Science.gov

Sample records for distributed relevance ranking

  1. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal

  2. Ranking Biomedical Annotations with Annotator's Semantic Relevancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  3. Ranking biomedical annotations with annotator's semantic relevancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aihua

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical annotation is a common and affective artifact for researchers to discuss, show opinion, and share discoveries. It becomes increasing popular in many online research communities, and implies much useful information. Ranking biomedical annotations is a critical problem for data user to efficiently get information. As the annotator's knowledge about the annotated entity normally determines quality of the annotations, we evaluate the knowledge, that is, semantic relationship between them, in two ways. The first is extracting relational information from credible websites by mining association rules between an annotator and a biomedical entity. The second way is frequent pattern mining from historical annotations, which reveals common features of biomedical entities that an annotator can annotate with high quality. We propose a weighted and concept-extended RDF model to represent an annotator, a biomedical entity, and their background attributes and merge information from the two ways as the context of an annotator. Based on that, we present a method to rank the annotations by evaluating their correctness according to user's vote and the semantic relevancy between the annotator and the annotated entity. The experimental results show that the approach is applicable and efficient even when data set is large. PMID:24899918

  4. Ranking Refinement via Relevance Feedback in Geographic Information Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro-Tello, Esaú; Villaseñor-Pineda, Luis; Montes-Y-Gómez, Manuel

    Recent evaluation results from Geographic Information Retrieval (GIR) indicate that current information retrieval methods are effective to retrieve relevant documents for geographic queries, but they have severe difficulties to generate a pertinent ranking of them. Motivated by these results in this paper we present a novel re-ranking method, which employs information obtained through a relevance feedback process to perform a ranking refinement. Performed experiments show that the proposed method allows to improve the generated ranking from a traditional IR machine, as well as results from traditional re-ranking strategies such as query expansion via relevance feedback.

  5. Incidence of q statistics in rank distributions

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, G. Cigdem; Robledo, Alberto; Gell-Mann, Murray

    2014-01-01

    We show that size-rank distributions with power-law decay (often only over a limited extent) observed in a vast number of instances in a widespread family of systems obey Tsallis statistics. The theoretical framework for these distributions is analogous to that of a nonlinear iterated map near a tangent bifurcation for which the Lyapunov exponent is negligible or vanishes. The relevant statistical–mechanical expressions associated with these distributions are derived from a maximum entropy principle with the use of two different constraints, and the resulting duality of entropy indexes is seen to portray physically relevant information. Whereas the value of the index α fixes the distribution’s power-law exponent, that for the dual index 2 − α ensures the extensivity of the deformed entropy. PMID:25189773

  6. Relevance Preserving Projection and Ranking for Web Image Search Reranking.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Pang, Yanwei; Li, Xuelong

    2015-11-01

    An image search reranking (ISR) technique aims at refining text-based search results by mining images' visual content. Feature extraction and ranking function design are two key steps in ISR. Inspired by the idea of hypersphere in one-class classification, this paper proposes a feature extraction algorithm named hypersphere-based relevance preserving projection (HRPP) and a ranking function called hypersphere-based rank (H-Rank). Specifically, an HRPP is a spectral embedding algorithm to transform an original high-dimensional feature space into an intrinsically low-dimensional hypersphere space by preserving the manifold structure and a relevance relationship among the images. An H-Rank is a simple but effective ranking algorithm to sort the images by their distances to the hypersphere center. Moreover, to capture the user's intent with minimum human interaction, a reversed k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm is proposed, which harvests enough pseudorelevant images by requiring that the user gives only one click on the initially searched images. The HRPP method with reversed KNN is named one-click-based HRPP (OC-HRPP). Finally, an OC-HRPP algorithm and the H-Rank algorithm form a new ISR method, H-reranking. Extensive experimental results on three large real-world data sets show that the proposed algorithms are effective. Moreover, the fact that only one relevant image is required to be labeled makes it has a strong practical significance. PMID:26011885

  7. Rank distributions: a panoramic macroscopic outlook.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo I; Cohen, Morrel H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions-top-down, bottom-up, and global-and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails. PMID:24580176

  8. Rank distributions: A panoramic macroscopic outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a panoramic macroscopic outlook of rank distributions. We establish a general framework for the analysis of rank distributions, which classifies them into five macroscopic "socioeconomic" states: monarchy, oligarchy-feudalism, criticality, socialism-capitalism, and communism. Oligarchy-feudalism is shown to be characterized by discrete macroscopic rank distributions, and socialism-capitalism is shown to be characterized by continuous macroscopic size distributions. Criticality is a transition state between oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, which can manifest allometric scaling with multifractal spectra. Monarchy and communism are extreme forms of oligarchy-feudalism and socialism-capitalism, respectively, in which the intrinsic randomness vanishes. The general framework is applied to three different models of rank distributions—top-down, bottom-up, and global—and unveils each model's macroscopic universality and versatility. The global model yields a macroscopic classification of the generalized Zipf law, an omnipresent form of rank distributions observed across the sciences. An amalgamation of the three models establishes a universal rank-distribution explanation for the macroscopic emergence of a prevalent class of continuous size distributions, ones governed by unimodal densities with both Pareto and inverse-Pareto power-law tails.

  9. Procedure for determining the distribution ranking index

    SciTech Connect

    Latino, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Distribution Ranking Index (DRI) has been developed as a simple but effective means to indicate the inherent, acute hazards of a material that might be released in a transportation accident. Utilizing existing Dow resources and procedures, it is one of the methods used for prioritization of chemicals in Dow`s distribution related process risk management effort. Seven individual hazard indexes are considered for a material. The values range from 1 to 4 with 4 representing the most severe hazard. The highest value from any hazard index determines the overall DRI. 3 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  10. The Distribution of the Sum of Signed Ranks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We describe the calculation of the distribution of the sum of signed ranks and develop an exact recursive algorithm for the distribution as well as an approximation of the distribution using the normal. The results have applications to the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test.

  11. Universality in the tail of musical note rank distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán del Río, M.; Cocho, G.; Naumis, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    Although power laws have been used to fit rank distributions in many different contexts, they usually fail at the tails. Languages as sequences of symbols have been a popular subject for ranking distributions, and for this purpose, music can be treated as such. Here we show that more than 1800 musical compositions are very well fitted by the first kind two parameter beta distribution, which arises in the ranking of multiplicative stochastic processes. The parameters a and b are obtained for classical, jazz and rock music, revealing interesting features. Specially, we have obtained a clear trend in the values of the parameters for major and minor tonal modes. Finally, we discuss the distribution of notes for each octave and its connection with the ranking of the notes.

  12. Rank-Size Distribution of Notes in Harmonic Music: Hierarchic Shuffling of Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Río, Manuel Beltrán; Cocho, Germinal

    We trace the rank size distribution of notes in harmonic music, which on previous works we suggested was much better represented by the Two-parameter, first class Beta distribution than the customary power law, to the ranked mixing of distributions dictated by the harmonic and instrumental nature of the piece. The same representation is shown to arise in other fields by the same type of ranked shuffling of distributions. We include the codon content of intergenic DNA sequences and the ranked distribution of sizes of trees in a determined area as examples. We show that the fittings proposed increase their accuracy with the number of distributions that are mixed and ranked.

  13. Relevance weighting of tier 1 endocrine screening endpoints by rank order.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Stuchal, Leah D; Mihaich, Ellen M; Becker, Richard A; Bentley, Karin S; Brausch, John M; Coady, Katie; Geter, David R; Gordon, Elliot; Guiney, Patrick D; Hess, Frederick; Holmes, Catherine M; LeBaron, Matthew J; Levine, Steve; Marty, Sue; Mukhi, Sandeep; Neal, Barbara H; Ortego, Lisa S; Saltmiras, David A; Snajdr, Suzanne; Staveley, Jane; Tobia, Abraham

    2014-02-01

    Weight of evidence (WoE) approaches are recommended for interpreting various toxicological data, but few systematic and transparent procedures exist. A hypothesis-based WoE framework was recently published focusing on the U.S. EPA's Tier 1 Endocrine Screening Battery (ESB) as an example. The framework recommends weighting each experimental endpoint according to its relevance for deciding eight hypotheses addressed by the ESB. Here we present detailed rationale for weighting the ESB endpoints according to three rank ordered categories and an interpretive process for using the rankings to reach WoE determinations. Rank 1 was assigned to in vivo endpoints that characterize the fundamental physiological actions for androgen, estrogen, and thyroid activities. Rank 1 endpoints are specific and sensitive for the hypothesis, interpretable without ancillary data, and rarely confounded by artifacts or nonspecific activity. Rank 2 endpoints are specific and interpretable for the hypothesis but less informative than Rank 1, often due to oversensitivity, inclusion of narrowly context-dependent components of the hormonal system (e.g., in vitro endpoints), or confounding by nonspecific activity. Rank 3 endpoints are relevant for the hypothesis but only corroborative of Ranks 1 and 2 endpoints. Rank 3 includes many apical in vivo endpoints that can be affected by systemic toxicity and nonhormonal activity. Although these relevance weight rankings (WREL ) necessarily involve professional judgment, their a priori derivation enhances transparency and renders WoE determinations amenable to methodological scrutiny according to basic scientific premises, characteristics that cannot be assured by processes in which the rationale for decisions is provided post hoc. PMID:24510745

  14. Random Texts Do Not Exhibit the Real Zipf's Law-Like Rank Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-i-Cancho, Ramon; Elvevåg, Brita

    2010-01-01

    Background Zipf's law states that the relationship between the frequency of a word in a text and its rank (the most frequent word has rank , the 2nd most frequent word has rank ,…) is approximately linear when plotted on a double logarithmic scale. It has been argued that the law is not a relevant or useful property of language because simple random texts - constructed by concatenating random characters including blanks behaving as word delimiters - exhibit a Zipf's law-like word rank distribution. Methodology/Principal Findings In this article, we examine the flaws of such putative good fits of random texts. We demonstrate - by means of three different statistical tests - that ranks derived from random texts and ranks derived from real texts are statistically inconsistent with the parameters employed to argue for such a good fit, even when the parameters are inferred from the target real text. Our findings are valid for both the simplest random texts composed of equally likely characters as well as more elaborate and realistic versions where character probabilities are borrowed from a real text. Conclusions/Significance The good fit of random texts to real Zipf's law-like rank distributions has not yet been established. Therefore, we suggest that Zipf's law might in fact be a fundamental law in natural languages. PMID:20231884

  15. Assessing introduction risk using species' rank-abundance distributions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Farrah T; Bradie, Johanna; Briski, Elizabeta; Bailey, Sarah A; Simard, Nathalie; MacIsaac, Hugh J

    2015-01-22

    Mixed-species assemblages are often unintentionally introduced into new ecosystems. Analysing how assemblage structure varies during transport may provide insights into how introduction risk changes before propagules are released. Characterization of introduction risk is typically based on assessments of colonization pressure (CP, the number of species transported) and total propagule pressure (total PP, the total abundance of propagules released) associated with an invasion vector. Generally, invasion potential following introduction increases with greater CP or total PP. Here, we extend these assessments using rank-abundance distributions to examine how CP : total PP relationships change temporally in ballast water of ocean-going ships. Rank-abundance distributions and CP : total PP patterns varied widely between trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific voyages, with the latter appearing to pose a much lower risk than the former. Responses also differed by taxonomic group, with invertebrates experiencing losses mainly in total PP, while diatoms and dinoflagellates sustained losses mainly in CP. In certain cases, open-ocean ballast water exchange appeared to increase introduction risk by uptake of new species or supplementation of existing ones. Our study demonstrates that rank-abundance distributions provide new insights into the utility of CP and PP in characterizing introduction risk. PMID:25473007

  16. Assessing introduction risk using species’ rank-abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Farrah T.; Bradie, Johanna; Briski, Elizabeta; Bailey, Sarah A.; Simard, Nathalie; MacIsaac, Hugh J.

    2015-01-01

    Mixed-species assemblages are often unintentionally introduced into new ecosystems. Analysing how assemblage structure varies during transport may provide insights into how introduction risk changes before propagules are released. Characterization of introduction risk is typically based on assessments of colonization pressure (CP, the number of species transported) and total propagule pressure (total PP, the total abundance of propagules released) associated with an invasion vector. Generally, invasion potential following introduction increases with greater CP or total PP. Here, we extend these assessments using rank-abundance distributions to examine how CP : total PP relationships change temporally in ballast water of ocean-going ships. Rank-abundance distributions and CP : total PP patterns varied widely between trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific voyages, with the latter appearing to pose a much lower risk than the former. Responses also differed by taxonomic group, with invertebrates experiencing losses mainly in total PP, while diatoms and dinoflagellates sustained losses mainly in CP. In certain cases, open-ocean ballast water exchange appeared to increase introduction risk by uptake of new species or supplementation of existing ones. Our study demonstrates that rank-abundance distributions provide new insights into the utility of CP and PP in characterizing introduction risk. PMID:25473007

  17. Inverted rank distributions: Macroscopic statistics, universality classes, and critical exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Cohen, Morrel H.

    2014-01-01

    An inverted rank distribution is an infinite sequence of positive sizes ordered in a monotone increasing fashion. Interlacing together Lorenzian and oligarchic asymptotic analyses, we establish a macroscopic classification of inverted rank distributions into five “socioeconomic” universality classes: communism, socialism, criticality, feudalism, and absolute monarchy. We further establish that: (i) communism and socialism are analogous to a “disordered phase”, feudalism and absolute monarchy are analogous to an “ordered phase”, and criticality is the “phase transition” between order and disorder; (ii) the universality classes are characterized by two critical exponents, one governing the ordered phase, and the other governing the disordered phase; (iii) communism, criticality, and absolute monarchy are characterized by sharp exponent values, and are inherently deterministic; (iv) socialism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by continuous power-law statistics; (v) feudalism is characterized by a continuous exponent range, is inherently stochastic, and is universally governed by discrete exponential statistics. The results presented in this paper yield a universal macroscopic socioeconophysical perspective of inverted rank distributions.

  18. Power-law and exponential rank distributions: A panoramic Gibbsian perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-04-15

    Rank distributions are collections of positive sizes ordered either increasingly or decreasingly. Many decreasing rank distributions, formed by the collective collaboration of human actions, follow an inverse power-law relation between ranks and sizes. This remarkable empirical fact is termed Zipf’s law, and one of its quintessential manifestations is the demography of human settlements — which exhibits a harmonic relation between ranks and sizes. In this paper we present a comprehensive statistical-physics analysis of rank distributions, establish that power-law and exponential rank distributions stand out as optimal in various entropy-based senses, and unveil the special role of the harmonic relation between ranks and sizes. Our results extend the contemporary entropy-maximization view of Zipf’s law to a broader, panoramic, Gibbsian perspective of increasing and decreasing power-law and exponential rank distributions — of which Zipf’s law is one out of four pillars.

  19. Denoised Wigner distribution deconvolution via low-rank matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin; Barbastathis, George

    2016-09-01

    Wigner distribution deconvolution (WDD) is a decades-old method for recovering phase from intensity measurements. Although the technique offers an elegant linear solution to the quadratic phase retrieval problem, it has seen limited adoption due to its high computational/memory requirements and the fact that the technique often exhibits high noise sensitivity. Here, we propose a method for noise suppression in WDD via low-rank noisy matrix completion. Our technique exploits the redundancy of an object's phase space to denoise its WDD reconstruction. We show in model calculations that our technique outperforms other WDD algorithms as well as modern iterative methods for phase retrieval such as ptychography. Our results suggest that a class of phase retrieval techniques relying on regularized direct inversion of ptychographic datasets (instead of iterative reconstruction techniques) can provide accurate quantitative phase information in the presence of high levels of noise. PMID:27607616

  20. Pathway Relevance Ranking for Tumor Samples through Network-Based Data Integration

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Lieven P. C.; Van den Eynden, Jimmy; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Demeester, Piet; Fostier, Jan; Marchal, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The study of cancer, a highly heterogeneous disease with different causes and clinical outcomes, requires a multi-angle approach and the collection of large multi-omics datasets that, ideally, should be analyzed simultaneously. We present a new pathway relevance ranking method that is able to prioritize pathways according to the information contained in any combination of tumor related omics datasets. Key to the method is the conversion of all available data into a single comprehensive network representation containing not only genes but also individual patient samples. Additionally, all data are linked through a network of previously identified molecular interactions. We demonstrate the performance of the new method by applying it to breast and ovarian cancer datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas. By integrating gene expression, copy number, mutation and methylation data, the method’s potential to identify key pathways involved in breast cancer development shared by different molecular subtypes is illustrated. Interestingly, certain pathways were ranked equally important for different subtypes, even when the underlying (epi)-genetic disturbances were diverse. Next to prioritizing universally high-scoring pathways, the pathway ranking method was able to identify subtype-specific pathways. Often the score of a pathway could not be motivated by a single mutation, copy number or methylation alteration, but rather by a combination of genetic and epi-genetic disturbances, stressing the need for a network-based data integration approach. The analysis of ovarian tumors, as a function of survival-based subtypes, demonstrated the method’s ability to correctly identify key pathways, irrespective of tumor subtype. A differential analysis of survival-based subtypes revealed several pathways with higher importance for the bad-outcome patient group than for the good-outcome patient group. Many of the pathways exhibiting higher importance for the bad-outcome patient group

  1. MememxGATE: Unearthing Latent Content Features for Improved Search and Relevancy Ranking Across Scientific Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, B. D.; McGibbney, L. J.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Joyce, M.; Whitehall, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    be utilized for improved search and relevancy ranking across scientific literature.

  2. Universality of Rank-Ordering Distributions in the Arts and Sciences

    PubMed Central

    del Río, Manuel Beltrán; Mansilla, Ricardo; Miramontes, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Searching for generic behaviors has been one of the driving forces leading to a deep understanding and classification of diverse phenomena. Usually a starting point is the development of a phenomenology based on observations. Such is the case for power law distributions encountered in a wealth of situations coming from physics, geophysics, biology, lexicography as well as social and financial networks. This finding is however restricted to a range of values outside of which finite size corrections are often invoked. Here we uncover a universal behavior of the way in which elements of a system are distributed according to their rank with respect to a given property, valid for the full range of values, regardless of whether or not a power law has previously been suggested. We propose a two parameter functional form for these rank-ordered distributions that gives excellent fits to an impressive amount of very diverse phenomena, coming from the arts, social and natural sciences. It is a discrete version of a generalized beta distribution, given by f(r) = A(N+1-r)b/ra, where r is the rank, N its maximum value, A the normalization constant and (a, b) two fitting exponents. Prompted by our genetic sequence observations we present a growth probabilistic model incorporating mutation-duplication features that generates data complying with this distribution. The competition between permanence and change appears to be a relevant, though not necessary feature. Additionally, our observations mainly of social phenomena suggest that a multifactorial quality resulting from the convergence of several heterogeneous underlying processes is an important feature. We also explore the significance of the distribution parameters and their classifying potential. The ubiquity of our findings suggests that there must be a fundamental underlying explanation, most probably of a statistical nature, such as an appropriate central limit theorem formulation. PMID:19277122

  3. Using of rank distributions in the study of perennial changes for monthly average temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskiy, V. B.; Stoyanov, A. K.; Tartakovsky, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of comparing the climatic data of various years with using rank distributions is considered in this paper. As a climatic data, the annual variation of temperature on the spatial areas of meteorological observations with high variability in average temperatures is considered. The results of clustering of the monthly average temperatures values by means of a recurrent neural network were used as the basis of comparing. For a given space of weather observations the rank distribution of the clusters cardinality identified for each year of observation, is being constructed. The resulting rank distributions allow you to compare the spatial temperature distributions of various years. An experimental comparison for rank distributions of the annual variation of monthly average temperatures has confirmed the presence of scatter for various years, associated with different spatio-temporal distribution of temperature. An experimental comparison of rank distributions revealed a difference in the integral annual variation of monthly average temperatures of various years for the Northern Hemisphere.

  4. The Role and Relevance of Rankings in Higher Education Policymaking. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sponsler, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Debates over the use of college rankings are often framed in binaries: ardent advocates versus outright rejectionists, rankers versus rankees. But the American higher education landscape is complex, and so too should be discussions of rankings. Moreover, the policymaking process is simultaneously intricate and predictable--information is processed…

  5. Methods of computing vocabulary size for the two-parameter rank distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmundson, H. P.; Fostel, G.; Tung, I.; Underwood, W.

    1972-01-01

    A summation method is described for computing the vocabulary size for given parameter values in the 1- and 2-parameter rank distributions. Two methods of determining the asymptotes for the family of 2-parameter rank-distribution curves are also described. Tables are computed and graphs are drawn relating paris of parameter values to the vocabulary size. The partial product formula for the Riemann zeta function is investigated as an approximation to the partial sum formula for the Riemann zeta function. An error bound is established that indicates that the partial product should not be used to approximate the partial sum in calculating the vocabulary size for the 2-parameter rank distribution.

  6. Text mixing shapes the anatomy of rank-frequency distributions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jake Ryland; Bagrow, James P; Danforth, Christopher M; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2015-05-01

    Natural languages are full of rules and exceptions. One of the most famous quantitative rules is Zipf's law, which states that the frequency of occurrence of a word is approximately inversely proportional to its rank. Though this "law" of ranks has been found to hold across disparate texts and forms of data, analyses of increasingly large corpora since the late 1990s have revealed the existence of two scaling regimes. These regimes have thus far been explained by a hypothesis suggesting a separability of languages into core and noncore lexica. Here we present and defend an alternative hypothesis that the two scaling regimes result from the act of aggregating texts. We observe that text mixing leads to an effective decay of word introduction, which we show provides accurate predictions of the location and severity of breaks in scaling. Upon examining large corpora from 10 languages in the Project Gutenberg eBooks collection, we find emphatic empirical support for the universality of our claim. PMID:26066216

  7. Text mixing shapes the anatomy of rank-frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jake Ryland; Bagrow, James P.; Danforth, Christopher M.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2015-05-01

    Natural languages are full of rules and exceptions. One of the most famous quantitative rules is Zipf's law, which states that the frequency of occurrence of a word is approximately inversely proportional to its rank. Though this "law" of ranks has been found to hold across disparate texts and forms of data, analyses of increasingly large corpora since the late 1990s have revealed the existence of two scaling regimes. These regimes have thus far been explained by a hypothesis suggesting a separability of languages into core and noncore lexica. Here we present and defend an alternative hypothesis that the two scaling regimes result from the act of aggregating texts. We observe that text mixing leads to an effective decay of word introduction, which we show provides accurate predictions of the location and severity of breaks in scaling. Upon examining large corpora from 10 languages in the Project Gutenberg eBooks collection, we find emphatic empirical support for the universality of our claim.

  8. Rank Regressions, Wage Distributions, and the Gender Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, Nicole M.; Lemieux, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Current Population Survey data from 1979 and 1991 were used to decompose changes in the gender wage gap into three components: skill distribution, wage structure, and improvements in women's position. Relative wage gains by women may have been a source of increasing wage inequality among men. (SK)

  9. Inheritance of Properties of Normal and Non-Normal Distributions after Transformation of Scores to Ranks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how population parameters representing heterogeneity of variance, skewness, kurtosis, bimodality, and outlier-proneness, drawn from normal and eleven non-normal distributions, also characterized the ranks corresponding to independent samples of scores. When the parameters of population distributions from which samples were…

  10. Exploring empirical rank-frequency distributions longitudinally through a simple stochastic process.

    PubMed

    Finley, Benjamin J; Kilkki, Kalevi

    2014-01-01

    The frequent appearance of empirical rank-frequency laws, such as Zipf's law, in a wide range of domains reinforces the importance of understanding and modeling these laws and rank-frequency distributions in general. In this spirit, we utilize a simple stochastic cascade process to simulate several empirical rank-frequency distributions longitudinally. We focus especially on limiting the process's complexity to increase accessibility for non-experts in mathematics. The process provides a good fit for many empirical distributions because the stochastic multiplicative nature of the process leads to an often observed concave rank-frequency distribution (on a log-log scale) and the finiteness of the cascade replicates real-world finite size effects. Furthermore, we show that repeated trials of the process can roughly simulate the longitudinal variation of empirical ranks. However, we find that the empirical variation is often less that the average simulated process variation, likely due to longitudinal dependencies in the empirical datasets. Finally, we discuss the process limitations and practical applications. PMID:24755621

  11. Exploring Empirical Rank-Frequency Distributions Longitudinally through a Simple Stochastic Process

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Benjamin J.; Kilkki, Kalevi

    2014-01-01

    The frequent appearance of empirical rank-frequency laws, such as Zipf’s law, in a wide range of domains reinforces the importance of understanding and modeling these laws and rank-frequency distributions in general. In this spirit, we utilize a simple stochastic cascade process to simulate several empirical rank-frequency distributions longitudinally. We focus especially on limiting the process’s complexity to increase accessibility for non-experts in mathematics. The process provides a good fit for many empirical distributions because the stochastic multiplicative nature of the process leads to an often observed concave rank-frequency distribution (on a log-log scale) and the finiteness of the cascade replicates real-world finite size effects. Furthermore, we show that repeated trials of the process can roughly simulate the longitudinal variation of empirical ranks. However, we find that the empirical variation is often less that the average simulated process variation, likely due to longitudinal dependencies in the empirical datasets. Finally, we discuss the process limitations and practical applications. PMID:24755621

  12. Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis of Probability Distributions in Fluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Chin; Chang, Tien

    2015-11-01

    Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) was introduced by Chang and Wu (2008) to describe the multifractal characteristic of intermittent events. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has successfully been applied to MHD turbulence simulations and turbulence data observed in various space plasmas. In this paper, the technique is applied to the probability distributions in the inertial range of the turbulent fluid flow, as given in the vast Johns Hopkins University (JHU) turbulence database. In addition, a refined method of finding the continuous ROMA spectrum and the scaled probability distribution function (PDF) simultaneously is introduced.

  13. Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1985-86. Nineteenth Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    Results of a survey of salaries of full-time administrators at public, doctoral-granting institutions for 1985-1986 are presented. Rank order distributions of 12-month administrative salaries are provided for 156 state universities in 49 states and 33 university systems in 27 states. Salary data for 151 universities in 47 states are also arranged…

  14. Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1986-87. Twentieth Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    Results of a survey of salaries of full-time administrators at public, doctoral-granting institutions for 1986-1987 are presented. Rank order distributions of 12-month administrative salaries are provided for 151 state universities in 49 states and 29 university systems in 23 states. Salary data for 151 universities are also arranged into the nine…

  15. Rank Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenson, Carlos

    Studies of rank distributions have been popular for decades, especially since the work of Zipf. For example, if we rank words of a given language by use frequency (most used word in English is 'the', rank 1; second most common word is 'of', rank 2), the distribution can be approximated roughly with a power law. The same applies for cities (most populated city in a country ranks first), earthquakes, metabolism, the Internet, and dozens of other phenomena. We recently proposed ``rank diversity'' to measure how ranks change in time, using the Google Books Ngram dataset. Studying six languages between 1800 and 2009, we found that the rank diversity curves of languages are universal, adjusted with a sigmoid on log-normal scale. We are studying several other datasets (sports, economies, social systems, urban systems, earthquakes, artificial life). Rank diversity seems to be universal, independently of the shape of the rank distribution. I will present our work in progress towards a general description of the features of rank change in time, along with simple models which reproduce it

  16. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Soncini, Ryan M; Means, Nicholas C; Weiland, Nathan T

    2013-10-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  17. Order-disorder transition in conflicting dynamics leading to rank-frequency generalized beta distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Martinez, R.; Martinez-Mekler, G.; Cocho, G.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of rank-ordered distributions of phenomena present in a variety of fields such as biology, sociology, linguistics, finance and geophysics has been a matter of intense research. Often power laws have been encountered; however, their validity tends to hold mainly for an intermediate range of rank values. In a recent publication (Martínez-Mekler et al., 2009 [7]), a generalization of the functional form of the beta distribution has been shown to give excellent fits for many systems of very diverse nature, valid for the whole range of rank values, regardless of whether or not a power law behavior has been previously suggested. Here we give some insight on the significance of the two free parameters which appear as exponents in the functional form, by looking into discrete probabilistic branching processes with conflicting dynamics. We analyze a variety of realizations of these so-called expansion-modification models first introduced by Wentian Li (1989) [10]. We focus our attention on an order-disorder transition we encounter as we vary the modification probability p. We characterize this transition by means of the fitting parameters. Our numerical studies show that one of the fitting exponents is related to the presence of long-range correlations exhibited by power spectrum scale invariance, while the other registers the effect of disordering elements leading to a breakdown of these properties. In the absence of long-range correlations, this parameter is sensitive to the occurrence of unlikely events. We also introduce an approximate calculation scheme that relates this dynamics to multinomial multiplicative processes. A better understanding through these models of the meaning of the generalized beta-fitting exponents may contribute to their potential for identifying and characterizing universality classes.

  18. Relationship between Particle Size Distribution of Low-Rank Pulverized Coal and Power Plant Performance

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ganguli, Rajive; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar

    2012-01-01

    Tmore » he impact of particle size distribution (PSD) of pulverized, low rank high volatile content Alaska coal on combustion related power plant performance was studied in a series of field scale tests. Performance was gauged through efficiency (ratio of megawatt generated to energy consumed as coal), emissions (SO 2 , NO x , CO), and carbon content of ash (fly ash and bottom ash).he study revealed that the tested coal could be burned at a grind as coarse as 50% passing 76 microns, with no deleterious impact on power generation and emissions.he PSD’s tested in this study were in the range of 41 to 81 percent passing 76 microns.here was negligible correlation between PSD and the followings factors: efficiency, SO 2 , NO x , and CO. Additionally, two tests where stack mercury (Hg) data was collected, did not demonstrate any real difference in Hg emissions with PSD.he results from the field tests positively impacts pulverized coal power plants that burn low rank high volatile content coals (such as Powder River Basin coal).hese plants can potentially reduce in-plant load by grinding the coal less (without impacting plant performance on emissions and efficiency) and thereby, increasing their marketability.« less

  19. Population distribution models: species distributions are better modeled using biologically relevant data partitions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Predicting the geographic distribution of widespread species through modeling is problematic for several reasons including high rates of omission errors. One potential source of error for modeling widespread species is that subspecies and/or races of species are frequently pooled for analyses, which may mask biologically relevant spatial variation within the distribution of a single widespread species. We contrast a presence-only maximum entropy model for the widely distributed oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) that includes all available presence locations for this species, with two composite maximum entropy models. The composite models either subdivided the total species distribution into four geographic quadrants or by fifteen subspecies to capture spatially relevant variation in P. polionotus distributions. Results Despite high Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) values for all models, the composite species distribution model of P. polionotus generated from individual subspecies models represented the known distribution of the species much better than did the models produced by partitioning data into geographic quadrants or modeling the whole species as a single unit. Conclusions Because the AUC values failed to describe the differences in the predictability of the three modeling strategies, we suggest using omission curves in addition to AUC values to assess model performance. Dividing the data of a widespread species into biologically relevant partitions greatly increased the performance of our distribution model; therefore, this approach may prove to be quite practical and informative for a wide range of modeling applications. PMID:21929792

  20. Distributed Compressive Sensing of Hyperspectral Images Using Low Rank and Structure Similarity Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bingchao; Xu, Ke; Wan, Jianwei; Liu, Xu

    2015-11-01

    An efficient method and system for distributed compressive sensing of hyperspectral images is presented, which exploit the low rank and structure similarity property of hyperspectral imagery. In this paper, by integrating the respective characteristics of DSC and CS, a distributed compressive sensing framework is proposed to simultaneously capture and compress hyperspectral images. At the encoder, every band image is measured independently, where almost all computation burdens can be shifted to the decoder, resulting in a very low-complexity encoder. It is simple to operate and easy to hardware implementation. At the decoder, each band image is reconstructed by the method of total variation norm minimize. During each band reconstruction, the low rand structure of band images and spectrum structure similarity are used to give birth to the new regularizers. With combining the new regularizers and other regularizer, we can sufficiently exploit the spatial correlation, spectral correlation and spectral structural redundancy in hyperspectral imagery. A numerical optimization algorithm is also proposed to solve the reconstruction model by augmented Lagrangian multiplier method. Experimental results show that this method can effectively improve the reconstruction quality of hyperspectral images.

  1. Evaluation of two formulations containing mineral trioxide aggregate on delayed tooth replantation: relevance of RANKL/RANK/OPG system.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Beatriz Farias; Souza, Carlos Eduardo Chrzanowski Pereira; Silva, Daniela Nascimento; Etges, Adriana; Campos, Maria Martha

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of White MTA (WMTA) and MTA Fillapex(®) on root resorption, when used for root canal filling, in a rat model of delayed tooth replantation, with special focus on the RANKL/RANK/OPG system. Maxillary right central incisors of male rats were extracted (total N = 48), and exposed to dry environment for 30 min. The animals were allocated into four groups: (1) WMTA; (2) MTA Fillapex; (3) Calcium hydroxide; (4) Negative control. After periodontal ligament removal, root canals were filled with the corresponding material and replanted. After 10 and 60 days, qualitative and semi-quantitative histological and immunohistochemical analyses were carried out. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's post hoc adjustment was used, at 10 and 60 days, to compare the experimental groups in terms of the inflammatory scores and in terms of the changes in OPG, RANK and RANKL. Both WMTA and MTA Fillapex groups displayed inflammatory and replacement resorption, with the presence of dento-alveolar ankylosis, similarly to that observed for calcium hydroxide, in either 10 or 60 days. Notably, a slight increase of the inflammatory process was observed in both MTA groups. Quantitatively, inflammation score analysis showed a significant difference between the calcium hydroxide and the control group at 10 days. On 60 days, dento-alveolar ankylosis was found significantly increased in the MTA Fillapex, in comparison to the control group (p < 0.05). For immunohistochemical analysis, the expression of both RANK and RANKL was reduced in calcium hydroxide and WMTA groups, from 10 to 60 days of evaluation, an effect that was accompanied by increased OPG immunolabelling. Otherwise, the MTA Fillapex group presented a general increase of RANKL immunopositivity, similarly to that observed in the negative control group. Our data showed that none of tested materials was able to fully prevent the root resorption, although the white MTA cement presented an

  2. Unveiling the species-rank abundance distribution by generalizing the Good-Turing sample coverage theory.

    PubMed

    Chao, Anne; Hsieh, T C; Chazdon, Robin L; Colwell, Robert K; Gotelli, Nicholas J

    2015-05-01

    Based on a sample of individuals, we focus on inferring the vector of species relative abundance of an entire assemblage and propose a novel estimator of the complete species-rank abundance distribution (RAD). Nearly all previous estimators of the RAD use the conventional "plug-in" estimator Pi (sample relative abundance) of the true relative abundance pi of species i. Because most biodiversity samples are incomplete, the plug-in estimators are applied only to the subset of species that are detected in the sample. Using the concept of sample coverage and its generalization, we propose a new statistical framework to estimate the complete RAD by separately adjusting the sample relative abundances for the set of species detected in the sample and estimating the relative abundances for the set of species undetected in the sample but inferred to be present in the assemblage. We first show that P, is a positively biased estimator of pi for species detected in the sample, and that the degree of bias increases with increasing relative rarity of each species. We next derive a method to adjust the sample relative abundance to reduce the positive bias inherent in j. The adjustment method provides a nonparametric resolution to the longstanding challenge of characterizing the relationship between the true relative abundance in the entire assemblage and the observed relative abundance in a sample. Finally, we propose a method to estimate the true relative abundances of the undetected species based on a lower bound of the number of undetected species. We then combine the adjusted RAD for the detected species and the estimated RAD for the undetected species to obtain the complete RAD estimator. Simulation results show that the proposed RAD curve can unveil the true RAD and is more accurate than the empirical RAD. We also extend our method to incidence data. Our formulas and estimators are illustrated using empirical data sets from surveys of forest spiders (for abundance data) and

  3. Seventeenth Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid 1983-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    Results of a survey of salaries of full-time administrators at public, doctorate-granting institutions for 1983-1984 are presented. A ranking of salaries paid among 133 universities in 45 states is presented, along with salary data arranged into nine regions defined by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The New York and Boston regions…

  4. Eighteenth Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1984-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    Results of a survey of salaries of full-time administrators at public, doctoral-granting institutions for 1984-1985 are presented. A ranking of salaries paid among 151 state-supported universities representing 47 states and 33 university systems representing 27 states is given. Salary data are also arranged into the nine regions defined by the…

  5. Sixteenth Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid 1982-1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    Salaries of full-time administrators at public, doctoral-granting institutions for 1982-1983 were surveyed. A ranking of salaries paid among 136 universities in 47 states is presented, along with salary data arranged into nine regions defined by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The New York and Boston regions are combined. A table of…

  6. Twenty-Ninth Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1995-96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    This report presents comparative data collected from 98 state-supported universities in 47 states, and 38 university systems representing 30 states, on the administrative salaries they paid in 1994-95. The salaries are presented in rank-order (from highest to lowest) to facilitate comparisons of a participant's relative standing with other…

  7. Twenty-Eighth Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1994-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    This report presents comparative data collected from 103 state-supported universities or university systems in 47 states, and 38 university systems representing 30 states, on the administrative salaries they paid in 1994-95. The salaries are presented in rank-order (from highest to lowest) to facilitate comparisons of a participant's relative…

  8. Thirtieth Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    This report presents comparative data collected from 87 state-supported universities in 45 states, and 27 university systems representing 21 states, on the administrative salaries they paid in 1996-97. The salaries are presented in rank-order (from highest to lowest) to facilitate comparisons of a participant's relative standing with other…

  9. Twenty-Seventh Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    This study presents comparative data collected from 85 state-supported universities or university systems in 45 states, and 35 university systems representing 28 states on the administrative salaries they paid in 1993-94. The salaries are presented in rank-order (from highest to lowest) to facilitate comparisons of a particular position's salary…

  10. Cometabolism of Monochloramine by Distribution System Relevant Mixed Culture Nitrifiers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monochloramine (NH2Cl) is increasingly used as a residual disinfectant. A major problem related to NH2Cl is nitrification in distribution systems, leading to rapid NH2Cl residual loss. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which oxidize ammonia (NH3) to nitrite, can cometabolize chem...

  11. Revisiting the destination ranking procedure in development of an Intervening Opportunities Model for public transit trip distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazem, Mohsen; Trépanier, Martin; Morency, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    An Enhanced Intervening Opportunities Model (EIOM) is developed for Public Transit (PT). This is a distribution supply dependent model, with single constraints on trip production for work trips during morning peak hours (6:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.) within the Island of Montreal, Canada. Different data sets, including the 2008 Origin-Destination (OD) survey of the Greater Montreal Area, the 2006 Census of Canada, GTFS network data, along with the geographical data of the study area, are used. EIOM is a nonlinear model composed of socio-demographics, PT supply data and work location attributes. An enhanced destination ranking procedure is used to calculate the number of spatially cumulative opportunities, the basic variable of EIOM. For comparison, a Basic Intervening Opportunities Model (BIOM) is developed by using the basic destination ranking procedure. The main difference between EIOM and BIOM is in the destination ranking procedure: EIOM considers the maximization of a utility function composed of PT Level Of Service and number of opportunities at the destination, along with the OD trip duration, whereas BIOM is based on a destination ranking derived only from OD trip durations. Analysis confirmed that EIOM is more accurate than BIOM. This study presents a new tool for PT analysts, planners and policy makers to study the potential changes in PT trip patterns due to changes in socio-demographic characteristics, PT supply, and other factors. Also it opens new opportunities for the development of more accurate PT demand models with new emergent data such as smart card validations.

  12. SITE RANK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site rank is formulated for ranking the relative hazard of contamination sources and vulnerability of drinking water wells. Site rank can be used with a variety of groundwater flow and transport models.

  13. A log-rank-type test to compare net survival distributions.

    PubMed

    Grafféo, Nathalie; Castell, Fabienne; Belot, Aurélien; Giorgi, Roch

    2016-09-01

    In population-based cancer studies, it is often interesting to compare cancer survival between different populations. However, in such studies, the exact causes of death are often unavailable or unreliable. Net survival methods were developed to overcome this difficulty. Net survival is the survival that would be observed if the disease under study was the only possible cause of death. The Pohar-Perme estimator (PPE) is a nonparametric consistent estimator of net survival. In this article, we present a log-rank-type test for comparing net survival functions (as estimated by PPE) between several groups. We put the test within the counting process framework to introduce the inverse probability weighting procedure as required by the PPE. We built a stratified version to control for categorical covariates that affect the outcome. We performed simulation studies to evaluate the performance of this test and worked an application on real data. PMID:26821615

  14. Twenty-Fourth Annual Rank-Order Distribution of Administrative Salaries Paid, 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Office of Institutional Research.

    This report summarizes the results of the annual survey conducted by the University of Arkansas in 146 state-supported universities representing 49 states and 32 university systems. The survey includes 12-month salaries of full-time administrators paid at major state-supported universities in the United States. The salaries are distributed in rank…

  15. Distribution of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin in calcified human carotid atheroma.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Catherine L; Isbilir, Salim; Basto, Pamela; Chen, Iou Yih; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Vaduganathan, Periyanan; Reardon, Michael J; Lawrie, Gerald; Peterson, Leif; Morrisett, Joel D

    2015-10-01

    Ectopic vascular calcification is a significant component of atherosclerotic disease. Osteopontin (OPN), Osteoprotegerin (OPG), Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) are each thought to play central roles in the calcification or demineralization of atherosclerotic lesions. Abnormalities in the balance of these proteins may lead to perturbations in bone remodeling and arterial calcification. The purpose of this study was to measure the distribution of these proteins in human carotid lesions and to elucidate possible mechanism(s) whereby they control the deposition or depletion of arterial calcification. Thirty-three patients who had undergone carotid endarterectomy (CEA) within the previous 18 months and 11 control patients were enrolled. CEA specimens were analyzed by EBCT for calcification content in terms of Agatston (AGAT) and Volume scores. CEA specimens were then cut into 5 mm segments which were homogenized and extracted. Extracts were analyzed for tissue levels of calcium, phosphorus, ALP, OPN, RANKL, and OPG. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for the same components. In CEA tissue segments, the calcification levels (CHA AGAT) were inversely associated with the levels of OPG (r = -0.432/-0.579, p < 0.05) and positively associated with the levels of RANKL (r = 0.332/0.415, p < 0.05). In turn, the tissue levels of OPG were associated with homologous serum levels of OPG (r = 0.820/0.389, p < 0.001), and the tissue levels of RANKL were associated with the serum levels of homologous RANKL (r = 0.739/0.666, p < 0.0001). This study suggests that serum levels of OPG and RANKL may be useful biomarkers for estimating the degree of calcification in carotid atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26307009

  16. Profiling the Flagship University Model: An Exploratory Proposal for Changing the Paradigm from Ranking to Relevancy. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.5.14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, John Aubrey

    2014-01-01

    It's a familiar if not fully explained paradigm. A "World Class University" (WCU) is supposed to have highly ranked research output, a culture of excellence, great facilities, and a brand name that transcends national borders. But perhaps most importantly, the particular institution needs to sit in the upper echelons of one or more…

  17. How to Rank Journals

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Corey J. A.; Brook, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68–0.84 Spearman’s ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows. PMID:26930052

  18. How to Rank Journals.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Corey J A; Brook, Barry W

    2016-01-01

    There are now many methods available to assess the relative citation performance of peer-reviewed journals. Regardless of their individual faults and advantages, citation-based metrics are used by researchers to maximize the citation potential of their articles, and by employers to rank academic track records. The absolute value of any particular index is arguably meaningless unless compared to other journals, and different metrics result in divergent rankings. To provide a simple yet more objective way to rank journals within and among disciplines, we developed a κ-resampled composite journal rank incorporating five popular citation indices: Impact Factor, Immediacy Index, Source-Normalized Impact Per Paper, SCImago Journal Rank and Google 5-year h-index; this approach provides an index of relative rank uncertainty. We applied the approach to six sample sets of scientific journals from Ecology (n = 100 journals), Medicine (n = 100), Multidisciplinary (n = 50); Ecology + Multidisciplinary (n = 25), Obstetrics & Gynaecology (n = 25) and Marine Biology & Fisheries (n = 25). We then cross-compared the κ-resampled ranking for the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set to the results of a survey of 188 publishing ecologists who were asked to rank the same journals, and found a 0.68-0.84 Spearman's ρ correlation between the two rankings datasets. Our composite index approach therefore approximates relative journal reputation, at least for that discipline. Agglomerative and divisive clustering and multi-dimensional scaling techniques applied to the Ecology + Multidisciplinary journal set identified specific clusters of similarly ranked journals, with only Nature & Science separating out from the others. When comparing a selection of journals within or among disciplines, we recommend collecting multiple citation-based metrics for a sample of relevant and realistic journals to calculate the composite rankings and their relative uncertainty windows. PMID:26930052

  19. A Comparison of the Power of Wilcoxon's Rank-Sum Statistic to that of Student's t Statistic under Various Nonnormal Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, R. Clifford; Higgins, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques were used to compare the power of Wilcoxon's rank-sum test to the power of the two independent means t test for situations in which samples were drawn from (1) uniform, (2) Laplace, (3) half-normal, (4) exponential, (5) mixed-normal, and (6) mixed-uniform distributions. (Author/JKS)

  20. To Overcome HITS Rank Similarity Confliction of Web Pages using Weight Calculation and Rank Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Rajender; Kumar, Naresh

    2011-12-01

    Search Engine gives an ordered list of web search results in response to a user query, wherein the important pages are usually displayed at the top with less important ones afterwards. It may be possible that the user may have to look for many screen results to get the required documents. In literatures, many page ranking algorithms has been given to find the page rank of a page. For example PageRank is considered in this work. This algorithm treats all the links equally when distributing rank scores. That's why this algorithm some time gives equal importance to all the pages. But in real this can not be happen because, if two pages have same rank then how we can judge which page is more important then other. So this paper proposes another idea to organize the search results and describe which page is more important when confliction of same rank is produced by the PageRank. So that the user can get more relevant and important results easily and in a short span of time.

  1. A Tiered Framework for Risk-Relevant Characterization and Ranking of Chemical Exposures: Applications to the National Children’s Study (NCS)

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Panos G.; Brinkerhoff, Christopher J.; Isukapalli, Sastry; Dellarco, Michael; Landrigan, Philip J.; Lioy, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge for large-scale environmental health investigations such as the National Children’s Study (NCS), is characterizing exposures to multiple, co-occurring chemical agents with varying spatiotemporal concentrations and consequences modulated by biochemical, physiological, behavioral, socioeconomic, and environmental factors. Such investigations can benefit from systematic retrieval, analysis, and integration of diverse extant information on both contaminant patterns and exposure-relevant factors. This requires development, evaluation, and deployment of informatics methods that support flexible access and analysis of multiattribute data across multiple spatiotemporal scales. A new “Tiered Exposure Ranking” (TiER) framework, developed to support various aspects of risk-relevant exposure characterization, is described here, with examples demonstrating its application to the NCS. TiER utilizes advances in informatics computational methods, extant database content and availability, and integrative environmental/exposure/biological modeling to support both “discovery-driven” and “hypothesis-driven” analyses. “Tier 1” applications focus on “exposomic” pattern recognition for extracting information from multidimensional data sets, whereas second and higher tier applications utilize mechanistic models to develop risk-relevant exposure metrics for populations and individuals. In this article, “tier 1” applications of TiER explore identification of potentially causative associations among risk factors, for prioritizing further studies, by considering publicly available demographic/socioeconomic, behavioral, and environmental data in relation to two health endpoints (preterm birth and low birth weight). A “tier 2” application develops estimates of pollutant mixture inhalation exposure indices for NCS counties, formulated to support risk characterization for these endpoints. Applications of TiER demonstrate the feasibility of developing risk-relevant

  2. Automated System for Kinetic Analysis of Particle Size Distributions for Pharmaceutically Relevant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Green, John-Bruce D.; Carter, Phillip W.; Zhang, Yingqing; Patel, Dipa; Kotha, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    Detailing the kinetics of particle formation for pharmaceutically relevant solutions is challenging, especially when considering the combination of formulations, containers, and timescales of clinical importance. This paper describes a method for using commercial software Automate with a stream-selector valve capable of sampling container solutions from within an environmental chamber. The tool was built to monitor changes in particle size distributions via instrumental particle counters but can be adapted to other solution-based sensors. The tool and methodology were demonstrated to be highly effective for measuring dynamic changes in emulsion globule distributions as a function of storage and mixing conditions important for parenteral nutrition. Higher levels of agitation induced the fastest growth of large globules (≥5 μm) while the gentler conditions actually showed a decrease in the number of these large globules. The same methodology recorded calcium phosphate precipitation kinetics as a function of [Ca2+] and pH. This automated system is readily adaptable to a wide range of pharmaceutically relevant systems where the particle size is expected to vary with time. This instrumentation can dramatically reduce the time and resources needed to probe complex formulation issues while providing new insights for monitoring the kinetics as a function of key variables. PMID:25140276

  3. The Privilege of Ranking: Google Plays Ball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of ranking systems used in various settings, including college football and academic admissions, focuses on the Google search engine. Explains the PageRank mathematical formula that scores Web pages by connecting the number of links; limitations, including authenticity and accuracy of ranked Web pages; relevancy; adjusting algorithms;…

  4. Plant distribution at the mobile dune scale and its relevance to soil properties and topographic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Xiaoan; Zhao, Halin; Zhao, Xueyong; Guo, Yirui; Li, Yulin; Luo, Yayong

    2008-05-01

    A survey was conducted in an 11-year recovery mobile dune (RMD11) and a 20-year recovery mobile dune (RMD20), in Horqin Sandy Land, Northern China, to determine plant distribution at the mobile dune scale and its relevance to soil properties and topographic features. The results showed that (1) vegetation cover and species number increased from dune top to bottom in the restoration process of mobile dune; (2) the average value of soil organic C, total N, pH, relative height of sampling site, very fine sand content and soil water contents (40-60 and 60-80 cm) of RMD11 were less than that of RMD20, respectively, and there were significant differences ( P < 0.05) between the two dunes; (3) soil resources were redistributed by shrub restoration and relative height of sampling site on dune. The distribution of sand pioneer plant, Agriophyllum squarrosum, was positively related to the relative height of sampling site and soil water content, while that of other herbaceous plants was positively related to soil nutrients in the restoration process of mobile dune. These results suggest that at mobile dune scale, plant distributions are determined by a combination of soil properties and topographic feature. Much effort should be made to preserve the interdune lowland and to improve the level of soil nutrients on mobile dune.

  5. On the predictability of protein database search complexity and its relevance to optimization of distributed searches.

    PubMed

    Deciu, Cosmin; Sun, Jun; Wall, Mark A

    2007-09-01

    We discuss several aspects related to load balancing of database search jobs in a distributed computing environment, such as Linux cluster. Load balancing is a technique for making the most of multiple computational resources, which is particularly relevant in environments in which the usage of such resources is very high. The particular case of the Sequest program is considered here, but the general methodology should apply to any similar database search program. We show how the runtimes for Sequest searches of tandem mass spectral data can be predicted from profiles of previous representative searches, and how this information can be used for better load balancing of novel data. A well-known heuristic load balancing method is shown to be applicable to this problem, and its performance is analyzed for a variety of search parameters. PMID:17663575

  6. Word ranking in a single document by Jensen-Shannon divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehri, Ali; Jamaati, Maryam; Mehri, Hassan

    2015-08-01

    Ranking the words in human written texts, according to their relevance to text context, plays a crucial role in many text mining tasks. Highly relevant words concentrate in some limited areas, while the irrelevant ones have nearly random spatial distribution throughout the text. But in the randomly shuffled version of the text, all word types are distributed at random. The difference between spatial distribution of words in the original version of a text and its shuffled version seems a proper criterion for word relevance ranking. In this procedure, spatial distribution of each word type in the document is defined by box counting method. Then we apply Jensen-Shannon divergence to measure the difference between probability distributions of each word in the original text and its shuffled version. This metric properly distinguishes relevant words from irrelevants without requiring any previous knowledge about text structure.

  7. When Does Rank(ABC)= Rank(AB) + Rank(BC) - Rank(B) Hold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Yongge; Styan, George P. H.

    2002-01-01

    The well-known Frobenius rank inequality established by Frobenius in 1911 states that the rank of the product ABC of three matrices satisfies the inequality rank(ABC) [greater than or equal]rank(AB) + rank(BC) - rank(B) A new necessary and sufficient condition for equality to hold is presented and then some interesting consequences and…

  8. Distribution of neurologists and neurosurgeons in India and its relevance to the adoption of telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Majority of Indians have no access to centres of neurological excellence in the country. A detailed analysis of 3666 members of the Neurological Society of India and the Indian Academy of Neurology revealed that not a single member lived in a geographical area covering 934.8 million people. 30.09% live in the four major metropolitan cities, 29.54% in the state capitals, 30.58% in Tier 2 cities, 7.12% in tier 3 cities and 2.67% in rural areas covering a population of 84.59 million. Building additional neurological centres cannot be the only answer, given the acute shortage of funds and trained personnel. In 1999, the author among others, foresaw that it could be possible, to extend the reach of urban specialists to suburban and rural India, by virtual means. The neurological community has been slow to use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as an integral part of their health care delivery system. This article analyses the distribution of neurologists and neurosurgeons in India and suggests that providing additional virtual neurological care can be the only answer to offset the lop sided distribution of clinical care givers in neurosciences. In this article, the authors' considerable experience in introducing and developing telehealth in India over the last 15 years is being shared with specific emphasis on its relevance to neurosciences. A review of the global literature on telemedicine and neurosciences will substantiate the plea that telemedicine must be deployed by neurologists and neurosurgeons in India to extend their reach to patients particularly those residing in rural areas. PMID:25947977

  9. Sparse regression analysis of task-relevant information distribution in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rish, Irina; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Heuton, Kyle; Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2012-02-01

    One of key topics in fMRI analysis is discovery of task-related brain areas. We focus on predictive accuracy as a better relevance measure than traditional univariate voxel activations that miss important multivariate voxel interactions. We use sparse regression (more specifically, the Elastic Net1) to learn predictive models simultaneously with selection of predictive voxel subsets, and to explore transition from task-relevant to task-irrelevant areas. Exploring the space of sparse solutions reveals a much wider spread of task-relevant information in the brain than it is typically suggested by univariate correlations. This happens for several tasks we considered, and is most noticeable in case of complex tasks such as pain rating; however, for certain simpler tasks, a clear separation between a small subset of relevant voxels and the rest of the brain is observed even with multivariate approach to measuring relevance.

  10. Bayesian nonparametric models for ranked set sampling.

    PubMed

    Gemayel, Nader; Stasny, Elizabeth A; Wolfe, Douglas A

    2015-04-01

    Ranked set sampling (RSS) is a data collection technique that combines measurement with judgment ranking for statistical inference. This paper lays out a formal and natural Bayesian framework for RSS that is analogous to its frequentist justification, and that does not require the assumption of perfect ranking or use of any imperfect ranking models. Prior beliefs about the judgment order statistic distributions and their interdependence are embodied by a nonparametric prior distribution. Posterior inference is carried out by means of Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques, and yields estimators of the judgment order statistic distributions (and of functionals of those distributions). PMID:25326663

  11. Interpersonal Attractiveness and Distribution of Task Relevant Information as Contributors to an Influence Base in Task Oriented Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinheimer, Robert Edward

    This study focused on the role played by two factors--interpersonal attractiveness of group members and pattern of distribution of task-relevant information--in forming an influence base in task-oriented discussion groups. For purposes of the study, members of discussion groups who were confederates in the study were assigned attitudinal…

  12. Automatic Ranked Output from Boolean Searches in SIRE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noreault, Terry; And Others

    1977-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness using an automatic algorithm to rank the results of Boolean searches of an inverted file design document retrieval system. Relevant documents were ranked significantly higher than nonrelevant documents on output lists. (Author/KP)

  13. TripleRank: Ranking Semantic Web Data by Tensor Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Thomas; Schultz, Antje; Sizov, Sergej; Staab, Steffen

    The Semantic Web fosters novel applications targeting a more efficient and satisfying exploitation of the data available on the web, e.g. faceted browsing of linked open data. Large amounts and high diversity of knowledge in the Semantic Web pose the challenging question of appropriate relevance ranking for producing fine-grained and rich descriptions of the available data, e.g. to guide the user along most promising knowledge aspects. Existing methods for graph-based authority ranking lack support for fine-grained latent coherence between resources and predicates (i.e. support for link semantics in the linked data model). In this paper, we present TripleRank, a novel approach for faceted authority ranking in the context of RDF knowledge bases. TripleRank captures the additional latent semantics of Semantic Web data by means of statistical methods in order to produce richer descriptions of the available data. We model the Semantic Web by a 3-dimensional tensor that enables the seamless representation of arbitrary semantic links. For the analysis of that model, we apply the PARAFAC decomposition, which can be seen as a multi-modal counterpart to Web authority ranking with HITS. The result are groupings of resources and predicates that characterize their authority and navigational (hub) properties with respect to identified topics. We have applied TripleRank to multiple data sets from the linked open data community and gathered encouraging feedback in a user evaluation where TripleRank results have been exploited in a faceted browsing scenario.

  14. Universal scaling in sports ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu; Bulou, Alain; Wang, Qiuping A.

    2012-09-01

    Ranking is a ubiquitous phenomenon in human society. On the web pages of Forbes, one may find all kinds of rankings, such as the world's most powerful people, the world's richest people, the highest-earning tennis players, and so on and so forth. Herewith, we study a specific kind—sports ranking systems in which players' scores and/or prize money are accrued based on their performances in different matches. By investigating 40 data samples which span 12 different sports, we find that the distributions of scores and/or prize money follow universal power laws, with exponents nearly identical for most sports. In order to understand the origin of this universal scaling we focus on the tennis ranking systems. By checking the data we find that, for any pair of players, the probability that the higher-ranked player tops the lower-ranked opponent is proportional to the rank difference between the pair. Such a dependence can be well fitted to a sigmoidal function. By using this feature, we propose a simple toy model which can simulate the competition of players in different matches. The simulations yield results consistent with the empirical findings. Extensive simulation studies indicate that the model is quite robust with respect to the modifications of some parameters.

  15. Ranking species in mutualistic networks.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic "nested" structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm--similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity--here we propose a method which--by exploiting their nested architecture--allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made. PMID:25640575

  16. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic “nested” structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm –similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity– here we propose a method which –by exploiting their nested architecture– allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made. PMID:25640575

  17. Ranking species in mutualistic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the architectural subtleties of ecological networks, believed to confer them enhanced stability and robustness, is a subject of outmost relevance. Mutualistic interactions have been profusely studied and their corresponding bipartite networks, such as plant-pollinator networks, have been reported to exhibit a characteristic ``nested'' structure. Assessing the importance of any given species in mutualistic networks is a key task when evaluating extinction risks and possible cascade effects. Inspired in a recently introduced algorithm -similar in spirit to Google's PageRank but with a built-in non-linearity- here we propose a method which -by exploiting their nested architecture- allows us to derive a sound ranking of species importance in mutualistic networks. This method clearly outperforms other existing ranking schemes and can become very useful for ecosystem management and biodiversity preservation, where decisions on what aspects of ecosystems to explicitly protect need to be made.

  18. Variable ranking based on the estimated degree of separation for two distributions of data by the length of the receiver operating characteristic curve.

    PubMed

    Maswadeh, Waleed M; Snyder, A Peter

    2015-05-30

    Variable responses are fundamental for all experiments, and they can consist of information-rich, redundant, and low signal intensities. A dataset can consist of a collection of variable responses over multiple classes or groups. Usually some of the variables are removed in a dataset that contain very little information. Sometimes all the variables are used in the data analysis phase. It is common practice to discriminate between two distributions of data; however, there is no formal algorithm to arrive at a degree of separation (DS) between two distributions of data. The DS is defined herein as the average of the sum of the areas from the probability density functions (PDFs) of A and B that contain a≥percentage of A and/or B. Thus, DS90 is the average of the sum of the PDF areas of A and B that contain ≥90% of A and/or B. To arrive at a DS value, two synthesized PDFs or very large experimental datasets are required. Experimentally it is common practice to generate relatively small datasets. Therefore, the challenge was to find a statistical parameter that can be used on small datasets to estimate and highly correlate with the DS90 parameter. Established statistical methods include the overlap area of the two data distribution profiles, Welch's t-test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test, Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test, and the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve (AUC). The area between the ROC curve and diagonal (ACD) and the length of the ROC curve (LROC) are introduced. The established, ACD, and LROC methods were correlated to the DS90 when applied on many pairs of synthesized PDFs. The LROC method provided the best linear correlation with, and estimation of, the DS90. The estimated DS90 from the LROC (DS90-LROC) is applied to a database, as an example, of three Italian wines consisting of thirteen variable responses for variable ranking consideration. An important highlight of the DS90-LROC method is utilizing the LROC curve methodology to

  19. On Rank Driven Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerman, J. J. P.; Prieto, F. J.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate a class of models related to the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model, initially proposed to study evolution. The BS model is extremely simple and yet captures some forms of "complex behavior" such as self-organized criticality that is often observed in physical and biological systems. In this model, random fitnesses in are associated to agents located at the vertices of a graph . Their fitnesses are ranked from worst (0) to best (1). At every time-step the agent with the worst fitness and some others with a priori given rank probabilities are replaced by new agents with random fitnesses. We consider two cases: The exogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from an a priori fixed distribution, and the endogenous case where the new fitnesses are taken from the current distribution as it evolves. We approximate the dynamics by making a simplifying independence assumption. We use Order Statistics and Dynamical Systems to define a rank-driven dynamical system that approximates the evolution of the distribution of the fitnesses in these rank-driven models, as well as in the BS model. For this simplified model we can find the limiting marginal distribution as a function of the initial conditions. Agreement with experimental results of the BS model is excellent.

  20. Estimation of Spatially Distributed Evapotranspiration Using Remote Sensing and a Relevance Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslova, I.; Bachour, R.; Walker, W. R.; Ticlavilca, A. M.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    With the development of surface energy balance analyses, remote sensing has become a spatially explicit and quantitative methodology for understanding evapotranspiration (ET), a critical requirement for water resources planning and management. Limited temporal resolution of satellite images and cloudy skies present major limitations that impede continuous estimates of ET. This study introduces a practical approach that overcomes (in part) the previous limitations by implementing machine learning techniques that are accurate and robust. The analysis was applied to the Canal B service area of the Delta Canal Company in central Utah using data from the 2009-2011 growing seasons. Actual ET was calculated by an algorithm using data from satellite images. A relevance vector machine (RVM), which is a sparse Bayesian regression, was used to build a spatial model for ET. The RVM was trained with a set of inputs consisting of vegetation indexes, crops, and weather data. ET estimated via the algorithm was used as an output. The developed RVM model provided an accurate estimation of spatial ET based on a Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient (E) of 0.84 and a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 0.5 mmday-1. This methodology lays the groundwork for estimating ET at a spatial scale for the days when a satellite image is not available. It could also be used to forecast daily spatial ET if the vegetation indexes model inputs are extrapolated in time and the reference ET is forecasted accurately.

  1. Divergence of acoustic signals in a widely distributed frog: relevance of inter-male interactions.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Nelson A; Opazo, Daniel; Díaz, Javier; Penna, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Divergence of acoustic signals in a geographic scale results from diverse evolutionary forces acting in parallel and affecting directly inter-male vocal interactions among disjunct populations. Pleurodema thaul is a frog having an extensive latitudinal distribution in Chile along which males' advertisement calls exhibit an important variation. Using the playback paradigm we studied the evoked vocal responses of males of three populations of P. thaul in Chile, from northern, central and southern distribution. In each population, males were stimulated with standard synthetic calls having the acoustic structure of local and foreign populations. Males of both northern and central populations displayed strong vocal responses when were confronted with the synthetic call of their own populations, giving weaker responses to the call of the southern population. The southern population gave stronger responses to calls of the northern population than to the local call. Furthermore, males in all populations were stimulated with synthetic calls for which the dominant frequency, pulse rate and modulation depth were varied parametrically. Individuals from the northern and central populations gave lower responses to a synthetic call devoid of amplitude modulation relative to stimuli containing modulation depths between 30-100%, whereas the southern population responded similarly to all stimuli in this series. Geographic variation in the evoked vocal responses of males of P. thaul underlines the importance of inter-male interactions in driving the divergence of the acoustic traits and contributes evidence for a role of intra-sexual selection in the evolution of the sound communication system of this anuran. PMID:24489957

  2. Playing the Rankings Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machung, Anne

    1998-01-01

    The "U.S. News and World Report" rankings of colleges do not affect institutions equally; the schools impacted most are those that have the most to lose because they benefit from, even rely on, the rankings for prestige and visibility. The magazine relies on the rankings for substantial sales revenues, and has garnered considerable power within…

  3. Order-Theoretical Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpineto, Claudio; Romano, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    Presents an approach to document ranking that explicitly addresses the word mismatch problem between a query and a document by exploiting interdocument similarity information, based on the theory of concept lattices. Compares information retrieval using concept lattice-based ranking (CLR) to BMR (best-match ranking) and HCR (hierarchical…

  4. Stable isotope distribution in precipitation in Romania and its relevance for palaeoclimatic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perşoiu, Aurel; Nagavciuc, Viorica; Bădăluţă, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    A surge of recent studies in Romania have targeted various aspects of palaeoclimate (based on stable isotopes in ice, speleothems, tree rings), mineral water origin, wine and other juices provenance. However, while much needed, these studies lack a stable isotope in precipitation background, with only two LMWL's being published so far. In this paper we discuss the links between the stable isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18O and δ2H), climate (air temperature, precipitation amount and large scale circulation) and their relevance for the palaeocllimatic interpretation of stable isotope values in cave ice, cryogenic calcite and tree rings from different sites in Romania. Most of the precipitation in Romania is delivered by the Westerlies, bringing moisture from the North Atlantic; however, their influence is greatly reduced in the eastern half of the country where local evaporative sources play an important role in the precipitation balance. The SW is dominated by water masses from the Mediterranean Sea, while the SE corner clearly draws most of the moisture from the Black Sea and strongly depleted North Atlantic vapor masses. In 2012, Romania experienced the worst draught in 60 years, possibly due to a northward shift of the jest stream associated to blocking conditions in summer, which led to a more northern penetration of the Mediterranean-derived air masses, as well increased precipitation of re-evaporated waters. We have further analyzed cave drip water (δ18O and δ2H), cryogenic cave calcite (δ18O and δ13C) and tree rings (δ18O and δ13C) from selected sites across NW Romania, where the water isotopes in precipitation showed the best (and easiest to understand, given the climatic conditions in 2012) correlation with climatic parameters. Our results that 1) δ18O and δ2H in cave ice are a good proxy for late summer through early winter air temperature; 2) δ13C in cryogenic cave calcite are possible indicators of soil humidity and 3) δ18O in pine

  5. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: relevance to drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10(6) M(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 0.1 g L(-1) CuO at 21 ± 1 °C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH(-) is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes. PMID:23796229

  6. An aggregate analysis of personal care products in the environment: Identifying the distribution of environmentally-relevant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Zachary R; Blaney, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 3-4 decades, per capita consumption of personal care products (PCPs) has steadily risen, resulting in increased discharge of the active and inactive ingredients present in these products into wastewater collection systems. PCPs comprise a long list of compounds employed in toothpaste, sunscreen, lotions, soaps, body washes, and insect repellants, among others. While comprehensive toxicological studies are not yet available, an increasing body of literature has shown that PCPs of all classes can impact aquatic wildlife, bacteria, and/or mammalian cells at low concentrations. Ongoing research efforts have identified PCPs in a variety of environmental compartments, including raw wastewater, wastewater effluent, surface water, wastewater solids, sediment, groundwater, and drinking water. Here, an aggregate analysis of over 5000 reported detections was conducted to better understand the distribution of environmentally-relevant PCP concentrations in, and between, these compartments. The distributions were used to identify whether aggregated environmentally-relevant concentration ranges intersected with available toxicity data. For raw wastewater, wastewater effluent, and surface water, a clear overlap was present between the 25th-75th percentiles and identified toxicity levels. This analysis suggests that improved wastewater treatment of antimicrobials, UV filters, and polycyclic musks is required to prevent negative impacts on aquatic species. PMID:27128715

  7. Plasma distribution of tetraphenylporphyrin derivatives relevant for Photodynamic Therapy: importance and limits of hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Benoît; Iorga, Bogdan I; Chaminade, Pierre; Paul, Jean-Louis; Maillard, Philippe; Prognon, Patrice; Kasselouri, Athena

    2013-02-01

    In the course of a Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) protocol, disaggregation of the sensitizer upon binding to plasma proteins and lipoproteins is one of the first steps following intravenous administration. This step governs its subsequent biodistribution and has even been evoked as possibly orientating mechanism of tumor destruction. It is currently admitted as being mainly dependent on sensitizer's hydrophobicity. In this context, as far as glycoconjugation of meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) macrocycle, a promising strategy to improve targeting of retinoblastoma cells confers to the sensitizer an amphiphilic character, we have studied the effect of this strategy on binding to plasma proteins and lipoproteins. With the exception of the majoritary protein binding (more than 80%) of more hydrophilic para-tetraglycoconjugated derivatives, high density lipoproteins (HDL) appear as main plasma carriers of the other amphiphilic glycoconjugated photosensitizers. This HDL-binding is a combined result of binding affinities (logKa ranging from 4.90 to 8.77 depending on the carrier and the TPP derivative considered) and relative plasma concentrations of the different carriers. Evaluation of binding affinities shows that if hydrophobicity can account for LDL- and HDL-affinities, it is not the case for albumin-affinity. Molecular docking simulations show that, if interactions are mainly of hydrophobic nature, polar interactions such as hydrogen bonds are also involved. This combination of interaction modalities should account for the absence of clear relationship between albumin-affinity and hydrophobicity. Taken together, our findings clarify the importance, but also the limits, of hydrophobicity's role in structure-plasma distribution relationship. PMID:23089311

  8. Spatial distribution of dissolved cadmium in the Jiulong river-estuary system: Relevance of anthropogenic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deli; Yang, Xiqian; Zhai, Weidong; Li, Yan; Hong, Huasheng

    2015-12-01

    This study first examined the spatial distribution of dissolved cadmium (Cd) along with other hydrochemical parameters in a large subtropical river estuary system (the Jiulong River-Estuary, China) between 2008 and 2010, aiming to evaluate the impacts of the recently increasing anthropogenic perturbation in natural waters. The results showed that dissolved Cd was variable in the watershed with sporadically high concentrations (>0.6 nmol L-1). The significantly positive correlation of dissolved Cd with phosphate in the watershed (May 2008: dissolved Cd=0.22*P+0.0062, r=0.64, p<0.05) indicated that dissolved Cd levels have been elevated along with P by the increasing agricultural discharges and/or sewage effluents. The estuary was characterized with decreased levels of dissolved Cd in the highly turbid upper part (salinity: <5; dissolved Cd: <0.1 nmol L-1; Total Suspended Matter: 100-300 mg/L), and a mid-salinity maximum of dissolved Cd in the middle part, which were higher in Summer high river discharge period (0.40-0.54 nmol L-1) than in Fall low river discharge period (0.25-0.35 nmol L-1). Dissolved Cd generally decreased outwards in the lower estuary and nearby coastal waters as mixed with the low Cd-content seawater offshore (dissolved Cd= -0.025*Salinity+0.96, r=0.60, p<0.05). In particular, an enhancement of dissolved Cd (by ~0.2 nmol L-1) was observed in the lower estuary and estuarine plume zone as a result of sewage discharges nearby and/or Cd-enriched submarine groundwater discharges. Summarily, our exemplary study provides clear evidence that China's natural waters are currently subject to local perturbation due to the recently increasing anthropogenic activities.

  9. Quantum anonymous ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Liu, Bin; Su, Qi; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2014-03-01

    Anonymous ranking is a kind of privacy-preserving ranking whereby each of the involved participants can correctly and anonymously get the rankings of his data. It can be utilized to solve many practical problems, such as anonymously ranking the students' exam scores. We investigate the issue of how quantum mechanics can be of use in maintaining the anonymity of the participants in multiparty ranking and present a series of quantum anonymous multiparty, multidata ranking protocols. In each of these protocols, a participant can get the correct rankings of his data and nobody else can match the identity to his data. Furthermore, the security of these protocols with respect to different kinds of attacks is proved.

  10. Let your users do the ranking.

    SciTech Connect

    Spomer, Judith E.

    2010-12-01

    Ranking search results is a thorny issue for enterprise search. Search engines rank results using a variety of sophisticated algorithms, but users still complain that search can't ever seem to find anything useful or relevant! The challenge is to provide results that are ranked according to the users' definition of relevancy. Sandia National Laboratories has enhanced its commercial search engine to discover user preferences, re-ranking results accordingly. Immediate positive impact was achieved by modeling historical data consisting of user queries and subsequent result clicks. New data is incorporated into the model daily. An important benefit is that results improve naturally and automatically over time as a function of user actions. This session presents the method employed, how it was integrated with the search engine,metrics illustrating the subsequent improvement to the users' search experience, and plans for implementation with Sandia's FAST for SharePoint 2010 search engine.

  11. Effect and relevance of the artificial drainage system when assessing the hydrologic impact of the imperviousness distribution within the watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thenoux, M.; Gironas, J. A.; Mejia, A.

    2013-12-01

    Cities and urban growth have relevant environmental and social impacts, which could eventually be enhanced or reduced during the urban planning process. From the point of view of hydrology, impermeability and natural soil compaction are one of the main problems that urbanization brings to watershed. Previous studies demonstrate and quantify the impacts of the distribution of imperviousness in a watershed, both on runoff volumes and flow, and the quality and integrity of streams and receiving bodies. Moreover, some studies have investigated the optimal distribution of imperviousness, based on simulating different scenarios of land use change and its effects on runoff, mostly at the outlet of the watershed. However, these studies typically do not address the impact of artificial drainage system associated with the imperviousness scenarios, despite it is known that storm sewer coverage affects the flow accumulation and generation of flow hydrographs. This study seeks to quantify the effects and relevance of the artificial system when it comes to assess the hydrological impacts of the spatial distribution of imperviousness and to determine the characteristics of this influence. For this purpose, an existing model to generate imperviousness distribution scenarios is coupled with a model developed to automatically generate artificial drainage networks. These models are applied to a natural watershed to generate a variety of imperviousness and storm sewer layout scenarios, which are evaluate with a morphoclimatic instantaneous unit hydrograph model. We first tested the ability of this approach to represent the joint effects of imperviousness (i.e. level and distribution) and storm sewer coverage. We then quantified the effects of these variables on the hydrological response, considering also different return period in order to take into account the variability of the precipitation regime. Overall, we show that the layout and spatial coverage of the storm sewer system

  12. Universal emergence of PageRank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, K. M.; Georgeot, B.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2011-11-01

    The PageRank algorithm enables us to rank the nodes of a network through a specific eigenvector of the Google matrix, using a damping parameter α ∈ ]0, 1[. Using extensive numerical simulations of large web networks, with a special accent on British University networks, we determine numerically and analytically the universal features of the PageRank vector at its emergence when α → 1. The whole network can be divided into a core part and a group of invariant subspaces. For α → 1, PageRank converges to a universal power-law distribution on the invariant subspaces whose size distribution also follows a universal power law. The convergence of PageRank at α → 1 is controlled by eigenvalues of the core part of the Google matrix, which are extremely close to unity, leading to large relaxation times as, for example, in spin glasses.

  13. A Markov chain model for image ranking system in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, Thi Thi; Tin, Pyke; Toriu, Takashi; Hama, Hiromitsu

    2014-03-01

    In today world, different kinds of networks such as social, technological, business and etc. exist. All of the networks are similar in terms of distributions, continuously growing and expanding in large scale. Among them, many social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and many others provides a powerful abstraction of the structure and dynamics of diverse kinds of inter personal connection and interaction. Generally, the social network contents are created and consumed by the influences of all different social navigation paths that lead to the contents. Therefore, identifying important and user relevant refined structures such as visual information or communities become major factors in modern decision making world. Moreover, the traditional method of information ranking systems cannot be successful due to their lack of taking into account the properties of navigation paths driven by social connections. In this paper, we propose a novel image ranking system in social networks by using the social data relational graphs from social media platform jointly with visual data to improve the relevance between returned images and user intentions (i.e., social relevance). Specifically, we propose a Markov chain based Social-Visual Ranking algorithm by taking social relevance into account. By using some extensive experiments, we demonstrated the significant and effectiveness of the proposed social-visual ranking method.

  14. Low-Rank Preserving Projections.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwu; Lai, Zhihui; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Zhang, David; Yuan, Chun

    2016-08-01

    As one of the most popular dimensionality reduction techniques, locality preserving projections (LPP) has been widely used in computer vision and pattern recognition. However, in practical applications, data is always corrupted by noises. For the corrupted data, samples from the same class may not be distributed in the nearest area, thus LPP may lose its effectiveness. In this paper, it is assumed that data is grossly corrupted and the noise matrix is sparse. Based on these assumptions, we propose a novel dimensionality reduction method, named low-rank preserving projections (LRPP) for image classification. LRPP learns a low-rank weight matrix by projecting the data on a low-dimensional subspace. We use the L21 norm as a sparse constraint on the noise matrix and the nuclear norm as a low-rank constraint on the weight matrix. LRPP keeps the global structure of the data during the dimensionality reduction procedure and the learned low rank weight matrix can reduce the disturbance of noises in the data. LRPP can learn a robust subspace from the corrupted data. To verify the performance of LRPP in image dimensionality reduction and classification, we compare LRPP with the state-of-the-art dimensionality reduction methods. The experimental results show the effectiveness and the feasibility of the proposed method with encouraging results. PMID:26277014

  15. Passage relevance models for genomics search

    PubMed Central

    Urbain, Jay; Frieder, Ophir; Goharian, Nazli

    2009-01-01

    We present a passage relevance model for integrating syntactic and semantic evidence of biomedical concepts and topics using a probabilistic graphical model. Component models of topics, concepts, terms, and document are represented as potential functions within a Markov Random Field. The probability of a passage being relevant to a biologist's information need is represented as the joint distribution across all potential functions. Relevance model feedback of top ranked passages is used to improve distributional estimates of query concepts and topics in context, and a dimensional indexing strategy is used for efficient aggregation of concept and term statistics. By integrating multiple sources of evidence including dependencies between topics, concepts, and terms, we seek to improve genomics literature passage retrieval precision. Using this model, we are able to demonstrate statistically significant improvements in retrieval precision using a large genomics literature corpus. PMID:19344479

  16. Memory Efficient Ranking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffat, Alistair; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes an approximate document ranking process that uses a compact array of in-memory, low-precision approximations for document length. Combined with another rule for reducing the memory required by partial similarity accumulators, the approximation heuristic allows the ranking of large document collections using less than one byte of memory…

  17. On Rank and Nullity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    This note explains how Emil Artin's proof that row rank equals column rank for a matrix with entries in a field leads naturally to the formula for the nullity of a matrix and also to an algorithm for solving any system of linear equations in any number of variables. This material could be used in any course on matrix theory or linear algebra.

  18. Hitting the Rankings Jackpot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, Samford University was ranked 27th in the nation in a report released by "Forbes" magazine. In this article, the author relates how the people working at Samford University were surprised at its ranking. Although Samford is the largest privately institution in Alabama, its distinguished academic achievements aren't even well-recognized…

  19. Adiabatic Quantum Algorithm for Search Engine Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnerone, Silvano; Zanardi, Paolo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2012-06-01

    We propose an adiabatic quantum algorithm for generating a quantum pure state encoding of the PageRank vector, the most widely used tool in ranking the relative importance of internet pages. We present extensive numerical simulations which provide evidence that this algorithm can prepare the quantum PageRank state in a time which, on average, scales polylogarithmically in the number of web pages. We argue that the main topological feature of the underlying web graph allowing for such a scaling is the out-degree distribution. The top-ranked log⁡(n) entries of the quantum PageRank state can then be estimated with a polynomial quantum speed-up. Moreover, the quantum PageRank state can be used in “q-sampling” protocols for testing properties of distributions, which require exponentially fewer measurements than all classical schemes designed for the same task. This can be used to decide whether to run a classical update of the PageRank.

  20. Recurrent fuzzy ranking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2012-11-01

    With the increasing development of fuzzy set theory in various scientific fields and the need to compare fuzzy numbers in different areas. Therefore, Ranking of fuzzy numbers plays a very important role in linguistic decision-making, engineering, business and some other fuzzy application systems. Several strategies have been proposed for ranking of fuzzy numbers. Each of these techniques has been shown to produce non-intuitive results in certain case. In this paper, we reviewed some recent ranking methods, which will be useful for the researchers who are interested in this area.

  1. A method for integrating and ranking the evidence for biochemical pathways by mining reactions from text

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Makoto; Ohta, Tomoko; Rak, Rafal; Rowley, Andrew; Kell, Douglas B.; Pyysalo, Sampo; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: To create, verify and maintain pathway models, curators must discover and assess knowledge distributed over the vast body of biological literature. Methods supporting these tasks must understand both the pathway model representations and the natural language in the literature. These methods should identify and order documents by relevance to any given pathway reaction. No existing system has addressed all aspects of this challenge. Method: We present novel methods for associating pathway model reactions with relevant publications. Our approach extracts the reactions directly from the models and then turns them into queries for three text mining-based MEDLINE literature search systems. These queries are executed, and the resulting documents are combined and ranked according to their relevance to the reactions of interest. We manually annotate document-reaction pairs with the relevance of the document to the reaction and use this annotation to study several ranking methods, using various heuristic and machine-learning approaches. Results: Our evaluation shows that the annotated document-reaction pairs can be used to create a rule-based document ranking system, and that machine learning can be used to rank documents by their relevance to pathway reactions. We find that a Support Vector Machine-based system outperforms several baselines and matches the performance of the rule-based system. The success of the query extraction and ranking methods are used to update our existing pathway search system, PathText. Availability: An online demonstration of PathText 2 and the annotated corpus are available for research purposes at http://www.nactem.ac.uk/pathtext2/. Contact: makoto.miwa@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23813008

  2. Relevance of risk predictions derived from a chronic species sensitivity distribution with cadmium to aquatic populations and ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mebane, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Criteria to protect aquatic life are intended to protect diverse ecosystems, but in practice are usually developed from compilations of single-species toxicity tests using standard test organisms that were tested in laboratory environments. Species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) developed from these compilations are extrapolated to set aquatic ecosystem criteria. The protectiveness of the approach was critically reviewed with a chronic SSD for cadmium comprising 27 species within 21 genera. Within the data set, one genus had lower cadmium effects concentrations than the SSD fifth percentile-based criterion, so in theory this genus, the amphipod Hyalella, could be lost or at least allowed some level of harm by this criteria approach. However, population matrix modeling projected only slightly increased extinction risks for a temperate Hyalella population under scenarios similar to the SSD fifth percentile criterion. The criterion value was further compared to cadmium effects concentrations in ecosystem experiments and field studies. Generally, few adverse effects were inferred from ecosystem experiments at concentrations less than the SSD fifth percentile criterion. Exceptions were behavioral impairments in simplified food web studies. No adverse effects were apparent in field studies under conditions that seldom exceeded the criterion. At concentrations greater than the SSD fifth percentile, the magnitudes of adverse effects in the field studies were roughly proportional to the laboratory-based fraction of species with adverse effects in the SSD. Overall, the modeling and field validation comparisons of the chronic criterion values generally supported the relevance and protectiveness of the SSD fifth percentile approach with cadmium. ?? 2009 Society for Risk Analysis.

  3. Multiplex PageRank.

    PubMed

    Halu, Arda; Mondragón, Raúl J; Panzarasa, Pietro; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2013-01-01

    Many complex systems can be described as multiplex networks in which the same nodes can interact with one another in different layers, thus forming a set of interacting and co-evolving networks. Examples of such multiplex systems are social networks where people are involved in different types of relationships and interact through various forms of communication media. The ranking of nodes in multiplex networks is one of the most pressing and challenging tasks that research on complex networks is currently facing. When pairs of nodes can be connected through multiple links and in multiple layers, the ranking of nodes should necessarily reflect the importance of nodes in one layer as well as their importance in other interdependent layers. In this paper, we draw on the idea of biased random walks to define the Multiplex PageRank centrality measure in which the effects of the interplay between networks on the centrality of nodes are directly taken into account. In particular, depending on the intensity of the interaction between layers, we define the Additive, Multiplicative, Combined, and Neutral versions of Multiplex PageRank, and show how each version reflects the extent to which the importance of a node in one layer affects the importance the node can gain in another layer. We discuss these measures and apply them to an online multiplex social network. Findings indicate that taking the multiplex nature of the network into account helps uncover the emergence of rankings of nodes that differ from the rankings obtained from one single layer. Results provide support in favor of the salience of multiplex centrality measures, like Multiplex PageRank, for assessing the prominence of nodes embedded in multiple interacting networks, and for shedding a new light on structural properties that would otherwise remain undetected if each of the interacting networks were analyzed in isolation. PMID:24205186

  4. RANK as a therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Eva; Sanz-Moreno, Adrián

    2016-06-01

    The RANK signaling pathway has emerged as a new target in breast cancer as receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and its receptor RANK mediate the pro-tumorigenic role of progesterone in the mammary gland. Thousands of cancer patients worldwide are already taking RANKL inhibitors for the management of bone metastasis, given the relevance of this pathway in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. RANK signaling also has multiple divergent effects in immunity and inflammation, both in the generation of active immune responses and in the induction of tolerance: it is required for lymph node organogenesis, thymic medullary epithelial development and self-tolerance, and regulates activation of several immune cells and inflammatory processes. The RANK pathway interferes with mammary epithelial differentiation and mediates the major proliferative response of mammary epithelium to progesterone and progesterone-driven expansion of mammary stem cells; it also controls hair follicle and epidermal stem cell homeostasis, pointing to RANK as a key regulator of epithelial stemness. Here we revisit the main functions of RANK signaling in bone remodeling, immune cells and epithelial differentiation. We also discuss the mechanistic evidence that supports its pleiotropic effects on cancer: from bone metastasis to immune and cancer-cell-dependent effects. PMID:26749530

  5. Rank-Driven Markov Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinfeld, Michael; Knight, Philip A.; Wade, Andrew R.

    2012-01-01

    We study a class of Markovian systems of N elements taking values in [0,1] that evolve in discrete time t via randomized replacement rules based on the ranks of the elements. These rank-driven processes are inspired by variants of the Bak-Sneppen model of evolution, in which the system represents an evolutionary `fitness landscape' and which is famous as a simple model displaying self-organized criticality. Our main results are concerned with long-time large- N asymptotics for the general model in which, at each time step, K randomly chosen elements are discarded and replaced by independent U[0,1] variables, where the ranks of the elements to be replaced are chosen, independently at each time step, according to a distribution κ N on {1,2,…, N} K . Our main results are that, under appropriate conditions on κ N , the system exhibits threshold behavior at s ∗∈[0,1], where s ∗ is a function of κ N , and the marginal distribution of a randomly selected element converges to U[ s ∗,1] as t→∞ and N→∞. Of this class of models, results in the literature have previously been given for special cases only, namely the `mean-field' or `random neighbor' Bak-Sneppen model. Our proofs avoid the heuristic arguments of some of the previous work and use Foster-Lyapunov ideas. Our results extend existing results and establish their natural, more general context. We derive some more specialized results for the particular case where K=2. One of our technical tools is a result on convergence of stationary distributions for families of uniformly ergodic Markov chains on increasing state-spaces, which may be of independent interest.

  6. Tool for Ranking Research Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, James N.; Scott, Kelly; Smith, Harold

    2005-01-01

    Tool for Research Enhancement Decision Support (TREDS) is a computer program developed to assist managers in ranking options for research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). It could likely also be adapted to perform similar decision-support functions in industrial and academic settings. TREDS provides a ranking of the options, based on a quantifiable assessment of all the relevant programmatic decision factors of benefit, cost, and risk. The computation of the benefit for each option is based on a figure of merit (FOM) for ISS research capacity that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative inputs. Qualitative inputs are gathered and partly quantified by use of the time-tested analytical hierarchical process and used to set weighting factors in the FOM corresponding to priorities determined by the cognizant decision maker(s). Then by use of algorithms developed specifically for this application, TREDS adjusts the projected benefit for each option on the basis of levels of technical implementation, cost, and schedule risk. Based partly on Excel spreadsheets, TREDS provides screens for entering cost, benefit, and risk information. Drop-down boxes are provided for entry of qualitative information. TREDS produces graphical output in multiple formats that can be tailored by users.

  7. Outflanking the Rankings Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that American higher education is allowing itself to be held hostage by the rankings industry, which can lead institutions to consider actions harmful to the public interest and encourage the public's infatuation with celebrity at the expense of substance. Instead of sitting quietly by during the upcoming ratings…

  8. RANKING INDOOR AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The basis of the ranking is 10 monitoring studies chosen to represent "typical" concentrations of the pollutants found indoors. The studies were conducted in the United States during the last 15 years, and mainly focused on concentrations of pollutants in homes, schools, and off...

  9. Responses to the Rankings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Change, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Ten higher education professionals and one college senior comment on the "U.S. News and World Report" rankings of doctoral programs in six liberal arts disciplines. The authors' response to one set of comments and the comments of an executive editor from the magazine are also included. (MSE)

  10. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. PMID:25795511

  11. College Rankings. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holub, Tamara

    The popularity of college ranking surveys published by "U.S. News and World Report" and other magazines is indisputable, but the methodologies used to measure the quality of higher education institutions have come under fire by scholars and college officials. Criticisms have focused on methodological flaws, such as failure to consider differences…

  12. Perceiving Action-Relevant Properties of Tools through Dynamic Touch: Effects of Mass Distribution, Exploration Style, and Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Steven J.; Hajnal, Alen; Lopresti-Goodman, Stacy; Isenhower, Robert W.; Kinsella-Shaw, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    At issue in the present series of experiments was the ability to prospectively perceive the action-relevant properties of hand-held tools by means of dynamic touch. In Experiment 1, participants judged object move-ability. In Experiment 2, participants judged how difficult an object would be to hold if held horizontally, and in Experiments 3 and…

  13. Rank diversity of languages: generic behavior in computational linguistics.

    PubMed

    Cocho, Germinal; Flores, Jorge; Gershenson, Carlos; Pineda, Carlos; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Statistical studies of languages have focused on the rank-frequency distribution of words. Instead, we introduce here a measure of how word ranks change in time and call this distribution rank diversity. We calculate this diversity for books published in six European languages since 1800, and find that it follows a universal lognormal distribution. Based on the mean and standard deviation associated with the lognormal distribution, we define three different word regimes of languages: "heads" consist of words which almost do not change their rank in time, "bodies" are words of general use, while "tails" are comprised by context-specific words and vary their rank considerably in time. The heads and bodies reflect the size of language cores identified by linguists for basic communication. We propose a Gaussian random walk model which reproduces the rank variation of words in time and thus the diversity. Rank diversity of words can be understood as the result of random variations in rank, where the size of the variation depends on the rank itself. We find that the core size is similar for all languages studied. PMID:25849150

  14. Rank Diversity of Languages: Generic Behavior in Computational Linguistics

    PubMed Central

    Cocho, Germinal; Flores, Jorge; Gershenson, Carlos; Pineda, Carlos; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Statistical studies of languages have focused on the rank-frequency distribution of words. Instead, we introduce here a measure of how word ranks change in time and call this distribution rank diversity. We calculate this diversity for books published in six European languages since 1800, and find that it follows a universal lognormal distribution. Based on the mean and standard deviation associated with the lognormal distribution, we define three different word regimes of languages: “heads” consist of words which almost do not change their rank in time, “bodies” are words of general use, while “tails” are comprised by context-specific words and vary their rank considerably in time. The heads and bodies reflect the size of language cores identified by linguists for basic communication. We propose a Gaussian random walk model which reproduces the rank variation of words in time and thus the diversity. Rank diversity of words can be understood as the result of random variations in rank, where the size of the variation depends on the rank itself. We find that the core size is similar for all languages studied. PMID:25849150

  15. Ranking of refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Guillermo; Weckert, Monika; Brüggemann, Rainer; Gerstmann, Silke; Frank, Hartmut

    2008-04-15

    Environmental ranking of refrigerants is of need in many instances. The aim is to assess the relative environmental hazard posed by 40 refrigerants, including those used in the past, those presently used, and some proposed substitutes. Ranking is based upon ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, and atmospheric lifetime and is achieved by applying the Hasse diagram technique, a mathematical method that allows us to assess order relationships of chemicals. The refrigerants are divided into 13 classes, of which the chlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluoroethers, and hydrocarbons contain the largest number of single substances. The dominance degree, a method for measuring order relationships among classes, is discussed and applied to the 13 refrigerant classes. The results show that some hydrofluoroethers are as problematic as the hydrofluorocarbons. Hydrocarbons and ammonia are the least problematic refrigerants with respect to the three environmental properties. PMID:18497145

  16. Kinesiology Faculty Citations across Academic Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Citations to research reports are used as a measure for the influence of a scholar's research line when seeking promotion, grants, and awards. The current study documented the distributions of citations to kinesiology scholars of various academic ranks. Google Scholar Citations was searched for user profiles using five research interest areas…

  17. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  18. Texture classification by local rank correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, D.; Subbarao, M.; Davis, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to texture classification based on local rank correlation is proposed here. Its performance is compared with Laws' method which uses local convolution with feature masks. In the experiments, texture samples are classified based on their distribution of local statistics, either rank correlations or convolutions. The new method achieves generally optimal classification rates. It appears to be more robust because local order statistics are unaffected by local sample differences due to monotonic shifts of texture gray values and are less sensitive to noise.

  19. Predicting accurate probabilities with a ranking loss

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian J; Vembu, Shankar; Elkan, Charles; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-01-01

    In many real-world applications of machine learning classifiers, it is essential to predict the probability of an example belonging to a particular class. This paper proposes a simple technique for predicting probabilities based on optimizing a ranking loss, followed by isotonic regression. This semi-parametric technique offers both good ranking and regression performance, and models a richer set of probability distributions than statistical workhorses such as logistic regression. We provide experimental results that show the effectiveness of this technique on real-world applications of probability prediction. PMID:25285328

  20. University Rankings and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  1. Ranking and Sequencing Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-08-13

    This database application (commonly called the Supermodel) provides a repository for managing critical facility/project information, allows the user to subjectively an objectively assess key criteria , quantify project risks, develop ROM cost estimates, determine facility/project end states, ultimately performing risk-based modeling to rank facilities/project based on risk, sequencing project schedules and provides an optimized recommended sequencing/scheduling of these projects which maximize the S&M cost savings to perform closure projects which benefit all stakeholders.

  2. Learning from partially annotated OPT images by contextual relevance ranking.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqi; Zhang, Jianguo; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Coats, Maria; Carey, Frank A; McKenna, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Annotations delineating regions of interest can provide valuable information for training medical image classification and segmentation methods. However the process of obtaining annotations is tedious and time-consuming, especially for high-resolution volumetric images. In this paper we present a novel learning framework to reduce the requirement of manual annotations while achieving competitive classification performance. The approach is evaluated on a dataset with 59 3D optical projection tomography images of colorectal polyps. The results show that the proposed method can robustly infer patterns from partially annotated images with low computational cost. PMID:24505790

  3. A LDA-based approach to promoting ranking diversity for genomics information retrieval

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the biomedical domain, there are immense data and tremendous increase of genomics and biomedical relevant publications. The wealth of information has led to an increasing amount of interest in and need for applying information retrieval techniques to access the scientific literature in genomics and related biomedical disciplines. In many cases, the desired information of a query asked by biologists is a list of a certain type of entities covering different aspects that are related to the question, such as cells, genes, diseases, proteins, mutations, etc. Hence, it is important of a biomedical IR system to be able to provide relevant and diverse answers to fulfill biologists' information needs. However traditional IR model only concerns with the relevance between retrieved documents and user query, but does not take redundancy between retrieved documents into account. This will lead to high redundancy and low diversity in the retrieval ranked lists. Results In this paper, we propose an approach which employs a topic generative model called Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) to promoting ranking diversity for biomedical information retrieval. Different from other approaches or models which consider aspects on word level, our approach assumes that aspects should be identified by the topics of retrieved documents. We present LDA model to discover topic distribution of retrieval passages and word distribution of each topic dimension, and then re-rank retrieval results with topic distribution similarity between passages based on N-size slide window. We perform our approach on TREC 2007 Genomics collection and two distinctive IR baseline runs, which can achieve 8% improvement over the highest Aspect MAP reported in TREC 2007 Genomics track. Conclusions The proposed method is the first study of adopting topic model to genomics information retrieval, and demonstrates its effectiveness in promoting ranking diversity as well as in improving relevance of ranked

  4. Forecasting Distributional Responses of Limber Pine to Climate Change at Management-Relevant Scales in Rocky Mountain National Park

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, William B.; Cook, Tammy; Melton, Forrest; Connor, Jeff; Bobowski, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Resource managers at parks and other protected areas are increasingly expected to factor climate change explicitly into their decision making frameworks. However, most protected areas are small relative to the geographic ranges of species being managed, so forecasts need to consider local adaptation and community dynamics that are correlated with climate and affect distributions inside protected area boundaries. Additionally, niche theory suggests that species' physiological capacities to respond to climate change may be underestimated when forecasts fail to consider the full breadth of climates occupied by the species rangewide. Here, using correlative species distribution models that contrast estimates of climatic sensitivity inferred from the two spatial extents, we quantify the response of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) to climate change in Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado, USA). Models are trained locally within the park where limber pine is the community dominant tree species, a distinct structural-compositional vegetation class of interest to managers, and also rangewide, as suggested by niche theory. Model forecasts through 2100 under two representative concentration pathways (RCP 4.5 and 8.5 W/m2) show that the distribution of limber pine in the park is expected to move upslope in elevation, but changes in total and core patch area remain highly uncertain. Most of this uncertainty is biological, as magnitudes of projected change are considerably more variable between the two spatial extents used in model training than they are between RCPs, and novel future climates only affect local model predictions associated with RCP 8.5 after 2091. Combined, these results illustrate the importance of accounting for unknowns in species' climatic sensitivities when forecasting distributional scenarios that are used to inform management decisions. We discuss how our results for limber pine may be interpreted in the context of climate change vulnerability and used to

  5. Test procedures and protocols: Their relevance to the figure of merit for thermal distribution systems. Volume 1: Informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1993-09-01

    A conceptual framework is developed that categorizes measurement protocols for forced-air thermal distribution systems in small buildings. This framework is based on the distinction between two generic approaches. The {open_quote}system-comparison{close_quote} approach seeks to determine, via a pair of whole-house energy-use measurements, the difference in energy use between the house with the as-found duct system and the same house with no energy losses attributable to the thermal distribution system. The {open_quote}component loss-factor{close_quote} approach identifies and measures the individual causes of duct losses, and then builds up a value for the net overall duct efficiency, usually with the help of computer simulation. Examples of each approach are analyzed and related to a proposed Figure of Merit for thermal distribution systems. This Figure of Merit would serve as the basis for a Standard Method of Test analogous to those already in place for furnaces, boilers, air conditioners, and heat pumps.

  6. Relevance of octanol-water distribution measurements to the potential ecological uptake of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Elijah J; Huang, Qingguo; Weber, Walter J

    2010-05-01

    Many potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) require various physicochemical modifications prior to use, suggesting that nanotubes having varied properties may pose risks in ecosystems. A means for estimating bioaccumulation potentials of variously modified CNTs for incorporation in predictive fate models would be highly valuable. An approach commonly used for sparingly soluble organic contaminants, and previously suggested for use as well with carbonaceous nanomaterials, involves measurement of their octanol-water partitioning coefficient (KOW) values. To test the applicability of this approach, a methodology was developed to measure apparent octanol-water distribution behaviors for purified multi-walled carbon nanotubes and those acid treated. Substantial differences in apparent distribution coefficients between the two types of CNTs were observed, but these differences did not influence accumulation by either earthworms (Eisenia foetida) or oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), both of which showed minimal nanotube uptake for both types of nanotubes. The results suggest that traditional distribution behavior-based KOW approaches are likely not appropriate for predicting CNT bioaccumulation. PMID:20821546

  7. Using concept relations to improve ranking in information retrieval.

    PubMed

    Price, Susan L; Delcambre, Lois M

    2005-01-01

    Despite improved search engine technology, most searches return numerous documents not directly related to the query. This problem is mitigated if relevant documents appear high on a ranked list of search results. We propose that some queries and the underlying information needs can be modeled as relationships between concepts (relations), and we match relations in queries to relations in documents to try to improve ranking of search results. We investigate four techniques to identify two relationships important in medicine, causes and treats, to improve the ranking of medical text documents relevant to clinical questions about causation and treatment. Preliminary results suggest that identifying relation instances can improve the ranking of search results. PMID:16779114

  8. Using Concept Relations to Improve Ranking in Information Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Price, Susan L.; Delcambre, Lois M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite improved search engine technology, most searches return numerous documents not directly related to the query. This problem is mitigated if relevant documents appear high on a ranked list of search results. We propose that some queries and the underlying information needs can be modeled as relationships between concepts (relations), and we match relations in queries to relations in documents to try to improve ranking of search results. We investigate four techniques to identify two relationships important in medicine, causes and treats, to improve the ranking of medical text documents relevant to clinical questions about causation and treatment. Preliminary results suggest that identifying relation instances can improve the ranking of search results. PMID:16779114

  9. Imaging geochemical heterogeneities using inverse reactive transport modeling: An example relevant for characterizing arsenic mobilization and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhreddine, Sarah; Lee, Jonghyun; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Fendorf, Scott; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    The spatial distribution of reactive minerals in the subsurface is often a primary factor controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in groundwater systems. However, direct measurement and estimation of heterogeneously distributed minerals are often costly and difficult to obtain. While previous studies have shown the utility of using hydrologic measurements combined with inverse modeling techniques for tomography of physical properties including hydraulic conductivity, these methods have seldom been used to image reactive geochemical heterogeneities. In this study, we focus on As-bearing reactive minerals as aquifer contaminants. We use synthetic applications to demonstrate the ability of inverse modeling techniques combined with mechanistic reactive transport models to image reactive mineral lenses in the subsurface and quantify estimation error using indirect, commonly measured groundwater parameters. Specifically, we simulate the mobilization of arsenic via kinetic oxidative dissolution of As-bearing pyrite due to dissolved oxygen in the ambient groundwater, which is an important mechanism for arsenic release in groundwater both under natural conditions and engineering applications such as managed aquifer recharge and recovery operations. The modeling investigation is carried out at various scales and considers different flow-through domains including (i) a 1D lab-scale column (80 cm), (ii) a 2D lab-scale setup (60 cm × 30 cm) and (iii) a 2D field-scale domain (20 m × 4 m). In these setups, synthetic dissolved oxygen data and forward reactive transport simulations are used to image the spatial distribution of As-bearing pyrite using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) for inverse modeling.

  10. Sorption and competition of two persistent organic pesticides onto marine sediments: Relevance to their distribution in aquatic system.

    PubMed

    Soubaneh, Youssouf Djibril; Gagné, Jean-Pierre; Lebeuf, Michel; Nikiforov, Vladimir; Gouteux, Bruno; Osman, Awaleh Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Sorption is a key process in the distribution of substances between environmental compartments in marine ecosystems. Two persistent organic pesticides, also known as toxaphene congeners, namely B8-1413 (P26) and B9-1679 (P50), are of special interest because they are not detected in sediments while relatively concentrated in marine mammals. Sorption-desorption, entrapment and competition behaviors of these pesticides onto marine sediments were studied to explain their environmental distribution. Data obtained under marine experimental conditions were fitted to sorption models to evaluate sorption coefficients and to assess the degree of B8-1413/B9-1679 entrapment of the two toxaphene congeners in sediments. Carbon normalized sorption coefficients (Koc) of both congeners were similar under in cold (2°C) marine (30 psu) conditions with high values ranging from 1.53×10(5) to 3.28×10(5) mL g(-1)indicative of a strong affinity to marine sediments However, the sorption-desorption investigations indicate that B8-1413/B9-1679 were on average 2.5 times less entrapped in sediments compared to B7-1450, a toxaphene congener known to accumulate predominantly in sediments. These results suggest that the low entrapment of B8-1413 and B9-1679 favor their availability and transfer to biological matrices. PMID:25765263

  11. Security techniques for prevention of rank manipulation in social tagging services including robotic domains.

    PubMed

    Choi, Okkyung; Jung, Hanyoung; Moon, Seungbin

    2014-01-01

    With smartphone distribution becoming common and robotic applications on the rise, social tagging services for various applications including robotic domains have advanced significantly. Though social tagging plays an important role when users are finding the exact information through web search, reliability and semantic relation between web contents and tags are not considered. Spams are making ill use of this aspect and put irrelevant tags deliberately on contents and induce users to advertise contents when they click items of search results. Therefore, this study proposes a detection method for tag-ranking manipulation to solve the problem of the existing methods which cannot guarantee the reliability of tagging. Similarity is measured for ranking the grade of registered tag on the contents, and weighted values of each tag are measured by means of synonym relevance, frequency, and semantic distances between tags. Lastly, experimental evaluation results are provided and its efficiency and accuracy are verified through them. PMID:25114975

  12. Security Techniques for Prevention of Rank Manipulation in Social Tagging Services including Robotic Domains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With smartphone distribution becoming common and robotic applications on the rise, social tagging services for various applications including robotic domains have advanced significantly. Though social tagging plays an important role when users are finding the exact information through web search, reliability and semantic relation between web contents and tags are not considered. Spams are making ill use of this aspect and put irrelevant tags deliberately on contents and induce users to advertise contents when they click items of search results. Therefore, this study proposes a detection method for tag-ranking manipulation to solve the problem of the existing methods which cannot guarantee the reliability of tagging. Similarity is measured for ranking the grade of registered tag on the contents, and weighted values of each tag are measured by means of synonym relevance, frequency, and semantic distances between tags. Lastly, experimental evaluation results are provided and its efficiency and accuracy are verified through them. PMID:25114975

  13. Examination of the relevance of using radiochromic films in measuring entrance skin dose distribution in conventional digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Soliman, K; Bakkari, M

    2015-07-01

    Based on manufacturer specifications, radiochromic films are sensitive enough to be used for dosimetry in digital mammography (DM). The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of measuring entrance surface dose (ESD) distribution using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films. The films were irradiated following a standard clinical two-view screening mammography protocol using a full-field digital mammography (FFDM) imaging system. The films were then digitised using a flatbed scanner. The calibration curve relating the readings from a calibrated ionisation chamber and the films' net optical density (NOD) could not be obtained. The examination of the calibration data revealed non-sensitivity of the films to resolve dose differences below 20 mGy at 28 kVp. Therefore, radiochromic films were found not to be suitable for measuring ESD profiles in DM. A 2D map of the NOD of the irradiated films obtained using in-house developed MATLAB computer program is presented. PMID:25852183

  14. The Privileges of Rank

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Alair

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effects of peacetime cold war military service on the life course according to four potentially overlapping theories that state that military service (1) was a disruption, (2) was a positive turning point, (3) allowed veterans to accumulate advantage, and (4) was an agent of social reproduction. The article argues that the extent to which the effect of military service on veterans' lives corresponds with one or another of the preceding theories depends on historical shifts in three dimensions: conscription, conflict, and benefits. Military service during the peacetime draft era of the late 1950s had a neutral effect on the socioeconomic attainment of enlisted veterans. However, it had a positive effect on veterans who served as officers, which partly stemmed from status reproduction and selection. Yet net of pre-service and educational differences by rank, officers in this peacetime draft era were still able to accumulate advantage. PMID:20842210

  15. Risk ranking by perception

    SciTech Connect

    Osei, E.K.; Amoh, G.E.A.; Schandorf, C.

    1997-02-01

    The study of people`s perception and acceptability of risk is important in understanding the public reaction to technology and its environmental and health impact. The perception of risk depends on several factors, including early experiences, education, controllability of the risk, the type of consequence, and the type of person(s) who makes the judgment. This paper reviews some of the main factors influencing people`s perception and acceptability of risk. Knowledge about which factors influence the perception of risk may enhance the understanding of different points of view brought into risk controversies, improve risk communication, and facilitate policy making. Results from a risk ranking by perception survey Conducted in Ghana are also presented. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Low-rank coal research

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, G. F.; Laudal, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

  17. Wikipedia ranking of world universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, José; Patt, Antoine; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-03-01

    We use the directed networks between articles of 24 Wikipedia language editions for producing the wikipedia ranking of world Universities (WRWU) using PageRank, 2DRank and CheiRank algorithms. This approach allows to incorporate various cultural views on world universities using the mathematical statistical analysis independent of cultural preferences. The Wikipedia ranking of top 100 universities provides about 60% overlap with the Shanghai university ranking demonstrating the reliable features of this approach. At the same time WRWU incorporates all knowledge accumulated at 24 Wikipedia editions giving stronger highlights for historically important universities leading to a different estimation of efficiency of world countries in university education. The historical development of university ranking is analyzed during ten centuries of their history.

  18. On the size distribution of collision fragments of NLC dust particles and their relevance to meteoric smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havnes, O.; Gumbel, J.; Antonsen, T.; Hedin, J.; La Hoz, C.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results from a new dust probe MUDD on the PHOCUS payload which was launched in July 2011. In the interior of MUDD all the incoming NLC/PMSE icy dust particles will collide, at an impact angle ~70° to the surface normal, with a grid constructed such that no dust particles can directly hit the bottom plate of the probe. Only collision fragments will continue down towards the bottom plate. We determine an energy distribution of the charged fragments by applying a variable electric field between the impact grid and the bottom plate of MUDD. We find that ~30% of the charged fragments have kinetic energies less than 10 eV, ~20% have energies between 10 and 20 eV while ~50% have energies above 20 eV. The transformation of limits in kinetic energy for ice or meteoric smoke particles (MSP) to radius is dependent on many assumptions, the most crucial being fragment velocity. We find, however, that the sizes of the charged fragments most probably are in the range of 1 to 2 nm if meteoric smoke particles (MSP), and slightly higher if ice particles. The observed high charging fraction and the dominance of fragment sizes below a few nm makes it very unlikely that the fragments can consist mainly of ice but that they must be predominantly MSP as predicted by Havnes and Næsheim (2007) and recently observed by Hervig et al. (2012). The MUDD results indicate that MSP are embedded in NLC/PMSE ice particles with a minimum volume filling factor of ~.05% in the unlikely case that all embedded MSP are released and charged. A few % volume filling factor (Hervig et al., 2012) can easily be reached if ~10% of the MSP are released and that their charging probability is ~0.1.

  19. The internal distribution of nickel and thallium in two freshwater invertebrates and its relevance to trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Julie; Hare, Landis

    2008-07-15

    Although nickel and thallium are present at potentially harmful concentrations in some lakes, there is little information on their bioaccumulation and transfer up aquatic food webs. To measure the propensity of animals for accumulating and transferring these contaminants along food chains, we exposed two common types of invertebrates, an insect (Chironomus riparius) and a worm (Tubifex tubifex), to these metals spiked into sediment. We then measured the subcellular distribution of Ni and Tl in these invertebrates to estimate the likelihood that these metals will have toxic effects on these prey or be transferred to higher trophic levels. In both species, at least half of their Ni and TI was present in fractions that are purportedly detoxified (granules and metal-binding proteins). Furthermore, based on information in the literature concerning prey subcellular fractions that are likely to be trophically available (TAM), we estimate that much of the Ni and TI in these animals (43-84%) is available for transfer to a predator. To test this prediction, we fed these invertebrates to the alderfly Sialis velata, and measured the efficiency with which this predator assimilated Ni and Tl from each prey type. The majority of both trace metals (58-83%) was assimilated by the predator, which suggests that these contaminants would be easily transferred along aquatic food chains and that models describing Ni and Tl accumulation by aquatic animals should consider food as a source of these metals. The proportion of metal that could potentially be taken up by a consumer (% TAM) and the actual percentage assimilated by S. velata fell on or reasonably close to a 1:1 line for the 4 prey-metal combinations. PMID:18754361

  20. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-07-01

    Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

  1. Research on B Cell Algorithm for Learning to Rank Method Based on Parallel Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuling; Zhang, Hongxian

    2016-01-01

    For the purposes of information retrieval, users must find highly relevant documents from within a system (and often a quite large one comprised of many individual documents) based on input query. Ranking the documents according to their relevance within the system to meet user needs is a challenging endeavor, and a hot research topic–there already exist several rank-learning methods based on machine learning techniques which can generate ranking functions automatically. This paper proposes a parallel B cell algorithm, RankBCA, for rank learning which utilizes a clonal selection mechanism based on biological immunity. The novel algorithm is compared with traditional rank-learning algorithms through experimentation and shown to outperform the others in respect to accuracy, learning time, and convergence rate; taken together, the experimental results show that the proposed algorithm indeed effectively and rapidly identifies optimal ranking functions. PMID:27487242

  2. Research on B Cell Algorithm for Learning to Rank Method Based on Parallel Strategy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuling; Zhang, Hongxian

    2016-01-01

    For the purposes of information retrieval, users must find highly relevant documents from within a system (and often a quite large one comprised of many individual documents) based on input query. Ranking the documents according to their relevance within the system to meet user needs is a challenging endeavor, and a hot research topic-there already exist several rank-learning methods based on machine learning techniques which can generate ranking functions automatically. This paper proposes a parallel B cell algorithm, RankBCA, for rank learning which utilizes a clonal selection mechanism based on biological immunity. The novel algorithm is compared with traditional rank-learning algorithms through experimentation and shown to outperform the others in respect to accuracy, learning time, and convergence rate; taken together, the experimental results show that the proposed algorithm indeed effectively and rapidly identifies optimal ranking functions. PMID:27487242

  3. Network tuned multiple rank aggregation and applications to gene ranking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the development of various high throughput technologies and analysis methods, researchers can study different aspects of a biological phenomenon simultaneously or one aspect repeatedly with different experimental techniques and analysis methods. The output from each study is a rank list of components of interest. Aggregation of the rank lists of components, such as proteins, genes and single nucleotide variants (SNV), produced by these experiments has been proven to be helpful in both filtering the noise and bringing forth a more complete understanding of the biological problems. Current available rank aggregation methods do not consider the network information that has been observed to provide vital contributions in many data integration studies. We developed network tuned rank aggregation methods incorporating network information and demonstrated its superior performance over aggregation methods without network information. The methods are tested on predicting the Gene Ontology function of yeast proteins. We validate the methods using combinations of three gene expression data sets and three protein interaction networks as well as an integrated network by combining the three networks. Results show that the aggregated rank lists are more meaningful if protein interaction network is incorporated. Among the methods compared, CGI_RRA and CGI_Endeavour, which integrate rank lists with networks using CGI [1] followed by rank aggregation using either robust rank aggregation (RRA) [2] or Endeavour [3] perform the best. Finally, we use the methods to locate target genes of transcription factors. PMID:25708095

  4. Beyond Low Rank + Sparse: Multiscale Low Rank Matrix Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Frank; Lustig, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Low rank methods allow us to capture globally correlated components within matrices. The recent low rank + sparse decomposition further enables us to extract sparse entries along with the globally correlated components. In this paper, we present a natural generalization and consider the decomposition of matrices into components of multiple scales. Such decomposition is well motivated in practice as data matrices often exhibit local correlations in multiple scales. Concretely, we propose a multi-scale low rank modeling that represents a data matrix as a sum of block-wise low rank matrices with increasing scales of block sizes. We then consider the inverse problem of decomposing the data matrix into its multi-scale low rank components and approach the problem via a convex formulation. Theoretically, we show that under an incoherence condition, the convex program recovers the multi-scale low rank components exactly. Practically, we provide guidance on selecting the regularization parameters and incorporate cycle spinning to reduce blocking artifacts. Experimentally, we show that the multi-scale low rank decomposition provides a more intuitive decomposition than conventional low rank methods and demonstrate its effectiveness in four applications, including illumination normalization for face images, motion separation for surveillance videos, multi-scale modeling of the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and collaborative filtering exploiting age information.

  5. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  6. Partial transfer entropy on rank vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugiumtzis, D.

    2013-06-01

    For the evaluation of information flow in bivariate time series, information measures have been employed, such as the transfer entropy (TE), the symbolic transfer entropy (STE), defined similarly to TE but on the ranks of the components of the reconstructed vectors, and the transfer entropy on rank vectors (TERV), similar to STE but forming the ranks for the future samples of the response system with regard to the current reconstructed vector. Here we extend TERV for multivariate time series, and account for the presence of confounding variables, called partial transfer entropy on ranks (PTERV). We investigate the asymptotic properties of PTERV, and also partial STE (PSTE), construct parametric significance tests under approximations with Gaussian and gamma null distributions, and show that the parametric tests cannot achieve the power of the randomization test using time-shifted surrogates. Using simulations on known coupled dynamical systems and applying parametric and randomization significance tests, we show that PTERV performs better than PSTE but worse than the partial transfer entropy (PTE). However, PTERV, unlike PTE, is robust to the presence of drifts in the time series and it is also not affected by the level of detrending.

  7. Obsession with Rankings Goes Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2008-01-01

    A Chinese list of the world's top universities would seem an unlikely concern for French politicians. But this year, France's legislature took aim at the annual rankings produced by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, which claims to list the 500 best universities in the world. The highest-ranked French entry, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, comes in…

  8. University Rankings in Critical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pusser, Brian; Marginson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses global postsecondary ranking systems by using critical-theoretical perspectives on power. This research suggests rankings are at once a useful lens for studying power in higher education and an important instrument for the exercise of power in service of dominant norms in global higher education. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  9. Technical Pitfalls in University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bougnol, Marie-Laure; Dulá, Jose H.

    2015-01-01

    Academicians, experts, and other stakeholders have contributed extensively to the literature on university rankings also known as "league tables". Often the tone is critical usually focused on the subjective aspects of the process; e.g., the list of the universities' attributes used in the rankings, their respective weights, and the size…

  10. University Ranking as Social Exclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amsler, Sarah S.; Bolsmann, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the dual role of global university rankings in the creation of a new, knowledge-identified, transnational capitalist class and in facilitating new forms of social exclusion. We examine how and why the practice of ranking universities has become widely defined by national and international organisations as an important…

  11. Semi-Automatic Determination of Citation Relevancy: User Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, G. David

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of online bibliographic database searches focuses on a software system, SORT-AID/SABRE, that ranks retrieved citations in terms of relevance. Results of a comprehensive user evaluation of the relevance ranking procedure to determine its effectiveness are presented, and implications for future work are suggested. (10 references) (LRW)

  12. Do lab-derived distribution coefficient values of pesticides match distribution coefficient values determined from column and field-scale experiments? A critical analysis of relevant literature.

    PubMed

    Vereecken, H; Vanderborght, J; Kasteel, R; Spiteller, M; Schäffer, A; Close, M

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed sorption parameters for pesticides that were derived from batch and column or batch and field experiments. The batch experiments analyzed in this study were run with the same pesticide and soil as in the column and field experiments. We analyzed the relationship between the pore water velocity of the column and field experiments, solute residence times, and sorption parameters, such as the organic carbon normalized distribution coefficient ( ) and the mass exchange coefficient in kinetic models, as well as the predictability of sorption parameters from basic soil properties. The batch/column analysis included 38 studies with a total of 139 observations. The batch/field analysis included five studies, resulting in a dataset of 24 observations. For the batch/column data, power law relationships between pore water velocity, residence time, and sorption constants were derived. The unexplained variability in these equations was reduced, taking into account the saturation status and the packing status (disturbed-undisturbed) of the soil sample. A new regression equation was derived that allows estimating the values derived from column experiments using organic matter and bulk density with an value of 0.56. Regression analysis of the batch/column data showed that the relationship between batch- and column-derived values depends on the saturation status and packing of the soil column. Analysis of the batch/field data showed that as the batch-derived value becomes larger, field-derived values tend to be lower than the corresponding batch-derived values, and vice versa. The present dataset also showed that the variability in the ratio of batch- to column-derived value increases with increasing pore water velocity, with a maximum value approaching 3.5. PMID:21546674

  13. Onotology-Based Annotation and Ranking Service for Geoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainju, R.; Ramachandran, R.; Li, X.; McEniry, M.; Kulkarni, A.; Conover, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is a need to automatically annotate information using a either a control vocabulary or an ontology to make the information not only easily discoverable but also allow the information to be linked to other information based on these semantic annotations. We present an ontology annotation and a ranking service designed to address this need. The service can be configured to use an ontology describing a specific application domain. Given text inputs, this service generates annotations whenever the service finds terms that intersect both in the text and the ontology. The service is also capable of ranking the different inputs based on the "contextual" similarity to the information captured in the ontology. To rank a given input, the service uses a specialized algorithm which calculated both an ontological score based on precomputed weights of the intersecting term from the ontology and a statistical score using traditional term frequency- inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) approach. Both these scores are normalized and combined to generate the final ranking. An example application of this service to find relevant datasets for studying Hurricanes within NASA's data catalog. A hurricane ontology is used to index and rank all the data set descriptions from the metadata catalog and only the datasets that rank high are presented to the end users as contextually relevant for studying Hurricanes.

  14. Relevancy 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Newman, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Where we present an overview on why relevancy is a problem, how important it is and how we can improve it. The topic of relevancy is becoming increasingly important in earth data discovery as our audience is tuned to the accuracy of standard search engines like Google.

  15. Rank by Readability: Document Weighting for Information Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbold, Neil; McLaughlin, Harry; Gillam, Lee

    In this paper, we present a new approach to ranking that considers the reading ability (and motivation) of the user. Web pages can be, increasingly, badly written with unfamiliar words, poor use of syntax, ambiguous phrases and so on. Readability research suggests that experts and motivated readers may overcome confusingly written text, but nevertheless find it an irritation. We investigate using readability to re-rank web pages. We take an extended view of readability that considers the reading level of retrieved web pages using techniques that consider both textual and cognitive factors. Readability of a selection of query results is examined, and a re-ranking on readability is compared to the original ranking. Results to date suggest that considering a view of readability for each reader may increase the probability of relevance to a particular user.

  16. Highlighting entanglement of cultures via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles.

    PubMed

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013. PMID:24098338

  17. Highlighting Entanglement of Cultures via Ranking of Multilingual Wikipedia Articles

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Young-Ho; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-01-01

    How different cultures evaluate a person? Is an important person in one culture is also important in the other culture? We address these questions via ranking of multilingual Wikipedia articles. With three ranking algorithms based on network structure of Wikipedia, we assign ranking to all articles in 9 multilingual editions of Wikipedia and investigate general ranking structure of PageRank, CheiRank and 2DRank. In particular, we focus on articles related to persons, identify top 30 persons for each rank among different editions and analyze distinctions of their distributions over activity fields such as politics, art, science, religion, sport for each edition. We find that local heroes are dominant but also global heroes exist and create an effective network representing entanglement of cultures. The Google matrix analysis of network of cultures shows signs of the Zipf law distribution. This approach allows to examine diversity and shared characteristics of knowledge organization between cultures. The developed computational, data driven approach highlights cultural interconnections in a new perspective. Dated: June 26, 2013 PMID:24098338

  18. Graph ranking for exploratory gene data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology has made it possible to simultaneously monitor the expression levels of thousands of genes in a single experiment. However, the large number of genes greatly increases the challenges of analyzing, comprehending and interpreting the resulting mass of data. Selecting a subset of important genes is inevitable to address the challenge. Gene selection has been investigated extensively over the last decade. Most selection procedures, however, are not sufficient for accurate inference of underlying biology, because biological significance does not necessarily have to be statistically significant. Additional biological knowledge needs to be integrated into the gene selection procedure. Results We propose a general framework for gene ranking. We construct a bipartite graph from the Gene Ontology (GO) and gene expression data. The graph describes the relationship between genes and their associated molecular functions. Under a species condition, edge weights of the graph are assigned to be gene expression level. Such a graph provides a mathematical means to represent both species-independent and species-dependent biological information. We also develop a new ranking algorithm to analyze the weighted graph via a kernelized spatial depth (KSD) approach. Consequently, the importance of gene and molecular function can be simultaneously ranked by a real-valued measure, KSD, which incorporates the global and local structure of the graph. Over-expressed and under-regulated genes also can be separately ranked. Conclusion The gene-function bigraph integrates molecular function annotations into gene expression data. The relevance of genes is described in the graph (through a common function). The proposed method provides an exploratory framework for gene data analysis. PMID:19811684

  19. A Simple Rank Product Approach for Analyzing Two Classes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tae Young

    2015-01-01

    The rank product statistic has been widely used to detect differentially expressed genes in replicated microarrays and a one-class setting. The objective of this article is to apply a rank product statistic to approximate the P-value of differential expression in a two-class setting, such as in normal and cancer cells. For this purpose, we introduce a simple statistic that compares the P-values of each class’s rank product statistic. Its null distribution is straightforwardly derived using the change-of-variable technique. PMID:26244016

  20. Caipirini: using gene sets to rank literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Keeping up-to-date with bioscience literature is becoming increasingly challenging. Several recent methods help meet this challenge by allowing literature search to be launched based on lists of abstracts that the user judges to be 'interesting'. Some methods go further by allowing the user to provide a second input set of 'uninteresting' abstracts; these two input sets are then used to search and rank literature by relevance. In this work we present the service 'Caipirini' (http://caipirini.org) that also allows two input sets, but takes the novel approach of allowing ranking of literature based on one or more sets of genes. Results To evaluate the usefulness of Caipirini, we used two test cases, one related to the human cell cycle, and a second related to disease defense mechanisms in Arabidopsis thaliana. In both cases, the new method achieved high precision in finding literature related to the biological mechanisms underlying the input data sets. Conclusions To our knowledge Caipirini is the first service enabling literature search directly based on biological relevance to gene sets; thus, Caipirini gives the research community a new way to unlock hidden knowledge from gene sets derived via high-throughput experiments. PMID:22297131

  1. Influence Analysis of Ranking Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Wai-Yin; Chan, Wai

    2002-01-01

    Developed diagnostic measures to identify observations in Thurstonian models for ranking data that unduly influence parameter estimates obtained by the partition maximum likelihood approach of W. Chan and P. Bender (1998). (SLD)

  2. Systematic Weighting and Ranking: Cutting the Gordian Knot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Charles H.; McKim, Geoffrey W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes SWEAR (Systematic Weighting and Ranking), a powers-of-two algorithm that can be used for searching the World Wide Web or any large database that automatically creates discrete, well-defined result sets and displays them in decreasing order of likely relevance. Also discusses fuzzy sets. (Author/LRW)

  3. Local Knowledge When Ranking Journals: Reproductive Effects and Resistant Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagarajah, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on the engagement of a US-based scholar and faculty members in a non-Western university in a mentoring exercise on publishing. It demonstrates how the "list" constructed in a particular academic department in the university for ranking relevant journals for publication has reproductive effects on knowledge…

  4. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, Daniel; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Tometsko, Mark; Blake, Michelle; Jacob, Allison P; Dougall, William C

    2015-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) is an essential mediator of osteoclast formation, function and survival. In patients with solid tumor metastasis to the bone, targeting the bone microenvironment by inhibition of RANKL using denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to RANKL, has been demonstrated to prevent tumor-induced osteolysis and subsequent skeletal complications. Recently, a prominent functional role for the RANKL pathway has emerged in the primary bone tumor giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB). Expression of both RANKL and RANK is extremely high in GCTB tumors and denosumab treatment was associated with tumor regression and reduced tumor-associated bone lysis in GCTB patients. In order to address the potential role of the RANKL pathway in another primary bone tumor, this study assessed human RANKL and RANK expression in human primary osteosarcoma (OS) using specific mAbs, validated and optimized for immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79) of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy

  5. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes. PMID:26553630

  6. Ranking structures and rank-rank correlations of countries: The FIFA and UEFA cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Cloots, Rudi; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-04-01

    Ranking of agents competing with each other in complex systems may lead to paradoxes according to the pre-chosen different measures. A discussion is presented on such rank-rank, similar or not, correlations based on the case of European countries ranked by UEFA and FIFA from different soccer competitions. The first question to be answered is whether an empirical and simple law is obtained for such (self-) organizations of complex sociological systems with such different measuring schemes. It is found that the power law form is not the best description contrary to many modern expectations. The stretched exponential is much more adequate. Moreover, it is found that the measuring rules lead to some inner structures in both cases.

  7. Web based collaborative decision making in flood risk management: Application of TOPSIS and visualisation techniques for ranking of alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, Mariele; Almoradie, Adrian; Jonoski, Andreja

    2014-05-01

    Development of flood risk management (FRM) plans is ideally carried out in a participatory process with relevant stakeholders. Integrating stakeholders knowledge and information in the decision making process creates trust amongst decision makers and stakeholders that often leads to a successful implementation of measures. Stakeholder participation however does not come without challenges and hindrances (e.g. limitation of resources, spatial distribution and interest to participate). The most challenging type of participation is Collaborative decision making (CDM). A web-based mobile or computer-aided environment offers an innovative approach to address these challenges and hindrances. Moreover, this also enhances participation. Different phases or steps of a CDM process are addressing relevant management objectives, identify scenarios and sets of proposed alternatives, individually rank these alternatives in order of preference and present an aggregated rank to view the groups position. In individual ranking, formulation of judgement should combine scientific facts with stakeholders' beliefs and attitudes. This paper presents a developed web-based CDM framework and its implementation, highlighting the application of a Muti-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) method for individual ranking of alternative, the method Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) with Fuzzy logic. Moreover, an innovative visualisation technique for stakeholders' group ranking is also presented. Case studies are the Alster catchment (Hamburg, Germany) and Cranbrook catchment, (London, UK). A series of stakeholders' workshops was done to test and evaluate the environments. It shows that the TOPSIS method provides a close representation of the stakeholders' preferences regarding the measures and alternatives. Overall the evaluation shows that web-based environments can address the challenges and hindrances and it enhances participation in flood risk management. The

  8. An iterative searching and ranking algorithm for prioritising pharmacogenomics genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, Quanqiu

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) studies are to identify genetic variants that may affect drug efficacy and toxicity. A machine understandable drug-gene relationship knowledge is important for many computational PGx studies and for personalised medicine. A comprehensive and accurate PGx-specific gene lexicon is important for automatic drug-gene relationship extraction from the scientific literature, rich knowledge source for PGx studies. In this study, we present a bootstrapping learning technique to rank 33,310 human genes with respect to their relevance to drug response. The algorithm uses only one seed PGx gene to iteratively extract and rank co-occurred genes using 20 million MEDLINE abstracts. Our ranking method is able to accurately rank PGx-specific genes highly among all human genes. Compared to randomly ranked genes (precision: 0.032, recall: 0.013, F1: 0.018), the algorithm has achieved significantly better performance (precision: 0.861, recall: 0.548, F1: 0.662) in ranking the top 2.5% of genes. PMID:23428471

  9. Learning to rank image tags with limited training examples.

    PubMed

    Songhe Feng; Zheyun Feng; Rong Jin

    2015-04-01

    With an increasing number of images that are available in social media, image annotation has emerged as an important research topic due to its application in image matching and retrieval. Most studies cast image annotation into a multilabel classification problem. The main shortcoming of this approach is that it requires a large number of training images with clean and complete annotations in order to learn a reliable model for tag prediction. We address this limitation by developing a novel approach that combines the strength of tag ranking with the power of matrix recovery. Instead of having to make a binary decision for each tag, our approach ranks tags in the descending order of their relevance to the given image, significantly simplifying the problem. In addition, the proposed method aggregates the prediction models for different tags into a matrix, and casts tag ranking into a matrix recovery problem. It introduces the matrix trace norm to explicitly control the model complexity, so that a reliable prediction model can be learned for tag ranking even when the tag space is large and the number of training images is limited. Experiments on multiple well-known image data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework for tag ranking compared with the state-of-the-art approaches for image annotation and tag ranking. PMID:25622318

  10. "Times Higher Education" 100 under 50 Ranking: Old Wine in a New Bottle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, Kaycheng

    2013-01-01

    "Times Higher Education" 100 under 50 ranking is a new twist to the university ranking. It focuses on universities that have a history of 50 years or less with the purpose of offsetting the advantage of prestige of the older ones. This article re-analysed the data publicly available and looked into relevant conceptual and statistical issues. The…

  11. Feature selection for splice site prediction: A new method using EDA-based feature ranking

    PubMed Central

    Saeys, Yvan; Degroeve, Sven; Aeyels, Dirk; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves

    2004-01-01

    Background The identification of relevant biological features in large and complex datasets is an important step towards gaining insight in the processes underlying the data. Other advantages of feature selection include the ability of the classification system to attain good or even better solutions using a restricted subset of features, and a faster classification. Thus, robust methods for fast feature selection are of key importance in extracting knowledge from complex biological data. Results In this paper we present a novel method for feature subset selection applied to splice site prediction, based on estimation of distribution algorithms, a more general framework of genetic algorithms. From the estimated distribution of the algorithm, a feature ranking is derived. Afterwards this ranking is used to iteratively discard features. We apply this technique to the problem of splice site prediction, and show how it can be used to gain insight into the underlying biological process of splicing. Conclusion We show that this technique proves to be more robust than the traditional use of estimation of distribution algorithms for feature selection: instead of returning a single best subset of features (as they normally do) this method provides a dynamical view of the feature selection process, like the traditional sequential wrapper methods. However, the method is faster than the traditional techniques, and scales better to datasets described by a large number of features. PMID:15154966

  12. Rank in Class and College Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally class rankings have been used by high schools to determine valedictorians and salutatorians. These rankings have also been used by colleges to make admission decisions and for awarding scholarships. While there is no direct link between college rank and college admission, there is evidence that not using class rank can reduce stress…

  13. The Globalization of College and University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, accountability, and benchmarking, university rankings have achieved a kind of iconic status. The major ones--the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU, or the "Shanghai rankings"), the QS (Quacquarelli Symonds Limited) World University Rankings, and the "Times Higher Education" World University Rankings…

  14. An Efficient Web Page Ranking for Semantic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, P.; Singh, M.; Kumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    With the enormous amount of information presented on the web, the retrieval of relevant information has become a serious problem and is also the topic of research for last few years. The most common tools to retrieve information from web are search engines like Google. The Search engines are usually based on keyword searching and indexing of web pages. This approach is not very efficient as the result-set of web pages obtained include large irrelevant pages. Sometimes even the entire result-set may contain lot of irrelevant pages for the user. The next generation of search engines must address this problem. Recently, many semantic web search engines have been developed like Ontolook, Swoogle, which help in searching meaningful documents presented on semantic web. In this process the ranking of the retrieved web pages is very crucial. Some attempts have been made in ranking of semantic web pages but still the ranking of these semantic web documents is neither satisfactory and nor up to the user's expectations. In this paper we have proposed a semantic web based document ranking scheme that relies not only on the keywords but also on the conceptual instances present between the keywords. As a result only the relevant page will be on the top of the result-set of searched web pages. We explore all relevant relations between the keywords exploring the user's intention and then calculate the fraction of these relations on each web page to determine their relevance. We have found that this ranking technique gives better results than those by the prevailing methods.

  15. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  16. Fuzzy Multicriteria Ranking of Aluminium Coating Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, A. F.

    2007-12-01

    This work deals with multicriteria ranking of aluminium coating methods. The alternatives used are: sulfuric acid anodization, A1; oxalic acid anodization, A2; chromic acid anodization, A3; phosphoric acid anodization, A4; integral color anodizing, A5; chemical conversion coating, A6; electrostatic powder deposition, A7. The criteria used are: cost of production, f1; environmental friendliness of production process, f2; appearance (texture), f3; reflectivity, f4; response to coloring, f5; corrosion resistance, f6; abrasion resistance, f7; fatigue resistance, f8. Five experts coming from relevant industrial units set grades to the criteria vector and the preference matrix according to a properly modified Delphi method. Sensitivity analysis of the ranked first alternative A1 against the `second best', which was A3 at low and A7 at high resolution levels proved that the solution is robust. The dependence of anodized products quality on upstream processes is presented and the impact of energy price increase on industrial cost is discussed.

  17. Conformational state distributions and catalytically relevant dynamics of a hinge-bending enzyme studied by single-molecule FRET and a coarse-grained simulation.

    PubMed

    Gabba, Matteo; Poblete, Simón; Rosenkranz, Tobias; Katranidis, Alexandros; Kempe, Daryan; Züchner, Tina; Winkler, Roland G; Gompper, Gerhard; Fitter, Jörg

    2014-10-21

    Over the last few decades, a view has emerged showing that multidomain enzymes are biological machines evolved to harness stochastic kicks of solvent particles into highly directional functional motions. These intrinsic motions are structurally encoded, and Nature makes use of them to catalyze chemical reactions by means of ligand-induced conformational changes and states redistribution. Such mechanisms align reactive groups for efficient chemistry and stabilize conformers most proficient for catalysis. By combining single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements with normal mode analysis and coarse-grained mesoscopic simulations, we obtained results for a hinge-bending enzyme, namely phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), which support and extend these ideas. From single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we obtained insight into the distribution of conformational states and the dynamical properties of the domains. The simulations allowed for the characterization of interdomain motions of a compact state of PGK. The data show that PGK is intrinsically a highly dynamic system sampling a wealth of conformations on timescales ranging from nanoseconds to milliseconds and above. Functional motions encoded in the fold are performed by the PGK domains already in its ligand-free form, and substrate binding is not required to enable them. Compared to other multidomain proteins, these motions are rather fast and presumably not rate-limiting in the enzymatic reaction. Ligand binding slightly readjusts the orientation of the domains and feasibly locks the protein motions along a preferential direction. In addition, the functionally relevant compact state is stabilized by the substrates, and acts as a prestate to reach active conformations by means of Brownian motions. PMID:25418172

  18. Conformational State Distributions and Catalytically Relevant Dynamics of a Hinge-Bending Enzyme Studied by Single-Molecule FRET and a Coarse-Grained Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gabba, Matteo; Poblete, Simón; Rosenkranz, Tobias; Katranidis, Alexandros; Kempe, Daryan; Züchner, Tina; Winkler, Roland G.; Gompper, Gerhard; Fitter, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, a view has emerged showing that multidomain enzymes are biological machines evolved to harness stochastic kicks of solvent particles into highly directional functional motions. These intrinsic motions are structurally encoded, and Nature makes use of them to catalyze chemical reactions by means of ligand-induced conformational changes and states redistribution. Such mechanisms align reactive groups for efficient chemistry and stabilize conformers most proficient for catalysis. By combining single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements with normal mode analysis and coarse-grained mesoscopic simulations, we obtained results for a hinge-bending enzyme, namely phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), which support and extend these ideas. From single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we obtained insight into the distribution of conformational states and the dynamical properties of the domains. The simulations allowed for the characterization of interdomain motions of a compact state of PGK. The data show that PGK is intrinsically a highly dynamic system sampling a wealth of conformations on timescales ranging from nanoseconds to milliseconds and above. Functional motions encoded in the fold are performed by the PGK domains already in its ligand-free form, and substrate binding is not required to enable them. Compared to other multidomain proteins, these motions are rather fast and presumably not rate-limiting in the enzymatic reaction. Ligand binding slightly readjusts the orientation of the domains and feasibly locks the protein motions along a preferential direction. In addition, the functionally relevant compact state is stabilized by the substrates, and acts as a prestate to reach active conformations by means of Brownian motions. PMID:25418172

  19. Scalable ranked retrieval using document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajiv; Oard, Douglas W.; Doermann, David

    2013-12-01

    Despite the explosion of text on the Internet, hard copy documents that have been scanned as images still play a significant role for some tasks. The best method to perform ranked retrieval on a large corpus of document images, however, remains an open research question. The most common approach has been to perform text retrieval using terms generated by optical character recognition. This paper, by contrast, examines whether a scalable segmentation-free image retrieval algorithm, which matches sub-images containing text or graphical objects, can provide additional benefit in satisfying a user's information needs on a large, real world dataset. Results on 7 million scanned pages from the CDIP v1.0 test collection show that content based image retrieval finds a substantial number of documents that text retrieval misses, and that when used as a basis for relevance feedback can yield improvements in retrieval effectiveness.

  20. Querying and Ranking XML Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlieder, Torsten; Meuss, Holger

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of XML, information retrieval, precision, and recall focuses on a retrieval technique that adopts the similarity measure of the vector space model, incorporates the document structure, and supports structured queries. Topics include a query model based on tree matching; structured queries and term-based ranking; and term frequency and…

  1. Let Us Rank Journalism Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unlike law, business, and medical schools, as well as universities in general, journalism schools and journalism programs have rarely been ranked. Publishers such as "U.S. News & World Report," "Forbes," "Bloomberg Businessweek," and "Washington Monthly" do not pay them much mind. What is the best…

  2. RELATIVE POTENCY RANKING FOR CHLOROPHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently the National Center for Environmental Assessment-Cincinnati completed a feasibility study for developing a toxicity related relative potency ranking scheme for chlorophenols. In this study it was concluded that a large data base exists pertaining to the relative toxicity...

  3. Ranked retrieval of Computational Biology models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study of biological systems demands computational support. If targeting a biological problem, the reuse of existing computational models can save time and effort. Deciding for potentially suitable models, however, becomes more challenging with the increasing number of computational models available, and even more when considering the models' growing complexity. Firstly, among a set of potential model candidates it is difficult to decide for the model that best suits ones needs. Secondly, it is hard to grasp the nature of an unknown model listed in a search result set, and to judge how well it fits for the particular problem one has in mind. Results Here we present an improved search approach for computational models of biological processes. It is based on existing retrieval and ranking methods from Information Retrieval. The approach incorporates annotations suggested by MIRIAM, and additional meta-information. It is now part of the search engine of BioModels Database, a standard repository for computational models. Conclusions The introduced concept and implementation are, to our knowledge, the first application of Information Retrieval techniques on model search in Computational Systems Biology. Using the example of BioModels Database, it was shown that the approach is feasible and extends the current possibilities to search for relevant models. The advantages of our system over existing solutions are that we incorporate a rich set of meta-information, and that we provide the user with a relevance ranking of the models found for a query. Better search capabilities in model databases are expected to have a positive effect on the reuse of existing models. PMID:20701772

  4. Knowledge-guided gene ranking by coordinative component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In cancer, gene networks and pathways often exhibit dynamic behavior, particularly during the process of carcinogenesis. Thus, it is important to prioritize those genes that are strongly associated with the functionality of a network. Traditional statistical methods are often inept to identify biologically relevant member genes, motivating researchers to incorporate biological knowledge into gene ranking methods. However, current integration strategies are often heuristic and fail to incorporate fully the true interplay between biological knowledge and gene expression data. Results To improve knowledge-guided gene ranking, we propose a novel method called coordinative component analysis (COCA) in this paper. COCA explicitly captures those genes within a specific biological context that are likely to be expressed in a coordinative manner. Formulated as an optimization problem to maximize the coordinative effort, COCA is designed to first extract the coordinative components based on a partial guidance from knowledge genes and then rank the genes according to their participation strengths. An embedded bootstrapping procedure is implemented to improve statistical robustness of the solutions. COCA was initially tested on simulation data and then on published gene expression microarray data to demonstrate its improved performance as compared to traditional statistical methods. Finally, the COCA approach has been applied to stem cell data to identify biologically relevant genes in signaling pathways. As a result, the COCA approach uncovers novel pathway members that may shed light into the pathway deregulation in cancers. Conclusion We have developed a new integrative strategy to combine biological knowledge and microarray data for gene ranking. The method utilizes knowledge genes for a guidance to first extract coordinative components, and then rank the genes according to their contribution related to a network or pathway. The experimental results show that

  5. Bayesian CP Factorization of Incomplete Tensors with Automatic Rank Determination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qibin; Zhang, Liqing; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor factorization of incomplete data is a powerful technique for tensor completion through explicitly capturing the multilinear latent factors. The existing CP algorithms require the tensor rank to be manually specified, however, the determination of tensor rank remains a challenging problem especially for CP rank . In addition, existing approaches do not take into account uncertainty information of latent factors, as well as missing entries. To address these issues, we formulate CP factorization using a hierarchical probabilistic model and employ a fully Bayesian treatment by incorporating a sparsity-inducing prior over multiple latent factors and the appropriate hyperpriors over all hyperparameters, resulting in automatic rank determination. To learn the model, we develop an efficient deterministic Bayesian inference algorithm, which scales linearly with data size. Our method is characterized as a tuning parameter-free approach, which can effectively infer underlying multilinear factors with a low-rank constraint, while also providing predictive distributions over missing entries. Extensive simulations on synthetic data illustrate the intrinsic capability of our method to recover the ground-truth of CP rank and prevent the overfitting problem, even when a large amount of entries are missing. Moreover, the results from real-world applications, including image inpainting and facial image synthesis, demonstrate that our method outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for both tensor factorization and tensor completion in terms of predictive performance. PMID:26353124

  6. A new mutually reinforcing network node and link ranking algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenghua; Dueñas-Osorio, Leonardo; Padgett, Jamie E.

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a novel Normalized Wide network Ranking algorithm (NWRank) that has the advantage of ranking nodes and links of a network simultaneously. This algorithm combines the mutual reinforcement feature of Hypertext Induced Topic Selection (HITS) and the weight normalization feature of PageRank. Relative weights are assigned to links based on the degree of the adjacent neighbors and the Betweenness Centrality instead of assigning the same weight to every link as assumed in PageRank. Numerical experiment results show that NWRank performs consistently better than HITS, PageRank, eigenvector centrality, and edge betweenness from the perspective of network connectivity and approximate network flow, which is also supported by comparisons with the expensive N-1 benchmark removal criteria based on network efficiency. Furthermore, it can avoid some problems, such as the Tightly Knit Community effect, which exists in HITS. NWRank provides a new inexpensive way to rank nodes and links of a network, which has practical applications, particularly to prioritize resource allocation for upgrade of hierarchical and distributed networks, as well as to support decision making in the design of networks, where node and link importance depend on a balance of local and global integrity. PMID:26492958

  7. Detecting determinism with improved sensitivity in time series: Rank-based nonlinear predictability score

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naro, Daniel; Rummel, Christian; Schindler, Kaspar; Andrzejak, Ralph G.

    2014-09-01

    The rank-based nonlinear predictability score was recently introduced as a test for determinism in point processes. We here adapt this measure to time series sampled from time-continuous flows. We use noisy Lorenz signals to compare this approach against a classical amplitude-based nonlinear prediction error. Both measures show an almost identical robustness against Gaussian white noise. In contrast, when the amplitude distribution of the noise has a narrower central peak and heavier tails than the normal distribution, the rank-based nonlinear predictability score outperforms the amplitude-based nonlinear prediction error. For this type of noise, the nonlinear predictability score has a higher sensitivity for deterministic structure in noisy signals. It also yields a higher statistical power in a surrogate test of the null hypothesis of linear stochastic correlated signals. We show the high relevance of this improved performance in an application to electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from epilepsy patients. Here the nonlinear predictability score again appears of higher sensitivity to nonrandomness. Importantly, it yields an improved contrast between signals recorded from brain areas where the first ictal EEG signal changes were detected (focal EEG signals) versus signals recorded from brain areas that were not involved at seizure onset (nonfocal EEG signals).

  8. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  9. Twisted Yangians of small rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Nicolas; Regelskis, Vidas; Wendlandt, Curtis

    2016-04-01

    We study quantized enveloping algebras called twisted Yangians associated with the symmetric pairs of types CI, BDI, and DIII (in Cartan's classification) when the rank is small. We establish isomorphisms between these twisted Yangians and the well known Olshanskii's twisted Yangians of types AI and AII, and also with the Molev-Ragoucy reflection algebras associated with symmetric pairs of type AIII. We also construct isomorphisms with twisted Yangians in Drinfeld's original presentation.

  10. State Online College Job Market: Ranking the States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony; Jayasundera, Tamara; Repnikov, Dmitri; Gulish, Artem

    2015-01-01

    "State Online College Job Market: Ranking the States" analyzes the online college labor market on a state-by-state basis. We examine the geographic distribution of online job ads for college graduates within industries and occupational clusters, and compare the relative strength of the online college labor market across states. We…

  11. The Academic Ranking of World Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Nian Cai; Cheng, Ying

    2005-01-01

    Shanghai Jiao Tong University has published on the Internet an Academic Ranking of World Universities that has attracted worldwide attention. Institutions are ranked according to academic or research performance and ranking indicators include major international awards, highly cited researchers in important fields, articles published in selected…

  12. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  13. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  14. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  15. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  16. Class Rank Weighs Down True Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The process of determining class rank does not help students achieve more or reach higher levels of proficiency. Evidence indicates ranking students may diminish students' motivation. High school educators argue that they are compelled to rank-order graduating students because selective colleges and universities require information about…

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis of Marketing Journal Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Michelle D.; Lewis, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to offer a comprehensive assessment of journal standings in Marketing from two perspectives. The discipline perspective of rankings is obtained from a collection of published journal ranking studies during the past 15 years. The studies in the published ranking stream are assessed for reliability by examining internal…

  18. Ranking Geochemical Energy Availability in Hydrothermal Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M. E.; Shock, E. L.; Meyer-Dombard, D.; Amend, J. P.

    2004-12-01

    The energy available to hyperthermophilic microorganisms in hot springs can be theoretically estimated using thermodynamic calculations based on geochemical measurements. The relative abundance of different geochemical energy sources (the "ranking" of these reactions) in particular hot springs may provide one explanation for the differences in hot spring microbial communities and also facilitate the culture of ecologically-relevant microorganisms. Geochemical sampling of seven Yellowstone National Park hot springs was repeated five times from 1999 to 2004 with the intent to compare the geochemistry and geochemical energy available to microorganisms. These seven hot springs were located in three separate regions of Yellowstone National Park: three hot springs, including Obsidian Pool, were sampled in the Mud Volcano area; two in the Sylvan Springs area (Gibbon Meadows); and one each in Imperial Meadows and Sentinel Meadows (Lower Geyser Basin). The hot springs were 75 to 93° C (with one 65° C exception) and spanned the bulk of the pH range at Yellowstone (pH 1.8 to 7.6). Geochemical measurements made on hot springs included redox-active species containing C, N, O, H, S, and Fe; these species were measured by field spectrophotometry and ion chromatography of fluid samples and gas chromatographic analysis of gas samples. From these measurements chemical affinities were calculated for 179 inorganic reactions which encompass the suite of autotrophic energy sources potentially available in each pool. Composite affinities for each reaction were compiled for each of the seven primary pools. The composite for each pool was assembled from repeat measurements from the primary pool as well as nearby pools with similar geochemistry. Calculations show that over half of these inorganic reactions could provide enough energy for a microorganism to survive, based on the threshold value of energy required by {it E. coli} (20 kJ per mole of electron pairs). Some microorganisms

  19. Cross ranking of cities and regions: population versus income

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueti, Roy; Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the inner economical structure of communities and their population distribution through a rank-rank analysis of official data, along statistical physics ideas within two techniques. The data is taken on Italian cities. The analysis is performed both at a global (national) and at a more local (regional) level in order to distinguish ‘macro’ and ‘micro’ aspects. First, the rank-size rule is found not to be a standard power law, as in many other studies, but a doubly decreasing power law. Next, the Kendall τ and the Spearman ρ rank correlation coefficients which measure pair concordance and the correlation between fluctuations in two rankings, respectively,—as a correlation function does in thermodynamics, are calculated for finding rank correlation (if any) between demography and wealth. Results show non only global disparities for the whole (country) set, but also (regional) disparities, when comparing the number of cities in regions, the number of inhabitants in cities and that in regions, as well as when comparing the aggregated tax income of the cities and that of regions. Different outliers are pointed out and justified. Interestingly, two classes of cities in the country and two classes of regions in the country are found. ‘Common sense’ social, political, and economic considerations sustain the findings. More importantly, the methods show that they allow to distinguish communities, very clearly, when specific criteria are numerically sound. A specific modeling for the findings is presented, i.e. for the doubly decreasing power law and the two phase system, based on statistics theory, e.g. urn filling. The model ideas can be expected to hold when similar rank relationship features are observed in fields. It is emphasized that the analysis makes more sense than one through a Pearson Π value-value correlation analysis

  20. FTA Basic Event & Cut Set Ranking.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-05-04

    Version 00 IMPORTANCE computes various measures of probabilistic importance of basic events and minimal cut sets to a fault tree or reliability network diagram. The minimal cut sets, the failure rates and the fault duration times (i.e., the repair times) of all basic events contained in the minimal cut sets are supplied as input data. The failure and repair distributions are assumed to be exponential. IMPORTANCE, a quantitative evaluation code, then determines the probability ofmore » the top event and computes the importance of minimal cut sets and basic events by a numerical ranking. Two measures are computed. The first describes system behavior at one point in time; the second describes sequences of failures that cause the system to fail in time. All measures are computed assuming statistical independence of basic events. In addition, system unavailability and expected number of system failures are computed by the code.« less

  1. An Extended Class of Matched Pairs Tests Based on Powers of Ranks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Paul W., Jr.; Berry, Kenneth J.

    1976-01-01

    A large class of rank tests which includes the "sign test" and Wilcoxon signed-ranks test is described. These distribution free tests provide a basis for testing various research hypotheses. Exact small sample and approximate large sample procedures are considered. Applications are presented including numerical examples. (Author/HG)

  2. Teaching Gateways and Bridges To Rank Broadcast Messages for Educational Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losee, Robert M., Jr.

    Messages entering an educational information distribution network may be ranked for an ordered introduction into the network to maximize the timeliness of message arrivals over the set of users. Electronic mail, EDI documents, and broadcast news may be ranked by the users who choose to examine those messages of interest or benefit to themselves.…

  3. Network Selection: A Method for Ranked Lists Selection

    PubMed Central

    Figini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding the set of rankings that best represents a given group of orderings on the same collection of elements (preference lists). This problem arises from social choice and voting theory, in which each voter gives a preference on a set of alternatives, and a system outputs a single preference order based on the observed voters’ preferences. In this paper, we observe that, if the given set of preference lists is not homogeneous, a unique true underling ranking might not exist. Moreover only the lists that share the highest amount of information should be aggregated, and thus multiple rankings might provide a more feasible solution to the problem. In this light, we propose Network Selection, an algorithm that, given a heterogeneous group of rankings, first discovers the different communities of homogeneous rankings and then combines only the rank orderings belonging to the same community into a single final ordering. Our novel approach is inspired by graph theory; indeed our set of lists can be loosely read as the nodes of a network. As a consequence, only the lists populating the same community in the network would then be aggregated. In order to highlight the strength of our proposal, we show an application both on simulated and on two real datasets, namely a financial and a biological dataset. Experimental results on simulated data show that Network Selection can significantly outperform existing related methods. The other way around, the empirical evidence achieved on real financial data reveals that Network Selection is also able to select the most relevant variables in data mining predictive models, providing a clear superiority in terms of predictive power of the models built. Furthermore, we show the potentiality of our proposal in the bioinformatics field, providing an application to a biological microarray dataset. PMID:22937075

  4. Impact of Doximity Residency Rankings on Emergency Medicine Applicant Rank Lists

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, William J.; Hopson, Laura R.; Khandelwal, Sorabh; White, Melissa; Gallahue, Fiona E.; Burkhardt, John; Rolston, Aimee M.; Santen, Sally A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study investigates the impact of the Doximity rankings on the rank list choices made by residency applicants in emergency medicine (EM). Methods We sent an 11-item survey by email to all students who applied to EM residency programs at four different institutions representing diverse geographical regions. Students were asked questions about their perception of Doximity rankings and how it may have impacted their rank list decisions. Results Response rate was 58% of 1,372 opened electronic surveys. This study found that a majority of medical students applying to residency in EM were aware of the Doximity rankings prior to submitting rank lists (67%). One-quarter of these applicants changed the number of programs and ranks of those programs when completing their rank list based on the Doximity rankings (26%). Though the absolute number of programs changed on the rank lists was small, the results demonstrate that the EM Doximity rankings impact applicant decision-making in ranking residency programs. Conclusion While applicants do not find the Doximity rankings to be important compared to other factors in the application process, the Doximity rankings result in a small change in residency applicant ranking behavior. This unvalidated ranking, based principally on reputational data rather than objective outcome criteria, thus has the potential to be detrimental to students, programs, and the public. We feel it important for specialties to develop consensus around measurable training outcomes and provide freely accessible metrics for candidate education. PMID:27330670

  5. Relations Among Some Low-Rank Subspace Recovery Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyang; Lin, Zhouchen; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Junbin

    2015-09-01

    Recovering intrinsic low-dimensional subspaces from data distributed on them is a key preprocessing step to many applications. In recent years, a lot of work has modeled subspace recovery as low-rank minimization problems. We find that some representative models, such as robust principal component analysis (R-PCA), robust low-rank representation (R-LRR), and robust latent low-rank representation (R-LatLRR), are actually deeply connected. More specifically, we discover that once a solution to one of the models is obtained, we can obtain the solutions to other models in closed-form formulations. Since R-PCA is the simplest, our discovery makes it the center of low-rank subspace recovery models. Our work has two important implications. First, R-PCA has a solid theoretical foundation. Under certain conditions, we could find globally optimal solutions to these low-rank models at an overwhelming probability, although these models are nonconvex. Second, we can obtain significantly faster algorithms for these models by solving R-PCA first. The computation cost can be further cut by applying low-complexity randomized algorithms, for example, our novel l2,1 filtering algorithm, to R-PCA. Although for the moment the formal proof of our l2,1 filtering algorithm is not yet available, experiments verify the advantages of our algorithm over other state-of-the-art methods based on the alternating direction method. PMID:26161818

  6. Sparse Contextual Activation for Efficient Visual Re-Ranking.

    PubMed

    Bai, Song; Bai, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an extremely efficient algorithm for visual re-ranking. By considering the original pairwise distance in the contextual space, we develop a feature vector called sparse contextual activation (SCA) that encodes the local distribution of an image. Hence, re-ranking task can be simply accomplished by vector comparison under the generalized Jaccard metric, which has its theoretical meaning in the fuzzy set theory. In order to improve the time efficiency of re-ranking procedure, inverted index is successfully introduced to speed up the computation of generalized Jaccard metric. As a result, the average time cost of re-ranking for a certain query can be controlled within 1 ms. Furthermore, inspired by query expansion, we also develop an additional method called local consistency enhancement on the proposed SCA to improve the retrieval performance in an unsupervised manner. On the other hand, the retrieval performance using a single feature may not be satisfactory enough, which inspires us to fuse multiple complementary features for accurate retrieval. Based on SCA, a robust feature fusion algorithm is exploited that also preserves the characteristic of high time efficiency. We assess our proposed method in various visual re-ranking tasks. Experimental results on Princeton shape benchmark (3D object), WM-SRHEC07 (3D competition), YAEL data set B (face), MPEG-7 data set (shape), and Ukbench data set (image) manifest the effectiveness and efficiency of SCA. PMID:26742133

  7. Large-scale linear rankSVM.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Pei; Lin, Chih-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Linear rankSVM is one of the widely used methods for learning to rank. Although its performance may be inferior to nonlinear methods such as kernel rankSVM and gradient boosting decision trees, linear rankSVM is useful to quickly produce a baseline model. Furthermore, following its recent development for classification, linear rankSVM may give competitive performance for large and sparse data. A great deal of works have studied linear rankSVM. The focus is on the computational efficiency when the number of preference pairs is large. In this letter, we systematically study existing works, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and propose an efficient algorithm. We discuss different implementation issues and extensions with detailed experiments. Finally, we develop a robust linear rankSVM tool for public use. PMID:24479776

  8. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  9. VisualRank: applying PageRank to large-scale image search.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yushi; Baluja, Shumeet

    2008-11-01

    Because of the relative ease in understanding and processing text, commercial image-search systems often rely on techniques that are largely indistinguishable from text-search. Recently, academic studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of employing image-based features to provide alternative or additional signals. However, it remains uncertain whether such techniques will generalize to a large number of popular web queries, and whether the potential improvement to search quality warrants the additional computational cost. In this work, we cast the image-ranking problem into the task of identifying "authority" nodes on an inferred visual similarity graph and propose VisualRank to analyze the visual link structures among images. The images found to be "authorities" are chosen as those that answer the image-queries well. To understand the performance of such an approach in a real system, we conducted a series of large-scale experiments based on the task of retrieving images for 2000 of the most popular products queries. Our experimental results show significant improvement, in terms of user satisfaction and relevancy, in comparison to the most recent Google Image Search results. Maintaining modest computational cost is vital to ensuring that this procedure can be used in practice; we describe the techniques required to make this system practical for large scale deployment in commercial search engines. PMID:18787237

  10. Distribution and prognostic relevance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoints in human brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Patrick N.; Bernatz, Simon; Scholz, Alexander; Zeiner, Pia S.; Zinke, Jenny; Kiyose, Makoto; Blasel, Stella; Beschorner, Rudi; Senft, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W.; Wikman, Harriet; Glatzel, Markus; Meinhardt, Matthias; Juratli, Tareq A.; Steinbach, Joachim P.; Plate, Karl H.; Wischhusen, Jörg; Weide, Benjamin; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The activation of immune cells by targeting checkpoint inhibitors showed promising results with increased patient survival in distinct primary cancers. Since only limited data exist for human brain metastases, we aimed at characterizing tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and expression of immune checkpoints in the respective tumors. Two brain metastases cohorts, a mixed entity cohort (n = 252) and a breast carcinoma validation cohort (n = 96) were analyzed for CD3+, CD8+, FOXP3+, PD-1+ lymphocytes and PD-L1+ tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. Analyses for association with clinico-epidemiological and neuroradiological parameters such as patient survival or tumor size were performed. TILs infiltrated brain metastases in three different patterns (stromal, peritumoral, diffuse). While carcinomas often show a strong stromal infiltration, TILs in melanomas often diffusely infiltrate the tumors. Highest levels of CD3+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were seen in renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and strongest PD-1 levels on RCCs and melanomas. High amounts of TILs, high ratios of PD-1+/CD8+ cells and high levels of PD-L1 were negatively correlated with brain metastases size, indicating that in smaller brain metastases CD8+ immune response might get blocked. PD-L1 expression strongly correlated with TILs and FOXP3 expression. No significant association of patient survival with TILs was observed, while high levels of PD-L1 showed a strong trend towards better survival in melanoma brain metastases (Log-Rank p = 0.0537). In summary, melanomas and RCCs seem to be the most immunogenic entities. Differences in immunotherapeutic response between tumor entities regarding brain metastases might be attributable to this finding and need further investigation in larger patient cohorts. PMID:26517811

  11. A Spatial Overlay Ranking Method for a Geospatial Search of Text Objects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanfear, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Earth-science researchers need the capability to find relevant information by location and topic. Conventional geographic techniques that simply check whether polygons intersect can efficiently achieve a high recall on location, but can not achieve precision for ranking results in likely order of importance to the reader. A spatial overlay ranking based upon how well an object's footprint matches the search area provides a more effective way to spatially search a collection of reports, and avoids many of the problems associated with an 'in/out' (True/False) boolean search. Moreover, spatial overlay ranking appears to work well even when spatial extent is defined only by a simple bounding box.

  12. Decision Tree Modeling for Ranking Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Philip L. H.; Wan, Wai Ming; Lee, Paul H.

    Ranking/preference data arises from many applications in marketing, psychology, and politics. We establish a new decision tree model for the analysis of ranking data by adopting the concept of classification and regression tree. The existing splitting criteria are modified in a way that allows them to precisely measure the impurity of a set of ranking data. Two types of impurity measures for ranking data are introduced, namelyg-wise and top-k measures. Theoretical results show that the new measures exhibit properties of impurity functions. In model assessment, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is applied to evaluate the tree performance. Experiments are carried out to investigate the predictive performance of the tree model for complete and partially ranked data and promising results are obtained. Finally, a real-world application of the proposed methodology to analyze a set of political rankings data is presented.

  13. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:24083315

  14. Email user ranking based on email networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Quang Anh; Vu, Minh Tuan; Frater, Michael; Jiang, Frank

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, four spam-filtering approaches based on the mail networks: Clustering, Extended Clustering Coefficient, PageRank Algorithm and Weighted PageRank Algorithm are analyzed. We also propose a couple of fully worked-out datasets against which the experimental comparisons with the respect to the accuracy of email user ranking and spam filtering are conducted. The results indicate that PageRank algorithm and Extended Clustering Coefficient approaches are better than others. The rate of true detection is over 99.5% while the failed alarm remains below 0.5%.

  15. Ranking chemicals based on chronic toxicity data.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, C T; Stara, J F; Durkin, P R

    1985-12-01

    During the past 3 years, EPA's ECAO/Cincinnati has developed a method to rank chemicals based on chronic toxicity data. This ranking system reflects two primary attributes of every chemical: the minimum effective dose and the type of effect elicited at that dose. The purpose for developing this chronic toxicity ranking system was to provide the EPA with the technical background required to adjust the RQs of hazardous substances designated in Section 101(14) of CERCLA or "Superfund." This approach may have applications to other areas of interest to the EPA and other regulatory agencies where ranking of chemicals based on chronic toxicity is desired. PMID:3843499

  16. Sulfur and phosphorus distribution between liquid iron and magnesia-saturated slag in molecular hydrogen/water atmosphere relevant to a novel green ironmaking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohassab Ahmed, Mohassab Yousef

    As an integral part of a research project which aimed to develop a novel green ironmaking process, an experimental determination of the sulfur and phosphorus distribution ratios, LS and LP, respectively, between molten iron and CaO-MgO(Saturated)-SiO2-Al 3O3-FeO slag was determined in the temperature range 1550-1650°C. Oxygen partial pressure was controlled by H2/H2O equilibrium in the range of 10-10-10-8 atm. For sulfur distribution, it was found that the trend of the distribution is the same as the previous work done under CO/CO2 atmosphere but LS in this case is 38-44 times less under similar oxygen partial pressure. This might be attributed to the impact of H2 on the distribution. Considering the fact that the input sulfur in the proposed process is approximately 34 times less than the blast furnace process, the proposed process would produce hot metal with approximately the same sulfur content to the hot metal produced by the blast furnace. For phosphorus distribution, LP was 450-1050 times that of the blast furnace. Also considering the amount of phosphorus input in the two processes, it was found that the expected P content in iron in the new process would be approximately three times less than in the blast furnace hot metal. This means that the proposed process will produce hot metal with much lower phosphorus which will minimize the need for dephosphorization in the steelmaking stage.

  17. Ranking Slope Stability in Frozen Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S.; Dinwiddie, C. L.; Walter, G. R.; Necsoiu, M.

    2011-12-01

    Motivated by the need to assess the risk of permafrost thaw to infrastructure, such as roads, bridges, and pipelines, a landscape-scale approach was developed to rank the risk of slope failures and thermokarst development in areas of seasonally frozen soils underlain by permafrost. The approach has two parts: (i) identifying locations where permafrost thaw is likely to occur under future climates, and (ii) identifying areas where thaw would have consequences with respect to a disturbance. The developed screening tool uses (i) land classification maps developed from remotely sensed data and (ii) a thermohydrologic hazard risk assessment to identify areas susceptible to slope instability under current and future climate states. The screening tool combines a numerical ground thawing and freezing dynamics model for calculating the thickness of the active layer and depth of permafrost with a simple slope stability model that is based upon the Level I Stability Analysis (LISA) approach of Harrell et al. (1992). Instead of using the numerical models directly within probabilistic sampling, a response function for the factor of safety in slope stability is developed from numerical simulations that systematically vary input parameters across their range of applicability. The response function is used within Monte Carlo sampling for each grid cell in a landscape model, with a probability distribution for each input parameter assigned to each grid cell based on (i) classes defined for each grid cell; (ii) a digital elevation model; (iii) empirical, mathematical, and numerical interpretive models; and (iv) probabilistic descriptions of the parameters in the interpretive models. For example, the root cohesion distribution is defined by vegetation class, with vegetation spread across the landscape using Landsat-derived vegetation classification maps. The probability of slope failure is the fraction of parameter realizations that result in a factor of safety less than 1. Ranking

  18. The evaluation ranking scale: clarification of methodological and procedural issues.

    PubMed

    Attkisson, C C; Roberts, R E; Pascoe, G C

    1983-01-01

    Compared with CSQ-8, a typical questionnaire approach to assessing global patient satisfaction, the Evaluation Ranking Scale (ERS) had equally good patient acceptability, yielded more normally distributed satisfaction scores, and results allowed comparative information about patients' evaluation of specific service dimensions. The study also addressed key questions that have emerged about the ERS procedure. Patients apparently do not distinguish conceptually between "importance" of dimensions and "satisfaction" with dimensions in the first phase (ranking) of the ERS. Results did confirm that the ERS sequence of ranking and then rating the dimensions is essential to achieving optimal utility of results. The ranking task seems to have an organizing effect on patients' approach to the rating task. This effect does not work to dictate results in the rating phase but rather seems to familiarize patients with the dimensions to be rated thereby yielding greater potential discriminative capacity for the ERS. Finally, results indicate that the ERS can be administered in a flexible fashion that yields additional information about the absolute importance of the six dimensions without loss of desired operating characteristics for the measure. PMID:10267262

  19. MedlineRanker: flexible ranking of biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Barbosa-Silva, Adriano; Schaefer, Martin; Huska, Matthew R; Muro, Enrique M; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2009-07-01

    The biomedical literature is represented by millions of abstracts available in the Medline database. These abstracts can be queried with the PubMed interface, which provides a keyword-based Boolean search engine. This approach shows limitations in the retrieval of abstracts related to very specific topics, as it is difficult for a non-expert user to find all of the most relevant keywords related to a biomedical topic. Additionally, when searching for more general topics, the same approach may return hundreds of unranked references. To address these issues, text mining tools have been developed to help scientists focus on relevant abstracts. We have implemented the MedlineRanker webserver, which allows a flexible ranking of Medline for a topic of interest without expert knowledge. Given some abstracts related to a topic, the program deduces automatically the most discriminative words in comparison to a random selection. These words are used to score other abstracts, including those from not yet annotated recent publications, which can be then ranked by relevance. We show that our tool can be highly accurate and that it is able to process millions of abstracts in a practical amount of time. MedlineRanker is free for use and is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/tools/medlineranker. PMID:19429696

  20. MedlineRanker: flexible ranking of biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Barbosa-Silva, Adriano; Schaefer, Martin; Huska, Matthew R.; Muro, Enrique M.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    The biomedical literature is represented by millions of abstracts available in the Medline database. These abstracts can be queried with the PubMed interface, which provides a keyword-based Boolean search engine. This approach shows limitations in the retrieval of abstracts related to very specific topics, as it is difficult for a non-expert user to find all of the most relevant keywords related to a biomedical topic. Additionally, when searching for more general topics, the same approach may return hundreds of unranked references. To address these issues, text mining tools have been developed to help scientists focus on relevant abstracts. We have implemented the MedlineRanker webserver, which allows a flexible ranking of Medline for a topic of interest without expert knowledge. Given some abstracts related to a topic, the program deduces automatically the most discriminative words in comparison to a random selection. These words are used to score other abstracts, including those from not yet annotated recent publications, which can be then ranked by relevance. We show that our tool can be highly accurate and that it is able to process millions of abstracts in a practical amount of time. MedlineRanker is free for use and is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/tools/medlineranker. PMID:19429696

  1. Citation analysis in journal rankings: medical informatics in the library and information science literature.

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanatham, R

    1998-01-01

    Medical informatics is an interdisciplinary field. Medical informatics articles will be found in the literature of various disciplines including library and information science publications. The purpose of this study was to provide an objectively ranked list of journals that publish medical informatics articles relevant to library and information science. Library Literature, Library and Information Science Abstracts, and Social Science Citation Index were used to identify articles published on the topic of medical informatics and to identify a ranked list of journals. This study also used citation analysis to identify the most frequently cited journals relevant to library and information science. PMID:9803294

  2. EXAMINING SOCIOECONOMIC HEALTH DISPARITIES USING A RANK-DEPENDENT RÉNYI INDEX

    PubMed Central

    Talih, Makram

    2015-01-01

    The Rényi index (RI) is a one-parameter class of indices that summarize health disparities among population groups by measuring divergence between the distributions of disease burden and population shares of these groups. The rank-dependent RI introduced in this paper is a two-parameter class of health disparity indices that also accounts for the association between socioeconomic rank and health; it may be derived from a rank-dependent social welfare function. Two competing classes are discussed and the rank-dependent RI is shown to be more robust to changes in the distribution of either socioeconomic rank or health. The standard error and sampling distribution of the rank-dependent RI are evaluated using linearization and re-sampling techniques, and the methodology is illustrated using health survey data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and registry data from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program. Such data underlie many population-based objectives within the U.S. Healthy People 2020 initiative. The rank-dependent RI provides a unified mathematical framework for eliciting various societal positions with regards to the policies that are tied to such wide-reaching public health initiatives. For example, if population groups with lower socioeconomic position were ascertained to be more likely to utilize costly public programs, then the parameters of the RI could be selected to reflect prioritizing those population groups for intervention or treatment. PMID:26566419

  3. A Different Approach to University Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tofallis, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Educationalists are well able to find fault with rankings on numerous grounds and may reject them outright. However, given that they are here to stay, we could also try to improve them wherever possible. All currently published university rankings combine various measures to produce an overall score using an additive approach. The individual…

  4. Rankings and the Global Reputation Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazelkorn, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This chapter delves into the growing influence and impact of rankings on higher education, as a lens through which to view how the race for reputation and status is changing the higher education landscape, both globally and nationally. The author considers the extent to which rankings are driving policy choices and institutional decisions and the…

  5. College Rankings: History, Criticism and Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Luke; Robe, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Today, college quality rankings in news magazines and guidebooks are a big business with tangible impacts on the operation of higher education institutions. The college rankings published annually by "U.S. News and World Report" ("U.S. News") are so influential that Don Hossler of Indiana University derisively claims that higher education is the…

  6. Mining Feedback in Ranking and Recommendation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Ziming

    2009-01-01

    The amount of online information has grown exponentially over the past few decades, and users become more and more dependent on ranking and recommendation systems to address their information seeking needs. The advance in information technologies has enabled users to provide feedback on the utilities of the underlying ranking and recommendation…

  7. A Ranking Method for Evaluating Constructed Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparative judgment approach for holistically scored constructed response tasks. In this approach, the grader rank orders (rather than rate) the quality of a small set of responses. A prior automated evaluation of responses guides both set formation and scaling of rankings. Sets are formed to have similar prior scores and…

  8. Public Perception of Cancer Survival Rankings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Scherr, Courtney L.; Brown, Natasha; Jones, Christina; Christy, Katheryn

    2013-01-01

    Past research has observed that certain subgroups (e.g., individuals who are overweight/obese) have inaccurate estimates of survival rates for particular cancers (e.g., colon cancer). However, no study has examined whether the lay public can accurately rank cancer survival rates in comparison with one another (i.e., rank cancers from most deadly…

  9. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2014-10-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected.

  10. A Rational Method for Ranking Engineering Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glower, Donald D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares two methods for ranking academic programs, the opinion poll v examination of career successes of the program's alumni. For the latter, "Who's Who in Engineering" and levels of research funding provided data. Tables display resulting data and compare rankings by the two methods for chemical engineering and civil engineering. (CS)

  11. The Rankings Game: Who's Playing Whom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burness, John F.

    2008-01-01

    This summer, Forbes magazine published its new rankings of "America's Best Colleges," implying that it had developed a methodology that would give the public the information that it needed to choose a college wisely. "U.S. News & World Report," which in 1983 published the first annual ranking, just announced its latest ratings last week--including…

  12. Ranking scientific publications: the effect of nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Liyang; Wei, Tian; Zeng, An; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-01-01

    Ranking the significance of scientific publications is a long-standing challenge. The network-based analysis is a natural and common approach for evaluating the scientific credit of papers. Although the number of citations has been widely used as a metric to rank papers, recently some iterative processes such as the well-known PageRank algorithm have been applied to the citation networks to address this problem. In this paper, we introduce nonlinearity to the PageRank algorithm when aggregating resources from different nodes to further enhance the effect of important papers. The validation of our method is performed on the data of American Physical Society (APS) journals. The results indicate that the nonlinearity improves the performance of the PageRank algorithm in terms of ranking effectiveness, as well as robustness against malicious manipulations. Although the nonlinearity analysis is based on the PageRank algorithm, it can be easily extended to other iterative ranking algorithms and similar improvements are expected. PMID:25322852

  13. Poisson statistics of PageRank probabilities of Twitter and Wikipedia networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2014-04-01

    We use the methods of quantum chaos and Random Matrix Theory for analysis of statistical fluctuations of PageRank probabilities in directed networks. In this approach the effective energy levels are given by a logarithm of PageRank probability at a given node. After the standard energy level unfolding procedure we establish that the nearest spacing distribution of PageRank probabilities is described by the Poisson law typical for integrable quantum systems. Our studies are done for the Twitter network and three networks of Wikipedia editions in English, French and German. We argue that due to absence of level repulsion the PageRank order of nearby nodes can be easily interchanged. The obtained Poisson law implies that the nearby PageRank probabilities fluctuate as random independent variables.

  14. Tan's Epsilon-Determinant and Ranks of Matrices over Semirings

    PubMed Central

    Mohindru, Preeti; Pereira, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    We use the ϵ-determinant introduced by Ya-Jia Tan to define a family of ranks of matrices over certain semirings. We show that these ranks generalize some known rank functions over semirings such as the determinantal rank. We also show that this family of ranks satisfies the rank-sum and Sylvester inequalities. We classify all bijective linear maps which preserve these ranks.

  15. A Ranking Approach to Genomic Selection

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Mathieu; Onogi, Akio; Iwata, Hiroyoshi; Ueda, Naonori

    2015-01-01

    Background Genomic selection (GS) is a recent selective breeding method which uses predictive models based on whole-genome molecular markers. Until now, existing studies formulated GS as the problem of modeling an individual’s breeding value for a particular trait of interest, i.e., as a regression problem. To assess predictive accuracy of the model, the Pearson correlation between observed and predicted trait values was used. Contributions In this paper, we propose to formulate GS as the problem of ranking individuals according to their breeding value. Our proposed framework allows us to employ machine learning methods for ranking which had previously not been considered in the GS literature. To assess ranking accuracy of a model, we introduce a new measure originating from the information retrieval literature called normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG). NDCG rewards more strongly models which assign a high rank to individuals with high breeding value. Therefore, NDCG reflects a prerequisite objective in selective breeding: accurate selection of individuals with high breeding value. Results We conducted a comparison of 10 existing regression methods and 3 new ranking methods on 6 datasets, consisting of 4 plant species and 25 traits. Our experimental results suggest that tree-based ensemble methods including McRank, Random Forests and Gradient Boosting Regression Trees achieve excellent ranking accuracy. RKHS regression and RankSVM also achieve good accuracy when used with an RBF kernel. Traditional regression methods such as Bayesian lasso, wBSR and BayesC were found less suitable for ranking. Pearson correlation was found to correlate poorly with NDCG. Our study suggests two important messages. First, ranking methods are a promising research direction in GS. Second, NDCG can be a useful evaluation measure for GS. PMID:26068103

  16. Physiological relevance of cell-specific distribution patterns of CFTR, NKCC1, NBCe1, and NHE3 along the crypt-villus axis in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Robert L.; Collaco, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the cell-specific subcellular expression patterns for sodium- and potassium-coupled chloride (NaK2Cl) cotransporter 1 (NKCC1), Na+ bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) to understand the functional plasticity and synchronization of ion transport functions along the crypt-villus axis and its relevance to intestinal disease. In the unstimulated intestine, all small intestinal villus enterocytes coexpressed apical CFTR and NHE3, basolateral NBCe1, and mostly intracellular NKCC1. All (crypt and villus) goblet cells strongly expressed basolateral NKCC1 (at approximately three-fold higher levels than villus enterocytes), but no CFTR, NBCe1, or NHE3. Lower crypt cells coexpressed apical CFTR and basolateral NKCC1, but no NHE3 or NBCe1 (except NBCe1-expressing proximal colonic crypts). CFTR, NBCe1, and NKCC1 colocalized with markers of early and recycling endosomes, implicating endocytic recycling in cell-specific anion transport. Brunner's glands of the proximal duodenum coexpressed high levels of apical/subapical CFTR and basolateral NKCC1, but very low levels of NBCe1, consistent with secretion of Cl−-enriched fluid into the crypt. The cholinergic agonist carbachol rapidly (within 10 min) reduced cell volume along the entire crypt/villus axis and promoted NHE3 internalization into early endosomes. In contrast, carbachol induced membrane recruitment of NKCC1 and CFTR in all crypt and villus enterocytes, NKCC1 in all goblet cells, and NBCe1 in all villus enterocytes. These observations support regulated vesicle traffic in Cl− secretion by goblet cells and Cl− and HCO3− secretion by villus enterocytes during the transient phase of cholinergic stimulation. Overall, the carbachol-induced membrane trafficking profile of the four ion transporters supports functional plasticity of the small intestinal villus epithelium that enables it to conduct both absorptive and

  17. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  18. Size-dependent distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments and its relevance to the migration of radiocesium in river systems after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Iwatani, Hokuto; Sakaguchi, Aya; Fan, Qiaohui; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the particle size distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Riverbed sediments were collected in the Abukuma River system in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures. The collected sediments were separated into 11 fractions, ranging from granular size (>2000 μm) to clay size (<2 μm) fractions. Cesium-137 concentrations were higher in the smaller particle size fractions, possibly reflecting specific surface areas and the mineralogy, in particular the clay mineral content. A gap in (137)Cs concentration was observed between the silt size and sand size fractions of riverbed sediments at downstream sites, whereas riverbed sediments at an upstream site did not show such a concentration gap. It is likely that selective transport of small particles in suspended state from upstream areas resulted in an accumulation of radiocesium in downstream areas. PMID:24874435

  19. Boosting Pose Ranking Performance via Rescoring with MM-GBSA.

    PubMed

    Greenidge, Paulette A; Lewis, Richard A; Ertl, Peter

    2016-09-01

    In this self-docking study, we address the so-called scoring problem. The 'scoring problem' is the inability to unambiguously identify biologically the most relevant pose, when the docking score is the main selection criterion. We use the Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area and ChemPLP scoring functions to assess the structure reproduction performance. Heavy-atom root-mean-squared deviation values are used to compare the docked poses with the crystallographic ones. 'Partial matching' is introduced. This algorithm captures the visual observation that the majority of a ligand can be well docked, but yet report a root-mean-squared deviation value of >2.0 Å. Often this is attributable to arbitrary placements of flexible side chains in undefined solvent regions. The metrics introduced by this algorithm are applicable for assessing the contribution of ligand sampling to the scoring problem. It is shown that rescoring ChemPLP poses with the Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area scoring function improves pose ranking by better discriminating against non-cognate-like poses. We conclude that poses should not be retained solely on their ranks, but on the score difference relative to the best-ranked pose. PMID:27061970

  20. Statistically efficient tomography of low rank states with incomplete measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Anirudh; Kypraios, Theodore; Guţă, Mădălin

    2016-04-01

    The construction of physically relevant low dimensional state models, and the design of appropriate measurements are key issues in tackling quantum state tomography for large dimensional systems. We consider the statistical problem of estimating low rank states in the set-up of multiple ions tomography, and investigate how the estimation error behaves with a reduction in the number of measurement settings, compared with the standard ion tomography setup. We present extensive simulation results showing that the error is robust with respect to the choice of states of a given rank, the random selection of settings, and that the number of settings can be significantly reduced with only a negligible increase in error. We present an argument to explain these findings based on a concentration inequality for the Fisher information matrix. In the more general setup of random basis measurements we use this argument to show that for certain rank r states it suffices to measure in O(r{log}d) bases to achieve the average Fisher information over all bases. We present numerical evidence for random states of up to eight atoms, which suggests that a similar behaviour holds in the case of Pauli bases measurements, for randomly chosen states. The relation to similar problems in compressed sensing is also discussed.

  1. Optimizing Search and Ranking in Folksonomy Systems by Exploiting Context Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Fabian; Henze, Nicola; Krause, Daniel

    Tagging systems enable users to annotate resources with freely chosen keywords. The evolving bunch of tag assignments is called folksonomy and there exist already some approaches that exploit folksonomies to improve resource retrieval. In this paper, we analyze and compare graph-based ranking algorithms: FolkRank and SocialPageRank. We enhance these algorithms by exploiting the context of tags, and evaluate the results on the GroupMe! dataset. In GroupMe!, users can organize and maintain arbitrary Web resources in self-defined groups. When users annotate resources in GroupMe!, this can be interpreted in context of a certain group. The grouping activity itself is easy for users to perform. However, it delivers valuable semantic information about resources and their context. We present GRank that uses the context information to improve and optimize the detection of relevant search results, and compare different strategies for ranking result lists in folksonomy systems.

  2. Ranking Adverse Drug Reactions With Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Assaf; Hoehndorf, Robert; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no publicly available resource that provides the relative severity of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Such a resource would be useful for several applications, including assessment of the risks and benefits of drugs and improvement of patient-centered care. It could also be used to triage predictions of drug adverse events. Objective The intent of the study was to rank ADRs according to severity. Methods We used Internet-based crowdsourcing to rank ADRs according to severity. We assigned 126,512 pairwise comparisons of ADRs to 2589 Amazon Mechanical Turk workers and used these comparisons to rank order 2929 ADRs. Results There is good correlation (rho=.53) between the mortality rates associated with ADRs and their rank. Our ranking highlights severe drug-ADR predictions, such as cardiovascular ADRs for raloxifene and celecoxib. It also triages genes associated with severe ADRs such as epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), associated with glioblastoma multiforme, and SCN1A, associated with epilepsy. Conclusions ADR ranking lays a first stepping stone in personalized drug risk assessment. Ranking of ADRs using crowdsourcing may have useful clinical and financial implications, and should be further investigated in the context of health care decision making. PMID:25800813

  3. Physicochemical water quality of the Mfoundi River watershed at Yaoundé, Cameroon, and its relevance to the distribution of bacterial indicators of faecal contamination.

    PubMed

    Djuikom, E; Jugnia, L B; Nola, M; Foto, S; Sikati, V

    2009-01-01

    Water quality of the Mfoundi River and four of its tributaries was studied by assessing some physicochemical variables (temperature, pH, conductivity, chlorides, phosphates and nitrogen ammonia, dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide, organic matter content and Biological Oxygen Demand) and their influence on the distribution of bacterial indicators of faecal contamination (total coliform, faecal coliform and faecal streptococci). For this, standard methods for the examination of physicochemical parameters in water were followed, and statistical analysis (Pearson correlations) used to establish any relationships between physicochemical and biological variables. Our results revealed that almost all of the examined physicochemical variables exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for recreational water. This was in agreement with a previous microbiological study indicating that these waters were not safe for human use or primary contact according to water quality standards established by the WHO. Results of our correlation analysis suggested that physicochemical and biological variables interact in complicated ways reflecting the complex processes occurring in the natural environment. It was also concluded that pollution in the Mfoundi River watershed poses an increased risk of infection for users and there exists an urgent need to control dumping of wastewater into this watershed. PMID:19934505

  4. Augmenting the Deliberative Method for Ranking Risks.

    PubMed

    Susel, Irving; Lasley, Trace; Montezemolo, Mark; Piper, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) characterized and prioritized the physical cross-border threats and hazards to the nation stemming from terrorism, market-driven illicit flows of people and goods (illegal immigration, narcotics, funds, counterfeits, and weaponry), and other nonmarket concerns (movement of diseases, pests, and invasive species). These threats and hazards pose a wide diversity of consequences with very different combinations of magnitudes and likelihoods, making it very challenging to prioritize them. This article presents the approach that was used at DHS to arrive at a consensus regarding the threats and hazards that stand out from the rest based on the overall risk they pose. Due to time constraints for the decision analysis, it was not feasible to apply multiattribute methodologies like multiattribute utility theory or the analytic hierarchy process. Using a holistic approach was considered, such as the deliberative method for ranking risks first published in this journal. However, an ordinal ranking alone does not indicate relative or absolute magnitude differences among the risks. Therefore, the use of the deliberative method for ranking risks is not sufficient for deciding whether there is a material difference between the top-ranked and bottom-ranked risks, let alone deciding what the stand-out risks are. To address this limitation of ordinal rankings, the deliberative method for ranking risks was augmented by adding an additional step to transform the ordinal ranking into a ratio scale ranking. This additional step enabled the selection of stand-out risks to help prioritize further analysis. PMID:26224206

  5. DebtRank-transparency: Controlling systemic risk in financial networks

    PubMed Central

    Thurner, Stefan; Poledna, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Nodes in a financial network, such as banks, cannot assess the true risks associated with lending to other nodes in the network, unless they have full information on the riskiness of all other nodes. These risks can be estimated by using network metrics (as DebtRank) of the interbank liability network. With a simple agent based model we show that systemic risk in financial networks can be drastically reduced by increasing transparency, i.e. making the DebtRank of individual banks visible to others, and by imposing a rule, that reduces interbank borrowing from systemically risky nodes. This scheme does not reduce the efficiency of the financial network, but fosters a more homogeneous risk-distribution within the system in a self-organized critical way. The reduction of systemic risk is due to a massive reduction of cascading failures in the transparent system. A regulation-policy implementation of the proposed scheme is discussed. PMID:23712454

  6. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 3. Technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Technologies applicable to the development and use of low-rank coals are analyzed in order to identify specific needs for research, development, and demonstration (RD and D). Major sections of the report address the following technologies: extraction; transportation; preparation, handling and storage; conventional combustion and environmental control technology; gasification; liquefaction; and pyrolysis. Each of these sections contains an introduction and summary of the key issues with regard to subbituminous coal and lignite; description of all relevant technology, both existing and under development; a description of related environmental control technology; an evaluation of the effects of low-rank coal properties on the technology; and summaries of current commercial status of the technology and/or current RD and D projects relevant to low-rank coals.

  7. Rasch analysis of rank-ordered data.

    PubMed

    Linacre, John M

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of several methods for the construction of linear measures from rank-ordered data are presented. The final partial-rankings of 356 professional golfers participating in 47 stroke-play tournaments are used for illustration. The methods include decomposing the rankings into independent paired comparisons without ties, into dependent paired comparisons without ties and into independent paired comparisons with ties. A further method, which is easier to implement, entails modeling each tournament as a partial-credit item in which the rank of each golfer is treated as the observation of a category on a partial-credit rating scale. For the golf data, the partial-credit method yields measures with greater face validity than the paired comparison methods. The methods are implemented with the computer programs FACETS and WINSTEPS. PMID:16385155

  8. Quantum navigation and ranking in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo; Duch, Jordi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zueco, David

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are formal frameworks capturing the interdependencies between the elements of large systems and databases. This formalism allows to use network navigation methods to rank the importance that each constituent has on the global organization of the system. A key example is Pagerank navigation which is at the core of the most used search engine of the World Wide Web. Inspired in this classical algorithm, we define a quantum navigation method providing a unique ranking of the elements of a network. We analyze the convergence of quantum navigation to the stationary rank of networks and show that quantumness decreases the number of navigation steps before convergence. In addition, we show that quantum navigation allows to solve degeneracies found in classical ranks. By implementing the quantum algorithm in real networks, we confirm these improvements and show that quantum coherence unveils new hierarchical features about the global organization of complex systems. PMID:22930671

  9. Quantum Navigation and Ranking in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Burillo, Eduardo; Duch, Jordi; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Zueco, David

    2012-01-01

    Complex networks are formal frameworks capturing the interdependencies between the elements of large systems and databases. This formalism allows to use network navigation methods to rank the importance that each constituent has on the global organization of the system. A key example is Pagerank navigation which is at the core of the most used search engine of the World Wide Web. Inspired in this classical algorithm, we define a quantum navigation method providing a unique ranking of the elements of a network. We analyze the convergence of quantum navigation to the stationary rank of networks and show that quantumness decreases the number of navigation steps before convergence. In addition, we show that quantum navigation allows to solve degeneracies found in classical ranks. By implementing the quantum algorithm in real networks, we confirm these improvements and show that quantum coherence unveils new hierarchical features about the global organization of complex systems. PMID:22930671

  10. Low-rank coal oil agglomeration

    DOEpatents

    Knudson, Curtis L.; Timpe, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.