic modulation of the GaN doping concentration only. The doping modulation changes the refractive index of GaN via the Burstein-Moss-effect. MOVPE growth of highly doped GaN:Ge and modulation of the dopant concentration by at least two orders of magnitude within few nanometers is required to achieve a refractive index contrast of 2-3%. Such modulation characteristic is achieved despite the presence of Ge memory effects and incorporation delay. We realized DBRs with up to 100 layer pairs by combining GaN:Ge with a nominal doping concentration of 1.6×1020 cm-3 as low-refractive index material with unintentionally doped GaN as high-refractive index layer. Scanning transmission electron microscope images reveal DBR structures with abrupt interfaces and homogenous layer thicknesses in lateral and vertical direction. Reflectance measurements of DBRs designed for the blue and near UV-spectral region show a narrow stopband with a maximum reflectivity of 85% at 418 nm and even 95% at 370 nm. InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well structures grown on top of such DBRs exhibit narrow emission spectra with linewidths below 3 nm and significantly increased emission intensity.

  12. InGaN Light-Emitting Diodes with an Embedded Nanoporous GaN Distributed Bragg Reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Guo-Yi; Chen, Kuei-Ting; Fan, Feng-Hsu; Huang, Kun-Pin; Hsu, Wei-Ju; Dai, Jing-Jie; Lai, Chun-Feng; Lin, Chia-Feng

    2016-01-01

    InGaN light emitting diodes (LED) structure with an embedded 1/4λ-stack nanoporous-GaN/undoped-GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) structure have been demonstrated. Si-heavily doped GaN epitaxial layers (n+-GaN) in the 12-period n+-GaN/u-GaN stack structure are transformed into low refractive index nanoporous GaN structure through the doping-selective electrochemical wet etching process. The central wavelength of the nanoporous DBR structure was located at 442.3 nm with a 57 nm linewidth and a 97.1% peak reflectivity. The effective cavity length (6.0λ), the effective penetration depth (278 nm) in the nanoporous DBR structure, and InGaN active layer matching to Fabry-Pérot mode order 12 were observed in the far-field photoluminescence radiative spectra. High electroluminescence emission intensity and line-width narrowing effect were measured in the DBR-LED compared with the non-treated LED structure. Non-linear emission intensity and line-width reducing effect, from 11.8 nm to 0.73 nm, were observed by increasing the laser excited power. Resonant cavity effect was observed in the InGaN LED with bottom nanoporous-DBR and top GaN/air interface. PMID:27363290

  13. High performance tunable 1. 5. mu. m InGaAs/InGaAsP multiple quantum well distributed Bragg reflector lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, T.L.; Koren, U.; Miller, B.I.

    1988-09-19

    We describe the structure and performance of tunable four-quantum-well InGaAs/InGaAsP distributed Bragg reflector lasers. We observe total tuning range as large as 94 A, differential efficiency of 32%/front facet, thresholds of 17 mA, low-chirp high-speed digital operation, and linewidths as low as 5.75 MHz at only 2 mW output.

  14. 1. 5-1. 6. mu. m GaInAsP/InP dynamic-single-mode (DSM) lasers with distributed Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, F.; Arai, S.; Suematsu, Y.; Tawee, T.

    1983-06-01

    The theoretical bases and the experimental results of the dynamic behavior of 1.5-1.6 ..mu..m GaInAsP/InP dynamic-single-mode (DSM) lasers with distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) are given. A condition for the single-mode operation of a rapidly modulated DBR laser, called a ''dynamic-single-mode laser,'' and the dynamic spectral width were theoretically presented. Experimentally, burried-heterostructure distributed-Bragg-reflector integrated-twin-guide (BH-DBR-ITG) and buried-heterostructure butt-jointed-built-in distributed-Bragg-reflector (BH-BJB-DBR) lasers emitting at the wavelength of 1.5-1.6 ..mu..m were directly modulated up to 3 GHz, and the stable single-mode operations were obtained in both types of lasers. The dynamic spectral width at the worst modulation condition was measured to be 0.27nm, which was about 1/35 times smaller than that of conventional lasers.

  15. Widely tunable Sampled Grating Distributed Bragg Reflector Quantum Cascade laser for gas spectroscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diba, Abdou Salam

    Since the advent of semiconductor lasers, the development of tunable laser sources has been subject of many efforts in industry and academia arenas. This interest towards broadly tunable lasers is mainly due to the great promise they have in many applications ranging from telecommunication, to environmental science and homeland security, just to name a few. After the first demonstration of quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the early nineties, QCL has experienced a rapid development, so much so that QCLs are now the most reliable and efficient laser source in the Mid-IR range covering between 3 microm to 30 microm region of the electromagnetic spectrum. QCLs have almost all the desirable characteristics of a laser for spectroscopy applications such as narrow spectral linewidth ideal for high selectivity measurement, high power enabling high sensitivity sensing and more importantly they emit in the finger-print region of most of the trace gases and large molecules. The need for widely tunable QCLs is now more pressing than ever before. A single mode quantum cascade laser (QCL) such as a distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, is an ideal light source for gas sensing in the MIR wavelength range. Despite their performance and reliability, DFB QCLs are limited by their relatively narrow wavelength tuning range determined by the thermal rollover of the laser. An external cavity (EC) QCL, on the other hand, is a widely tunable laser source, and so far is the choice mid-infrared single frequency light sources for detecting multiple species/large molecules. However, EC QCLs can be complex, bulky and expensive. In the quest for finding alternative broadly wavelength tunable sources in the mid-infrared, many monolithic tunable QCLs are recently proposed and fabricated, including SG-DBR, DFB-Arrays, Slot-hole etc. and they are all of potentially of interest as a candidate for multi-gas sensing and monitoring applications, due to their large tuning range (>50 cm-1), and potentially low

  16. Highly tunable heterogeneously integrated III-V on silicon sampled-grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers operating in the O-band.

    PubMed

    Duprez, Helene; Jany, Christophe; Seassal, Christian; Ben Bakir, Badhise

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and performance of the first hetero-integrated III-V on silicon sampled-grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers (SGDBR) operating in the O-band and based on direct bonding and adiabatic coupling. Two devices with different geometric parameters are presented both showing an output power in the Si waveguide as high as 7.5 mW and a continuous tuning range of 27 and 35 nm respectively with a side mode suppression ration higher than 35 dB. PMID:27607693

  17. Design of a tandem distributed Bragg reflectors specialized for enhancing the efficiency of GaN-based ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Ji, Qingbin; Zong, Hua; Yan, Tongxing; Li, Junchao; Wei, Tiantian; Hu, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    We design a type of "tandem distributed Bragg reflector (DBR)" that shows advantages over normal DBR in ultraviolet region. We apply a tandem DBR centered at 390 nm to a resonant cavity light emitting diodes model, consequently enhancing the extraction efficiency without detuning the cavity while narrowing the spectral width of the emitted light. The extraction efficiency into a numerical aperture exhibits a 36% increase compared to that of the normal structure. We further demonstrate the potential that the tandem DBRs (centered at 343 nm and 246 nm respectively) have for enhancing the efficiency in GaN-based deep UV device.

  18. High power (130 mW) 40 GHz 1.55 μm mode-locked distributed Bragg reflector lasers with integrated optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Jehan; Hou, Lianping; Haji, Mohsin; Strain, Michael J; Marsh, John H; Bryce, A Catrina; Kelly, Anthony E

    2012-02-01

    High output power 40 GHz 1.55 μm passively mode-locked surface-etched distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers with monolithically integrated semiconductor optical amplifiers are reported. These are based on an optimized AlGaInAs/InP epitaxial structure with a three quantum well active layer and an optical trap layer. The device produces near transform limited Gaussian pulses with a pulse duration of 3.3 ps. An average output power during mode-locked operation of 130 mW was achieved with a corresponding peak power of >1 W. PMID:22297347

  19. Efficient high-power frequency doubling of distributed Bragg reflector tapered laser radiation in a periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate planar waveguide.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczyk, Daniel; Güther, Reiner; Paschke, Katrin; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Lee, Han-Young; Erbert, Götz

    2011-02-01

    We report on efficient single-pass, high-power second-harmonic generation in a periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO3 planar waveguide using a distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser as a pump source. A coupling efficiency into the planar waveguide of 73% was realized, and 1.07 W of visible laser light at 532 nm was generated. Corresponding optical and electro-optical conversion efficiencies of 26% and 8.4%, respectively, were achieved. Good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions was observed. PMID:21283192

  20. Single-frequency Q-switched erbium-doped fiber ring laser by combination of a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a Mach-Zender interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anting; Ming, Hai; Xie, Jianping; Chen, Xiyao; Lv, Liang; Huang, Wencai; Xu, Lixin

    2003-06-20

    A single-frequency Q-switched erbium-doped fiber ring laser is implemented for producing a single frequency with 25-Mhz laser linewidth, Q-switched pulses with a high peak power at 1557.5 mm. The single longitudinal mode is selected by a distributed Bragg reflector fiber laser, and a fiberoptic Mach-Zehnder interferometer acts as a Q-switch. The peak power and the average power of the Q-switched pulses vary with the repetition rate. PMID:12833955

  1. ZnO/a-Si distributed Bragg reflectors for light trapping in thin film solar cells from visible to infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aqing; Yuan, Qianmin; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) consisting of ZnO and amorphous silicon (a-Si) were prepared by magnetron sputtering method for selective light trapping. The quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs with only 6 periods exhibit a peak reflectance of above 99% and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 347 nm in the range of visible to infrared. The 6-pair reversed quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs also have a peak reflectance of 98%. Combination of the two ZnO/a-Si DBRs leads to a broader stopband from 686 nm to 1354 nm. Using the ZnO/a-Si DBRs as the rear reflector of a-Si thin film solar cells significantly increases the photocurrent in the spectrum range of 400-1000 nm, in comparison with that of the cells with Al reflector. The obtained results suggest that ZnO/a-Si DBRs are promising reflectors of a-Si thin-film solar cells for light trapping.

  2. Fano resonances in integrated silicon Bragg reflectors for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Solgaard, Olav

    2013-11-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally Fano resonances in integrated silicon Bragg reflectors. These asymmetric resonances are obtained by interference between light reflected from the Bragg waveguide and from the end facet. The Bragg reflectors were designed and modeled using the 1D transfer matrix method, and they were fabricated in standard silicon wafers using a CMOS-compatible process. The results show that the shape and asymmetry of the Fano resonances depend on the relative phase of the reflected light from the Bragg reflectors and end facet. This phase relationship can be controlled to optimize the lineshapes for sensing applications. Temperature sensing in these integrated Bragg reflectors are experimentally demonstrated with a temperature sensitivity of 77 pm/°C based on the thermo-optic effect of silicon. PMID:24216944

  3. Crack-free and conductive Si-doped AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown on 6H-SiC(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Ive, Tommy; Brandt, Oliver; Kostial, Helmar; Hesjedal, Thorsten; Ramsteiner, Manfred; Ploog, Klaus H.

    2004-09-13

    We demonstrate Si-doped n-type AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors grown on 6H-SiC(0001). The structures are crack-free and have a stopband centered around 450 nm with a full width at half maximum between 40 and 50 nm. The maximum measured reflectance is {>=}99%. A comparison between Si-doped and undoped structures reveals no degradation of the reflectance due to the Si doping. Vertical conductance measurements at room temperature on the samples show an ohmic I-V behavior in the entire measurement range. The measured resistivity at 77 K is only a factor of 2 larger than the resistivity measured at room temperature.

  4. High-power green and blue electron-beam pumped surface-emitting lasers using dielectric and epitaxial distributed Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, T.; Klembt, S.; Kozlovsky, V. I.; Zheng, A.; Tiberi, M. D.; Kruse, C.

    2015-03-21

    ZnSe-based electron-beam pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the green (λ = 530 nm) and blue (λ = 462 nm) spectral region have been realized. Structures with and without epitaxial bottom distributed Bragg reflector have been fabricated and characterized. The samples consist of an active region containing 20 quantum wells with a cavity length varying between an optical thickness of 10 λ to 20 λ. The active material is ZnCdSSe in case of the green devices and ZnSe for the blue ones. Room temperature single mode lasing for structures with and without epitaxial bottom mirror with a maximum output power up to 5.9 W (green) and 3.3 W (blue) is achieved, respectively.

  5. High-Quality Crystal Growth and Characteristics of AlGaN-Based Solar-Blind Distributed Bragg Reflectors with a Tri-layer Period Structure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Yang, Lianhong; Liu, Yanli; Dong, Kexiu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-01-01

    To realize AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), a novel tri-layer AlGaN/AlInN/AlInGaN periodical structure that differs from the traditional periodically alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index materials was proposed and grown on an Al0.5Ga0.5N template via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Because of the intentional design of the AlInGaN strain transition layer, a state-of-the-art DBR structure with atomic-level-flatness interfaces was achieved using an AlGaN template. The fabricated DBR exhibits a peak reflectivity of 86% at the centre wavelength of 274 nm and a stopband with a full-width at half-maximum of 16 nm. PMID:27381651

  6. Distributed Bragg reflector lattice-matched Pb/sub 1-x/Sn/sub x/Te/PbSe/sub y/Te/sub 1-y/ diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kapon, E.; Zussman, A.; Katzir, A.

    1984-02-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lattice-matched Pb/sub 1-x/Sn/sub x/Te/PbSe/sub y/Te/sub 1-y/ diode lasers were fabricated using liquid phase epitaxy. These DBR lasers were operated within a limited range of heat-sink temperatures 8.5--38 K, and the threshold current density at 20 K was approx.3 kA/cm/sup 2/. Single longitudinal-mode operation was obtained up to more than three times the threshold current. The DBR lasers exhibited continuous tuning over a relatively wide range of approx.6 cm/sup -1/ near 775 cm/sup -1/ (12.9 ..mu..m). The average tuning rate was 0.21 cm/sup -1//K, and it was much smaller than the rate for corresponding Fabry--Perot lasers, which was 2.3 cm/sup -1//K.

  7. High-Quality Crystal Growth and Characteristics of AlGaN-Based Solar-Blind Distributed Bragg Reflectors with a Tri-layer Period Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Yang, Lianhong; Liu, Yanli; Dong, Kexiu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-01-01

    To realize AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), a novel tri-layer AlGaN/AlInN/AlInGaN periodical structure that differs from the traditional periodically alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index materials was proposed and grown on an Al0.5Ga0.5N template via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Because of the intentional design of the AlInGaN strain transition layer, a state-of-the-art DBR structure with atomic-level-flatness interfaces was achieved using an AlGaN template. The fabricated DBR exhibits a peak reflectivity of 86% at the centre wavelength of 274 nm and a stopband with a full-width at half-maximum of 16 nm. PMID:27381651

  8. High-Quality Crystal Growth and Characteristics of AlGaN-Based Solar-Blind Distributed Bragg Reflectors with a Tri-layer Period Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Yang, Lianhong; Liu, Yanli; Dong, Kexiu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-07-01

    To realize AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), a novel tri-layer AlGaN/AlInN/AlInGaN periodical structure that differs from the traditional periodically alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index materials was proposed and grown on an Al0.5Ga0.5N template via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Because of the intentional design of the AlInGaN strain transition layer, a state-of-the-art DBR structure with atomic-level-flatness interfaces was achieved using an AlGaN template. The fabricated DBR exhibits a peak reflectivity of 86% at the centre wavelength of 274 nm and a stopband with a full-width at half-maximum of 16 nm.

  9. Molecular beam epitaxy grown AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflector on InP substrate operating near 1. 55 [mu]m

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Fritz, I.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Headley, T.J.; Olsen, J.A.; Klem, J.F.; Drummond, T.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Surface normal optoelectronic devices operating in the 1.3--1.5 [mu]m wavelength range require distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a practical number ([le]50) of mirror layers. This requirement implies a large refractive index difference between the mirror layers, which is difficult to achieve in the traditionally used phosphide compounds. For the first time, an AlAsSb/GaAsSb DBR grown nominally lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy is demonstrated. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.53 [mu]m, which is well fitted by these theoretical predictions. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate reasonable crystal quality with some defects due to an unintentional lattice mismatch to the substrate.

  10. Electron and hole accumulations at GaN/AlInN/GaN interfaces and conductive n-type AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shotaro; Ikeyama, Kazuki; Yasuda, Toshiki; Furuta, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Iwaya, Motoaki; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    We investigated electron and hole accumulations at GaN/AlInN/GaN interfaces by Hall effect measurement. The InN mole fraction and temperature dependences on the sheet carrier densities at the interfaces reveal that electrons and holes were induced by large positive and negative polarization charges to satisfy the charge neutrality conditions, respectively. On the basis of the above results, we then designed and demonstrated a low-resistity 10-pair Si-doped n-type AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) by using high Si doped and graded layers at the GaN/AlInN interfaces. The low-resistity n-type AlInN/GaN DBR will reduce the resistance and the internal loss in blue vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers.

  11. Highly reflective, long wavelength AlAsSb/GaAsSb distributed Bragg reflector grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Fritz, I.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Howard, A.J.; Headley, T.J.; Klem, J.F.; Drummond, T.J. )

    1995-01-16

    Surface normal optoelectronic devices operating at long wavelengths ([gt]1.3 [mu]m), require distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with a practical number ([le]50) of mirror layers. This requirement implies a large refractive index difference between the mirror layers, which is difficult to achieve in the traditionally used phosphide compounds. We demonstrate a highly reflective AlAsSb/GaAsSb DBR grown nominally lattice matched to an InP substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate a stop band centered at 1.74 [mu]m with maximum reflectivity exceeding 98%, which is well fitted by our theoretical predictions. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate reasonable crystal quality with some defects due to an unintentional lattice mismatch to the substrate.

  12. High-power green and blue electron-beam pumped surface-emitting lasers using dielectric and epitaxial distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, T.; Klembt, S.; Kozlovsky, V. I.; Zheng, A.; Tiberi, M. D.; Kruse, C.

    2015-03-01

    ZnSe-based electron-beam pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the green (λ = 530 nm) and blue (λ = 462 nm) spectral region have been realized. Structures with and without epitaxial bottom distributed Bragg reflector have been fabricated and characterized. The samples consist of an active region containing 20 quantum wells with a cavity length varying between an optical thickness of 10 λ to 20 λ. The active material is ZnCdSSe in case of the green devices and ZnSe for the blue ones. Room temperature single mode lasing for structures with and without epitaxial bottom mirror with a maximum output power up to 5.9 W (green) and 3.3 W (blue) is achieved, respectively.

  13. Strong coupling in non-polar GaN/AlGaN microcavities with air-gap/III-nitride distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Renchun; Arita, Munetaka; Kako, Satoshi; Kamide, Kenji; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Strong coupling between excitons and photons is experimentally demonstrated in m-plane GaN/AlGaN microcavities (MCs) with air/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) at room temperature. Strong coupling is confirmed by momentum space spectroscopy, and a Rabi splitting (Ω) of 84 meV is estimated. A Rabi splitting of 84 meV is the largest value reported in a III-nitride DBR MC to date and is mainly attributed to the shortened effective cavity length resulting from the high index contrast in the air-gap DBRs used here. These results show that III-nitride air-gap DBR MCs have a high potential for realizing high Ω / κ systems (where κ is the cavity loss).

  14. O-band (1310 nm) Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) device characterization for OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talkington, Desmond; Derickson, Dennis; Ensher, Jason

    2014-03-01

    Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reector (VT-DBR) lasers in source swept OCT (SS-OCT) have previously been demonstrated at 1550 nm and 1600 nm.1 Many OCT applications prefer 1310 nm operation. This work describes the first demonstration of a VT-DBR operating at 1310 nm in the O-band, ideal for use in SS-OCT. This paper addresses the device characterization of such lasers, illustrating they are capable of fast amplitude and frequency sweeps necessary for SS-OCT applications. Equivalent circuit models for each of the five ports are also created to determine their electrical parasitics. Narrow linewidths of the VT-DBR indicate coherence length of several centimeters are possible during fast wavelength sweeps.

  15. High-frequency acousto-optic effects in Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Farmer, D J; Akimov, A V; Gippius, N A; Bailey, J; Sharp, J S; Kent, A J

    2014-06-16

    Picosecond acoustic interferometry was used to study the acousto-optic properties of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) manufactured from two immiscible polymers (cellulose acetate and polyvinylcarbyzole). Picosecond strain pulses were injected into the structure and changes in its reflectance were monitored as a function of time. The reflectance exhibited single-frequency harmonic oscillations as the strain pulse traversed the DBR. A transfer matrix method was used to model the reflectance of the DBR in response to interface modulation and photo-elastic effects. This work shows that photo-elastic effects can account for the acousto-optic response of DBRs with acoustically matched layers. PMID:24977613

  16. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  17. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  18. The localized surface plasmon resonances based on a Bragg reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Liu, Yumin; Yu, Zhongyuan; Ye, Chunwei; Lv, Hongbo; Shu, Changgan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical analysis on how the wavelength of the localized surface plasmon resonances of gold nanoparticle can lead shift for the resonance wavelength. In our results, we calculate the scattering cross-section, the absorption cross-section and the field enhancement due to the nanoparticle. Numerical simulation were done using the finite element method (FEM). The work that we do here is different from the previous work because we use the Bragg reflector as a substrate. The Bragg reflector has a property of high reflectivity in some certain frequency bandwidth because of its periodic structure. The coherence interference of the Bragg reflector contributes to the plasmon resonances and results in some special character for a wide variety application, from sensing to photovoltaic. The periodic number of the Bragg reflector substrate and shapes of the nanoparticles are also discussed that result in a shift of the resonance wavelength.

  19. Photonic generation of tunable microwave signals from a dual-wavelength distributed-Bragg-reflector highly Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Shupei; Feng, Zhouming; Xu, Shanhui; Zhang, Weinan; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Tong; Yang, Changsheng; Li, Can; Yang, Zhongmin

    2013-12-01

    The photonic generation of tunable microwave signal from a dual-wavelength distributed-Bragg-reflector (DW-DBR) highly Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber laser is presented. Microwave signals centered at ˜15, ˜22 and ˜25 GHz with <10 kHz linewidth were obtained. The laser cavity of the fiber laser consists of a dual-channel narrowband fiber-Bragg-grating (DC-NB-FBG), a 0.4-cm-long Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber and a wideband FBG (WB-FBG). The wavelength selecting gratings are spatially separated to create partially separated resonant cavities. Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped phosphate fiber ensures that mode competition is relative weak under low pump power. The short cavity length and the DC-NB-FBG ensure that only one longitudinal mode is supported by each reflection peak. Dual-wavelength single-frequency lasing with laser linewidths of <4 kHz is achieved.

  20. Design of a high efficiency ultrathin CdS/CdTe solar cell using back surface field and backside distributed Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Khosroabadi, Saeed; Keshmiri, Seyyed Hossein

    2014-05-01

    A high efficiency CdS/CdTe solar cell was designed with a reduced CdTe absorber-layer thickness and a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) as an optical reflector and a ZnTe layer as back surface field (BSF) layer. Simulation results showed that with combination of DBR and BSF layers and 0.3 µm thick CdTe, the conversion efficiency was increased about 3.2% as compared with a reference cell (with 4 µm thick CdTe layer). It was also shown that the efficiency can be increased up to 6.02% by using a long carrier lifetime in the absorber layer. Under global AM 1.5G conditions, the proposed cell structure had an open-circuit voltage of 1.062 V, a short-circuit current density of 24.64 mA/cm², and a fill factor of 81.3%, corresponding to a total area conversion efficiency of 21.02%. PMID:24922397

  1. High-performance GaN-based light-emitting diodes on patterned sapphire substrate with a novel hybrid Ag mirror and atomic layer deposition-TiO2/Al2O3 distributed Bragg reflector backside reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Chen, Hongjun; Zhang, Xiong; Zhang, Peiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Honggang; Cui, Yiping

    2013-06-01

    GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LED) on a patterned sapphire substrate with a novel hybrid atomic layer deposition (ALD)-TiO2Al2O3 distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag mirror have been proposed and fabricated. Due to the excellent thickness uniformity of ALD for the proposed reflector, high reflectivity over 99.3% at an incident angle of 5 deg has been achieved. It was also found that the reflectivity of a backside reflector with an Ag mirror slightly depends on incident light wavelength and incident angle. Moreover, because of the good adhesion between TiO2/Al2O3 DBR and the Ag mirror, the fabrication process was simplified and reliable. With a 60 mA current injection, an enhancement of 5.2%, 8.9%, and 47.1% in light output power (LOP) at the 460 nm wavelength was realized for the proposed LED with Ag mirror and 3-pair ALD-TiO2Al2O3 DBR as compared with a LED with a traditional Ag mirror and 3-pair TiO2/SiO2 DBR, with Al mirror and 3-pair ALD-TiO2Al2O3 DBR, and without backside reflector, respectively. This result shows that the ALD-TiO/O3 DBR can be used to enhance the LOP greatly and improve adhesion between the sapphire substrate and the metallic mirror, and thus is very promising for fabricating high performance GaN-based LEDs.

  2. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy. PMID:25121863

  3. Tunable plasmonic Bragg reflector with different graphene nanoribbon widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Huawei; Kong, Fanmin; Li, Kang; Sheng, Shiwei

    2015-09-01

    We propose and numerically analyze a Bragg reflector composed of periodically arranged graphene nanoribbon waveguides with different widths. Because of the unique property of the graphene edge mode, the effective index contrast used for the reflector can be obtained by designing graphene nanoribbons with different widths without changing the dielectric substrate structure. Good band stop filtering characteristics are shown at the band gap of the transmission spectrum by numerical simulation. The performance of the proposed Bragg reflector is analyzed in terms of different parameters, such as the chemical potential, the number of periods, and the size of the unit cell. The proposed Bragg reflector will be expected to have important potential applications in the highly integrated SPP-based photonic devices.

  4. Parametric x-ray FEL operating with external Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshevsky, V.G.; Batrakov, K.G.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1995-12-31

    In the crystal X-ray FELs using channeling and parametric quasi-Cherenkov mechanisms of spontaneous radiation were considered as versions of FEL allowing, in principle, to obtain coherent X-ray source. In this case a crystal is both radiator and resonator for X-rays emitted by a particle beam passing through crystal. However, it is well-known that a beam current density required for lasing is extremely high in X-ray spectral range for any radiation mechanisms and it is very important to find a way to lower its magnitude. The application of three-dimensional distributed feedback formed by dynamical diffraction of emitted photons permitted to reduce starting beam current density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} times up to 10{sup 9}. One of ways to lower the starting current is the formation of multi-wave distributed feedback the another one is the application of external reflectors. The thing is that lasing regime was shown to be produced at frequencies in the vicinity of degeneration point for roots of dispersion equation describing radiation modes excited in an active medium (crystal plus particle beam). Unfortunately, in case of parametric quasi-Cherenkov FEL this region coincides with the region of strong self-absorption of radiation inside a crystal. That fact, obviously, increases the starting beam current. In this report we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors gives the possibility to lower radiation self-absorption inside a crystal by modifying radiation modes excited in the active medium under consideration. The corresponding dispersion equation and the expression for excited modes are derived. The generation equation determining starting conditions for lasing is obtained. Using these expressions we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors permits to reduce starting beam current density more than 10 times.

  5. Design and fabrication of UV band-pass filters based on SiO2/Si3N4 dielectric distributed bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jiangping; Gao, Wang; Liu, Bin; Cao, Xianlei; Tao, Tao; Xie, Zili; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Dunjun; Ping, Han; Zhang, Rong

    2016-02-01

    We have designed one kind of optical filters based on double stacks of 13.5-pairs SiO2/Si3N4 dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DDBR) structures, to realize the passband with different central wavelengths in ultraviolet (UV) range. These SiO2/Si3N4 multi-layers have been successfully fabricated on (0001) sapphire substrates by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The reflectance spectra measured by the UV-visible spectrometer manifest that a series of band-pass filters with fixed passband width of ∼30 nm and central passband varied from 310 nm to 370 nm have been obtained successfully. Besides, the other series of filters with passband width varied from 30 nm to 45 nm can be achieved. With good control of PECVD deposition parameters, all samples exhibit smooth surface with root mean square roughness less than 4.5 nm. Moreover, cross-section scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show these DDBR structures have good periodicity in accordance with the design, indicating that these band-pass filter structures are suitable for wavelength-window-selection UV photodetectors.

  6. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography using an Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector swept laser in the mouse middle ear.

    PubMed

    Park, Jesung; Carbajal, Esteban F; Chen, Xi; Oghalai, John S; Applegate, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhOCT) offers exquisite sensitivity to mechanical vibration in biological tissues. There is growing interest in using PhOCT for imaging the nanometer scale vibrations of the ear in animal models of hearing disorders. Swept-source-based systems offer fast acquisition speeds, suppression of common mode noise via balanced detection, and good signal roll-off. However, achieving high phase stability is difficult due to nonlinear laser sweeps and trigger jitter in a typical swept laser source. Here, we report on the initial application of a Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) swept laser as the source for a fiber-based PhOCT system. The VT-DBR swept laser is electronically tuned and precisely controls sweeps without mechanical movement, resulting in highly linear sweeps with high wavelength stability and repeatability. We experimentally measured a phase sensitivity of 0.4 pm standard deviation, within a factor of less than 2 of the computed shot-noise limit. We further demonstrated the system by making ex vivo measurements of the vibrations of the mouse middle ear structures. PMID:25361322

  7. Development of a wavelength-stabilized distributed bragg reflector laser diode to the Cs-D2 line for field use in accurate geophysical measurements.

    PubMed

    Hori, Teruhito; Araya, Akito; Moriwaki, Shigenori; Mio, Norikatsu

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a wavelength-stabilized laser diode (LD) for geophysical measurement devices, which benefit from the uniformity of laser light. Regarding this purpose, a system that has such characteristics as low power consumption, sturdiness against mechanical disturbances, and a long life with long-term frequency stability is especially required. Therefore, we adopt as the light source a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) LD because it has various advantages concerning such properties. This paper describes the durable and compact wavelength-stabilized laser system. Since our DBR-LD oscillates at 852 nm, we selected the Cs-D2 line (6 2S1/2-6 2P3/2 transition) as a frequency reference to obtain a long-term stability in wavelength. Stabilization is performed by a feedback system using a modulation transfer (MT) method, which is a kind of Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy, to acquire a saturated absorption signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Using this system, we could continuously lock the laser frequency to the hyperfine component of the Cs-D2 line for more than one week. By an Allan standard deviation measurement, the uncertainty of the stabilized laser frequency was found to be better than 1 x 10(-10) (<40 kHz) in a Gatetime region longer than 100 s. PMID:17578154

  8. Tensile-strained germanium microdisks with circular Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kurdi, M.; Prost, M.; Ghrib, A.; Elbaz, A.; Sauvage, S.; Checoury, X.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Picardi, G.; Ossikovski, R.; Boeuf, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the combination of germanium microdisks tensily strained by silicon nitride layers and circular Bragg reflectors. The microdisks with suspended lateral Bragg reflectors form a cavity with quality factors up to 2000 around 2 μm. This represents a key feature to achieve a microlaser with a quasi-direct band gap germanium under a 1.6% biaxial tensile strain. We show that lowering the temperature significantly improves the quality factor of the quasi-radial modes. Linewidth narrowing is observed in a range of weak continuous wave excitation powers. We finally discuss the requirements to achieve lasing with these kind of structures.

  9. High performance of InGaN light-emitting diodes by air-gap/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Hee Yun; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Katharria, Yashpal Singh; Han, Nam; Kang, Ji Hye; Park, Young Jae; Han, Min; Ryu, Beo Deul; Ko, Kang Bok; Suh, Eun-Kyoung; Hong, Chang-Hee

    2012-04-23

    The effect of air-gap/GaN DBR structure, fabricated by selective lateral wet-etching, on InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is investigated. The air-gap/GaN DBR structures in LED acts as a light reflector, and thereby improve the light output power due to the redirection of light into escape cones on both front and back sides of the LED. At an injection current of 20 mA, the enhancement in the radiometric power as high as 1.91 times as compared to a conventional LED having no DBR structure and a far-field angle as low as 128.2° are realized with air-gap/GaN DBR structures. PMID:22535092

  10. POLICRYPS-based electrically switchable Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    De Sio, Luciano; Tabiryan, Nelson; Bunning, Timothy J

    2015-12-14

    The formation and characterization of a switchable volume reflective element fabricated from a polymer liquid crystal (LC) polymer slice (POLICRYPS) structure by holographic photopolymerization at high temperature (65 °C) using a photosensitive/nematic liquid crystal prepolymer mixture is reported. The submicron Bragg structure formed consists of periodic continuous polymeric walls separated by periodic LC channels. The phase separated NLC self-aligns in a homeotropic alignment between the polymer walls as indicated by polarizing optical microscopy analysis (Maltese cross). The resulting periodic grating structure results in a Bragg reflection notch upon illumination with white light due to the periodic variation in refractive index. Electro-optical experiments realized through in-plane electrodes and temperature experiments confirm that the multilayer structure acts as a Bragg mirror whose reflection efficiency can be controlled by either a small (~3V/µm) electric field or temperature. PMID:26699059

  11. High-power temperature-stable GaInNAs distributed Bragg reflector laser emitting at 1180  nm.

    PubMed

    Korpijärvi, Ville-Markus; Viheriälä, Jukka; Koskinen, Mervi; Aho, Antti T; Guina, Mircea

    2016-02-15

    We report a single-mode 1180 nm distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode with a high output power of 340 mW. For the fabrication, we employed novel nanoimprint lithography that ensures cost-effective, large-area, conformal patterning and does not require regrowth. The output characteristics exhibited outstanding temperature insensitivity with a power drop of only 30% for an increase of the mount temperature from 20°C to 80°C. The high temperature stability was achieved by using GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), which exhibit improved carrier confinement compared to standard InGaAs/GaAs QWs. The corresponding characteristic temperatures were T0=110  K and T1=160  K. Moreover, we used a large detuning between the peak wavelength of the material gain at room temperature and the lasing wavelength determined by the DBR. In addition to good temperature characteristics, GaInNAs/GaAs QWs exhibit relatively low lattice strain with direct impact on improving the lifetime of laser diodes at this challenging wavelength range. The single-mode laser emission could be tuned by changing the mount temperature (0.1 nm/°C) or the drive current (0.5 pm/mA). The laser showed no degradation in a room-temperature lifetime test at 900 mA drive current. These compact and efficient 1180 nm laser diodes are instrumental for the development of compact frequency-doubled yellow-orange lasers, which have important applications in medicine and spectroscopy. PMID:26872156

  12. Efficiency enhancement of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells using CdS quantum dots and distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lin, Chien-Chung; Han, Hau-Vei; Chen, Hsin-Chu; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Lai, Wei-Chi; Sheu, Jin-Kong; Lai, Fang-I.; Yu, Peichen; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2013-03-01

    In recent year, InGaN-based alloy was also considered for photovoltaic devices owing to the distinctive material properties which are benefit photovoltaic performance. However, the Indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on top, which plays a role of transparent conductive oxide (TCO), can absorb UV photons without generating photocurrent. Also, the thin absorber layer in the device, which is consequent result after compromising with limited crystal quality, has caused insufficient light absorption. In this report, we propose an approach for solving these problems. A hybrid design of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) solar cells combined with colloidal CdS quantum dots (QDs) and back side distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) has been demonstrated. CdS QDs provide down-conversion effect at UV regime to avoid absorption of ITO. Moreover, CdS QDs also exhibit anti-reflective feature. DBRs at the back side have effectively reflected the light back into the absorber layer. CdS QDs enhance the external quantum efficiency (EQE) for light with wavelength shorter than 400 nm, while DBRs provide a broad band enhancement in EQE, especially within the region of 400 nm ~ 430 nm in wavelength. CdS QDs effectively achieved a power conversion efficiency enhancement as high as 7.2% compared to the device without assistance of CdS QDs. With the participation of DBRs, the power conversion efficiency enhancement has been further boosted to 14%. We believe that the hybrid design of InGaN/GaN MQWs solar cells with QDs and DBRs can be a method for high efficiency InGaN/GaN MQWs solar cells.

  13. Graphene-based tunable plasmonic Bragg reflector with a broad bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin; Yu, XueChao; Hu, Bin; Dubrovkin, Alexander; Wang, Qi Jie

    2014-01-15

    We propose and numerically analyze a plasmonic Bragg reflector formed in a graphene waveguide. The results show that the graphene plasmonic Bragg reflector can produce a broadband stopband that can be tuned over a wide wavelength range by a small change in the Fermi energy level of graphene. By introducing a defect into the Bragg reflector, we can achieve a Fabry-Perot-like microcavity with a quality factor of 50 for the defect resonance mode formed in the stopband. The proposed Bragg reflector could be used as a broadband ultrafast tunable integrated filter and a broadband modulator. In addition, the defect microcavity may find applications in graphene-based resonators. PMID:24562124

  14. Light output enhancement of GaN-based flip-chip light-emitting diodes fabricated with SiO2/TiO2 distributed Bragg reflector coated on mesa sidewall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, K. H.; Min, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, H. K.; Sone, C.; Park, Y.; Kim, H.

    2010-09-01

    We report on the enhanced light output of GaN-based flip-chip light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated with SiO2/TiO2 distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on mesa sidewall. At the wavelength of 400 nm, five pairs of SiO2/TiO2 DBR coats on the GaN layer showed a normal-incidence reflectivity as high as 99.1%, along with an excellent angle-dependent reflectivity. As compared to the reference LED, the LED fabricated with the DBR-coated mesa sidewall showed an increased output power by a factor of 1.32 and 1.12 before and after lamp packaging, respectively. This could be attributed to an efficient reflection of the laterally guided mode at the highly reflective mesa sidewall, enhancing the subsequent extraction of light through the sapphire substrate.

  15. Enhanced output power of near-ultraviolet LEDs with AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors on 6H-SiC by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Pengcheng; Liang, Hongwei; Xia, Xiaochuan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jianhua; Huang, Huishi; Feng, Qiuju; Shen, Rensheng; Luo, Yingmin; Du, Guotong

    2015-09-01

    Near-ultraviolet (UV) InGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) LEDs with 30 pairs AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) were grown on 6H-SiC substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. A thin SiNx interlayer was introduced between the DBRs and n-GaN layer of the LED to reduce the threading dislocation density and result in enhancement the internal quantum efficiency (ηint) of the InGaN/AlGaN LED. The result indicates that the light output power for the LED with DBRs and SiNx interlayer was approximately 56% higher (at 350 mA) than the LED without DBRs and SiNx interlayer on 6H-SiC substrate, and this significant improvement in performance is attributed not only to the light extraction enhancement via the DBRs but also due to improve epilayer crystalline quality.

  16. Plasmonic Bragg reflectors based on metal-embedded MIM structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ming; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li; Liu, Deming; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2012-11-01

    We propose and investigate a metalembedded metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure plasmonic Bragg reflector (PBR) using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method with PMLs (perfectly matched layers) boundary conditions. It improves the performance of conventional step profile MIM PBRs to some extent. Our numerical study reveals that the metal-embedded PBRs exhibit lower insertion loss, narrower bandgap, and reduced rippling in the transmission spectrum when compared with the step PBRs at the same normalized index contrast and transmission levels. The defect mode of the metal-embedded PBRs also exhibits higher transmission. To suppress the sidelobes in the transmission spectrum, we further smooth the end of the embedded metal, which demonstrates a better performance. Then, we find with respect to the Bragg wavelength, the longer wavelengths have a tendency to spread in the wider regions of the insulator layer; however, the shorter wavelengths have a tendency to spread in the embedded metal regions. The apodized PBRs with the embedded metal length decreasing (increasing) efficaciously suppress the ripples at the right (left) band edges. Then, we use the impedance theoretical model to explain this phenomenon. Finally, we realize a flat-top transmission band filter by connecting two apodized PBRs, and the band and center wavelength can be adjusted.

  17. High efficient radiation stable AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with internal Bragg reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. M.; Kalinovsky, V. S.; Komin, V. V.; Kochnev, I. V.; Lantratov, V. M.; Shvarts, M. Z.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of solar cells based on AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with an internal Bragg reflector as the back-surface reflector is presented. The Bragg reflector is grown by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on n-GaAs substrates in a horizontal resistively heated reactor. The Bragg reflector with its maximum reflectance centered at a wavelength of 860 nm consists of 12 pairs of AlAs/GaAs layers. The resulting Bragg reflector has a thickness of 0.072 micrometers for AlAs and 0.059 micrometers for GaAs. The multi-layered quasi-dielectric stack selectively reflects weakly absorbed photons with energies near to the GaAs band gap for a second pass through the photoactive region, thus increasing the photocurrent. The use of the Bragg reflector allows the external quantum efficiency to be increased in the long wavelength of the spectrum. The use of the Bragg reflector and an antireflective coating and prismatic cover allowed an efficiency of 23.4 percent to be obtained.

  18. Absorption-free Bragg reflector using Zeeman sublevels in atomic vapor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjie; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2014-06-30

    Absorption-free Bragg reflector has been studied in ions doped in crystals. We propose a new scheme using Zeeman sublevels of atoms to construct an absorption-free Bragg reflector with practical laser power. Its spatial period of refractive index equals half of the wavelength of the incident standing-wave coupling light. The proposal is simulated in a helium atom scheme, and can be extended to alkali earth atoms. PMID:24977814

  19. Widely tunable active Bragg reflector integrated lasers in InGaAsP-InP

    SciTech Connect

    Broberg, B.; Nilsson, S.

    1988-04-18

    Monolithic InGaAsP-InP lasers comprising an active Bragg reflector integrated with a separately pumped wide-band gain region have been developed. The lasers operate in a dynamic single mode in the 1.55 ..mu..m wavelength region. By adjusting the current through the Bragg reflector, the wavelength can be tuned. The maximum tuning range is 11.6 nm.

  20. Enhanced light absorption in GaAs solar cells with internal Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, S. P.; Vernon, S. M.; Sanfacon, M. M.; Mastrovito, A.

    The use of epitaxial multilayer dielectric mirrors (Bragg reflectors) as back-surface reflectors in thin-film GaAs solar cells on GaAs and silicon substrates is investigated. Al0.3Ga0.9As/Al0.85Ga0.15As Bragg reflectors were grown by low-pressure MOCVD on GaAs substrates and shown to exhibit near-ideal optical reflectance and structural perfection. Thin GaAs solar cells grown on Bragg reflectors showed increases in short-circuit current (0.5 to 1.0 mA/sq cm) and efficiency (0.7 percentage points) relative to cells without back reflectors. Efficiencies of 24.7 percent at one sun AM1.5 were measured for GaAs cells only 2 microns thick on Bragg reflectors. In addition to the optical enhancements, Bragg reflectors also appear to improve the defect structure of GaAs-on-Si solar cells. This approach should lead to improved efficiency for GaAs-on-Si solar cells and improved radiation resistance on GaAs cells.

  1. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser emitting at 1.56 microns with AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb distributed Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Lear, K.L.; Vawter, G.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1998-07-01

    The authors report 77K operation of an optically pumped vertical cavity surface emitting laser with an Sb-based cavity. The structure consists of 15 and 20 pair AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb top and bottom reflectors and a bulk InGaAs active region.

  2. A hollow waveguide Bragg reflector: A tunable platform for integrated photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Hollow waveguides are promising candidates for applications in sensing and high-power transmission. Flexible design and cost effective fabrication of hollow waveguides make it possible to realize integrated devices with small temperature dependence, tight control on optical confinement and tailorable characteristics. One of the potential applications of hollow waveguide is a tunable Bragg reflector, which can be used as building block for integrated photonics. In this review, integrated tunable Bragg reflector based on hollow-core optical waveguide is reviewed and presented; this Bragg reflector offers variable characteristics and design flexibility for applications in reconfigurable integrated photonic devices and circuits. Variety of tunable optical functions can be realized with on-chip Bragg reflector based on hollow waveguide, few of them are discussed in this review. Ultra-wide tuning in Bragg wavelength and on-chip polarization control can be realized using 3D hollow waveguide. A tapered 3D hollow waveguide Bragg reflector for an adjustable compensation of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is then discussed. The utilization of a high-index contrast grating in hollow waveguide is demonstrated to reduce the polarization dependence and reflection-bandwidth. The polarization- and bandwidth control may be useful for realizing polarization insensitive devices and semiconductor lasers with ultra-wide tuning.

  3. Effect of the photon lifetime on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors and an oxide current aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, M. A.; Blokhin, S. A. Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Maleev, N. A.; Blokhin, A. A.; Zadiranov, Yu. M.; Nikitina, E. V.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of the photon lifetime in an optical microcavity on the characteristics of 850-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with fully doped distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and an oxide current aperture is studied. The photon lifetime in the microcavity is controlled by varying the upper DBR reflectance. It is found that the speed of VCSELs with a current-aperture diameter of 10 μm is mainly limited by the self-heating effect, despite an increase in the relaxation-oscillation damping coefficient with increasing photon lifetime in the microcavity. At the same time, the higher level of internal optical loss in lasers with a current-aperture diameter of 1.5 μm leads to dominance of the effect of relaxation-oscillation damping independently of the radiation output loss. In the case of devices with a current-aperture diameter of 5.5 μm, both mechanisms limiting the speed operate, which allow an increase in the VCSEL effective modulation frequency from 21 to 24 GHz as the photon lifetime decreases from 3.7 to 0.8 ps.

  4. Generation of spectrally stable continuous-wave emission and ns pulses with a peak power of 4 W using a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a ridge-waveguide power amplifier.

    PubMed

    Klehr, A; Wenzel, H; Fricke, J; Bugge, F; Erbert, G

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a diode-laser based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) light source which emits high-power spectrally stabilized and nearly-diffraction limited optical pulses in the nanoseconds range as required by many applications. The MOPA consists of a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser as master oscillator driven by a constant current and a ridge waveguide power amplifier (PA) which can be driven by a constant current (DC) or by rectangular current pulses with a width of 5 ns at a repetition frequency of 200 kHz. Under pulsed operation the amplifier acts as an optical gate, converting the CW input beam emitted by the DBR laser into a train of short amplified optical pulses. With this experimental MOPA arrangement no relaxation oscillations occur. A continuous wave power of 1 W under DC injection and a pulse power of 4 W under pulsed operation are reached. For both operational modes the optical spectrum of the emission of the amplifier exhibits a peak at a constant wavelength of 973.5 nm with a spectral width < 10 pm. PMID:25321974

  5. Growth of non-polar InGaN quantum dots with an underlying AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tongtong; Griffiths, James T.; Fu, Wai Yuen; Howkins, Ashley; Boyd, Ian W.; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-12-01

    Non-polar (11-20) InGaN quantum dots (QDs) have been grown using a modified droplet epitaxy method by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy on top of a 15-period AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) on a-plane GaN pseudo-substrate prepared by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG), in which the QDs are located at the centre of a ca. 180 nm GaN layer. The AlN/GaN DBR has shown a peak reflectivity of ∼80% at a wavelength of ∼454 nm with a 49 nm wide, flat stop-band. Variations in layer thicknesses observed by cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy have been identified as the main source of degradation of the DBR reflectivity. The presence of trenches due to incomplete coalescence of the ELOG template and the formation of cracks due to relaxation of tensile strain during the DBR growth may distort the DBR and further reduce the reflectivity. The DBR top surface is very smooth and does not have a detrimental effect on the subsequent growth of QDs. Enhanced single QD emission at 20 K was observed in cathodoluminescence.

  6. Improve growth rate of Smith-Purcell free-electron laser by Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Imasaki, K.; Yang, Z.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Asakawa, M. R.; Hangyo, M.; Miyamoto, S.

    2011-05-23

    Grating with Bragg reflectors for the Smith-Purcell free-electron laser is proposed to improve the reflection coefficient, resulting in enhancing the interaction of the surface wave with the electron beam and, consequently, relax the requirements to the electron beam. With the help of particle-in-cell simulations, it has been shown that the usage of Bragg reflectors may improve the growth rate, shorten the time for the device to reach saturation, and lower the start current for the operation of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser.

  7. Relation between chirp and linewidth reduction in external Bragg reflector semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, N.A.; Henry, C.H.; Kazarinov, R.F.; Lee, H.J.; Johnson, B.H.

    1987-07-13

    A 1.5-..mu..m single longitudinal mode semiconductor laser, formed by butt coupling an external Bragg reflector to a standard Fabry--Perot laser, is shown to have greatly reduced wavelength chirp and emission linewidth. The linewidth reduction is found to be proportional to the square of the chirp reduction, in agreement with a previous theoretical prediction. The linewidth and chirp reduction factor can be varied by changing the operating point of the laser. With a 3-mm-long Bragg reflector, a linewidth of 1 MHz at 5 mW has been achieved.

  8. Ultraviolet GaN photodetectors on Si via oxide buffer heterostructures with integrated short period oxide-based distributed Bragg reflectors and leakage suppressing metal-oxide-semiconductor contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Szyszka, A. E-mail: adam.szyszka@pwr.wroc.pl; Haeberlen, M.; Storck, P.; Thapa, S. B.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-28

    Based on a novel double step oxide buffer heterostructure approach for GaN integration on Si, we present an optimized Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM)-based Ultraviolet (UV) GaN photodetector system with integrated short-period (oxide/Si) Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) and leakage suppressing Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) electrode contacts. In terms of structural properties, it is demonstrated by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray studies that the DBR heterostructure layers grow with high thickness homogeneity and sharp interface structures sufficient for UV applications; only minor Si diffusion into the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is detected under the applied thermal growth budget. As revealed by comparative high resolution x-ray diffraction studies on GaN/oxide buffer/Si systems with and without DBR systems, the final GaN layer structure quality is not significantly influenced by the growth of the integrated DBR heterostructure. In terms of optoelectronic properties, it is demonstrated that—with respect to the basic GaN/oxide/Si system without DBR—the insertion of (a) the DBR heterostructures and (b) dark current suppressing MOS contacts enhances the photoresponsivity below the GaN band-gap related UV cut-off energy by almost up to two orders of magnitude. Given the in-situ oxide passivation capability of grown GaN surfaces and the one order of magnitude lower number of superlattice layers in case of higher refractive index contrast (oxide/Si) systems with respect to classical III-N DBR superlattices, virtual GaN substrates on Si via functional oxide buffer systems are thus a promising robust approach for future GaN-based UV detector technologies.

  9. Generation of spectrally-stable continuous-wave emission and ns pulses at 800 nm and 975 nm with a peak power of 4 W using a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a ridge-waveguide power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klehr, A.; Wenzel, H.; Fricke, J.; Bugge, F.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor based sources which emit high-power spectrally stable nearly diffraction-limited optical pulses in the nanosecond range are ideally suited for a lot of applications, such as free-space communications, metrology, material processing, seed lasers for fiber or solid state lasers, spectroscopy, LIDAR and frequency doubling. Detailed experimental investigations of 975 nm and 800 nm diode lasers based on master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) light sources are presented. The MOPA systems consist of distributed Bragg reflector lasers (DBR) as master oscillators driven by a constant current and ridge waveguide power amplifiers which can be driven DC and by current pulses. In pulse regime the amplifiers modulated with rectangular current pulses of about 5 ns width and a repetition frequency of 200 kHz act as optical gates, converting the continuous wave (CW) input beam emitted by the DBR lasers into a train of short optical pulses which are amplified. With these experimental MOPA arrangements no relaxation oscillations in the pulse power occur. With a seed power of about 5 mW at a wavelength of 973 nm output powers behind the amplifier of about 1 W under DC injection and 4 W under pulsed operation, corresponding to amplification factors of 200 (amplifier gain 23 dB) and 800 (gain 29 dB) respectively, are reached. At 800 nm a CW power of 1 W is obtained for a seed power of 40 mW. The optical spectra of the emission of the amplifiers exhibit a single peak at a constant wavelength with a line width < 10 pm in the whole investigated current ranges. The ratios between laser and ASE levels were > 50 dB. The output beams are nearly diffraction limited with beam propagation ratios M2lat ~ 1.1 and M2ver ~ 1.2 up to 4 W pulse power.

  10. Vertically Conductive Single-Crystal SiC-Based Bragg Reflector Grown on Si Wafer

    PubMed Central

    Massoubre, David; Wang, Li; Hold, Leonie; Fernandes, Alanna; Chai, Jessica; Dimitrijev, Sima; Iacopi, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC) thin-films on silicon (Si) were used for the fabrication and characterization of electrically conductive distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) on 100 mm Si wafers. The DBRs, each composed of 3 alternating layers of SiC and Al(Ga)N grown on Si substrates, show high wafer uniformity with a typical maximum reflectance of 54% in the blue spectrum and a stopband (at 80% maximum reflectance) as large as 100 nm. Furthermore, high vertical electrical conduction is also demonstrated resulting to a density of current exceeding 70 A/cm2 above 1.5 V. Such SiC/III-N DBRs with high thermal and electrical conductivities could be used as pseudo-substrate to enhance the efficiency of SiC-based and GaN-based optoelectronic devices on large Si wafers. PMID:26601894

  11. Vertically Conductive Single-Crystal SiC-Based Bragg Reflector Grown on Si Wafer.

    PubMed

    Massoubre, David; Wang, Li; Hold, Leonie; Fernandes, Alanna; Chai, Jessica; Dimitrijev, Sima; Iacopi, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC) thin-films on silicon (Si) were used for the fabrication and characterization of electrically conductive distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) on 100 mm Si wafers. The DBRs, each composed of 3 alternating layers of SiC and Al(Ga)N grown on Si substrates, show high wafer uniformity with a typical maximum reflectance of 54% in the blue spectrum and a stopband (at 80% maximum reflectance) as large as 100 nm. Furthermore, high vertical electrical conduction is also demonstrated resulting to a density of current exceeding 70 A/cm(2) above 1.5 V. Such SiC/III-N DBRs with high thermal and electrical conductivities could be used as pseudo-substrate to enhance the efficiency of SiC-based and GaN-based optoelectronic devices on large Si wafers. PMID:26601894

  12. Vertically Conductive Single-Crystal SiC-Based Bragg Reflector Grown on Si Wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoubre, David; Wang, Li; Hold, Leonie; Fernandes, Alanna; Chai, Jessica; Dimitrijev, Sima; Iacopi, Alan

    2015-11-01

    Single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC) thin-films on silicon (Si) were used for the fabrication and characterization of electrically conductive distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) on 100 mm Si wafers. The DBRs, each composed of 3 alternating layers of SiC and Al(Ga)N grown on Si substrates, show high wafer uniformity with a typical maximum reflectance of 54% in the blue spectrum and a stopband (at 80% maximum reflectance) as large as 100 nm. Furthermore, high vertical electrical conduction is also demonstrated resulting to a density of current exceeding 70 A/cm2 above 1.5 V. Such SiC/III-N DBRs with high thermal and electrical conductivities could be used as pseudo-substrate to enhance the efficiency of SiC-based and GaN-based optoelectronic devices on large Si wafers.

  13. High reflectance III-nitride Bragg reflectors grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, H.M.; Moustakas, T.D.

    2000-07-01

    Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) structures based on AlN/GaN have been grown on (0001) sapphire by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy (ECR-MBE). The design of the structures was predetermined by simulations using the transmission matrix method. A number of structures have been grown with 20.5--25.5 periods showing peak reflectance ranging form the near-UV to the green wavelength regions. For the best sample, peak reflectance up to 99% was observed centered at 467 nm with a bandwidth of 45 nm. The experimental reflectance data were compared with the simulations and show excellent agreement with respect to peak reflectance, bandwidth of high reflectance and the locations of the sidelobes.

  14. Output beam profile control of slow-light Bragg reflector waveguide deflector with high-contrast sub-wavelength grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaodong; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrated a super-high resolution beam scanner based on a Bragg reflector waveguide. In this device, radiation profile is wavelength-dependent. However, for specific applications, it is important to optimize the radiation direction. We propose a solution for this by introducing a high-contrast sub-wavelength grating (HCG). Numerical simulations using finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) and rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) were carried out. We found that, by designing the thickness, period and duty cycle of HCG, the output phase and intensity can be changed. As a result, it is possible to shift the output direction of the beam profile. We discussed their dependences on HCG parameters. On the other hand, the thicknesses (numbers of pairs) of the top- and bottom- distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) mirrors are influential to the results. A discussion on the thickness dependence was carried out. We found that, HCG has stronger influence to thinner mirrors. Because HCG can provide high reflectivity, thin mirrors are not a problem in such slow-light waveguides. We believe this proposal can offer us a method to obtain desirable output beam direction of Bragg reflector waveguides deflectors.

  15. Multi-mode coupling analysis of a sub-terahertz band planar corrugated Bragg reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo; Luo, Yong; Wang, Jian-Xun; Shu, Guo-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    Planar Bragg reflector operating in the sub-terahertz wavelength installed at the upstream end of a sheet beam backward wave oscillator (BWO) is very promising to minimize the whole circuit structure and make it more compact. In this paper, a sub-terahertz wavelength (0.18-0.22 THz) tunable planar Bragg reflector is numerically analyzed by using multi-mode coupling theory (MCT). The operating mode TE10 and dominant coupling mode TE01 are mainly considered in this theory. Reflection and transmission performance of the reflector are demonstrated in detail and the results, in excellent agreement with the theoretical analysis and simulation, are also presented in this paper. Self- and cross-coupling coefficients between these two modes are presented as well. The reflector behaviors with different Bragg dimensions are discussed and analyzed in the 0.16-0.22 THz range. The analysis in this paper can be of benefit to the design and fabrication of the whole BWO circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. G0501040161101040).

  16. Porous silicon Bragg reflectors on multi-crystalline silicon wafer with p-n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. I.; Skryshevsky, V. A.; Kyslovets, O. S.; Nychyporuk, T.; Lemiti, M.

    2016-04-01

    Bragg reflectors consisting of the sequence of dielectric layers are considered to create p-n junction solar cells (SC) with improved efficiency in the longwave spectral range. Bragg mirrors (BM) based on porous silicon (PS) mutilayers at the backside of single crystalline and multicrystalline silicon wafer were formed by electrochemically etching. Maximal experimental reflectivity for BM on multicrystalline substrate achieves 62% due to the natural crystallites disorientation of multicrystalline substrate, whereas for single crystalline silicon the reflectivity in maximum is 87%. BM was formed also on rear side of multicrystalline silicon wafer with p-n junction.

  17. Optical parameters of the tunable Bragg reflectors in squid

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Amitabh; DeMartini, Daniel G.; Eck, Elizabeth; Morse, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Cephalopods (e.g. octopus, squid and cuttlefish) dynamically tune the colour and brightness of their skin for camouflage and communication using specialized skin cells called iridocytes. We use high-resolution microspectrophotometry to investigate individual tunable Bragg structures (consisting of alternating reflectin protein-containing, high-refractive index lamellae and low-refractive index inter-lamellar spaces) in live and chemically fixed iridocytes of the California market squid, Doryteuthis opalescens. This subcellular, single-stack microspectrophotometry allows for spectral normalization, permitting use of a transfer-matrix model of Bragg reflectance to calculate all the parameters of the Bragg stack—the refractive indices, dimensions and numbers of the lamellae and inter-lamellar spaces. Results of the fitting analyses show that eight or nine pairs of low- and high-index layers typically contribute to the observed reflectivity in live cells, whereas six or seven pairs of low- and high-index layers typically contribute to the reflectivity in chemically fixed cells. The reflectin-containing, high-index lamellae of live cells have a refractive index proportional to the peak reflectivity, with an average of 1.405 ± 0.012 and a maximum around 1.44, while the reflectin-containing lamellae in fixed tissue have a refractive index of 1.413 ± 0.015 suggesting a slight increase of refractive index in the process of fixation. As expected, incremental changes in refractive index contribute to the greatest incremental changes in reflectivity for those Bragg stacks with the most layers. The excursions in dimensions required to tune the measured reflected wavelength from 675 (red) to 425 nm (blue) are a decrease from ca 150 to 80 nm for the high-index lamellae and from ca 120 to 50 nm for the low-index inter-lamellar spaces. Fixation-induced dimensional changes also are quantified, leading us to suggest that further microspectrophotometric analyses of this iridocyte

  18. Tunable channel-drop filters consisting of polymeric Bragg reflectors and a mode sorting asymmetric X-junction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Soo; Park, Tea-Hyun; Chu, Woo-Sung; Lee, Chang-Hee; Shin, Sang-Yung; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-06-29

    A tunable channel-drop filter as essential component for the wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communication system has been demonstrated, which is based on polymer waveguide Bragg reflectors. For an ordinary Bragg reflector, the filtered signal is reflected toward the input waveguide. Thus an external circulator is required to separate the filtered signal from the input port, though it increases the total footprint and cost. For this purpose, we employed dual Bragg reflectors and a mode sorting asymmetric X-junction. The Bragg reflector exhibited a maximum reflectivity of 94% for a 6-mm long grating, a 3-dB bandwidth of 0.39 nm and a 20-dB bandwidth of 2.6 nm. The mode sorting crosstalk in asymmetric X-junction was less than -20 dB, and linear wavelength tuning was achieved over 10 nm at the applied thermal power of 377 mW. PMID:26191731

  19. Mode-locking pulse dynamics in a fiber laser with a saturable Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, J.N.; Collings, B.C.; Bergman, K.; Tsuda, S.; Cundiff, S.T.; Knox, W.H.; Holmes, P.; Weinstein, M.

    1997-10-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the pulse dynamics in a fiber laser mode locked by a saturable Bragg reflector and operating in regimes beyond the scope of the master mode-locking equation. An asymptotically valid mode-locked evolution equation is derived, which includes a heuristic model for the saturable Bragg reflector dynamics. The model employed allows, for the first time to our knowledge, direct comparison (with no free parameters) of the theoretical predictions of the pulse spectral and temporal profiles with experimental results in both the normal and anomalous dispersion regimes. Extensive numerical simulations of the governing evolution equation, an averaged equation, and analytical solutions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental results. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  20. Multijunction GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells with Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Emelyanov, V. M. Kalyuzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Shvarts, M. Z.; Lantratov, V. M.

    2010-12-15

    Effect of subcell parameters on the efficiency of GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge tandem solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons at fluences of up to 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} has been theoretically studied. The optimal thicknesses of GaInP and GaInAs subcells, which provide the best photocurrent matching at various irradiation doses in solar cells with and without built-in Bragg reflectors, were determined. The dependences of the photoconverter efficiency on the fluence of 1-MeV electrons and on the time of residence in the geostationary orbit were calculated for structures optimized to the beginning and end of their service lives. It is shown that the optimization of the subcell heterostructures for a rated irradiation dose and the introduction of Bragg reflectors into the structure provide a 5% overall increase in efficiency for solar cells operating in the orbit compared with unoptimized cells having no Bragg reflector.

  1. InAlN/GaN Bragg reflectors grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gacevic, Z.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Estrade, S.

    2010-12-01

    We report on molecular beam epitaxy growth and characterization of ten-period lattice-matched InAlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), with peak reflectivity centered around 400 nm. Thanks to the well tuned ternary alloy composition, crack-free surfaces have been obtained, as confirmed by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their good periodicity and well-defined interfaces have been confirmed by both x-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. Peak reflectivity values as high as 60% with stop bands of 30 nm have been demonstrated. Optical measurements revealed that discrepancy between the obtained (60%) and the theoretically expected ({approx}75%) reflectivity is a consequence of significant residual absorption ({approx}35%). TEM measurements revealed the coexistence of zinc-blende and wurtzite phases, as well as planar defects, mainly in GaN. These defects are suggested as the potential source of the undesired absorption and/or scattering effects that lowered the DBRs' peak reflectivity.

  2. Effect of implementation of a Bragg reflector in the photonic band structure of the Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis Javier; Alija, Alfonso Rodriguez; Postigo, Pablo Aitor; Galisteo-López, J F; Galli, Matteo; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Seassal, Christian; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the change of the photonic band structure of the Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice when the horizontal mirror symmetry is broken by an underlying Bragg reflector. The structure consists of an InP photonic crystal slab including four InAsP quantum wells, a SiO(2) bonding layer, and a bottom high index contrast Si/SiO(2) Bragg mirror deposited on a Si wafer. Angle- and polarization-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used for measuring the photonic band structure and for investigating the coupling to a polarized plane wave in the far field. A drastic change in the k-space photonic dispersion between the structure with and without Bragg reflector is measured. An important enhancement on the photoluminescence emission up to seven times has been obtained for a nearly flat photonic band, which is characteristic of the Suzuki-phase lattice. PMID:18545565

  3. Planar-Dielectric-Wakefield Accelerator Structure Using Bragg-Reflector Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonian, G.; Williams, O.; Barber, S.; Bruhwiler, D.; Favier, P.; Fedurin, M.; Fitzmorris, K.; Fukasawa, A.; Hoang, P.; Kusche, K.; Naranjo, B.; O'Shea, B.; Stoltz, P.; Swinson, C.; Valloni, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We report experimental measurements of narrow-band, single-mode excitation, and drive beam energy modulation, in a dielectric wakefield accelerating structure with planar geometry and Bragg-reflector boundaries. A short, relativistic electron beam (˜1 ps ) with moderate charge (˜100 pC ) is used to drive the wakefields in the structure. The fundamental mode of the structure is reinforced by constructive interference in the alternating dielectric layers at the boundary, and is characterized by the spectral analysis of the emitted coherent Cherenkov radiation signal. Data analysis shows a narrow-band peak at 210 GHz corresponding to the fundamental mode of the structure. Simulations in both 2D and 3D provide insight into the propagating fields and reproduction of the electron beams dynamics observables and emitted radiation characteristics.

  4. Transmission type tunable wavelength filters based on polymer waveguide Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Hyun; Seo, Jun-Kyu; Park, Joonoh; Lee, Hak-Kyu; Shin, Jin-Soo; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2016-03-01

    In WDM communication systems, a compact low-cost tunable wavelength filter is highly demanded. Polymeric Bragg reflector devices are suitable for this purpose because the large thermo-optic effect of the polymer enables widely tunable wavelength filters with simple device structure. To direct the filtered signal in the forward direction rather than the backward direction, a waveguide mirror device is integrated. A compact package was then achieved by attaching a fiber-connecting receptacle and a high-speed PD on each side of the chip. The tunable filter exhibited a tuning range of 14 nm, a 3-dB bandwidth of 0.45 nm, and a 15-dB bandwidth of 1.54 nm. The device exhibited a low polarization dependence of 0.08 nm, which is the first demonstration in polymeric tunable filters.

  5. Planar-dielectric-wakefield accelerator structure using Bragg-reflector boundaries.

    PubMed

    Andonian, G; Williams, O; Barber, S; Bruhwiler, D; Favier, P; Fedurin, M; Fitzmorris, K; Fukasawa, A; Hoang, P; Kusche, K; Naranjo, B; O'Shea, B; Stoltz, P; Swinson, C; Valloni, A; Rosenzweig, J B

    2014-12-31

    We report experimental measurements of narrow-band, single-mode excitation, and drive beam energy modulation, in a dielectric wakefield accelerating structure with planar geometry and Bragg-reflector boundaries. A short, relativistic electron beam (∼1  ps) with moderate charge (∼100  pC) is used to drive the wakefields in the structure. The fundamental mode of the structure is reinforced by constructive interference in the alternating dielectric layers at the boundary, and is characterized by the spectral analysis of the emitted coherent Cherenkov radiation signal. Data analysis shows a narrow-band peak at 210 GHz corresponding to the fundamental mode of the structure. Simulations in both 2D and 3D provide insight into the propagating fields and reproduction of the electron beams dynamics observables and emitted radiation characteristics. PMID:25615344

  6. High-efficiency AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells with internal Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, V.M.; Komin, V.V.; Kochnev, I.V.; Lantratov, V.M.; Shvarts, M.Z.

    1994-12-31

    The work presents an investigation of solar cells (SCs) based on AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with internal Bragg reflectors grown by low-pressure MOCVD on n-GaAs substrates in a horizontal resistively heated reactor. The typical structure consists of: Bragg reflector (BR) having 12 periods, n-GaAs base layer with the thickness of 1,500--2,000 nm, 400--500 nm thick p-GaAs emitter, 70 nm thick p-AlGaAs passivating window and top p-GaAs contact layers. The BR with the reflectance maximum centered at the wavelength of 860 nm consists of twelve pairs of AlAs/GaAs layers. The resulting BR thicknesses is 71.6 nm for A.As and 59 nm for GaAs. In this case the peak of reflectance spectrum is in the area of 830--900 nm where the reflectance is close to unit. This multi-layer quasi-dielectric stack selectively reflect weakly absorbed photons with energies near the GaAs band gap for a second pass through the photoactive region increasing the photocurrent. The employment of the BR allows to increase the external quantum efficiency in the long wavelength range of the spectrum and to fabricate simultaneously a thinner n-GaAs base layer. The use of the internal BR, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} for antireflecting coating and prismatic cover allowed them to obtain efficiency of 23.4% (17.7 suns, AM0, 25 C) and 27.2% (23.4 suns, Am 1.5).

  7. Feasibility of microwave-produced Bragg reflector: Examined by the chamber experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, S.P.; Zhang, Y.S.

    1990-10-01

    A set of parallel plasma layers is generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in a chamber containing dry air at a pressure comparable to the upper atmosphere. The dependencies of breakdown conditions on the pressure and pulse length are examined. The results are shown to be consistent with the appearance of tad erosion of microwave pulse caused by air breakdown. A Bragg scattering experiment, using the plasma layers as a Bragg reflector is then performed. Both time domain and frequency domain measurements of wave scattering are conducted. ne experiment results are found to agree very well with the theory. Moreover, the time domain measurement of wave scattering provides an unambiguous way for determining the temporal evolution of electron density during the first IMP period. A Langmuir double probe is also used to determine the decay rate of electron density during a later time interval (I ms to 1.1 ms). The propagation of high power microwave pulses through the air is also studied experimentally. The mechanisms responsible for two different degree of tail erosion have been identified. The optimum amplitude of an 1. 1us pulse for maximum energy transfer through the air has been determined.

  8. On the feasibility of microwave produced Bragg reflector: Examined by the chamber experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.; Kossey, Paul A.; Barker, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    A set of parallel plasma layers is generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in a chamber containing dry air at a pressure comparable to the upper atmosphere. The dependencies of breakdown conditions on the pressure and pulse length are examined. The results are shown to be consistent with the appearance of tail erosion of microwave pulse caused by air breakdown. A Bragg scattering experiment using the plasma layers as a Bragg reflector is then performed. Both time domain and frequency domain measurements of wave scattering are conducted. The results are found to agree very well with the theory. Moreover, the time domain measurement of wave scattering provides an unambiguous way for determining the temporal evolution of electron density during the first 100 microsec period. A Langmuir double probe is also used to determine the decay rate of electron density during a later time interval (1 to 1.1 ms). The propagation of high power microwave pulses through the air is also studied experimentally. The mechanism responsible for two different degrees of tail erosion were identified. The optimum amplitude of a 1.1 microsec pulse for maximum energy transfer through the air was determined.

  9. Performance characteristics of a 1. 5. mu. m single-frequency semiconductor laser with an external waveguide Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, N.A.; Henry, C.H.; Kazarinov, R.F.; Lee, H.J.; Orlowsky, K.J.; Johnson, B.H.; Scotti, R.E.; Ackerman, D.A.; Anthony, P.J.

    1988-02-01

    Single-frequency operation of 1.5 ..mu..m semiconductor lasers was obtained by combining a regular Fabry-Perot laser to an external waveguide Bragg reflector. The laser is characterized by very pure single-frequency operation, 1 MHz linewidth, and greatly-reduced frequency chirp under direct modulation. The laser has been tested in 1.7 Gbit/s transmission experiments over 82.5 km of fiber.

  10. Crystalline garnet Bragg reflectors for high power, high temperature, and integrated applications fabricated by multi-beam pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloyan, Katherine A.; May-Smith, Timothy C.; Zervas, Michalis N.; Eason, Robert W.

    2012-08-01

    Crystalline Bragg reflectors are of interest for high power, high temperature, and integrated applications. We demonstrate the automated growth of such structures by shuttered multi-beam pulsed laser deposition. Geometries include 145 layer stacks exhibiting >99.5% reflection and π phase-shifted designs. A crystalline grating strength-apodized sample was grown by mixing plumes to obtain layers with custom refractive indices. Peak reflection wavelength was tuneable with incident position, samples withstood temperatures of ˜750 °C, and film and substrate have been shown to withstand incident pulsed laser fluences of up to ˜33 J cm-2.

  11. Single-mode properties of distributed-reflector lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Komori, K.; Arai, S.; Suematsu, Y.; Arima, Y.; Aoki, M.

    1989-06-01

    The fundamental properties of a distributed-reflector (DR) laser, consisting of an active section and a passive distributed reflector section are theoretically investigated. The DR laser, in principle, has the properties of high efficiency and high-power performance in dynamic-single-mode operation, thus eliminating the problems of low device efficiency in DFB lasers and low output power in DBR lasers. The effective length of a distributed reflector including gain and loss is introduced as a novel concept and is applied for the analytical determination of the lasing condition. The conditions required for dynamic-single-mode operation with one-facet output are given in terms of the propagation constant difference between the active and passive regions related to the coupling coefficient of the passive reflector. This condition is experimentally found to be attainable by utilizing a conventional fabrication process.

  12. Tapered cavity surface emitting distributed Bragg reflector lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hui

    2000-09-01

    High power, diffraction-limited semiconductor lasers are required for a wide range of applications such as pumping for EDFAs, Raman amplifiers, and for free space optical communications. Unstable resonator has been identified as a very promising concept to develop these lasers. The objective of this research is to investigate and develop tapered cavity unstable resonator grating coupled surface emitting lasers (TCSELs). The laser consists of a ridge section, a tapered gain section and a DBR grating section. The ridge is used to ensure single lateral mode operation. The taper is used to achieve high power from a large aperture. The grating is used to provide feedback and surface outcoupling. This laser design has several key features including high output power, near diffraction-limited beam, low divergence angle, single longitudinal mode operation, and integration with dynamic functionality such as wavelength tuning and beam steering. In this dissertation the design, fabrication and characterization of TCSELs are discussed. The theory of TCSELs is presented. As a theoretical investigation, a comprehensive numerical modeling based on finite difference beam propagation method (FD-BPM) for semiconductor laser is developed. The model includes major parameters affecting device performance such as current spreading, carrier diffusion, nonlinear gain- carrier relation, gain saturation, carrier induced antiguiding and thermal lensing. The simulation results are presented and effects of design parameters on device performance are discussed. TCSELs with different device design and functionality are fabricated. The characterization results are discussed. High power operation is obtained under both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) operation. Collimated near diffraction-limited beam is demonstrated with moderate power. Single longitudinal mode operation with high side mode suppression ratio is observed. Wavelength tuning and beam steering is achieved using current injection to the suitable grating section through indium tin oxide (ITO). Several approaches for the improvement of the laser performance are discussed.

  13. Spatially graded TiO₂-SiO₂ Bragg reflector with rainbow-colored photonic band gap.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhruv Pratap; Lee, Seung Hee; Choi, Il Yong; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2015-06-29

    A simple single-step method to fabricate spatially graded TiO2-SiO2 Bragg stack with rainbow colored photonic band gap is presented. The gradation in thickness of the Bragg stack was accomplished with a modified glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique with dynamic shadow enabled by a block attached to one edge of the rotating substrate. A linear gradation in thickness over a distance of about 17 mm resulted in a brilliant colorful rainbow pattern. Interestingly, the photonic band gap position can be changed across the whole visible wavelength range by linearly translating the graded Bragg stack over a large area substrate. The spatially graded Bragg stack may find potential applications in the tunable optical devices, such as optical filters, reflection gratings, and lasers. PMID:26191764

  14. Lateral integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and slow light Bragg reflector waveguide devices.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Toshikazu; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2014-03-20

    We present the modeling and the experiment on the lateral integration of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and slow light Bragg reflector waveguide devices. The modeling shows an efficient direct-lateral coupling from a VCSEL to an integrated slow light waveguide. The calculated result shows a possibility of 13 dB chip gain and an extinction ratio over 5 dB for a compact slow light semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and electroabsorption modulator integrated with a VCSEL, respectively. We demonstrate an SOA-integrated VCSEL, exhibiting the maximum output power over 6 mW. Also, we fabricate a sub-50-μm long electroabsorption modulator laterally integrated with a VCSEL. An extinction ratio of over 15 dB for a voltage swing of 2.0 V is obtained without noticeable change of threshold. In addition, we demonstrate an on-chip electrothermal beam deflector integrated with a VCSEL. PMID:24663452

  15. Ytterbium-doped fibre laser with a Bragg grating reflector written in a multimode fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Grukh, Dmitrii A; Medvedkov, O I; Paramonov, Vladimir M; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2005-04-30

    An efficient cladding-pumped Yb-doped fibre laser with a Bragg grating written in a multimode graded-index fibre is fabricated for the first time. The laser emits one transverse mode with a slope efficiency of 60%. The resonator design proposed in the paper can be used for the development of high-power fibre lasers with an increased fibre core diameter. (lasers)

  16. Diode-end-pumped passively mode-locked high-power Nd:YVO4 laser with a relaxed saturable Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y F; Tsai, S W; Lan, Y P; Wang, S C; Huang, K F

    2001-02-15

    We demonstrate a high-power passively mode-locked Nd:YVO (4) laser that uses a saturable Bragg reflector (SBR) with strain relaxation. 23.5 W of average power with ~21.5-ps cw mode-locked pulse trains was generated at a 50-W pump power. Experimental results show that appropriate strain relaxation in the SBR makes the mode-locking operation less sensitive to temperature variation. PMID:18033546

  17. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  18. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P F

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  19. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yong; Noh, Junghyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns.

  20. Bragg Reflectors Based on Block Copolymer/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS) and TiO2 Hybrid Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Colella, Nicholas; Watkins, James

    2014-03-01

    Maleamic acid functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) can interact with the poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO) block in Pluronics F108 block copolymer via hydrogen bonding to form well-ordered block copolymer nanocomposites. In this study, the block copolymer composites are spin coated into thin films and maleamic acid groups are thermal crosslinked to stabilize the nanocomposite structure. High temperature calcination of the stabilized nanocomposite yields a robust mesoporous silica thin film. By adjusting the loading of POSS into the block copolymer prior to calcination, the refractive index (RI) of mesoporous silica films can be tuned between 1.13 and 1.18. We show these low RI films can be sequentially layered with hybrid TiO2 nanocomposite films that exhibit a RI of approximately 2.0 to yield efficient Bragg reflectors. The TiO2 films are prepared by the calcinations of polymer/anatase TiO2 nanoparticle composites with NP loadings as high as 90wt%. Due to the porosity existing in each layer, the wavelength of the reflected light is sensitive to the adsorption of solvent vapors such as toluene, isopropanol, and tetrahydrofuran, or analytes, which suggest applications in sensors. Acknowledge The Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing.

  1. A highly distributed Bragg stack with unique geometry provides effective camouflage for Loliginid squid eyes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Amanda L.; Sweeney, Alison M.; Johnsen, Sönke; Morse, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Cephalopods possess a sophisticated array of mechanisms to achieve camouflage in dynamic underwater environments. While active mechanisms such as chromatophore patterning and body posturing are well known, passive mechanisms such as manipulating light with highly evolved reflectors may also play an important role. To explore the contribution of passive mechanisms to cephalopod camouflage, we investigated the optical and biochemical properties of the silver layer covering the eye of the California fishery squid, Loligo opalescens. We discovered a novel nested-spindle geometry whose correlated structure effectively emulates a randomly distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), with a range of spatial frequencies resulting in broadband visible reflectance, making it a nearly ideal passive camouflage material for the depth at which these animals live. We used the transfer-matrix method of optical modelling to investigate specular reflection from the spindle structures, demonstrating that a DBR with widely distributed thickness variations of high refractive index elements is sufficient to yield broadband reflectance over visible wavelengths, and that unlike DBRs with one or a few spatial frequencies, this broadband reflectance occurs from a wide range of viewing angles. The spindle shape of the cells may facilitate self-assembly of a random DBR to achieve smooth spatial distributions in refractive indices. This design lends itself to technological imitation to achieve a DBR with wide range of smoothly varying layer thicknesses in a facile, inexpensive manner. PMID:21325315

  2. A highly distributed Bragg stack with unique geometry provides effective camouflage for Loliginid squid eyes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Amanda L; Sweeney, Alison M; Johnsen, Sönke; Morse, Daniel E

    2011-10-01

    Cephalopods possess a sophisticated array of mechanisms to achieve camouflage in dynamic underwater environments. While active mechanisms such as chromatophore patterning and body posturing are well known, passive mechanisms such as manipulating light with highly evolved reflectors may also play an important role. To explore the contribution of passive mechanisms to cephalopod camouflage, we investigated the optical and biochemical properties of the silver layer covering the eye of the California fishery squid, Loligo opalescens. We discovered a novel nested-spindle geometry whose correlated structure effectively emulates a randomly distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), with a range of spatial frequencies resulting in broadband visible reflectance, making it a nearly ideal passive camouflage material for the depth at which these animals live. We used the transfer-matrix method of optical modelling to investigate specular reflection from the spindle structures, demonstrating that a DBR with widely distributed thickness variations of high refractive index elements is sufficient to yield broadband reflectance over visible wavelengths, and that unlike DBRs with one or a few spatial frequencies, this broadband reflectance occurs from a wide range of viewing angles. The spindle shape of the cells may facilitate self-assembly of a random DBR to achieve smooth spatial distributions in refractive indices. This design lends itself to technological imitation to achieve a DBR with wide range of smoothly varying layer thicknesses in a facile, inexpensive manner. PMID:21325315

  3. All optical mode controllable Er-doped random fiber laser with distributed Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W L; Ma, R; Tang, C H; Rao, Y J; Zeng, X P; Yang, Z J; Wang, Z N; Gong, Y; Wang, Y S

    2015-07-01

    An all-optical method to control the lasing modes of Er-doped random fiber lasers (RFLs) is proposed and demonstrated. In the RFL, an Er-doped fiber (EDF) recoded with randomly separated fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) is used as the gain medium and randomly distributed reflectors, as well as the controllable element. By combining random feedback of the FBG array and Fresnel feedback of a cleaved fiber end, multi-mode coherent random lasing is obtained with a threshold of 14 mW and power efficiency of 14.4%. Moreover, a laterally-injected control light is used to induce local gain perturbation, providing additional gain for certain random resonance modes. As a result, active mode selection of the RFL is realized by changing locations of the laser cavity that is exposed to the control light. PMID:26125397

  4. Phase-based Bragg intragrating distributed strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Ohn, M. M.; Measures, R. M.

    1996-03-01

    A strain-distribution sensing technique based on the measurement of the phase spectrum of the reflected light from a fiber-optic Bragg grating is described. When a grating is subject to a strain gradient, the grating will experience a chirp and therefore the resonant wavelength will vary along the grating, causing wavelength-dependent penetration depth. Because the group delay for each wavelength component is related to its penetration depth and the resonant wavelength is determined by strain, a measured phase spectrum can then indicate the local strain as a function of location within the grating. This phase-based Bragg grating sensing technique offers a powerful new means for studying some important effects over a few millimeters or centimeters in smart structures.

  5. BOR-FDTD analysis of nonlinear Fiber Bragg grating and distributed Bragg resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL Mashade, Mohamed B.; Nady, M.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, nonlinear materials have attracted a great deal of attention because of their importance in designing new devices to meet a need range of optical systems. An intense investigation of the possibility of using these materials for all optical ultrafast applications is achieved by allowing their dielectric characteristics to be varied in such a way that a periodic perturbation of their refractive index along the length of the waveguide will be formed. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, on the other hand, has been proven to be one of the most powerful numerical techniques that are usefully applied to a wide range of optical devices. In this paper, a FDTD technique, developed for nonlinear structures, is used to analyze a nonlinear waveguide and periodic nonlinear structures that exhibit attractive properties that make them suitable for novel devices with wavelength tunable characteristics. More specifically, the Bodies of Revolution (BOR) FDTD numerical simulation method will be used to model the fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) and the direct integration method will be employed to include the effect of Self Phase Modulation (SPM) in this model. The combination of these techniques will result in a model that is used to analyze two different types of periodic nonlinear structure, FBG and Distributed Bragg Resonator (DBR). The nonlinear effect provides the designer an added degree of design flexibility for devices with wavelength tunable characteristics, for example, in the design of tunable filters, WDM systems and optical sensors.

  6. Laboratory chamber experiments exploring the potential use of artificially ionized layers of gas as a Bragg reflector for over-the-horizon signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.; Lee, M. C.; Kossey, Paul; Barker, Robert J.

    1992-12-01

    A set of parallel plasma layers is generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in a chamber containing dry air at a pressure comparable to the upper atmosphere. The dependence of the breakdown conditions on the pressure and pulse length is examined. The results are shown to be consistent with the appearance of tail erosion of microwave pulse caused by air breakdown. Bragg scattering experiments, using the plasma layers as a Bragg reflector are then performed. Both time domain and frequency domain measurements of wave scattering are conducted. The experimental results are found to agree very well with the theory. Moreover, the time domain measurement of wave scattering provides an unambiguous way for determining the temporal evolution of electron density during the first 100-microsec period.

  7. Laboratory chamber experiments exploring the potential use of artificially ionized layers of gas as a Bragg reflector for over-the-horizon signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.; Lee, M. C.; Kossey, Paul; Barker, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    A set of parallel plasma layers is generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in a chamber containing dry air at a pressure comparable to the upper atmosphere. The dependence of the breakdown conditions on the pressure and pulse length is examined. The results are shown to be consistent with the appearance of tail erosion of microwave pulse caused by air breakdown. Bragg scattering experiments, using the plasma layers as a Bragg reflector are then performed. Both time domain and frequency domain measurements of wave scattering are conducted. The experimental results are found to agree very well with the theory. Moreover, the time domain measurement of wave scattering provides an unambiguous way for determining the temporal evolution of electron density during the first 100-microsec period.

  8. Control of the spontaneous emission from a single quantum dash using a slow-light mode in a two-dimensional photonic crystal on a Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, N.; Fiore, A.; Nedel, P.; Seassal, C.; Ben Bakir, B.; Letartre, X.; Gendry, M.; Viktorovitch, P.

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate the coupling of a single InAs/InP quantum, emitting around 1.55 {mu}m, to a slow-light mode in a two-dimensional photonic crystal on Bragg reflector. These surface addressable 2.5D photonic crystal band-edge modes present the advantages of a vertical emission and the mode area and localization may be controlled, leading to a less critical spatial alignment with the emitter. An increase in the spontaneous emission rate by a factor of 1.5-2 is measured at low temperature and is compared to the Purcell factor predicted by three-dimensional time-domain electromagnetic simulations.

  9. Tamm plasmon-polariton with negative group velocity induced by a negative index meta-material capping layer at metal-Bragg reflector interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cunding; Kong, Mingdong; Li, Bincheng

    2014-05-01

    Influence of a negative refractive index meta-material (NIM) capping layer on properties of Tamm plasmon-polariton at the interface of metal-Bragg reflector structure is investigated. Conditions for excitation of the plasmon-polariton is determined from reflectivity mapping calculation and analyzed with cavity mode theory. For specific thicknesses of capping layers, Tamm plasmon-polariton with negative group velocity is revealed in a wide region of frequency. Different from backward optical propagation induced by negative effective-group-refractive-index in dispersive media, negative group velocity of Tamm plasmon-polariton results from opposite signs of cross-section-integrated field energy and Poynting vector. PMID:24921834

  10. Two-photon-excitation scanning microscopy of living neurons with a saturable Bragg reflector mode-locked diode-pumped Cr:LiSrAlFl laser.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, K; Denk, W; Knox, W H; Tsuda, S

    1996-09-01

    A Cr:LiSrAlFl laser, pumped with a diffraction-limited laser diode and mode locked with a saturable Bragg reflector, produces 90-fs pulses at 860 nm with a cw power as high as 88 mW in two beams. It is shown that this recently developed, compact, solid-state laser can be used as an excitation source for two-photon laser scanning microscopy. Morphological and functional images of neocortical and cerebellar neurons were obtained with submicrometer three-dimensional resolution. Single dendritic spines could easily be resolved deep in scattering tissue. PMID:19876369

  11. Low-loss 1.3-microm GaInNAs saturable Bragg reflector for high-power picosecond neodymium lasers.

    PubMed

    Sun, H D; Valentine, G J; Macaluso, R; Calvez, S; Burns, D; Dawson, M D; Jouhti, T; Pessa, M

    2002-12-01

    A novel low-loss, single-step-growth 1.3-microm GaInNAs saturable Bragg reflector mode-locking element has been developed. Combined radial thickness and postgrowth annealing control have permitted a tuning range of 46 nm for passive mode locking to be demonstrated from one wafer. With this structure, stabilized mode locking was obtained from quasi-cw diode-pumped Nd:YLF and Nd:YALO lasers operating at 1314 and 1342 nm, respectively, with average on-time output powers of as much as 20 W and pulse durations as low as 22 ps. PMID:18033462

  12. Distributive tactile sensing using fibre Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Barbara M.; Webb, David J.; Tam, Betty; Slack, Paul; Brett, Peter N.

    2006-04-01

    Two distributive tactile sensing systems are presented, based on fibre Bragg grating sensors. The first is a onedimensional metal strip with an array of 4 sensors, which is capable of detecting the magnitude and position of a contacting load. This system is compared experimentally with a similar system using resistive strain gauges. The second is a two-dimensional steel plate with 9 sensors which is able to distinguish the position and shape of a contacting load. This system is compared with a similar system using 16 infrared displacement sensors. Each system uses neural networks to process the sensor data to give information concerning the type of contact.

  13. Automated design of a uniform distribution using faceted reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassarly, William J.; David, Stuart R.; Jenkins, David G.; Riser, Andrew; Davenport, Thomas L.

    2000-07-01

    Faceted reflectors are a ubiquitous means for providing uniform illumination in many commercial lighting products, examples being newer flashlights, department-store display lighting, and the faceted reflectors found in overhead projectors. However, the design of faceted reflectors using software has often been more limited by the tools available to design them than by the imagination of the designers. One of the keys to enabling a broader range of design options has been to allow more complex surfaces using constructive solid geometry (CSG). CSG uses Boolean operations on basic geometric primitives to define shapes to create individual facets. In this paper, we describe an improved faceted reflector design algorithm and use it to create a wide range of CSG-based reflectors. The performance of various reflectors is compared using a Monte Carlo ray-trace method.

  14. Measurement of distributed strain and temperature based on higher order and higher mode Bragg conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirkis, James S. (Inventor); Sivanesan, Ponniah (Inventor); Venkat, Venki S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A Bragg grating sensor for measuring distributed strain and temperature at the same time comprises an optical fiber having a single mode operating wavelength region and below a cutoff wavelength of the fiber having a multimode operating wavelength region. A saturated, higher order Bragg grating having first and second order Bragg conditions is fabricated in the optical fiber. The first order of Bragg resonance wavelength of the Bragg grating is within the single mode operating wavelength region of the optical fiber and the second order of Bragg resonance wavelength is below the cutoff wavelength of the fiber within the multimode operating wavelength region. The reflectivities of the saturated Bragg grating at the first and second order Bragg conditions are less than two orders of magnitude of one another. In use, the first and second order Bragg conditions are simultaneously created in the sensor at the respective wavelengths and a signal from the sensor is demodulated with respect to each of the wavelengths corresponding to the first and second order Bragg conditions. Two Bragg conditions have different responsivities to strain and temperature, thus allowing two equations for axial strain and temperature to be found in terms of the measure shifts in the primary and second order Bragg wavelengths. This system of equations can be solved for strain and temperature.

  15. Solar reflector soiling pattern distributions and reflectance measurement requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Kidney, K. )

    1990-10-01

    Short-term specular reflectance losses from optical surfaces used in the collection or concentration of solar energy results in significant reduction of these systems' output. Losses range from 0.1% to 1.0% per day, approaching asymptotes of 25% to 60% for periods greater than one year, depending onsite and season. To appropriately assess the value of a particular location for the production of power, consideration of the rates of soiling and strategies to minimize losses resulting from soiling must be considered. Strategies for measuring the optical performance of reflector materials to a specified degree of accuracy have been developed, according to the types of soiling patterns observed. It was found most soiling occurs with the accumulation of particulates in spots of different sizes, and the spot sizes follow a lognormal distribution. For most practical situations, it was determined that 10 measurements with a 1-cm-diameter beam are enough to place the average value within 3% of the true value, with a confidence level of 95%.

  16. Temperature and thermal stress distributions for the HFIR permanent reflector generated by nuclear heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1998-04-01

    The beryllium permanent reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor has the main functions for slowing down and reflecting the neutrons and housing the experimental facilities. The reflector is heated as a result of the nuclear reaction. Heat is removed mainly by the cooling water passing through the densely distributed coolant holes along the vertical or axial direction of the reflector. The reflector neutronic distribution and its heating rate are calculated by J.C. Gehin of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by applying the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. The heat transfer boundary conditions along several reflector interfaces are estimated to remove additional heat from the reflector. The present paper is to report the calculation results of the temperature and the thermal stress distributions of the permanent reflector by applying the computer aided design code I-DEAS and the finite element code ABAQUS. The present calculation is to estimate the high stress areas as a result of the new beam tube cutouts along the horizontal mid-plane of the reflector of the recent reactor upgrade project. These high stresses were not able to be calculated in the preliminary design analysis in earlier 60`s. The heat transfer boundary conditions are used in this redesigned calculation. The material constants and the acceptance criteria for the allowable stresses are mainly based on that assumed in the preliminary design report.

  17. Fibre Bragg grating sensors for distributive tactile sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Barbara M.; Webb, David J.; Tam, Betty; Slack, Paul; Brett, Peter N.

    2007-01-01

    Distributive tactile sensing is a method of tactile sensing in which a small number of sensors monitors the behaviour of a flexible substrate which is in contact with the object being sensed. This paper describes the first use of fibre Bragg grating sensors in such a system. Two systems are presented: the first is a one-dimensional metal strip with an array of four sensors, which is capable of detecting the magnitude and position of a contacting load. This system is favourably compared experimentally with a similar system using resistive strain gauges. The second system is a two-dimensional steel plate with nine sensors which is able to distinguish the position and shape of a contacting load, or the positions of two loads simultaneously. This system is compared with a similar system using 16 infrared displacement sensors. Each system uses neural networks to process the sensor data to give information concerning the type of contact. Issues and limitations of the systems are discussed, along with proposed solutions to some of the difficulties.

  18. 2.5-Gb/s hybridly-integrated tunable external cavity laser using a superluminescent diode and a polymer Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki-Hong; Oh, Su Hwan; Kim, Ki Soo; Kwon, O-Kyun; Oh, Dae Kon; Noh, Young-Ouk; Lee, Hyung-Jong

    2010-03-15

    We presented a hybridly-integrated tunable external cavity laser with 0.8 nm mode spacing 16 channels operating in the direct modulation of 2.5-Gbps for a low-cost source of a WDM-PON system. The tunable laser was fabricated by using a superluminescent diode (SLD) and a polymer Bragg reflector. The maximum output power and the power slope efficiency of the tunable laser were 10.3 mW and 0.132 mW/mA, respectively, at the SLD current of 100 mA and the temperature of 25 degrees C. The directly-modulated tunable laser successfully provided 2.5-Gbps transmissions through 20-km standard single mode fiber. The power penalty of the tunable laser was less than 0.8 dB for 16 channels after a 20-km transmission. The power penalty variation was less than 1.4 dB during the blue-shifted wavelength tuning. PMID:20389571

  19. A comparative study of photon recycling effects in n{sup +}-p and p{sup +}-n InP solar cells with Bragg reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, A.; Kurizuka, M.; Murshid, Md.M.; Hashimoto, A.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical calculation of photon recycling (PR) effect has been carried out for n{sup +}-p and p{sup +}-n structure InP cells with Bragg reflector (BR). For both structures with a thin ({approx_gt}0.1 {micro}m) emitter, PR effects on photocurrent are scarcely observed. A large contribution of PR to photocurrent is found for an n{sup +}-p structure with a thick ({approx_gt}0.5 {micro}m) emitter although photocurrent itself is reduced. A p{sup +}-n structure with a similar configuration, on the other hand, shows very small PR effects. Such a difference in the magnitude of PR effects between both cell structures is brought by the difference in radiative and nonradiative lifetimes between n{sup +} and p{sup +} emitters. An increase in Voc is found for an n{sup +}-p cell with a thin ({approximately}2 {micro}m) base layer. As results of increases in photocurrent and Voc by PR, conversion efficiency of a n{sup +}-p cell is increased by about 3%. For both cell structures, BR effects are observed for a base thickness less than about 3 {micro}m. The effects are not due to the trapping of reemitted light but the trapping of incident light.

  20. Surface-emitting, single-lobe operation from second-order distributed-reflector lasers with central grating phaseshift

    SciTech Connect

    Witjaksono, Gunawan; Botez, Dan

    2001-06-25

    Surface-emitting diode lasers containing a second-order Bragg grating with a central phaseshift, {Delta}{phi}, of values around {pi} are found to fundamentally favor lasing in a mode of symmetric near-field amplitude profile, which in turn provides emission in a single-lobed beam orthonormal to the surface. Devices of 500 {mu}m long distributed-feedback (DFB) active region ({lambda}=0.98{mu}m) and 500 {mu}m long distributed feedback reflector passive regions provide, for {Delta}{phi}={pi}, a surface-emitted beam pattern with 88% central-lobe power content, and external differential quantum efficiency, {eta}{sub D}, of 51%. Since the guided field is antisymmetric to start with, and a central {pi} phaseshift causes two grating-outcoupled beams to be out-of-phase with each other, the net result is a single-lobed far-field pattern. The guided-field peak-to-valley (intensity) ratio, R, in the active (i.e., DFB) region is only 2, which insures single-mode operation to high powers, since the intermodal discrimination is high ({ge}100 cm{minus}1). Over a wide range in {Delta}{phi}:60{degree}; {eta}{sub D} remains high ({gt}50%) and the degree of guided-field uniformity remains low (R{lt}2). {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Inverse problem for shape control of flexible space reflectors using distributed solar pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggräfe, A.; Heiligers, J.; Ceriotti, M.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates controlled elastic deflection of thin circular space reflectors using an inverse problem approach to non-linear thin membrane theory. When changing the surface reflectivity across the membrane, the distributed loads due to ambient solar radiation pressure can be manipulated optically, thus controlling the surface shape without using mechanical or piezo-electric systems. The surface reflectivity can in principle be modulated using uniformly distributed thin-film electro-chromic coatings. We present an analytic solution to the inverse problem of finding the necessary reflectivity distribution that creates a specific membrane deflection, for example that of a parabolic reflector. Importantly, the reflectivity distribution across the surface is found to be independent of membrane size, thickness and solar distance, enabling engineering of the reflectivity distribution directly during the manufacture of the membrane.

  2. Two-dimensional distributed feedback lasers based on static and dynamic Bragg structures

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, V R; Ginzburg, N S

    2011-09-30

    In order to increase the output power of DFB lasers, we consider the possibility of using two-dimensional distributed feedback. Within the framework of this scheme, the feedback circuit includes four partial wave fluxes propagating in mutually orthogonal directions, which makes it possible to provide coherent radiation from a spatially extended planar active medium characterised by large values of the Fresnel parameter. By analogy with the onedimensional distributed feedback, the wave coupling can be ensured by using both the structures with a periodically varying effective refractive index (static two-dimensional Bragg structures) and the gain modulation (photo-induced two-dimensional Bragg structures). Within the semiclassical approximation, the initial conditions and nonlinear dynamics of lasers with the above-described two-dimensional Bragg structures are analysed. Self-similarity conditions are found, allowing one to scale the laser parameters with increasing active region size, which is accompanied by an increase in the integrated output power.

  3. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G.; Kuz'michev, V. V.; Mamaev, Yu. A.; Vasiliev, D. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J. E.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V. S.; Ustinov, V. M.; Vasiliev, A. P.; Zhukov, A. E.; Roberts, J. S.

    2008-02-06

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  4. Performance enhancement of thin film silicon solar cells based on distributed Bragg reflector and diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R. S.; Saravanan, S.; Kalainathan, S.

    2014-12-15

    The influence of various designing parameters were investigated and explored for high performance solar cells. Single layer grating based solar cell of 50 μm thickness gives maximum efficiency up to 24 % whereas same efficiency is achieved with the use of three bilayers grating based solar cell of 30 μm thickness. Remarkably, bilayer grating based solar cell design not only gives broadband absorption but also enhancement in efficiency with reduced cell thickness requirement. This absorption enhancement is attributed to the high reflection and diffraction from DBR and grating respectively. The obtained short-circuit current were 29.6, 32.9, 34.6 and 36.05 mA/cm{sup 2} of 5, 10, 20 and 30 μm cell thicknesses respectively. These presented designing efforts would be helpful to design and realize new generation of solar cells.

  5. Highly Effective Polarized Electron Sources Based on Strained Semiconductor Superlattice with Distributed Bragg Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L.G.; Aulenbacher, K.; Clendenin, J.E.; Kuz'michev, V.V.; Mamaev, Yu.A.; Maruyama, T.; Mikhrin, V.S.; Roberts, J.S.; Utstinov, V.M.; Vasiliev, D.A.; Vasiliev, A.P.; Yashin, Yu.P.; Zhukov, A.E.; /St. Petersburg Polytechnic Inst. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /SLAC /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst. /Sheffield U.

    2007-11-28

    Resonance enhancement of the quantum efficiency of new polarized electron photocathodes based on a short-period strained superlattice structures is reported. The superlattice is a part of an integrated Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We demonstrate that the Fabry-Perot resonator enhances the quantum efficiency by the order of magnitude in the wavelength region of the main polarization maximum. The high structural quality implied by these results points to the very promising application of these photocathodes for spin-polarized electron sources.

  6. Design of LED-based reflector-array module for specific illuminance distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Enguo; Yu, Feihong

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents an efficient and practical design method for a LED based reflector-array lighting module. Improving on previous designs, this method could offer higher design freedom to achieve specific illuminance distribution for actual lighting application and deal with the LED light intensity distribution while shortening the design time. The detailed design description of the lighting system is thoroughly investigated. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, an ultra-compact reflector-array module, which produces a rectangular illumination area with a large aspect ratio, is specially designed to meet the high-demanding requirements of industrial lighting application. Design results show that most LED emitting energy could be collected into the required lighting region while higher-brightness and better-uniformity are simultaneously available within the focus region. It is expected that this method will have great potential for other lighting applications.

  7. On-Chip High-Resolution Beam Scanner Based on Bragg Reflector Slow-Light Waveguide Amplifier and Tunable Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahama, Masanori; Gu, Xiaodong; Shimada, Toshikazu; Koyama, Fumio

    2012-04-01

    We propose a monolithic beam scanner consisting of a Bragg reflector slow-light waveguide amplifier and a tunable micro-electro-mechanical vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Continuous beam steering of over 30° and a narrow divergence angle of below 0.1° are predicted, which gives us a number of resolution points over 300. In addition, the modeling on saturation characteristics of a slow light amplifier shows a possibility of the maximum output power of over 10 mW.

  8. Strain distribution and sensitivity in fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadpay, C.; Sivakumar, N. R.; Mrad, N.

    2008-06-01

    Optical Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) sensors have seen significant development in recent years. Such sensor technology developed initially for the civil infrastructure is currently attracting the aerospace industry due to the potential versatility of this technology and its measurement capability. The structural health monitoring and the diagnostics and prognostics health management communities are excited about such development and ready to embrace such capability. Sensors reliability and accuracy, however, continue to be two parameters critical to the eventual implementation of the technology in high value targets. Such parameters can be improved by different manufacturing techniques as well as optimum grating's coating selection. This paper presents an evaluation of the mechanical behavior of the FBG strain sensors. A simulated analysis, using finite element modeling, revealed the impact of coating material selection, coating thickness selection, and bonding effect on the strain transfer loss. Results illustrate that metallic fiber coatings are more suitable for improved strain transfer than their polymeric counterparts and acrylic coatings are least effective with adhesive layer as small as possible.

  9. Hybrid Raman/fiber Bragg grating sensor for distributed temperature and discrete dynamic strain measurements.

    PubMed

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Taki, Mohammad; Signorini, Alessandro; Zaidi, Farhan; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Faralli, Stefano; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2012-11-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a hybrid fiber optic sensing technique that effectively combines Raman optical time domain reflectometry and in-line time-division-multiplexing for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) dynamic interrogation. The highly integrated proposed scheme employs broadband apodized low reflectivity FBGs with a single narrowband optical source and a shared receiver block, allowing for simultaneous measurements of distributed static temperature and discrete dynamic strain, over the same sensing fiber. PMID:23114320

  10. Dynamic measurement of inside strain distributions in adhesively bonded joints by embedded fiber Bragg grating sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Hideaki; Ning, Xiaoguang; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-05-01

    Long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the length of about 100 mm was embedded onto the surface of a carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) substrate and two CFRP adherends were joined by adhesive to form an adhesive bonded single-lap joint. The joint was subjected to 0.5 Hz cyclic tensile load and longitudinal strain distributions along FBG were measured at 5 Hz by the fiber-optic distributed sensing system based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR). We could successfully monitor the strain distributions accurately with high spatial resolution of around 1 mm.

  11. Type IIa Bragg grating based ultra-short DBR fiber laser with high temperature resistance.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yang; Feng, Fu-Rong; Liang, Yi-Zhi; Jin, Long; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2015-12-15

    We report on the fabrication of a thermally resistant ultra-short distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser based on the photo inscription of two wavelength-matched type IIa gratings in a thin-core Er-doped fiber. With continuous UV exposure, each Bragg reflector initially grows as a type I grating, followed by decay in strength, and then re-grows as a type IIa grating with enhanced thermal resistance. The DBR laser, with an entire length of 13 mm, can stably operate at 600°C with single longitude mode, which provides potential applications in high temperature environments. PMID:26670491

  12. Thermally triggered fiber lasers based on secondary-type-In Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fu-Rong; Ran, Yang; Liang, Yi-Zhi; Gao, Shuai; Feng, Yuan-Hua; Jin, Long; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2016-06-01

    The secondary-type-In grating formed in a small-core photosensitivity active fiber is discovered and investigated. Due to the different grating types, the transmission dip of a secondary grating structure chases and integrates with the type-In grating structure as the temperature increases, which strengthens the reflectivity of the grating. By use of these secondary-type-In gratings as Bragg reflectors, a thermally activated distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser is proposed, which can be potentially used in high-temperature alarms and sensors. PMID:27244391

  13. Bragg mirror inscription on LiNbO3 waveguides by index microstructuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferriere, Richard; Benkelfat, Badr-Eddine; Dudley, John M.; Ghoumid, Kamal

    2006-05-01

    Numerous applications in integrated optics, especially those related to multiwavelength telecommunications, require dichroic reflectors for use as narrowband or broadband wavelength-selective filters. Bragg mirrors are excellent candidates for this purpose, and we describe a method of fabricating Bragg grating reflectors in Ti-indiffused Lithium Niobate single-mode waveguides based on holographic masking in association with proton exchange. The holographic setup is employed to record a photolithographic mask directly on the substrate, enabling the inscription of waveguides with both periodic and aperiodic distributed parameters.

  14. High-power and narrow-linewidth tunable distributed-reflector laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshimitsu; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Tanizawa, Ken; Uesaka, Katsumi

    2016-02-01

    Deployment of digital coherent transmission technologies to metro networks drives the use of higher-order modulation formats such as PDM-16QAM and downsizing of optical transceivers. A narrow-linewidth (<300 kHz) tunable laser with high output power (>+17 dBm) is very attractive for such purposes, not only because it can compensate for the modulation loss increase caused by a high-peak-to-average ratio of the electrical driving signal of higher-order modulation formats, but also because it can be shared between transmitter and receiver saving the foot-print and power dissipation. This paper reviews the Tunable Distributed Amplification -- Chirped Sampled Grating -- Distributed Reflector (TDA-CSG-DR) laser being developed for metro application.

  15. High-Q X-band distributed Bragg resonator utilizing an aperiodic alumina plate arrangement.

    PubMed

    Bale, Simon; Everard, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a high-Q X-band distributed Bragg resonator that uses an aperiodic arrangement of non-lambda/4 low loss alumina plates mounted in a cylindrical waveguide. An ABCD parameter waveguide model was developed to simulate and optimize the cavity. The dielectric plates and air waveguide dimensions were optimized to achieve maximum quality factor by redistributing the energy loss within the cavity. An unloaded quality factor (Q(0)) of 196,000 was demonstrated at 9.93 GHz. PMID:20040428

  16. Superradiant amplification of terahertz radiation by plasmons in inverted graphene with a planar distributed Bragg resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Polischuk, O. V. Popov, V. V.; Otsuji, T.

    2015-11-15

    It is shown theoretically that stimulated generation of terahertz radiation by plasmons in graphene with a planar distributed Bragg resonator is possible at two different frequencies for each plasmon mode. This behavior may be attributed to the superradiance of the collective plasmon mode, which is associated with superlinear increase in the radiative damping of the plasmons with increase in pumping power. As a result, the curves of the radiative damping and the plasmon gain as a function of the pumping power intersect at two points corresponding to different generation conditions.

  17. Quasi-distributed fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors for stator bars monitoring of large electric generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Uilian J.; da Silva, Erlon V.; Biffe Di Renzo, André; Martelli, Cicero; Cardozo da Silva, Jean Carlos

    2016-05-01

    This work presents the application of a sensor based on quasi-distributed Fiber Bragg Gratings to monitor stator bars temperature of large electric generators. The applied FBG packaging method follows industrial standard procedures, and resulted in a robust and reliable sensing method, facilitating the future installation in the power plant. Experimental results are acquired in laboratory using the expected range of temperature values in the real machine. The measurement errors in the recorded results are within the calculated uncertainties and the time constant is shorter than what is obtained with conventional RTD for the same application.

  18. GaN-based high-voltage light-emitting diodes with backside reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huamao, Huang; Hong, Wang; Xiaosheng, Huang; Jinyong, Hu

    2014-07-01

    High-voltage light-emitting diodes (HV-LED) withbackside reflector, including Ti3O5/SiO2 distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) or hybrid reflector combining DBR and Al or Ag metal layer, are investigated using Monte Carlo ray tracing method. The hybrid reflector leads to more enhancement of light-extraction efficiency (LEE). Moreover, the LEE can also be improved by redesigning the thicknesses of DBR. HV-LED with four redesigned DBR pairs (4-MDBR), and those with a hybrid reflector combining 4-MDBR and Al metal layer (4-MDBR-Al), are fabricated. Compared to 4-MDBR, the enhancement of light-output power induced by 4-MDBR-Al is 4.6%, which is consistent with the simulated value of 4.9%.

  19. Fiber Bragg Grating Array as a Quasi Distributed Temperature Sensor for Furnace Boiler Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. Saidi; Prasad, R. L. N. Sai; Sengupta, D.; Shankar, M. Sai; Srimannarayana, K.; Kishore, P.; Rao, P. Vengal

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the experimental work on distributed temperature sensing making use of Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array sensor for possible applications in the monitoring of temperature profile in high temperature boilers. A special sensor has been designed for this purpose which consists of four FBGs (of wavelengths λB1 = 1547.28 nm, λB2 = 1555.72 nm, λB3 = 1550.84 nm, λB4 = 1545.92 nm) written in hydrogen loaded fiber in line with a spacing of 15 cm between them. All the FBGs are encapsulated inside a stainless steel tube for avoiding micro cracks using rigid probe technique. The spatial distribution of temperature profile inside a prototype boiler has been measured experimentally both in horizontal and vertical directions employing the above sensor and the results are presented.

  20. Thermal Characterization of a Simulated Fission Engine via Distributed Fiber Bragg Gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Roger G.; Fielder, Robert S.; Seeley, Ryan J.; Kozikowski, Carrie L.; Raum, Matthew T.

    2005-02-06

    We report the use of distributed fiber Bragg gratings to monitor thermal conditions within a simulated nuclear reactor core located at the Early Flight Fission Test Facility of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Distributed fiber-optic temperature measurements promise to add significant capability and advance the state-of-the-art in high-temperature sensing. For the work reported herein, seven probes were constructed with ten sensors each for a total of 70 sensor locations throughout the core. These discrete temperature sensors were monitored over a nine hour period while the test article was heated to over 700 deg. C and cooled to ambient through two operational cycles. The sensor density available permits a significantly elevated understanding of thermal effects within the simulated reactor. Fiber-optic sensor performance is shown to compare very favorably with co-located thermocouples where such co-location was feasible.

  1. Distributed OTDR-interferometric sensing network with identical ultra-weak fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Shang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Yu, Hai-Hu; Jiang, De-Sheng; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a distributed sensing network with 500 identical ultra-weak fiber Bragg gratings (uwFBGs) in an equal separation of 2m using balanced Michelson interferometer of the phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (φ-OTDR) for acoustic measurement. Phase, amplitude, frequency response and location information can be directly obtained at the same time by using the passive 3 × 3 coupler demodulation. Lab experiments on detecting sound waves in water tank are carried out. The results show that this system can well demodulate distributed acoustic signal with the pressure detection limit of 0.122Pa and achieve an acoustic phase sensitivity of around -158dB (re rad/μPa) with a relatively flat frequency response between 450Hz to 600Hz. PMID:26561173

  2. Distribution of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts across the Bragg Curve of Light and Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Lacy, S.; Gridley, D. S.; Rusek, A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    The space environment consists of energetic particles of varying mass and energy, and understanding the :biological Bragg curve" is essential in optimizing shielding effectiveness against space radiation induced biological impacts. The "biological Bragg curve" is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. Previously, we studied the induction of micronuclei (MN) across the Bragg curve of energetic Fe and Si ions, and observed no increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells, which indicates inhibition of cell progression, was found higher at the Bragg peak location in comparison to the plateau region of the Bragg curve. Here, we report the induction of MN in normal human fibroblast cells across the Bragg curve of incident protons generated at Loma Linda University. Similar to Si and Fe ions, the ratio of mono- to bi-nucleated cells showed a clear spike as the protons reached the Bragg peak. Unlike the two heavy ions, however, the MN yield also increased at the Bragg peak location. These results confirm the hypothesis that severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak of heavy, but not light ions are more likely to go through reproductive death and not be evaluated for micronuclei.

  3. Sensitivity Distribution Properties of a Phase-Shifted Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor to Ultrasonic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji; Saito, Kazuya; Yu, Fengming

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the sensitivity distribution properties of a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) to ultrasonic waves were investigated employing the surface attachment method. A careful consideration was taken and examined by experimental results to explain that the distances and angles between the sensor and ultrasonic source influence not only the amplitudes, but also the initial phases, waveforms, and spectra of detected signals. Furthermore, factors, including the attachment method and the material's geometric dimensions, were also discussed. Although these results were obtained based on PS-FBG, they are also applicable to a normal FBG sensor or even an optical fiber sensor, due to the identical physical changes induced by ultrasonic waves in all three. Thus, these results are useful for applications of optical fiber sensors in non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring. PMID:24412903

  4. Direct tabu search algorithm for the fiber Bragg grating distributed strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, F.; Seddiki, O.

    2010-09-01

    A direct tabu search (DTS) algorithm used for determining the strain profile along a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) from its reflection spectrum has been demonstrated. By combining the transfer matrix method (TMM) for calculating the reflection spectrum of an FBG and the DTS method, we obtain a new method for the distributed sensing. Direct search based strategies are used to direct a tabu search. These strategies are based on a new pattern search procedure called an adaptive pattern search (APS). In addition, the well-known Nelder-Mead (NME) algorithm is used as a local search method in the final stage of the optimization process. The numerical simulations show good agreement between the original and the reconstructed strain profiles.

  5. Sensitivity distribution properties of a phase-shifted fiber bragg grating sensor to ultrasonic waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji; Saito, Kazuya; Yu, Fengming

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the sensitivity distribution properties of a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) to ultrasonic waves were investigated employing the surface attachment method. A careful consideration was taken and examined by experimental results to explain that the distances and angles between the sensor and ultrasonic source influence not only the amplitudes, but also the initial phases, waveforms, and spectra of detected signals. Furthermore, factors, including the attachment method and the material's geometric dimensions, were also discussed. Although these results were obtained based on PS-FBG, they are also applicable to a normal FBG sensor or even an optical fiber sensor, due to the identical physical changes induced by ultrasonic waves in all three. Thus, these results are useful for applications of optical fiber sensors in non-destructive testing and structural health monitoring. PMID:24412903

  6. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in ultra-long distributed feedback Bragg gratings in standard optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Sébastien; Lambin-Iezzi, Victor; Wahbeh, Mamoun; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-04-15

    Distributed feedback (DFB) fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) are widely used as narrow-band filters and single-mode cavities for lasers. Recently, a nonlinear generation has been shown in 10-20 cm DFB gratings in a highly nonlinear fiber. First, we show in this Letter a novel fabrication technique of ultra-long DFBs in a standard fiber (SMF-28). Second, we demonstrate nonlinear generation in such gratings. A particular inscription technique was used to fabricate all-in-phase ultra-long FBG and to implement reproducible phase shift to form a DFB mode. We demonstrate stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) emission from this DFB mode and characterize the resulting laser. It seems that such a SBS based DFB laser stabilizes a pump's jittering and reduces its linewidth. PMID:27082348

  7. Three-dimensional distribution of S wave reflectors in the northern Kinki district, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Sho; Iio, Yoshihisa; Katao, Hiroshi; Miura, Tsutomu; Yoneda, Itaru; Sawada, Masayo

    2016-06-01

    Distinct reflected waves (S × S) are observed in the northern Kinki district, southwestern Japan. We conducted a high-resolution reflection analysis by using data from 128 seismic stations with an average spacing of about 5 km. We used a stacking method to obtain three-dimensional distributions of relative reflection strengths of S waves and found a thin planar zone of high reflection strengths at depths of 25-30 km, which we call a S wave reflector. We also found that the zone of high reflection strengths is dipping to the north and that low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) occurred near the edge of the zone at depths around the Moho discontinuity. It is inferred from these results that fluid is concentrated in this zone of high reflection strengths. It is likely that the zone of high reflection strengths is a path of fluid upwelling from the mantle, together with the hypocentral region of LFEs, that is located near the lower edge of the zone. The northern Kinki district is thought to be part of the Niigata-Kobe Tectonic Zone (NKTZ) high strain rates region. The high reflection strengths zone may be associated with high strain rates in the NKTZ.

  8. The effect of tracking performance due to temperature distribution of SiC reflectors in periscopic laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yiwei; Fu, Sen; Tao, Kunyu; Jiang, Yijun

    2015-10-01

    Effect of temperature gradient and uniform temperature on tracking performance of reflectors in periscopic laser communication terminals was studied. Zernike polynomials on elliptical area were used to fit wave-front aberration of elliptical reflectors in periscopic laser communication terminals due to temperature distribution. RMS value of the thermal deformation, tracking error and intensity on detectors degradation at receiving terminals caused by thermal deformation were studied in inter-satellite laser communication system. From the result we can know that effect of temperature gradient is the move of peak intensity and a little degradation. The tracking error reaches 2.9μrad when temperature gradient is 14°C/m. The uniform temperature will cause variation of intensity distribution on focus plane of detectors. When the difference between uniform temperature and reference temperature is small, the astigmatism causing by thermal distortion is very important. As the difference becomes bigger, the high-order modes of Zernike polynomials become very important. The distribution of intensity becomes irregular and the area is very big. This will reduce the tracking performance of detectors. This work will contribute to the thermal control of elliptical reflectors in periscopic laser communication terminals on satellites in orbit.

  9. Quasi-distributed fiber bragg grating array sensor for furnace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P. Saidi; Sai Prasad, R. L. N.; Sen Gupta, D.; Sai Shankar, M.; Srimannarayana, K.; Ravinder Reddy, P.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental work on distributed temperature sensing making use of the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) array sensor for possible applications in the monitoring of the temperature profile in high temperature boilers is presented. A special sensor has been designed for this purpose which consists of four FBGs (of wavelengths λ B1 =1545.8 nm, λ B2 =1547 nm, λ B3 =1550.8 nm, λ B4 =1555.5 nm at 30 °C) written in the hydrogen-loaded fiber in line. All the FBGs are encapsulated inside a stainless steel tube using the rigid probe technique for avoiding micro cracks. The spatial distribution of the temperature profile inside a prototype boiler was measured experimentally both in horizontal and vertical directions employing the above sensor, and the results are presented. Further, the finite element simulation has been carried out by using ANSYS R11 software to predict temperature contours in the boiler, and the experimental and predicted results were found to be closely matching.

  10. Pasted type distributed two-dimensional fiber Bragg grating vibration sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Zhou, Zude; Wei, Qin

    2015-07-01

    A pasted type distributed two-dimensional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) vibration sensor has been proposed and studied in this paper. The optical fiber is directly considered as an elastomer. The two-dimensional vibration can be separated by subtraction/addition of two FBGs' center wavelength shift. The principle of the sensor as well as numerical simulation and experimental analyses are presented. Experimental results show that the resonant frequencies of the sensor x/y main vibration direction are separately 1300/20.51 Hz, which are consistent with the numerical simulation analysis result. The flat frequency range resides in 10-750 Hz and 3-12 Hz, respectively; dynamic range is 28.63 dB; in the x main vibration direction, the sensor's sensitivity is 32.84 pm/g, with linearity 3.91% in the range of 10-60 m/s(2), while in the y main vibration direction, the sensor's sensitivity is 451.3 pm/g, with linearity 1.92% in the range of 1.5-8 m/s(2). The cross sensitivity is 3.91%. Benefitting from the two dimensional sensing properties, it can be used in distributed two-dimensional vibration measurement. PMID:26233410

  11. Photonic crystal intermediate reflectors for micromorph solar cells: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P G; Chutinan, A; Leong, K; Kherani, N P; Ozin, G A; Zukotynski, S

    2010-03-01

    Wave-optics analysis is performed to investigate the benefits of utilizing Bragg-reflectors and inverted ZnO opals as intermediate reflectors in micromorph cells. The Bragg-reflector and the inverted ZnO opal intermediate reflector increase the current generated in a 100 nm thick upper a-Si:H cell within a micromorph cell by as much as 20% and 13%, respectively. The current generated in the bottom muc-Si:H cell within the micromorph is also greater when the Bragg-reflector is used as the intermediate reflector. The Bragg-reflector outperforms the ZnO inverted opal because it has a larger stop-gap, is optically thin, and due to greater absorption losses that occur in the opaline intermediate reflectors. PMID:20389460

  12. Distributed Feedback in and Distributed Bragg Reflection from Periodic Chiral Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Kevin Michael

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we examine the combined effects of electromagnetic chirality and periodicity on wave interactions in active and passive media. Isotropic chiral media have the unique property of possessing two intrinsic indices of refraction without the additional complication of anisotropy. The two refractive indices arise from different propagation velocities for right-circularly-polarized (RCP) and left -circularly-polarized (LCP) waves (i.e., circular birefringence), and their existence suggests that chiral media may be used in conjunction with the coherent feedback characteristics of periodic structures to create structures that favor either RCP or LCP solutions. In this study, we develop the theory that describes the wave interactions in such periodic chiral structures, and we examine several representative cases, including active devices, to identify specific characteristics. Bandgap characteristics are developed here for finite-length slabs of periodic chiral media using coupled -mode theory. The theory shows that stratified, periodic, isotropic media fall into one of three categories: subchiral, chiral, or superchiral. The superchiral periodic medium possesses three stop bands for the fundamental Bragg condition where the three stop bands are associated with LCP rightarrow RCP coupling, LCP to LCP coupling, and RCP to RCP coupling. We examine the reflectivity for superchiral periodic media to show the degree of polarization mode isolation for both passive and active structures. We also study the relationships among the chiral constitutive parameters (i.e., permittivity, permeability, and chirality admittance) based on a canonical chiral media model, and we address how the presence of chirality may enhance the reflectivity from periodic slabs. In addition to periodic media, we investigate the role of chirality for mode coupling in symmetric planar waveguides with periodic boundaries. Such structures are of current interest as mode converters, filters, and

  13. A high-precision, distributed geodetic strainmeter based on dual coaxial cable Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, J.; Wei, T.; Wei, M.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of surface deformation are essential for understanding a wide range of geophysical problems, including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and glaciers. Current geodetic technologies, such as GPS, InSAR, borehole and laser strainmeters, are costly and limited in their temporal or spatial resolution. Here we present a new type of strainmeter based on coaxial cable Bragg grating (CCBG) sensing technology that provides high-precision, distributed strain measurements at a moderate cost. The coaxial-cable-based strainmeter is designed to cover a long distance (~ km) under harsh environmental conditions such as extreme temperatures. To minimize the environmental noises, two CCBGs are introduced into the geodetic strainmeter: one is used to measure the strain applied on it, and the other acts as a reference only to detect the environmental noises. The environmental noises are removed using the inputs from the strained CCBG and the reference CCBG in a frequency mixer. The test results show that the geodetic strainmeter with dual CCBGs has micron-strain accuracy in the lab.

  14. A practical distributed Fiber Bragg grating temperature sensor system based on STM32 processor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun; Cheng, Yongxin; Wang, Guangyu; Zhang, Yanjun

    2015-10-01

    A practical distributed FBG temperature sensor system based on STM32 processor platform is presented in this paper and this FBG sensing system can realize single-channel and multi-point temperature measurement. Because the measured area has been divided into several parts, every part has several fiber Bragg gratings with the same wavelength. There is no need to get the temperature of each point, just get the temperature field information of the parts. In other words, if the temperature of points is varied, the largest varied temperature of the points in one part can be obtained as the temperature of this part. So in the system only use one light source, but more FBGs can be implanted in a fiber, which can effectively reduce costs and complexity. In signal processing system, the FFP-TF control circuit cans precise control without distortion of FFP-TF; high precision photoelectric detection circuit can achieve nW level optical power detection; wavelength demodulation algorithm can achieve system synchronization. The PC monitoring software based on VC++ is used to display the monitoring interface. The experiment results indicated that temperature precision is 1°C and the linearity is over 99.6%. All experiments can be reproducible. It has been seen in experiments that the system has the characteristics of the high measured stable, good reliability, low cost and can meet the needs of the engineering measurements.

  15. Theoretical methods for the calculation of Bragg curves and 3D distributions of proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, W.; Matsinos, E.

    2010-12-01

    The well-known Bragg-Kleeman rule RCSDA = A ṡ E has become a pioneer work in radiation physics of charged particles and is still a useful tool to estimate the range RCSDA of approximately monoenergetic protons with initial energy E0 in a homogeneous medium. The rule is based on the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA). It results from a generalized (nonrelativistic) Langevin equation and a modification of the phenomenological friction term. The complete integration of this equation provides information about the residual energy E(z) and dE(z)/dz at each position z(0 ≦ z ≦ RCSDA). A relativistic extension of the generalized Langevin equation yields the formula RCSDA = A ṡ (E0 + E/2M ṡ c2)p. The initial energy of therapeutic protons satisfies E0 ≪ 2M ṡ c2(M ṡ c2 = 938.276 MeV), which enables us to consider the relativistic contributions as correction terms. Besides this phenomenological starting-point, a complete integration of the Bethe-Bloch equation (BBE) is developed, which also provides the determination of RCSDA, E(z) and dE(z)/dz and uses only those parameters given by the BBE itself (i.e., without further empirical parameters like modification of friction). The results obtained in the context of the aforementioned methods are compared with Monte-Carlo calculations (GEANT4); this Monte-Carlo code is also used with regard to further topics such as lateral scatter, nuclear interactions, and buildup effects. In the framework of the CSDA, the energy transfer from protons to environmental atomic electrons does not account for local fluctuations. Based on statistical quantum mechanics, an analysis of the Gaussian convolution and the Landau-Vavilov distribution function is carried out to describe these fluctuations. The Landau tail is derived as Hermite polynomial corrections of a Gaussian convolution. It is experimentally confirmed that proton Bragg curves with E0 ≧ 120 MeV show a buildup, which increases with the proton energy. This

  16. Focusing, wavelength tuning, beam steering and beam shaping of circular grating surface emitting distributed Bragg reflector lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Robert Scott

    Over the past decade, circular grating surface emitting DBR lasers (CGSELs) have progressed from theory to reality. These devices possess several properties that make them attractive options for such applications as optical interconnects and laser arrays. These advantages include low divergence angles, circular beam profiles, and high power output. In this dissertation, the addition of new functionality to these lasers including wavelength tunability, focusing, beam steering and beam shaping is investigated. The theory governing device operation is presented. Pertinent discussions include the coupled mode equations, grating coupling, focusing and changes to the effective index of refraction resulting from current injection through a transparent electrode on the grating. The development and refinement of the device fabrication process is detailed. Key milestones in the grating writing process included achieving first order gratings (Λ = 0.15 μm), creating chirped period gratings for focusing and optimizing the linewidth and uniformity of the grating for high power devices. Of equal importance in obtaining high efficiency devices was the reactive ion etch process. Two different etch recipes were developed: one for mesa-definition and a shallower grating-defining etch. Significant evaluation of the electrical and optical properties of the transparent electrode, Indium Tin Oxide, was performed. Incorporating ITO into the fabrication process required optimization of deposition, patterning, etching and annealing. Device performance, efficiency and functionality improved with each generation. Consequentially, over 225 mW of output power for a injection current of 600 mA, or a slope efficiency of 0.43 mW/mA, was produced by the final generation of high power CGSELs. Focusing was demonstrated by the creation of individual devices with different focal lengths. Coarse mode selection was obtained by removing radial segments of the circular grating thereby eliminating both feedback coupling and surface outcoupling. Dynamic functionality such as beam steering and wavelength tuning was also realized for devices with ITO. Over 1° of beam steering was achieved for an ITO injection current of 35 mA. Similarly, over 1 nm of tuning, or 0.5 nm of continuous tuning, was accomplished. In conclusion, possibilities for improvements in device performance and future work are suggested.

  17. Sensitivities in the production of spread-out Bragg peak dose distributions by passive scattering with beam current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.-M.; Brett, Robert; Engelsman, Martijn; Slopsema, Roelf; Kooy, Hanne; Flanz, Jay

    2007-10-15

    A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) is used in proton beam therapy to create a longitudinal conformality of the required dose to the target. In order to create this effect in a passive beam scattering system, a variety of components must operate in conjunction to produce the desired beam parameters. We will describe how the SOBP is generated and will explore the tolerances of the various components and their subsequent effect on the dose distribution. A specific aspect of this investigation includes a case study involving the use of a beam current modulated system. In such a system, the intensity of the beam current can be varied in synchronization with the revolution of the range-modulator wheel. As a result, the weights of the pulled-back Bragg peaks can be individually controlled to produce uniform dose plateaus for a large range of treatment depths using only a small number of modulator wheels.

  18. Quasi-interferometric scheme improved by fiber Bragg grating for detection of outer mechanical stress influence on distributed sensor being silica multimode optical fiber operating in a few-mode regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafarova, Anastasia M.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Kuznetzov, Artem A.; Minaeva, Alina Y.; Sevruk, Nikita L.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Vasilets, Alexander A.; Bourdine, Anton V.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Burdin, Vladimir A.

    2016-03-01

    This work presents results of experimental approbation of modified fiber optic stress sensor based on a few-mode effects occurring during laser-excited optical signal propagation over silica multimode optical fiber (MMF). Modification is concerned with adding of quasi-interferometric scheme realized by two multimode Y-couplers with equalized arm lengths improved by fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and special offset launching conditions providing laser-based excitation of higher-order modes. We tested FBGs written on graded-index MMFs 50/125 with Bragg wavelength 1550 nm connected to different parts of proposed scheme. Researches are focused on comparing analysis of both spectral and pulse responses under changing of selected mode mixing and power diffusion processes due to stress local and distributed action to sensor fiber depending on scheme configuration. Here we considered FBGs not only as particular wavelength reflector during spectral response measurement but also as local periodic microstructure defect strongly effecting few-mode signal components mixing process that provides pulse response variation. Some results of spectral and pulse response measurements produced for different scheme configuration and their comparison analysis are represented.

  19. Structural Health Monitoring of Composite Materials Using Distributed Fiber Bragg Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kual, Raj; Taylor, Scott; Jackson, Kurt V.; Myers, George; Wang, Y.; Sharma, A.; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health monitoring of polymer matrix composite materials using fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is accomplished using a tunable IR (infrared) laser via transmission mode. Results are presented from experiments of composite structures with FBG's embedded at various orientations, and surface measurements of various cryogenic composite vessels.

  20. Distributed strain and temperature mapping in the Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE-100) thermal simulator using fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for the SAFE-100 non-nuclear core simulator. The purpose of the combined temperature and strain mapping was to obtain a correlation between power distribution and core shape within the simulator. In a nuclear reactor, core dimension affects local reactivity and therefore power distribution. 20 FBG temperature sensors were installed in the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the NASA Marshal Space Flight Center in an interstitial location approximately 2.3mm in diameter. The simulator was heated during two separate experiments using graphite resistive heating elements. The first experiment reached a maximum temperature of approximately 800°C, while the second experiment reached 1150°C. A detailed profile of temperature vs. time and location within the simulator was generated. During a second test, highly distributed fiber Bragg grating strain sensors were arrayed about the circumference and along the length of the heated core region. The maximum temperature during this test was approximately 300°C. A radial and longitudinal strain distribution was obtained that correlated well with known power distribution. Work continues to increase the strain sensor operating temperature and sensor multiplexing to allow high-resolution mapping.

  1. Distribution of petroleum hydrocarbons and toluene biodegradation, Knox Street fire pits, Fort Bragg, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, S.L.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Knox Street fire pits, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to monitor the distribution of toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (TEX) in soil vapor, ground water, and ground-water/vapor to evaluate if total concentrations of TEX at the site are decreasing with time, and to quantify biodegradation rates of toluene in the unsaturated and saturated zones. Soil-vapor and ground-water samples were collected around the fire pits and ground-water/vapor samples were collected along the ground-water discharge zone, Beaver Creek, on a monthly basis from June 1994 through June 1995. Concentrations of TEX compounds in these samples were determined with a field gas chro- matograph. Laboratory experiments were performed on aquifer sediment samples to measure rates of toluene biodegradation by in situ micro- organisms. Based on field gas chromatographic analytical results, contamination levels of TEX compounds in both soil vapor and ground water appear to decrease downgradient of the fire-pit source area. During the 1-year study period, the observed temporal and spatial trends in soil vapor TEX concentrations appear to reflect differences in the distribution of TEX among solid, aqueous, and gaseous phases within fuel-contaminated soils in the unsaturated zone. Soil temperature and soil moisture are two important factors which influence the distribution of TEX com- pounds among the different phases. Because of the short period of data collection, it was not possible to distinguish between seasonal fluc- tuations in soil vapor TEX concentrations and an overall net decrease in TEX concentrations at the study site. No seasonal trend was observed in total TEX concentrations for ground- water samples collected at the study site. Although the analytical results could not be used to determine if ground-water TEX concen- trations decreased during the study at a specific location, the data were used to examine rate constants of toluene biodegradation. Based on

  2. Structural health monitoring of composite-based UAVs using simultaneous fiber optic interrogation by static Rayleigh-based distributed sensing and dynamic fiber Bragg grating point sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, Moshe; Sovran, Ido; Bergman, Arik; Motil, Avi; Shapira, Osher; Ben-Simon, Uri; Kressel, Iddo

    2015-09-01

    Embedded fiber-optic strain sensing networks for airworthy assessment of operational Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are presented. Sensing is based on in-flight fiber Bragg grating technology, as well as on on-ground Rayleigh backscattering distributed strain sensing. While the in-flight instrumentation monitors loads, looking for excessive values, the Rayleigh-based technique is used for high spatial resolution strain distribution along the UAV wings, under prescribed loading. Consistency of measurements over time indicates structural integrity. Simultaneous strain measurements using both distributed Rayleigh and fiber Bragg gratings, on the same fiber, promises to combine high spatial resolution, though practically static measurements with dynamic, though discrete ones.

  3. Cavity-resonator-integrated guided-mode resonance band-stop reflector.

    PubMed

    Ura, Shogo; Nakata, Masahiro; Yanagida, Kenichi; Inoue, Junichi; Kintaka, Kenji

    2016-06-27

    A cavity-resonator-integrated guided-mode resonance filter (CRIGF) consists of a grating coupler inside a pair of distributed Bragg reflectors. A combination of a CRIGF with a high-reflection substrate can provide a new type of a band-stop reflector with a small aperture for a vertically incident wave from air. A narrow stopband was theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated. It was quantitatively shown that reflection spectra depended on optical-buffer-layer thickness. The reflector of 10-μm aperture was fabricated and characterized. The extinction ratio in reflectance was measured to be lower than -20 dB at a resonance wavelength. The bandwidth at -3 dB was 0.15 nm. PMID:27410663

  4. Application of fiber-optic bragg grating sensors in monitoring environmental loads of overhead power transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Bjerkan, L

    2000-02-01

    We demonstrate the capability of using fiber-optic sensors for measurements on environmental loads on a high-power, overhead transmission line. A trial system with three Bragg gratings, including a temperature reference, was installed on a 160-m span of a 60-kV line. An interrogation system with a tunable distributed Bragg reflector laser source was used. Several measurements of the induced loads on a conductor were recorded in various wind conditions. In particular, aeolian vibrations were frequently observed, and several measurements of this phenomenon were made. The results correlate well with simple theoretical predictions and visual observations. PMID:18337925

  5. Freeform reflectors for architectural lighting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruidong; Hong, Qi; Zhang, Hongxia; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-12-14

    We propose an improved method to design freeform reflectors for architectural lighting: one for accent lighting and another for large area wall washing. The designed freeform reflectors effectively distribute light fluxes over the target surfaces, and generate appropriate illumination patterns for comfortable visual environments, which provides greater flexibility for lighting designs, allows many challenging designs, and improves energy-efficiency simultaneously. PMID:26698974

  6. Design and analysis of annular antenna arrays with different reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, G; Joines, W T

    2004-09-01

    The design and performance of annular antenna arrays with reflectors is presented. Arrays with three shapes of reflectors are analysed and simulated. These include the corner reflector, the circular reflector and the elliptical reflector. Power-density distributions within the annular arrays with and without reflectors are obtained by using the FDTD method. Also, the image theory method is used to verify the FDTD results in one case. By comparing the power-density distribution pattern of all four of the array designs (three with different reflectors, one without reflector), it is readily seen in each case that the array with reflectors yields better power-efficiency than the array without reflectors and the elliptical reflector yields the best performance. Comparisons of each array are made using 4, 6 and 8 antennae in the annular array. By using the optimized results of the elliptical reflector, the requirement for the input-power level to each antenna is greatly reduced. PMID:15370818

  7. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessels using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The increasing use of advanced composite materials in the wide range of applications including Space Structures is a great impetus to the development of smart materials. These materials offer a wide range of possibilities within the space program. But before they can be reliably incorporated into space flight applications, additional understanding is required in the area of damage tolerance of these materials. Efforts to enhance our understanding of failure modes, mechanical properties, long and short term environmental effects, cyclic damage accumulation and residual strength are needed. Thus we have employed the use of fiber optical sensors which offers an excellent opportunity exploit these materials through monitoring and characterizing their mechanical properties and thus the integrity of structures made from such materials during their life cycle. Use of these optical innovations provides an insight into structures that have not been available in the past, as well as the technology available to provide real time health monitoring throughout its life cycle. The embedded fiber optical sensor shows a clearly detectable sensitivity to changes in the near strain and stress fields of the host structure promoted by mechanical or thermal loading or, in certain conditions, structural damage. The last ten years have seen a large increase in the use of FBG based monitoring systems in a broad range of applications. Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in composite structures. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around

  8. Superfluorescent fiber source achieving multisignal power equalization in distributed fiber Bragg grating sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying-Gang; Jia, Zhen-An; Qiao, Xue-Guang; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Shi-Chao

    2011-12-01

    In order to achieve multisignal power equalization in a quasidistributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system, an erbium-doped fiber (EDF) superfluorescent source with high flatness and broadband spectrum is presented using a three-stage double-pump configuration. The spectral protrusions in the vicinity of 1532 and 1570 nm are flattened, which is achieved by designing a gain flattening filter with a long-period grating. The result shows that the flatness of the output spectrum covering the C and L band, from 1526.52 to 1607.87 nm, is less than 0.76 dBm. The 3 dB bandwidth is 75.68 nm, and the output power of 13.11 mW is achieved in the C and L band. By using the fiber amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source in FBG sensing system for decreasing multisignals peak power variation, the standard deviation of multisignals peak power is decreased to 1.00 dBm. In a multiplexed FBG sensing system, the high flattening fiber ASE source is beneficial to long-distance transmission, amplification, recognition, and demodulation of FBG sensing signals.

  9. Bragg-cell receiver study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Lonnie A.

    1987-01-01

    Bragg-cell receivers are employed in specialized Electronic Warfare (EW) applications for the measurement of frequency. Bragg-cell receiver characteristics are fully characterized for simple RF emitter signals. This receiver is early in its development cycle when compared to the IFM receiver. Functional mathematical models are derived and presented in this report for the Bragg-cell receiver. Theoretical analysis is presented and digital computer signal processing results are presented for the Bragg-cell receiver. Probability density function analysis are performed for output frequency. Probability density function distributions are observed to depart from assumed distributions for wideband and complex RF signals. This analysis is significant for high resolution and fine grain EW Bragg-cell receiver systems.

  10. Ultra efficient silicon nitride grating coupler with bottom grating reflector.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinghui; Yu, Yu; Ye, Mengyuan; Liu, Lei; Deng, Shupeng; Zhang, Xinliang

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically propose a silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) grating coupler (GC) with both ultrahigh efficiency and simplified fabrication processes. Instead of using a bottom distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) or metal reflector, a bottom Si grating reflector (GR) with comparable reflectivity is utilized to improve the coupling efficiency. The fully etched Si GR is designed based on an industrially standard silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer with 220 nm top Si layer. By properly adjusting the trench width and period length of the Si GR, a high reflectivity over 90% is obtained. The Si(3)N(4) GC is optimized based on a common 400 nm Si(3)N(4) layer sitting on the Si GR with a SiO(2) separation layer. With an appropriate distance between the Si(3)N(4) GC and bottom Si GR, a low coupling loss of -1.47 dB is theoretically obtained using uniform GC structure. A further record ultralow loss of -0.88 dB is predicted by apodizing the Si(3)N(4) GC. The specific fabrication processes and tolerance are also investigated. Compared with DBR, the bottom Si GR can be easily fabricated by single step of patterning and etching, simplifying the fabrication processes. PMID:26480144

  11. Distributed sensing of carbon-epoxy composites and filament wound pressure vessels using fiber-bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Joseph; Kaul, Raj K.; Taylor, Scott L.; Myer, George; Jackson, Kurt V.; Sharma, Anup

    2002-11-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson"s ration in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  12. Distributed Sensing of Carbon-Epoxy Composites and Filament Wound Pressure Vessels Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myer, G.; Jackson, K.; Osei, A.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  13. Photosensitivity of Germanium-Doped Silica Fibers, Mask Fabrication of Fiber Bragg Gratings, and Their Application as a Strain Sensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prohaska, John Dennis

    This thesis addresses issues related to the formation and application of fiber Bragg gratings. A description of existing methods of grating formation is reviewed. Also, mechanisms for photo-induced refractive index changes in germanium doped silica fibers are examined. A new method of fiber Bragg grating formation is proposed and experimentally verified using diffraction masks. The near field diffraction theory of Fresnel images is described in relation to this new method. Bragg reflectors have been experimentally produced in germanium doped silica optical fibers through the use of a surface relief phase mask. By the addition of an optical system the period of the produced grating may be changed. The wavelength of a fiber Bragg grating has been experimentally tuned using wave front shaping optics. The application of fiber Bragg grating as a strain sensor is examined in the context of a civil engineering environment. The issues and advantages of fiber Bragg gratings as devices for distributed strain measurements in large scale concrete structures are experimentally evaluated.

  14. Code generator using distributed phase shifts applied on a chirped fibre Bragg grating in a semiconductor fibre ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D. Simard, Alexandre; LaRochelle, Sophie

    2009-06-01

    As data traffic increases on telecommunication networks, optical communication systems must adapt to deal with this increasing bursty traffic. Packet switched networks are considered a good solution to provide efficient bandwidth management. We recently proposed the use of spectra amplitude codes (SAC) to implement all-optical label processing for packet switching and routing. The implementation of this approach requires agile photonic components including filters and lasers. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable source able to generate the routing codes, which are composed of two wavelengths on a 25 GHz grid. Our solution is to use a cascade of two chirped fibre Bragg gratings (CFBG) in a semiconductor fibre ring laser. The wavelength selection process comes from distributed phase shifts applied on the CFBG that is used in transmission. Those phase shifts are obtained via local thermal perturbations created by resistive chrome lines deposited on a glass plate. The filter resonances are influenced by four parameters: the chrome line positions, the temperature profile along the fibre, the neighbouring heater state (ON/OFF) and the grating itself. Through numerical modeling, these parameters are optimized to design the appropriate chrome line pattern. With this device, we demonstrate successful generation of reconfigurable SAC codes.

  15. Light-output enhancement of GaN-based light-emitting diodes with three-dimensional backside reflectors patterned by microscale cone array.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huamao; Hu, Jinyong; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) backside reflector, compared with flat reflectors, can improve the probability of finding the escape cone for reflecting lights and thus enhance the light-extraction efficiency (LEE) for GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) chips. A triangle-lattice of microscale SiO2 cone array followed by a 16-pair Ti3O5/SiO2 distributed Bragg reflector (16-DBR) was proposed to be attached on the backside of sapphire substrate, and the light-output enhancement was demonstrated by numerical simulation and experiments. The LED chips with flat reflectors or 3D reflectors were simulated using Monte Carlo ray tracing method. It is shown that the LEE increases as the reflectivity of backside reflector increases, and the light-output can be significantly improved by 3D reflectors compared to flat counterparts. It can also be observed that the LEE decreases as the refractive index of the cone material increases. The 3D 16-DBR patterned by microscale SiO2 cone array benefits large enhancement of LEE. This microscale pattern was prepared by standard photolithography and wet-etching technique. Measurement results show that the 3D 16-DBR can provide 12.1% enhancement of wall-plug efficiency, which is consistent with the simulated value of 11.73% for the enhancement of LEE. PMID:25133262

  16. Light-Output Enhancement of GaN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes with Three-Dimensional Backside Reflectors Patterned by Microscale Cone Array

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinyong; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) backside reflector, compared with flat reflectors, can improve the probability of finding the escape cone for reflecting lights and thus enhance the light-extraction efficiency (LEE) for GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) chips. A triangle-lattice of microscale SiO2 cone array followed by a 16-pair Ti3O5/SiO2 distributed Bragg reflector (16-DBR) was proposed to be attached on the backside of sapphire substrate, and the light-output enhancement was demonstrated by numerical simulation and experiments. The LED chips with flat reflectors or 3D reflectors were simulated using Monte Carlo ray tracing method. It is shown that the LEE increases as the reflectivity of backside reflector increases, and the light-output can be significantly improved by 3D reflectors compared to flat counterparts. It can also be observed that the LEE decreases as the refractive index of the cone material increases. The 3D 16-DBR patterned by microscale SiO2 cone array benefits large enhancement of LEE. This microscale pattern was prepared by standard photolithography and wet-etching technique. Measurement results show that the 3D 16-DBR can provide 12.1% enhancement of wall-plug efficiency, which is consistent with the simulated value of 11.73% for the enhancement of LEE. PMID:25133262

  17. Radar polarimeter measures orientation of calibration corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Norikane, Lynne

    1987-01-01

    Radar polarimeter signals from a set of trihedral corner reflectors located in the Goldstone Dry Lake in California were analyzed, and three types of scattering behavior were observed: (1) Bragg-like slightly rough surface scattering that represents the background signal from the dry lake, (2) trihedral corner reflector scattering that returns the incident polarization, and (3) two-bounce corner reflector scattering resulting from a particular alignment of a trihedral reflector. A radar calibration approach using trihedral corner reflectors should be designed such that precise alignment of the reflectors is ensured, as three-bounce and two-bounce geometries lead to very different cross sections and hence very different inferred calibration factors.

  18. Experimental detailed power distribution in a fast spectrum thermionic reactor fuel element at the core/BeO reflector interface region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.; Lantz, E.

    1973-01-01

    A zero-power critical assembly was designed, constructed, and operated for the prupose of conducting a series of benchmark experiments dealing with the physics characteristics of a UN-fueled, Li-7-cooled, Mo-reflected, drum-controlled compact fast reactor for use with a space-power conversion system. The critical assembly was modified to simulate a fast spectrum advanced thermionics reactor by: (1) using BeO as a reflector in place of some of the existing molybdenum, (2) substituting Nb-1Zr tubing for some of the existing Ta tubing, and (3) inserting four full-scale mockups of thermionic type fuel elements near the core and BeO reflector boundary. These mockups were surrounded with a buffer zone having the equivalent thermionic core composition. In addition to measuring the critical mass of this thermionic configuration, a detailed power distribution in one of the thermionic element stages in the mixed spectrum region was measured. A power peak to average ratio of two was observed for this fuel stage at the midplane of the core and adjacent to the reflector. Also, the power on the outer surface adjacent to the BeO was slightly more than a factor of two larger than the power on the inside surface of a 5.08 cm (2.0 in.) high annular fuel segment with a 2.52 cm (0.993 in. ) o.d. and a 1.86 cm (0.731 in.) i.d.

  19. DNA damage intensity in fibroblasts in a 3-dimensional collagen matrix correlates with the Bragg curve energy distribution of a high LET particle

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Andres I.; Hight, Suzie K.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.; Rusek, Adam; Story, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The DNA double-strand break (DSB) damage response induced by high energy charged particles on lung fibroblast cells embedded in a 3-dimensional (3-D) collagen tissue equivalents was investigated using antibodies to the DNA damage response proteins gamma-histone 2AX (γ-H2AX) and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (p-DNA-PKcs). Materials and methods 3-D tissue equivalents were irradiated in positions across the linear distribution of the Bragg curve profiles of 307.7 MeV/nucleon, 556.9 MeV/nucleon, or 967.0 MeV/nucleon 56Fe ions at a dose of 0.30 Gy. Results Patterns of discrete DNA damage streaks across nuclei or saturated nuclear damage were observed, with saturated nuclear damage being more predominant as samples were positioned closer to the physical Bragg peak. Quantification of the DNA damage signal intensities at each distance for each of the examined energies revealed a biological Bragg curve profile with a pattern of DNA damage intensity similar to the physical Bragg curve for the particular energy. Deconvolution microscopy of nuclei with streaked or saturated nuclear damage pattern revealed more details of the damage, with evidence of double-strand breaks radially distributed from the main particle track as well as multiple discrete tracks within saturated damage nuclei. Conclusions These 3-D culture systems can be used as a biological substrate to better understand the interaction of heavy charged particles of different energies with tissue and could serve as a basis to model space-radiation-induced cancer initiation and progression. PMID:20201648

  20. Structural, optical and waveguiding properties improvement of SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} Bragg reflectors processed by the sol–gel method under the effect of Ni-doped TiO{sub 2} and annealing duration

    SciTech Connect

    Sedrati, H.; Bensaha, R.; Bensouyad, H.; Miska, P.; Robert, S.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The formation of anatase phase only, whatever are Ni content and annealing duration. • Transmission and PL spectra redshifted with Ni content and annealing duration. • PL lowering with Ni content is due to the recombination rate of electron–hole reduction. • Annealing duration increases the recombination rate and then the PL intensity rises. • Increasing Ni content improves waveguiding properties and then two TE modes appear. - Abstract: We investigated the nickel doped TiO{sub 2} layer and annealing duration effects on SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} Bragg reflectors. The films crystallize in pure anatase phase whatever is the Ni content and the annealing duration. In UV–vis-NIR analyses, variations of width, position and transmission coefficient of the stop-band were observed. The PL spectra red-shifted when the Ni content and annealing duration increased. As the annealing duration increases, an additional sharp emission peak appears around 867 nm, indicating a reduced number of defects. As Ni content increased, the M-lines spectroscopy shows two transverse electric polarization guided modes TE{sub 0} and TE{sub 1}, which indicates a decreased refractive index and an increased film thickness.

  1. Diffraction Analysis Of Distorted Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Mumford, Jeffrey H.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of systematic distortions of surfaces on radiation patterns predicted. Computer program for Diffraction Analysis of Reflector Antennas Subject to Systematic Distortions predicts performance of reflector antennas subject to sinusoidal, thermal, or gravitational distortions. Provides local interpolation algorithm readily applied to nonregular distribution of data. Developed in UNIVAC FORTRAN 77 for UNIVAC computer.

  2. Distributed sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  3. Distributed Sensing of Composite Over-wrapped Pressure Vessel Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings at Ambient and Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings are use to monitor the structural properties of composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in laminate structure. The fiber Bragg sensors are both embedded within the composite laminates and bonded to the surface of the vessel with varying orientations with respect to the carbon fiber in the epoxy matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 2800 psi. This is done at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures using water and liquid nitrogen. The recorded response is compared with the response from conventional strain gauge also present on the vessel. Additionally, several vessels were tested that had been damaged to simulate different type of events, such as cut tow, delimitation and impact damage.

  4. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting near 1.5 {mu}m with Sb-based reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, O.; Klem, J.F.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-04-01

    We describe use of AlAsSb/AlGaAsSb lattice matched to InP for distributed Bragg reflectors. These structures are integral to several surface normal devices, in particular vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. The high refractive index ratio of these materials allows formation of a highly reflective mirror with relatively few mirror pairs. As a result, we have been able to show for the first time the 77K CW operation of an optically pumped, monolithic, all-epitaxial vertical cavity laser, emitting at 1.56 {mu}m.

  5. Thermally tunable integrated planar Bragg-grating stabilized diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, S. G.; Gates, J. C.; Berry, S. A.; Holmes, C.; Smith, P. G. R.

    2015-03-01

    A pair of external cavity diode lasers are fabricated using an integrated planar Bragg grating. The planar waveguide and Bragg reflector is UV-written within a glass-on-silicon chip. Intensity isolated, continuous wavelength tuning at > 1kHz modulation rate is acheived using micro-heating elements fabricated directly over the Bragg grating. Low RIN (<140dB) and low linewidth (δν ~ 200 kHz) operation is found using a heterodyne measurement. We demonstrate the lasers operating in phase-locked loop configuration where one laser is frequency-offset locked to the other.

  6. GaInAsP/InP Distributed Reflector Lasers and Integration of Front Power Monitor by Using Lateral Quantum Confinement Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Saeed Mahmud; Lee, SeungHun; Suemitsu, Ryo; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2008-06-01

    By using lateral quantum confinement effect, a sub mA threshold current operation of a long wavelength GaInAsP/InP distributed-reflector (DR) laser, consisting of wide and narrow wirelike active regions, was demonstrated for the first time under room-temperature continuous-wave (RT-CW) condition. Eye-patterns have been studied for back-to-back as well as 10-km optical fiber transmission line. Even though devices had broad contact electrodes, clear eye opening was observed up to 2 Gbps pseudo random bit sequence (PRBS; 231 - 1) data. A monolithic integration of a power monitor (PM) at the front side of the DR laser was also demonstrated for the first time. Almost linear photocurrent characteristic with very high isolation resistance of 60 MΩ was obtained by separating the PM section by a narrow (500 nm) and deep groove filled with benzocyclobutene (BCB).

  7. Linearized Bragg grating assisted electro-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Khurgin, Jacob B; Morton, Paul A

    2014-12-15

    We propose a new linearized electro-optic modulator in which linearization is achieved by modulating the index of a Bragg grating reflector placed in the arm(s) of a Michelson Interferometer. This grating-assisted Michelson (GAMI) modulator can operate as either an intensity or amplitude modulator, and is shown to significantly improve the linearity of microwave photonics links. PMID:25503037

  8. Computer prediction of dual reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C.

    1981-01-01

    A program for calculating radiation patterns for reflector antennas with either smooth analytic surfaces or with surfaces composed of a number of panels. Techniques based on the geometrical optics (GO) approach were used in tracing rays over the following regions: from a feed antenna to the first reflector surface (subreflector); from this reflector to a larger reflector surface (main reflector); and from the main reflector to a mathematical plane (aperture plane) in front of the main reflector. The equations of GO were also used to calculate the reflected field components for each ray making use of the feed radiation pattern and the parameters defining the surfaces of the two reflectors. These resulting fields form an aperture distribution which is integrated numerically to compute the radiation pattern for a specified set of angles.

  9. Enhanced luminous efficiency of phosphor-converted LEDs by using back reflector to increase reflectivity for yellow light.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shengjun; Cao, Bin; Yuan, Shu; Liu, Sheng

    2014-12-01

    To obtain high reflectivity over a broad range of green, yellow, and red light as well as blue light incidents from a particular angular range and further increase the luminous efficiency of a phosphor-converted white LED packaging module, a novel back hybrid reflector including a SiO(2) total internal reflection layer (TIR), five-pair SiO(2)/TiO(2) double distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) stacks, and a gold (Au) metallic mirror was designed and fabricated. The double DBR stacks have layers configured to reflect green, yellow, and red light as well as blue light, which includes a first portion where the thickness of the layers are relatively larger, and also includes a second portion where the thickness of the layers is relatively smaller. Light that is passing toward the hybrid reflector at angles greater than the critical angle (56°) is reflected by the SiO(2) TIR layer at the sapphire/SiO(2) interface, whereas the light that passes through the SiO(2) TIR layer with incident angles between 0° and 56° is reflected by the double DBR stacks. The overall hybrid reflector can ensure a reflectivity of more than 95% in both the blue light wavelength region and the yellow light wavelength region. The obtained higher reflectivity in the yellow light wavelength region will benefit the phosphor-converted LEDs because yellow light backscattered by phosphor particles is reflected upward. PMID:25607969

  10. Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

  11. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  12. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  13. Omnidirectional reflectors with novel low-refractive-index material for light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jingqun

    Solid state lighting technology requires high brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with high light-extraction efficiency. A very promising approach to improve the light-extraction efficiency of devices is to integrate a high reflectivity omnidirectional reflector (ODR) with low-refractive-index (low-n) material onto LED chips. ODRs are defined as reflectors with reflectivity close to 100% at any incident angle for both polarizations. Low-n material is a new class of optical thin film material, which has great potential in application of not only ODRs but also other optical filters. In this dissertation, internal ODRs with low-n material are discussed. Two kinds of ODRs are reviewed. One is a triple-layer ODR, which consists of a semiconductor, a quarter-wavelength thick low- n layer, and a reflective metal layer such as Ag or Al. The other one is a dielectric-multilayer ODR, which consists of a thick low- n material and a one-dimensional photonic crystal. Both reflectors have high reflectivity at any incident angle in the semiconductor ambient. Low-n material is the key component for the ODRs. A novel low-n material with refractive index as low as n = 1.05, has been demonstrated to have advantages over conventional optical thin films. A single-pair distributed Bragg reflector using such low-n material is demonstrated to have enhanced reflectivity in the visible spectrum. A graded-index anti-reflection coating with index matching condition enabled by the low-n material is demonstrated to have reflectivity lower than 0.3% over wide spectrum range and angle of incidence. A conductive low-n material is obtained by oblique-angle deposition of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Such material has a much lower refractive index than conventional transparent dense ITO material while still having good conductivity. A GalnN with triple-layer ODR using a conductive low-n material is successfully fabricated and incorporated into an LED that is shown to have enhanced light

  14. Semiconductor Laser With Multilayer Dielectric Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Multilayer dielectric reflector included in proposed surface-emitting, distributed-feedback, grating semiconductor laser (e.g., a GaAlAs device). Contributes to efficiency and output power of laser by reducing amount of light entering substrate, where wasted by absorption. Index of refraction in reflector sublayers alternates between higher and lower value. Higher value less than effective index of refraction of waveguide layer.

  15. Streicker Bridge: a comparison between Bragg-grating long-gauge strain and temperature sensors and Brillouin scattering-based distributed strain and temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Chen, Jeremy; Hubbell, David

    2011-04-01

    The Streicker Bridge at Princeton University campus has been equipped with two fiber-optic sensing technologies: discrete long-gauge sensing, based on Fiber Bragg-Gratings (FBG), and truly-distributed sensing, based on Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA). The sensors were embedded in concrete during the construction. The early age measurements, including hydration swelling and contraction, and post-tensioning of concrete were registered by both systems and placed side by side in order to compare their performances. Aside from the usual behavior, an unusual increase in strain was detected by several sensors in various cross-sections. The nature of this event is still under investigation, but preliminary study indicates early-age cracking as the cause. The comparison between the two monitoring systems shows good agreement in the areas where no unusual behavior was detected, but some discrepancies are noticed at locations where unusual behavior occurred and during the early age of concrete. These discrepancies are attributed to the spatial resolution of the distributed monitoring system and the temperature influences at early age. In this paper, general information concerning the Streicker Bridge project is given. The monitoring systems and their specifications are briefly presented. The monitoring data are analyzed and a comparison between the two systems is performed.

  16. Astigmatism in reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Astigmatic phase error in large parabolic reflector antennas is discussed. A procedure for focusing an antenna and diagnosing the presence and degree of astigmatism is described. Theoretical analysis is conducted to determine the nature of this error in such antennas.

  17. Tunable channel drop filters consisting of a tilted Bragg grating and a mode sorting polymer waveguide.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Jin-Soo; Huang, Guanghao; Chu, Woo-Sung; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2016-03-21

    Optical wavelength filters with large tuning range and narrow bandwidth are crucial for enhancing the capability of WDM communication systems. A polymeric tunable filter for C-band, comprising a tilted Bragg grating and a mode sorting waveguide junction is proposed in this work. For dropping a certain wavelength signal, the tilted Bragg grating reflects an odd mode into an even mode and then the reflected even mode propagates towards an output port of the asymmetric Y-junction due to the mode sorting. Consequently, the output port is separated from the input port, which is not possible in an ordinary Bragg reflector. The tilted Bragg reflector with an odd-even mode coupling efficiency of 61% exhibited a maximum reflectivity of 95% for a grating of 6 mm. A linear wavelength tuning of over 10 nm was achieved for an applied thermal power of 312 mW. PMID:27136768

  18. Intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber sensor based on ultra-short Bragg gratings for quasi-distributed strain and temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuang

    The health monitoring of smart structures in civil engineering is becoming more and more important as in-situ structural monitoring would greatly reduce structure life-cycle costs and improve reliability. The distributed strain and temperature sensing is highly desired in large structures where strain and temperature at over thousand points need to be measured simultaneously. It is difficult to carry out this task using conventional electrical strain sensors. Fiber optic sensors provide an excellent opportunity to fulfill this need due to their capability to multiplex many sensors along a single fiber cable. Numerous research studies have been conducted in past decades to increase the number of sensors to be multiplexed in a distributed sensor network. This dissertation presents detailed research work on the analysis, design, fabrication, testing, and evaluation of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot fiber optic sensor for quasi-distributed strain and temperature measurements. The sensor is based on two ultra-short and broadband reflection fiber Bragg gratings. One distinct feature of this sensor is its ultra low optical insertion loss, which allows a significant increase in the sensor multiplexing capability. Using a simple integrated sensor interrogation unit and an optical spectrum based signal processing algorithm, many sensors can be interrogated along a single optical fiber with high accuracy, high resolution and large dynamic range. Based on the experimental results and theoretical analysis, it is expected that more than 500 sensors can be multiplexed with little crosstalk using a frequency-division multiplexing technology. With this research, it is possible to build an easy fabrication, robust, high sensitivity and quasi-distributed fiber optic sensor network that can be operated reliably even in harsh environments or extended structures. This research was supported in part by U.S. National Science Foundation under grant CMS-0427951.

  19. Phase-shifted Bragg microstructured optical fiber gratings utilizing infiltrated ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Candiani, Alessandro; Margulis, Walter; Sterner, Carola; Konstantaki, Maria; Pissadakis, Stavros

    2011-07-01

    Results are presented on the efficient spectral manipulation of uniform and chirped Bragg reflectors inscribed in microstructured optical fibers utilizing short lengths of ferrofluids infiltrated in their capillaries. The infiltrated ferrofluidic defects can generate either parasitic reflection notch features in uniform Bragg reflectors of up to 80% visibility and ~0.1 nm spectral shift or tunability of the bandwidth and strength reflection up to 100% when introduced into chirped gratings. Spectra are presented for different spatial positions and optical characteristics of the ferrofluidic section. PMID:21725475

  20. The analysis of light trapping and internal quantum efficiency of a solar cell with DBR back reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Kuo-Hui; Yang, Jaw-Yen

    2009-11-15

    A theoretical analysis of the total internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a flat-band p-n homo-junction silicon solar cell with back reflector using distributed Bragg reflectors to improve the light trapping is presented and contributions of different regions of the structure to IQEs are simulated. An optical model for the determination of generation profile of the cell is adopted and multiple light passes are considered and compared to previous single light pass approach. It is found that the spatial widths of the cell, the surface recombination velocities, the front surface transmittance and the back reflector have significant impacts on the IQEs. With two light passes and normal incident light, the simulation result shows the IQEs can be increased over the one pass value by 6.34% and with a 60 light reflection angle, the IQEs can be further increased by 9.01% while assuming the reflectance at back structure closed to 100%. The effect on IQEs by back reflectance is more significant than that by front transmittance. Under multiple light passes simulation, up to 51 light trapping passes have been considered at wavelength range 900-1100 nm, the cell IQEs can be enhanced by about 26.98%. (author)

  1. A new approach for shaping of dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, W. D.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1987-01-01

    The shaping of 2-D dual-reflector antenna systems to generate a prescribed distribution with uniform phase at the aperture of the second reflector is examined. This method is based on the geometrical nature of Cassegrain and Gregorian dual-reflector antennas. The method of syntheses satisfies the principles of geometrical optics which are the foundations of dual-reflector designs. Instead of setting up differential equations or heuristically designing the subreflector, a set of algebraic equations is formulated and solved numerically to obtain the desired surfaces. The caustics of the reflected rays from the subreflector can be obtained and examined. Several examples of 2-D dual-reflector shaping are shown to validate the study. Geometrical optics and physical optics are used to calculate the scattered fields from the reflectors.

  2. Shaping techniques for offset fed dual reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.; Chu, R. S.

    A shaping scheme is presented for the design of offset-fed dual reflector antennas for substantial performance improvement. The design procedure of a shaped system starts with a proper choice of a nonshaped offset system as a reference. This baseline is used to optimize the location of the feedhorn and the centers of the reflectors. The shaping program then uses these inputs and generates the numerical profiles of the reflectors to achieve the desired aperture distribution. After shaping, the reflector profiles would deviate from that of the baseline system by only a small amount compared to the dimensions of the antenna.

  3. See-through dye-sensitized solar cells: photonic reflectors for tandem and building integrated photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Leo-Philipp; O'Brien, Paul G; Soheilnia, Navid; Yang, Yang; Kherani, Nazir P; Grätzel, Michael; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Tétreault, Nicolas

    2013-10-25

    See-through dye-sensitized solar cells with 1D photonic crystal Bragg reflector photoanodes show an increase in peak external quantum efficiency of 47% while still maintaining high fill factors, resulting in an almost 40% increase in power conversion efficiency. These photoanodes are ideally suited for tandem and building integrated photovoltaics. PMID:23966106

  4. Modeling Mechanical Behavior of a Prismatic Replaceable Reflector Block

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Bratton

    2009-04-01

    This report outlines the development of finite element models used to determine temperature and stresses in a prismatic core reflector block. This initial analysis determines an appropriate temperature distribution in a prismatic reflector from limiting conditions in the adjacent fuel block based on simplifying assumptions.

  5. Mirror and Bragg reflections of neutrons at a nuclear resonance: (Final technical report)

    SciTech Connect

    Batigun, C.M.; Brugger, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    These experiments have observed the mirror reflection and Bragg diffraction of neutrons at the energy of a low lying nuclear resonance of /sup 115/In. The reflector was a mirror of In metal with the resonance at 1.457 eV. The mirror reflection for different angles of incidence has been measured and sets of data showing the relative reflectivities have been obtained. For the Bragg diffraction, the crystal was a wafer of InP and several examples of Bragg reflections near 1.455 eV were measured. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Bragg Curve, Biological Bragg Curve and Biological Issues in Space Radiation Protection with Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honglu, Wu; Cucinotta, F.A.; Durante, M.; Lin, Z.; Rusek, A.

    2006-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X-rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged particle exposure. Since the dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply as the particle approaches the end of its range, a position known as the Bragg peak, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle traversal since biological effects are influenced by the track structure of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the biological Bragg curve is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. To achieve a Bragg curve distribution, we exposed cells to energetic heavy ions with the beam geometry parallel to a monolayer of fibroblasts. Qualitative analyses of gamma-H2AX fluorescence, a known marker of DSBs, indicated increased clustering of DNA damage before the Bragg peak, enhanced homogenous distribution at the peak, and provided visual evidence of high linear energy transfer (LET) particle traversal of cells beyond the Bragg peak. A quantitative biological response curve generated for micronuclei (MN) induction across the Bragg curve did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak. However, the ratio of mono-to bi-nucleated cells, which indicates inhibition in cell progression, increased at the Bragg peak location. These results, along with other biological concerns, show that space radiation protection with shielding can be a complicated issue.

  7. Inline microring reflector for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young Mo

    The microring is a compact resonator that is used as a versatile building block in photonic circuits ranging from filters, modulators, logic gates, sensors, switches, multiplexers, and laser cavities. The Bragg grating is a periodic structure that allows the selection of a narrow bandwidth of spectrum for stable lasing operation. In this dissertation, we study analysis and simulations of a compact microring based reflector assembled by forming a Bragg grating into a loop. With the appropriate design, the microring resonance can precisely align with the reflection peak of the grating while all other peaks are suppressed by reflection nulls of the grating. The field buildup at the resonance effectively amplifies small reflection of the grating, thereby producing significant overall reflection from the ring, and it is possible to achieve a stable narrow linewidth compact laser by forming a single mode laser cavity. The device operation principle is studied from two distinct perspectives; the first looks at coupling of two contra-directional traveling waves within the ring whereas the second aspect investigates relative excitation of the two competing microring resonant modes. In the former method, we relate the steady state amplitudes of the two traveling waves to the reflection spectrum of the grating and solve for the reflection and transmission response for each wavelength of interest. In the latter approach, we expand the field in terms of the resonant modes of the ring cavity and derive transfer functions for reflection and transmission from the nearby mode frequencies. The angular periodicity of the reflective microring geometry allows us to effectively simulate the resonant modes from a computational domain of a single period grating when the continuity boundary condition is applied. We successfully predict the reflection and transmission response of a Si3N 4/SiO2 microring reflector using this method---otherwise too large to carry out full-wave simulation

  8. Multiplexing of fiber optic Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kok Cheung Peter

    2000-11-01

    The main objective of this project was to develop a novel technique for multiplexing fiber Bragg grating sensors for strain measurements. Multiplexing is a very important issue for fiber Bragg grating sensors, as it allows them to be used for distributed sensing where their greatest impact is anticipated. Three types of multiplexed fiber Bragg grating sensor system prototypes were developed in this work. Most effort was devoted to a frequency-modulated continuous wave technique for multiplexing fiber Bragg grating sensors. A detailed mathematical analysis of the frequency-modulated continuous wave multiplexing technique was performed. It was identified that the technique can be used to multiplex up to 32 fiber Bragg grating sensors of the same nominal Bragg wavelength with a theoretical crosstalk performance of below -48 dB. This level of crosstalk corresponds to a wavelength detected error of well below 1 pm if fiber Bragg gratings having a bandwidth of around 0.2 nm are used. A few hundreds of sensors could be multiplexed by combining the frequency-modulated continuous wave technique with the well known wavelength-division-multiplexing technique. The practical factors which limit the performance, including the effect of biasing from the optimal working condition and the effect of non-ideal frequency sweeping intensity modulation, were investigated. The system performance, in terms of power budget and inter-sensor crosstalk for a serial and parallel architecture was also determined. A series of experiments were carried out to verify the principle of operation and to study the effects arising from the various practical performance limiting factors and from different network architectures. A three sensor system was experimentally demonstrated with -30 dB crosstalk level and with 2 μɛ resolution in terms of root-mean-square strain value. The system performance was found to be limited by the residual amplitude modulation due to the non-ideal frequency response of

  9. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  10. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of space erecting a 100 meter paraboloidal radio frequency reflector by joining a number of individually deployed structural modules. Three module design concepts were considered: (1) the deployable cell module (DCM); (2) the modular paraboloidal erectable truss antenna (Mod-PETA); and (3) the modular erectable truss antenna (META). With the space shuttle (STS) as the launch system, the methodology of packaging and stowing in the orbiter, and of dispensing, deploying and joining, in orbit, were studied and the necessary support equipment identified. The structural performance of the completed reflectors was evaluated and their overall operational capability and feasibility were evaluated and compared. The potential of the three concepts to maintain stable shape in the space environment was determined. Their ability to operate at radio frequencies of 1 GHz and higher was assessed assuming the reflector surface to consist of a number of flat, hexagonal facets. A parametric study was performed to determine figure degradation as a function of reflector size, flat facet size, and f/D ratio.

  11. The Corner Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Whitney S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the corner reflector array left on the moon by the July 1969 Apollo astronauts is described. The array was used to reflect earth-originating laser beams back to earth, and yielded a more accurate determination (to within six inches) of distance from the earth to the moon. (MP)

  12. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  13. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  14. Freeform reflector design for LED street lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Schreiber, Peter; Walkling, Andreas; Schierz, Christoph; Schwede, Maik; Gühne, Volker

    2011-10-01

    Faceted freeform reflectors were designed for intelligent street lighting with LED cluster arrays for main traffic roads. Special attention was paid to achieve highly efficient illumination on both wet and dry road surfaces. CIE reflection tables W4 and C2 were applied in the simulation for these two conditions, respectively. The reflector design started with plane facets, then - to avoid artifacts from the images of the individual LEDs - plane facets were replaced with cylindrical facets. To get even more flexibility for the design and optimization, freeform facets were employed, modeled by extruding two different conic curves together. Besides of achieving well-proportioned road luminance distribution, the basic shapes of the reflectors were formed to control stray light caused by multiple reflections within the reflector and by reflection of light from neighbor clusters within the cluster array. The merit functions include useful transmission of light to the road as well as overall and lengthwise uniformity according to road illumination standards. Due to the large amount of variables, the optimization was carried out sequentially facet by facet. The design loops included compromising with manufacturing limitations for plastics molding and thorough analysis of conformity with DIN EN 13201 standards for ME road lighting classes. The calculated reflector profiles are realized by plastic injection molding.

  15. Narrow-band resonant optical reflectors and resonant optical transformers for laser stabilization and wavelength division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Kazarinov, R.F.; Henry, C.H.; Olsson, N.A.

    1987-09-01

    The authors propose a new way of making highly resonant integrated optical circuits based on weak side-by-side coupling between waveguides and high Q distributed Bragg resonators. This method can be used to design a resonant optical reflector which, when used as a feedback element to a laser, will result in a compact structure that has both extremely narrow line width and very low chirp. By coupling the resonator to two waveguides, one on either side, an optical analog of the resonant transformer can be made. This device can be used for wavelength division multiplexing. Such multiplexer elements will both resonantly transform optical power from the laser to a common output channel and also provide feedback which locks the laser to the channel wavelength.

  16. Absolute Bragg wavelength and dispersion determination in dispersive incoherent OFDR interrogators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, J.; Torregrosa, G.; Hervás, J.; Fernández-Pousa, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We report on an incoherent OFDR interrogator of FBG arrays based on the concept of dispersive wavelength to time delay mapping. The system is specifically designed to show stability to environmental thermal variations by the incorporation of a composite dispersive delay and weak broadband reflectors for delay and dispersion monitoring. Dispersion is imparted by the combination of a fiber coil and an athermally-packaged chirped fiber Bragg grating for dispersion compensation. Using differential measurements over a single acquisition trace, the values of Bragg wavelengths and dispersion are determined from the delays experienced by the FBGs and by additional reference wavelengths reflected in the broadband reflectors. The results show maximum deviations of 20 pm and 0.2 ps/nm with respect to OSA measurements of Bragg wavelengths and nominal dispersion values, respectively.

  17. Rim loaded reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, O. M.; Franceschetti, G.

    1980-05-01

    A general theory of reflector antennas loaded by surface impedances is presented. Spatial variation of primary illumination is taken into account using a generalized slope diffraction coefficient. The theory is experimentally checked on surface loaded square plate scatterers and then used for computing the radiation diagram of parabolic and hyperbolic dishes. Computer programs and computed diagrams refer to the case of focal illumination and negligible tapering of primary illumination.

  18. Secondary pattern computation of an offset reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communications satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. In analyzing reflector antennas the computation of the secondary pattern is the main concern. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern of an offset reflector has been developed and implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of geometrical optics to describe the fields from the feed to the reflector surface and to the aperture plane. The resulting aperture field distribution is then transformed to the far-field zone by the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Comparing this technique with other well-known techniques (the geometrical theory of diffraction, physical optics (Jacobi-Bessel), etc.) shows good agreement for large (diameter of 100 lambda or greater) reflector antennas.

  19. Fiber Bragg Grating Filter High Temperature Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Brass, Eric D.; Pencil, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a scaled-down method for determining high temperatures using fiber-based Bragg gratings. Bragg gratings are distributed along the length of the optical fiber, and have high reflectivities whenever the optical wavelength is twice the grating spacing. These spatially distinct Bragg regions (located in the core of a fiber) are sensitive to local temperature changes. Since these fibers are silica-based they are easily affected by localized changes in temperature, which results in changes to both the grating spacing and the wavelength reflectivity. We exploit the shift in wavelength reflectivity to measure the change in the local temperature. Note that the Bragg region (sensing area) is some distance away from where the temperature is being measured. This is done so that we can measure temperatures that are much higher than the damage threshold of the fiber. We do this by affixing the fiber with the Bragg sensor to a material with a well-known coefficient of thermal expansion, and model the heat gradient from the region of interest to the actual sensor. The research described in this paper will culminate in a working device as well as be the second portion of a publication pending submission to Optics Letters.

  20. High performance GaN-based LEDs on patterned sapphire substrate with patterned composite SiO2/Al2O3 passivation layers and TiO2/Al2O3 DBR backside reflector.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Zhang, Xiong; Chen, Hongjun; Zhang, Peiyuan; Liu, Honggang; Chang, Hudong; Zhao, Wei; Liao, Qinghua; Cui, Yiping

    2013-09-01

    GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) with patterned composite SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) passivation layers and TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) backside reflector have been proposed and fabricated. Highly passivated Al(2)O(3) layer deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) layer with excellent uniformity and quality has been achieved with atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology. With a 60 mA current injection, an enhancement of 21.6%, 59.7%, and 63.4% in the light output power (LOP) at 460 nm wavelength was realized for the LED with the patterned composite SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) passivation layers, the LED with the patterned composite SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) passivation layers and Ag mirror + 3-pair TiO(2)/SiO(2) DBR backside reflector, and the LED with the patterned composite SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) passivation layer and Ag mirror + 3-pair ALD-grown TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) DBR backside reflector as compared with the conventional LED only with a single SiO(2) passivation layer, respectively. PMID:24104020

  1. Double Bragg Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, H; Müntinga, H; Wenzlawski, A; Krutzik, M; Tackmann, G; Abend, S; Gaaloul, N; Giese, E; Roura, A; Kuhl, R; Lämmerzahl, C; Peters, A; Windpassinger, P; Sengstock, K; Schleich, W P; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E M

    2016-04-29

    We employ light-induced double Bragg diffraction of delta-kick collimated Bose-Einstein condensates to create three symmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometers. They rely on (i) first-order, (ii) two successive first-order, and (iii) second-order processes which demonstrate the scalability of the corresponding momentum transfer. With respect to devices based on conventional Bragg scattering, these symmetric interferometers double the scale factor and feature a better suppression of noise and systematic uncertainties intrinsic to the diffraction process. Moreover, we utilize these interferometers as tiltmeters for monitoring their inclination with respect to gravity. PMID:27176520

  2. Double Bragg Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, H.; Müntinga, H.; Wenzlawski, A.; Krutzik, M.; Tackmann, G.; Abend, S.; Gaaloul, N.; Giese, E.; Roura, A.; Kuhl, R.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Peters, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Schleich, W. P.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.

    2016-04-01

    We employ light-induced double Bragg diffraction of delta-kick collimated Bose-Einstein condensates to create three symmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometers. They rely on (i) first-order, (ii) two successive first-order, and (iii) second-order processes which demonstrate the scalability of the corresponding momentum transfer. With respect to devices based on conventional Bragg scattering, these symmetric interferometers double the scale factor and feature a better suppression of noise and systematic uncertainties intrinsic to the diffraction process. Moreover, we utilize these interferometers as tiltmeters for monitoring their inclination with respect to gravity.

  3. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of

  4. Reflector antennas for ultrawideband usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The provision of high gain antennas for ultrawideband systems is limited not only by the electromagnetic problems but also by the mechanical aspects such as the volume required. Single antenna elements such as TEM horns can provide gains of 20.0 dBi at the highest operating frequencies but any additional gain requires the use of other techniques. The simplest techniques are to use an array of elements or to use a reflector antenna. This paper deals with the design of reflector antennas. The transforming effect of the reflector surface is such that a constant aperture feed results in a constant gain reflector while a constant gain feed results in a constant aperture reflector. However this elegant postulate is somewhat degraded in practice by the presence of blockage, spillover and diffraction from the rim in a reflector antenna.

  5. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  6. Wirelessly Controllable Inflated Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea

    2005-01-01

    Inflatable membrane reflectors are attractive for deployable, large aperture, lightweight optical and microwave systems in micro-gravity space environment. However, any fabrication flaw or temperature variation may results in significant aberration of the surface. Even for a perfectly fabricated inflatable membrane mirror with uniform thickness, theory shows it will form a Hencky curve surface but a desired parabolic or spherical surface. Precision control of the surfaceshape of extremely flexible membrane structures is a critical challenge for the success of this technology. Wirelessly controllable inflated reflectors made of electroactive polymers (EAP) are proposed in this paper. A finite element model was configured to predict the behavior of the inflatable EAP membranes under pre-strains, pressures and distributed electric charges on the surface. To explore the controllability of the inflatable EAP reflectors, an iteration algorism was developed to find the required electric actuation for correcting the aberration of the Hencky curve to the desired parabolic curve. The correction capability of the reflectors with available EAP materials was explored numerically and is presented in this paper.

  7. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  8. Environmental Degradation of Solar Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Report presents results of study of atmospheric degradation of large solar reflectors for power generators. Three general types of reflective surfaces investigated. Report also describes computer buildup and removal (by rain and dew) of contamination from reflectors. Data used to determine effects of soil buildup and best method and frequency of washing at various geographic locations.

  9. Optimum Reflector Configurations for Minimizing Fission Power Peaking in a Lithium-Cooled, Liquid-Metal Reactor with Sliding Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Poston, David I.

    2005-02-06

    Many design constraints limit the development of a space fission power system optimized for fuel performance, system reliability, and mission cost. These design constraints include fuel mass provisions to meet cycle-length requirements, fuel centerline and clad temperatures, and clad creep from fission gas generation. Decreasing the fission power peaking of the reactor system enhances all of the mentioned parameters. This design study identifies the cause, determines the reflector configurations for reactor criticality, and generates worth curves for minimized fission-power-peaking configuration in a lithium-cooled liquid-metal reactor that uses sliding reflectors. Because of the characteristics of the core axial power distribution and axial power distortions inherent to the sliding reflector design, minimizing the power peaking of the reactor involves placing the reflectors in a position that least distorts the axial power distribution. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the Government.

  10. Effect of Rayleigh-scattering distributed feedback on multiwavelength Raman fiber laser generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Taher, A. E.; Harper, P.; Babin, S. A.; Churkin, D. V.; Podivilov, E. V.; Ania-Castanon, J. D.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2011-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a Raman fiber laser based on multiple point-action fiber Bragg grating (FBG) reflectors and distributed feedback via Rayleigh scattering in a ~22 km long optical fiber. Twenty two lasing lines with spacing of ~100 GHz (close to ITU grid) in C-band are generated at Watts power level. In contrast to the normal cavity with competition between laser lines, the random distributed feedback cavity exhibits highly stable multiwavelength generation with a power-equalized uniform distribution which is almost independent on power. The current set up showing the capability of generating Raman gain of about 100-nm wide giving the possibility of multiwavelength generation at different bands.

  11. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  12. Making Curved Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Prototype curved lightweight dichroic microwave reflectors designed to be highly reflective in X and K(suba) frequency bands and highly transmissive in K(subu) and S bands. Conductive grid elements formed photolithographically on curved reflector surfaces. Intended for use as subreflectors of main paraboloidal antenna reflector to enable simultaneous operation in both prime-focus configuration in K(subu) and S bands and Cassegrain configuration in X and K(suba) bands. Basic concepts of reflectors described in "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701). "Double Square-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18676), "Triband Circular-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18714), and "Improved Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18664).

  13. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  14. Reflector Surface Error Compensation in Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Imbriale, William

    2010-01-01

    By probing the field on a small subreflector at a minimal number of points, the main reflector surface errors can be obtained and subsequently used to design a phase-correction subreflector that can compensate for main reflector errors. The compensating phase-error profile across the subreflector can be achieved either by a surface deformation or by the use of an array of elements such as patch antennas that can cause a phase shift between the incoming and outgoing fields. The second option is of primary interest here, but the methodology can be applied to either case. The patch array is most easily implemented on a planar surface. Therefore, the example of a flat subreflector and a parabolic main reflector (a Newtonian dual reflector system) is considered in this work. The subreflector is assumed to be a reflector array covered with patch elements. The phase variation on a subreflector can be detected by a small number of receiving patch elements (probes). By probing the phase change at these few selected positions on the subreflector, the phase error over the entire surface can be recovered and used to change the phase of all the patch elements covering the subreflector plane to compensate for main reflector errors. This is accomplished by using a version of sampling theorem on the circular aperture. The sampling is performed on the phase-error function on the circular aperture of the main reflector by a method developed using Zernike polynomials. This method is based upon and extended from a theory previously proposed and applied to reflector aperture integration. This sampling method provides for an exact retrieval of the coefficients of up to certain orders in the expansion of the phase function, from values on a specifically calculated set of points in radial and azimuthal directions in the polar coordinate system, on the circular reflector aperture. The corresponding points on the subreflector are then obtained and, by probing the fields at these points, a

  15. Switchable and tunable film bulk acoustic resonator fabricated using barium strontium titanate active layer and Ta2O5/SiO2 acoustic reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbrockey, N. M.; Kalkur, T. S.; Mansour, A.; Khassaf, H.; Yu, H.; Aindow, M.; Alpay, S. P.; Tompa, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    A solidly mounted acoustic resonator was fabricated using a Ba0.60Sr0.40TiO3 (BST) film deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The device was acoustically isolated from the substrate using a Bragg reflector consisting of three pairs of Ta2O5/SiO2 layers deposited by chemical solution deposition. Transmission electron microscopy verified that the Bragg reflector was not affected by the high temperatures and oxidizing conditions necessary to process high quality BST films. Electrical characterization of the resonator demonstrated a quality factor (Q) of 320 and an electromechanical coupling coefficient (Kt2) of 7.0% at 11 V.

  16. Detection of reflector surface from near field phase measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ida, Nathan

    1991-01-01

    The deviation of a reflector antenna surface from a perfect parabolic shape causes degradation of the performance of the antenna. The problem of determining the shape of the reflector surface in a reflector antenna using near field phase measurements is not a new one. A recent issue of the IEEE tansactions on Antennas and Propagation (June 1988) contained numerous descriptions of the use of these measurements: holographic reconstruction or inverse Fourier transform. Holographic reconstruction makes use of measurement of the far field of the reflector and then applies the Fourier transform relationship between the far field and the current distribution on the reflector surface. Inverse Fourier transformation uses the phase measurements to determine the far field pattern using the method of Kerns. After the far field pattern is established, an inverse Fourier transform is used to determine the phases in a plane between the reflector surface and the plane in which the near field measurements were taken. These calculations are time consuming since they involve a relatively large number of operations. A much faster method can be used to determine the position of the reflector. This method makes use of simple geometric optics to determine the path length of the ray from the feed to the reflector and from the reflector to the measurement point. For small physical objects and low frequencies, diffraction effects have a major effect on the error, and the algorithm provides incorrect results. It is believed that the effect is less noticeable for large distortions such as antenna warping, and more noticeable for small, localized distortions such as bumps and depressions such as might be caused by impact damage.

  17. Bragg scattering of electromagnetic waves by microwave-produced plasma layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1990-01-01

    A set of parallel plasma layers is generated by two intersecting microwave pulses in a chamber containing dry air at a pressure comparable to the upper atmosphere. The dependencies of breakdown conditions on the pressure and pulse length are examined. The results are shown to be consistent with the appearance of tail erosion of the microwave pulse caused by air breakdown. A Bragg scattering experiment, using the plasma layers as a Bragg reflector, is then performed. Both time domain and frequency domain measurements of wave scattering are conducted. The experimental results are found to agree very well with the theory.

  18. Photonic scanning receiver using an electrically tuned fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Rugeland, P; Yu, Z; Sterner, C; Tarasenko, O; Tengstrand, G; Margulis, W

    2009-12-15

    A 5-cm-long electrically tuned fiber Bragg grating is used to filter a microwave signal on an optical carrier at 1.55 mum. A chirped distributed-feedback structure is employed, with a transmission bandwidth of 54 MHz and relative optical carrier rejection of >30 dB for rf frequencies >2 GHz. The rapid monotonic sweep of the Bragg wavelength is translated into a fast-frequency sweep for rf analysis. PMID:20016616

  19. SEISMIC-REFLECTOR DATABASE SOFTWARE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Evelyn L.; Hosom, John-Paul

    1986-01-01

    The seismic data analysis (SDA) software system facilitates generation of marine seismic reflector databases composed of reflector depths, travel times, root-mean-square and interval velocities, geographic coordinates, and identifying information. System processes include digitizing of seismic profiles and velocity semblance curves, merging of velocity and navigation data with profile travel-time data, calculation of reflector depths in meters, profile and map graphic displays, data editing and smoothing, and entry of finalized data into a comprehensive database. An overview of concepts, file structures, and programs is presented.

  20. Use of 3000 Bragg Grating Strain Sensors Distributed on Four Eight-meter Optical Fibers During Static Load Tests of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childers, Brooks A.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Allison, Sidney G.; Moore, Thomas C., Sr.; Hare, David A.; Batten, Christopher F.; Jegley, Dawn C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a fiber optic system to measure strain at thousands of locations along optical fibers where weakly reflecting Bragg gratings have been photoetched. The optical fibers were applied to an advanced composite transport wing along with conventional foil strain gages. A comparison of the fiber optic and foil gage systems used for this test will be presented including: a brief description of both strain data systems; a discussion of the process used for installation of the optical fiber; comparative data from the composite wing test; the processes used for the location and display of the high density fiber optic data. Calibration data demonstrating the potential accuracy of the fiber optic system will also be presented. The opportunities for industrial and commercial applications will be discussed. The fiber optic technique is shown to be a valuable augmentation to foil strain gages providing insight to structural behavior previously requiring reliance on modeling.

  1. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  2. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Petr Martin; Moses, William

    2008-06-11

    When simulating light collection in scintillators, modeling the angular distribution of optical light reflectance from surfaces is very important. Since light reflectance is poorly understood, either purely specular or purely diffuse reflectance is generally assumed. In this paper we measure the optical reflectance distribution for eleven commonly used reflectors. A 440 nm, output power stabilized, un-polarized laser is shone onto a reflector at a fixed angle of incidence. The reflected light's angular distribution is measured by an array of silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are movable to cover 2 pi of solid angle. The light-induced current is, through a multiplexer, read out with a digital multimeter. A LabVIEW program controls the motion of the laser and the photodiode array, the multiplexer, and the data collection. The laser can be positioned at any angle with a position accuracy of 10 arc minutes. Each photodiode subtends 6.3o, and the photodiode array can be positioned at any angle with up to 10 arc minute angular resolution. The dynamic range for the current measurements is 105:1. The measured light reflectance distribution was measured to be specular for several ESR films as well as for aluminum foil, mostly diffuse for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and titanium dioxide paint, and neither specular nor diffuse for Lumirror(R), Melinex(R) and Tyvek(R). Instead, a more complicated light distribution was measured for these three materials.

  3. Differential correction method applied to measurement of the FAST reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Yi; Zhu, Li-Chun; Hu, Jin-Wen; Li, Zhi-Heng

    2016-08-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) adopts an active deformable main reflector which is composed of 4450 triangular panels. During an observation, the illuminated area of the reflector is deformed into a 300-m diameter paraboloid and directed toward a source. To achieve accurate control of the reflector shape, positions of 2226 nodes distributed around the entire reflector must be measured with sufficient precision within a limited time, which is a challenging task because of the large scale. Measurement of the FAST reflector makes use of stations and node targets. However, in this case the effect of the atmosphere on measurement accuracy is a significant issue. This paper investigates a differential correction method for total stations measurement of the FAST reflector. A multi-benchmark differential correction method, including a scheme for benchmark selection and weight assignment, is proposed. On-site evaluation experiments show there is an improvement of 70%–80% in measurement accuracy compared with the uncorrected measurement, verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Two-way reflector based on two-dimensional sub-wavelength high-index contrast grating on SOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harpinder; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-05-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) high-index contrast grating (HCG) is proposed as a two-way reflector on Silicon-on-insulator (SOI). The proposed reflector provides high reflectivity over two (practically important) sets of angles of incidence- normal (θ = 0 °) and oblique/grazing (θ = 80 ° - 85 ° / 90 °). Analytical model of 2D HCG is presented using improved Fourier modal method. The vertical incidence is useful for application in VCSEL while oblique/grazing incidence can be utilized in high confinement (HCG mirrors based) hollow waveguides and Bragg reflectors. The proposed two-way reflector also exhibits a large reflection bandwidth (around telecom wavelength) which is an advantage for broadband photonic devices.

  5. A new approach for synthesizing dual reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittra, R.; Hyjazie, F.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    It is pointed out that the offset geometry for dual reflector antennas is attractive for satellite communications where low side lobes are necessary to achieve good isolation between adjacent main lobes operating over the same frequency band. A description is presented of a new, numerically rigorous technique for synthesizing dual offset reflectors. The objective of the synthesis procedure is to transform a given primary feed pattern into a desired aperture distribution through two reflections in an offset dual reflector system. It is found that a given specification for the aperture distribution does not always lead to a smooth solution for the two surfaces. In this event, the so-called energy condition on the specified amplitude distribution is relaxed, and an approximate solution which satisfies the energy condition only within a certain numerical tolerance is derived.

  6. A new approach for synthesizing dual reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Hyjazie, F.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the offset geometry for dual reflector antennas is attractive for satellite communications where low side lobes are necessary to achieve good isolation between adjacent main lobes operating over the same frequency band. A description is presented of a new, numerically rigorous technique for synthesizing dual offset reflectors. The objective of the synthesis procedure is to transform a given primary feed pattern into a desired aperture distribution through two reflections in an offset dual reflector system. It is found that a given specification for the aperture distribution does not always lead to a smooth solution for the two surfaces. In this event, the so-called energy condition on the specified amplitude distribution is relaxed, and an approximate solution which satisfies the energy condition only within a certain numerical tolerance is derived.

  7. Angle-tuned, evanescently-decoupled reflector for high-efficiency red light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Kyung; Cho, Hyun Kyong; Park, Kyung Keun; Jang, Junho; Lee, Jeong Soo; Park, Kyung Wook; Park, Youngho; Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-04-28

    We propose and demonstrate evanescently-decoupled, solid-angle-optimized distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for AlGaInP light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The thickness of each DBR layer is tuned to the wavelength slightly longer than the emission peak of the active medium in order to maximize the radiated power integrated over the top surface. In addition, to increase the horizontal radiation through the side facets, the glancing-angle reflectivity at the AlInP/AlAs interface is improved by employing an AlAs layer thicker than the attenuation length of the evanescent field. With the improved DBR, the integrated output power of AlGaInP LEDs is enhanced by a factor of 1.9 in comparison to those of LEDs with conventional DBRs. Additional 1.25-fold enhancement is observed by incorporating an square-lattice hole array (a=1200nm) into the top GaP surface by a conventional photolithography. PMID:18545303

  8. Analysis and design of tunable wideband microwave photonics phase shifter based on Fabry-Perot cavity and Bragg mirrors in silicon-on-insulator waveguide.

    PubMed

    Qu, Pengfei; Zhou, Jingran; Chen, Weiyou; Li, Fumin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Caixia; Ruan, Shengping; Dong, Wei

    2010-04-20

    We designed a microwave (MW) photonics phase shifter, consisting of a Fabry-Perot filter, a phase modulation region (PMR), and distributed Bragg reflectors, in a silicon-on-insulator rib waveguide. The thermo-optics effect was employed to tune the PMR. It was theoretically demonstrated that the linear MW phase shift of 0-2pi could be achieved by a refractive index variation of 0-9.68x10(-3) in an ultrawideband (about 38?GHz-1.9?THz), and the corresponding tuning resolution was about 6.92 degrees / degrees C. The device had a very compact size. It could be easily integrated in silicon optoelectronic chips and expected to be widely used in the high-frequency MW photonics field. PMID:20411021

  9. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  10. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  11. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  12. A contour calculation method for rapid freeform reflector construction with ellipsoid patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhenfeng; Yu, Feihong

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a contour calculation method (CCM) for the freeform reflector design. Conservation of energy relates the light flux from a Lambertian-type point source to a desired irradiance and a discrete spot distribution on a target plane. This relationship determines the edges of the reflector patches, thus, enabling the design of a non-imaging freeform reflector based on a series of ellipsoid patches modeled as NURBS curves in Rhinoceros. As an example, we present a freeform reflector design composed of 6400 ellipsoid patches to illuminate a surface with 94% uniformity. A computer calculation takes 18.5 s.

  13. Free-electron maser with high-selectivity Bragg resonator using coupled propagating and trapped modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Golubev, I. I.; Golubykh, S. M.; Zaslavskii, V. Yu.; Zotova, I. V.; Kaminsky, A. K.; Kozlov, A. P.; Malkin, A. M.; Peskov, N. Yu.; Perel'Shteĭn, É. A.; Sedykh, S. N.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-10-01

    A free-electron maser (FEM) with a double-mirror resonator involving a new modification of Bragg structures operating on coupled propagating and quasi-cutoff (trapped) modes has been studied. The presence of trapped waves in the feedback chain improves the selectivity of Bragg resonators and ensures stable single-mode generation regime at a considerable superdimensionality of the interaction space. The possibility of using the new feedback mechanism has been confirmed by experiments with a 30-GHz FEM pumped by the electron beam of LIU-3000 (JINR) linear induction accelerator, in which narrow-band generation was obtained at a power of ˜10 MW and a frequency close to the cutoff frequency of the trapped mode excited in the input Bragg reflector.

  14. Effect of reflector location at array criticality

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.T.

    1980-11-01

    The motion of a thick reflector away from a critical array of subcritical units of fissile material results in an array reactivity loss. The fraction of the total reactivity worth of a reflector is related to the distance a reflector is located from the surfaces of an array. The magnitude of reactivity associated with the reflector location may be used in the assessment of nuclear criticality safety of operations with fissile materials to establish margins of subcriticality. An equivalence is established between the reactivity associated with reflector location and the reactivity associated with the thickness of a water reflector closely fitting an array.

  15. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  16. Shaped reflector antenna analysis using the Jacobi-Bessel series. [design for space and satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.

    1980-01-01

    A vector radiation integral is derived for an offset shaped reflector illuminated by an arbitrarily located and oriented source. A procedure for expressing the integral in terms of a series of the Fourier transforms of an effective aperture distribution is discussed. The Jacobi-Bessel series is used to evaluate the Fourier transforms. Numerical results are presented for different reflector configurations and source locations.

  17. Optical receivers using rough reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the possible use of rough, or nondiffraction-limited, reflectors for collecting optical signals. It is shown that in the absence of background radiation, the reflector's surface quality has little effect on the performance of a properly designed receiver, but that the presence of even small amounts of background radiation can lead to severe performance degradation. Techniques are suggested for improving receiver performance in high-background environments, and bounds and approximations to the exact error-probability expressions are derived.

  18. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  19. Adjusting the Contour of Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Giebler, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Postfabrication adjustment of contour of panels for reflector, such as parabolic reflector for radio antennas, possible with simple mechanism consisting of threaded stud, two nuts, and flexure. Contours adjusted manually.

  20. Construction concepts for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Withnell, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    Three construction concepts for deployable precision segmented reflectors are presented. The designs produce reflectors with very high surface accuracies and diameters three to five times the width of the launch vehicle shroud. Of primary importance is the reliability of both the deployment process and the reflector operation. This paper is conceptual in nature, and uses these criteria to present beneficial design concepts for deployable precision segmented reflectors.

  1. Bicollimated near-field Gregorian reflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, J. B. L.

    1983-02-01

    A bicollimated near-field Gregorian reflector is structurally similar to a classical confocal parabolic reflector, but its surfaces are shaped to have better scan capability. A geometrical optics procedure is used in designing the reflector surfaces. A three dimensional ray tracing procedure is used in analyzing the aperture phase errors as the beam is scanned to different angles. The results show that the bicollimated configuration has about 45% greater angular scanning range than the corresponding confocal parabolic dual-reflector system.

  2. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  3. Wavelength-division-multiplexed distributed optical fiber amplifier bus network for data and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Blair, Loudon T.; Urquhart, Paul

    1993-07-01

    A wavelength-division-multiplexed distributed optical fiber amplifier bus network was constructed, using five 150-m sections of lightly doped Er fiber to provide signal amplification and four 1 x 2 directional couplers to tap the signal to four Bragg reflectors. The performance of the bus network was studied at different signal wavelengths, and the network topology suitable for simultaneous transmission of data and wavelength multiplexing of sensors was considered. Such an approach can increase the use of fiber-based local-area networks in intelligent (smart) structures.

  4. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  5. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  6. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  7. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  8. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  9. Primary reflector for solar energy collection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor); Stephens, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector is disclosed which has an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material. The device reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well-known freeway paving machinery.

  10. Computer prediction of large reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botula, A.

    1980-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating reflector antenna radiation patterns was rewritten and extended to include reflectors composed of a number of panels. These individual panels must be analytic surfaces. The theoretical foundation for the program is as follows: Geometrical optics techniques are used to trace rays from a feed antenna to the reflector surface and back to a mathematical plane just in front of the reflector. The resulting tangential electric field distribution, assumed to be the only source of forward radiation, is integrated numerically to calculate the radiation pattern for a desired set of angles. When the reflector is composed of more than one panel, each panel is treated as a separated antenna, the ray-tracing procedure and integration being repeated for each panel. The results of the individual aperture plane integrations are stored and summed to yield the relative electric field strength over the angles of interest. An example and several test cases are included to demonstrate the use of the program and verify the new method of computation.

  11. Preliminary design of 19-element feed cluster for a large F/D reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The design of a low sidelobe 19 element microstrip cluster and its distribution network is described. The problem of spillover illumination of an adjacent reflector in a multiple aperture reflector system is addressed. A practical implementation of the array is presented which requires only one printed circuit board for the distribution network with the potential for being easily tailored to a wide range of excitation distributions.

  12. Optical Bragg accelerators.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Amit; Schächter, Levi

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a Bragg waveguide consisting of a series of dielectric layers may form an excellent optical acceleration structure. Confinement of the accelerating fields is achieved, for both planar and cylindrical configurations by adjusting the first dielectric layer width. A typical structure made of silica and zirconia may support gradients of the order of 1 GV/m with an interaction impedance of a few hundreds of ohms and with an energy velocity of less than 0.5c. An interaction impedance of about 1000 Omega may be obtained by replacing the Zirconia with a (fictitious) material of epsilon=25. Special attention is paid to the wake field developing in such a structure. In the case of a relatively small number of layers, it is shown that the total electromagnetic power emitted is proportional to the square of the number of electrons in the macrobunch and inversely proportional to the number of microbunches; this power is also inversely proportional to the square of the internal radius of the structure for a cylindrical structure, and to the width of the vacuum core in a planar structure. Quantitative results are given for a higher number of dielectric layers, showing that in comparison to a structure bounded by metallic walls, the emitted power is significantly smaller due to propagation bands allowing electromagnetic energy to escape. PMID:15324182

  13. Optimal design of one-dimensional photonic crystal back reflectors for thin-film silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu Zhang, Jianjun Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying

    2014-08-14

    For thin-film silicon solar cells (TFSC), a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) is a good back reflector (BR) because it increases the total internal reflection at the back surface. We used the plane-wave expansion method and the finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm to simulate and analyze the photonic bandgap (PBG), the reflection and the absorption properties of a 1D PC and to further explore the optimal 1D PC design for use in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. With identified refractive index contrast and period thickness, we found that the PBG and the reflection of a 1D PC are strongly influenced by the contrast in bilayer thickness. Additionally, light coupled to the top three periods of the 1D PC and was absorbed if one of the bilayers was absorptive. By decreasing the thickness contrast of the absorptive layer relative to the non-absorptive layer, an average reflectivity of 96.7% was achieved for a 1D PC alternatively stacked with a-Si:H and SiO{sub 2} in five periods. This reflectivity was superior to a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) structure with 93.5% and an Ag film with 93.4%. n-i-p a-Si:H solar cells with an optimal 1D PC-based BR offer a higher short-circuit current density than those with a DBR-based BR or an AZO/Ag-based BR. These results provide new design rules for photonic structures in TFSC.

  14. Compact directed percolation with movable partial reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2002-09-01

    We study a version of compact directed percolation (CDP) in one dimension in which occupation of a site for the first time requires that a 'mine' or an antiparticle be eliminated. This process is analogous to the variant of directed percolation with a long-time memory, proposed by Grassberger et al (1997 Phys. Rev. E 55 2488) in order to understand spreading at a critical point involving an infinite number of absorbing configurations. The problem is equivalent to that of a pair of random walkers in the presence of movable partial reflectors. The walkers, which are unbiased, start one lattice spacing apart and annihilate on their first contact. Each time one of the walkers tries to visit a new site, it is reflected (with probability r) back to its previous position, while the reflector is simultaneously pushed one step away from the walker. Iteration of the discrete-time evolution equation for the probability distribution yields the survival probability S(t). We find that S(t) ~ t-δ, with δ varying continuously between 1/2 and 1.160 as the reflection probability varies between 0 and 1.

  15. Bragg wavelength shift for irradiated polymer fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdalla, Taymour A.; Nafee, Sherif S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of neutron-irradiation from a 5 Ci Am-241/Be-9 neutron source on the characteristics of Polymer Fiber Bragg Grating (PFBG) has been studied in the present work. The PFBG has been irradiated using fast neutrons with different doses range from 24 up to 720 Gy. The transmittance and reflectance of the PFBG have been recorded and interpreted before and after the irradiation. Results in this study showed that the neutron irradiation might cause a structural degradation of the polymer's main chain, which led to a shift in the Central Bragg Wavelength (CBW). In addition, the CBW increased from 4 pm to 14 pm when the neutron dose increased from 24 to 720 Gy. Moreover, no saturation has been observed in the CBW under the effect of the applied doses. Therefore, the PFBG of high Bragg wavelength is a suitable candidate for the use in the dosimetry systems.

  16. Open-loop heliostat reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Koide, G.T.

    1980-07-30

    A microcomputer controlled heliostat driven in an elevation/azimuth gimbal arrangement with simple shaft encoders can reflect a sunlight beam to within +-two inches vertically and +-one inch horizontally at a distance of seven feet from the target, which corresponds to an arc of +-1.5/sup 0/. To minimize the error in tracking, the reflector should be aligned as accurately as possible with the north-south axis, with a transit or solar noon.

  17. Volume Bragg grating stabilized spectrally narrow Tm fiber laser.

    PubMed

    McComb, Timothy; Sudesh, Vikas; Richardson, Martin

    2008-04-15

    A Tm-doped large mode area (LMA) silica fiber laser has been locked to a stable wavelength of 2,053.9 nm using a volume Bragg grating (VBG). The measured spectral width of the laser output was <300 pm, limited by the spectrometer resolution. Although this laser had modest output (approximately 5W) and slope efficiency (41%), this new approach to spectrally limiting the output of LMA fiber lasers is inherently extendable to kilowatt powers, opening up several applications including high-power pulsed fiber lasers and spectral beam combining. Performance characteristics of the laser compared to one using a dielectric mirror as a high reflector are described, and the results imply low VBG losses. PMID:18414564

  18. Bragg interactions in periodic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic waves of wavelength lambda with periodic structures of spatial period lambda are studied. The emphasis of the work is on Bragg interactions where lambda approximately equal to 2 lambda/N and the Bragg order N takes on the values 1, 2,.... An extended coupled waves (ECW) theory is developed for the case N greater or equal to 2 and the results of the theory are found to compare favorably with the exact results of Floquet theory. Numerous numerical results are displayed as Brillouin diagrams for the first few Bragg orders. Moreover, explicit expressions for coupling coefficients, bandgap shifts and bandgap widths are derived for singly periodic media. Particular note is taken of phase speeding effects.

  19. Intermediate reflectors for enhanced top cell performance in photovoltaic thin-film tandem cells.

    PubMed

    Bielawny, Andreas; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lederer, Falk; Wehrspohn, Ralf B

    2009-05-11

    We have investigated the impact of three types of intermediate reflectors on the absorption enhancement in the top cell of micromorph tandem solar cells using rigorous diffraction theory. As intermediate reflectors we consider homogenous dielectric thin-films and 1D and 3D photonic crystals. Besides the expected absorption enhancements in cases where photonic band gaps are matched to the absorption edge of the semiconductor, our results distinguish between the impact of zero order Bragg-resonances and diffraction-based enhancement at larger lattice constants of the 3D photonic crystal. Our full-spectrum analysis permits for a quantitative prediction of the photovoltaic conversion efficiency increase of the a-Si:H top cell. PMID:19434178

  20. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung Kil; Hah, Chang Joo; Cho, Sung Ju; Seong, Ki Bong

    2016-01-01

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4˜5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO2 fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  1. Resonant Bragg quantum wells in hybrid photonic crystals: optical properties and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiumarini, D.; D'Andrea, A.; Tomassini, N.

    2016-03-01

    The exciton-polariton propagation in resonant hybrid periodic stacks of isotropic/anisotropic layers, with misaligned in-plane anisotropy and Bragg photon frequency in resonance with Wannier exciton of 2D quantum wells is studied by self-consistent theory and in the effective mass approximation. The optical tailoring of this new class of resonant Bragg reflectors, where the structural periodicity of a multi-layer drives the in-plane optical \\hat{C}-axis orientation, is computed for symmetric and asymmetric elementary cells by conserving strong radiation-matter coupling and photonic band-gaps. The optical response computation, on a finite cluster of N-asymmetric elementary cells, shows anomalous exciton-polariton propagation and absorbance properties strongly dependent on the incident wave polarizations. Finally, the behaviour of the so-called intermediate dispersion curves, close to the unperturbed exciton resonance, and located between upper and lower branches of the first band gap, is studied as a function of the in-plane \\hat{C}-axis orientation. This latter optical property is promising for storing exciton-polariton impulses in this kind of Bragg reflector.

  2. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  3. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  4. System Would Keep Telescope Reflector Segments Aligned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Eldred, Daniel B.; Briggs, Hugh C.; Agronin, Michael L.; Kiceniuk, Taras

    1991-01-01

    Proposed actuation system maintains alignments of reflector segments of large telescope. Sensors measure positions and orientations of segments. Figure-control computer calculates orientation and figure of overall reflector surface from sensor data. Responding to computer output, servocontroller for each actuator corrects piston and tilt errors of each segment. Actuators adjust segments in response to sensed positions. Concept applicable to such large segmented space-based reflectors as those used in communication and in collection of solar energy.

  5. Air-suspended TiO2-based HCG reflectors for visible spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Ehsan; Bengtsson, Jörgen; Gustavsson, Johan; Carlsson, Stefan; Rossbach, Georg; Haglund, Åsa

    2015-02-01

    For GaN-based microcavity light emitters, such as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and resonant cavity light emitting diodes (RCLEDs) in the blue-green wavelength regime, achieving a high reflectivity wide bandwidth feedback mirror is truly challenging. The material properties of the III-nitride alloys are hardly compatible with the conventional distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and the newly proposed high-contrast gratings (HCGs). Alternatively, at least for the top outcoupling mirror, dielectric materials offer more suitable material combinations not only for the DBRs but also for the HCGs. HCGs may offer advantages such as transverse mode and polarization control, a broader reflectivity spectrum than epitaxially grown DBRs, and the possibility to set the resonance wavelength after epitaxial growth by the grating parameters. In this work we have realized an air-suspended TiO2 grating with the help of a SiO2 sacrificial layer. The deposition processes for the dielectric layers were fine-tuned to minimize the residual stress. To achieve an accurate control of the grating duty cycle, a newly developed lift-off process, using hydrogen silesquioxan (HSQ) and sacrificial polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) resists, was applied to deposit the hard mask, providing sub-10 nm resolution. The finally obtained TiO2/air HCGs were characterized in a micro-reflectance measurement setup. A peak power reflectivity in excess of 95% was achieved for TM polarization at the center wavelength of 435 nm, with a reflectivity stopband width of about 80 nm (FWHM). The measured HCG reflectance spectra were compared to corresponding simulations obtained from rigorous coupled-wave analysis and very good agreement was found.

  6. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  7. Solar thermal collectors using planar reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    Specular reflectors have been used successfully with flat-plate collectors to achieve exceptionally high operating temperatures and high delivered energy per unit collector area. Optimal orientation of collectors and reflectors can result in even higher performance with an improved relationship between energy demand and supply. This paper reports on a study providing first order optimization of collector-reflector arrays in which single- and multiple-faceted reflectors in fixed or singly adjustable configurations provide delivered energy maxima in either summer or winter.

  8. Cherenkov radiation oscillator without reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, Y.; Yang, Z.; Hangyo, M.; Miyamoto, S.

    2014-05-12

    This Letter presents a Cherenkov radiation oscillator with an electron beam travelling over a finitely thick plate made of negative-index materials. In such a scheme, the external reflectors required in the traditional Cherenkov oscillators are not necessary, since the electromagnetic energy flows backward in the negative-index materials, leading to inherent feedback. We theoretically analyzed the interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic wave, and worked out the growth rate and start current through numerical calculations. With the help of particle-in-cell simulation, the theoretical predictions are well demonstrated.

  9. Study of Membrane Reflector Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, K.; Hedgepeth, J.

    1979-01-01

    Very large reflective surfaces are required by future spacecraft for such purposes as solar energy collection, antenna surfaces, thermal control, attitude and orbit control with solar pressure, and solar sailing. The performance benefits in large membrane reflector systems, which may be derived from an advancement of this film and related structures technology, are identified and qualified. The results of the study are reported and summarized. Detailed technical discussions of various aspects of the study are included in several separate technical notes which are referenced.

  10. Piezocomposite Actuator Arrays for Correcting and Controlling Wavefront Error in Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel Case; Peterson, Lee D.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Shi, Fang; Agnes, Greg S.; Hoffman, Samuel M.; Wilkie, William Keats

    2012-01-01

    Three reflectors have been developed and tested to assess the performance of a distributed network of piezocomposite actuators for correcting thermal deformations and total wave-front error. The primary testbed article is an active composite reflector, composed of a spherically curved panel with a graphite face sheet and aluminum honeycomb core composite, and then augmented with a network of 90 distributed piezoelectric composite actuators. The piezoelectric actuator system may be used for correcting as-built residual shape errors, and for controlling low-order, thermally-induced quasi-static distortions of the panel. In this study, thermally-induced surface deformations of 1 to 5 microns were deliberately introduced onto the reflector, then measured using a speckle holography interferometer system. The reflector surface figure was subsequently corrected to a tolerance of 50 nm using the actuators embedded in the reflector's back face sheet. Two additional test articles were constructed: a borosilicate at window at 150 mm diameter with 18 actuators bonded to the back surface; and a direct metal laser sintered reflector with spherical curvature, 230 mm diameter, and 12 actuators bonded to the back surface. In the case of the glass reflector, absolute measurements were performed with an interferometer and the absolute surface was corrected. These test articles were evaluated to determine their absolute surface control capabilities, as well as to assess a multiphysics modeling effort developed under this program for the prediction of active reflector response. This paper will describe the design, construction, and testing of active reflector systems under thermal loads, and subsequent correction of surface shape via distributed peizeoelctric actuation.

  11. An optical fiber Bragg grating tactile sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Barbara; Allsop, Thomas; Williams, John; Webb, David; Bennion, Ian; Fisher, Matthew

    2007-05-01

    Tactile sensors are needed for many emerging robotic and telepresence applications such as keyhole surgery and robot operation in unstructured environments. We have proposed and demonstrated a tactile sensor consisting of a fibre Bragg grating embedded in a polymer "finger". When the sensor is placed in contact with a surface and translated tangentially across it measurements on the changes in the reflectivity spectrum of the grating provide a measurement of the spatial distribution of forces perpendicular to the surface and thus, through the elasticity of the polymer material, to the surface roughness. Using a sensor fabricated from a Poly Siloxane polymer (Methyl Vinyl Silicone rubber) spherical cap 50 mm in diameter, 6 mm deep with an embedded 10 mm long Bragg grating we have characterised the first and second moment of the grating spectral response when scanned across triangular and semicircular periodic structures both with a modulation depth of 1 mm and a period of 2 mm. The results clearly distinguish the periodicity of the surface structure and the differences between the two different surface profiles. For the triangular structure a central wavelength modulation of 4 pm is observed and includes a fourth harmonic component, the spectral width is modulated by 25 pm. Although crude in comparison to human senses these results clearly shown the potential of such a sensor for tactile imaging and we expect that with further development in optimising both the grating and polymer "finger" properties a much increased sensitivity and spatial resolution is achievable.

  12. Utilization of monolayer MoS2 in Bragg stacks and metamaterial structures as broadband absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Bablu; Simsek, Ergun

    2016-06-01

    We numerically study the possibility of using atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) for applications requiring broadband absorption in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. We demonstrate that when monolayer TMDs are positioned into a finite-period of multilayer Bragg stack geometry, they make broadband, wide-angle, almost polarization-independent absorbers. In our study, we consider molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) as semiconducting and dielectric thin film of alternate high- and low- index films, respectively. By optimizing the thickness of the SiO2 film, we find that monolayer MoS2 based Bragg stacks can absorb 94.7% of the incident energy in the visible (350-700 nm). Similar structures can be engineered to make perfect reflectors for saturable absorption applications. We also demonstrate that bandwidth of metamaterial absorbers can be expanded using monolayer TMDs.

  13. Spatial suppression of interference in hybrid reflector antennas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, N.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, E.

    2016-04-01

    The article describes a 7-beam hybrid reflector antenna with a 19-element feed element which forms a radiation pattern in the form of a cluster. During the research the synthesis of the amplitude-phase distribution of the antenna feed element has been conducted. A radiation pattern for three situations of interference: along the first side lobe, along the ramp of the main lobe, along the main lobe.

  14. Detecting subsurface reflectors in southwestern Japan using ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Shiro

    2010-05-01

    We will demonstrate to detect several subsurface reflectors in southwestern Japan using ambient seismic noise. There are several subsurface reflectors or possible reflectors shown in previous studies. Examples are mid-crust reflector in Tamba area (near Osaka and Kyoto), reflective Moho discontinuity in Shikoku district (e.g. Gupta et al., 2009, JAES), and upper boundary of Philippine Sea plate which is gently subducting beneath Shikoku district (e.g. Shiomi et al., 2004, JGR). We computed the auto-correlation functions (ACF) of continuous short period seismograms obtained from Hinet (NIED) and DPRI (Kyoto Univ.) seismic networks. We divided the continuous record into 1 hour segments and applied ‘running absolute mean normalization' (Bensen et al., 2007, GJI) and band-pass filtering. In this analysis, pass band of the filter was assumed 0.5 Hz - 1.0 Hz. Then we stacked the ACFs of at least 1.5 years long for each single station. In this frequency range, the shapes of ACFs are rather temporally stable although the slight seasonal change of the input signal recognized from the corresponding cross-correlation functions among the stations. Thus we stacked the ACFs of all year around without selecting particular season. Finally we adopted automatic gain control (AGC) filter to enhance the later phases of the stacked ACFs. Preliminary result shows several phases recognized in some regions. Lag times of prominent phases of one region seem to be different from those of the other region. Although these phase are not identified in this stage, we are investigating the source of the phases. If this method is successfully applied, we would able to delineate precise distribution of subsurface reflectors beneath Japan using the dense seismic network. It will contribute to understand the behavior of possible existing fluid beneath active faults that affects the occurrence of the shallow crustal earthquakes as well as shallow plate boundary earthquakes.

  15. Characteristics of AlN/GaN nanowire Bragg mirror grown on (001) silicon by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Junseok; Bhattacharya, Pallab; Zhou, Zifan; Guo, Wei; Ooi, Boon S.

    2013-10-28

    GaN nanowires containing AlN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) heterostructures have been grown on (001) silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. A peak reflectance of 70% with normal incidence at 560 nm is derived from angle resolved reflectance measurements on the as-grown nanowire DBR array. The measured peak reflectance wavelength is significantly blue-shifted from the ideal calculated value. The discrepancy is explained by investigating the reflectance of the nanoscale DBRs with a finite difference time domain technique. Ensemble nanowire microcavities with In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N nanowires clad by AlN/GaN DBRs have also been characterized. Room temperature emission from the microcavity exhibits considerable linewidth narrowing compared to that measured for unclad In{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}N nanowires. The resonant emission is characterized by a peak wavelength and linewidth of 575 nm and 39 nm, respectively.

  16. Bragg diffraction for normal and obliquely circularly polarized light due a new chiral mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Garay, P.; Manzanares-Martinez, J.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, A.; Lizola, Josue; Clark, Marielena; Palma, Lillian

    2015-09-01

    We have found experimentally the transmittance of normal incident circularly polarized light due to new chiral mixture that was distorted by electric field. The chiral mixture was achieved by mixtures of two nematic liquid crystals (5OCB and 5CB) and S-1-bromo-2-methylbutane. We have found a regime of circular Bragg diffraction for certain values of concentrations and thickness. Optical diffraction phenomenon have received particular attention in research for optical and electro-optical applications, such as low -voltage modulators, reflective phase gratings and smart reflectors.

  17. Shaped cassegrain reflector antenna. [design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Design equations are developed to compute the reflector surfaces required to produce uniform illumination on the main reflector of a cassegrain system when the feed pattern is specified. The final equations are somewhat simple and straightforward to solve (using a computer) compared to the ones which exist already in the literature. Step by step procedure for solving the design equations is discussed in detail.

  18. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  19. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  20. Strong Bragg backscattering in reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Heuraux, S.; Popov, A. Yu

    2009-06-01

    The reflection of the probing microwave occurring in the vicinity of the backscattering Bragg resonance point (far from the cut-off) at a high enough density fluctuation level and leading to a large jump of the reflected wave phase and a corresponding time delay is described analytically using a 1D model. Explicit expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients are derived and compared against results of numerical modelling. The criteria for transition to the nonlinear regime of strong Bragg backscattering (BBS) is obtained for both O-mode and X-mode reflectometry. It is shown that a strong nonlinear regime of BBS may occur in ITER at the 0.5-2% relative density perturbation level both for the ordinary and extraordinary mode probing. The possibility of probing wave trapping leading to strong enhancement of the electric field and associated high phase variation of the reflected wave due to BBS is demonstrated.

  1. Monolithic integrated optic fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian

    2010-04-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are a mature sensing technology that has gained rapid acceptance in civil, aerospace, chemical and petrochemical, medicine, aviation and automotive industries. Fiber Bragg grating sensors can be use for a variety of measurements including strain, stress, vibration, acoustics, acceleration, pressure, temperature, moisture, and corrosion distributed at multiple locations within the structure using a single fiber element. The most prominent advantages of FBGs are: small size and light weight, multiple FBG transducers on a single fiber, and immunity to radio frequency interference. A major disadvantage of FBG technology is that conventional state-of-the-art fiber Bragg grating interrogation systems are typically bulky, heavy, and costly bench top instruments that are assembled from off-the-shelf fiber optic and optical components integrated with a signal electronics board into an instrument console. Based on the need for a compact FBG interrogation system, this paper describes recent progress towards the development of a miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-TransceiverTM) system based on multi-channel monolithic integrated optic sensor microchip technology. The integrated optic microchip technology enables the monolithic integration of all of the functionalities, both passive and active, of conventional bench top FBG sensor interrogators systems, packaged in a miniaturized, low power operation, 2-cm x 5-cm small form factor (SFF) package suitable for the long-term structural health monitoring in applications where size, weight, and power are critical for operation.

  2. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the backscatter cross section of a dihedral corner reflector, using Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), is completed in the azimuthal plane, and very good agreement with experimental results is obtained. The advantages and limitations of the GTD and PTD techniques are discussed specifically for radar cross section applications. The utilization of GTD and PTD in oblique incidence diffraction from conducting targets is discussed. Results for equivalent current off-axis diffraction from the flat rectangular plate are presented using the equivalent currents of Knott, Senior, and Michaeli. The rectangular subdivision technique of Sikta, and its extension by Sunatara, alleviate some of the limitations of the equivalent techniques. As yet, neither technique can be used in bistatic scattering or for multiple scattering of a complex target.

  3. Fibre Bragg grating for flood embankment monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowski, Konrad; Nevar, Stanislau; Dworzanski, Adam; Hackiewicz, Krzysztof; Jedrzejewski, Kazimierz

    2014-11-01

    In this article we present the preliminary studies for the flood embankment monitoring system based on the fibre Bragg gratings. The idea of the system is presented. The Bragg resonance shift is transformed to the change of the power detected by the standard InGaAs photodiode. The discrimination of the received power was executed by another fibre Bragg grating with different parameters. The project of the fully functional system is presented as well.

  4. Six-dimensional optical storage utilizing wavelength selective, polarization sensitive, and reflectivity graded Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shangqing

    2014-09-01

    An optical storage system which stores data in three spacial and three physical dimensions is designed and investigated. Its feasibility has been demonstrated by theoretical derivation and numerical calculation. This system has comprehensive advantages including very large capacity, ultrafast throughputs, relatively simple structure and compatibility with CD and DVD. It's an actually practicable technology. With two-photon absorption writing/erasing and optical coherence tomography reading, its storage capacity is over 32 Tbytes per DVD sized disk, and its reading speed is over 25 Gbits/s with high signal-to-noise ratio of over 76 dB. The larger capacity of over 1 Pbyte per disk is potential.

  5. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure

    PubMed Central

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes. PMID:26345083

  6. Lightweight composite reflectors for space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian E.; McNeal, Shawn R.; Ono, Russell M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to advance the state of the art in lightweight, high optical quality reflectors for space- and Earth-based telescopes. This was accomplished through the combination of a precision silicon carbide (SiC) reflector surface and a high specific strength, low-mass SiC structural support. Reducing the mass of components launched into space can lead to substantial cost savings, but an even greater benefit of lightweight reflectors for both space- and Earth-based optics applications is the fact that they require far less complex and less expensive positioning systems. While Ultramet is not the first company to produce SiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for reflector surfaces, it is the first to propose and demonstrate a lightweight, open-cell SiC structural foam that can support a thin layer of the highly desirable polished SiC reflector material. SiC foam provides a substantial structural and mass advantage over conventional honeycomb supports and alternative finned structures. The result is a reflector component that meets or exceeds the optical properties of current high-quality glass, ceramic, and metal reflectors while maintaining a substantially lower areal density.

  7. Fabrication of Spherical Reflectors in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu; Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Serivens, Wally

    2005-01-01

    A process is proposed for fabrication of lightweight spherical reflectors in outer space for telescopes, radio antennas, and light collectors that would be operated there. The process would obviate the relatively massive substrates and frames needed to support such reflectors in normal Earth gravitation. According to the proposal, fabrication of a reflector would begin with blowing of a bubble to the specified reflector radius. Taking advantage of the outer-space vacuum as a suitable environment for evaporative deposition of metal, a metal-evaporation source would be turned on and moved around the bubble to deposit a reflective metal film over the specified reflector area to a thickness of several microns. Then the source would be moved and aimed to deposit more metal around the edge of the reflector area, increasing the thickness there to approximately equal to 100 micron to form a frame. Then the bubble would be deflated and peeled off the metal, leaving a thin-film spherical mirror having an integral frame. The mirror would then be mounted for use. The feasibility of this technology has been proved by fabricating a prototype at JPL. As shown in the figure, a 2-in. (.5-cm) diameter hemispherical prototype reflector was made from a polymer bubble coated with silver, forming a very smooth surface.

  8. Integrated reflector antenna design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Ni, S.; Christensen, M.; Wang, Y. M.

    1993-01-01

    Reflector antenna design is a mature field and most aspects were studied. However, of that most previous work is distinguished by the fact that it is narrow in scope, analyzing only a particular problem under certain conditions. Methods of analysis of this type are not useful for working on real-life problems since they can not handle the many and various types of perturbations of basic antenna design. The idea of an integrated design and analysis is proposed. By broadening the scope of the analysis, it becomes possible to deal with the intricacies attendant with modem reflector antenna design problems. The concept of integrated reflector antenna design is put forward. A number of electromagnetic problems related to reflector antenna design are investigated. Some of these show how tools for reflector antenna design are created. In particular, a method for estimating spillover loss for open-ended waveguide feeds is examined. The problem of calculating and optimizing beam efficiency (an important figure of merit in radiometry applications) is also solved. Other chapters deal with applications of this general analysis. The wide angle scan abilities of reflector antennas is examined and a design is proposed for the ATDRSS triband reflector antenna. The development of a general phased-array pattern computation program is discussed and how the concept of integrated design can be extended to other types of antennas is shown. The conclusions are contained in the final chapter.

  9. Reflectors Made from Membranes Stretched Between Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Tolomeo, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight cylindrical reflectors of a proposed type would be made from reflective membranes stretched between pairs of identically curved and identically oriented end rails. In each such reflector, the curvature of the two beams would define the reflector shape required for the intended application. For example, the beams could be curved to define a reflector of parabolic cross section, so that light incident along the axis of symmetry perpendicular to the cylindrical axis would be focused to a line. In addition, by applying suitable forces to the ends of the beams, one could bend the beams to adjust the reflector surface figure to within a precision of the order of the wavelength of the radiation to be reflected. The figure depicts an example of beams shaped so that in the absence of applied forces, each would be flat on one side and would have a radius of curvature R on the opposite side. Alternatively, the curvature of the reflector-membrane side could be other than circular. In general, the initial curvature would be chosen to optimize the final reflector shape. Then by applying forces F between the beam ends in the positions and orientations shown in the figure, one could bend beams to adjust their shape to a closer approximation of the desired precise circular or noncircular curvature.

  10. Multiple Bragg reflection by a thick mosaic crystal.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Joachim

    2014-09-01

    Symmetric Bragg-case reflections from a thick, ideally imperfect, crystal slab are studied mostly by analytical means. The scattering transfer function of a thin mosaic layer is derived and brought into a form that allows for analytical approximations or easy quadrature. The Darwin-Hamilton equations are generalized, lifting the restriction of wavevectors to a two-dimensional scattering plane. A multireflection expansion shows that wavevector diffusion can be studied independently of the real-space coordinate. Combining analytical arguments and Monte Carlo simulations, multiple Bragg reflections are found to result in a minor correction of the reflected intensity, a moderate broadening of the reflected azimuth angle distribution, a considerable modification of the polar angle distribution, and a noticeable shift and distortion of rocking curves. PMID:25176991

  11. Recent advances in electromagnetic synthesis and analysis of dual-shaped reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Imbriale, W.; Mittra, R.

    1982-01-01

    Dual-shaped reflectors have been used for many years. Thus, these reflectors have been used as high gain antennas on Voyagers 1 and 2. The objectives of the geometrical optics (GO) dual shaped synthesis are considered. Concerning the synthesis of dual shaped reflectors, it has been shown for circular symmetric reflectors that an exact GO solution can be found to the problem of transforming, by two reflections, any feed pattern into any aperture distribution. This problem involves solving two simultaneous nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The same approach for offset geometry leads to two simultaneous nonlinear partial differential equations. It is shown that these equations could also be integrated numerically, except that in general these equations are not total and therefore, in general, they do not have a 'smooth' solution. It is further shown that the offset partial differentials often very nearly form a total differential in many cases of practical importance.

  12. Bragg optics computer codes for neutron scattering instrument design

    SciTech Connect

    Popovici, M.; Yelon, W.B.; Berliner, R.R.; Stoica, A.D.

    1997-09-01

    Computer codes for neutron crystal spectrometer design, optimization and experiment planning are described. Phase space distributions, linewidths and absolute intensities are calculated by matrix methods in an extension of the Cooper-Nathans resolution function formalism. For modeling the Bragg reflection on bent crystals the lamellar approximation is used. Optimization is done by satisfying conditions of focusing in scattering and in real space, and by numerically maximizing figures of merit. Examples for three-axis and two-axis spectrometers are given.

  13. Solar cell having improved back surface reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1982-10-01

    The operating temperature is reduced and the output of a solar cell is increased by using a solar cell which carries electrodes in a grid finger pattern on its back surface. These electrodes are sintered at the proper temperature to provide good ohmic contact. After sintering, a reflective material is deposited on the back surface by vacuum evaporation. Thus, the application of the back surface reflector is separate from the back contact formation. Back surface reflectors formed in conjunction with separate grid finger configuration back contacts are more effective than those formed by full back metallization of the reflector material.

  14. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  15. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  16. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  17. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  18. 49 CFR 393.26 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reflectors. (a) Mounting. Reflex reflectors shall be mounted at the locations required by § 393.11. In the... mounting height range. All permanent reflex reflectors shall be securely mounted on a rigid part of the... required to be permanently mounted to a part of the vehicle. Temporary reflex reflectors on...

  19. Pactruss support structure for precision segmented reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The application of the Pactruss deployable structure to the support of large paraboloidal reflectors of very high precision was studied. The Pactruss concept, originally conceived for the Space Station truss, is shown to be suitable for use in a triangular arrangement to support a reflector surface composed of hexagonal reflector panels. A hybrid of Pactruss structural and deployable single-fold beams is shown to accommodate a center body. A minor alteration in the geometry is in order to avoid lockup during deployment. To assess the capability of the hybrid Pactruss structure, an example truss supporting a full-scale (20 meter diameter) infrared telescope was analyzed for static and dynamic performance. A truss structure weighing 800 kilograms gave adequate support to a reflector surface weighing 3,000 kilograms.

  20. Property of radially quadratic reflector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizusawa, M.; Katagi, T.

    1986-01-01

    This report shows that when considered in terms of optical geometry, radially parabolic and radially hyperbolic mirrors used as mirrors for Cassegrain and parabolic antennas possess values similar to common conical horn reflector antennas.

  1. Precision Segmented Reflector figure control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Eldred, D.; Briggs, C.; Kiceniuk, T.; Agronin, M.

    1989-01-01

    A control system architecture for an actively controlled segmented reflector is described along with a design realization for achieving precision alignment of reflector panels. Performance requirements are derived in part from the Large Deployable Reflector, which is a representative mission, and error allocations are made which consider mirror panel surface errors, position measurement and figure estimation, and position control of both quasi-static and dynamic disturbances. The design uses multiple wavelength interferometric edge sensors and voice coil actuators in conjunction with a hybrid control strategy to correct panel position errors. A unit cell shown to be central to the concept is analyzed. The cell integrates the sensing, actuation, and mechanical functions of a control module together with a reflector panel to form a unitized assembly.

  2. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  3. Uniform sunlight concentration reflectors for photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Rabady, Rabi Ibrahim

    2014-03-20

    Sunlight concentration is essential to reach high temperatures of a working fluid in solar-thermal applications and to reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation systems. Commonly, sunlight concentration is realized by parabolic or cylindrical reflectors, which do not provide uniform concentration on the receiver finite surface. Uniform concentration of sunlight is favored especially for the PV conversion applications since it not only enhances the conversion efficiency of sunlight but also reduces the thermal variations along the receiving PV cell, which can be a performance and life-span limiting factor. In this paper a reflector profile that uniformly infiltrates the concentrated sunlight into the receiving unit is attempted. The new design accounts for all factors that contribute to the nonuniform concentration, like the reflector curvature, which spatially reflects the sunlight nonuniformly, and the angular dependency of both the reflector reflectivity and the sunlight transmission through the PV cell. PMID:24663464

  4. Diffraction analysis of frequency selective reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, a unified computational technique is presented which allows the incorporation of the curved frequency-selective surface (FSS) geometry in the computation of the reflector antenna radiation pattern. The scattered fields from an illuminated FSS reflector are formalized using Huygens' principle in such a way that the 'reflecting' and the 'transparent' FSS subreflector cases are treated identically and the thickness of the FSS subreflector remains arbitrary. The analysis utilizes local surface coordinates to describe the reflection/transmission matrices of the FSS subreflector where it is assumed that these matrices are available. In most cases one may use the local tangent plane for approximating the plane of the FSS in the local coordinate surface of the reflector. The paper demonstrates how the local curved coordinate system can be introduced in the diffraction modeling of FSS reflectors and its importance in accurately predicting the side-lobe and crosspolarization levels. Results of numerical simulations are presented for several FSS subreflector configurations.

  5. An offset-fed reflector antenna with an axially symmetric main reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D.-C.; Rusch, W. V. T.

    1984-11-01

    A design method for an offset-fed, dual reflector antenna (Cassegrain type or Gregorian type) system with an axisymmetric main reflector is presented. Geometrical optics (GO) and the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) are used to find the surface-current density on the main reflector. A modified Jacobi-Bessel series (JBS) method is used to find the far-field pattern for the physical optics (PO) integral. In the defocused mode of operation, a new technique is developed to find the reflection point on the subreflector corresponding to the defocused feed and a general field point on the main reflector. Two sample systems are designed.

  6. Aberrations of ellipsoidal reflectors for unit magnification.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, K D

    1974-12-01

    Ellipsoidal reflectors are useful for the 1:1 imaging of small objects without spherical and chromatic aberration. The magnitude of the off-axis aberrations of such reflectors is computed by application of Fermat's principle to the Hamiltonian point characteristic. The limiting form of the mirror aperture for which these aberrations do not exceed a set tolerance is an ellipse whose semiaxes depend on object size and angle of incidence. PMID:20134811

  7. Structural analysis of FAST reflector supporting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. F.; Deng, C. G.; Li, G. Q.; He, Y. M.

    According to the deformation and movement requirements of the FAST reflector, a multi-purpose analysis, including the load-bearing behavior, deformation, construction costs of the reflector supporting structure and its model, is presented in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of steel and aluminum alloy structures are also discussed and compared through detailed design calculations under load-bearing capacity and normal working conditions.

  8. Easily Assembled Reflector for Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectors for concentrating solar collectors are assembled quickly and inexpensively by method that employs precontoured supports, plastic film, and adhesive to form a segmented glass mirror. New method is self-focusing, and does not require skilled labor at any stage. Contoured ribs support film and mirror segments of reflector. Nine mirror segments are bonded to sheet. Combined mirror surface closely approximates a spherical surface with a radius of curvature of 36 inches (0.91 m).

  9. Analysis of bonding stress with high strength adhesive between the reflector and the mounts in space camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hu, Yongming; Li, Yingcai; Qu, Youshan; Ding, Jiaoteng

    2010-05-01

    The bond stress is analyzed when the optics were attached to their mounts with high strength adhesive in space camera. The model was founded that a circular planar reflector supported by one, three, six or twelve adhesive points, which evenly distributed on different circles. The surface deformation of reflector is mainly caused by the shrinkage after solidity. The functional relation was deduced between the bonding force of the reflector and the characteristic dimension of the adhesive spot using piecewise function, and then analyzing the RMS error of no gravity assuming that the adhesive spot is fixed connect to the reflector using Nastran. The analytical RMS error was the aberration which added by solidification of adhesive. The calculation result is in good agreement with the experiment results. This analyzing method will be useful for the microstress clamping of high performance reflector system for application in space optical systems.

  10. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.; Zdeb, John J.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  11. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 claims.

  12. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes a mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 figs.

  13. Analysis of reflector antenna system including frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Fujikawa, G.

    1992-10-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS's) are often used in spaceborne applications of reflector antennas due to their ability to allow multiple feeds to utilize the same reflector dish. The problems inherent in evaluating the FSS separately from the reflector system are discussed. A method of integrating the FSS effects into the reflector system analysis is presented. An example is given for the proposed Advanced Tracking and Delay Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) single-access triband reflector antenna.

  14. Analysis of reflector antenna system including frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Fujikawa, G.

    1992-01-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS's) are often used in spaceborne applications of reflector antennas due to their ability to allow multiple feeds to utilize the same reflector dish. The problems inherent in evaluating the FSS separately from the reflector system are discussed. A method of integrating the FSS effects into the reflector system analysis is presented. An example is given for the proposed Advanced Tracking and Delay Relay Satellite System (ATDRSS) single-access triband reflector antenna.

  15. Advanced Fibre Bragg Grating and Microfibre Bragg Grating Fabrication Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kit Man

    Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) have become a very important technology for communication systems and fibre optic sensing. Typically, FBGs are less than 10-mm long and are fabricated using fused silica uniform phase masks which become more expensive for longer length or non-uniform pitch. Generally, interference UV laser beams are employed to make long or complex FBGs, and this technique introduces critical precision and control issues. In this work, we demonstrate an advanced FBG fabrication system that enables the writing of long and complex gratings in optical fibres with virtually any apodisation profile, local phase and Bragg wavelength using a novel optical design in which the incident angles of two UV beams onto an optical fibre can be adjusted simultaneously by moving just one optical component, instead of two optics employed in earlier configurations, to vary the grating pitch. The key advantage of the grating fabrication system is that complex gratings can be fabricated by controlling the linear movements of two translation stages. In addition to the study of advanced grating fabrication technique, we also focus on the inscription of FBGs written in optical fibres with a cladding diameter of several ten's of microns. Fabrication of microfibres was investigated using a sophisticated tapering method. We also proposed a simple but practical technique to filter out the higher order modes reflected from the FBG written in microfibres via a linear taper region while the fundamental mode re-couples to the core. By using this technique, reflection from the microfibre Bragg grating (MFBG) can be effectively single mode, simplifying the demultiplexing and demodulation processes. MFBG exhibits high sensitivity to contact force and an MFBG-based force sensor was also constructed and tested to investigate their suitability for use as an invasive surgery device. Performance of the contact force sensor packaged in a conforming elastomer material compares favourably to one

  16. The Effect of Boundary Support and Reflector Dimensions on Inflatable Parabolic Antenna Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Michael J.; Baginski, Frank; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    For parabolic antennas with sufficient surface accuracy, more power can be radiated with a larger aperture size. This paper explores the performance of antennas of various size and reflector depth. The particular focus is on a large inflatable elastic antenna reflector that is supported about its perimeter by a set of elastic tendons and is subjected to a constant hydrostatic pressure. The surface accuracy of the antenna is measured by an RMS calculation, while the reflector phase error component of the efficiency is determined by computing the power density at boresight. In the analysis, the calculation of antenna efficiency is not based on the Ruze Equation. Hence, no assumption regarding the distribution of the reflector surface distortions is presumed. The reflector surface is modeled as an isotropic elastic membrane using a linear stress-strain constitutive relation. Three types of antenna reflector construction are considered: one molded to an ideal parabolic form and two different flat panel design patterns. The flat panel surfaces are constructed by seaming together panels in a manner that the desired parabolic shape is approximately attained after pressurization. Numerical solutions of the model problem are calculated under a variety of conditions in order to estimate the accuracy and efficiency of these antenna systems. In the case of the flat panel constructions, several different cutting patterns are analyzed in order to determine an optimal cutting strategy.

  17. Design of reflector contours to satisfy photometric criteria using physically realizable light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Domina E.

    2001-11-01

    Traditionally reflector design has been confined to the use of surfaces defined in terms of conic sections, assuming that all light sources can be considered to be point sources. In the middle of the twentieth century, it was recognized that major improvements could be made if the shape of the reflector was designed to produce a desired distribution of light form an actual light source. Cylindrical reflectors were created which illuminated airport runways using fluorescent lamps in such a way that pilots could make visual landings safely even in fog. These reflector contours were called macrofocal parabolic cylinders. Other new reflector contours introduced were macrofocal elliptic cylinders which confined the light to long rectangles. Surfaces of revolution the fourth degree were also developed which made possible uniform floodlighting of a circular region. These were called horned and peaked quartics. The optimum solution of the automotive head lighting problem has not yet been found. The paper concludes with a discussion of the possibility of developing reflectors which are neither cylindrical nor rotational but will produce the optimum field of view for the automobile driver both in clear weather and in fog.

  18. Backward Wave Couplers And Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilopoulos, C.; Cozens, J. R.

    1987-09-01

    The analysis and experimental results for weakly perturbed, narrow band, backward wave couplers and fibre reflectors, will be presented. Conventional, co-directional fibre couplers - polished, fused or coaxial - can be designed to demonstrate a sufficient wavelength dependence for some filtering and multiplexing applications. While coupled bandwidths can be sufficiently reduced by weakening the coupling between the guides and hence increasing the interaction (beat) length, useful limits of a few nms are reached for interaction lengths of a few cms. These limitations in coupled bandwidth are considerably transformed for contra-directional coupling provided by a periodic perturbation of suitable pitch (half the guide wavelength) imposed on the coupler. The inverse relationship between bandwidth and interaction length still holds, but the magnitudes are substantially improved. Calculations show that we may expect sub-Angstrom bandwidths for interaction lengths in the order of 1cm. These extremely narrow band effects depend on the successful fabrication of regular, weak, periodic perturbations over relatively long fibre lengths. We have fabricated long gratings (~ 1cm) of periodicity ~ 0.27μm on D-shaped elliptical cored fibres as a first step towards narrow band couplers. These structures can be investigated by observing reflection characteristics at ~ 800nm and the latest results will be described. A contra-directional coupler may then be formed, by joining two dissimilar D-fibres in the polished-coupler configuration with a periodic structure in between them. Additionally, the design of a special twin-core fibre coupler will be described, and its potential as a backward-wave coupler will be examined.

  19. Degradation of the Bragg peak due to inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Urie, M; Goitein, M; Holley, W R; Chen, G T

    1986-01-01

    The rapid fall-off of dose at the end of range of heavy charged particle beams has the potential in therapeutic applications of sparing critical structures just distal to the target volume. Here we explored the effects of highly inhomogeneous regions on this desirable depth-dose characteristic. The proton depth-dose distribution behind a lucite-air interface parallel to the beam was bimodal, indicating the presence of two groups of protons with different residual ranges, creating a step-like depth-dose distribution at the end of range. The residual ranges became more spread out as the interface was angled at 3 degrees, and still more at 6 degrees, to the direction of the beam. A second experiment showed little significant effect on the distal depth-dose of protons having passed through a mosaic of teflon and lucite. Anatomic studies demonstrated significant effects of complex fine inhomogeneities on the end of range characteristics. Monoenergetic protons passing through the petrous ridges and mastoid air cells in the base of skull showed a dramatic degradation of the distal Bragg peak. In beams with spread out Bragg peaks passing through regions of the base of skull, the distal fall-off from 90 to 20% dose was increased from its nominal 6 to well over 32 mm. Heavy ions showed a corresponding degradation in their ends of range. In the worst case in the base of skull region, a monoenergetic neon beam showed a broadening of the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak to over 15 mm (compared with 4 mm in a homogeneous unit density medium). A similar effect was found with carbon ions in the abdomen, where the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak (nominally 5.5 mm) was found to be greater than 25 mm behind gas-soft-tissue interfaces. We address the implications of these data for dose computation with heavy charged particles. PMID:3952143

  20. High-efficiency FEL-oscillator with Bragg resonator operated in reversed guide field regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, A.K.; Sedykh, S.N.; Sergeyev, A.P.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the present work was to develop a narrow-band FEL-oscillator working in millimeter wavelength with, high efficiency. It looked promising to combine the high selective property of Bragg resonator with high efficiency and other advantages of FEL operation in the reversed guide-field regime. An experimental study of the FEL was performed using lilac LIU-3000 (JINR, Dubna) with the electron energy of 1 MeV, beam current up to 200 A and pulse duration of 200 ns. The beam was injected into the internction region with guide magnetic field of 2.9 kGs. Transverse oscillations of electrons were pumped by the helical wiggler with the period length of 6 cm and the field slowly up-tapering over the initial 6 periods. The FEI electrodynamic system consisted of a circular waveguide with diameter 20 mm and two Bragg reflectors. The H wave of the circular waveguide was shown for operation. Two effective feedback waves were observed in {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} electrodynamic measurement in correspondence with calculations; the E wave near the frequency of 31. 5 GHz and the E wave - 37.5 GHz. The width of the both reflection resonances was about 2%. In {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} experiments the radiation on the designed H wave and frequencies corresponding to the both feedback waves was registered separately. Selection of the frequency was realized by varying of the wiggler field strength. The spectrum was measured with a set of the cut--off waveguide filters with inaccuracy less than 2%. Calibrated Semiconductor detectors wire used to measure the radiation power. The radiation with the frequencies of 37.5 and 31.5 GHz was observed in vicinity of the wiggler field amplitude of 2.5 kGs. The measured spectrum width of the output FEL-oscillator radiation did not exceed the width of the Bragg reflector resonances for the both feedback waves.

  1. High LET-induced H2AX phosphorylation around the Bragg curve.

    PubMed

    Desai, N; Durante, M; Lin, Z W; Cucinotta, F; Wu, H

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the spatial distribution of the induction of the phosphorylated form of the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), known to be activated by DSBs. Following irradiation of human fibroblast cells with 600 MeV/nucleon silicon and 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions we observed the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in an x/y plane. Polyethylene shielding was used to achieve a Bragg curve distribution with beam geometry parallel to the monolayer of cells. We present data that highlights the formation of immunofluorescent gamma-H2AX tracks showing the ion trajectories across the Bragg peak of irradiated human fibroblast cells. Qualitative analyses of these distributions indicated potentially increased clustering of DNA damage before the Bragg peak, enhanced gamma-H2AX distribution at the peak, and provided visual evidence of high-linear energy transfer particle traversal of cells beyond the Bragg peak in agreement with one-dimensional transport approximations. Spatial assessment of gamma-H2AX fluorescence may provide direct insights into DNA damage across the Bragg curve for high charge and energy ions including the biological consequences of shielding and possible contributors to bystander effects. PMID:15934200

  2. High LET-induced H2AX phosphorylation around the Bragg curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, N.; Durante, M.; Lin, Z. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Wu, H.

    We investigated the spatial distribution of the induction of the phosphorylated form of the histone protein H2AX (γ-H2AX), known to be activated by DSBs. Following irradiation of human fibroblast cells with 600 MeV/nucleon silicon and 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions we observed the formation of γ-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in an x/ y plane. Polyethylene shielding was used to achieve a Bragg curve distribution with beam geometry parallel to the monolayer of cells. We present data that highlights the formation of immunofluorescent γ-H2AX tracks showing the ion trajectories across the Bragg peak of irradiated human fibroblast cells. Qualitative analyses of these distributions indicated potentially increased clustering of DNA damage before the Bragg peak, enhanced γ-H2AX distribution at the peak, and provided visual evidence of high-linear energy transfer particle traversal of cells beyond the Bragg peak in agreement with one-dimensional transport approximations. Spatial assessment of γ-H2AX fluorescence may provide direct insights into DNA damage across the Bragg curve for high charge and energy ions including the biological consequences of shielding and possible contributors to bystander effects.

  3. Split-mode fiber Bragg grating sensor for high-resolution static strain measurements.

    PubMed

    Malara, P; Mastronardi, L; Campanella, C E; Giorgini, A; Avino, S; Passaro, V M N; Gagliardi, G

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate a strain sensor with very high sensitivity in the static and low frequency regime based on a fiber ring cavity that includes a π phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating. The grating acts as a partial reflector that couples the two counter-propagating cavity modes, generating a splitting of the resonant frequencies. The presence of a sharp transition within the π phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating's spectral transmittance makes this frequency splitting extremely sensitive to length, temperature, and the refractive index of the fiber in the region where the grating is written. The splitting variations caused by small mechanical deformations of the grating are tracked in real time by interrogating a cavity resonance with a locked-carrier scanning-sideband technique. The measurable strain range and bandwidth are characterized, and a resolution of 320  pϵ/Hz(1/2) at 0 Hz is experimentally demonstrated, the highest achieved to date with a fiber Bragg grating sensor. PMID:25503025

  4. Multiwave interaction formulation of a coaxial Bragg structure and its experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    LaiYingxin; Zhang Shichang

    2007-11-15

    A multiwave interaction formulation of coaxial Bragg structure with either one or both of the conductors sinusoidally corrugated is presented to describe all the forward and backward waves of various propagating modes within the structure. The validity of the formulation is examined in terms of the reported experiments, and good agreement of the theoretical results with the experimental measurements is demonstrated. Comparison of the present formulation with the previous two-wave interaction treatment shows substantial difference, and confirms the significance of the multiwave interaction formulation presented in this paper. Based on the multiwave interaction formulation, interesting information is revealed that a higher-order mode (such as TE{sub 6,1}) operation at a frequency of hundreds of gigahertz in a coaxial Bragg reflector can be achieved due to the suppression of spurious modes. This peculiarity provides potential application in constructing a high-Q coaxial Bragg resonator for a high-power cyclotron autoresonance maser or a free-electron laser oscillator in the millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges.

  5. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, W. Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K.; Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within ±30 μm and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 μm. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound

  6. Cross-fiber Bragg grating transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia (Inventor); Zheng, Jianli (Inventor); Lavarias, Arnel (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A transducer has been invented that uses specially-oriented gratings in waveguide a manner that allows the simultaneous measurement of physical phenomena (such as shear force, strain and temperature) in a single sensing element. The invention has a highly sensitive, linear response and also has directional sensitivity with regard to strain. The transducer has a waveguide with a longitudinal axis as well as two Bragg gratings. The transducer has a first Bragg grating associated with the waveguide that has an angular orientation .theta..sub.a relative to a perpendicular to the longitudinal axis such that 0.degree.<.theta..sub.a <.theta..sub.max. The second Bragg grating is associated with the waveguide in such a way that the angular orientation .theta..sub.b of the grating relative to a perpendicular to the longitudinal axis is (360.degree.-.theta..sub.max)<.theta..sub.b <360.degree.. The first Bragg grating can have a periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.a and the second Bragg grating can have a periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.b such that the periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.a of the first Bragg grating does not equal the periodicity .LAMBDA..sub.b of the second Bragg grating. The angle of the gratings can be such that .theta..sub.a =360.degree.-.theta..sub.b. The waveguide can assume a variety of configurations, including an optical fiber, a rectangular waveguide and a planar waveguide. The waveguide can be fabricated of a variety of materials, including silica and polymer material.

  7. Hyperbolic Metamaterials with Bragg Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Sedov, Evgeny S; Iorsh, I V; Arakelian, S M; Alodjants, A P; Kavokin, Alexey

    2015-06-12

    We propose a novel mechanism for designing quantum hyperbolic metamaterials with the use of semiconductor Bragg mirrors containing periodically arranged quantum wells. The hyperbolic dispersion of exciton-polariton modes is realized near the top of the first allowed photonic miniband in such a structure which leads to the formation of exciton-polariton X waves. Exciton-light coupling provides a resonant nonlinearity which leads to nontrivial topologic solutions. We predict the formation of low amplitude spatially localized oscillatory structures: oscillons described by kink shaped solutions of the effective Ginzburg-Landau-Higgs equation. The oscillons have direct analogies in gravitational theory. We discuss implementation of exciton-polariton Higgs fields for the Schrödinger cat state generation. PMID:26196825

  8. Interferometric fiber Bragg grating shift demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepien, Karol; Jóźwik, Michalina; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a fiber Bragg grating shift demodulator with changeable resolution based on an unbalanced fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Preliminary research proves phase sensitivity to Bragg wavelength changes of 6,83 rad/mɛ. Phase sensitivity can be modified by changing the optical path difference witch is only limited by the coherence length of light reflected by the fiber Bragg grating. This solution can be used as a single sensor or as a part of a more complex system.

  9. System dynamic simulation of precision segmented reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Choon-Foo; Lou, Michael C.

    1991-01-01

    A joint effort was undertaken on a Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) Project. The missions in which the PSR is to be used will use large (up to 20 m in diameter) telescopes. The essential requirement for the telescopes is that the reflector surface of the primary mirror must be made extremely precise to allow no more than a few microns of errors and, additionally, this high surface precision must be maintained when the telescope is subjected to on-orbital mechanical and thermal disturbances. Based on the mass, size, and stability considerations, reflector surface formed by segmented, probably actively or passively controlled, composite panels are regarded as most suitable for future space based astronomical telescope applications. In addition to the design and fabrication of composite panels with a surface error of less than 3 microns RMS, PSR also develops related reflector structures, materials, control, and sensing technologies. As part of the planning effort for PSR Technology Demonstration, a system model which couples the reflector, consisting of panels, support truss and actuators, and the optical bench was assembled for dynamic simulations. Random vibration analyses using seismic data obtained from actual measurements at the test site designated for PSR Technology Demonstration are described.

  10. Enhanced imaging of reflector antenna surface distortion using microwave holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Sean W.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1989-01-01

    Two signal processing techniques are discussed that improve the accuracy of a microwave holographic measurement by removing unwanted signals from the aperture distribution: pattern simulation and subtraction, and time domain filtering. Pattern simulation and subtraction involves modeling unwanted scattering mechanisms and then removing them from the measured far-field data. Measurements taken on a focal point geometry and a Cassegrain geometry at 11 GHz were processed by the holographic analysis system. Pattern simulation and subtraction was applied to both geometries. Surface deformation profiles generated for the Cassegrain antenna by this system were compared to an optical measurement of the main reflector surface.

  11. High frequency strain measurements with fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Angelmahr, M.; Schade, W.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years fiber Bragg grating sensors gained interest in structural health monitoring and concepts for smart structures. They are small, lightweight, and immune to electromagnetic interference. Using multiplexing techniques, several sensors can be addressed by a single fiber. Therefore, well-established structures and materials in industrial applications can be easily equipped with fiber optical sensors with marginal influence on their mechanical properties. In return, critical components can be monitored in real-time, leading to reduced maintenance intervals and a great reduction of costs. Beside of generally condition monitoring, the localization of failures in a structure is a desired feature of the condition monitoring system. Detecting the acoustic emission of a sudden event, its place of origin can be determined by analyzing the delay time of distributed sensor signals. To achieve high localization accuracies for the detection of cracks, breaks, and impacts high sampling rates combined with the simultaneous interrogation of several fiber Bragg grating sensors are required. In this article a fiber Bragg grating interrogator for high frequency measurements up to the megahertz range is presented. The interrogator is based on a passive wavelength to intensity conversion applying arrayed waveguide gratings. Light power fluctuations are suppressed by a differential data evaluation, leading to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio and a low strain detection limit. The measurement system is used to detect, inter alia, wire breaks in steel wire ropes for dockside cranes.

  12. Design of blended rolled edges for compact range main reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericksen, K. P.; Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure to design blended rolled edge terminations for arbitrary rim shape compact range main reflectors is presented. The reflector may be center-fed or offset-fed. The design procedure leads to a reflector which has a continuous and smooth surface. This procedure also ensures small diffracted fields from the junction between the paraboloid and the blended rolled edge while satisfying certain constraints regarding the maximum height of the reflector and minimum operating frequency of the system. The prescribed procedure is used to design several reflectors and the performance of these reflectors is presented.

  13. Optomechanical behavior of embedded fiber Bragg grating strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastro, Stephen A.

    2005-11-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) can provide extremely sensitive strain measurements for various materials and structures. The main functionality of the Bragg grating is along the fiber's main axis, where changes in the grating's spacing can be converted into strain measurements. Previous work from a number of researchers has identified bifurcation and broadening of the Bragg signal under transverse loading. The work presented in this thesis highlights efforts to relate transverse loading to changes in index of refraction in the fiber core cross section, and then ultimately to predicted changes in Bragg signals. The background of FBGs, their application, manufacturing, and operation is outlined. In addition, background on the general concept of photoelasticity, the relationship of stress and index of refraction, in glass materials is presented. A theoretical analysis was performed for uncoated silica fiber to calculate the stresses within an optical fiber core under transverse loading. The transverse loading profile ranged from pure diametric point loading to a more distributed profile. The stresses calculated were translated into changes of index of refraction and FBG signal values. The analysis was then simulated utilizing a numerical model, calculating stress, change of index of refraction, and change in FBG signal with various transverse loading profiles. In addition to an uncoated fiber, a polymer coated fiber system was analyzed. The model was verified by performing a laboratory experiment where FBGs were loaded transversely and their signal monitored. A special loading rig was designed and fabricated to impart transverse loading to the fiber while monitoring the compression load and deflection of the loading plates. The laboratory experienced showed reasonable agreement with the numerical model. The data show that side loading of the FBG caused a bifurcation of the signal, and that this effect can be predicted by the theoretical model. The modeling work completed

  14. Bragg reflection transmission filters for variable resolution monochromators

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D. )

    1989-01-01

    There are various methods for improving the angular and spectral resolution of monochromator and analyzer systems. The novel system described here, though limited to higher x-ray energies (>20keV), is based on a dynamical effect occurring on the transmitted beam with a thin perfect crystal plate set in the Bragg reflection case. In the case of Bragg reflection from a perfect crystal, the incident beam is rapidly attenuated as it penetrates the crystal in the range of reflection. This extinction length is of the order of microns. The attenuation length, which determines the amount of normal transmission through the plate is generally much longer. Thus, in the range of the Bragg reflection the attenuation of the transmitted beam can change by several orders of magnitude with a small change in energy or angle. This thin crystal plate cuts a notch in the transmitted beam with a width equal to its Darwin width, thus acting as a transmission filter. When used in a non-dispersive mode with other monochromator crystals, the filter when set at the Bragg angle will reflect the entire Darwin width of the incident beam and transmit the wings of the incident beam distribution. When the element is offset in angle by some fraction of the Darwin width, the filter becomes useful in adjusting the angular width of the transmitted beam and removing a wing. Used in pairs with a symmetric offset, the filters can be used to continuously adjust the intrinsic angular divergence of the beam with good wing reduction. Instances where such filters may be useful are in improving the angular resolution of a small angle scattering camera. These filters may be added to a Bonse-Hart camera with one pair on the incident beam to reduce the intrinsic beam divergence and a second pair on the analyzer arm to improve the analyzer resolution. 2 refs., 3 Figs.

  15. Critical wind effects on parabolic reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Marvin F.

    2004-09-01

    For decades designers of dish antennas and radio telescopes have known the aerodynamic properties of parabolic reflectors. However, site planners and end users are not necessarily versed in their properties, and so can place them on sites or use them in such a manner that the wind causes a maximum of disruption of the pointing and tracking performance. Parabolic reflectors make excellent airfoils, and as such act like an airplane wing in many respects. Having some knowledge of sensitive wind directions relative to the Line Of Sight (LOS) can lead a user to change his site selection or operating procedures to achieve the optimum pointing and tracking performance for most observations. This knowledge can also contribute information to help specify the necessary performance characteristics. This paper discusses the aerodynamic properties of parabolic reflectors so the reader can get a ready grasp of the issues.

  16. Test progress on the electrostatic membrane reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihora, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An extemely lightweight type of precision reflector antenna, being developed for potential deployment from the space shuttle, uses electrostatic forces to tension a thin membrane and form it into a concave reflector surface. The typical shuttle-deployed antenna would have a diameter of 100 meters and an RMS surface smoothness of 10 to 1 mm for operation at 1 to 10 GHz. NASA Langley Research Center built and is currently testing a subscale (16 foot diameter) model of the membrane reflector portion of such an antenna. Preliminary test results and principal factors affecting surface quality are addressed. Factors included are the effect of the perimeter boundary, splicing of the membrane, the long-scale smoothness of commercial membranes, and the spatial controllability of the membrane using voltage adjustments to alter the electrostatic pressure. Only readily available commercial membranes are considered.

  17. Compensation for primary reflector wavefront error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, Aden B. (Inventor); Meinel, Marjorie P. (Inventor); Stacy, John E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a telescope having primary and secondary reflectors, wherein the actual primary reflector surface deviates from an ideal primary reflector surface, such deviation is compensated for. At least one intermediate element forms an image of the primary surface onto the secondary surface, so each point on the secondary surface corresponds to a point on the primary surface. The secondary surface is formed with a deviation from an ideal secondary surface, with the piston distance of each point on the actual secondary surface equal to the piston distance of a corresponding point on the actual primary surface from the ideal primary surface. It is found that this results in electromagnetic (e.g., light) rays which strike a deviating area of the actual primary surface being brought to the same focus as if the actual primary surface did not have a deviation from an ideal primary surface.

  18. Figure control concepts for segmented reflector telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, D.; Chu, C. C.; Ih, C.-H. C.; Wang, S. J.; Ryaciotaki-Boussalis, H. A.

    1989-01-01

    Control analysis activities related to the development of figure control technologies for large space telescopes with precision segmented actively controlled primary reflectors are reviewed. The Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) configuration is described along with the development and use of the PSR models. Geometric and dynamic models, characterization of figure estimation errors and optimal sensor placement, and the development of quasi-static and dynamic control concepts are outlined. The structure of a quasi-static controller is presented, that utilizes edge sensor measurements to estimate displacement errors at the actuator level and generates figure correction commands. The second approach considers decentralization of the reflector system at the panel level, while the third considers decentralization at the actuator level.

  19. Composite materials for precision space reflector panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.; Bowles, David E.; Towell, Timothy W.; Connell, John W.

    1992-01-01

    One of the critical technology needs of large precision reflectors for future astrophysical and optical communications satellites lies in the area of structural materials. Results from a materials research and development program at NASA Langley Research Center to provide materials for these reflector applications are discussed. Advanced materials that meet the reflector panel requirements are identified, and thermal, mechanical and durability properties of candidate materials after exposure to simulated space environments are compared. A parabolic, graphite-phenolic honeycomb composite panel having a surface accuracy of 70.8 microinches rms and an areal weight of 1.17 lbm/sq ft was fabricated with T50/ERL1962 facesheets, a PAEI thermoplastic surface film, and Al and SiO(x) coatings.

  20. Phase controlled integrated interferometric single-sideband filter based on planar Bragg gratings implementing photonic Hilbert transform.

    PubMed

    Sima, Chaotan; Gates, J C; Rogers, H L; Mennea, P L; Holmes, C; Zervas, M N; Smith, P G R

    2013-03-01

    The monolithically integrated all-optical single-sideband (SSB) filter based on photonic Hilbert transform and planar Bragg gratings is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. An SSB suppression of 12 dB at 6 GHz and sideband switching are achieved via thermal tuning. An X-coupler, photonic Hilbert transformer, flat top reflector, and a micro heater are incorporated in a single silicon-on-silica substrate. The device can be thermally tuned by the micro heater on top of the channel waveguide. The device is fabricated using a combination of direct UV grating writing technology and photolithography. PMID:23455279

  1. Controls on the Geometry of Accretion Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Bell, R. E.; Buck, W. R.; Creyts, T. T.

    2012-12-01

    Basal accretion occurs when meltwater refreezes onto the base of an ice sheet. Thick packages (900-1100m) of accretion ice are identified in radio-echo sounding data as plume-shaped reflectors above the basal reflector and below isochronous layers of meteoric ice. Accretion reflectors have been imaged in both Antarctica and Greenland rising to a height of 1/3-1/2 of the ice sheet thickness and extending in the flow direction as far as 100 km. Here we use a two-dimensional thermomechanical higher order flowline model coupled to a basal hydrology model to investigate the freezing rates and energy budgets of basal accretion processes. Simple order-of-magnitude estimates for the freezing rate based on the observed height of the reflectors and the assumption that all ice under the observed reflector consists of accretion ice indicate very large freezing rates, on the order of 10-100 cm/yr. We test two end-member possibilities for the formation of the basal accretion bodies: high accretion rates and complex basal deformation. The first possibility is that the freezing rates are very large. The second possibility is that the ice under the observed reflector is a mixture of accreted and meteoric ice. If the ice below the accretion reflector is a mixture, the freezing rates can be much smaller than the simple estimates. If the freezing rates are small, then complex basal deformation must be invoked to cause accretion ice to override meteoric ice to a height of 1/3-1/2 the ice thickness. In the basal deformation case, low freezing rates predict a maximum thickness of 100-200m of accretion ice. The remaining ice beneath the reflector will be deformed meteoric ice. Both cases make testable predictions. If the accretion rates are very high and supercooling is the dominant process, accretion cannot use up all of the subglacial water. In this high rate scenario there will be water at the melting point exiting the accretion site. Alternatively if the accretion is part of a complex

  2. Nuclear Transmutations in HFIR's Beryllium Reflector and Their Impact on Reactor Operation and Reflector Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Maldonado, G Ivan; Primm, Trent; Proctor, Larry Duane

    2012-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory utilizes a large cylindrical beryllium reflector that is subdivided into three concentric regions and encompasses the compact reactor core. Nuclear transmutations caused by neutron activation occur in the beryllium reflector regions, which leads to unwanted neutron absorbing and radiation emitting isotopes. During the past year, two topics related to the HFIR beryllium reflector were reviewed. The first topic included studying the neutron poison (helium-3 and lithium-6) buildup in the reflector regions and its affect on beginning-of-cycle reactivity. A new methodology was developed to predict the reactivity impact and estimated symmetrical critical control element positions as a function of outage time between cycles due to helium-3 buildup and was shown to be in better agreement with actual symmetrical critical control element position data than the current methodology. The second topic included studying the composition of the beryllium reflector regions at discharge as well as during decay to assess the viability of transporting, storing, and ultimately disposing the reflector regions currently stored in the spent fuel pool. The post-irradiation curie inventories were used to determine whether the reflector regions are discharged as transuranic waste or become transuranic waste during the decay period for disposal purposes and to determine the nuclear hazard category, which may affect the controls invoked for transportation and temporary storage. Two of the reflector regions were determined to be transuranic waste at discharge and the other region was determined to become transuranic waste in less than 2 years after being discharged due to the initial uranium content (0.0044 weight percent uranium). It was also concluded that all three of the reflector regions could be classified as nuclear hazard category 3 (potential for localized consequences only).

  3. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  4. In Vitro Experimental Model to Investigate the Biological Effects across the Bragg Curve of High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, N.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Durante, M.; Lin, Z.; Meador, J.; Rusek, A.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high energy ions, with a spacecrafts shielding material providing the only major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike lowLET gamma or Xrays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged particle exposure since the dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply as the particle approaches the end of its range, a position known as the Bragg peak and the correlating spatial dose distribution identified as the Bragg curve. The Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle traversal since biological effects are influenced by the track structure of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the biological Bragg curve is dependent of the energy and the type of the primary particle, and may vary for different biological endpoints. Here we describe a unique irradiation geometry and experimental system to measure the biological response across the Bragg curve in one consistent biological sample. Polyethylene shielding was used to achieve a Bragg curve distribution with the beam geometry parallel to a monolayer of fibroblast cells. We present data that highlights the differential formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal deletions across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts irradiated with 600 MeV/nucleon iron ion beams. Qualitative analyses of gammaH2AX fluorescence, a known marker of DSBs, indicated potentially increased clustering of DNA damage before the Bragg peak, enhanced homogenous distribution at the peak, and provided visual evidence of high linear energy transfer (LET) particle traversal of cells beyond the Bragg peak in agreement with one-dimensional transport approximations. A biological response curve generated for micronuclei induction across the Bragg curve for 600 MeV/n Fe ions did not reveal an increase in the yield of micronuclei at the Bragg

  5. Initial global 2-D shielding analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source core and reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    This document describes the initial global 2-D shielding analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, the D{sub 2}O reflector, the reflector vessel, and the first 200 mm of light water beyond the reflector vessel. Flux files generated here will later serve as source terms in subsequent shielding analyses. In addition to reporting fluxes and other data at key points of interest, a major objective of this report was to document how these analyses were performed, the phenomena that were included, and checks that were made to verify that these phenomena were properly modeled. In these shielding analyses, the fixed neutron source distribution in the core was based on the `lifetime-averaged` spatial power distribution. Secondary gamma production cross sections in the fuel were modified so as to account intrinsically for delayed fission gammas in the fuel as well as prompt fission gammas. In and near the fuel, this increased the low-energy gamma fluxes by 50 to 250%, but out near the reflector vessel, these same fluxes changed by only a few percent. Sensitivity studies with respect to mesh size were performed, and a new 2-D mesh distribution developed after some problems were discovered with respect to the use of numerous elongated mesh cells in the reflector. All of the shielding analyses were performed sing the ANSL-V 39n/44g coupled library with 25 thermal neutron groups in order to obtain a rigorous representation of the thermal neutron spectrum throughout the reflector. Because of upscatter in the heavy water, convergence was very slow. Ultimately, the fission cross section in the various materials had to be artificially modified in order to solve this fixed source problem as an eigenvalue problem and invoke the Vondy error-mode extrapolation technique which greatly accelerated convergence in the large 2-D RZ DORT analyses. While this was quite effective, 150 outer iterations (over energy) were still required.

  6. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  7. Making Precise Antenna Reflectors For Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. Richard; Wanhainen, Joyce S.; Ketelsen, Dean A.

    1994-01-01

    In improved method of fabrication of precise, lightweight antenna reflectors for millimeter wavelengths, required precise contours of reflecting surfaces obtained by computer numberically controlled machining of surface layers bonded to lightweight, rigid structures. Achievable precision greater than that of older, more-expensive fabrication method involving multiple steps of low- and high-temperature molding, in which some accuracy lost at each step.

  8. Advanced sunflower antenna concept development. [stowable reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of stowing large solid antenna reflectors in the shuttle was demonstrated for applications with 40 foot apertures at frequencies of 100 GHz. Concepts allowing extension of the basic concept to 80-foot apertures operable at 60 GHz were identified.

  9. Collapsible structure for an antenna reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trubert, M. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A collapsible support for an antenna reflector for use in supporting spacecraft antennas is described. The support has a regid base and a number of struts which are pivoted at the base. The deployment of the struts and their final configuration for supporting the antenna are illustrated.

  10. Don't Forget the Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1991-01-01

    Various modes of reflection are classified and practical examples of devices, such as cat's eyes, are discussed. Typical light rays are traced through several systems, providing exercises with varying degrees of difficulty. Corner-cube retroreflectors, glass spheres, reflecting luminaries, light concentrators, parabolic reflectors, and off-set and…

  11. Electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Siddiqui, Omar; Ramahi, Omar M

    2015-09-01

    We introduce electrically thin dielectric lenses and reflectors that focus a plane wave based on the principles of phase compensation and constructive wave interference. Phase compensation is achieved by arranging thin rectangular slabs having different dielectric permittivity according to a permittivity profile obtained through analytic design equations. All incident rays parallel to the optical axis converge to a focal point with equalized optical paths resulting in constructive interference. Plane wave simulations indicate strong focusing, even in the presence of impedance mismatch between free space and the dielectric layers composing the lens. We demonstrate focusing at 9.45 GHz using a lens fabricated with commercially available dielectric materials. In addition to focusing, the flat lens proposed here demonstrates relatively high power gain at the focal point. We also present a flat reflector based on the same concept. We believe that the proposed dielectric lens and reflector are strong candidates to replace heavy metallic dishes and reflectors used in a variety of applications, especially satellites. PMID:26367439

  12. Heat dissipation in water-cooled reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, Toyoki

    1994-01-01

    The energy balance of a lamp varies with the thermal and optical characteristics of the reflector. The photosynthetic radiation efficiency of lamps, defined as input power divided by photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) emitted from the lamp ranges between 0.17 and 0.26. The rest of the energy input is wasted as longwave (3000 nm and over) and non-PAR shortwave radiation (from 700 nm to 3000 nm), convective, and conductive heat from the lamp, reflector, and ballast, and simply for increasing the cooling load. Furthermore, some portion of the PAR is uselessly absorbed by the inner walls, shelves, vessels, etc. and some portion of the PAR received by the plantlets is converted into sensible and latent heat. More than 98% of the energy input is probably converted into heat, with only less than 2% of the energy input being converted into chemical energy as carbohydrates by photosynthesis. Therefore, it is essential to reduce the generation of heat in the culture room in order to reduce the cooling load. Through use of a water-cooled reflector, the generation of convective and conductive heat and longwave radiation from the reflector can be reduced, without reduction of PAR.

  13. Perception for a large deployable reflector telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. M.; Swanson, P. N.; Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Optical science and technology concepts for a large deployable reflector for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy from above the earth's atmosphere are discussed. Requirements given at the Asilomar Conference are reviewed. The technical challenges of this large-aperture (about 20-meter) telescope, which will be diffraction limited in the infrared, are highlighted in a brief discussion of one particular configuration.

  14. Modeling For Stabilization Of Segmented Telescope Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Boussalis, Helen A.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses mathematical modeling of vibrations and active control to suppress vibrations of large, segmented telescope reflector. Vibrating structure treated as collection of substructures, each initially treated separately. Vibrations suppressed considerably, in comparison with open-loop vibration-attenuation mechanism.

  15. Physical optics model of side lobe nulling by discs on a parabolic reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, D. A.

    1985-12-01

    By mounting small disc reflectors that are moveable relative to the inner reflector surface of a parabolic dish antenna, nulls can be generated in the side lobe region of the power radiation pattern with minimal distortion effects to the main beam. A physical optics model of this antenna system is developed to investigate in a simplified direct manner the phenomena of phase nulling caused by disc movement. Array theory using isotropic radiators is used to sample the aperture distribution to approximate the far field electric field of the dish. A physical optics approximation for scattering off a flat metal disc is used for discs and feed blockage effects.

  16. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  17. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  18. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  19. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  20. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  1. 33 CFR 118.120 - Radar reflectors and racons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radar reflectors and racons. 118... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.120 Radar reflectors and racons. The District Commander may require or authorize the installation of radar reflectors and racons on bridge structures,...

  2. Fast implementation of Oliker's ellipses technology to build free form reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magarill, S.

    2013-09-01

    The field of illumination optics has a number of applications where using free-form reflective surfaces to create a required light distribution can be beneficial. Oliker's concept of combining elliptical surfaces is the foundation of forming a reflector for an arbitrary illuminance distribution. The algorithm for fast implementation of this concept is discussed in detail. It is based on an analytical computation of a 3D cloud of points in order to map the reflector shape with the required flux distribution. Flux delivered to chosen zones across the target can be calculated based on the number of associated cloud points and its locations. This allows optimized ellipse parameters to achieve the required flux distribution without raytracing through the reflector geometry. Such a strictly analytical optimization is much faster than building reflector geometry and raytracing each step of the optimization. A generated 3D cloud of points can be used with a standard SolidWorks feature to build the loft surface. This surface consists of adjacent elliptical facets and should be smooth to maintain continuous irradiance across the target. A secondary operation to smooth the surface profile between elliptical facets is discussed. Examples of proposed algorithm implementations are presented.

  3. On the theory of the synthesis of single and dual offset shaped reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Mittra, Raj

    1987-01-01

    Two reflectors shaped so as to transforn a geometrical optics (GO) feed power pattern into a uniform amplitude and phase aperture distribution are indicated schematically. Single- and dual-shaped geometrical optics problems are solved via exact solutions obtained by progressive integration. It is concluded that an infinite set of such solutions exists.

  4. On the theory of the synthesis of single and dual offset shaped reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Mittra, Raj

    1987-08-01

    Two reflectors shaped so as to transforn a geometrical optics (GO) feed power pattern into a uniform amplitude and phase aperture distribution are indicated schematically. Single- and dual-shaped geometrical optics problems are solved via exact solutions obtained by progressive integration. It is concluded that an infinite set of such solutions exists.

  5. Transient axial solution for plane and axisymmetric waves focused by a paraboloidal reflector.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Te; Zhu, Jinying; Haberman, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    A time domain analytical solution is presented to calculate the pressure response along the axis of a paraboloidal reflector for a normally incident plane wave. This work is inspired by Hamilton's axial solution for an ellipsoidal mirror and the same methodology is employed in this paper. Behavior of the reflected waves along reflector axis is studied, and special interest is placed on focusing gain obtained at the focal point. This analytical solution indicates that the focusing gain is affected by reflector geometry and the time derivative of the input signal. In addition, focused pressure response in the focal zone given by various reflector geometries and input frequencies are also investigated. This information is useful for selecting appropriate reflector geometry in a specific working environment to achieve the best signal enhancement. Numerical simulation employing the finite element method is used to validate the analytical solution, and visualize the wave field to provide a better understanding of the propagation of reflected waves. This analytical solution can be modified to apply to non-planar incident waves with axisymmetric wavefront and non-uniform pressure distribution. An example of incident waves with conical-shaped wavefront is presented. PMID:23556573

  6. A comparison of reflector antenna designs for wide-angle scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M.; Lee, S. W.; Houshmand, B.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Acosta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional reflector antennas are typically designed for up to + or - 20 beamwidths scan. An attempt was made to stretch this scan range to some + or - 300 beamwidths. Six single and dual reflector antennas were compared. It is found that a symmetrical parabolic reflector with f/D = 2 and a single circular waveguide feed has the minimum scan loss (only 0.6 dB at Theta sub 0 = 8 deg, or a 114 beamwidths scan). The scan is achieved by tilting the parabolic reflector by an angle equal to the half-scan angle. The f/D may be shortened if a cluster 7 to 19 elements instead of one element is used for the feed. The cluster excitation is adjusted for each new beam scan direction to compensate for the imperfect field distribution over the reflector aperture. The antenna can be folded into a Cassegrain configuration except that, due to spillover and blockage considerations, the amount of folding achievable is small.

  7. Predicted and measured performance of a shaped reflector in a dual-gridded reflector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, G. D.; Malik, D. P. S.

    Current and proposed satellite communications systems demand dual-linearly polarized transmit/receive antennas for contoured and/or multiple-beam coverages. The proven means of satisfying these requirements is by the use of dual-gridded reflectors with multiple feed blocks for a contoured beam. In this paper practical issues and advantages concerning the choice of using a shaped reflector to replace one of the multiple feed antennas (MFAs) within a dual-gridded pair are addressed. For single contoured beam applications a shaped reflector has several important advantages. Primarily it allows a single feed system to replace a whole feed cluster and associated beamforming networks. In a study for the Orion satellites this resulted in a total mass saving of 7.5 kg per feed block and a considerable reduction in hardware complexity. This resulted in a total mass saving of 15 kg which translates to an extra 6 months life for the spacecraft. The use of a single focussed feed also results in the illumination efficiency being improved by approximately 20%. Interestingly the requirements for the Orion satellites are for both spot beams of one polarization and for a contoured beam of the orthogonal polarization to cover all the spots, for both North America and Europe. These requirements have been met by the use of two dual-gridded reflector systems; one antenna in each system being a multiple-beam-antenna and the other a shaped reflector. This paper uses as an example a realistic MFA design devised during the Orion contract procurement stage and its performance is compared with that of an equivalent shaped reflector design optimized at single and multiple frequencies. The susceptibility to predict in service thermal distortions of the two designs is then assessed. Finally some recent results are presented of measured and predicted feed cross-polar radiation collimated by a gridded shaped reflector; the feed being at the focus of an unshaped reflector behind the shaped dish.

  8. Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred Ludwig; Hill, Kenneth Wayne; Scott, Steven Douglas; Feder, Russell; Ko, Jinseok; Rice, John E.; Ince-Cushman, Alexander Charles; Jones, Frank

    2012-07-10

    Arrangements for the point-to-point imaging of a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and ultrasound at large angles of incidence employ matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors to eliminate astigmatic imaging errors. Matched pairs of spherically bent crystals or spherically bent multi-layers are used for X-rays and EUV radiation; and matched pairs of spherically bent mirrors that are appropriate for the type of radiation are used with microwaves, infrared and visible light, or ultrasound. The arrangements encompass the two cases, where the Bragg angle--the complement to the angle of incidence in optics--is between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on both crystals/mirrors or between 0.degree. and 45.degree. on the first crystal/mirror and between 45.degree. and 90.degree. on the second crystal/mirror, where the angles of convergence and divergence are equal. For x-rays and EUV radiation, also the Bragg condition is satisfied on both spherically bent crystals/multi-layers.

  9. Fiber Bragg Gratings for High-Temperature Thermal Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.

    2004-07-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were used as a characterization tool to study the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the Nasa Marshal Space Flight Center. The motivation for this work was to support Nasa space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. Distributed high temperature measurements, up to 1150 deg. C, were made with FBG temperature sensors. Additionally, FBG strain measurements were taken at elevated temperatures to provide a strain profile of the core during operation. This paper will discuss the contribution of these measurements to meet the goals of Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center. (authors)

  10. Design tradeoff study for reflector antenna systems for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A general tradeoff is made of the symmetric Cassegrain antenna with regard to the possibility of meeting a 90% beam efficiency. The effects of aperture taper and blockage are calculated using an adjustable sidelobe circular distribution. Numerical integration is used. For the feed spillover calculation, a low sidelobe symmetric feed pattern is used with the equivalent parabola and numerical integration. Reflector cross polarization is calculated using double numerical integration. Reflector back lobes are estimated from radiation pattern envelopes of commercial common carrier dish antennas. The curves allow a range of f/D to be determined for a specified edge taper and blockage diameter ratio, and with a table of Cassegrain parameters, a range of possible designs that meet the 90% beam efficiency is obtained. It is shown that the feed and reflector design and implementation must be carefully done.

  11. Polymer planar Bragg grating for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, M.; Hartlaub, N.; Koller, G.; Belle, S.; Schmauss, B.; Hellmann, R.

    2013-05-01

    Bragg gratings have become indispensable as optical sensing elements and are already used for a variety of technical applications. Mainly silica fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) have been extensively studied over the last decades and are nowadays commercially available. Bragg grating sensors consisting of other materials like polymers, however, have only recently come into the focus of fundamental and applied research. Polymers exhibit significantly different properties advantageous for many sensing applications and therefore provide a good alternative to silica based devices. In addition, polymer materials are inexpensive, simple to handle as well as available in various forms like liquid resists or bulk material. Accordingly, polymer integrated optics attract increasing interest and can serve as a substitute for optical fibers. We report on the fabrication of a planar Bragg grating sensor in bulk Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The sensor consists of an optical waveguide and a Bragg grating, both written simultaneously into a PMMA chip by a single writing step, for which a phase mask covered by an amplitude mask is placed on top of the PMMA and exposed to the UV radiation of a KrF excimer laser. Depending on the phase mask period, different Bragg gratings reflecting in the telecommunication wavelength range are fabricated and characterized. Reflection and transmission measurements show a narrow reflection band and a high reflectivity of the polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG). After connecting to a single mode fiber, the portable PPBG based sensor was evaluated for different measurands like humidity and strain. The sensor performance was compared to already existing sensing systems. Due to the obtained results as well as the rapid and cheap fabrication of the sensor chip, the PPBG qualifies for a low cost sensing element.

  12. The effect of reflector geometry on the acoustic field and bubble dynamics produced by an electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng; Zhong, Pei

    2006-06-01

    A theoretical model for the propagation of shock wave from an axisymmetric reflector was developed by modifying the initial conditions for the conventional solution of a nonlinear parabolic wave equation (i.e., the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznestsov equation). The ellipsoidal reflector of an HM-3 lithotripter is modeled equivalently as a self-focusing spherically distributed pressure source. The pressure wave form generated by the spark discharge of the HM-3 electrode was measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone and used as source conditions in the numerical calculation. The simulated pressure wave forms, accounting for the effects of diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous absorption in wave propagation and focusing, were compared with the measured results and a reasonably good agreement was found. Furthermore, the primary characteristics in the pressure wave forms produced by different reflector geometries, such as that produced by a reflector insert, can also be predicted by this model. It is interesting to note that when the interpulse delay time calculated by linear geometric model is less than about 1.5 micros, two pulses from the reflector insert and the uncovered bottom of the original HM-3 reflector will merge together. Coupling the simulated pressure wave form with the Gilmore model was carried out to evaluate the effect of reflector geometry on resultant bubble dynamics in a lithotripter field. Altogether, the equivalent reflector model was found to provide a useful tool for the prediction of pressure wave form generated in a lithotripter field. This model may be used to guide the design optimization of reflector geometries for improving the performance and safety of clinical lithotripters. PMID:16838506

  13. The effect of reflector geometry on the acoustic field and bubble dynamics produced by an electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Zhong, Pei

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical model for the propagation of shock wave from an axisymmetric reflector was developed by modifying the initial conditions for the conventional solution of a nonlinear parabolic wave equation (i.e., the Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznestsov equation). The ellipsoidal reflector of an HM-3 lithotripter is modeled equivalently as a self-focusing spherically distributed pressure source. The pressure wave form generated by the spark discharge of the HM-3 electrode was measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone and used as source conditions in the numerical calculation. The simulated pressure wave forms, accounting for the effects of diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous absorption in wave propagation and focusing, were compared with the measured results and a reasonably good agreement was found. Furthermore, the primary characteristics in the pressure wave forms produced by different reflector geometries, such as that produced by a reflector insert, can also be predicted by this model. It is interesting to note that when the interpulse delay time calculated by linear geometric model is less than about 1.5 μs, two pulses from the reflector insert and the uncovered bottom of the original HM-3 reflector will merge together. Coupling the simulated pressure wave form with the Gilmore model was carried out to evaluate the effect of reflector geometry on resultant bubble dynamics in a lithotripter field. Altogether, the equivalent reflector model was found to provide a useful tool for the prediction of pressure wave form generated in a lithotripter field. This model may be used to guide the design optimization of reflector geometries for improving the performance and safety of clinical lithotripters. PMID:16838506

  14. Passive fathometer reflector identification with phase shift modeling.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Gerstoft, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In passive fathometer processing, the presence of wavelets in the estimate of the medium's Green's function corresponds to the location of reflectors in the seabed; amplitudes are related to seabed properties. Bayesian methods have been successful in identifying reflectors that define layer interfaces. Further work, however, revealed that phase shifts are occasionally present in the wavelets and hinder accurate layer identification for some reflectors. With a Gibbs sampler that computes probability densities of reflector depths, strengths of the reflections, and wavelet phase shifts, the significance of phase shift modeling in successful estimation of reflectors and their strengths is demonstrated. PMID:27475201

  15. Bragg Spectroscopy of a Strongly-Interacting Homogeneous BEC: probing quantum depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Raphael; Eigen, Christoph; Baker, Adam; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Smith, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We will present Bragg spectroscopy measurements performed on a homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) as a function of interaction strength. The width and position of the Bragg resonance reveal the momentum distribution and energy shift of the ground state, respectively. We observe that the width increases as a function of interaction strength and interpret this behavior as a result of quantum depletion of the condensate, induced by interactions. The central frequency of the resonance grows linearly with the interaction strength (mean-field behavior) but is reduced as the interaction strength further increases; being completely suppressed at high values.

  16. Stability of higher-order Bragg interactions in active periodic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The stability of waves in unbounded, longitudinally periodic media is studied for index and gain coupling. Time-independent periodic media are found to support both stable and absolutely unstable waves. The wave characteristics depend upon average gain or loss, coupling type, and Bragg order. The extended coupled waves equations provide explicit values of threshold, frequency, and temporal growth rate for instabilities at all Bragg resonances through the dispersion relation. Applications to multiharmonic periodicities and complex couplings are briefly discussed with particular note taken of possible reductions of the stability thresholds and removal of threshold degeneracies. Comparisons are made to the longitudinally bounded case of distributed feedback lasers.

  17. Fabrication of Extremely Short Length Fiber Bragg Gratings for Sensor Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Rogowski, Robert S.; Tedjojuwono, Ken K.

    2002-01-01

    A new technique and a physical model for writing extremely short length Bragg gratings in optical fibers have been developed. The model describes the effects of diffraction on the spatial spectra and therefore, the wavelength spectra of the Bragg gratings. Using an interferometric technique and a variable aperture, short gratings of various lengths and center wavelengths were written in optical fibers. By selecting the related parameters, the Bragg gratings with typical length of several hundred microns and bandwidth of several nanometers can be obtained. These short gratings can be apodized with selected diffraction patterns and hence their broadband spectra have a well-defined bell shape. They are suitable for use as miniaturized distributed strain sensors, which have broad applications to aerospace research and industry as well.

  18. Bragg-edge neutron transmission strain tomography for in situ loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensrich, C. M.; Hendriks, J. N.; Gregg, A.; Meylan, M. H.; Luzin, V.; Tremsin, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    An approach for tomographic reconstruction of three-dimensional strain distributions from Bragg-edge neutron transmission strain images is outlined and investigated. This algorithm is based on the link between Bragg-edge strain measurements and the Longitudinal Ray Transform, which has been shown to be sensitive only to boundary displacement. By exploiting this observation we provide a method for reconstructing boundary displacement from sets of Bragg-edge strain images. In the case where these displacements are strictly the result of externally applied tractions, corresponding internal strain fields can then be found through traditional linear-static finite element methods. This approach is tested on synthetic data in two-dimensions, where the rate of convergence in the presence of measurement noise and beam attenuation is examined.

  19. Terahertz bandwidth photonic Hilbert transformers based on synthesized planar Bragg grating fabrication.

    PubMed

    Sima, Chaotan; Gates, J C; Holmes, C; Mennea, P L; Zervas, M N; Smith, P G R

    2013-09-01

    Terahertz bandwidth photonic Hilbert transformers are proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The integrated device is fabricated via a direct UV grating writing technique in a silica-on-silicon platform. The photonic Hilbert transformer operates at bandwidths of up to 2 THz (~16 nm) in the telecom band, a 10-fold greater bandwidth than any previously reported experimental approaches. Achieving this performance requires detailed knowledge of the system transfer function of the direct UV grating writing technique; this allows improved linearity and yields terahertz bandwidth Bragg gratings with improved spectral quality. By incorporating a flat-top reflector and Hilbert grating with a waveguide coupler, an ultrawideband all-optical single-sideband filter is demonstrated. PMID:23988981

  20. Detuned Plasmonic Bragg Grating Sensor Based on a Defect Metal-Insulator-Metal Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shinian; Song, Ci; Xia, Xiushan; Liang, Xiuye; Tang, Baojie; Hu, Zheng-Da; Wang, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    A nanoscale Bragg grating reflector based on the defect metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide is developed and numerically simulated by using the finite element method (FEM). The MIM-based structure promises a highly tunable broad stop-band in transmission spectra. The narrow transmission window is shown to appear in the previous stop-band by changing the certain geometrical parameters. The central wavelengths can be controlled easily by altering the geographical parameters. The development of surface plasmon polarition (SPP) technology in metallic waveguide structures leads to more possibilities of controlling light at deep sub-wavelengths. Its attractive ability of breaking the diffraction limit contributes to the design of optical sensors. PMID:27240381

  1. Detuned Plasmonic Bragg Grating Sensor Based on a Defect Metal-Insulator-Metal Waveguide.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shinian; Song, Ci; Xia, Xiushan; Liang, Xiuye; Tang, Baojie; Hu, Zheng-Da; Wang, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    A nanoscale Bragg grating reflector based on the defect metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide is developed and numerically simulated by using the finite element method (FEM). The MIM-based structure promises a highly tunable broad stop-band in transmission spectra. The narrow transmission window is shown to appear in the previous stop-band by changing the certain geometrical parameters. The central wavelengths can be controlled easily by altering the geographical parameters. The development of surface plasmon polarition (SPP) technology in metallic waveguide structures leads to more possibilities of controlling light at deep sub-wavelengths. Its attractive ability of breaking the diffraction limit contributes to the design of optical sensors. PMID:27240381

  2. Strongly Dispersive Transient Bragg Grating for High Harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.; Spector, L.S.; Gaarde, M.B.; McFarland, B.K.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Guhr, Markus; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-04

    We create a transient Bragg grating in a high harmonic generation medium using two counterpropagating pulses. The Bragg grating disperses the harmonics in angle and can diffract a large bandwidth with temporal resolution limited only by the source size.

  3. Axle counter for high-speed railway based on fibre Bragg grating sensor and algorithm optimization for peak searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yu; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng; Wang, Pengfei

    2014-08-01

    For the benefit of electrical isolation, corrosion resistance and quasi-distributed detecting, Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor has been studied for high-speed railway application progressively. Existing Axle counter system based on fiber Bragg grating sensor isn't appropriate for high-speed railway for the shortcoming of emplacement of fiber Bragg grating sensor, low Sampling rate and un-optimized algorithm for peak searching. We propose a new design for the Axle counter of high-speed railway based on high-speed fiber Bragg grating demodulating system. We also optimized algorithm for peak searching by synthesizing the three sensor data, bringing forward the time axle, Gaussian fitting and Finite Element Analysis. The feasibility was verified by field experiment.

  4. Results from a Bragg curve spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, D. D.; Davis, K. J.

    The Bragg Curve Spectrometer (BCS) is an ionization chamber long enough to stop particles of interest. Particles enter through the cathode window and leave an ionization track parallel to the electric field. The ionization electrons drift through a Frisch grid and are collected on an anode. The anode current, as a function of time, is split and used as input for two amplifiers, one with a long integration time constant for energy measurement, and one with a short time constant to pick off the maximum ionization or Bragg peak. The Bragg peak, which is proportional to the nuclear charge, is used for particle identification. Several versions of the BCS have been constructed and tested. The results are described.

  5. Bragg reflection of ocean waves from sandbars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, B.; Herbers, T. H. C.

    2003-01-01

    Resonant Bragg reflection of ocean surface waves by a field of natural shore-parallel sandbars was observed in Cape Cod Bay, MA. Waves transmitted through the bars were reflected strongly from the steep shoreline, and the observed cross-shore variations in the onshore- and offshore-directed energy fluxes are consistent with theory for resonant Bragg reflection, including a 20% decay of the incident wave energy flux that is an order of magnitude greater than expected for wave-orbital velocity induced bottom friction. Bragg reflection was observed for a range of incident wave conditions, including storms when sediment transported toward and away from nodes and antinodes caused by the reflecting waves might result in growth and maintenance of the sandbars.

  6. High efficiency, broadband solar cell architectures based on arrays of volumetrically distributed narrowband photovoltaic fibers.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Brendan; Nothern, Denis; Pipe, Kevin P; Shtein, Max

    2010-09-13

    We propose a novel solar cell architecture consisting of multiple fiber-based photovoltaic (PV) cells. Each PV fiber element is designed to maximize the power conversion efficiency within a narrow band of the incident solar spectrum, while reflecting other spectral components through the use of optical microcavity effects and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) coatings. Combining PV fibers with complementary absorption and reflection characteristics into volume-filling arrays enables spectrally tuned modules having an effective dispersion element intrinsic to the architecture, resulting in high external quantum efficiency over the incident spectrum. While this new reflective tandem architecture is not limited to one particular material system, here we apply the concept to organic PV (OPV) cells that use a metal-organic-metal-dielectric layer structure, and calculate the expected performance of such arrays. Using realistic material properties for organic absorbers, transport layers, metallic electrodes, and DBR coatings, 17% power conversion efficiency can be reached. PMID:21165073

  7. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  8. Contact cleaning of polymer film solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Christopher; Fernández-García, Aránzazu; Sutter, Florian; Almond, Heather; King, Peter

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the accelerated ageing of polymer film reflecting surfaces under the conditions to be found during contact cleaning of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) collectors in the presence of dust and sand particles. In these situations, contact cleaning using brushes and water is required to clean the reflecting surfaces. Whilst suitable for glass reflectors, this paper discusses the effects of existing cleaning processes on the optical and visual properties of polymer film surfaces, and then describes the development of a more benign but effective contact cleaning process for cleaning polymer reflectors. The effects of a range of cleaning brushes are discussed, with and without the presence of water, in the presence of sand and dust particles from selected representative locations. Reflectance measurements and visual inspection shows that a soft cleaning brush with a small amount of water can clean polymer film reflecting surfaces without inflicting surface damage or reducing specular reflectance.

  9. Adjusting Surfaces Of Large Antenna Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Adelman, Howard M.; Bailey, Marion C.; Hoftka, Raphael T.

    1989-01-01

    New approach more effective than traditional rms-surface-distortion approach. Optimization procedure for control of shape of reflector of large space antenna (LSA). Main feature is shape-controlling mathematical mechanism driven by need to satisfy explicit EM design requirements. Uses standard finite-element structural analysis, aperture-integration EM analysis, and constrained optimization techniques to predict set of actuator inputs that improves performance of antenna while minimizing applied control effort. Procedure applicable to wide variety of LSA concepts.

  10. Measuring Shapes Of Reflectors By Microwave Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Pair of reports discusses theoretical foundation and recent theoretical and practical developments in use of microwave holography to measure surfaces of microwave antennas. (Second report abbreviated version of first report.) Microwave holographic measurements provide acceptable accuracy and are more convenient and less time consuming than optical and mechanical measurements, especially where measurements repeated. Microwave holographyic metrology of lare reflectors, first reported in 1976, improved into accurate technique with potential industrial applications.

  11. Vacuum deposited polymer/silver reflector material

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

    1994-07-01

    Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less than 50 cents per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 {mu}m to .8 {mu}m. It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process - for Polymer Multi-Layer.

  12. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Robert Grimes, David

    2016-08-21

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity. PMID:27445095

  13. Simulation of parabolic reflectors for ultraviolet phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, David Robert

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UVR) phototherapy is widely used to treat an array of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema and vitiligo. For such interventions, a quantified dose is vital if the treatment is to be both biologically effective and to avoid the detrimental effects of over-dosing. As dose is absorbed at surface level, the orientation of patient site with respect to the UVR lamps modulates effective dose. Previous investigations have modelled this behaviour, and examined the impact of shaped anodized aluminium reflectors typically placed around lamps in phototherapy cabins. These mirrors are effective but tend to yield complex patterns of reflection around the cabin which can result in substantial dose inhomogeneity. There has been some speculation over whether using the reflective property of parabolic mirrors might improve dose delivery or homogeneity through the treatment cabin. In this work, the effects of parabolic mirrors are simulated and compared with standard shaped mirrors. Simulation results strongly suggest that parabolic reflectors reduce total irradiance relative to standard shaped reflectors, and have a negligible impact on dose homogeneity.

  14. A novel radar reflector with variable RCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotajima, H.; Fujita, H.

    1981-06-01

    It is shown that a radar reflector is obtained for which the radar cross section is variable linearly in decibels in accordance with the rotating angle of the Luneburg lens if use is made of the focusing ability and the spherical symmetry of the lens. The reflector consists of a special reflecting strip attached to the Luneburg lens. A prototype radar reflector was designed and fabricated, and the design method is described. The specifications of the prototype, including the maximum and minimum values of the radar cross section, the usable rotating angle in the horizontal plane, and the allowable rotating angle in the elevation are listed and the determination of their values is described. The reflection pattern was measured by the magic-T method in an anechoic chamber with a horizontally polarized 9375 MHz signal. The most important linearity was found to be within + or -0.2 dB of the design value. The linearity over the entire range is satisfactory.

  15. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  16. Annular Bragg resonators (ABR): the ideal tool for biochemical sensing, nonlinear optics, and cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jacob; Green, William M. J.; Yariv, Amnon

    2006-02-01

    Circular resonators are fundamentally interesting elements that are essential for research involving highly confined fields and strong photon-atom interactions such as cavity QED, as well as for practical applications in optical communication systems as and biochemical sensing. The important characteristics of a ring resonator are the Q-factor, the free spectral range (FSR) and the modal volume, where the last two are primarily determined by the resonator dimensions. The Total-Internal-Reflection (TIR) mechanism employed in "conventional" resonators couples between these characteristics and limits the ability to realize compact devices with large FSR, small modal volume and high Q. Recently, we proposed and analyzed a new class of a resonator in an annular geometry that is based on a single defect surrounded by radial Bragg reflectors on both sides. The radial Bragg confinement breaks the link between the characteristics of the mode and paves a new way for the realization of compact and low loss resonators. Such properties as well as the unique mode profile of the ABRs make this class of devices an excellent tool for ultra-sensitive biochemical detection as well as for studies in nonlinear optics and cavity QED.

  17. Top-hat random fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongwei; Gbadebo, Adenowo; Turitsyna, Elena G

    2015-08-01

    We examined the possibility of using noise or pseudo-random variations of the refractive index in the design of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). We demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that top-hat FBGs may be designed and fabricated using this approach. The reflectivity of the fabricated top-hat FBG matches quite well with that of the designed one. PMID:26258365

  18. Tunable Bragg filters with a phase transition material defect layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Gong, Zilun; Dong, Kaichen; Lou, Shuai; Slack, Jonathan; Anders, Andre; Yao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    We propose an all-solid-state tunable Bragg filter with a phase transition material as the defect layer. Bragg filters based on a vanadium dioxide defect layer sandwiched between silicon dioxide/titanium dioxide Bragg gratings are experimentally demonstrated. Temperature dependent reflection spectroscopy shows the dynamic tunability and hysteresis properties of the Bragg filter. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy reveals the connection between the tunability and the phase transition of the vanadium dioxide defect layer. This work paves a new avenue in tunable Bragg filter designs and promises more applications by combining phase transition materials and optical cavities. PMID:27607643

  19. Cross polarization in beam waveguide-fed Cassegrain reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshmand, Bijan

    1991-02-01

    The sensitivity of the cross-polarization level to a deviation from the geometrical condition derived by Mizusawa and Kitsuregawa (1973) for different geometrical configurations is studied. This condition restricts the number of possible beam waveguide configurations for beam waveguide-fed Cassegrain reflector (BFCR) antennas. For a symmetrical feed, this condition results in a symmetrical aperture distribution with no cross-polarized component. By examining a number of beam waveguide configurations satisfying the condition, it was observed that for linearly polarized feed, the cross-polarization level is very sensitive to a deviation from this condition. For circularly polarized feed, deviation from this condition does not increase the cross-polarization level; however, it results in the squinting of the beam for BFCRs.

  20. Reaction formulation for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors and dielectric-coated cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N. N.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction concept is employed to formulate an integral equation for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors, and dielectric-coated conducting cylinders. The surface-current density on the conducting surface is expanded with subsectional bases. The dielectric layer is modeled with polarization currents radiating in free space. Maxwell's equation and the boundary conditions are employed to express the polarization-current distribution in terms of the surface-current density on the conducting surface. By enforcing reaction tests with an array of electric test sources, the moment method is employed to reduce the integral equation to a matrix equation. Inversion of the matrix equation yields the current distribution, and the scattered field is then obtained by integrating the current distribution. The theory, computer program and numerical results are presented for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors, and dielectric-coated conducting cylinders.