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Sample records for distribution apparent mass

  1. Apparent mass of seated man—First determination with a soft seat and dynamic seat pressure distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Barbara; Rützel, Sebastian; Blüthner, Ralph; Menzel, Gerhard; Wölfel, Horst Peter; Seidel, Helmut

    2006-12-01

    Data of the impedance and/or the apparent mass of the sitting human body during the exposure to whole-body vibration in z-direction using rigid seats were standardized in the ISO 5982. These data are available as target functions for model developments. Models developed on this data basis should also apply to driver seats with a soft seat and backrest cushion, although the qualitative different contact conditions were neglected. Due to insufficient technical prerequisites, the determination of forces at the interface between subject and soft seat was impossible until very recently. Results of studies during static conditions showed clear differences in the pressure distributions between the rigid and the soft contact areas. In this experimental study pressure distributions on a seat cushion were measured during whole-body vibration in z-direction (random signal in the frequency range between 0.3 and 20 Hz, vibration magnitudes 0.25, 0.8, and 1.6 m s -2 unweighted root mean square measured at the seat base) with a sampling rate of 32 m s. The apparent masses were calculated by the forces derived from the pressure distributions and accelerations measured at one point of the seat cushion near the buttocks. The moduli of the apparent masses derived for the soft seat were clearly lower than those determined for a rigid seat. These apparent masses showed a similar dependence on the vibration magnitude as the apparent mass functions derived in the usual way for rigid seats. Factors that could explain differences between the apparent mass functions derived for the soft and rigid seat were discussed and evaluated. The data of this study indicate the possibility and necessity to consider the contact conditions at the interface when deriving target functions for the model development. Recommendations for technical improvements and further experimental studies with driver seats were derived.

  2. On the Bartnik mass of apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantoulidis, Christos; Schoen, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we characterize the intrinsic geometry of apparent horizons (outermost marginally outer trapped surfaces) in asymptotically flat spacetimes; that is, the Riemannian metrics on the two sphere which can arise. Furthermore we determine the minimal ADM mass of a spacetime containing such an apparent horizon. The results are conveniently formulated in terms of the quasi-local mass introduced by Bartnik (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 2346-8). The Hawking mass provides a lower bound for Bartnik’s quasilocal mass on apparent horizons by way of Penrose’s conjecture on time symmetric slices, proven in 1997 by Huisken and Ilmanen (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 353-437) and in full generality in 1999 by Bray (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 177-267). We compute Bartnik’s mass for all non-degenerate apparent horizons and show that it coincides with the Hawking mass. As a corollary we disprove a conjecture due to Gibbons in the spirit of Thorne’s hoop conjecture (Gibbons 2009 arXiv:0903.1580), and construct a new large class of examples of apparent horizons with the integral of the negative part of the Gauss curvature arbitrarily large.

  3. Theoretical Pressure Distribution, Apparent Mass, and Moment of Inertia of a Disk Pendulum Oscillating at Low Frequency. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., Washington, D. C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Equations are developed which give the pressure profile, the forces and torques on a disk pendulum by means of point source wave theory from acoustics. The pressure, force and torque equations for an unbaffled disk are developed. These equations are then used to calculate the apparent mass and apparent inertia for the pendulum.

  4. Mass density at geostationary orbit and apparent mass refilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, R. E.; Takahashi, Kazue; Amoh, Justice; Singer, H. J.

    2016-04-01

    We used the inferred equatorial mass density ρm,eq based on measurements of Alfvén wave frequencies measured by the GOES satellites during 1980-1991 in order to construct a number of different models of varying complexity for the equatorial mass density at geostationary orbit. The most complicated models are able to account for 66% of the variance with a typical variation from actual values of a factor of 1.56. The factors that influenced ρm,eq in the models were, in order of decreasing importance, the F10.7 EUV index, magnetic local time, the solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn, the phase of the year, and the solar wind BZ (GSM Z direction). During some intervals, some of which were especially geomagnetically quiet, ρm,eq rose to values that were significantly higher than those predicted by our models. For 10 especially quiet intervals, we examined long-term (>1 day) apparent refilling, the increase in ρm,eq at a fixed location. We found that the behavior of ρm,eq varies for different events. In some cases, there is significant apparent refilling, whereas in other cases ρm,eq stays the same or even decreases slightly. Nevertheless, we showed that on average, ρm,eq increases exponentially during quiet intervals. There is variation of apparent refilling with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. On the third day of apparent refilling, ρm,eq has on average a similar value at solar maximum or solar minimum, but at solar maximum, ρm,eq begins with a larger value and rises relatively less than at solar minimum.

  5. Apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass of standing subjects during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    2006-05-01

    The effects of posture and vibration magnitude on the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the standing human body during exposure to vertical vibration have been investigated. Twelve male subjects were exposed to random vertical vibration over the frequency range 2.0-20 Hz at three vibration magnitudes: 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 m s -2 rms. Subjects stood in five different postures: upright, lordotic, anterior lean, knees bent and knees more bent. The vertical acceleration at the floor and the forces in the vertical and fore-and-aft directions at the floor were used to obtain the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass. The resonance frequency of the apparent mass was significantly reduced with knees bent and knees more bent postures, but there were only minor effects on the resonance frequency by changing the position of the upper body. Considerable cross-axis apparent mass, up to about 30% of the static mass of subjects, was found. The cross-axis apparent mass was influenced by all postural changes used in the study. In all postures the resonance frequencies of the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass tended to decrease with increasing vibration magnitude. This nonlinear characteristic tended to be less clear in some postures in which subjects increased muscle tension.

  6. The horizontal apparent mass of the standing human body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    2011-06-01

    The driving-point dynamic responses of standing people (e.g. their mechanical impedance or apparent mass) influence their dynamic interactions with structures on which they are supported. The apparent mass of the standing body has been reported previously for vertical excitation but not for lateral or fore-and-aft excitation. Twelve standing male subjects were exposed to fore-and-aft and lateral random vibration over the frequency range 0.1-5.0 Hz for 180 s at four vibration magnitudes: 0.016, 0.0315, 0.063, and 0.125 m s -2 rms. With lateral excitation at 0.063 m s -2 rms, subjects also stood with three separations of the feet. The dynamic forces measured at the driving-point in each of the three translational axes (i.e. fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical) showed components not linearly related to the input vibration, and not seen in previous studies with standing subjects exposed to vertical vibration or seated subjects exposed to vertical or horizontal vibration. A principal peak in the lateral apparent mass around 0.5 Hz tended to decrease in both frequency and magnitude with increasing magnitude of vibration and increase with increasing separation of the feet. The fore-and-aft apparent mass appeared to peak at a frequency lower than the lowest frequency used in the study.

  7. General theory for apparent energy distribution of sea waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ke-Jian; Sun, Fu

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a general theory for the apparent energy distribution of sea waves. Using the joint distribution of wave periods and heights proposed earlier by the second author, the authors define the generalized apparent energy distribution and derive the analytical form of the so called generalized outer frequency spectrum or nth-order frequency spectrum. Some possible relationships between it and the Fourier frequency spectrum are discussed. It is shown that the widely used Bretschneider spectrum can be easily obtained from the above definition and that generalized outer frequency spectrum has equilibrium range with exponent -( n+3) whose upper limit is -3.

  8. A model of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The apparent mass of the human body reflects gross movements caused by whole-body vibration and can be used to predict the influence of body dynamics on seat transmissibility. With vertical excitation, various models fit the measured vertical apparent mass of the human body, but experiments also show high fore-and-aft forces on the seat (the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass) that have not influenced current models. This paper defines a model that predicts the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the seated human body during vertical excitation. A three degree-of-freedom model with vertical, fore-and-aft and rotational (i.e. pitch) degrees of freedom has been developed with twelve model parameters (representing inertia, stiffness, damping, and geometry) optimised to the measured vertical apparent mass and the measured fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the body. The model provides close fits to the moduli and phases for both median data and the responses of 12 individual subjects. The optimum model parameters found by fitting to the median apparent mass of 12 subjects were similar to the medians of the same parameters found by fitting to the individual apparent masses of the same 12 subjects. The model suggests the seated human body undergoes fore-and-aft motion on a seat when exposed to vertical excitation, with the primary resonance frequency of the apparent mass arising from vertical motion of the body. According to the model, changes in the vertical, fore-and-aft, or rotational degree of freedom have an effect on the resonance in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass.

  9. Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Effect of seat backrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2009-11-01

    The transmission of vibration through a seat depends on various characteristics of the seat and the dynamic response of the human body. The dynamic response of the body can be represented by its apparent mass, but the effect of the seat on the apparent mass of the body is not well understood. This study was designed to quantify the effect of foam and rigid backrests on the vertical apparent mass of the human measured at the seat surface supporting the body. The apparent masses of 12 subjects were measured during exposure to random vertical vibration (1.0 ms -2 rms from 0.125 to 40 Hz) in a seat with a rigid backrest, in the same rigid seat with three thicknesses of foam backrest (50, 100 and 150 mm), and in the same seat with no backrest. The backrests were inclined at various angles: 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25° and 30° for the rigid and 100 mm foam backrests, and 0°, 10°, 20° and 30° for the 50 and 150 mm foam backrests. With all vertical backrests (i.e., 0° inclination), there were resonances in the apparent mass of the body around 5 and 10 Hz. With no backrest, the apparent mass was increased at frequencies less than the resonance frequency but decreased at frequencies between 8 and 20 Hz, relative to the apparent mass with the vertical rigid and foam backrests. With the rigid backrest, the primary resonance frequencies in the apparent mass increased with increasing backrest inclination. With the foam backrests, the resonance frequencies decreased with increasing backrest inclination. At frequencies less than the primary resonance, the apparent mass decreased with increasing backrest inclination, particularly with the rigid backrest. Between 8 and 15 Hz, the apparent mass decreased with increasing inclination, most notably with the foam backrests. At inclinations less than 30°, there was little effect of foam thickness on the apparent mass, but at 30° an increase in the thickness of the foam decreased the frequency of the first resonances. Since

  10. Observational bias and the apparent distribution of ponds on Eros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, James H.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Kahn, Eliezer G.; Prockter, Louise M.

    2014-10-01

    Over 300 “ponds” have been identified on 433 Eros: smooth deposits that sharply embay the bounding depressions in which they lie. The known ponds are largely concentrated near the equator at the ends of the long axis of the asteroid. Here, we examine the pixel scale of images available at the pond locations, and compare the observed distribution of ponds on Eros to that of the image pixel scale. We find that the majority (60%) of ponds are found in the regions covered by images with pixel scales less than 2 m/px, a total of only 13% of the surface area. The correlation between pond density and image pixel scale suggests a significant observational bias in the identification of small ponds. These findings suggest that the distribution of ponds on Eros may not be as clear-cut as previously reported, and that it may be best not to use this distribution to assess existing models regarding their formation of these landforms.

  11. Comparison of the apparent masses and cross-axis apparent masses of seated humans exposed to single- and dual-axis whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Neil J.; Maeda, Setsuo

    2006-12-01

    Humans are exposed to whole-body vibration in many types of environment. In almost all cases, the vibration to which the human is exposed comprises multi-axis vibration, such that vibration occurs in all directions simultaneously. Despite the complex nature of vibration to which humans are exposed in the workplace, almost all laboratory studies investigating the biomechanical response of the person have been completed using single-axis simulators. This paper presents a study whereby 15 male subjects were exposed to single-axis whole-body vibration in the x-, y- and z-directions and dual-axis vibration in the xy-, xz-, and yz-directions using a 6 degree-of-freedom vibration simulator. All vibration magnitudes were 0.4 ms -2 rms in each axis. Acceleration and force was measured in the x-, y-, and z-direction during all trials. Subjects sat in two postures ('back-on' and 'back-off') on a flat rigid seat. Apparent masses measured using single-axis and dual-axis vibration stimuli showed comparable results; similarly, cross-axis apparent masses (i.e. the ratio of the force in one direction to the acceleration in another direction) were almost identical for the single- and dual-axis vibration stimuli. All results were in agreement with data previously published using single-axis vibration. In most cases, the peaks in the apparent mass and the cross-axis apparent mass occurred at a slightly lower frequency for the dual-axis vibration than for the single-axis vibration. It is hypothesised that this change is due to a nonlinear effect, analogous to that which occurs with increasing vibration magnitude for single-axis vibration.

  12. Apparent unitarity violation in high mass region of MbW from a "hidden" top partner at high energy colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chengcheng; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-09-01

    Perturbative unitarity conditions have been playing an important role in estimating the energy scale of new physics, including the Higgs mass as the most important example. In this letter, we show that there is a possibility to see the hint of a new physics (top quark partner) indirectly by observing an "apparent" unitarity violation in the distribution of invariant mass of b-jet and W-boson (Mbw) well above the mass of a top quark in a process of a heavy resonance decaying into a pair of top quarks.

  13. Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Inter-subject variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, Martin G. R.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-02-01

    The biodynamic responses of the seated human body to whole-body vibration vary considerably between people, but the reasons for the variability are not well understood. This study was designed to determine how the physical characteristics of people affect their apparent mass and whether inter-subject variability is influenced by the magnitude of vibration and the support of a seat backrest. The vertical apparent masses of 80 seated adults (41 males and 39 females aged 18-65) were measured at frequencies between 0.6 and 20 Hz with four backrest conditions (no backrest, upright rigid backrest, reclined rigid backrest, reclined foam backrest) and with three magnitudes of random vibration (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m s -2 rms). Relationships between subject physical characteristics (age, gender, weight, and anthropometry) and subject apparent mass were investigated with multiple regression models. The strongest predictor of the modulus of the vertical apparent mass at 0.6 Hz, at resonance, and at 12 Hz was body weight, with other factors having only a marginal effect. After correction for other variables, the principal resonance frequency was most consistently associated with age and body mass index. As age increased from 18 to 65 years, the resonance frequency increased by up to 1.7 Hz, and when the body mass index was increased from 18 to 34 kg m -2 the resonance frequency decreased by up to 1.7 Hz. These changes were greater than the 0.9-Hz increase in resonance frequency between sitting without a backrest and sitting with a reclined rigid backrest, and greater than the 1.0-Hz reduction in resonance frequency when the magnitude of vibration increased from 0.5 to 1.5 m s -2 rms. It is concluded that the effects of age, body mass index, posture, vibration magnitude, and weight should be taken into account when defining the vertical apparent mass of the seated human body.

  14. The neutron star mass distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kiziltan, Bülent; Kottas, Athanasios; De Yoreo, Maria; Thorsett, Stephen E.

    2013-11-20

    In recent years, the number of pulsars with secure mass measurements has increased to a level that allows us to probe the underlying neutron star (NS) mass distribution in detail. We critically review the radio pulsar mass measurements. For the first time, we are able to analyze a sizable population of NSs with a flexible modeling approach that can effectively accommodate a skewed underlying distribution and asymmetric measurement errors. We find that NSs that have evolved through different evolutionary paths reflect distinctive signatures through dissimilar distribution peak and mass cutoff values. NSs in double NS and NS-white dwarf (WD) systems show consistent respective peaks at 1.33 M {sub ☉} and 1.55 M {sub ☉}, suggesting significant mass accretion (Δm ≈ 0.22 M {sub ☉}) has occurred during the spin-up phase. The width of the mass distribution implied by double NS systems is indicative of a tight initial mass function while the inferred mass range is significantly wider for NSs that have gone through recycling. We find a mass cutoff at ∼2.1 M {sub ☉} for NSs with WD companions, which establishes a firm lower bound for the maximum NS mass. This rules out the majority of strange quark and soft equation of state models as viable configurations for NS matter. The lack of truncation close to the maximum mass cutoff along with the skewed nature of the inferred mass distribution both enforce the suggestion that the 2.1 M {sub ☉} limit is set by evolutionary constraints rather than nuclear physics or general relativity, and the existence of rare supermassive NSs is possible.

  15. Seated Occupant Apparent Mass Characteristics Under Automotive Postures and Vertical Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAKHEJA, S.; HARU, I.; BOILEAU, P.-É.

    2002-05-01

    The biodynamic apparent mass response characteristics of 24 human subjects (12 males and 12 females) seated under representative automotive postures with hands-in-lap (passengers) and hands-on-steering wheel (drivers) are reported. The measurements were carried out under white noise vertical excitations of 0·25, 0·5 and 1·0m/s2r.m.s. acceleration magnitudes in the 0·5-40Hz frequency range and a track measured input (1·07m/s2). The measured data have been analyzed to study the effects of hands position, body mass, magnitude and type of vibration excitation, and feet position, on the biodynamic response expressed in terms of apparent mass. A comparison of the measured response of subjects assuming typical automotive postures involving inclined cushion, inclined backrest and full use of backrest support with data determined under different postural conditions and excitation levels revealed considerable differences. The biodynamic response of automobile occupants seated with hands in lap, peaks in the 6·5-8·6Hz frequency range, which is considerably higher than the reported range of fundamental frequencies (4·5-5Hz) in most other studies involving different experimental conditions. The peak magnitude tends to decrease considerably for the driving posture with hands-on-steering wheel, while a second peak in the 8-12 Hz range becomes more apparent for this posture. The results suggest that biodynamic response of occupants seated in automotive seats and subject to vertical vibration need to be characterized, as a minimum, by two distinct functions for passenger and driving postures. A higher body mass, in general, yields higher peak magnitude response and lower corresponding frequency for both postures. The strong dependence of the response on the body mass is further demonstrated by grouping the measured data into four different mass ranges: less than 60 kg, between 60·5 and 70 kg, between 70·5 and 80 kg, and above 80 kg. From the results, it is concluded that

  16. Apparent plasticity in functional traits determining competitive ability and spatial distribution: a case from desert

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jiang-Bo; Xu, Gui-Qing; Jenerette, G. Darrel; Bai, Yong-fei; Wang, Zhong-Yuan; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Species competitive abilities and their distributions are closely related to functional traits such as biomass allocation patterns. When we consider how nutrient supply affects competitive abilities, quantifying the apparent and true plasticity in functional traits is important because the allometric relationships among traits are universal in plants. We propose to integrate the notion of allometry and the classical reaction norm into a composite theoretical framework that quantifies the apparent and true plasticity. Combining the framework with a meta-analysis, a series of field surveys and a competition experiment, we aimed to determine the causes of the dune/interdune distribution patterns of two Haloxylon species in the Gurbantonggut Desert. We found that (1) the biomass allocation patterns of both Haloxylon species in responses to environmental conditions were apparent rather than true plasticity and (2) the allometric allocation patterns affected the plants’ competition for soil nutrient supply. A key implication of our results is that the apparent plasticity in functional traits of plants determines their response to environmental change. Without identifying the apparent and true plasticity, we would substantially overestimate the magnitude, duration and even the direction of plant responses in functional traits to climate change. PMID:26190745

  17. Time Varying Apparent Volume of Distribution and Drug Half-Lives Following Intravenous Bolus Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Carl A.; Wesolowski, Michal J.; Babyn, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a model that generalizes the apparent volume of distribution and half-life as functions of time following intravenous bolus injection. This generalized model defines a time varying apparent volume of drug distribution. The half-lives of drug remaining in the body vary in time and become longer as time elapses, eventually converging to the terminal half-life. Two example fit models were substituted into the general model: biexponential models from the least relative concentration error, and gamma variate models using adaptive regularization for least relative error of clearance. Using adult population parameters from 41 studies of the renal glomerular filtration marker 169Yb-DTPA, simulations of extracellular fluid volumes of 5, 10, 15 and 20 litres and plasma clearances of 40 and 100 ml/min were obtained. Of these models, the adaptively obtained gamma variate models had longer times to 95% of terminal volume and longer half-lives. PMID:27403663

  18. Complexation of Arsenite with Dissolved Organic Matter: Conditional Distribution Coefficients and Apparent Stability Constants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The complexation of arsenic (As) with dissolved organic matter (DOM), although playing an important role in regulating As mobility and transformation, is poorly characterized, as evidenced by scarce reporting of fundamental parameters of As-DOM complexes. The complexation of arsenite (AsIII) with Aldrich humic acid (HA) at different pHs was characterized using a recently developed analytical technique to measure both free and DOM-bound As. Conditional distribution coefficient (KD), describing capacity of DOM in binding AsIII from the mass perspective, and apparent stability constant (Ks), describing stability of resulting AsIII-DOM complexes, were calculated to characterize AsIII-DOM complexation. Log KD of AsIII ranged from 3.7 to 2.2 (decreasing with increase of As/DOM ratio) at pH 5.2, from 3.6 to 2.6 at pH 7, and from 4.3 to 3.2 at pH = 9.3, respectively. Two-site ligand binding models can capture the heterogeneity of binding sites and be used to calculate Ks by classifying the binding sites into strong (S1) and weak (S2) groups. Log Ks for S1 sites are 7.0, 6.5, and 5.9 for pH 5.2, 7, and 9.3, respectively, which are approximately 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than for weak S2 sites. The results suggest that AsIII complexation with DOM increases with pH, as evidenced by significant spikes in concentrations of DOM-bound AsIII and in KD values at pH 9.3. In contrary to KD, log Ks decreased with pH, in particular for S1 sites, probably due to the presence of negatively charged H2AsO3− and the involvement of metal-bridged AsIII-DOM complexation at pH 9.3. PMID:20801484

  19. Apparent Susceptibility Contrast Distribution of Continental Lithosphere in China and Its Surroundings: Implications to Regional Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Sun, S.; Zhang, Y.; Liang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Lithospheric magnetic field characterizes response of magnetic properties of rocks, which are mainly dependent on mineral and temperature variations. Hence, lithospheric magnetic structure brings important information to understand tectonic and thermal processes in the crust and uppermost mantle. In particular, the reliable global geomagnetic field models with large-scales based on satellite magnetic measurements provide regional view of the lithospheric magnetic structure. Here, with smallest and flattest constraints we use the inversion method based on the single layer model to calculate the spatial distribution of apparent susceptibility of continental lithosphere in China and its surroundings. It should be noted that: (1) magnetic anomaly data we used has removed the effect of global oceanic remanent magnetization, (2) the error of magnetic anomaly data is estimated from statistical analysis among MF7, GRIMM_L120, CHAOS5 and CM5 models, (3) the magnetic layer is bounded by the bottom of sediment and the Moho from CRUST1.0 model and is discretized into ellipsoidal prisms with equal angles in latitude and longitude, and (4) an adaptive subdivision & Gauss-Legendre quadrature with fixed order is adopted to solve the forward problem and IGRF11 is utilized as inducing field model. Since the missing longest wavelength components in the lithospheric magnetic field models and the so-called magnetic annihilators, the Apparent Susceptibility Contrast (ASC) distribution is obtained. The ASC distribution has obvious variations and illustrates the mosaic continent with old blocks, orogenic belts, rework fragments and also earthquake regions/zones. Moreover, the ASC distribution provides new insights and evidences of the destruction of North China Craton and geodynamic processes of Tibetan plateau and Baikal rift etc. This study is supported by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No.: 2015M572217) and Natural Science Fund of Hubei Province (Grant No.: 2015CFB361).

  20. Cryptic organisation within an apparently irregular rostrocaudal distribution of interneurons in the embryonic zebrafish spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Simon; Conran, John G.; Tamme, Richard; Gaudin, Arnaud; Webb, Jonathan; Lardelli, Michael

    2010-11-15

    The molecules and mechanisms involved in patterning the dorsoventral axis of the developing vertebrate spinal cord have been investigated extensively and many are well known. Conversely, knowledge of mechanisms patterning cellular distributions along the rostrocaudal axis is relatively more restricted. Much is known about the rostrocaudal distribution of motoneurons and spinal cord cells derived from neural crest but there is little known about the rostrocaudal patterning of most of the other spinal cord neurons. Here we report data from our analyses of the distribution of dorsal longitudinal ascending (DoLA) interneurons in the developing zebrafish spinal cord. We show that, although apparently distributed irregularly, these cells have cryptic organisation. We present a novel cell-labelling technique that reveals that DoLA interneurons migrate rostrally along the dorsal longitudinal fasciculus of the spinal cord during development. This cell-labelling strategy may be useful for in vivo analysis of factors controlling neuron migration in the central nervous system. Additionally, we show that DoLA interneurons persist in the developing spinal cord for longer than previously reported. These findings illustrate the need to investigate factors and mechanisms that determine 'irregular' patterns of cell distribution, particularly in the central nervous system but also in other tissues of developing embryos.

  1. Apparent power-law distributions in animal movements can arise from intraspecific interactions

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Greg A.; Severns, Paul M.; Edwards, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Lévy flights have gained prominence for analysis of animal movement. In a Lévy flight, step-lengths are drawn from a heavy-tailed distribution such as a power law (PL), and a large number of empirical demonstrations have been published. Others, however, have suggested that animal movement is ill fit by PL distributions or contend a state-switching process better explains apparent Lévy flight movement patterns. We used a mix of direct behavioural observations and GPS tracking to understand step-length patterns in females of two related butterflies. We initially found movement in one species (Euphydryas editha taylori) was best fit by a bounded PL, evidence of a Lévy flight, while the other (Euphydryas phaeton) was best fit by an exponential distribution. Subsequent analyses introduced additional candidate models and used behavioural observations to sort steps based on intraspecific interactions (interactions were rare in E. phaeton but common in E. e. taylori). These analyses showed a mixed-exponential is favoured over the bounded PL for E. e. taylori and that when step-lengths were sorted into states based on the influence of harassing conspecific males, both states were best fit by simple exponential distributions. The direct behavioural observations allowed us to infer the underlying behavioural mechanism is a state-switching process driven by intraspecific interactions rather than a Lévy flight. PMID:25519992

  2. Distribution of CD4 Lymphocyte Cells Among Apparently Healthy HIV Seropositive and Seronegative Populations

    PubMed Central

    Abubakar, Abdulazeez A

    2012-01-01

    Background: CD4 lymphocyte cells are often used as prognostic markers for monitoring the progression of immunosupression such as HIV infection. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the distribution of CD4 lymphocytes among apparently healthy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative and seropositive populations in a Nigerian state. Materials and Methods: A total of 1520 apparently healthy subjects aged 18–64 years, composed of 800 males and 720 females attending some selected health institutions in the state, participated in the study. Ten milliliters of blood was collected from each subject; 5 ml of this was used for HIV antibodies sero-typing while the remaining 5 ml was anticoagulated and used for CD4 lymphocytes level determination. Only samples tested positive both with Capillus and Determine HIV test kits were further differentiated into sero-types with a standard diagnostic HIV test kit. The CD4 lymphocyte levels of all the sample were determined; mean CD4 levels of 205.1±0.09 and 287.4±0.3 cells/μl were recorded among females seropositives and seronagatives respectively. Statistical analysis by the Student t-test showed a significant difference in the mean CD4 lymphocyte count by gender. Results: Findings showed a mean CD4 level of 311.7±1.2 cells/μl among seropositive males while 399.3±0.6 cells/μl was recorded among seronegatives (t=5.86). The study also recorded a CD4 lymphocyte range of 232–464 cells/μl among apparently healthy seronegative population in this locality. Conclusion: The findings showed a significantly higher mean CD4 lymphocyte count among adult male HIV seronegatives (χ2=9.22) and seropositives (χ2=15.07) than their female counterparts. Further research work using the automation technique is suggested to confirm this new range for monitoring HIV subjects on antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22454823

  3. Relationship between measured apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses of seated occupants exposed to vertical vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Rakheja, S.; Boileau, P.-É.

    2008-07-01

    The "to-the-body" and "through-the-body" biodynamic response functions of the seated human body exposed to vertical vibration are measured and analyzed in an attempt to identify relationships between the apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility measures. The experiments involved 12 male subjects exposed to three magnitudes of whole-body vertical random vibration (0.25,0.5,1.0 m/s 2 rms acceleration) in the 0.5-15 Hz frequency range, and seated with three back support conditions (none, vertical and inclined), and two different hands positions (hands in lap and hands on the steering wheel). The vertical apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility responses were acquired during the experiments, where the head acceleration was measured using a light and adjustable helmet-strap mounted accelerometer. The results showed that both the measured responses show good agreements in the primary resonances, irrespective of the back support condition, while considerable differences between the normalized apparent mass and seat-to-head transmissibility could be seen in the secondary resonance range for the two back supported postures. The seat-to-head transmissibility responses are further shown to be relatively sensitive to back supported postures compared with that of apparent mass responses. Relatively stronger effects of hands position were observed on the seat-to-head transmissibility responses compared with the apparent mass responses under back supported conditions. From the results, it is further concluded that seat-to-head transmissibility emphasizes the biodynamic response in the vicinity of the secondary resonance compared to the apparent mass. The seat-to-head transmissibility measure is thus considered to be more appropriate for describing seated body response to higher frequency vibration.

  4. Apparent mass of seated men—Determination with single- and multi-axis excitations at different magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinz, Barbara; Blüthner, Ralph; Menzel, Gerhard; Rützel, Sebastian; Seidel, Helmut; Wölfel, Horst Peter

    2006-12-01

    Apparent mass data describing the biodynamic responses of the human body during whole-body vibration in vertical direction using rigid seats has often been published and standardized. Such data has been used as a target function for developing models. At present there is no adequate database for the apparent mass during whole-body vibration in horizontal direction and in more than one vibration axis. Experiments and subsequent data analysis can be used to improve the database for modelling. An experimental study was performed with 13 male subjects sitting on a rigid seat without backrest, and with a hand resting on a support. They were exposed to random whole-body vibration with root-mean square (rms) values of about 0.25, 1.0 and 2.0 m s -2 in vertical, fore-and-aft, and lateral direction, and additionally in two horizontal vibration axes and all three vibration axes simultaneously. The forces and accelerations were measured in x-, y-, and z-directions for each condition tested. With an increase of the vibration magnitude in the three directions measured, the apparent mass functions shifted to lower frequencies. At the same vibration magnitude, the apparent mass functions shifted to the lower frequencies with an increasing number of vibration axes. The effects of the factors vibration magnitude and number of axes on the apparent mass curves were tested. The method of the modal description was applied to all individual apparent mass functions in order to obtain representative target functions. Recommendations for the revision of ISO 5982 were summarized.

  5. Are We Predicting the Actual or Apparent Distribution of Temperate Marine Fishes?

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Jacquomo; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Harvey, Euan; Rattray, Alex; Versace, Vincent L.

    2012-01-01

    Planning for resilience is the focus of many marine conservation programs and initiatives. These efforts aim to inform conservation strategies for marine regions to ensure they have inbuilt capacity to retain biological diversity and ecological function in the face of global environmental change – particularly changes in climate and resource exploitation. In the absence of direct biological and ecological information for many marine species, scientists are increasingly using spatially-explicit, predictive-modeling approaches. Through the improved access to multibeam sonar and underwater video technology these models provide spatial predictions of the most suitable regions for an organism at resolutions previously not possible. However, sensible-looking, well-performing models can provide very different predictions of distribution depending on which occurrence dataset is used. To examine this, we construct species distribution models for nine temperate marine sedentary fishes for a 25.7 km2 study region off the coast of southeastern Australia. We use generalized linear model (GLM), generalized additive model (GAM) and maximum entropy (MAXENT) to build models based on co-located occurrence datasets derived from two underwater video methods (i.e. baited and towed video) and fine-scale multibeam sonar based seafloor habitat variables. Overall, this study found that the choice of modeling approach did not considerably influence the prediction of distributions based on the same occurrence dataset. However, greater dissimilarity between model predictions was observed across the nine fish taxa when the two occurrence datasets were compared (relative to models based on the same dataset). Based on these results it is difficult to draw any general trends in regards to which video method provides more reliable occurrence datasets. Nonetheless, we suggest predictions reflecting the species apparent distribution (i.e. a combination of species distribution and the probability

  6. Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Effect of a footrest and a steering wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toward, M. G. R.; Griffin, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    The apparent mass of the seated human body influences the vibration transmitted through a car seat. The apparent mass of the body is known to be influenced by sitting posture but the influence of the position of the hands and the feet is not well understood. This study was designed to quantify the influence of steering wheel location and the position of a footrest on the vertical apparent mass of the human body. The influences of the forces applied by the hands to a steering wheel and by the feet to a footrest were also investigated. Twelve subjects were exposed to whole-body vertical random vibration (1.0 m s -2 rms over the frequency range 0.13-40.0 Hz) while supported by a rigid seat with a backrest reclined to 15°. The apparent mass of the body was measured with five horizontal positions and three vertical positions of a steering wheel and also with hands in the lap, and with five horizontal positions of a footrest. The influence of five forward forces (0, 50, 100, 150, 200 N) applied separately to the 'steering wheel' and the footrest were also investigated as well as a 'no backrest' condition. With their hands in their laps, subjects exhibited a resonance around 6.7 Hz, compared to 4.8 Hz when sitting upright with no backrest. In the same posture holding a steering wheel, the mass supported on the seat surface decreased and there was an additional resonance at 4 Hz. Moving the steering wheel away from the body reduced the apparent mass at the primary resonance frequency and increased the apparent mass around the 4 Hz resonance. As the feet moved forward, the mass supported on the seat surface decreased, indicating that the backrest and footrest supported a greater proportion of the subject weight. Applying force to either the steering wheel or the footrest reduced the apparent mass at resonance and decreased the mass supported on the seat surface. It is concluded that the positions and contact conditions of the hands and the feet affect the biodynamic

  7. Nonlinearity in apparent mass and transmissibility of the supine human body during vertical whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2009-07-01

    Resonance frequencies evident in the apparent mass and the transmissibility of the human body decrease with increasing vibration magnitude, but the mechanisms responsible for this nonlinearity have not been established. This experiment was designed to explore the effects of body location on the nonlinearity of the body in supine postures. In a group of 12 male subjects, the apparent mass and transmissibility to the sternum, upper abdomen, and lower abdomen were measured in three postures (relaxed semi-supine, flat supine and constrained semi-supine) with vertical random vibration (0.25-20 Hz) at seven vibration magnitudes (nominally 0.0313, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 ms -2 rms). In all three postures, the apparent mass resonance frequencies and the primary peak frequencies in the transmissibilities to the upper and lower abdomen decreased with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.25 to 1.0 ms -2 rms. Nonlinearity generally apparent in transmissibility to the abdomen was less evident in transmissibility to the sternum and less evident in transmissibilities to the abdomen at vibration magnitudes less than 0.125 ms -2 rms. The nonlinearity was more apparent in the flat supine posture than in the semi-supine postures. The findings are consistent with the nonlinearity being associated with the response of soft tissues, more likely a consequence of passive thixotropy than muscle activity.

  8. Global Lithospheric Apparent Susceptibility Distribution Converted from Geomagnetic Models by CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Magnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Xiong, Xiong; Li, Yongdong; Liang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Recently, because of continually accumulated magnetic measurements by CHAMP satellite and Swarm constellation of three satellites and well developed methodologies and techniques of data processing and geomagnetic field modeling etc., global lithospheric magnetic anomaly field models become more and more reliable. This makes the quantitative interpretation of lithospheric magnetic anomaly field possible for having an insight into large-scale magnetic structures in the crust and uppermost mantle. Many different approaches have been utilized to understand the magnetized sources, such as forward, inversion, statistics, correlation analysis, Euler deconvolution, signal transformations etc. Among all quantitative interpretation methods, the directly converting a magnetic anomaly map into a magnetic susceptibility anomaly map proposed by Arkani-Hamed & Strangway (1985) is, we think, the most fast quantitative interpretation tool for global studies. We just call this method AS85 hereinafter for short. Although Gubbins et al. (2011) provided a formula to directly calculate the apparent magnetic vector distribution, the AS85 method introduced constraints of magnetized direction and thus corresponding results are expected to be more robust especially in world-wide continents. Therefore, in this study, we first improved the AS85 method further considering non-axial dipolar inducing field using formulae by Nolte & Siebert (1987), initial model or priori information for starting coefficients in the apparent susceptibility conversion, hidden longest-wavelength components of lithospheric magnetic field and field contaminations from global oceanic remanent magnetization. Then, we used the vertically integrated susceptibility model by Hemant & Maus (2005) and vertically integrated remanent magnetization model by Masterton et al. (2013) to test the validity of our improved method. Subsequently, we applied the conversion method to geomagnetic field models by CHAMP and Swarm satellite

  9. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, Will M.; Sravan, Niharika; Kalogera, Vicky; Cantrell, Andrew; Kreidberg, Laura; Bailyn, Charles D.; Mandel, Ilya E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com E-mail: andrew.cantrell@yale.edu E-mail: charles.bailyn@yale.edu

    2011-11-10

    We perform a Bayesian analysis of the mass distribution of stellar-mass black holes using the observed masses of 15 low-mass X-ray binary systems undergoing Roche lobe overflow and 5 high-mass, wind-fed X-ray binary systems. Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo calculations, we model the mass distribution both parametrically-as a power law, exponential, Gaussian, combination of two Gaussians, or log-normal distribution-and non-parametrically-as histograms with varying numbers of bins. We provide confidence bounds on the shape of the mass distribution in the context of each model and compare the models with each other by calculating their relative Bayesian evidence as supported by the measurements, taking into account the number of degrees of freedom of each model. The mass distribution of the low-mass systems is best fit by a power law, while the distribution of the combined sample is best fit by the exponential model. This difference indicates that the low-mass subsample is not consistent with being drawn from the distribution of the combined population. We examine the existence of a 'gap' between the most massive neutron stars and the least massive black holes by considering the value, M{sub 1%}, of the 1% quantile from each black hole mass distribution as the lower bound of black hole masses. Our analysis generates posterior distributions for M{sub 1%}; the best model (the power law) fitted to the low-mass systems has a distribution of lower bounds with M{sub 1%}>4.3 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence, while the best model (the exponential) fitted to all 20 systems has M{sub 1%}>4.5 M{sub sun} with 90% confidence. We conclude that our sample of black hole masses provides strong evidence of a gap between the maximum neutron star mass and the lower bound on black hole masses. Our results on the low-mass sample are in qualitative agreement with those of Ozel et al., although our broad model selection analysis more reliably reveals the best-fit quantitative description of the

  10. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, James P.

    2013-09-01

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  11. Nonlinearity in the vertical transmissibility of seating: the role of the human body apparent mass and seat dynamic stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufano, Saverio; Griffin, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of a seat in reducing vibration depends on the characteristics of the vibration, the dynamic characteristics of the seat, and the dynamic characteristics of the person sitting on the seat. However, it is not known whether seat cushions influence the dynamic response of the human body, whether the human body influences the dynamic response of seat cushions, or the relative importance of human body nonlinearity and seat nonlinearity in causing nonlinearity in measures of seat transmissibility. This study was designed to investigate the nonlinearity of the coupled seat and human body systems and to compare the apparent mass of the human body supported on rigid and foam seats. A frequency domain model was used to identify the dynamic parameters of seat foams and investigate their dependence on the subject-sitting weight and hip breadth. With 15 subjects, the force and acceleration at the seat base and acceleration at the subject interface were measured during random vertical vibration excitation (0.25-25 Hz) at each of five vibration magnitudes, (0.25-1.6 ms-2 r.m.s.) with four seating conditions (rigid flat seat and three foam cushions). The measurements are presented in terms of the subject's apparent mass on the rigid and foam seat surfaces, and the transmissibility and dynamic stiffness of each of the foam cushions. Both the human body and the foams showed nonlinear softening behaviour, which resulted in nonlinear cushion transmissibility. The apparent masses of subjects sitting on the rigid seat and on foam cushions were similar, but with an apparent increase in damping when sitting on the foams. The foam dynamic stiffness showed complex correlations with characteristics of the human body, which differed between foams. The nonlinearities in cushion transmissibilities, expressed in terms of changes in resonance frequencies and moduli, were more dependent on human body nonlinearity than on cushion nonlinearity.

  12. ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION AND BIRTH MASSES OF NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Oezel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Santos Villarreal, Antonio; Narayan, Ramesh

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the distribution of neutron star masses in different populations of binaries, employing Bayesian statistical techniques. In particular, we explore the differences in neutron star masses between sources that have experienced distinct evolutionary paths and accretion episodes. We find that the distribution of neutron star masses in non-recycled eclipsing high-mass binaries as well as of slow pulsars, which are all believed to be near their birth masses, has a mean of 1.28 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.24 M{sub Sun }. These values are consistent with expectations for neutron star formation in core-collapse supernovae. On the other hand, double neutron stars, which are also believed to be near their birth masses, have a much narrower mass distribution, peaking at 1.33 M{sub Sun }, but with a dispersion of only 0.05 M{sub Sun }. Such a small dispersion cannot easily be understood and perhaps points to a particular and rare formation channel. The mass distribution of neutron stars that have been recycled has a mean of 1.48 M{sub Sun} and a dispersion of 0.2 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the expectation that they have experienced extended mass accretion episodes. The fact that only a very small fraction of recycled neutron stars in the inferred distribution have masses that exceed {approx}2 M{sub Sun} suggests that only a few of these neutron stars cross the mass threshold to form low-mass black holes.

  13. Analysis of cascade impactor mass distributions.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Craig; Mitchell, Jolyon

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the approaches for analyzing cascade impactor (CI) mass distributions produced by pulmonary drug products and the considerations necessary for selecting the appropriate analysis procedure. There are several methods available for analyzing CI data, yielding a hierarchy of information in terms of nominal, ordinal and continuous variables. Mass distributions analyzed as a nominal function of the stages and auxiliary components is the simplest approach for examining the whole mass emitted by the inhaler. However, the relationship between the mass distribution and aerodynamic diameter is not described by such data. This relationship is a critical attribute of pulmonary drug products due to the association between aerodynamic diameter and the mass of particulates deposited to the respiratory tract. Therefore, the nominal mass distribution can only be utilized to make decisions on the discrete masses collected in the CI. Mass distributions analyzed as an ordinal function of aerodynamic diameter can be obtained by introducing the stage size range, which generally vary in magnitude from one stage to another for a given type of CI, and differ between CIs of different designs. Furthermore, the mass collected by specific size ranges within the CI are often incorrectly used to estimate in vivo deposition at various regions of the respiratory tract. A CI-generated mass distribution can be directly related to aerodynamic diameter by expressing the mass collected by each size-fractionating stage in terms of either mass frequency or cumulative mass fraction less than the aerodynamic size appropriate to each stage. Analysis of the aerodynamic diameter as a continuous variable allows comparison of mass distributions obtained from different products, obtained by different CI designs, as well as providing input to in vivo particle deposition models. The lack of information about the mass fraction emitted by the inhaler that is not size-analyzed by

  14. On the Mass Distribution of Animal Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Sidney; Clauset, Aaron; Schwab, David

    2009-03-01

    We develop a simple diffusion-reaction model to account for the broad and asymmetric distribution of adult body masses for species within related taxonomic groups. The model assumes three basic evolutionary features that control body mass: (i) a fixed lower limit that is set by metabolic constraints, (ii) a species extinction risk that is a weakly increasing function of body mass, and (iii) cladogenetic diffusion, in which daughter species have a slight tendency toward larger mass. The steady-state solution for the distribution of species masses in this model can be expressed in terms of the Airy function. This solution gives mass distributions that are in good agreement with data on 4002 terrestrial mammal species from the late Quaternary and 8617 extant bird species.

  15. An analytic model of the in-line and cross-axis apparent mass of the seated human body exposed to vertical vibration with and without a backrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guangtai; Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    During vertical excitation of the seated human body there are vertical and fore-and-aft forces at the seat that are influenced by contact with a backrest, so it is desirable to take into account the effect of a backrest when developing models of the seated human body. Initially, a seven degree-of-freedom multi-body dynamic model was developed for the human body sitting with an upright posture unsupported by a backrest and exposed to vertical vibration. The model was optimized to fit the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass measured on a seat. The model was then extended by the addition of vertical and fore-and-aft reaction forces to the upper lumbar spine to model the interaction between the human body and a backrest. By minimizing the least square error between experimental data and the analytical solution of the apparent masses on the seat and at the back, the human body model was able to represent both the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass on the seat and at the back. Parameter sensitivity studies showed that the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass on the seat and the backrest were all highly sensitive to the axial stiffness of the tissue beneath the pelvis. Pitch motion of the upper-body contributed to the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass on the seat. The apparent mass at the back was more sensitive to the stiffness and damping of the lower back than the properties of the upper back.

  16. Apparent height and body mass index influence perceived leadership ability in three-dimensional faces.

    PubMed

    Re, Daniel E; Dzhelyova, Milena; Holzleitner, Iris J; Tigue, Cara C; Feinberg, David R; Perrett, David I

    2012-01-01

    Facial appearance has a well-documented effect on perceived leadership ability. Face judgments of leadership ability predict political election outcomes across the world, and similar judgments of business CEOs predict company profits. Body height is also associated with leadership ability, with taller people attaining positions of leadership more than their shorter counterparts in both politics and in the corporate world. Previous studies have found some face characteristics that are associated with leadership judgments, however there have been no studies with three-dimensional faces. We assessed which facial characteristics drive leadership judgments in three-dimensional faces. We found a perceptual relationship between height and leadership ability. We also found that facial maturity correlated with leadership judgments, and that faces of people with an unhealthily high body mass index received lower leadership ratings. We conclude that face attributes associated with body size and maturity alter leadership perception, and may influence real-world democratic leadership selection. PMID:23586287

  17. On an apparent discrepancy between pulsation and evolution masses for Cepheids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iben, I., Jr.; Tuggle, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Results of new theoretical pulsation calculations in the linear nonadiabatic approximation are presented. Emphasis is placed on the location of blue edges (the borderline between stability and instability against pulsation) for pulsation in the fundamental mode. The results of evolutionary calculations for the helium-burning phase are introduced, and a theoretical period-luminosity relationship is obtained for Cepheids that lie on the blue edge of the instability strip. The theoretical results are then compared with current estimates of the intrinsic bulk properties of 13 Cepheids, and it is shown how theoretical and observational properties may be reconciled without assuming significant mass loss or the necessity of major adjustments in the theory. Finally, it is argued that the required revision in Cepheid luminosities lies within the observational uncertainties.

  18. Deep-sea record of impact apparently unrelated to mass extinction in the Late Triassic

    PubMed Central

    Onoue, Tetsuji; Sato, Honami; Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Hidaka, Yoshihiro; Shirai, Naoki; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Osawa, Takahito; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Toh, Yosuke; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Harada, Hideo; Orchard, Michael J.; Nedachi, Munetomo

    2012-01-01

    The 34-million-year (My) interval of the Late Triassic is marked by the formation of several large impact structures on Earth. Late Triassic impact events have been considered a factor in biotic extinction events in the Late Triassic (e.g., end-Triassic extinction event), but this scenario remains controversial because of a lack of stratigraphic records of ejecta deposits. Here, we report evidence for an impact event (platinum group elements anomaly with nickel-rich magnetite and microspherules) from the middle Norian (Upper Triassic) deep-sea sediment in Japan. This includes anomalously high abundances of iridium, up to 41.5 parts per billion (ppb), in the ejecta deposit, which suggests that the iridium-enriched ejecta layers of the Late Triassic may be found on a global scale. The ejecta deposit is constrained by microfossils that suggest correlation with the 215.5-Mya, 100-km-wide Manicouagan impact crater in Canada. Our analysis of radiolarians shows no evidence of a mass extinction event across the impact event horizon, and no contemporaneous faunal turnover is seen in other marine planktons. However, such an event has been reported among marine faunas and terrestrial tetrapods and floras in North America. We, therefore, suggest that the Manicouagan impact triggered the extinction of terrestrial and marine organisms near the impact site but not within the pelagic marine realm. PMID:23129649

  19. Measurement and modelling of the y-direction apparent mass of sitting human body-cushioned seat system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, George Juraj; Múčka, Peter; Hinz, Barbara; Blüthner, Ralph

    2009-04-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted using 13 male subjects seated on a cushioned commercial vehicle driver's seat. The hands gripped a mock-up steering wheel and the subjects were in contact with the lumbar region of the backrest. The accelerations and forces in the y-direction were measured during random lateral whole-body vibration with a frequency range between 0.25 and 30 Hz, vibration magnitudes 0.30, 0.98, and 1.92 m s -2 (unweighted root mean square (rms)). Based on these laboratory measurements, a linear multi-degree-of-freedom (mdof) model of the seated human body and cushioned seat in the lateral direction ( y-axis) was developed. Model parameters were identified from averaged measured apparent mass values (modulus and phase) for the three excitation magnitudes mentioned. A preferred model structure was selected from four 3-dof models analysed. The mean subject parameters were identified. In addition, identification of each subject's apparent mass model parameters was performed. The results are compared with previous studies. The developed model structure and the identified parameters can be used for further biodynamical research in seating dynamics.

  20. Mass Distributions of Linear Chain Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Shane L.; Craciun, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    Biochemistry has many examples of linear chain polymers, i.e., molecules formed from a sequence of units from a finite set of possibilities; examples include proteins, RNA, single-stranded DNA, and paired DNA. In the field of mass spectrometry, it is useful to consider the idea of weighted alphabets, with a word inheriting weight from its letters. We describe the distribution of the mass of these words in terms of a simple recurrence relation, the general solution to that relation, and a canonical form that explicitly describes both the exponential form of this distribution and its periodic features, thus explaining a wave pattern that has been observed in protein mass databases. Further, we show that a pure exponential term dominates the distribution and that there is exactly one such purely exponential term. Finally, we illustrate the use of this theorem by describing a formula for the integer mass distribution of peptides and we compare our theoretical results with mass distributions of human and yeast peptides. PMID:23024448

  1. The field white dwarf mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Cummings, J.; Kalirai, J. S.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Gentile-Fusillo, N.; Raddi, R.

    2016-09-01

    We revisit the properties and astrophysical implications of the field white dwarf mass distribution in preparation of Gaia applications. Our study is based on the two samples with the best established completeness and most precise atmospheric parameters, the volume-complete survey within 20 pc and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) magnitude-limited sample. We explore the modelling of the observed mass distributions with Monte Carlo simulations, but find that it is difficult to constrain independently the initial mass function (IMF), the initial-to-final-mass relation (IFMR), the stellar formation history (SFH), the variation of the Galactic disc vertical scale height as a function of stellar age, and binary evolution. Each of these input ingredients has a moderate effect on the predicted mass distributions, and we must also take into account biases owing to unidentified faint objects (20 pc sample), as well as unknown masses for magnetic white dwarfs and spectroscopic calibration issues (SDSS sample). Nevertheless, we find that fixed standard assumptions for the above parameters result in predicted mean masses that are in good qualitative agreement with the observed values. It suggests that derived masses for both studied samples are consistent with our current knowledge of stellar and Galactic evolution. Our simulations overpredict by 40-50 per cent the number of massive white dwarfs (M > 0.75 M⊙) for both surveys, although we can not exclude a Salpeter IMF when we account for all biases. Furthermore, we find no evidence of a population of double white dwarf mergers in the observed mass distributions.

  2. IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

  3. Hemisphere jet mass distribution at finite Nc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yoshikazu; Hatta, Yoshitaka; Ueda, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    We perform the leading logarithmic resummation of nonglobal logarithms for the single-hemisphere jet mass distribution in e+e- annihilation including the finite-Nc corrections. The result is compared with the previous all-order result in the large-Nc limit as well as fixed-order perturbative calculations.

  4. Customizing Mass Distributions of E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Brockenbrough S.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the concept of distance educators sending a mass distribution of messages to students via electronic mail. The concept uses course information databases to customize and generate message content. Describes steps of using off-the-shelf commercial software to process course data and send it to course participants by electronic mail via the…

  5. Star-formation in nuclear clusters and the origin of the Galactic center apparent core distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear stellar clusters (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: build-up of NSCs and Continuous in-situ star-formation. Here we study the effects of star formation on the build-up of NSCs and its implications for their long term evolution and their resulting structure. We show that continuous star-formation can lead to the build-up of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky-way NSC. We also find that the general structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in-situ star-formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger stellar population does not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in-situ star-formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations which are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure towards the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inwards; with younger populations having larger core sizes.

  6. Space Technology 7 : Micropropulsion and Mass Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnaub, A.; Dunn, C.; Ziemer, J,; Hruby, V.; Spence, D.; Demmons, N.; Roy, T.; McCormick, R.; Gasaska, C.; Young, J.; Connolly, W.; O'Donnell, J.; Markley, F.; Maghami, P.; Hsu, O.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA New Millennium Program Space Technology 7 (ST7) project will validate technology for precision spacecraft control. The ST7 disturbance reduction system (DRS) will contain new micropropulsion technology to be flown as part of the European Space Agency's LISA (laser interferometer space antenna) Pathfinder project. After launch into a low Earth orbit in early 2010, the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft will be maneuvered to a halo orbit about the Earth-Sun LI Lagrange point for operations. The DRS will control the position of the spacecraft relative to a reference to an accuracy of one nanometer over time scales of several thousand seconds. To perform the control the spacecraft will use a new colloid thruster technology. The thrusters will operate over the range of 5 to 30 micro-Newtons with precision of 0.1 micro-Newton. The thrust will be generated by using a high electric field to extract charged droplets of a conducting colloid fluid and accelerating them with a precisely adjustable voltage. The control position reference will be provided by the European LISA Technology Package, which will include two nearly free-floating test masses. The test mass position and attitude will be sensed and adjusted using electrostatic capacitance bridges. The DRS will control the spacecraft position with respect to one test mass while minimizing disturbances on the second test mass. The dynamic control system will cover eighteen degrees of freedom, six for each of the test masses and six for the spacecraft. In the absence of other disturbances, the test masses will slowly gravitate toward local concentrations of spacecraft mass. The test mass acceleration must be minimized to maintain the acceleration of the enclosing drag-free spacecraft within the control authority of the micropropulsion system. Therefore, test mass acceleration must be predicted by accurate measurement of mass distribution, then offset by the placement of specially shaped balance masses near each test mass

  7. Stellar Mass Distributions in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxin; Hunter, D.; LITTLE THINGS Team

    2011-01-01

    We present the radial distributions of the stellar mass and the star formation histories for a large sample of dwarf irregular galaxies assembled by the LITTLE THINGS project (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, http://www.lowell.edu/users/dah/littlethings/index.html). Specifically, utilizing the multi-band data including FUV/NUV/UBV/Hα/3.6μm, and with the CB07 stellar population synthesis models, we analyze the variations of the SEDs as a function of radius. By studying the relationship between the stellar mass, star formation histories, star formation and HI gas, we will discuss the possible star formation modes and the roles played by the stellar mass and gas in determining the star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies in general. We gratefully acknowledge funding for this research from the National Science Foundation (AST-0707563).

  8. An apparent contradiction in the role of phosphorus in Cenozoic chemical mass balances for the World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Margaret Lois; Filippelli, Gabriel M.

    1994-08-01

    Little is known about the fluxes to and from the ocean during the Cenozoic of phosphorus (P), a limiting nutrient for oceanic primary productivity and organic carbon burial on geologic timescales. Previous studies have concluded that dissolved river fluxes increased worldwide during the Cenozoic and that organic carbon burial decreased relative to calcium carbonate burial and perhaps in absolute terms as well. To examine the apparent contradiction between increased river fluxes of P (assuming P fluxes behave like the others) expected to drive increased organic carbon burial and observations indicating decreased organic carbon burial, we determined P accumulation rates for equatorial Pacific sediments from Ocean Drilling Program leg 138 sites in the eastern equatorial Pacific and leg 130 sites on the Ontong Java Plateau in the western equatorial Pacific. Although there are site specific and depth dependent effects on P accumulation rates, there are important features common to the records at all sites. P accumulation rates declined from 50 to 20 Ma, showed some variability from 20 to 10 Ma, and had a substantial peak from 9 to 3 Ma centered at 5-6 Ma. These changes in P accumulation rates for the equatorial Pacific are equivalent to substantial changes in the P mass balance. However, the pattern resembles neither that of weathering flux indicators (87Sr/86Sr and Ge/Si ratios) nor that of the carbon isotope record reflecting changes in organic carbon burial rates. Although these P accumulation rate patterns need confirmation from other regions with sediment burial significant in global mass balances (e.g., the North Pacific and Southern Ocean), it appears that P weathering inputs to the ocean are decoupled from those of other elements and that further exploration is needed of the relationship between P burial and net organic carbon burial.

  9. Measurement and modelling of x-direction apparent mass of the seated human body-cushioned seat system.

    PubMed

    Stein, George Juraj; Múcka, Peter; Chmúrny, Rudolf; Hinz, Barbara; Blüthner, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    For modelling purposes and for evaluation of driver's seat performance in the vertical direction various mechano-mathematical models of the seated human body have been developed and standardized by the ISO. No such models exist hitherto for human body sitting in an upright position in a cushioned seat upper part, used in industrial environment, where the fore-and-aft vibrations play an important role. The interaction with the steering wheel has to be taken into consideration, as well as, the position of the human body upper torso with respect to the cushioned seat back as observed in real driving conditions. This complex problem has to be simplified first to arrive at manageable simpler models, which still reflect the main problem features. In a laboratory study accelerations and forces in x-direction were measured at the seat base during whole-body vibration in the fore-and-aft direction (random signal in the frequency range between 0.3 and 30 Hz, vibration magnitudes 0.28, 0.96, and 2.03 ms(-2) unweighted rms). Thirteen male subjects with body masses between 62.2 and 103.6 kg were chosen for the tests. They sat on a cushioned driver seat with hands on a support and backrest contact in the lumbar region only. Based on these laboratory measurements a linear model of the system-seated human body and cushioned seat in the fore-and-aft direction has been developed. The model accounts for the reaction from the steering wheel. Model parameters have been identified for each subject-measured apparent mass values (modulus and phase). The developed model structure and the averaged parameters can be used for further bio-dynamical research in this field. PMID:16962599

  10. The Role of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Quantification in Differentiating Benign and Malignant Renal Masses by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Hamidi, Cihad; Bozkurt, Yaşar; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Kuday, Suzan; Gümüş, Hatice; Türkçü, Gül; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Bilici, Aslan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is a widely-accepted diagnostic modality whose efficacy has been investigated by numerous past studies in the differentiation of malignant lesions from benign entities. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of renal lesions. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: A total of 137 patients with renal lesions were included in this study. The median apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values as well as the b 800 and b 1600 signal intensities of normal kidneys, solid components of mixed renal masses, and total cystic lesions were evaluated. Results: There were significant differences between the ADC values of lesions and normal renal parenchyma, and between the ADC values of benign and malignant renal lesions on DWIs at b values of 800 and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). There were significant differences between the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 2 cysts and the ADC values of Bosniak Category 1 and 3 cysts on DWIs at b values of 800 s/mm2 (p<0.001) and 1600 s/mm2 (p<0.001). A cutoff value of 1.902 × 10−3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 800 s/mm2 provided 88% sensitivity and 96% specificity for differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. A cutoff value of 1.623 × 10−3 mm2/s for the ADC with a b value of 1600 s/mm2 provided 79% sensitivity and 96% specificity (p<0.001) for the differentiation between benign and malignant renal lesions. Conclusion: Accurate assessment of renal masses is important for determining the necessity for surgical intervention. DWI provides additional value by differentiating benign from malignant renal tumors and can be added to routine kidney MRI protocols. PMID:26185715

  11. Apparent behaviour of charged and neutral materials with ellipsoidal fibre distributions and cross-validation of finite element implementations.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Thomas; Kelly, Daniel J

    2012-05-01

    Continuous fibre distribution models can be applied to a variety of biological tissues with both charged and neutral extracellular matrices. In particular, ellipsoidal models have been used to describe the complex material behaviour of tissues such as articular cartilage and their engineered tissue equivalents. The choice of material parameters is more difficult than in classical anisotropic models and the impact that changes to these parameters can have on the predictions of such models are poorly understood. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the apparent behaviour of this class of materials over a range of material parameters. We further introduce a scaling approach to overcome certain counter-intuitive aspects related to the choice of anisotropy parameters and outline the integration method used in our implementations. User material codes for the commercial FE software packages Abaqus and MSC Marc are provided for use by other investigators. Cross-validation of our code against similar implementations in FEBio is also presented. PMID:22498290

  12. Water masses and 129I distribution in the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfimov, Vasily; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2013-01-01

    The application of the radioactive isotope iodine-129 as a tracer of water circulation in the oceans has provided interesting information with respect to sources and mixing of different water masses. We here present results of 129I distribution in water profiles located in the Nordic Seas and use the isotope to fingerprint water masses in the region. The samples were collected by the US research vessel Knorr in May-June 2002. 129I signatures along the Norwegian Sea reflect a mixing of 129I-rich surface water along the Scandinavian continental slope and 129I-poor North Atlantic surface water. These two water masses become less segregated along the Fram Strait where apparent 129I enrichment penetrates the return Arctic flow into the East Greenland Current. The 129I data further suggest existence of a water mass that is not entirely labeled with respect to origin at the Denmark Strait bottom water. This water parcel probably originates from the Iceland Sea. 129I data also shed light on the major deep water outflow from the Nordic Seas located at the Faeroe Bank Channel.

  13. Correlated patterns in hydrothermal plume distribution and apparent magmatic budget along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Edward; Christophe Hémond; Anne Briais; Marcia Maia; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Sharon L. Walker; Tingting Wang; Yongshun John Chen

    2014-01-01

    Multiple geological processes affect the distribution of hydrothermal venting along a mid-ocean ridge. Deciphering the role of a specific process is often frustrated by simultaneous changes in other influences. Here we take advantage of the almost constant spreading rate (65–71 mm/yr) along 2500 km of the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) between 77°E and 99°E to examine the spatial density of hydrothermal venting relative to regional and segment-scale changes in the apparent magmatic budget. We use 227 vertical profiles of light backscatter and (on 41 profiles) oxidation-reduction potential along 27 first and second-order ridge segments on and adjacent to the Amsterdam-St. Paul (ASP) Plateau to map ph, the fraction of casts detecting a plume. At the regional scale, venting on the five segments crossing the magma-thickened hot spot plateau is almost entirely suppressed (ph = 0.02). Conversely, the combined ph (0.34) from all other segments follows the global trend of ph versus spreading rate. Off the ASP Plateau, multisegment trends in ph track trends in the regional axial depth, high where regional depth increases and low where it decreases. At the individual segment scale, a robust correlation between ph and cross-axis inflation for first-order segments shows that different magmatic budgets among first-order segments are expressed as different levels of hydrothermal spatial density. This correlation is absent among second-order segments. Eighty-five percent of the plumes occur in eight clusters totaling ∼350 km. We hypothesize that these clusters are a minimum estimate of the length of axial melt lenses underlying this section of the SEIR.

  14. Vertical and dual-axis vibration of the seated human body: Nonlinearity, cross-axis coupling, and associations between resonances in transmissibility and apparent mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guangtai; Qiu, Yi; Griffin, Michael J.

    2012-12-01

    The vertical apparent mass of the human body exhibits nonlinearity, with the principal resonance frequency reducing as the vibration magnitude increases. Measures of the transmission of vibration to the spine and the pelvis have suggested complex modes are responsible for the dominant resonance during vertical excitation, but the modes present with dual-axis excitation have not been investigated. This study was designed to examine how the apparent mass and transmissibility of the human body depend on the magnitude of vertical excitation and the addition of fore-and-aft excitation, and the relation between the apparent mass and the transmissibility of the body. The movement of the body (over the first, fifth and twelfth thoracic vertebrae, the third lumbar vertebra, and the pelvis) in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions (and in pitch at the pelvis) was measured in 12 male subjects sitting with their hands on their laps during random vertical vibration excitation (over the range 0.25-20 Hz) at three vibration magnitudes (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 m s-2 rms). At the highest magnitude of vertical excitation (1.0 m s-2 rms) the effect of adding fore-aft vibration (at 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 m s-2 rms) was investigated. The forces in the vertical and fore-and-aft directions on the seat surface were also measured so as to calculate apparent masses. Resonances in the apparent mass and transmissibility to the spine and pelvis in the fore-and-aft and vertical directions, and pitch transmissibility to the pelvis, shifted to lower frequencies as the magnitude of vertical excitation increased and as the magnitude of the additional fore-and-aft excitation increased. The nonlinear resonant behaviour of the apparent mass and transmissibility during dual-axis vibration excitation suggests coupling between the principal mode associated with vertical excitation and the cross-axis influence of fore-and-aft excitation. The transmissibility measures are consistent with complex modes

  15. Mass distributions for induced fission of different Hg isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2012-10-01

    With the improved scission-point model mass distributions are calculated for induced fission of different Hg isotopes with even mass numbers A=180, 184, 188, 192, 196, and 198. The calculated mass distribution and mean total kinetic energy of fission fragments are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. The asymmetric mass distribution of fission fragments of 180Hg observed in the recent experiment is explained. The change in the shape of the mass distribution from asymmetric to more symmetric is revealed with increasing A of the fissioning AHg nucleus, and reactions are proposed to verify this prediction experimentally.

  16. MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, Margaret J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J.; Serra, Ana Laura E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it E-mail: serra@to.infn.it

    2013-02-10

    Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

  17. Dynamic Distribution of the Gut Microbiota and the Relationship with Apparent Crude Fiber Digestibility and Growth Stages in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qing; Li, Pinghua; Hao, Shuaishuai; Zhang, Yeqiu; Kim, Sung Woo; Li, Huizhi; Ma, Xiang; Gao, Shuo; He, Lichun; Wu, WangJun; Huang, Xuegen; Hua, Jindi; Zhou, Bo; Huang, Ruihua

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an important role in nutrient digestibility in animals. To examine changes in the pig gut microbiota across growth stages and its effects on nutrient digestion, the gut microbiota population in pigs at 28 days (before weaning), and 60, 90, and 150 days of age was assessed by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. The apparent digestibility of crude fiber (CF), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), crude protein (CP) and ether extract (EE) was also assessed in these pigs. A total of 19,875 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified from all samples. Both bacterial abundance and diversity increased with age. A total of 22 phyla and 249 genera were identified from all fecal samples; Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were the most dominant phyla in all samples. With increasing age, the proportion of TM7 and Tenericutes increased, whereas the proportion of Lentisphaerae and Synergistetes decreased. The abundance of 36 genera varied with age, and the apparent digestibility of CF increased with age. Three phyla, Proteobacteria, Tenericutes and TM7, and 11 genera, including Anaeroplasma, Campylobacter, and Clostridium, were correlated with apparent CF digestibility. PMID:25898122

  18. [Determination of apparent mean mass of proteins associated with heme in the hemoglobin molecule of Arenicola marina (L.), Annelida, Polychaeta].

    PubMed

    Toulmond, A

    1979-02-12

    Protein and iron concentrations and maximum combined oxygen concentration were measured in the blood of the lugworm Arenicola marina. The calculated mean molecular mass of the heme-associated proteins was higher than that reported for known invertebrate and vertebrate intracellular hemoglobins. The difference is probably due to the presence of polypeptide chains not linked to heme groups in the extracellular annelid hemoglobins. PMID:111865

  19. Relationship Not Found Between Blood and Urine Concentrations and Body Mass Index in Humans With Apparently Adequate Boron Status.

    PubMed

    Koc, Fulya; Aysan, Erhan; Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Arpaci, Beyza; Gecer, Salih; Demirci, Selami; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2016-06-01

    The impact of boron on the development of obesity remains controversial in the analysis of experimental and clinical data. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between blood and urine boron concentrations and obesity in normal, overweight, obese, and morbidly obese subjects in different age groups. A total of 105 subjects were categorized into 12 groups based on body mass index and three different age levels: as young adult (18 to 34 years old), adult (35 to 54 years old), and older adult (greater than 55 years old). Age, gender, body mass index, and blood and urine boron concentrations were recorded for each subject. There were 50 women and 55 men, with a mean age of 44.63 ± 17.9 years. Blood and urine boron concentrations were similar among the groups (p = 0.510 and p = 0.228, respectively). However, a positive correlation between age and blood boron concentration (p = 0.001) was detected in contrast to the presence of a negative correlation between age and urine boron concentration (p = 0.027). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between gender, age, and quantitative values of body mass index for each subject, and blood and urine boron concentrations. Although the relationship between boron and obesity has not been confirmed, changes of blood and urine boron concentrations with age may have some physiologic sequences to cause obesity. PMID:26458903

  20. Age- and direction-related adaptations of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone with respect to apparent stiffness and tissue level stress distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming; Qin, Ling

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to study the age-related adaptation of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone at the apparent level, as well as the tissue level in three orthogonal directions. Ninety trabecular specimens were obtained from six normal L4 vertebral bodies of six male cadavers in two age groups, three aged 62 years and three aged 69 years, and were scanned using a high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system, then converted to micro-finite element models to do micro-finite element analyses. The relationship between apparent stiffness and bone volume fraction, and the tissue level von Mises stress distribution for each trabecular specimen when compressed separately in the longitudinal direction, medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions (transverse directions) were derived and compared between two age groups. The results showed that at the apparent level, trabecular bones from 69-year group had stiffer bone structure relative to their volume fractions in all three directions, and in both age groups, changes in bone volume fraction could explain more variations in apparent stiffness in the longitudinal direction than the transverse directions; at the tissue level, aging had little effect on the tissue von Mises stress distributions for the compressions in all the three directions. The novelty of the present study was that it provided quantitative assessments on the age and direction-related adaptation of Chinese male lumbar vertebral trabecular bone from two different levels: stiffness at the apparent level and stress distribution at the tissue level. It may help to understand the failure mechanisms and fracture risks of vertebral body associated with aging and direction for the prevention of fracture risks in elder individuals.

  1. Neutron Star Mass Distribution in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-01

    Massive neutron stars with ∼ 2Mʘ have been observed in neutron star-white dwarf binaries. On the other hand, well-measured neutron star masses in double-neutron-star binaries are still consistent with the limit of 1.5Mʘ. These observations raised questions on the neutron star equations of state and the neutron star binary evolution processes. In this presentation, a hypothesis of super-Eddington accretion and its implications are discussed. We argue that a 2Mʘ neutron star is an outcome of the super-Eddington accretion during the evolution of neutron star-white dwarf binary progenitors. We also suggest the possibility of the existence of new type of neutron star binary which consists of a typical neutron star and a massive compact companion (high-mass neutron star or black hole) with M ≥ 2Mʘ.

  2. Effect of dietary coarsely ground corn on broiler live performance, gastrointestinal tract development, apparent ileal digestibility of energy and nitrogen, and digesta particle size distribution and retention time

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Stark, C. R.; Ferket, P. R.; Williams, C. M.; Pacheco, W. J.; Brake, J.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary structural material has been reported to improve broiler live performance and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) function. In this 50 d cage study, the effects of coarsely ground corn (CC) inclusion on broiler live performance, GIT development, apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of energy and nitrogen (N), and digesta particle size distribution and retention time were investigated. This study included 3 CC inclusions (0, 25, and 50% fine corn [FC] replaced by CC), with 6 replicate cages of 10 birds per treatment. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) at 35 and 42 d was improved (P < 0.01) as the dietary inclusion of CC increased without effect on feed intake. The 50% CC diet increased absolute and relative gizzard weight at 42 d of age as compared to diets with 0 and 25% CC (P < 0.01). Dietary CC increased absolute proventriculus weight at 28 d of age (P < 0.05). A numerically lower gizzard digesta pH (P < 0.08) was observed at 28 d but not 42 d of age, and there was no difference in proventriculus, jejunum, or ileum digesta pH at 28 or 42 d of age. The 25 and 50% CC treatments increased the digesta retention time at 30 and 45 d of age (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). The 25 and 50% CC treatments improved AID of energy by 7.1 and 8.2%, respectively, when compared with the 0% CC treatment, and they improved AID of N by 12.2 and 12.4%, respectively (P < 0.01). The digesta particles in the jejunum exhibited a similar distribution, with a dgw (geometric mean diameter by mass) of 218, 204, and 181 μm when 0, 25, of 50% CC diets were consumed, respectively. In conclusion, birds fed pelleted and screened diets that contained 25 and 50% CC exhibited increased BW, improved FCR, and increased AID of energy and N, which was probably due to enhanced gizzard development and greater digesta retention time. PMID:25568134

  3. Rapid Analysis of Mass Distribution of Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Shielding Evaluation Toolset (RADSET) is a computer program that rapidly calculates the spatial distribution of mass of an arbitrary structure for use in ray-tracing analysis of the radiation-shielding properties of the structure. RADSET was written to be used in conjunction with unmodified commercial computer-aided design (CAD) software that provides access to data on the structure and generates selected three-dimensional-appearing views of the structure. RADSET obtains raw geometric, material, and mass data on the structure from the CAD software. From these data, RADSET calculates the distribution(s) of the masses of specific materials about any user-specified point(s). The results of these mass-distribution calculations are imported back into the CAD computing environment, wherein the radiation-shielding calculations are performed.

  4. Molar mass distribution and solubility modeling of asphaltenes

    SciTech Connect

    Yarranton, H.W.; Masliyah, J.H.

    1996-12-01

    Attempts to model asphaltene solubility with Scatchard-Hildebrand theory were hampered by uncertainty in molar volume and solubility parameter distribution within the asphaltenes. By considering asphaltenes as a series of polyaromatic hydrocarbons with randomly distributed associated functional groups, molar volume and solubility parameter distributions are calculated from experimental measurements of molar mass and density. The molar mass distribution of Athabasca asphaltenes is determined from interfacial tension and vapor pressure osmometry measurements together with plasma desorption mass spectrometry determinations from the literature. Asphaltene densities are calculated indirectly from mixtures of known concentration of asphaltene in toluene. Asphaltene density, molar volume, and solubility parameter are correlated with molar mass. Solid-liquid equilibrium calculations based on solubility theory and the asphaltene property correlations successfully predict experimental data for both the precipitation point and the amount of precipitated asphaltenes in toluene-hexane solvent mixtures.

  5. Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress Due to Interdisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, Jürgen; Klemann, Volker; Sneeuw, Nico

    2014-11-01

    This Special Issue on "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System: Recent Scientific Progress due to Interdisciplinary Research" reports a number of findings resulting from a collaborative effort run from 2006 until 2013, in the framework of the DFG Priority Program 1257 "Mass Distribution and Mass Transport in the Earth System". Contributions have been arranged along five lines, i.e. (1) improvements in geodesy: satellite mass monitoring through gravimetry and altimetry, (2) applications in large-scale hydrology, (3) applications in solid Earth research, (4) applications in cryospheric research, (5) applications in ocean sciences.

  6. [Grain Size Distribution Characteristics of Suspended Particulate Matter as Influenced by the Apparent Pollution in the Eutrophic Urban Landscape Water Body].

    PubMed

    Gong, Dan-yan; Pan, Yang; Huang, Yong; Bao, Wei; Li, Qian-qian

    2016-03-15

    Grain size distribution characteristics of suspended particulate matter (SPM) reflects the apparent polluted condition of the urban landscape water. In order to explore the internal relationship between the eutrophication of urban landscape water's apparent pollution and grain size distribution of SPM, and its influencing factors, this paper selected five representative sampling sites in Feng Jin River which is a typical eutrophication river in Suzhou City, measured the grain size distribution of SPM, sensation pollution index (SPI) and water quality index, and analyzed their correlation. The results showed that: The rich nutrient water possessed a similar characteristics in grain size distribution. The grain size distribution of SPM in water was multimodal, and the the peak position was roughly the same; the grain size distribution of SPM was composed by multiple components. It could be roughly divided into six parts with the particle size range of every group being < 1.5 µm, 1.5-8 µm, 8-35 µm, 35-186 µm, 186-516 µm, > 516 µm. The component III was superior (with an average volume fraction of 38.3%-43.2%), and its volume fraction had a significant positive relation with the SPI value and the Chl-a content. The increase of component III volume fraction was the reflection of particle size's result of increasing SPI value. The increase of component III volume fraction was mainly derived from the increasing algal content. The volume fraction of group IV + group VI + group V was significantly higher under the condition of exogenous enter. When there was no exogenous component, the volume fraction of group IV + group VI + group V had a significant negative correlation with SPI value; when there were exogenous components, the volume fraction of group IV + group VI + group V had a weak positive correlation with SPI value, but the correlation did not reach a significant level. Environmental factors (Fv/Fm and DO) and exogenous factors had an influence by functioning

  7. Optimal shield mass distribution for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed and successfully used for determining the optimum distribution of space radiation shielding on geometrically complex space vehicles. These methods have been incorporated in computer program SWORD for dose evaluation in complex geometry, and iteratively calculating the optimum distribution for (minimum) shield mass satisfying multiple acute and protected dose constraints associated with each of several body organs.

  8. Effect of voluntary periodic muscular activity on nonlinearity in the apparent mass of the seated human body during vertical random whole-body vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Griffin, Michael J.

    2006-12-01

    The principal resonance frequency in the driving-point impedance of the human body decreases with increasing vibration magnitude—a nonlinear response. An understanding of the nonlinearities may advance understanding of the mechanisms controlling body movement and improve anthropodynamic modelling of responses to vibration at various magnitudes. This study investigated the effects of vibration magnitude and voluntary periodic muscle activity on the apparent mass resonance frequency using vertical random vibration in the frequency range 0.5-20 Hz. Each of 14 subjects was exposed to 14 combinations of two vibration magnitudes (0.25 and 2.0 m s -2 root-mean square (rms)) in seven sitting conditions: two without voluntary periodic movement (A: upright; B: upper-body tensed), and five with voluntary periodic movement (C: back-abdomen bending; D: folding-stretching arms from back to front; E: stretching arms from rest to front; F: folding arms from elbow; G: deep breathing). Three conditions with voluntary periodic movement significantly reduced the difference in resonance frequency at the two vibration magnitudes compared with the difference in a static sitting condition. Without voluntary periodic movement (condition A: upright), the median apparent mass resonance frequency was 5.47 Hz at the low vibration magnitude and 4.39 Hz at the high vibration magnitude. With voluntary periodic movement (C: back-abdomen bending), the resonance frequency was 4.69 Hz at the low vibration magnitude and 4.59 Hz at the high vibration magnitude. It is concluded that back muscles, or other muscles or tissues in the upper body, influence biodynamic responses of the human body to vibration and that voluntary muscular activity or involuntary movement of these parts can alter their equivalent stiffness.

  9. Distributed Capacitive Sensor for Sample Mass Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; McKinney, Colin; Jackson, Shannon P.; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Manohara, Harish; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey

    2011-01-01

    Previous robotic sample return missions lacked in situ sample verification/ quantity measurement instruments. Therefore, the outcome of the mission remained unclear until spacecraft return. In situ sample verification systems such as this Distributed Capacitive (DisC) sensor would enable an unmanned spacecraft system to re-attempt the sample acquisition procedures until the capture of desired sample quantity is positively confirmed, thereby maximizing the prospect for scientific reward. The DisC device contains a 10-cm-diameter pressure-sensitive elastic membrane placed at the bottom of a sample canister. The membrane deforms under the weight of accumulating planetary sample. The membrane is positioned in close proximity to an opposing rigid substrate with a narrow gap. The deformation of the membrane makes the gap narrower, resulting in increased capacitance between the two parallel plates (elastic membrane and rigid substrate). C-V conversion circuits on a nearby PCB (printed circuit board) provide capacitance readout via LVDS (low-voltage differential signaling) interface. The capacitance method was chosen over other potential approaches such as the piezoelectric method because of its inherent temperature stability advantage. A reference capacitor and temperature sensor are embedded in the system to compensate for temperature effects. The pressure-sensitive membranes are aluminum 6061, stainless steel (SUS) 403, and metal-coated polyimide plates. The thicknesses of these membranes range from 250 to 500 m. The rigid substrate is made with a 1- to 2-mm-thick wafer of one of the following materials depending on the application requirements glass, silicon, polyimide, PCB substrate. The glass substrate is fabricated by a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication approach. Several concentric electrode patterns are printed on the substrate. The initial gap between the two plates, 100 m, is defined by a silicon spacer ring that is anodically bonded to the glass

  10. Mass Load Distribution Dependence of Mass Sensitivity of Magnetoelastic Sensors under Different Resonance Modes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kewei; Zhang, Lin; Chai, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors as an important type of acoustic wave sensors have shown great promise for a variety of applications. Mass sensitivity is a key parameter to characterize its performance. In this work, the effects of mass load distribution on the mass sensitivity of a magnetoelastic sensor under different resonance modes were theoretically investigated using the modal analysis method. The results show that the mass sensitivity and “nodal point” positions are related to the point displacement, which is determined by the motion patterns. The motion patterns are affected by resonance modes and mass load distribution. Asymmetrical mass load distribution causes the motion patterns lose symmetry and leads to the shift of “nodal point”. The mass sensitivity changing with mass load distribution behaves like a sine wave with decaying amplitude and the minimum mass sensitivity appears at the first valley. This study provides certain theoretical guidance for optimizing the mass sensitivity of a magnetoelastic sensor or other acoustic wave based sensors. PMID:26295233

  11. The Mass Distribution of Companions to Low-mass White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jeff J.; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.

    2014-12-01

    Measuring the masses of companions to single-line spectroscopic binary stars is (in general) not possible because of the unknown orbital plane inclination. Even when the mass of the visible star can be measured, only a lower limit can be placed on the mass of the unseen companion. However, since these inclination angles should be isotropically distributed, for a large enough, unbiased sample, the companion mass distribution can be deconvolved from the distribution of observables. In this work, we construct a hierarchical probabilistic model to infer properties of unseen companion stars given observations of the orbital period and projected radial velocity of the primary star. We apply this model to three mock samples of low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs; M <~ 0.45 M ⊙) and a sample of post-common-envelope binaries. We use a mixture of two Gaussians to model the WD and neutron star (NS) companion mass distributions. Our model successfully recovers the initial parameters of these test data sets. We then apply our model to 55 WDs in the extremely low-mass (ELM) WD Survey. Our maximum a posteriori model for the WD companion population has a mean mass μWD = 0.74 M ⊙, with a standard deviation σWD = 0.24 M ⊙. Our model constrains the NS companion fraction f NS to be <16% at 68% confidence. We make samples from the posterior distribution publicly available so that future observational efforts may compute the NS probability for newly discovered LMWDs.

  12. Is the Binary Mass Ratio Distribution Separation-Dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Kraus, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of planets orbiting retired A-stars on close orbits and young A-stars on very wide orbits have renewed interest in the properties of nearby intermediate-mass stars. Especially interesting are the young stars because directly-imaged planets orbiting them may be bright enough for characterization (e.g. HR 8799, Beta Pictoris, etc). However, intermediate-mass stars and especially young intermediate mass stars are part of multiple systems more often than not. Close stellar companions may affect the formation and orbital evolution of any planets, and the properties of the companions can help constrain the binary formation mechanism. The mass ratio distribution of a population of binary stars, especially if the distribution for close companions is significantly different from that of wide companions, is helpful to distinguish companions that were born in or affected by the circumstellar disk from those which formed through fragmentation of the molecular core. Previous imaging surveys have found that binary systems with A-type primary stars tend to have cool companions with extreme mass ratios. There are hints at a much flatter mass ratio distribution for close companions, but strong completeness effects complicate the picture. We have conducted a spectroscopic survey of ~400 nearby main sequence A- and B-type stars, aimed at detecting stellar companions as late as M4 for all orbital separations <100 AU. We have searched for companions to the stars by cross-correlating the spectra against model templates for F-M type stars; a significant peak in the cross-correlation function indicates a detection. Our cross-correlation technique can detect low-mass companions with orbits that are too wide to detect with radial velocity monitoring and too small to detect with imaging techniques, making it complementary to work already done. We will present results from our survey and compare the mass ratio distribution we measure to the corresponding distribution for

  13. Kinetic Analysis of Isothermal Decomposition Process of Sodium Bicarbonate Using the Weibull Probability Function—Estimation of Density Distribution Functions of the Apparent Activation Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Bojan

    2009-10-01

    The decomposition process of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) has been studied by thermogravimetry in isothermal conditions at four different operating temperatures (380 K, 400 K, 420 K, and 440 K). It was found that the experimental integral and differential conversion curves at the different operating temperatures can be successfully described by the isothermal Weibull distribution function with a unique value of the shape parameter ( β = 1.07). It was also established that the Weibull distribution parameters ( β and η) show independent behavior on the operating temperature. Using the integral and differential (Friedman) isoconversional methods, in the conversion (α) range of 0.20 ≤ α ≤ 0.80, the apparent activation energy ( E a ) value was approximately constant ( E a, int = 95.2 kJmol-1 and E a, diff = 96.6 kJmol-1, respectively). The values of E a calculated by both isoconversional methods are in good agreement with the value of E a evaluated from the Arrhenius equation (94.3 kJmol-1), which was expressed through the scale distribution parameter ( η). The Málek isothermal procedure was used for estimation of the kinetic model for the investigated decomposition process. It was found that the two-parameter Šesták-Berggren (SB) autocatalytic model best describes the NaHCO3 decomposition process with the conversion function f(α) = α0.18(1-α)1.19. It was also concluded that the calculated density distribution functions of the apparent activation energies ( ddfE a ’s) are not dependent on the operating temperature, which exhibit the highly symmetrical behavior (shape factor = 1.00). The obtained isothermal decomposition results were compared with corresponding results of the nonisothermal decomposition process of NaHCO3.

  14. Halo mass distribution reconstruction across the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cheng; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo; Tao, Charling

    2015-08-01

    We study the relation between halo mass and its environment from a probabilistic perspective. We find that halo mass depends not only on local dark matter density, but also on non-local quantities such as the cosmic web environment and the halo-exclusion effect. Given these accurate relations, we have developed the HADRON-code (Halo mAss Distribution ReconstructiON), a technique which permits us to assign halo masses to a distribution of haloes in three-dimensional space. This can be applied to the fast production of mock galaxy catalogues, by assigning halo masses, and reproducing accurately the bias for different mass cuts. The resulting clustering of the halo populations agree well with that drawn from the BigMultiDark N-body simulation: the power spectra are within 1σ up to scales of k = 0.2 h Mpc-1, when using augmented Lagrangian perturbation theory based mock catalogues. Only the most massive haloes show a larger deviation. For these, we find evidence of the halo-exclusion effect. A clear improvement is achieved when assigning the highest masses to haloes with a minimum distance separation. We also compute the two- and three-point correlation functions, and find an excellent agreement with N-body results. Our work represents a quantitative application of the cosmic web classification. It can have further interesting applications in the multitracer analysis of the large-scale structure for future galaxy surveys.

  15. Implications of the Cosmological Constant for Spherically Symmetric Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, scientists have made the discovery that the expansion rate of the Universe is increasing rather than decreasing. This acceleration leads to an additional term in Albert Einstein's field equations which describe general relativity and is known as the cosmological constant. This work explores the aftermath of a non-vanishing cosmological constant for relativistic spherically symmetric mass distributions, which are susceptible to change against Einstein's field equations. We introduce a stellar structure equation known as the Tolman-Oppenhiemer-Volkoff (TOV) equation modified for a cosmological constant, which is derived from Einstein's modified field equations. We solve this modified TOV equation for these spherically symmetric mass distributions and obtain stellar properties such as mass and radius and investigate changes that may occur depending on the value of the cosmological constant.

  16. BINARY FORMATION MECHANISMS: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE COMPANION MASS RATIO DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Reggiani, Maddalena M.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2011-09-01

    We present a statistical comparison of the mass ratio distribution of companions, as observed in different multiplicity surveys, to the most recent estimate of the single-object mass function. The main goal of our analysis is to test whether or not the observed companion mass ratio distribution (CMRD) as a function of primary star mass and star formation environment is consistent with having been drawn from the field star initial mass function (IMF). We consider samples of companions for M dwarfs, solar-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars, both in the field as well as clusters or associations, and compare them with populations of binaries generated by random pairing from the assumed IMF for a fixed primary mass. With regard to the field we can reject the hypothesis that the CMRD was drawn from the IMF for different primary mass ranges: the observed CMRDs show a larger number of equal-mass systems than predicted by the IMF. This is in agreement with fragmentation theories of binary formation. For the open clusters {alpha} Persei and the Pleiades we also reject the IMF random-pairing hypothesis. Concerning young star-forming regions, currently we can rule out a connection between the CMRD and the field IMF in Taurus but not in Chamaeleon I. Larger and different samples are needed to better constrain the result as a function of the environment. We also consider other companion mass functions and we compare them with observations. Moreover the CMRD both in the field and clusters or associations appears to be independent of separation in the range covered by the observations. Combining therefore the CMRDs of M (1-2400 AU) and G (28-1590 AU) primaries in the field and intermediate-mass primary binaries in Sco OB2 (29-1612 AU) for mass ratios, q = M{sub 2}/M{sub 1}, from 0.2 to 1, we find that the best chi-square fit follows a power law dN/dq{proportional_to}q {sup {beta}}, with {beta} = -0.50 {+-} 0.29, consistent with previous results. Finally, we note that the

  17. Binary Formation Mechanisms: Constraints from the Companion Mass Ratio Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Maddalena M.; Meyer, Michael R.

    2011-09-01

    We present a statistical comparison of the mass ratio distribution of companions, as observed in different multiplicity surveys, to the most recent estimate of the single-object mass function. The main goal of our analysis is to test whether or not the observed companion mass ratio distribution (CMRD) as a function of primary star mass and star formation environment is consistent with having been drawn from the field star initial mass function (IMF). We consider samples of companions for M dwarfs, solar-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars, both in the field as well as clusters or associations, and compare them with populations of binaries generated by random pairing from the assumed IMF for a fixed primary mass. With regard to the field we can reject the hypothesis that the CMRD was drawn from the IMF for different primary mass ranges: the observed CMRDs show a larger number of equal-mass systems than predicted by the IMF. This is in agreement with fragmentation theories of binary formation. For the open clusters α Persei and the Pleiades we also reject the IMF random-pairing hypothesis. Concerning young star-forming regions, currently we can rule out a connection between the CMRD and the field IMF in Taurus but not in Chamaeleon I. Larger and different samples are needed to better constrain the result as a function of the environment. We also consider other companion mass functions and we compare them with observations. Moreover the CMRD both in the field and clusters or associations appears to be independent of separation in the range covered by the observations. Combining therefore the CMRDs of M (1-2400 AU) and G (28-1590 AU) primaries in the field and intermediate-mass primary binaries in Sco OB2 (29-1612 AU) for mass ratios, q = M 2/M 1, from 0.2 to 1, we find that the best chi-square fit follows a power law dN/dqvpropq β, with β = -0.50 ± 0.29, consistent with previous results. Finally, we note that the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test gives a ~1% probability

  18. Einstein imaging observations of clusters with a bimodal mass distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, W.; Bechtold, J.; Blair, W.; Giacconi, R.; Van Speybroeck, L.; Jones, C.

    1981-01-01

    Einstein imaging observations of four X-ray clusters of galaxies characterized by a double X-ray surface brightness and thus mass distribution are presented. The clusters A98, A115, A1750 and SC 0627-54 were found to exhibit two enhancements in their X-ray surface brightness distributions in observations made with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter. Calculations of the probability that the clusters represent chance superpositions indicate that the double clusters are physically associated. The radial distributions of the components are inconsistent with those of single point sources, and have been used to derive cluster luminosities which are typical of rich clusters. Masses of the subclusters are also found to be typical of bound and virialized clusters with gas contributing 10%. Within the framework of the hierarchical theory of galactic clustering, the double clusters are suggested to represent an intermediate evolutionary stage before the merger of subclusters into a relaxed Coma-type cluster.

  19. The distribution of mass components in simulated disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Santos, Isabel M.; Brook, Chris B.; Stinson, Greg; Di Cintio, Arianna; Wadsley, James; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Gottlöber, Stefan; Yepes, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Using 22 hydrodynamical simulated galaxies in a ΛCDM (Λ cold dark matter) cosmological context we recover not only the observed baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, but also the observed `mass discrepancy-acceleration' relation, which reflects the distribution of the main components of the galaxies throughout their discs. This implies that the simulations, which span the range 52 < Vflat < 222 km s-1, where Vflat is the circular velocity at the flat part of the rotation curve, and match galaxy scaling relations, are able to recover the observed relations between the distributions of stars, gas and dark matter over the radial range for which we have observational rotation curve data. Furthermore, we explicitly match the observed baryonic to halo mass relation for the first time with simulated galaxies. We discuss our results in the context of the baryon cycle that is inherent in these simulations, and with regards to the effect of baryonic processes on the distribution of dark matter.

  20. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF COMPANIONS TO LOW-MASS WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Jeff J.; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Agüeros, Marcel A.

    2014-12-20

    Measuring the masses of companions to single-line spectroscopic binary stars is (in general) not possible because of the unknown orbital plane inclination. Even when the mass of the visible star can be measured, only a lower limit can be placed on the mass of the unseen companion. However, since these inclination angles should be isotropically distributed, for a large enough, unbiased sample, the companion mass distribution can be deconvolved from the distribution of observables. In this work, we construct a hierarchical probabilistic model to infer properties of unseen companion stars given observations of the orbital period and projected radial velocity of the primary star. We apply this model to three mock samples of low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs; M ≲ 0.45 M {sub ☉}) and a sample of post-common-envelope binaries. We use a mixture of two Gaussians to model the WD and neutron star (NS) companion mass distributions. Our model successfully recovers the initial parameters of these test data sets. We then apply our model to 55 WDs in the extremely low-mass (ELM) WD Survey. Our maximum a posteriori model for the WD companion population has a mean mass μ{sub WD} = 0.74 M {sub ☉}, with a standard deviation σ{sub WD} = 0.24 M {sub ☉}. Our model constrains the NS companion fraction f {sub NS} to be <16% at 68% confidence. We make samples from the posterior distribution publicly available so that future observational efforts may compute the NS probability for newly discovered LMWDs.

  1. The Close Companion Mass-ratio Distribution of Intermediate-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Kraus, Adam; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Binary stars and higher-order multiple systems are a ubiquitous outcome of star formation, especially as the system mass increases. The companion mass-ratio distribution is a unique probe into the conditions of the collapsing cloud core and circumstellar disk(s) of the binary fragments. Inside a˜ 1000 {{A}}{{U}} the disks from the two forming stars can interact, and additionally companions can form directly through disk fragmentation. We should, therefore, expect the mass-ratio distribution of close companions (a≲ 100 AU) to differ from that of wide companions. This prediction is difficult to test using traditional methods, in particular, with intermediate-mass primary stars, for a variety of observational reasons. We present the results of a survey searching for companions to A- and B-type stars using the direct spectral detection method, which is sensitive to late-type companions within ˜ 1\\prime\\prime of the primary and which has no inner working angle. We estimate the temperatures and surface gravity of most of the 341 sample stars and derive their masses and ages. We additionally estimate the temperatures and masses of the 64 companions we find, 23 of which are new detections. We find that the mass-ratio distribution for our sample has a maximum near q˜ 0.3. Our mass-ratio distribution has a very different form than in previous works, where it is usually well-described by a power law, and indicates that close companions to intermediate-mass stars experience significantly different accretion histories or formation mechanisms than wide companions.

  2. Lacunarity and multifractal analysis of the large DLA mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Romo, Suemi; Sosa-Herrera, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    We show the methodology used to analyze fractal and mass-multifractal properties of very large Diffusion-Limited Aggregation (DLA) clusters with a maximum of 109 particles for 2D aggregates and 108 particles for 3D clusters, to support our main result; the scaling behavior obtained by our experimental results corresponds to the expected performance of monofractal objects. In order to estimate lacunarity measures for large DLA clusters, we develop a variant of the gliding-box algorithm which reduces the computer time needed to obtain experimental results. We show how our mass multifractal data have a tendency to present monofractal behavior for the mass distribution of the cases presented in this paper in the limit of very large clusters. Lacunarity analysis shows, provided we study small clusters mass distributions, data which might be interpreted as two different values of fractal dimensions while the cluster grows; however, this effect tends to vanish when the cluster size increases further, in such a way that monofractality is achieved. The outcomes of this paper lead us to conclude that the previously reported mass multifractality behavior (Vicsek et al., 1990 [13]) detected for DLA clusters is a consequence of finite size effects and floating point precision limitations and not an intrinsic feature of the phenomena, since the scaling behavior of our DLA clusters space corresponds to monofractal objects, being this situation remarkably noticeable in the limit of very large clusters.

  3. Estimating groundwater recharge on a temperate humid to semiarid volcanic island (Jeju, Korea) from water table fluctuations, Cl mass balance, apparent CFC-12 ages and 3H renewal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, K. B.; El-Kadi, A. I.; Mair, A.; Whittier, R.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater table fluctuations, Chloride mass balance, apparent groundwater Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-12) ages and tritium (3H) renewal rates were used to assess recharge on Jeju Island (Korea), where groundwater is the main source of potable water. Given the limitations of various techniques and the respective data, the methods yield highly variable results of 10 to 1,991 mm/yr, with an average of 780 mm/yr that represents about 40% of the average annual rainfall over the island. The magnitude of recharge has not changed significantly over the past 50 years as indicated by an overall agreement of estimates for recent inter-seasonal recharge from the water table fluctuation method, and the long term average values from the geochemical techniques and the detailed water budget. Heterogeneity of recharge at the catchment scale is caused by spatially and temporally variable rainfall and evapotranspiration as well as the wide range in effective porosity and specific yield values of the aquifer lithologies. A Piston Flow model with negligible dispersion and diffusion fits 3H values for most groundwater samples. This implies that the mafic to intermediate volcanics exhibit fracture-hosted groundwater flow and that rapid recharge may be occurring in zones of interconnected porosity that represent a fraction of the total porosity. Calculated recharge rates that are generally highest (>1,000 mm/yr) in southern and eastern catchments and decrease with altitude indicate a strong control of topography and rainfall. However, since high recharge may occur across broad areas, attempts to protect groundwater from surface contamination require management of the landscape as a whole, not just the uplands. Increased recharge in western catchments (i.e., Hallim and Hangyeong) has not lowered groundwater nitrate contents due to the low effective porosities of the aquifers, where older nitrate-rich water is trapped in massive lava blocks within the unsaturated zone and is slowly mixed with

  4. The mass distribution function of planets in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Renu

    2016-05-01

    I will describe some deductions about the planet mass function from the observational data of exoplanets and theoretical considerations of dynamical stability of planetary systems. The Kepler mission has carried out a systematic survey for planets in the Galaxy, and obtained data on several hundred exo-planetary systems. Analysis of these data indicates that planetary orbital separations have an approximately log-normal distribution. Taken together with plausible ansatzs for the dynamical stability of multi-planet systems, it appears that the planet mass function is peaked in logarithm of mass, with the most probable value of log m/M_Earth ∼ (0.6 ‑ 1.0). A modest extrapolation finds that Earth mass planets are about ~1000 times more common than Jupiter mass planets, and that the most common planets in the Galaxy may be of lunar-to-Mars mass.This research was supported by NSF (grant AST-1312498) and NASA (grant NNX14AG93G).

  5. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m3/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m3 (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m3 (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources. PMID:26644919

  6. NASA Langley Research Center's distributed mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, Juliet Z.; Humes, D. Creig

    1993-01-01

    There is a trend in institutions with high performance computing and data management requirements to explore mass storage systems with peripherals directly attached to a high speed network. The Distributed Mass Storage System (DMSS) Project at NASA LaRC is building such a system and expects to put it into production use by the end of 1993. This paper presents the design of the DMSS, some experiences in its development and use, and a performance analysis of its capabilities. The special features of this system are: (1) workstation class file servers running UniTree software; (2) third party I/O; (3) HIPPI network; (4) HIPPI/IPI3 disk array systems; (5) Storage Technology Corporation (STK) ACS 4400 automatic cartridge system; (6) CRAY Research Incorporated (CRI) CRAY Y-MP and CRAY-2 clients; (7) file server redundancy provision; and (8) a transition mechanism from the existent mass storage system to the DMSS.

  7. Gravitational and mass distribution effects on stationary superwinds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Añorve-Zeferino, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we model the effect of non-uniform dynamical mass distributions and their associated gravitational fields on the stationary galactic superwind solution. We do this by considering an analogue injection of mass and energy from stellar winds and SNe. We consider both compact dark-matter and baryonic haloes that does not extend further from the galaxies optical radii Ropt as well as extended gravitationally-interacting ones. We consider halo profiles that emulate the results of recent cosmological simulations and coincide also with observational estimations from galaxy surveys. This allows to compare the analytical superwind solution with outflows from different kinds of galaxies. We give analytical formulae that establish when an outflow is possible and also characterize distinct flow regimes and enrichment scenarios. We also constraint the parameter space by giving approximate limits above which gravitation, self-gravitation and radiative cooling can inhibit the stationary flow. We obtain analytical expressions for the free superwind hydrodynamical profiles. We find that the existence or inhibition of the superwind solution highly depends on the steepness and concentration of the dynamical mass and the mass and energy injection rates. We compare our results with observational data and a recent numerical work. We put our results in the context of the mass-metallicity relationship to discuss observational evidence related to the selective loss of metals from the least massive galaxies and also discuss the case of massive galaxies.

  8. Mass Distribution in Plumes: constraints from gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, S. I.; Baines, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat Island in the Caribbean has been active for more than 15 years. A small network, consisting of 4 sites, 5 - 10 km distant from the Soufriere Hills Volcano, was installed early in 2003. Each site has borehole strainmeters as well as micro-barographs and gave clear data from all volcanic events. A number of vulcanian explosions followed the major dome collapse on 13th July, 2003 and have continued until at least January 2008.. The plumes from these fragmentation events gave rise to an ~800 second period atmospheric pressure signal of 20 - 50 pascal amplitude propagating at about 30 m/sec. The onset is rarefaction. The data are consistent with a gravity wave confined to the troposphere. Note that plumes penetrating the stratosphere have a very different air pressure character. Initial modeling indicated that the coda of these waves was sensitive to the mass distribution in the plume. Since only the data beyond about 1000 seconds are found to yield information about mass distribution, we can use a simple impulsive source. The data, and particularly the coda, are best satisfied if most of the effective mass is at mid-plume, with reduced amounts near the surface and high in the troposphere. This suggests that the heavier ash particles fall as the plume rises. Since particle size impacts the event's hazard, this type of observation may have predictive capability.

  9. Probing the Mass Distribution and Stellar Populations of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Johnny; Martini, P.; Thompson, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    M82 is often considered the archetypical starburst galaxy because of its spectacular starbust-driven superwind. Its close proximity of 3.6 Mpc and nearly edge-on geometry make it a unique laboratory for studying the physics of rapid star formation and violent galactic winds. In addition, there is evidence that it has been tidally-truncated by its interaction with M81 and therefore has essentially no dark matter halo. The mass distribution of this galaxy is needed to estimate the power of its superwind, as well as determine if a dark matter halo is still present. Numerous studies have used stellar and gas dynamics to estimate the mass distribution, yet the substantial dust attenuation has been a significant challenge. We have measured the stellar kinematics in the near-infrared K-band with the LUCI-1 spectrograph at the Large Binocular Telescope. We used the '2CO stellar absorption bandhead at 2.29µm to measure the stellar rotation curve out to ˜4kpc, and our results confirm that the dark matter halo is still present. This is in stark contrast with the nearly Keplerian gas dynamics measured with HI and CO emission from the interstellar medium. We estimate M82's dynamical mass to be ˜1010 M⊙. We have also measured the equivalent width of the 12CO bandhead to provide new constraints on the spatial extent of the red supergiant population. The variation in the CO equivalent width with radius clearly shows that supergiants dominate the light within 0.5kpc radius. The superwind is likely launched from this region, where we estimate the enclosed mass is 2×109 M⊙.

  10. MASS DISTRIBUTION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Plana, H.; Amram, P.; De Oliveira, C. Mendes; Balkowski, C.

    2010-01-15

    This study presents the mass distribution for a sample of 18 late-type galaxies in nine Hickson compact groups. We used H{alpha} rotation curves (RCs) from high-resolution two-dimensional velocity fields of Fabry-Perot observations and the J-band photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, in order to determine the dark halo and the visible matter distributions. The study compares two halo density profiles, an isothermal core-like distribution, and a cuspy one. We also compare their visible and dark matter distributions with those of galaxies belonging to cluster and field galaxies coming from two samples: 40 cluster galaxies of Barnes et al. and 35 field galaxies of Spano et al. The central halo surface density is found to be constant with respect to the total absolute magnitude similar to what is found for the isolated galaxies. This suggests that the halo density is independent of galaxy type and environment. We have found that core-like density profiles better fit the RCs than cuspy-like ones. No major differences have been found between field, cluster, and compact group galaxies with respect to their dark halo density profiles.

  11. Generalised extreme value distributions provide a natural hypothesis for the shape of seed mass distributions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Will; Moles, Angela T; Chong, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Among co-occurring species, values for functionally important plant traits span orders of magnitude, are uni-modal, and generally positively skewed. Such data are usually log-transformed "for normality" but no convincing mechanistic explanation for a log-normal expectation exists. Here we propose a hypothesis for the distribution of seed masses based on generalised extreme value distributions (GEVs), a class of probability distributions used in climatology to characterise the impact of event magnitudes and frequencies; events that impose strong directional selection on biological traits. In tests involving datasets from 34 locations across the globe, GEVs described log10 seed mass distributions as well or better than conventional normalising statistics in 79% of cases, and revealed a systematic tendency for an overabundance of small seed sizes associated with low latitudes. GEVs characterise disturbance events experienced in a location to which individual species' life histories could respond, providing a natural, biological explanation for trait expression that is lacking from all previous hypotheses attempting to describe trait distributions in multispecies assemblages. We suggest that GEVs could provide a mechanistic explanation for plant trait distributions and potentially link biology and climatology under a single paradigm. PMID:25830773

  12. Mass and charge distributions in Fe-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, H.; Mignerey, A.C.; Marchetti, A.A.; Weston-Dawkes, A.P.; Kehoe, W.L.; Obenshain, F.

    1995-02-21

    The charge and mass of the projectile-like fragments produced in the 12-MeV/nucleon {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho reaction were measured at a laboratory scattering angle of 16 degrees. The mass and charge distributions of the projectile-like fragments were generated as a function of total kinetic energy loss (TKEL), and characterized by their neutron and proton centroids and variances, and correlation factors. A weak drift of the system towards mass asymmetry, opposite to the direction which minimizes the potential energy of the composite system, was observed. The increase in the variances with energy loss is consistent with a nucleon exchange mechanism as a means for energy dissipation. Predictions of two nucleon exchange models, Randrup`s and, Tassan-Got`s models, are compared to the experimental results of the 672-MeV {sup 56}Fe + {sup 165}Ho reaction and to other Fe-induced reactions. The proton and neutron centroids were found to be generally better reproduced by Tassan-Got`s model than by Randrup`s model. The variances and correlation factor are well reproduced for asymmetric systems by both models.

  13. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-12-31

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca and {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and {sup 35}Cl, on {sup 209}Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the {sup 31}Cl on {sup 209}Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction {sup 37}Cl on {sup 40}Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids.

  14. Boosted apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp

    Boosted black holes play an important role in General Relativity (GR), especially in relation to the binary black hole problem. Solving Einstein vac- uum equations in the strong field regime had long been the holy grail of numerical relativity until the significant breakthroughs made in 2005 and 2006. Numerical relativity plays a crucial role in gravitational wave detection by providing numerically generated gravitational waveforms that help search for actual signatures of gravitational radiation exciting laser interferometric de- tectors such as LIGO, VIRGO and GEO600 here on Earth. Binary black holes orbit each other in an ever tightening adiabatic inspiral caused by energy loss due to gravitational radiation emission. As the orbits shrinks, the holes speed up and eventually move at relativistic speeds in the vicinity of each other (separated by ~ 10M or so where 2M is the Schwarzschild radius). As such, one must abandon the Newtonian notion of a point mass on a circular orbit with tangential velocity and replace it with the concept of black holes, cloaked behind spheroidal event horizons that become distorted due to strong gravity, and further appear distorted because of Lorentz effects from the high orbital velocity. Apparent horizons (AHs) are 2-dimensional boundaries that are trapped surfaces. Conceptually, one can think of them as 'quasi-local' definitions for a black hole horizon. This will be explained in more detail in chapter 2. Apparent horizons are especially important in numerical relativity as they provide a computationally efficient way of describing and locating a black hole horizon. For a stationary spacetime, apparent horizons are 2-dimensional cross-sections of the event horizon, which is itself a 3-dimensional null surface in spacetime. Because an AH is a 2-dimensional cross-section of an event horizon, its area remains invariant under distortions due to Lorentz boosts although its shape changes. This fascinating property of the AH can be

  15. Revealing spatial distribution of soil organic carbon contents and stocks of a disturbed bog relict by in-situ NIR and apparent EC mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, Michel; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Don, Axel; Altdorff, Daniel; van der Kruk, Jan; Huisman, Johan A.

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies showed that in-situ visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy can overcome the limitations of conventional soil sampling. Costs can be reduced and spatial resolution enhanced when mapping field-scale variability of soil organic carbon (SOC). Detailed maps can help to improve SOC management and lead to better estimates of field-scale total carbon stocks. Knowledge of SOC field patterns may also help to reveal processes and factors controlling SOC variability. In this study, we apply in situ vis-NIR and apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) mapping to a disturbed bog relict. The major question of this application study was how field-scale in-situ vis-NIR mapping performs for a very heterogeneous area and under difficult grassland conditions and under highly-variable water content conditions. Past intensive peat cutting and deep ploughing in some areas, in combination with a high background heterogeneity of the underlying mineral sediments, have led to a high variability of SOC content (5.6 to 41.3 %), peat layer thickness (25 to 60 cm) and peat degradation states (from nearly fresh to amorphous). Using a field system developed by Veris Technologies (Salina KS, USA), we continuously collected vis-NIR spectra at 10 cm depth (measurement range: 350 nm to 2200 nm) over an area of around 12 ha with a line spacing of about 12 m. The system includes a set of discs for measuring ECa of the first 30 and 90 cm of the soil. The same area was also mapped with a non-invasive electro-magnetic induction (EMI) setup that provided ECa data of the first 25, 50 and 100 cm. For calibration and validation of the spatial data, we took 30 representative soil samples and 15 soil cores of about 90 cm depth, for which peat thickness, water content, pore water EC, bulk density (BD), as well as C and N content were determined for various depths. Preliminary results of the calibration of the NIR spectra to the near-surface SOC contents indicate good data quality despite the

  16. Analysis of Mass Distribution of Fission Fragment in Superheavy Mass Region

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomo, Y.

    2009-05-04

    Recently our FLNR theoretical group completes a calculation model to treat all reaction processes in heavy and superheavy mass region, which is so called 'Unified model'. Using a lot of available experimental data, we verify the validity of our model and establish a reliable model to describe the whole reaction process. As examples of the application of our model, we discuss two cases that are quasi-fission process and deep inelastic collision. We show the calculation results of the mass distribution of fission fragments in the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 236}U. Also, we discuss the possibility for the production of new heavy neutron-rich nuclei in the low-energy multi-neutron transfer process.

  17. A spiral galaxy's mass distribution uncovered through lensing and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trick, Wilma H.; van de Ven, Glenn; Dutton, Aaron A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the matter distribution of a spiral galaxy with a counter-rotating stellar core, SDSS J1331+3628 (J1331), independently with gravitational lensing and stellar dynamical modelling. By fitting a gravitational potential model to a quadruplet of lensing images around J1331's bulge, we tightly constrain the mass inside the Einstein radius Rein = (0.91 ± 0.02)″( ≃ 1.83 ± 0.04~kpc) to within 4%: Mein = (7.8 ± 0.3) × 1010M⊙. We model observed long-slit major axis stellar kinematics in J1331's central regions by finding Multi-Gaussian Expansion (MGE) models for the stellar and dark matter distribution that solve the axisymmetric Jeans equations. The lens and dynamical model are independently derived, but in very good agreement with each other around ˜Rein. We find that J1331's center requires a steep total mass-to-light ratio gradient. A dynamical model including a NFW halo (with virial velocity v200 ≃ 240 ± 40~kms-1 and concentration c200 ≃ 8 ± 2) and moderate tangential velocity anisotropy (βz ≃ -0.4 ± 0.1) can reproduce the signatures of J1331's counter-rotating core and predict the stellar and gas rotation curve at larger radii. However, our models do not agree with the observed velocity dispersion at large radii. We speculate that the reason could be a non-trivial change in structure and kinematics due to a possible merger event in J1331's recent past.

  18. Large-scale mass distribution in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M.; Steinhauser, D.; Vogelsberger, M.; Genel, S.; Springel, V.; Torrey, P.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations at low redshifts thus far fail to account for all of the baryons expected in the Universe according to cosmological constraints. A large fraction of the baryons presumably resides in a thin and warm-hot medium between the galaxies, where they are difficult to observe due to their low densities and high temperatures. Cosmological simulations of structure formation can be used to verify this picture and provide quantitative predictions for the distribution of mass in different large-scale structure components. Here we study the distribution of baryons and dark matter at different epochs using data from the Illustris simulation. We identify regions of different dark matter density with the primary constituents of large-scale structure, allowing us to measure mass and volume of haloes, filaments and voids. At redshift zero, we find that 49 per cent of the dark matter and 23 per cent of the baryons are within haloes more massive than the resolution limit of 2 × 108 M⊙. The filaments of the cosmic web host a further 45 per cent of the dark matter and 46 per cent of the baryons. The remaining 31 per cent of the baryons reside in voids. The majority of these baryons have been transported there through active galactic nuclei feedback. We note that the feedback model of Illustris is too strong for heavy haloes, therefore it is likely that we are overestimating this amount. Categorizing the baryons according to their density and temperature, we find that 17.8 per cent of them are in a condensed state, 21.6 per cent are present as cold, diffuse gas, and 53.9 per cent are found in the state of a warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  19. Determination of hyaluronan molecular mass distribution in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; de la Motte, Carol A; Cowman, Mary K

    2015-04-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low-M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from 20 unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employing ion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive enzyme-linked sorbent assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M⩽20 kDa, M∼20 to 60 kDa, and M∼60 to 110 kDa comprised averages of 1.5, 1.4, and 2.0% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M⩾110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from 13 samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of approximately 440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low-M HA components. PMID:25579786

  20. Determination of Hyaluronan Molecular Mass Distribution in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Han; Amin, Ripal; Ye, Xin; De La Motte, Carol A.; Cowman, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) in human milk mediates host responses to microbial infection, via TLR4- and CD44-dependent signaling. Signaling by HA is generally size-specific. Because pure HA with average molecular mass (M) of 35 kDa can elicit a protective response in intestinal epithelial cells, it has been proposed that human milk HA may have a bioactive low M component. Here we report the size distribution of HA in human milk samples from twenty unique donors. A new method for HA analysis, employingion exchange (IEX) chromatography to fractionate HA by size, and specific quantification of each size fraction by competitive Enzyme Linked Sorbent Assay (ELSA), was developed. When separated into four fractions, milk HA with M ≤ 20 kDa, M ≈20-60 kDa, and M ≈ 60-110 kDa comprised an average of 1.5%, 1.4% and 2% of the total HA, respectively. The remaining 95% was HA with M≥110 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis of the higher M HA from thirteen samples showed nearly identical M distributions, with an average M of ∼440 kDa. This higher M HA component in human milk is proposed to bind to CD44 and to enhance human beta defensin 2 (HBD2) induction by the low M HA components. PMID:25579786

  1. Statistical effects related to low numbers of reacting molecules analyzed for a reversible association reaction A + B = C in ideally dispersed systems: An apparent violation of the law of mass action.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, R; Sosnowski, S; Maślanka, Ł

    2016-03-28

    Theoretical analysis and computer simulations (Monte Carlo and numerical integration of differential equations) show that the statistical effect of a small number of reacting molecules depends on a way the molecules are distributed among the small volume nano-reactors (droplets in this study). A simple reversible association A + B = C was chosen as a model reaction, enabling to observe both thermodynamic (apparent equilibrium constant) and kinetic effects of a small number of reactant molecules. When substrates are distributed uniformly among droplets, all containing the same equal number of substrate molecules, the apparent equilibrium constant of the association is higher than the chemical one (observed in a macroscopic-large volume system). The average rate of the association, being initially independent of the numbers of molecules, becomes (at higher conversions) higher than that in a macroscopic system: the lower the number of substrate molecules in a droplet, the higher is the rate. This results in the correspondingly higher apparent equilibrium constant. A quite opposite behavior is observed when reactant molecules are distributed randomly among droplets: the apparent association rate and equilibrium constants are lower than those observed in large volume systems, being the lower, the lower is the average number of reacting molecules in a droplet. The random distribution of reactant molecules corresponds to ideal (equal sizes of droplets) dispersing of a reaction mixture. Our simulations have shown that when the equilibrated large volume system is dispersed, the resulting droplet system is already at equilibrium and no changes of proportions of droplets differing in reactant compositions can be observed upon prolongation of the reaction time. PMID:27036432

  2. Statistical effects related to low numbers of reacting molecules analyzed for a reversible association reaction A + B = C in ideally dispersed systems: An apparent violation of the law of mass action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, R.; Sosnowski, S.; Maślanka, Ł.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical analysis and computer simulations (Monte Carlo and numerical integration of differential equations) show that the statistical effect of a small number of reacting molecules depends on a way the molecules are distributed among the small volume nano-reactors (droplets in this study). A simple reversible association A + B = C was chosen as a model reaction, enabling to observe both thermodynamic (apparent equilibrium constant) and kinetic effects of a small number of reactant molecules. When substrates are distributed uniformly among droplets, all containing the same equal number of substrate molecules, the apparent equilibrium constant of the association is higher than the chemical one (observed in a macroscopic—large volume system). The average rate of the association, being initially independent of the numbers of molecules, becomes (at higher conversions) higher than that in a macroscopic system: the lower the number of substrate molecules in a droplet, the higher is the rate. This results in the correspondingly higher apparent equilibrium constant. A quite opposite behavior is observed when reactant molecules are distributed randomly among droplets: the apparent association rate and equilibrium constants are lower than those observed in large volume systems, being the lower, the lower is the average number of reacting molecules in a droplet. The random distribution of reactant molecules corresponds to ideal (equal sizes of droplets) dispersing of a reaction mixture. Our simulations have shown that when the equilibrated large volume system is dispersed, the resulting droplet system is already at equilibrium and no changes of proportions of droplets differing in reactant compositions can be observed upon prolongation of the reaction time.

  3. Apparent-Dip Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, R. B.; Lamar, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews methods of determining apparent dip and highlights the use of a device which consists of a nomogram printed on a protractor. Explains how the apparent-dip calculator-protractor can be constructed and outlines the steps for its operation. (ML)

  4. Multi-component Erlang distribution of plant seed masses and sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, San-Hong; Wei, Hua-Rong

    2012-12-01

    The mass and the size distributions of plant seeds are very similar to the multi-component Erlang distribution of final-state particle multiplicities in high-energy collisions. We study the mass, length, width, and thickness distributions of pumpkin and marrow squash seeds in this paper. The corresponding distribution curves are obtained and fitted by using the multi-component Erlang distribution. In the comparison, the method of χ2-testing is used. The mass and the size distributions of the mentioned seeds are shown to obey approximately the multi-component Erlang distribution with the component number being 1.

  5. The mass distribution of the Fornax dSph: constraints from its globular cluster distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, David R.; Dehnen, Walter; Read, Justin I.; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2012-10-01

    Uniquely among the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, Fornax hosts globular clusters. It remains a puzzle as to why dynamical friction has not yet dragged any of Fornax's five globular clusters to the centre, and also why there is no evidence that any similar star cluster has been in the past (for Fornax or any other tidally undisrupted dSph). We set up a suite of 2800 N-body simulations that sample the full range of globular cluster orbits and mass models consistent with all existing observational constraints for Fornax. In agreement with previous work, we find that if Fornax has a large dark matter core, then its globular clusters remain close to their currently observed locations for long times. Furthermore, we find previously unreported behaviour for clusters that start inside the core region. These are pushed out of the core and gain orbital energy, a process we call 'dynamical buoyancy'. Thus, a cored mass distribution in Fornax will naturally lead to a shell-like globular cluster distribution near the core radius, independent of the initial conditions. By contrast, cold dark matter-type cusped mass distributions lead to the rapid infall of at least one cluster within Δt = 1-2 Gyr, except when picking unlikely initial conditions for the cluster orbits (˜2 per cent probability), and almost all clusters within Δt = 10 Gyr. Alternatively, if Fornax has only a weakly cusped mass distribution, then dynamical friction is much reduced. While over Δt = 10 Gyr this still leads to the infall of one to four clusters from their present orbits, the infall of any cluster within Δt = 1-2 Gyr is much less likely (with probability 0-70 per cent, depending on Δt and the strength of the cusp). Such a solution to the timing problem requires (in addition to a shallow dark matter cusp) that in the past the globular clusters were somewhat further from Fornax than today; they most likely did not form within Fornax, but were accreted.

  6. Penrose inequality and apparent horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2004-12-15

    A spherically symmetric spacetime is presented with an initial data set that is asymptotically flat, satisfies the dominant energy condition, and such that on this initial data M<{radical}(A/16{pi}), where M is the total mass and A is the area of the apparent horizon. This provides a counterexample to a commonly stated version of the Penrose inequality, though it does not contradict the true Penrose inequality.

  7. Isospin dependence of mass-distribution shape of fission fragments of Hg isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Andreyev, A. N.

    2013-10-01

    Using an improved scission-point model, the mass distributions are calculated for induced fission of even Hg isotopes with mass numbers A=174to196. With increasing A of a fissioning AHg nucleus the mass distribution evolves from symmetric for 174Hg, to asymmetric for isotopes close to 180Hg, and back to more symmetric for 192,194,196Hg. In the fissioning Hg isotopes their excitation energy weakly influences the shape of the mass distribution. In 180,184Hg, the mass distributions of fission fragments remain asymmetric even at high excitation energies.

  8. Quantifying the line-of-sight mass distributions for time-delay lenses with stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristian; Fassnacht, Chris; Treu, Tommaso; Suyu, Sherry; Auger, Matt; Koopmans, Leon; Marshall, Phil; Wong, Kenneth; Collett, Thomas; Agnello, Adriano; Blandford, Roger; Courbin, Frederic; Hilbert, Stefan; Meylan, Georges; Sluse, Dominique

    2014-12-01

    Measuring cosmological parameters with a realistic account of systematic uncertainties is currently one of the principal challenges of physical cosmology. Building on our recent successes with two gravitationally lensed systems, we have started a program to achieve accurate cosmographic measurements from five gravitationally lensed quasars. We aim at measuring H_0 with an accuracy better than 4%, comparable to but independent from measurements by current BAO, SN or Cepheid programs. The largest current contributor to the error budget in our sample is uncertainty about the line-of-sight mass distribution and environment of the lens systems. In this proposal, we request wide-field u-band imaging of the only lens in our sample without already available Spitzer/IRCA observations, B1608+656. The proposed observations are critical for reducing these uncertainties by providing accurate redshifts and in particular stellar masses for galaxies in the light cones of the target lens system. This will establish lensing as a powerful and independent tool for determining cosmography, in preparation for the hundreds of time-delay lenses that will be discovered by future surveys.

  9. DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF AN AEROSOL MASS DISTRIBUTION MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    An aerosol mass monitor has been built to measure the masses of non-volatile aerosols in the range of 0.05 to 5 micrometers aerodynamic particle diameter. The instrument consists of a newly designed spiral duct aerosol centrifuge equipped with highly sensitive quartz sensors for ...

  10. Distribution of dark and luminous mass in galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Lovas, Stephen; Kielkopf, John F.

    2014-06-01

    A uniform scale relation between dark and baryonic matter is observed in galaxies over a broad range of physical parameter space. The ratio of dark to baryonic mass is found to increase proportionately with radial distance in observational data spanning a wide dynamic range of morphological type, rotation velocity, radius, surface density, and mass. This close relation between dark and baryonic mass poses a fine-tuning problem for galaxy formation models. Such a uniform scale relation, extending from the inner galactic region to the outermost kinematic data point, may play a role in clarifying the dark matter phenomenon.

  11. No Apparent Reduction in Schistosome Burden or Genetic Diversity Following Four Years of School-Based Mass Drug Administration in Mwea, Central Kenya, a Heavy Transmission Area

    PubMed Central

    Lelo, Agola E.; Mburu, David N.; Magoma, Gabriel N.; Mungai, Ben N.; Kihara, Jimmy H.; Mwangi, Ibrahim N.; Maina, Geoffrey M.; Kinuthia, Joseph M.; Mutuku, Martin W.; Loker, Eric S.; Mkoji, Gerald M.; Steinauer, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a debilitating neglected tropical disease that infects over 200 million people worldwide. To combat this disease, in 2012, the World Health Organization announced a goal of reducing and eliminating transmission of schistosomes. Current control focuses primarily on mass drug administration (MDA). Therefore, we monitored transmission of Schistosoma mansoni via fecal egg counts and genetic markers in a typical school based MDA setting to ascertain the actual impacts of MDA on the targeted schistosome population. Methods For 4 years, we followed 67 children enrolled in a MDA program in Kenya. Infection status and egg counts were measured each year prior to treatment. For 15 of these children, for which there was no evidence of acquired resistance, meaning they became re-infected following each treatment, we collected microsatellite genotype data from schistosomes passed in fecal samples as a representation of the force of transmission between drug treatments. We genotyped a total of 4938 parasites from these children, with an average of 329.2 parasites per child for the entire study, and an average of 82.3 parasites per child per annual examination. We compared prevalence, egg counts, and genetic measures including allelic richness, gene diversity (expected heterozygosity), adult worm burdens and effective number of breeders among time points to search for evidence for a change in transmission or schistosome populations during the MDA program. Findings We found no evidence of reduced transmission or schistosome population decline over the course of the program. Although prevalence declined in the 67 children as it did in the overall program, reinfection rates were high, and for the 15 children studied in detail, schistosome egg counts and estimated adult worm burdens did not decline between years 1 and 4, and genetic diversity increased over the course of drug treatment. Interpretation School based control programs undoubtedly improve the

  12. Using Punnett Squares to Facilitate Students' Understanding of Isotopic Distributions in Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sein, Lawrence T., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The isotopic distribution in mass spectroscopy is described for identifying pure compounds, being able to distinguish molecular fragments by masses. Punnett squares are familiar, easy to compute, and often graphical which makes helpful to students and the relative distribution of isotopic combination is easily generated for even isotopic…

  13. Comparing the Effects of Massed and Distributed Practice on Skill Acquisition for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haq, Shaji S.; Kodak, Tiffany; Kurtz-Nelson, Evangeline; Porritt, Marilynn; Rush, Kristin; Cariveau, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We replicated and extended the findings of Haq and Kodak (2015) by evaluating the efficiency of massed and distributed practice for teaching tacts and textual and intraverbal behavior to 3 children with autism. Massed practice included all practice opportunities conducted on 1 day during each week, and distributed practice included practice…

  14. A unified model for the spatial and mass distribution of subhaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiaxin; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Jing, Yipeng

    2016-04-01

    N-body simulations suggest that the substructures that survive inside dark matter haloes follow universal distributions in mass and radial number density. We demonstrate that a simple analytical model can explain these subhalo distributions as resulting from tidal stripping which increasingly reduces the mass of subhaloes with decreasing halocentric distance. As a starting point, the spatial distribution of subhaloes of any given infall mass is shown to be largely indistinguishable from the overall mass distribution of the host halo. Using a physically motivated statistical description of the amount of mass stripped from individual subhaloes, the model fully describes the joint distribution of subhaloes in final mass, infall mass and radius. As a result, it can be used to predict several derived distributions involving combinations of these quantities including, but not limited to, the universal subhalo mass function, the subhalo spatial distribution, the gravitational lensing profile, the dark matter annihilation radiation profile and boost factor. This model clarifies a common confusion when comparing the spatial distributions of galaxies and subhaloes, the so-called anti-bias, as a simple selection effect. We provide a PYTHON code SUBGEN for populating haloes with subhaloes at http://icc.dur.ac.uk/data/.

  15. Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Ickhikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the origin of the narrowness of the single peak at mass-symmetric division in the fragment mass-yield curve for spontaneous fission of {sup 258}Fm. For this purpose, we employ the macroscopic-microscopic model and calculate a potential-energy curve at the mass-symmetric compact scission configuration, as a function of the fragment mass number, which is obtained from the single-particle wave-function densities. In the calculations, we minimize total energies by varying the deformations of the two fragments, with constraints on the mass quadrupole moment, and by keeping the neck radius zero. The energies thus become functions of mass asymmetry. Using the obtained potential, we solve the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation with a microscopic coordinate-dependent inertial mass to calculate the fragment mass-yield curve. The calculated mass yield, expressed in terms of the microscopic mass density, is consistent with the extremely narrow experimental mass distribution.

  16. The distribution of mass and angular momentum in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Marochnik, L.S.; Mukhin, L.M.; Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1989-01-01

    This book describes the contribution of the comets in the Oort cloud to the angular momentum of the solar system. Topics covered include: Nuclear mass of the new comets observed, Mass of the Oort cloud, Mass distribution in the solar system, Zone of comet formation, Angular momentum of the Oort cloud, and Angular momentum of the Hills cloud.

  17. Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs) with adjustable mass accuracy.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs), a new software tool designed to compute molecular isotopic distributions with adjustable accuracies. MIDAs offers two algorithms, one polynomial-based and one Fourier-transform-based, both of which compute molecular isotopic distributions accurately and efficiently. The polynomial-based algorithm contains few novel aspects, whereas the Fourier-transform-based algorithm consists mainly of improvements to other existing Fourier-transform-based algorithms. We have benchmarked the performance of the two algorithms implemented in MIDAs with that of eight software packages (BRAIN, Emass, Mercury, Mercury5, NeutronCluster, Qmass, JFC, IC) using a consensus set of benchmark molecules. Under the proposed evaluation criteria, MIDAs's algorithms, JFC, and Emass compute with comparable accuracy the coarse-grained (low-resolution) isotopic distributions and are more accurate than the other software packages. For fine-grained isotopic distributions, we compared IC, MIDAs's polynomial algorithm, and MIDAs's Fourier transform algorithm. Among the three, IC and MIDAs's polynomial algorithm compute isotopic distributions that better resemble their corresponding exact fine-grained (high-resolution) isotopic distributions. MIDAs can be accessed freely through a user-friendly web-interface at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/midas/index.html. PMID:24254576

  18. Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs) with Adjustable Mass Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Gelio; Ogurtsov, Aleksey Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present Molecular Isotopic Distribution Analysis (MIDAs), a new software tool designed to compute molecular isotopic distributions with adjustable accuracies. MIDAs offers two algorithms, one polynomial-based and one Fourier-transform-based, both of which compute molecular isotopic distributions accurately and efficiently. The polynomial-based algorithm contains few novel aspects, whereas the Fourier-transform-based algorithm consists mainly of improvements to other existing Fourier-transform-based algorithms. We have benchmarked the performance of the two algorithms implemented in MIDAs with that of eight software packages (BRAIN, Emass, Mercury, Mercury5, NeutronCluster, Qmass, JFC, IC) using a consensus set of benchmark molecules. Under the proposed evaluation criteria, MIDAs's algorithms, JFC, and Emass compute with comparable accuracy the coarse-grained (low-resolution) isotopic distributions and are more accurate than the other software packages. For fine-grained isotopic distributions, we compared IC, MIDAs's polynomial algorithm, and MIDAs's Fourier transform algorithm. Among the three, IC and MIDAs's polynomial algorithm compute isotopic distributions that better resemble their corresponding exact fine-grained (high-resolution) isotopic distributions. MIDAs can be accessed freely through a user-friendly web-interface at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/midas/index.html.

  19. Fission fragment mass distributions in reactions forming the {sup 213}Fr compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Appannababu, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Deshmukh, N. N.; Rath, P. K.; Singh, N. L.; Nayak, B. K.; Thomas, R. G.; Choudhury, R. K.; Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Negi, D.; Prasad, E.

    2011-03-15

    The fission fragment mass angle correlations and mass ratio distributions have been investigated for the two systems {sup 16}O+{sup 197}Au and {sup 27}Al+{sup 186}W, leading to the same compound nucleus {sup 213}Fr around the Coulomb barrier energies. Systematic analysis of the variance of the mass distributions as a function of temperature and angular momentum suggests true compound nuclear fission for both the reactions, indicating the absence of nonequilibrium fission processes.

  20. Earthquake Apparent Stress Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Mayeda, K.; Ruppert, S.

    2002-12-01

    There is currently a disagreement within the geophysical community on the way earthquake energy scales with magnitude. One set of recent papers finds evidence that energy release per seismic moment (apparent stress) is constant (e.g. Choy and Boatwright, 1995; McGarr, 1999; Ide and Beroza, 2001). Another set of recent papers finds the apparent stress increases with magnitude (e.g. Kanamori et al., 1993 Abercrombie, 1995; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Izutani and Kanamori, 2001). The resolution of this issue is complicated by the difficulty of accurately accounting for and determining the seismic energy radiated by earthquakes over a wide range of event sizes in a consistent manner. We have just started a project to reexamine this issue by analyzing aftershock sequences in the Western U.S. and Turkey using two different techniques. First we examine the observed regional S-wave spectra by fitting with a parametric model (Walter and Taylor, 2002) with and without variable stress drop scaling. Because the aftershock sequences have common stations and paths we can examine the S-wave spectra of events by size to determine what type of apparent stress scaling, if any, is most consistent with the data. Second we use regional coda envelope techniques (e.g. Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Mayeda et al, 2002) on the same events to directly measure energy and moment. The coda techniques corrects for path and site effects using an empirical Green function technique and independent calibration with surface wave derived moments. Our hope is that by carefully analyzing a very large number of events in a consistent manner using two different techniques we can start to resolve this apparent stress scaling issue. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  1. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  2. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3-4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages.

  3. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages. PMID:26924271

  4. Impact of enhanced-flushing reagents and organic-liquid distribution on mass removal and mass-discharge reduction.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Nihat Hakan; Lee, Ann Russo; Brusseau, Mark L

    2013-10-01

    A series of column and flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate the impact of non-uniform organic-liquid distribution on the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in source zone mass under conditions of enhanced-solubilization flushing. Trichloroethene was used as the model organic liquid, and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and ethanol were used as representative enhanced-flushing reagents. The results were compared to those of water-flood control experiments. Concentrations of trichloroethene in the effluent exhibited multi-step behavior with time, wherein multiple secondary periods of quasi steady state were observed. This non-ideal behavior was observed for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. For all flow-cell experiments, the later stage of mass removal was controlled by the more poorly- accessible mass associated with higher-saturation zones. The profiles relating reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in mass exhibited generally similar behavior for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. This indicates that while the rates and magnitudes of mass removal are altered by the presence of a solubilization-reagent solution, the fundamental mass-removal process is not. The profiles obtained for the flow-cell systems differed from those obtained for the column systems, highlighting the impact of source-zone heterogeneity on mass-removal behavior. PMID:24563557

  5. Impact of enhanced-flushing reagents and organic-liquid distribution on mass removal and mass-discharge reduction

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Nihat Hakan; Lee, Ann Russo; Brusseau, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    A series of column and flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate the impact of non-uniform organic-liquid distribution on the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in source zone mass under conditions of enhanced-solubilization flushing. Trichloroethene was used as the model organic liquid, and SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and ethanol were used as representative enhanced-flushing reagents. The results were compared to those of water-flood control experiments. Concentrations of trichloroethene in the effluent exhibited multi-step behavior with time, wherein multiple secondary periods of quasi steady state were observed. This non-ideal behavior was observed for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. For all flow-cell experiments, the later stage of mass removal was controlled by the more poorly- accessible mass associated with higher-saturation zones. The profiles relating reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in mass exhibited generally similar behavior for both the water-flood and enhanced-flushing experiments. This indicates that while the rates and magnitudes of mass removal are altered by the presence of a solubilization-reagent solution, the fundamental mass-removal process is not. The profiles obtained for the flow-cell systems differed from those obtained for the column systems, highlighting the impact of source-zone heterogeneity on mass-removal behavior. PMID:24563557

  6. The supernova progenitor mass distributions of M31 and M33: further evidence for an upper mass limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2014-11-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry to measure star formation histories, we age-date the stellar populations surrounding supernova remnants (SNRs) in M31 and M33. We then apply stellar evolution models to the ages to infer the corresponding masses for their supernova progenitor stars. We analyze 33 M33 SNR progenitors and 29 M31 SNR progenitors in this work. We then combine these measurements with 53 previously published M31 SNR progenitor measurements to bring our total number of progenitor mass estimates to 115. To quantify the mass distributions, we fit power laws of the form dN/dM∝M {sup –α}. Our new larger sample of M31 progenitors follows a distribution with α=4.4{sub −0.4}{sup +0.4}, and the M33 sample follows a distribution with α=3.8{sub −0.5}{sup +0.4}. Thus both samples are consistent within the uncertainties, and the full sample across both galaxies gives α=4.2{sub −0.3}{sup +0.3}. Both the individual and full distributions display a paucity of massive stars when compared to a Salpeter initial mass function, which we would expect to observe if all massive stars exploded as SN that leave behind observable SNR. If we instead fix α = 2.35 and treat the maximum mass as a free parameter, we find M {sub max} ∼ 35-45 M {sub ☉}, indicative of a potential maximum cutoff mass for SN production. Our results suggest that either SNR surveys are biased against finding objects in the youngest (<10 Myr old) regions, or the highest mass stars do not produce SNe.

  7. Thermodynamics of noncommutative geometry inspired black holes based on Maxwell-Boltzmann smeared mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Liu, Yan-Chun; Zhu, Qiao

    2014-02-01

    In order to further explore the effects of non-Gaussian smeared mass distribution on the thermodynamical properties of noncommutative black holes, we consider noncommutative black holes based on Maxwell-Boltzmann smeared mass distribution in (2+1)-dimensional spacetime. The thermodynamical properties of the black holes are investigated, including Hawking temperature, heat capacity, entropy and free energy. We find that multiple black holes with the same temperature do not exist, while there exists a possible decay of the noncommutative black hole based on Maxwell-Boltzmann smeared mass distribution into the rotating (commutative) BTZ black hole.

  8. Asymmetry of fission fragment mass distribution for Po and Ir isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Using the improved scission-point model, the mass distributions are calculated for induced fission of several Po and Ir isotopes. The calculated mass distributions and mean total kinetic energies of fission fragments are compared with the existing experimental data. The revealed coexistence of both symmetric and asymmetric modes in the β -delayed fission of At,196194 is in agreement with the experimental observations. The change of the shape of mass distribution with increasing A of fissioning AIr nucleus from asymmetric for 185Ir to symmetric for 193Ir is found.

  9. Apparent arterial compliance.

    PubMed

    Quick, C M; Berger, D S; Noordergraaf, A

    1998-04-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in estimating total arterial compliance. Because it cannot be measured directly, a lumped model is usually applied to derive compliance from aortic pressure and flow. The archetypical model, the classical two-element windkessel, assumes 1) system linearity and 2) infinite pulse wave velocity. To generalize this model, investigators have added more elements and have incorporated nonlinearities. A different approach is taken here. It is assumed that the arterial system 1) is linear and 2) has finite pulse wave velocity. In doing so, the windkessel is generalized by describing compliance as a complex function of frequency that relates input pressure to volume stored. By applying transmission theory, this relationship is shown to be a function of heart rate, peripheral resistance, and pulse wave reflection. Because this pressure-volume relationship is generally not equal to total arterial compliance, it is termed "apparent compliance." This new concept forms the natural counterpart to the established concept of apparent pulse wave velocity. PMID:9575945

  10. Classification of ultrasonic B-mode images of breast masses using Nakagami distribution.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P M; Dumane, V A; Reid, J M; Genis, V; Forsberg, F; Piccoli, C W; Goldberg, B B

    2001-03-01

    The Nakagami distribution was proposed recently for modeling the echo from tissue. In vivo breast data collected from patients with lesions were studied using this Nakagami model. Chi-square tests showed that the Nakagami distribution is a better fit to the envelope than the Rayleigh distribution. Two parameters, m (effective number) and alpha (effective cross section), associated with the Nakagami distribution were used for the classification of breast masses. Data from 52 patients with breast masses/lesions were used in the studies. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were calculated for the classification methods based on these two parameters. The results indicate that these parameters of the Nakagami distribution may be useful in classification of the breast abnormalities. The Nakagami distribution may be a reasonable means to characterize the backscattered echo from breast tissues toward a goal of an automated scheme for separating benign and malignant breast masses. PMID:11370371

  11. THE DEPENDENCE OF PRESTELLAR CORE MASS DISTRIBUTIONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE PARENTAL CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Parravano, Antonio; Sanchez, Nestor; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2012-08-01

    The mass distribution of prestellar cores is obtained for clouds with arbitrary internal mass distributions using a selection criterion based on the thermal and turbulent Jeans mass and applied hierarchically from small to large scales. We have checked this methodology by comparing our results for a log-normal density probability distribution function with the theoretical core mass function (CMF) derived by Hennebelle and Chabrier, namely a power law at large scales and a log-normal cutoff at low scales, but our method can be applied to any mass distributions representing a star-forming cloud. This methodology enables us to connect the parental cloud structure with the mass distribution of the cores and their spatial distribution, providing an efficient tool for investigating the physical properties of the molecular clouds that give rise to the prestellar core distributions observed. Simulated fractional Brownian motion (fBm) clouds with the Hurst exponent close to the value H = 1/3 give the best agreement with the theoretical CMF derived by Hennebelle and Chabrier and Chabrier's system initial mass function. Likewise, the spatial distribution of the cores derived from our methodology shows a surface density of companions compatible with those observed in Trapezium and Ophiucus star-forming regions. This method also allows us to analyze the properties of the mass distribution of cores for different realizations. We found that the variations in the number of cores formed in different realizations of fBm clouds (with the same Hurst exponent) are much larger than the expected root N statistical fluctuations, increasing with H.

  12. Mass effects on angular distribution of sputtered atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R. R.; King, M. E.; Wehner, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Sputtering metal targets at low ion energies (Hg or Ar at less than 300 eV) under normal ion incidence causes the lighter atoms (lighter isotopes or lighter elements of alloys) to be preferentially ejected in a direction normal to the target surface. Experimental results are shown for several elements and alloys at various bombardment energies. The amount of enrichment of the lighter species normal to the target surface decreases quite rapidly with increasing ion energy. The phenomenon is a result of reflective collisions because lighter atoms can be backscattered from heavier ones underneath but not vice versa. The effect provides an explanation of why solar-wind-exposed lunar material is enriched in the heavier isotopes, since sputtered lower-mass elements have a higher chance of achieving the lunar escape velocity.

  13. Rack Distribution Effects on MPLM Center of Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tester, John T.

    2005-01-01

    This research was in support of exploring the need for more flexible "center of gravity (CG) specifications than those currently established by NASA for the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The MPLM is the cargo carrier for International Space Station (ISS) missions. The MPLM provides locations for 16 standard racks, as shown in Figure 1; not all positions need to be filled in any given flight. The MPLM coordinate system (X(sub M), Y(sub M), Z(sub M)) is illustrated as well. For this project, the primary missions of interest were those which supply the ISS and remove excess materials on the return flights. These flights use a predominate number of "Resupply Stowage Racks" (RSR) and "Resupply Stowage Platforms" (RSP). In these two types of racks, various smaller items are stowed. Hence, these racks will exhibit a considerable range of mass values as well as a range as to where their individual CG are located.

  14. Orbital structure and mass distribution in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronawitter, Andi; Saglia, R. P.; Gerhard, Ortwin; Bender, Ralf

    2000-05-01

    We report on a homogeneous dynamical analysis of a sample of 21 round (17 E0/E1, 4 E2) elliptical galaxies. We present new kinematic data for eight of these galaxies and new photometry for one object. The remaining kinematic and photometric data and the required distance information are taken from the literature. The analysis uses non-parametric spherical models and takes into account line profile information as well as velocity dispersions. We present model fits to the kinematic data and the derived radial profiles of orbital anisotropy and B-band mass-to-light ratio, including confidence intervals. The circular velocity curves resulting from our model fits are all consistent with being flat outside R~ 0.3 R_e. Generally, the M/L ratio profiles show an outward increase, although models based on luminous matter are ruled out at 95% confidence only for three galaxies (NGC 2434, NGC 7507, NGC 7626). For NGC 1399, NGC 4472, NGC 4486, and NGC 4636, where X-ray observations are available, the mass profiles of the best fit models match the ones derived from the X-ray analysis. The best models for most galaxies are isotropic to slightly radially anisotropic, with typical beta <~0.3, in a few cases beta <~0 .5 at R_e/2. We discuss the generally small effects of flattening along the line-of-sight (the expected = 0.79 for this sample of luminous ellipticals) and of small embedded disks. Our results suggest that elliptical galaxies have surprisingly uniform dynamical properties.

  15. The shape of the mass distribution in M31 from its globular cluster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, Stephen M.; Huchra, John P.; Stauffer, John

    1989-01-01

    The velocity dispersion and rotation velocity of the M31 globular cluster system depend on the relative division of mass between the flat disk and a spherically symmetric halo. Using the tensor virial theorem, it is shown in detail how the mass ratio can be constrained. Radial velocities have been collected for 149 globular clusters in M31. With no assumptions about the isotropy of the velocity distribution, the globular cluster kinematics are consistent with the mass distribution inferred by the rotation curve but otherwise place no strong constraints on the relative division of the mass. If the velocity distribution is isotropic, models with the disk mass ranging between 1/2 and 1 times its maximum possible value are marginally favored.

  16. Apparent capitellar fractures.

    PubMed

    Ring, David

    2007-11-01

    Isolated capitellar fractures are rare but are identified as such, even when they are more complex, because the displaced capitellar fracture is usually the most obvious and identifiable radiographic finding and because teaching has traditionally underemphasized the involvement of the trochlea in such fractures. The author prefers the term 'apparent capitellar fractures' and draws on his experience to explain why he favors three-dimensional CT for depicting fracture detail. This article discusses treatment options, emphasizing open reduction and internal fixation to restore the native elbow. Operative techniques, including extensile lateral exposure and olecranon osteotomy; fixation techniques; and elbow arthroplasty, are described. Complications, such as ulnar neuropathy and infection, are also covered. PMID:18054674

  17. The apparent Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Helou, A.

    2015-10-01

    We exploit the parallel between dynamical black holes and cosmological spacetimes to describe the evolution of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes from the point of view of an observer in terms of the dynamics of the apparent horizon. Using the Hayward-Kodama formalism of dynamical black holes, we clarify the role of the Clausius relation to derive the Friedmann equations for a Universe, in the spirit of Jacobson’s work on the thermodynamics of spacetime. We also show how dynamics at the horizon naturally leads to the quantum-mechanical process of Hawking radiation. We comment on the connection of this work with recent ideas to consider our observable Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate and on the corresponding role of vacuum energy.

  18. Earthquake Apparent Stress Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeda, K.; Walter, W. R.

    2003-04-01

    There is currently a disagreement within the geophysical community on the way earthquake energy scales with magnitude. One set of recent papers finds evidence that energy release per seismic moment (apparent stress) is constant (e.g. Choy and Boatwright, 1995; McGarr, 1999; Ide and Beroza, 2001). Another set of recent papers finds the apparent stress increases with magnitude (e.g. Kanamori et al., 1993 Abercrombie, 1995; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Izutani and Kanamori, 2001). The resolution of this issue is complicated by the difficulty of accurately accounting for and determining the seismic energy radiated by earthquakes over a wide range of event sizes in a consistent manner. We have just started a project to reexamine this issue by applying the same methodology to a series of datasets that spans roughly 10 orders in seismic moment, M0. We will summarize recent results using a coda envelope methodology of Mayeda et al, (2003) which provide the most stable source spectral estimates to date. This methodology eliminates the complicating effects of lateral path heterogeneity, source radiation pattern, directivity, and site response (e.g., amplification, f-max and kappa). We find that in tectonically active continental crustal areas the total radiated energy scales as M00.25 whereas in regions of relatively younger oceanic crust, the stress drop is generally lower and exhibits a 1-to-1 scaling with moment. In addition to answering a fundamental question in earthquake source dynamics, this study addresses how one would scale small earthquakes in a particular region up to a future, more damaging earthquake. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. High-speed multiple-mode mass-sensing resolves dynamic nanoscale mass distributions

    PubMed Central

    Olcum, Selim; Cermak, Nathan; Wasserman, Steven C.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneously measuring multiple eigenmode frequencies of nanomechanical resonators can determine the position and mass of surface-adsorbed proteins, and could ultimately reveal the mass tomography of nanoscale analytes. However, existing measurement techniques are slow (<1 Hz bandwidth), limiting throughput and preventing use with resonators generating fast transient signals. Here we develop a general platform for independently and simultaneously oscillating multiple modes of mechanical resonators, enabling frequency measurements that can precisely track fast transient signals within a user-defined bandwidth that exceeds 500 Hz. We use this enhanced bandwidth to resolve signals from multiple nanoparticles flowing simultaneously through a suspended nanochannel resonator and show that four resonant modes are sufficient for determining their individual position and mass with an accuracy near 150 nm and 40 attograms throughout their 150-ms transit. We envision that our method can be readily extended to other systems to increase bandwidth, number of modes, or number of resonators. PMID:25963304

  20. Mass and spatial distribution of carbonaceous component in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M.; Chang, S.

    1993-01-01

    Cometary grains containing large amounts of carbon and/or organic matter were discovered by in situ measurements of cometary dust composition during VEGA and GIOTTO fly-by missions. In accordance with the classification for the data of PUMA-1 and PUMA-2 mass-spectrometers on board the VEGA spacecraft, particles with a ratio of C to any rock-forming element (Mg, Si, Fe, Ca etc.) greater than 10, were categorized as CHON. There are 464 such particles in PUMA-1 data and 51 in PUMA-2 data. Application of cluster analysis to these grains revealed several distinct compositional classes, namely: (H,C,N,O), (H,C,N), (H,C), (H,C,O), (C,N), (C,O), (C,N,O), and (C). Similar classes were identified among particles analyzed by PIA. Also, about a third of all particles fell into groups (H) and (O) characterized by abundances of these elements beyond chemically reasonable limits.

  1. Interplay of fission modes in mass distribution of light actinide nuclei 225,227Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, R.; Sugathan, P.; Jhingan, A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mukul, Ish; Mohanto, G.; Siwal, D.; Saneesh, N.; Banerjee, T.; Thakur, Meenu; Mahajan, Ruchi; Kumar, N.; Chatterjee, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Fission-fragment mass distributions were measured for 225,227Pa nuclei formed in fusion reactions of 19F + 206,208Pb around fusion barrier energies. Mass-angle correlations do not indicate any quasi-fission like events in this bombarding energy range. Mass distributions were fitted by Gaussian distribution and mass variance extracted. At below-barrier energies, the mass variance was found to increase with decrease in energy for both nuclei. Results from present work were compared with existing data for induced fission of 224,226Th and 228U around barrier energies. Enhancement in mass variance of 225,227Pa nuclei at below-barrier energies shows evidence for presence of asymmetric fission events mixed with symmetric fission events. This is in agreement with the results of mass distributions of nearby nuclei 224,226Th and 228U where two-mode fission process was observed. Two-mode feature of fission arises due to the shell effects changing the landscape of the potential-energy surfaces at low excitation energies. The excitation-energy dependence of the mass variance gives strong evidence for survival of microscopic shell effects in fission of light actinide nuclei 225,227Pa with initial excitation energy ∼30-50 MeV.

  2. The small domain of cytochrome f from the psychrophile Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241 modulates the apparent molecular mass and decreases the accumulation of cytochrome f in the mesophile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Loiselay, Christelle; Savitch, Leonid V; Simmonds, John; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Choquet, Yves; Hüner, Norman P A

    2007-10-01

    Cytochrome f from the psychrophile Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241 has a lower thermostability of its c-type heme and an apparent molecular mass that is 7 kDa lower than that of the model mesophilic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We combined chloroplast transformation, site-directed mutagensis, and the creation of chimeric fusion constructs to assess the contribution of specific domains and (or) amino acids residues to the structure, stability, and accumulation of cytochrome f, as well as its function in photosynthetic intersystem electron transport. We demonstrate that differences in the amino acid sequence of the small domain and specific charged amino acids in the large domain of cytochrome f alter the physical properties of this protein but do not affect either the thermostability of the c-type heme, the apparent half-life of cytochrome f in the presence of the chloroplastic protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol, or the capacity for photosynthetic intersystem electron transport, measured as e-/P700. However, pulse-labeling with [14C]acetate, combined with immunoblotting, indicated that the negative autoregulation of cytochrome f accumulation observed in mesophilic C. reinhardtii transformed with chimeric constructs from the psychrophile was likely the result of the defective association of the chimeric forms of cytochrome f with the other subunits of the cytochrome b6/f complex native to the C. reinhardtii wild type. These results are discussed in terms of the unique fatty acid composition of the thylakoid membranes of C. raudensis UWO 241 adapted to cold environments. PMID:17901903

  3. Internal velocity and mass distributions in simulated clusters of galaxies for a variety of cosmogonic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue

    1994-01-01

    The mass and velocity distributions in the outskirts (0.5-3.0/h Mpc) of simulated clusters of galaxies are examined for a suite of cosmogonic models (two Omega(sub 0) = 1 and two Omega(sub 0) = 0.2 models) utilizing large-scale particle-mesh (PM) simulations. Through a series of model computations, designed to isolate the different effects, we find that both Omega(sub 0) and P(sub k) (lambda less than or = 16/h Mpc) are important to the mass distributions in clusters of galaxies. There is a correlation between power, P(sub k), and density profiles of massive clusters; more power tends to point to the direction of a stronger correlation between alpha and M(r less than 1.5/h Mpc); i.e., massive clusters being relatively extended and small mass clusters being relatively concentrated. A lower Omega(sub 0) universe tends to produce relatively concentrated massive clusters and relatively extended small mass clusters compared to their counterparts in a higher Omega(sub 0) model with the same power. Models with little (initial) small-scale power, such as the hot dark matter (HDM) model, produce more extended mass distributions than the isothermal distribution for most of the mass clusters. But the cold dark matter (CDM) models show mass distributions of most of the clusters more concentrated than the isothermal distribution. X-ray and gravitational lensing observations are beginning providing useful information on the mass distribution in and around clusters; some interesting constraints on Omega(sub 0) and/or the (initial) power of the density fluctuations on scales lambda less than or = 16/h Mpc (where linear extrapolation is invalid) can be obtained when larger observational data sets, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, become available.

  4. Volume and mass distribution in selected asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Włodarczyk, I.; Leliwa-Kopystyński, J.

    2014-10-01

    The main focus of this paper is calculation of the diameters of asteroids belonging to five families (Vesta, Eos, Eunomia, Koronis, and Themis). To do that, we used the HCM algorithm applied for a data set containing 292,003 numbered asteroids, and a numerical procedure for choosing the crucial parameter of the HCM, called "the cutting velocity" vcut. It was established with a precision as high as 1 m s-1. Thereafter, we used the WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) catalog to set a range of albedo for the largest members of each family considered. The albedo data were supported by the data concerning color classification (SDSS MOC4). The asteroids with albedo out of this range were classified as interlopers and were therefore disqualified as family members. Sizes were calculated for the asteroids with albedo within the acceptable range. For the other asteroids (those chosen by means of the HCM, but with albedo not listed in the WISE), the value of albedo of the largest member of the family was adopted. Results are given in a set of figures showing the families on the planes (a, e), (a, i), (e, i). Diameters and volumes of the asteroids that are the individual members of a family were calculated on the basis of their known or assumed albedo and on their absolute magnitude. Volumes of the parent bodies of the families were found on the basis of the cumulative volume distribution of these families. We also studied the secular resonances of the family members. We have shown that the locations of members of the considered asteroid families are related to the lines of secular resonances z1, z2, and z3 with Saturn.

  5. Cluster ion distributions and correlation with fragment valence in laser-induced mass spectra of oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Michiels, E.; Bijbels, R.

    1984-06-01

    Laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA) spectra are described for binary oxides belonging to different groups in the periodic table. The positive and negative cluster ion distributions show a strong correlation with the valence electron configuration of the metal in the oxide. The bond dissociation energy of the MO/sup +/ ion also affects the intensity distributions. 20 references, 10 figures.

  6. Effects of Massed, Distributed, and Spaced Trial Sequencing on Severely Handicapped Students' Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Marilyn; And Others

    1982-01-01

    During training of cognitive and motor skills, the effects of massed, distributed, and spaced trial sequencing were evaluated relative to performance of 11 severely handicapped students (5-19 years old). Results supported the addition of distributed trial sequencing to the technology of instruction for severely handicapped learners. (Author/CL)

  7. Spectroscopy of the DA white dwarfs - Automatic atmospheric parameterization and mass distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the automatic calculation of the atmospheric parameters (Teff and log g) of hydrogen-rich degenerate stars from low-resolution spectra is described, and then applied to the spectra of 53 DA white dwarfs. A value for the width of the DA mass distribution of sigma M/solar-M not greater than +0.10 is obtained using the proposed approach. The data indicate that the distribution is asymmetrically skewed to low masses; however, there is also evidence of a high-mass non-Gaussian tail.

  8. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION MODELED BY A LEFT TRUNCATED BETA DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zaninetti, Lorenzo

    2013-03-10

    The initial mass function for stars is usually fitted by three straight lines, which means it has seven parameters. The presence of brown dwarfs (BDs) increases the number of straight lines to four and the number of parameters to nine. Another common fitting function is the lognormal distribution, which is characterized by two parameters. This paper is devoted to demonstrating the advantage of introducing a left truncated beta probability density function, which is characterized by four parameters. The constant of normalization, the mean, the mode, and the distribution function are calculated for the left truncated beta distribution. The normal beta distribution that results from convolving independent normally distributed and beta distributed components is also derived. The chi-square test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test are performed on a first sample of stars and BDs that belongs to the massive young cluster NGC 6611, and on a second sample that represents the masses of the stars of the cluster NGC 2362.

  9. Megamaser Disks Reveal a Broad Distribution of Black Hole Mass in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. E.; Seth, A.; Kim, M.; Läsker, R.; Goulding, A.; Gao, F.; Braatz, J. A.; Henkel, C.; Condon, J.; Lo, K. Y.; Zhao, W.

    2016-08-01

    We use new precision measurements of black hole (BH) masses from water megamaser disks to investigate scaling relations between macroscopic galaxy properties and supermassive BH mass. The megamaser-derived BH masses span 106–108 {M}ȯ , while all the galaxy properties that we examine (including total stellar mass, central mass density, and central velocity dispersion) lie within a narrower range. Thus, no galaxy property correlates tightly with {M}{BH} in ∼L* spiral galaxies as traced by megamaser disks. Of them all, stellar velocity dispersion provides the tightest relation, but at fixed {σ }* the mean megamaser {M}{BH} are offset by ‑0.6 ± 0.1 dex relative to early-type galaxies. Spiral galaxies with non-maser dynamical BH masses do not appear to show this offset. At low mass, we do not yet know the full distribution of BH mass at fixed galaxy property; the non-maser dynamical measurements may miss the low-mass end of the BH distribution due to an inability to resolve their spheres of influence and/or megamasers may preferentially occur in lower-mass BHs.

  10. Examining troughs in the mass distribution of all theoretically possible tryptic peptides.

    PubMed

    Nefedov, Alexey V; Mitra, Indranil; Brasier, Allan R; Sadygov, Rovshan G

    2011-09-01

    This work describes the mass distribution of all theoretically possibly tryptic peptides made of 20 amino acids, up to the mass of 3 kDa, with resolution of 0.001 Da. We characterize regions between the peaks of the distribution, including gaps (forbidden zones) and low-populated areas (quiet zones). We show how the gaps shrink over the mass range and when they completely disappear. We demonstrate that peptide compositions in quiet zones are less diverse than those in the peaks of the distribution and that by eliminating certain types of unrealistic compositions the gaps in the distribution may be increased. The mass distribution is generated using a parallel implementation of a recursive procedure that enumerates all amino acid compositions. It allows us to enumerate all compositions of tryptic peptides below 3 kDa in 48 min using a computer cluster with 12 Intel Xeon X5650 CPUs (72 cores). The results of this work can be used to facilitate protein identification and mass defect labeling in mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments. PMID:21780838

  11. Mass distributions and morphological and chemical characterization of urban aerosols in the continental Balkan area (Belgrade).

    PubMed

    Đorđević, D; Buha, J; Stortini, A M; Mihajlidi-Zelić, A; Relić, D; Barbante, C; Gambaro, A

    2016-01-01

    This work presents characteristics of atmospheric aerosols of urban central Balkans area, using a size-segregated aerosol sampling method, calculation of mass distributions, SEM/EDX characterization, and ICP/MS analysis. Three types of mass distributions were observed: distribution with a pronounced domination of coarse mode, bimodal distribution, and distribution with minimum at 1 μm describing the urban aerosol. SEM/EDX analyses have shown morphological difference and variation in the content of elements in samples. EDX spectra demonstrate that particles generally contain the following elements: Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg, Ni, K, Si, S. Additionally, the presence of As, Br, Sn, and Zn found in air masses from southeast segment points out the anthropogenic activities most probably from mining activities in southeastern part of Serbia. The ratio Al/Si equivalent to the ratio of desert dust was associated with air masses coming from southeastern and southwestern segments, pointing to influences from North Africa and Middle East desert areas whereas the Al/Si ratio in other samples is significantly lower. In several samples, we found high values of aluminum in the nucleation mode. Samples with low share of crustal elements in the coarse mode are collected when Mediterranean air masses prevailed, while high share in the coarse mode was associated with continental air masses that could be one of the approaches for identification of the aerosol origin. Graphical abstract ᅟ. PMID:26347417

  12. On the detection of a cometary mass distribution. [by perturbations on space probe orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Peale, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of detecting a possible cometary distribution on the fringes of the solar system is examined. The acceleration of a space probe due to a hypothetical cometary mass distribution with the surface density rising to a maximum and subsequently falling off with increasing distance from the sun is analyzed. The total minimum detectable cometary mass for the Pioneer and Mariner spacecraft is estimated on the basis of this model to be on the order of 1000 earth masses. Precision tracking of deep space probes is less sensitive by three orders of magnitude for the detection of an unseen cometary mass distribution at the fringes of the solar system than are the secular perturbations of long-period comets.

  13. Dynamics and swing control of double-pendulum bridge cranes with distributed-mass beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Liang, Zan; Zang, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Motion-induced oscillations of crane payloads seriously degrade their effectiveness and safety. Significant progress has been achieved with reducing payload oscillations on a single-pendulum crane with a point-mass payload attached to the end of the cable. However, large payloads and the actual configuration of the hoisting mechanism may transform the crane to a double-pendulum system with a distributed-mass payload. The manipulation task can be more challenging because of the complicated dynamics. The dynamics of bridge cranes transporting distributed-mass beams are derived. A command-smoothing scheme is presented to suppress the complex payload oscillations. Simulations of a large range of motions are used to analyze the dynamic behavior of the cranes and the robustness of the method. Experimental results obtained from a small-scale double-pendulum bridge crane transporting a distributed-mass beam validate the simulated dynamic behavior and the effectiveness of the method.

  14. Fission fragment mass distributions in 35Cl+Sm,154144 reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Nayak, B. K.; Jhingan, A.; Pujari, P. K.; Mahata, K.; Santra, S.; Saxena, A.; Mirgule, E. T.; Thomas, R. G.

    2015-08-01

    Background: A new type of asymmetric fission was observed in β -delayed fission of 180Tl [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.252502] as symmetric mass distribution would be expected based on conventional shell effects leading to the formation of N =50 fragments. Following this observation, theoretical calculations were carried out which predict asymmetric mass distribution for several mercury isotopes around mass region of ˜180 at low and moderate excitation energies [Moller, Randrup, and Sierk, Phys. Rev. C 85, 024306 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.024306; Andreev, Adamian, and Antonenko, Phys. Rev. C 86, 044315 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.044315]. Studies on fission fragment mass distribution are required in this mass region to investigate this newly observed phenomenon. Purpose: The fission fragment mass distributions have been measured in 35Cl+Sm,154144 reactions at Elab=152.5 ,156.1 ,and 163.7 MeV populating compound nuclei in the mass region of ˜180 with variable excitation energy and neutron number to investigate the nature of mass distribution. Method: The fission fragment mass distribution has been obtained by measuring the "time of flight (TOF)" of fragments with respect to the beam pulse using two multiwire proportional counters placed at θlab=±65 .5∘ with respect to the beam direction. From the TOF of fragments, their velocities were determined, which were used to obtain mass distribution taking the compound nucleus as the fissioning system. Results: For both systems, mass distributions, although, appear to be symmetric, could not be fitted well by a single Gaussian. The deviation from a single Gaussian fit is more pronounced for the 35Cl+144Sm reaction. A clear flat top mass distribution has been observed for the 35Cl+144Sm reaction at the lowest beam energy. The mass distribution is very similar to that observed in the 40Ca+142Nd reaction, which populated a similar compound nucleus, but for the pronounced dip in the

  15. Comparing the effects of massed and distributed practice on skill acquisition for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Haq, Shaji S; Kodak, Tiffany; Kurtz-Nelson, Evangeline; Porritt, Marilynn; Rush, Kristin; Cariveau, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We replicated and extended the findings of Haq and Kodak (2015) by evaluating the efficiency of massed and distributed practice for teaching tacts and textual and intraverbal behavior to 3 children with autism. Massed practice included all practice opportunities conducted on 1 day during each week, and distributed practice included practice opportunities conducted across several days during the week. The results indicated that distributed practice was more efficient for all participants. Suggested areas for future research and implications for practice are discussed. PMID:25962478

  16. On the Evolution of the Mass Distribution on Interstellar Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hee

    1995-01-01

    Mass distributions of interstellar dust grains have been determined using the objective maximum entropy method based on modeling the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and polarization in various environments. For the extinction analysis, we adopted bare spherical silicate and graphite grains. The mass distributions found are qualitatively similar to a widely used power-law distribution, however they depart significantly to achieve a good fit to the data (the detailed structure depends on the chemical composition). We also show how the mass distribution falls off smoothly toward large sizes (radii > 0.3 μm). At small sizes (< 0.02 μm) only the total mass of grains can be constrained. Most of the analysis for the polarization is based on bare silicate grains. Infinite cylinders as well as spheroids are considered. The aligned grain mass distributions found bear little resemblance to a power law. Compared to the mass distribution based on extinction, there is a close similarity for large grains, but it is not necessary to have nearly as many small grains. An oblate shape is preferred to prolate. Among materials explored, silicate is the most satisfactory. An interesting problem arises in explaining the wavelength dependence of ultraviolet interstellar polarization, if the refractive index of "astronomical silicate is adopted, but the problem is much reduced if the rise of electronic absorption is simply shifted by about 1 mu m^{-1} to higher frequencies. While this is not unlike obsidian, a volcanic glass, laboratory measurements for many more amorphous silicates are needed. There is a systematic reduction in the relative number of small grains with a<0.1murm m in the more dense regions. On the other hand, there is not any noticeable variation for large grains. This suggests that aggregation plays a major role in the variation of the mass distribution as the medium becomes more dense (with shattering operating in reverse). Theoretical studies of

  17. The MLP distribution: a modified lognormal power-law model for the stellar initial mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shantanu; Gil, M.; Auddy, Sayantan

    2015-05-01

    This work explores the mathematical properties of a distribution introduced by Basu & Jones (2004), and applies it to model the stellar initial mass function (IMF). The distribution arises simply from an initial lognormal distribution, requiring that each object in it subsequently undergoes exponential growth but with an exponential distribution of growth lifetimes. This leads to a modified lognormal with a power-law (MLP) distribution, which can in fact be applied to a wide range of fields where distributions are observed to have a lognormal-like body and a power-law tail. We derive important properties of the MLP distribution, like the cumulative distribution, the mean, variance, arbitrary raw moments, and a random number generator. These analytic properties of the distribution can be used to facilitate application to modelling the IMF. We demonstrate how the MLP function provides an excellent fit to the IMF compiled by Chabrier and how this fit can be used to quickly identify quantities like the mean, median, and mode, as well as number and mass fractions in different mass intervals.

  18. Optimal Mass Distribution Prediction for Human Proximal Femur with Bi-modulus Property.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiao; Cai, Kun; Qin, Qing H

    2014-12-01

    Simulation of the mass distribution in a human proximal femur is important to provide a reasonable therapy scheme for a patient with osteoporosis. An algorithm is developed for prediction of optimal mass distribution in a human proximal femur under a given loading environment. In this algorithm, the bone material is assumed to be bi-modulus, i.e., the tension modulus is not identical to the compression modulus in the same direction. With this bi-modulus bone material, a topology optimization method, i.e., modified SIMP approach, is employed to determine the optimal mass distribution in a proximal femur. The effects of the difference between two moduli on the final material distribution are numerically investigated. Numerical results obtained show that the mass distribution in bi-modular bone materials is different from that in traditional isotropic material. As the tension modulus is less than the compression modulus for bone tissues, the amount of mass required to support tension loads is greater than that required by isotropic material for the same daily activities including one-leg stance, abduction and adduction. PMID:26336694

  19. The Mass-Radius-Eccentricity Distribution of Near-Resonant Transiting Exoplanet Pairs Detected by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabram, Megan; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Ford, Eric B.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the mass-radius-eccentricity distribution of transiting planets near first-order mean motion resonances using Transit Timing Variation (TTV) observations from NASA's Kepler mission. Kepler's precise measurements of transit times (Mazeh et al. 2014; Rowe et al. 2015) constrain the planet-star mass ratio, eccentricity and pericenter directions for hundreds of planets. Strongly-interacting planetary systems allow TTVs to provide precise measurements of masses and orbital eccentricities separately (e.g., Kepler-36, Carter et al. 2012). In addition to these precisely characterized planetary systems, there are several systems harboring at least two planets near a mean motion resonance (MMR) for which TTVs provide a joint constraint on planet masses, eccentricities and pericenter directions (Hadden et al. 2015). Unfortunately, a near degeneracy between these parameters leads to a posterior probability density with highly correlated uncertainties. Nevertheless, the population encodes valuable information about the distribution of planet masses, orbital eccentricities and the planet mass-radius relationship. We characterize the distribution of masses and eccentricities for near-resonant transiting planets by combining a hierarchical Bayesian model with an analytic model for the TTV signatures of near-resonant planet pairs (Lithwick & Wu 2012). By developing a rigorous statistical framework for analyzing the TTV signatures of a population of planetary systems, we significantly improve upon previous analyses. For example, our analysis includes transit timing measurements of near-resonant transiting planet pairs regardless of whether there is a significant detection of TTVs, thereby avoiding biases due to only including TTV detections.

  20. Distributed low-mass star formation in the IRDC G34.43+00.24

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Arce, Héctor G.; Offner, Stella; Kassis, Marc; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Guzmán, Andrés E.; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2014-08-20

    We have used deep near-infrared observations with adaptive optics to discover a distributed population of low-mass protostars within the filamentary Infrared Dark Cloud G34.43+00.24. We use maps of dust emission at multiple wavelengths to determine the column density structure of the cloud. In combination with an empirically verified model of the magnitude distribution of background stars, this column density map allows us to reliably determine overdensities of red sources that are due to embedded protostars in the cloud. We also identify protostars through their extended emission in the K band, which comes from excited H{sub 2} in protostellar outflows or reflection nebulosity. We find a population of distributed low-mass protostars, suggesting that low-mass protostars may form earlier than, or contemporaneously with, high-mass protostars in such a filament. The low-mass protostellar population may also produce the narrow line-width SiO emission observed in some clouds without high-mass protostars. Finally, we use a molecular line map of the cloud to determine the virial parameter per unit length along the filament and find that the highest mass protostars form in the most bound portion of the filament, as suggested by theoretical models.

  1. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Daniel; West, Andrew A.; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2009-08-03

    We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

  2. The Stellar Populations of Deeply Embedded Young Clusters: Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Emergent Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    1996-04-01

    The goal of this thesis is to test the following hypothesis: the initial distribution of stellar masses from a single "episode" of star formation is independent of the local physical conditions of the region. In other words, is the initial mass function (IMF) strictly universal over spatial scales d < 1 \\ pc and over time intervals Delta-tau << 3 x 10^6 yrs? We discuss the utility of embedded clusters in addressing this question. Using a combination of spectroscopic and photometric techniques, we seek to characterize emergent mass distributions of embedded clusters in order to compare them both with each other and with the field star IMF. Medium resolution (R=1000) near-infrared spectra obtainable with the current generation of NIR grating spectrographs can provide estimates of the photospheric temperatures of optically-invisible stars. Deriving these spectral types requires a three--step process; i) setting up a classification scheme based on near-infrared spectra of spectral standards; ii) understanding the effects of accretion on this classification scheme by studying optically-visible young stellar objects; and iii) applying this classification technique to the deeply embedded clusters. Combining near-infrared photometry with spectral types, accurate stellar luminosities can be derived for heavily reddened young stars thus enabling their placement in the H-R diagram. From their position in the H-R diagram, masses and ages of stars can be estimated from comparison with theoretical pre-main sequence evolutionary models. Because it is not practical to obtain complete spectroscopic samples of embedded cluster members, a technique is developed based solely on near-IR photometry for estimating stellar luminosities from flux--limited surveys. We then describe how spectroscopic surveys of deeply embedded clusters are necessary in order to adopt appropriate mass-luminosity relationships. Stellar luminosity functions constructed from complete extinction-limited samples

  3. Using Theoretical Protein Isotopic Distributions to Parse Small-Mass-Difference Post-Translational Modifications via Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Timothy W.; Williams, Jared R.; Lopez, Nathan I.; Morré, Jeffrey T.; Bradford, C. Samuel; Beckman, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Small-mass-difference modifications to proteins are obscured in mass spectrometry by the natural abundance of stable isotopes such as 13C that broaden the isotopic distribution of an intact protein. Using a ZipTip (Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA) to remove salt from proteins in preparation for high-resolution mass spectrometry, the theoretical isotopic distribution intensities calculated from the protein's empirical formula could be fit to experimentally acquired data and used to differentiate between multiple low-mass modifications to proteins. We could readily distinguish copper from zinc bound to a single-metal superoxide dismutase (SOD1) species; copper and zinc only differ by an average mass of 1.8 Da and have overlapping stable isotope patterns. In addition, proteins could be directly modified while bound to the ZipTip. For example, washing 11 mM S-methyl methanethiosulfonate over the ZipTip allowed the number of free cysteines on proteins to be detected as S-methyl adducts. Alternatively, washing with the sulfhydryl oxidant diamide could quickly reestablish disulfide bridges. Using these methods, we could resolve the relative contributions of copper and zinc binding, as well as disulfide reduction to intact SOD1 protein present from <100 μg of the lumbar spinal cord of a transgenic, SOD1 overexpressing mouse. Although techniques like ICP-MS can measure total metal in solution, this is the first method able to assess the metal-binding and sulfhydryl reduction of SOD1 at the individual subunit level and is applicable to many other proteins.

  4. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  5. MASS DISTRIBUTIONS OF STARS AND CORES IN YOUNG GROUPS AND CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, Manon; Kirk, Helen; Myers, Philip C. E-mail: hkirk@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the relation of the stellar initial mass function and the dense core mass function (CMF), using stellar masses and positions in 14 well-studied young groups. Initial column density maps are computed by replacing each star with a model initial core having the same star formation efficiency (SFE). For each group the SFE, core model, and observational resolution are varied to produce a realistic range of initial maps. A clump-finding algorithm parses each initial map into derived cores, derived core masses, and a derived CMF. The main result is that projected blending of initial cores causes derived cores to be too few and too massive. The number of derived cores is fewer than the number of initial cores by a mean factor of 1.4 in sparse groups and 5 in crowded groups. The mass at the peak of the derived CMF exceeds the mass at the peak of the initial CMF by a mean factor of 1.0 in sparse groups and 12.1 in crowded groups. These results imply that in crowded young groups and clusters, the mass distribution of observed cores may not reliably predict the mass distribution of protostars that will form in those cores.

  6. The nonlinear equation of state of sea water and the global water mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycander, Jonas; Hieronymus, Magnus; Roquet, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    The role of nonlinearities of the equation of state (EOS) of seawater for the distribution of water masses in the global ocean is examined through simulations with an ocean general circulation model with various manipulated versions of the EOS. A simulation with a strongly simplified EOS, which contains only two nonlinear terms, still produces a realistic water mass distribution, demonstrating that these two nonlinearities are indeed the essential ones. Further simulations show that each of these two nonlinear terms affects a specific aspect of the water mass distribution: the cabbeling term is crucial for the formation of Antarctic Intermediate Water and the thermobaric term for the layering of North Atlantic Deep Water and Antarctic Bottom Water.

  7. Cluster Mass Distribution of the Hubble Frontier Fields - What have we learned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Paul, Kneib

    2016-07-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields have provided the deepest imaging of six of the most massive clusters in the Universe. Using strong lensing and weak lensing techniques, we have investigated with a record high precision the mass models of these clusters. First we identified the multiples images that are then confronted to an evolving model to best match the strong lensing observable constraints. We then include weak lensing and flexion to investigate the mass distribution in the outer region. By investigating the accuracy of the model we show that we can constrain the small scale mass distribution, thus investigating the relation between the cluster galaxy stellar mass and its dark matter halo. On larger scale combining with weak lensing and X-ray measurement we can probe the assembly scenario of these cluster, which confirm that massive clusters are at the crossroads of filamentary structures.

  8. Search for Z' ---> e+ e- using dielectron mass and angular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-02-01

    The authors search Z{prime} bosons in dielectron events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using a 0.45 fb{sup -1} dataset accumulated with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. To identify the Z{prime} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} signal, both the dielectron invariant mass distribution and the angular distribution of the electron pair are used. No evidence of a signal is found, and 95% confidence level lower limits are set on the Z{prime} mass for several models. Limits are also placed on the mass and gauge coupling of a generic Z{prime}, as well as on the contact interaction mass scales for different helicity structure scenarios.

  9. Measurement of fragment mass distributions in neutron-induced fission reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutkin, V. D.; Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Blomgren, J.; Pomp, S.; Österlund, M.; Andersson, P.; Bevilacqua, R.; Meulders, J. P.; Prieels, R.

    2009-10-01

    Fragment mass distributions from neutron-induced fission of 232Th and 238U have been measured at quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE. The measurements have been carried out making use of a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The measurement technique as well as the data processing is described. Preliminary data on primary fragment mass yields are given for an incident neutron energy of 32.8 MeV.

  10. Gas Puff Radiation Performance As a Function of Radial Mass Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Philip L.; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Prasad, Rahul; Qi, Niansheng; Waisman, Eduardo; Failor, B. H.; Levine, J. S.; Sze, H.

    2002-12-01

    The basic concept of a z-pinch, that JxB forces implode a shell of mass, creating a hot dense plasma on-axis, is coming under closer scrutiny. Wire arrays may start with an initial cold mass in a near "ideal" shell, but in fact they appear to develop complex radial mass distributions well before the final x-ray output [1,2]. We consider here the situation for gas puff z-pinches. While the ideal of a gas "shell" has been the nominal objective for many years, detailed measurements of gas flow show that nozzles used for plasma radiation sources (PRS) also have complex radial distributions. In particular, there are significant data [3] showing that the best x-ray yield comes from the least shell-like distributions. Recent experiments on the Double Eagle generator with argon have further enhanced this view [4]. For those tests with a double "shell" nozzle, there was a factor of almost 4 increase in yield when the relative mass (outer:inner) in the two shells was changed from 2:1 to less than 1:1. We suggest the following explanation. A configuration with most of its mass at large radii is subject to severe disruption by instabilities during the implosion. A more continuous radial mass distribution with dρ/dr < 0 may mitigate instability development (via the "snowplow stabilization" [5] mechanism) and thus enhance the thermalization of the kinetic energy of the imploding mass. In addition, the appropriate balance of outer to inner mass maximizes the formation of a strong shock in the core of the pinch that heats the plasma and leads to x-ray emission.

  11. The Mass Surface Density Distribution of a High-Mass Protocluster forming from an IRDC and GMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wanggi; Tan, Jonathan C.; Kainulainen, Jouni; Ma, Bo; Butler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We study the probability distribution function (PDF) of mass surface densities of infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G028.36+00.07 and its surrounding giant molecular cloud (GMC). Such PDF analysis has the potential to probe the physical processes that are controlling cloud structure and star formation activity. The chosen IRDC is of particular interest since it has almost 100,000 solar masses within a radius of 8 parsecs, making it one of the most massive, dense molecular structures known and is thus a potential site for the formation of a high-mass, "super star cluster". We study mass surface densities in two ways. First, we use a combination of NIR, MIR and FIR extinction maps that are able to probe the bulk of the cloud structure that is not yet forming stars. This analysis also shows evidence for flattening of the IR extinction law as mass surface density increases, consistent with increasing grain size and/or growth of ice mantles. Second, we study the FIR and sub-mm dust continuum emission from the cloud, especially utlizing Herschel PACS and SPIRE images. We first subtract off the contribution of the foreground diffuse emission that contaminates these images. Next we examine the effects of background subtraction and choice of dust opacities on the derived mass surface density PDF. The final derived PDFs from both methods are compared, including also with other published studies of this cloud. The implications for theoretical models and simulations of cloud structure, including the role of turbulence and magnetic fields, are discussed.

  12. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. We obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both to the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.

  13. Energy and mass distributions of impact ejecta blankets on the moon and Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Okeefe, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The paper applies previously calculated impact-induced flow fields (O'Keefe and Ahrens, 1977) resulting from interaction of 5-cm radius gabbroic anorthosite impactor with a half-space of the same material, at various velocities, to obtain mass and energy ejecta distributions. Whereas earlier results described the ejecta distribution from a 15 km/s impact of an iron object on the moon in terms of mass vs. distance, the present results describe, at a given distance from the impact, the energy content as a function of depth, i.e., the thermal structure of ejecta blankets. Pertinent computational methods are included, and several tables and plots supplement the text.

  14. No influence of a N =126 neutron-shell closure in fission-fragment mass distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Ghosh, T. K.; Banerjee, K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Kundu, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Meena, J. K.; Mukherjee, G.; Saha, A. K.; Asgar, Md. A.; Dey, A.; Manna, S.; Pandey, R.; Rana, T. K.; Roy, P.; Roy, T.; Srivastava, V.; Bhattacharya, P.; Biswas, D. C.; Joshi, B. N.; Mahata, K.; Shrivastava, A.; Vind, R. P.; Pal, S.; Behera, B. R.; Singh, Varinderjit

    2015-10-01

    Mass distributions of the fragments in the fission of 206Po and the N =126 neutron shell closed nucleus 210Po have been measured. No significant deviation of mass distributions has been found between 206Po and 210Po, indicating the absence of shell correction at the saddle point in both the nuclei, contrary to the reported angular anisotropy and prescission neutron multiplicity results. This result provides benchmark data to test the new fission dynamical models to study the effect of shell correction on the potential energy surface at saddle point.

  15. Collisional evolution - an analytical study for the non steady-state mass distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira Martins, R.

    1999-05-01

    To study the collisional evolution of asteroidal groups one can use an analytical solution for the self-similar collision cascades. This solution is suitable to study the steady-state mass distribution of the collisional fragmentation. However, out of the steady-state conditions, this solution is not satisfactory for some values of the collisional parameters. In fact, for some values for the exponent of the mass distribution power law of an asteroidal group and its relation to the exponent of the function which describes "how rocks break" the author arrives at singular points for the equation which describes the collisional evolution. These singularities appear since some approximations are usually made in the laborious evaluation of many integrals that appear in the analytical calculations. They concern the cutoff for the smallest and the largest bodies. These singularities set some restrictions to the study of the analytical solution for the collisional equation. To overcome these singularities the author performed an algebraic computation considering the smallest and the largest bodies and he obtained the analytical expressions for the integrals that describe the collisional evolution without restriction on the parameters. However, the new distribution is more sensitive to the values of the collisional parameters. In particular the steady-state solution for the differential mass distribution has exponents slightly different from 11/6 for the usual parameters in the asteroid belt. The sensitivity of this distribution with respect to the parameters is analyzed for the usual values in the asteroidal groups. With an expression for the mass distribution without singularities, one can evaluate also its time evolution. The author arrives at an analytical expression given by a power series of terms constituted by a small parameter multiplied by the mass to an exponent, which depends on the initial power law distribution. This expression is a formal solution for the

  16. The mass distribution of coarse particulate organic matter exported from an alpine headwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turowski, J. M.; Badoux, A.; Bunte, K.; Rickli, C.; Federspiel, N.; Jochner, M.

    2013-05-01

    Coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) particles span sizes from 1 mm, with masses less than 1 mg, to large logs and whole trees, which may have masses of several hundred kilograms. Different size and mass classes play different roles in stream environments, from being the prime source of energy in stream ecosystems to macroscopically determining channel morphology and local hydraulics. We show that a single scaling exponent can describe the mass distribution of CPOM transported in the Erlenbach, a steep mountain stream in the Swiss Prealps. This exponent takes an average value of -1.8, is independent of discharge and valid for particle masses spanning almost seven orders of magnitude. Together with a rating curve of CPOM transport rates with discharge, we discuss the importance of the scaling exponent for measuring strategies and natural hazard mitigation. Similar to CPOM, the mass distribution of in-stream large woody debris can likewise be described by power law scaling distributions, with exponents varying between -1.8 and -2.0, if all in-stream material is considered, and between -1.4 and -1.8 for material locked in log jams. We expect that scaling exponents are determined by stream type, vegetation, climate, substrate properties, and the connectivity between channels and hillslopes. However, none of the descriptor variables tested here, including drainage area, channel bed slope and forested area, show a strong control on exponent value. The number of streams studied in this paper is too small to make final conclusions.

  17. Foil perforation particulate impact records on LDEF MAP AO023: Incident mass distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, J. A. M.; Sullivan, K.

    1991-01-01

    An array of multiple foils varying from 1.5 to 3.0 microns exposed on Long Duration Exposure Facility's (LEDF's) geocentrically stabilized exposure platform provides perforation distributions which relate to particulate flux mass distributions and impact velocity in LDEF's orbital reference frame. The application of physical modeling enables a preliminary separation into orbital and interplanetary components, both of which have differing velocities and hence penetration effectiveness. Thin foil hypervelocity calibration data and parametric penetration formulae developed to relate target hole diameter to projectile dimensions are critically examined and a new formula offered for the ballistic limit situation. Incorporating projectile density, target density, and target strength and dimensional scaling from submicron particulates to centimeter scale data, it contrast very significantly with previous formulae in the interpretation of space impact data. Perforation flux distributions for the leading, trailing, and space pointing faces and associated mass distributions for the two populations are presented.

  18. The Distribution of YSO Masses in Dense Hubs and Less Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Dense "hubs" and less dense radiating "filaments" are common features of nearby star-forming regions and infrared dark clouds. Cores and young stars are more concentrated in such hubs than in their radiating filaments. Accreting protostars may gain less mass in such low-density filaments, since low-density gas takes longer to accrete, and since the accretion must draw gas from a greater distance in filamentary geometry. We present an investigation of the mass distributions of YSOs in dense clusters and low-density filaments in the nearest molecular clouds, to test whether YSO masses depend on environment density and geometry. HK is supported by an NSERC PDF.

  19. Stellar Populations of Deeply Embedded Young Clusters: Near--Infrared Spectroscopy and Emergent Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    1996-02-01

    The goal of this thesis is to test the following hypothesis: the initial distribution of stellar masses from a single ``episode'' of star formation is independent of the local physical conditions of the region. In other words, is the initial mass function (IMF) strictly universal over spatial scales d < 1 pc and over time intervals Δ τ << 3 × 106yrs? We discuss the utility of embedded clusters in addressing this question. Using a combination of spectroscopic and photometric techniques, we seek to characterize emergent mass distributions of embedded clusters in order to compare them both with each other and with the field star IMF. Medium resolution (R = 1000) near--infrared spectra obtainable with the current generation of NIR grating spectrographs can provide estimates of the photospheric temperatures of optically--invisible stars. Deriving these spectral types requires a three--step process; i) setting up a classification scheme based on near--infrared spectra of spectral standards; ii) understanding the effects of accretion on this classification scheme by studying optically--visible young stellar objects; and iii) applying this classification technique to the deeply embedded clusters. Combining near--infrared photometry with spectral types, accurate stellar luminosities can be derived for heavily reddened young stars thus enabling their placement in the H--R diagram. From their position in the H--R diagram, masses and ages of stars can be estimated from comparison with theoretical pre--main sequence evolutionary models. Because it is not practical to obtain complete spectroscopic samples of embedded cluster members, a technique is developed based solely on near--IR photometry for estimating stellar luminosities from flux--limited surveys. We then describe how spectroscopic surveys of deeply embedded clusters are necessary in order to adopt appropriate mass--luminosity relationships. Stellar luminosity functions constructed from complete extinction

  20. The Age, Mass, and Size Distributions of Star Clusters in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Rupali; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Dinino, Daiana; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Chien, L.-H.; Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    We present a new catalog of 3816 compact star clusters in the grand design spiral galaxy M51 based on observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The age distribution of the clusters declines starting at very young ages, and can be represented by a power law, {dN}/dτ \\propto {τ }γ , with γ =-0.65+/- 0.15. No significant changes in the shape of the age distribution at different masses is observed. The mass function of the clusters younger than τ ≈ 400 {{Myr}} can also be described by a power law, {dN}/{dM}\\propto {M}β , with β ≈ \\-2.1+/- 0.2. We compare these distributions with the predictions from various cluster disruption models, and find that they are consistent with models where clusters disrupt approximately independent of their initial mass, but not with models where lower mass clusters are disrupted earlier than their higher mass counterparts. We find that the half-light radii of clusters more massive than M ≈ 3× {10}4 {M}ȯ and with ages between 100 and 400 {{Myr}} are larger by a factor of ≈3–4 than their counterparts that are younger than 107 years old, suggesting that the clusters physically expand during their early life.

  1. Body mass index distribution affects discrepancies in weight classifications in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of body mass index (BMI) distribution, ethnicity, and age at menarche on the consistency in the prevalence of underweight and overweight as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the International Obesity Task Fo...

  2. Two-Year-Olds Learn Novel Nouns, Verbs, and Conventional Actions from Massed or Distributed Exposures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Jane B.; Tomasello, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Examined 2-year-olds' comprehension and production of novel nouns, verbs, or actions at 3 intervals after training conducted in massed or distributed exposures. Found that for comprehension, children learned all item types in all training conditions at all retention intervals. Production was better for nonverbal actions than for either word type…

  3. ON THE PROPORTIONALITY OF FINE MASS CONCENTRATION AND EXTINCTION COEFFICIENT FOR BIMODAL SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a bimodal size distribution of ambient aerosol, an upper limit in particle size can be chosen for the fine aerosol fraction so that the extinction coefficient for light scattering and absorption is directly proportional to the fine mass concentration, with no dependence on th...

  4. Physical conditions, dynamics and mass distribution in the center of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genzel, R.; Townes, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations of the central 10 pc of the Galaxy, and conclusions on energetics, dynamics, and mass distribution derived from X and gamma ray measurements and from infrared and microwave studies, especially from spectroscopy, high resolution imaging, and interferometry are reviewed. Evidence for and against a massive black hole is analyzed.

  5. Effects of Massed vs. Distributed Practice and Word Frequency on Young Children's Free Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Robert L.

    Research on massed practice (MP) and distributed practice effects to preschool children in free recall tasks is reported. A total of 40 kindergarten children were randomly assigned to High Frequency and Low Frequency word groups. No significant differences were found between the two groups on the dimensions of IQ and age. Lists of 32 high…

  6. Imaging distributed and massed repetitions of natural scenes: Spontaneous retrieval and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Margaret M.; Costa, Vincent D.; Ferrari, Vera; Codispoti, Maurizio; Fitzsimmons, Jeffrey R.; Lang, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitions that are distributed (spaced) across time prompt enhancement of a memory-related event-related potential, compared to when repetitions are massed (contiguous). Here, we employed fMRI to investigate neural enhancement and suppression effects during free viewing of natural scenes that were either novel or repeated four times with massed or distributed repetitions. Distributed repetition was uniquely associated with a repetition enhancement effect in a bilateral posterior parietal cluster that included the precuneus and posterior cingulate and which has previously been implicated in episodic memory retrieval. Unique to massed repetition, on the other hand, was enhancement in a right dorsolateral prefrontal cluster that has been implicated in short-term maintenance. Repetition suppression effects for both types of spacing were widespread in regions activated during novel picture processing. Taken together, the data are consistent with a hypothesis that distributed repetition prompts spontaneous retrieval of prior occurrences, whereas massed repetitions prompts short-term maintenance of the episodic representation, due to contiguous presentation. These processing differences may mediate the classic spacing effect in learning and memory. PMID:25504854

  7. Back-trajectory model of the Saharan dust flux and particle mass distribution in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, Albert; Resch, Francois; Afeti, George

    2013-06-01

    A back trajectory model of the Sahara dust flux toward the Gulf of Guinea has been studied. First, the atmospheric circulation over North and West Africa in winter is obtained by the backward trajectory plots with NOAA HYSPLIT to establish the winds responsible for the dust transport. The 'box' model derived by Resch et al. (2007) is used to develop the back trajectory model equations. The dust particle mass distributions at various locations traced back from Kumasi and Tamale to the Harmattan dust origin in the Chad basin can be obtained. The model is first tested with the particle mass concentrations at Tamale in Harmattan 2002 and 2005, which are easily deduced. Sample calculations are shown to illustrate the use of the model to estimate the particle mass concentration distributions at Kano and Maiduguri in Nigeria during the Harmattan 2002 and 2005.

  8. Pre-Hawking radiation may allow for reconstruction of the mass distribution of the collapsing object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-07-01

    Hawking radiation explicitly depends only on the black hole's total mass, charge and angular momentum. It is therefore generally believed that one cannot reconstruct the information about the initial mass distribution of an object that made the black hole. However, instead of looking at radiation from a static black hole, we can study the whole time-dependent process of the gravitational collapse, and pre-Hawking radiation which is excited because of the time-dependent metric. We compare radiation emitted by a single collapsing shell with that emitted by two concentric shells of the equivalent total mass. We calculate the gravitational trajectory and the momentum energy tensor. We show that the flux of energy emitted during the collapse by a single shell is significantly different from the flux emitted by two concentric shells of the equivalent total mass. When the static black hole is formed, the fluxes become indistinguishable. This implies that an observer studying the flux of particles from a collapsing object could in principle reconstruct information not only about the total mass of the collapsing object, but also about the mass distribution.

  9. The co-evolution of spiral structure and mass distribution in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seigar, Marc

    2005-07-01

    We propose to use a new diagnostic tool to study the mass buildup in disk galaxies as a function of look-back time out to z 1. The tight correlation between spiral arm pitch angle and rotation curve shear rate {Seigar et al. 2005} demonstrates that the tightness of spiral structure in disk galaxies depends on the central mass concentration {including dark matter}, as this determines the shear rate. Galaxies with high central mass concentration have a higher shear rate and more tightly wound spiral structure than those with low mass concentration. As a result, the evolution of spiral structure over time can be used to search for evolution in the mass distribution in spiral galaxies. The main goal of this project is to determine evolution in the mass distribution of disk galaxies, using spiral arm pitch angles as a quanitative indicator. In order to do this we will use nearly face-on disk galaxies with measurable spiral structure, observed in the GOODS fields.

  10. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  11. Detailed mass size distributions of elements and species, and aerosol chemical mass closure during fall 1999 at Gent, Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Cafmeyer, Jan; Dubtsov, Sergei; Chi, Xuguang

    2002-04-01

    A 10-stage microorifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) and a 12-stage small deposit area low pressure impactor (SDI) were operated at Gent from 6 September to 30 October 1999. Thirty-four parallel samples (of typically 24 h) were collected. The MOUDI samples were analysed for the particulate mass (PM) by weighing, and for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) by a thermal-optical transmission technique. The SDI samples were analysed for 27 elements by PIXE. PM and OC exhibited typically a rather similar bimodal size distribution, with most of their mass in the submicrometer size range. EC was predominantly associated with fine particles, with maximum typically at around 0.2 μm equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD). Sulphur was also mainly in the fine size range, but with maximum at 0.5 μm EAD. Other elements with mainly a fine mode were V, Ni, As, Se and Pb. The crustal elements (Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Zr) exhibited mostly a unimodal coarse mode size distribution, with maximum at about 4 μm EAD. Other elements with mainly a coarse mode were Na, Mg, P, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Ga and Sr. The elements K, Zn and Rb were generally bimodal. Aerosol chemical mass closure calculations indicated that organic aerosol and crustal matter were the major aerosol types in the supermicrometer size range, and that the dominant aerosol types in the submicrometer fraction were organic aerosol and sulphate. On average, 74% of the gravimetric PM was accounted for by the aerosol types considered.

  12. Binary star statistics - The mass ratio distribution for very wide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    Published observational data on a common-proper-motion sample (CPMS) of 326 pairs of AGK 3 stars (Halbwachs, 1986) with proper motion greater than 50 marcsec/yr and separation/proper-motion ratios less than 1000 yr are analyzed statistically to determine the frequency distribution of mass ratios (q = M2/M1). The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with those for a sample of 798 visual binaries (VBs) studied by Worley and Heintz (1983). Both samples are found to have distributions with a peak at q = about 1, but this tendency is more pronounced in the VBs than in the CPMS. The q distribution of the VB sample, unlike that of the CPMS, cannot be explained by assuming that it is a random sample of normal initial mass functions; from this it is inferred that a binary formation mechanism which favors systems with q = about 1 may be involved.

  13. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2006-01-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2005 to December 31, 2005 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse continued to obtain additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in the last reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has obtained raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (C{sub d}/m) information for several biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated in the last reporting period. Preliminary results of the mean mass and the shape data obtained are reported here, and more data collection is in progress.

  14. SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2006-06-30

    This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period January 01, 2006 to June 30, 2006 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse completed obtaining additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in a previous reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed obtaining raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (Cd/m) information for 9 more biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated before in this project. Results of the mean mass data obtained to date are reported here, and analysis of the raw data collected by REM is in progress.

  15. [Characteristics of mass size distributions of water-soluble, inorganic ions during summer and winter haze days of Beijing].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Min; Liu, Zi-Rui; Chen, Hong; Wang, Yue-Si

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the size distribution characteristics of water soluble inorganic ions in haze days, the particle samples were collected by two Andersen cascade impactors in Beijing during summer and winter time and each sampling period lasted two weeks. Online measurement of PM10 and PM2.5 using TEOM were also conducted at the same time. Sources and formation mechanism of water soluble inorganic ions were analyzed based on their size distributions. The results showed that average concentrations of PM10 and PM 2.5 were (245.5 +/- 8.4) microg x m(-3) and (120.2 +/- 2.0) microg x m(-3) during summer haze days (SHD), and were (384.2 +/- 30.2) microg x m(-3) and (252.7 +/- 47.1) microg x m(-3) during winter haze days (WHD), which suggested fine particles predominated haze pollution episode in both seasons. Total water-soluble inorganic ions concentrations were higher in haze days than those in non-haze days, especially in fine particles. Furthermore, concentrations of secondary inorganic ions (SO4(2-), NO3(-) and NH4(+)) increased quicker than other inorganic ions in fine particles during haze days, indicating secondary inorganic ions played an important role in the formation of haze pollution. Similar size distributions were found for all Sinorganic water soluble ions except for NO3(-), during SHD and WHD. SO4(2-) and NH4(+) dominated in the fine mode (PM1.0) while Mg2+ and Ca2+ accumulated in coarse fraction, Na+, Cl- and K+ showed a bimodal distribution. For NO3(-), however, it showed a bimodal distribution during SHD and a unimodal distribution dominated in the fine fraction was found during WHD. The average mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of SO4(2-) was 0.64 microm in SHD, which suggested the formation of SO4(2-) was mainly attributed to in-cloud processes. Furthermore, a higher apparent conversion rate of sulfur dioxide (SOR) was found in SHD, indicating more fine particles were produced by photochemical reaction in haze days than that in non-haze days. The

  16. Mapping drug distribution in brain tissue using liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Tucker, James W; Spreadborough, Michael J; Iverson, Suzanne L; Clench, Malcolm R; Webborn, Peter J H; Goodwin, Richard J A

    2015-10-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA-MS) is a surface sampling technique that incorporates liquid extraction from the surface of tissue sections with nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Traditional tissue analysis techniques usually require homogenization of the sample prior to analysis via high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), but an intrinsic weakness of this is a loss of all spatial information and the inability of the technique to distinguish between actual tissue penetration and response caused by residual blood contamination. LESA-MS, in contrast, has the ability to spatially resolve drug distributions and has historically been used to profile discrete spots on the surface of tissue sections. Here, we use the technique as a mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) tool, extracting points at 1 mm spatial resolution across tissue sections to build an image of xenobiotic and endogenous compound distribution to assess drug blood-brain barrier penetration into brain tissue. A selection of penetrant and "nonpenetrant" drugs were dosed to rats via oral and intravenous administration. Whole brains were snap-frozen at necropsy and were subsequently sectioned prior to analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) and LESA-MSI. MALDI-MSI, as expected, was shown to effectively map the distribution of brain penetrative compounds but lacked sufficient sensitivity when compounds were marginally penetrative. LESA-MSI was used to effectively map the distribution of these poorly penetrative compounds, highlighting its value as a complementary technique to MALDI-MSI. The technique also showed benefits when compared to traditional homogenization, particularly for drugs that were considered nonpenetrant by homogenization but were shown to have a measurable penetration using LESA-MSI. PMID:26350423

  17. The mass distribution of coarse particulate organic matter exported from an Alpine headwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turowski, J. M.; Badoux, A.; Bunte, K.; Rickli, C.; Federspiel, N.; Jochner, M.

    2013-09-01

    Coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) particles span sizes from 1 mm, with a dry mass less than 1 mg, to large logs and entire trees, which can have a dry mass of several hundred kilograms. Pieces of different size and mass play different roles in stream environments, from being the prime source of energy in stream ecosystems to macroscopically determining channel morphology and local hydraulics. We show that a single scaling exponent can describe the mass distribution of CPOM heavier than 0.1 g transported in the Erlenbach, a steep mountain stream in the Swiss pre-Alps. This exponent takes an average value of -1.8, is independent of discharge and valid for particle masses spanning almost seven orders of magnitude. Similarly, the mass distribution of in-stream large woody debris (LWD) in several Swiss streams can be described by power law scaling distributions, with exponents varying between -1.8 and -2.0, if all in-stream LWD is considered, and between -1.3 and -1.8 for material locked in log jams. We found similar values for in-stream and transported material in the literature. We had expected that scaling exponents are determined by stream type, vegetation, climate, substrate properties, and the connectivity between channels and hillslopes. However, none of the descriptor variables tested here, including drainage area, channel bed slope and the percentage of forested area, show a strong control on exponent value. Together with a rating curve of CPOM transport rates with discharge, the scaling exponents can be used in the design of measuring strategies and in natural hazard mitigation.

  18. Large-Scale Ichthyoplankton and Water Mass Distribution along the South Brazil Shelf

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo-Soares, Luis Carlos Pinto; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Freire, Andrea Santarosa; Muelbert, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton is an essential component of pelagic ecosystems, and environmental factors play an important role in determining its distribution. We have investigated simultaneous latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients in ichthyoplankton abundance to test the hypothesis that the large-scale distribution of fish larvae in the South Brazil Shelf is associated with water mass composition. Vertical plankton tows were collected between 21°27′ and 34°51′S at 107 stations, in austral late spring and early summer seasons. Samples were taken with a conical-cylindrical plankton net from the depth of chlorophyll maxima to the surface in deep stations, or from 10 m from the bottom to the surface in shallow waters. Salinity and temperature were obtained with a CTD/rosette system, which provided seawater for chlorophyll-a and nutrient concentrations. The influence of water mass on larval fish species was studied using Indicator Species Analysis, whereas environmental effects on the distribution of larval fish species were analyzed by Distance-based Redundancy Analysis. Larval fish species were associated with specific water masses: in the north, Sardinella brasiliensis was found in Shelf Water; whereas in the south, Engraulis anchoita inhabited the Plata Plume Water. At the slope, Tropical Water was characterized by the bristlemouth Cyclothone acclinidens. The concurrent analysis showed the importance of both cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients on the large-scale distribution of larval fish species. Our findings reveal that ichthyoplankton composition and large-scale spatial distribution are determined by water mass composition in both latitudinal and cross-shelf gradients. PMID:24614798

  19. The chemical evolution of Dwarf Galaxies with galactic winds - the role of mass and gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Recchi, Simone

    2015-08-01

    Energetic feedback from Supernovae and stellar winds can drive galactic winds. Dwarf galaxies (DGs), due to their shallower potential wells, are assumed to be more vulnera-ble to these energetic processes. Metal loss through galactic winds is also commonly invoked to explain the low metal content of DGs.Our main aim in this presentation is to show that galactic mass cannot be the only pa-rameter determining the fraction of metals lost by a galaxy. In particular, the distribution of gas must play an equally important role. We perform 2-D chemo-dynamical simula-tions of galaxies characterized by different gas distributions, masses and gas fractions. The gas distribution can change the fraction of lost metals through galactic winds by up to one order of magnitude. In particular, disk-like galaxies tend to lose metals more easily than roundish ones. Consequently, also the final element abundances attained by models with the same mass but with different gas distributions can vary by up to one dex. Confirming previous studies, we also show that the fate of gas and freshly pro-duced metals strongly depends on the mass of the galaxy. Smaller galaxies (with shal-lower potential wells) more easily develop large-scale outflows; therefore, the fraction of lost metals tends to be higher.Another important issue is that the invoked mechanism to transform central cusps to cored dark-matter distributions by baryon loss due to strong galactic winds cannot work in general, must be critically tested, and should be clearly discernible by the chemical evolution of DGs.

  20. System effectiveness of a targeted free mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets in Zanzibar, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticide-treated nets (ITN) and long-lasting insecticidal treated nets (LLIN) are important means of malaria prevention. Although there is consensus regarding their importance, there is uncertainty as to which delivery strategies are optimal for dispensing these life saving interventions. A targeted mass distribution of free LLINs to children under five and pregnant women was implemented in Zanzibar between August 2005 and January 2006. The outcomes of this distribution among children under five were evaluated, four to nine months after implementation. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in May 2006 in two districts of Zanzibar: Micheweni (MI) on Pemba Island and North A (NA) on Unguja Island. Household interviews were conducted with 509 caretakers of under-five children, who were surveyed for socio-economic status, the net distribution process, perceptions and use of bed nets. Each step in the distribution process was assessed in all children one to five years of age for unconditional and conditional proportion of success. System effectiveness (the accumulated proportion of success) and equity effectiveness were calculated, and predictors for LLIN use were identified. Results The overall proportion of children under five sleeping under any type of treated net was 83.7% (318/380) in MI and 91.8% (357/389) in NA. The LLIN usage was 56.8% (216/380) in MI and 86.9% (338/389) in NA. Overall system effectiveness was 49% in MI and 87% in NA, and equity was found in the distribution scale-up in NA. In both districts, the predicting factor of a child sleeping under an LLIN was caretakers thinking that LLINs are better than conventional nets (OR = 2.8, p = 0.005 in MI and 2.5, p = 0.041 in NA), in addition to receiving an LLIN (OR = 4.9, p < 0.001 in MI and in OR = 30.1, p = 0.001 in NA). Conclusions Targeted free mass distribution of LLINs can result in high and equitable bed net coverage among children under five. However, in order to sustain

  1. On the probability distribution function of the mass surface density of molecular clouds. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischera, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    The probability distribution function (PDF) of the mass surface density of molecular clouds provides essential information about the structure of molecular cloud gas and condensed structures out of which stars may form. In general, the PDF shows two basic components: a broad distribution around the maximum with resemblance to a log-normal function, and a tail at high mass surface densities attributed to turbulence and self-gravity. In a previous paper, the PDF of condensed structures has been analyzed and an analytical formula presented based on a truncated radial density profile, ρ(r) = ρc/ (1 + (r/r0)2)n/ 2 with central density ρc and inner radius r0, widely used in astrophysics as a generalization of physical density profiles. In this paper, the results are applied to analyze the PDF of self-gravitating, isothermal, pressurized, spherical (Bonnor-Ebert spheres) and cylindrical condensed structures with emphasis on the dependence of the PDF on the external pressure pext and on the overpressure q-1 = pc/pext, where pc is the central pressure. Apart from individual clouds, we also consider ensembles of spheres or cylinders, where effects caused by a variation of pressure ratio, a distribution of condensed cores within a turbulent gas, and (in case of cylinders) a distribution of inclination angles on the mean PDF are analyzed. The probability distribution of pressure ratios q-1 is assumed to be given by P(q-1) ∝ q-k1/ (1 + (q0/q)γ)(k1 + k2) /γ, where k1, γ, k2, and q0 are fixed parameters. The PDF of individual spheres with overpressures below ~100 is well represented by the PDF of a sphere with an analytical density profile with n = 3. At higher pressure ratios, the PDF at mass surface densities Σ ≪ Σ(0), where Σ(0) is the central mass surface density, asymptotically approaches the PDF of a sphere with n = 2. Consequently, the power-law asymptote at mass surface densities above the peak steepens from Psph(Σ) ∝ Σ-2 to Psph(Σ) ∝ Σ-3. The

  2. Fission fragment mass distribution studies in 30Si +180Hf reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamlath, A.; Shareef, M.; Prasad, E.; Sugathan, P.; Thomas, R. G.; Jhingan, A.; Appannababu, S.; Nasirov, A. K.; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Varier, K. M.; Yadav, C.; Babu, B. R. S.; Nath, S.; Mohanto, G.; Mukul, Ish; Singh, D.; Kailas, S.

    2016-01-01

    Fission fragment mass-angle and mass ratio distributions have been measured for the 30Si + 180Hf reaction in the beam energy range 128-148 MeV. Quasifission signature is observed in this reaction, forming the compound system 210Rn. The results are compared with a very asymmetric reaction 16O + 194Pt, forming the same compound nucleus. Calculations assuming saddle point, scission point and DNS models have been performed to interpret the experimental results. The results strongly suggest the entrance channel dependence of quasifission in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Habitat productivity influences root mass vertical distribution in grazed Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Marta; Rebollo, Salvador; Rodríguez, Miguel Á.

    2010-07-01

    Herbivores are expected to influence grassland ecosystems by modifying root biomass and root spatial distribution of plant communities. Studies in perennial dominated grasslands suggest that grazing intensity and primary productivity may be strong determinants of the vertical distribution of subterranean biomass. However, no studies have addressed this question in annual dominated pastures. In this study we assess the effect of grazing and habitat productivity on the vertical distribution of root mass in an annual dominated Mediterranean pasture grazed by free-ranging sheep and wild rabbits. We evaluate the effects of grazing on total root mass and vertical root distribution (0-4, 4-8 and 8-12 cm depths) in two neighboring topographic sites (uplands and lowlands) with different productivity using a replicated fence experiment which excludes sheep and sheep plus rabbits. We found evidences that grazing affected root biomass and vertical distribution at lowlands (high productivity habitats), where places grazed by sheep plus rabbits exhibit more root mass and a higher concentration of it towards the soil surface than only rabbits and ungrazed places. In contrast, grazing did not affect root biomass and vertical distribution at uplands (low productivity habitats). We suggest that higher nitrogen and organic matter found in lowlands permit a plant adjustment for nitrogen acquisition by increasing biomass allocation to root production which would allow plant regrowth and the quick completion of the annual life cycle. Contrary, soil resources scarcity at uplands do not permit plants modify their root growth patterns in response to grazing. Our study emphasizes the importance of primary productivity in predicting grazing effect on belowground processes in Mediterranean environments dominated by annuals.

  4. Centrifugal spreader mass and nutrients distribution patterns for application of fresh and aged poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Temple, W D; Skowrońska, M; Bomke, A A

    2014-06-15

    A spin-type centrifugal spreader was evaluated using fresh and aged poultry litter upon dry mass, product nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K), incubation study soil available N and particle size distribution patterns. Relative to the aged litter (37% moisture content), the fresh litter (17% moisture content) had greater <1.00 mm particle size fraction weights and atmospheric particulate was launched, which posed as a potential fallout to adjacent fields, waterways and residences. Relative to the aged litter, the broadcast fresh litter resulted in higher coefficients of variation (CV) over its transverse distance, a narrower calculated space distance between passes for uniform spread and lower soil available N concentrations. For nitrogen application over the broadcast transverse distance the fresh litter displayed a high R(2) best fit 4th order polynomial distribution pattern, while the aged litter showed high R(2) best fit 6th order polynomial distribution pattern. A soil incubation study of the fresh and aged broadcast litter resulted in a more variable or lower R(2) best fit 2nd order polynomial distribution pattern. For both the fresh and aged litter, the calculated distance between passes to achieve a uniform mass distribution was greater than that required for the broadcast of soil available N. For the fresh litter, the soil available N and litter P concentration levels strongly correlated (relatively high p and R(2) values) with the <1.00 mm fraction weight, while for the aged litter this relationship was not as significant. In addition to reducing the health risk (i.e. pathogens, antibiotic residues and resistant bacteria) and/or environment issues (particulate fallout onto waterways, adjacent fields and/or residences) our study mass, particulate and N distribution patterns results suggest that poultry litter should be allowed to age before broadcast application is attempted. PMID:24705099

  5. High-speed data duplication/data distribution: An adjunct to the mass storage equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The term 'mass storage' invokes the image of large on-site disk and tape farms which contain huge quantities of low- to medium-access data. Although the cost of such bulk storage is recognized, the cost of the bulk distribution of this data rarely is given much attention. Mass data distribution becomes an even more acute problem if the bulk data is part of a national or international system. If the bulk data distribution is to travel from one large data center to another large data center then fiber-optic cables or the use of satellite channels is feasible. However, if the distribution must be disseminated from a central site to a number of much smaller, and, perhaps varying sites, then cost prohibits the use of fiber-optic cable or satellite communication. Given these cost constraints much of the bulk distribution of data will continue to be disseminated via inexpensive magnetic tape using the various next day postal service options. For non-transmitted bulk data, our working hypotheses are that the desired duplication efficiency of the total bulk data should be established before selecting any particular data duplication system; and, that the data duplication algorithm should be determined before any bulk data duplication method is selected.

  6. Modelling mass transport through a porous partition: Effect of pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayet, Mohamed; Velázquez, Armando; Mengual, Juan I.

    2004-09-01

    Direct contact membrane distillation process has been studied using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene and polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. The membranes were characterized in terms of their non-wettability, pore size distribution and porosity. The mean pore sizes and pore size distributions were obtained by means of wet/dry flow method. The mean pore size and the effective porosity of the membranes were also determined from the gas permeation test. A theoretical model that considers the pore size distribution together with the gas transport mechanisms through the membrane pores was developed for this process. The contribution of each mass transport mechanism was analyzed. It was found that both membranes have pore size distributions in the Knudsen region and in the transition between Knudsen and ordinary diffusion region. The transition region was the major contribution to mass transport. The predicted water vapor permeability of the membranes were compared with the experimental ones. The effect of considering pore size distribution instead of mean pore size to predict the water vapor permeability of the membranes was investigated.

  7. Compound and metabolite distribution measured by MALDI mass spectrometric imaging in whole-body tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckli, Markus; Staab, Dieter; Schweitzer, Alain

    2007-02-01

    The determination of the compound distribution in laboratory animal tissue in early development is a standard process in pharmaceutical research. While this information is traditionally obtained by means of whole-body autoradiography using radiolabeled compounds, this technology does not distinguish between metabolites and parent compound. The technique described in this article, termed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric imaging, can fill this gap by simultaneously measuring compound and multiple metabolites distributed in whole-body tissue sections, using non-labeled compounds.

  8. Estimation of the initial shape of meteoroids based on statistical distributions of fragment masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnikov, V. V.; Gritsevich, M. I.; Kuznetsova, D. V.; Turchak, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    An approach to the estimation of the initial shape of a meteoroid based on the statistical distributions of masses of its recovered fragments is presented. The fragment distribution function is used to determine the corresponding scaling index of the power law with exponential cutoff. The scaling index is related empirically to the shape parameter of a fragmenting body by a quadratic equation, and the shape parameter is expressed through the proportions of the initial object. This technique is used to study a representative set of fragments of the Bassikounou meteorite and compare the obtained data with the results of statistical analysis of other meteorites.

  9. THE GALAXY-HALO/SUBHALO CONNECTION: MASS RELATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SOME SATELLITE OCCUPATIONAL DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Puebla, A.; Avila-Reese, V.; Drory, N.

    2013-04-10

    We infer the local stellar-to-halo/subhalo mass relations (MRs) for central and satellite galaxies separately. Our statistical method is an extension of the abundance matching, halo occupation distribution, and conditional stellar mass function formalisms. We constrain the model using several combinations of observational data, consisting of the total galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF), its decomposition into centrals and satellites, and the projected two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) measured in different stellar mass (M{sub *}) bins. In addition, we use the {Lambda}CDM halo and subhalo mass functions. The differences among the resulting MRs are within the model-fit uncertainties (which are very small, smaller than the intrinsic scatter between galaxy and halo mass), no matter what combination of data are used. This shows that matching abundances or occupational numbers is equivalent, and that the GSMFs and 2PCFs are tightly connected. We also constrain the values of the intrinsic scatter around the central-halo (CH) and satellite-subhalo (SS) MRs assuming them to be constant: {sigma}{sub c} = 0.168 {+-} 0.051 dex and {sigma}{sub s} = 0.172 {+-} 0.057 dex, respectively. The CH and SS MRs are actually different, in particular when we take the subhalo mass at the present-day epoch instead of at their accretion time. When using the MRs for studying the satellite population (e.g., in the Milky Way, MW), the SS MR should be chosen instead of the average one. Our model allows one to calculate several population statistics. We find that the central galaxy M{sub *} is not on average within the mass distribution of the most massive satellite, even for cluster-sized halos, i.e., centrals are not a mere realization of the high end of the satellite mass function; however for >3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} M{sub Sun} halos, {approx}15% of centrals could be. We also find that the probabilities of MW-sized halos of having N Magellanic Cloud (MC) sized satellites agree

  10. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sandhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-20

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. As a result, we obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both tomore » the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.« less

  11. The mass distribution of the strong lensing cluster SDSS J1531+3414

    SciTech Connect

    Sharon, Keren; Johnson, Traci L.; Gladders, Michael D.; Rigby, Jane R.; Wuyts, Eva; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Florian, Michael K.; Dahle, Håkon

    2014-11-01

    We present the mass distribution at the core of SDSS J1531+3414, a strong-lensing cluster at z = 0.335. We find that the mass distribution is well described by two cluster-scale halos with a contribution from cluster-member galaxies. New Hubble Space Telescope observations of SDSS J1531+3414 reveal a signature of ongoing star formation associated with the two central galaxies at the core of the cluster, in the form of a chain of star forming regions at the center of the cluster. Using the lens model presented here, we place upper limits on the contribution of a possible lensed image to the flux at the central region, and rule out that this emission is coming from a background source.

  12. Hematopoiesis and aging. IV. Mass and distribution of erythroid marrow in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, D.R.

    1985-11-01

    Aged mice are ''anemic,'' i.e., they have a lower hematocrit than young adult mice, but this appears to be a ''dilutional'' anemia; the red cell mass is normal. Other observations have supported the hypothesis that basal erythropoiesis does not change as mice grow old. In the present study, the percentage of injected VZFe found in the skeleton and spleen, VZFe distribution between various bones and bone groups, and the number of nucleated erythroid cells per humerus were studied and the total mass of erythroid precursors was calculated. There was no significant difference in any of these values between mice aged 3-27 months. The variability of VZFe distribution within various skeletal parts was no greater in aged than in young mice. Thus, these data further strengthen the case for normal basal rates of erythropoiesis in aged mice.

  13. An Efficient Method to Calculate the Aggregated Isotopic Distribution and Exact Center-Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesen, Jürgen; Dittwald, Piotr; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we present a computation- and memory-efficient method to calculate the probabilities of occurrence and exact center-masses of the aggregated isotopic distribution of a molecule. The method uses fundamental mathematical properties of polynomials given by the Newton-Girard theorem and Viete's formulae. The calculation is based on the atomic composition of the molecule and the natural abundances of the elemental isotopes in normal terrestrial matter. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, which we named BRAIN, we compare it with the results obtained from five existing software packages ( IsoPro, Mercury, Emass, NeutronCluster, and IsoDalton) for 10 biomolecules. Additionally, we compare the computed mass centers with the results obtained by calculating, and subsequently aggregating, the fine isotopic distribution for two of the exemplary biomolecules. The algorithm will be made available as a Bioconductor package in R, and is also available upon request.

  14. Fission fragment mass yield deduced from density distribution in the pre-scission configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warda, M.; Zdeb, A.

    2015-11-01

    Static self-consistent methods usually allow one to determine the most probable fission fragments mass asymmetry. We have applied random neck rupture mechanism to the nuclei in the configuration at the end of fission paths. Fission fragment mass distributions have been deduced from the pre-scission nuclear density distribution obtained from the self-consistent calculations. Potential energy surfaces as well as nuclear shapes have been calculated in the fully microscopic theory, namely the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model with the effective Gogny D1S density-dependent interaction. The method has been applied for analysis of fission of {}{256,258}Fm, 252Cf and 180Hg and compared with the experimental data.

  15. Modal structure of chemical mass size distribution in the high Arctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillamo, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aurela, Minna; MäKelä, Timo; Maenhaut, Willy; Leek, Caroline

    2001-11-01

    Chemical mass size distributions of aerosol particles were measured in the remote marine boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Atmospheric Research Program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996 (AOE-96). An inertial impaction method was used to classify aerosol particles into different size classes for subsequent chemical analysis. The particle chemical composition was determined by ion chromatography and by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. Continuous particle size spectra were extracted from the raw data using a data inversion method. Clear and varying modal structures for aerosols consisting of primary sea-salt particles or of secondary particles related to dimethyl sulfide emissions were found. Concentration levels of all modes decreased rapidly when the distance from open sea increased. In the submicrometer size range the major ions found by ion chromatography were sulfate, methane sulfonate, and ammonium. They had most of the time a clear Aitken mode and one or two accumulation modes, with aerodynamic mass median diameters around 0.1 μm, 0.3 μm, and between 0.5-1.0 μm, respectively. The overall submicron size distributions of these three ions were quite similar, suggesting that they were internally mixed over most of this size range. The corresponding modal structure was consistent with the mass size distributions derived from the particle number size distributions measured with a differential mobility particle sizer. The Aitken to accumulation mode mass ratio for nss-sulfate and MSA was substantially higher during clear skies than during cloudy periods. Primary sea-salt particles formed a mode with an aerodynamic mass median diameter around 2 μm. In general, the resulting continuous mass size distributions displayed a clear modal structure consistent with our understanding of the two known major source mechanisms. One is the sea-salt aerosol emerging from seawater by bubble bursting. The other is related to

  16. ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORBITAL ECCENTRICITIES FOR VERY LOW-MASS BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Liu, Michael C.

    2011-06-01

    We have compiled a sample of 16 orbits for very low-mass stellar (<0.1 M{sub sun}) and brown dwarf binaries, including updated orbits for HD 130948BC and LP 415-20AB. This sample enables the first comprehensive study of the eccentricity distribution for such objects. We find that very low-mass binaries span a broad range of eccentricities from near-circular to highly eccentric (e {approx} 0.8), with a median eccentricity of 0.34. We have examined potential observational biases in this sample, and for visual binaries we show through Monte Carlo simulations that if we choose appropriate selection criteria then all eccentricities are equally represented ({approx}< 5% difference between input and output eccentricity distributions). The orbits of this sample of very low-mass binaries show some significant differences from their solar-type counterparts. They lack a correlation between orbital period and eccentricity, and display a much higher fraction of near-circular orbits (e < 0.1) than solar-type stars, which together may suggest a different formation mechanism or dynamical history for these two populations. Very low-mass binaries also do not follow the e{sup 2} distribution of Ambartsumian, which would be expected if their orbits were distributed in phase space according to a function of energy alone (e.g., the Boltzmann distribution). We find that current numerical simulations of very low-mass star formation do not completely reproduce the observed properties of our binary sample. The cluster formation model of Bate agrees very well with the overall e distribution, but the lack of any high-e (>0.6) binaries at orbital periods comparable to our sample suggests that tidal damping due to gas disks may play too large of a role in the simulations. In contrast, the circumstellar disk fragmentation model of Stamatellos and Whitworth predicts only high-e binaries and thus is highly inconsistent with our sample. These discrepancies could be explained if multiple formation

  17. Measurement of the Moments of the Hadronic Invariant Mass Distribution in Semileptonic Beta Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration TITLE=Measuremen

    2005-03-13

    Using 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, we measure the first two moments of the hadronic invariant mass-squared distribution in charmed semileptonic B decays. From these we determine the non-perturbative Heavy Quark Effective Theory parameters {Lambda} and {lambda}{sub 1} used to relate the B meson semileptonic branching ratio to the CKM matrix element |V{sub cb}|.

  18. Rapid mass-spectrometric determination of boron isotopic distribution in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Rein, J E; Abernathey, R M

    1972-07-01

    Boron isotopic ratios are measured in boron carbide by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. A powder blend of boron carbide and sodium hydroxide is prepared, a small portion is transferred to a tantalum filament, the filament is heated to produce sodium borate, and the filament is transferred to the mass spectrometer where the(11)B/(10)B ratio is measured, using the Na(2)BO(2)(+) ion. Variables investigated for their effect on preferential volatilization of (10)B include the sodium hydroxide-boron carbide ratio and the temperature and duration of filament heating. A series of boron carbide pellets containing natural boron, of the type proposed for the control rods of the Fast Flux Test Facility reactor, were analysed with an apparently unbiased result of 4.0560 for the (11)B/(10)B ratio (standard deviation 0.0087). The pellets contained over 3% metal impurities typically found in this material. Time of analysis is 45 min per sample, with one analyst. PMID:18961131

  19. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF STARLESS AND PROTOSTELLAR CORES IN GOULD BELT CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sadavoy, Sarah I.; Di Francesco, James; Bontemps, Sylvain; Megeath, S. Thomas; Allgaier, Erin; Rebull, Luisa M.; Carey, Sean; McCabe, Caer-Eve; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Padgett, Deborah; Gutermuth, Robert; Hora, Joe; Huard, Tracy; Muzerolle, James; Terebey, Susan

    2010-02-20

    Using data from the SCUBA Legacy Catalogue (850 {mu}m) and Spitzer Space Telescope (3.6-70 {mu}m), we explore dense cores in the Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, Serpens, and Orion molecular clouds. We develop a new method to discriminate submillimeter cores found by Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) as starless or protostellar, using point source photometry from Spitzer wide field surveys. First, we identify infrared sources with red colors associated with embedded young stellar objects (YSOs). Second, we compare the positions of these YSO candidates to our submillimeter cores. With these identifications, we construct new, self-consistent starless and protostellar core mass functions (CMFs) for the five clouds. We find best-fit slopes to the high-mass end of the CMFs of -1.26 +- 0.20, -1.22 +- 0.06, -0.95 +- 0.20, and -1.67 +- 0.72 for Ophiuchus, Taurus, Perseus, and Orion, respectively. Broadly, these slopes are each consistent with the -1.35 power-law slope of the Salpeter initial mass function at higher masses, but suggest some differences. We examine a variety of trends between these CMF shapes and their parent cloud properties, potentially finding a correlation between the high-mass slope and core temperature. We also find a trend between core mass and effective size, but we are very limited by sensitivity. We make similar comparisons between core mass and size with visual extinction (for A{sub V} >= 3) and find no obvious trends. We also predict the numbers and mass distributions of cores that future surveys with SCUBA-2 may detect in each of these clouds.

  20. Control of bridge cranes with distributed-mass payloads under windy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Operating cranes is challenging because payloads experience large and dangerous oscillations, especially when the system is suffering from wind disturbances and the large-size payload is modeled as a distributed-mass model. The payload oscillations induced by both intentional motions commanded by the human operator and by the external wind disturbances make the dynamics more complicated. This paper presents a novel combined control architecture to limit oscillations of the distributed-mass payload caused by both human-operator commands and wind disturbances. While a smoothed command suppressed operator-induced oscillations, a wind-rejection command eliminated the payload swing resulting from the wind gusts. Through simulations, a large range of system parameters and motions are analyzed to investigate the dynamic behavior of bridge cranes with distributed-mass beams and wind disturbances by using the new control scheme. Experimental results obtained from a small-scale bridge crane validate the simulated dynamic behavior and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. The Bivariate Luminosity--HI Mass Distribution Function of Galaxies based on the NIBLES Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, Zhon; Schneider, Stephen E.; van Driel, Wim; Lehnert, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We use 21cm HI line observations for 2610 galaxies from the Nançay Interstellar Baryons Legacy Extragalactic Survey (NIBLES) to derive a bivariate luminosity--HI mass distribution function. Our HI survey was selected to randomly probe the local (900 < cz < 12,000 km/s) galaxy population in each 0.5 mag wide bin for the absolute z-band magnitude range of -13.5 < Mz < -24 without regard to morphology or color. This targeted survey allowed more on-source integration time for weak and non-detected sources, enabling us to probe lower HI mass fractions and apply lower upper limits for non-detections than would be possible with the larger blind HI surveys. Additionally, we obtained a factor of four higher sensitivity follow-up observations at Arecibo of 90 galaxies from our non-detected and marginally detected categories to quantify the underlying HI distribution of sources not detected at Nançay. Using the optical luminosity function and our higher sensitivity follow up observations as priors, we use a 2D stepwise maximum likelihood technique to derive the two dimensional volume density distribution of luminosity and HI mass in each SDSS band.

  2. Distribution of nanoflagellates in five water masses of the East China Sea in autumn and winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiquan; Huang, Lingfeng; Zhu, Zhisheng; Xiong, Yuan; Lu, Jiachang

    2016-02-01

    The variations of abundance, biomass and trophic structure of nanoflagellates (NF) among five typical water masses in the East China Sea were investigated in autumn (November 19-December 23, 2006) and winter (February 22-March 11, 2007). It was found that water mass had a significant impact on the distribution of NF. Either in autumn or in winter, the highest abundance and biomass of NF were recorded in the East China Sea Shelf Mixing Water (ECSSMW), and the lowest in the Kuroshio Subsurface Water (KSSW). While in the East China Sea Coastal Water (ECSCW), the abundance and biomass of both heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and pigmented phototrophic nanoflagellates (PNF) were only slightly higher than that in Taiwan Strait Water (TSW) and Kuroshio Surface Water (KSW). In respect to the seasonal variation, the abundance and biomass of NF in TSW declined in winter, while in other 4 water masses, they showed an increasing trend from autumn to winter, mainly due to the decrease (in TSW) or increase (in ECSCW, ECSSMW, KSW and KSSW) of HNF. The distribution pattern of abundance- or biomass-based PNF/HNF ratio was found to be correlated to the nutrient level of the water mass. Results of Pearson correlation analysis and principle component analysis indicated that PNF was mainly constrained by nutrient supply, and HNF was controlled by food availability in the East China Sea.

  3. Visualizing spatial distribution of alectinib in murine brain using quantitative mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Ryu, Shoraku; Yamashita, Makiko; Ohtsuka, Naoto; Nishidate, Masanobu; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Hamada, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    In the development of anticancer drugs, drug concentration measurements in the target tissue have been thought to be crucial for predicting drug efficacy and safety. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is commonly used for determination of average drug concentrations; however, complete loss of spatial information in the target tissue occurs. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been recently applied as an innovative tool for detection of molecular distribution of pharmacological agents in heterogeneous targets. This study examined the intra-brain transitivity of alectinib, a novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, using a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-MSI and LC-MS/MS techniques. We first analyzed the pharmacokinetic profiles in FVB mice and then examined the effect of the multidrug resistance protein-1 (MDR1) using Mdr1a/b knockout mice including quantitative distribution of alectinib in the brain. While no differences were observed between the mice for the plasma alectinib concentrations, diffuse alectinib distributions were found in the brain of the Mdr1a/b knockout versus FVB mice. These results indicate the potential for using quantitative MSI for clarifying drug distribution in the brain on a microscopic level, in addition to suggesting a possible use in designing studies for anticancer drug development and translational research. PMID:27026287

  4. Visualizing spatial distribution of alectinib in murine brain using quantitative mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aikawa, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Ryu, Shoraku; Yamashita, Makiko; Ohtsuka, Naoto; Nishidate, Masanobu; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Hamada, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    In the development of anticancer drugs, drug concentration measurements in the target tissue have been thought to be crucial for predicting drug efficacy and safety. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is commonly used for determination of average drug concentrations; however, complete loss of spatial information in the target tissue occurs. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been recently applied as an innovative tool for detection of molecular distribution of pharmacological agents in heterogeneous targets. This study examined the intra-brain transitivity of alectinib, a novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, using a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–MSI and LC-MS/MS techniques. We first analyzed the pharmacokinetic profiles in FVB mice and then examined the effect of the multidrug resistance protein-1 (MDR1) using Mdr1a/b knockout mice including quantitative distribution of alectinib in the brain. While no differences were observed between the mice for the plasma alectinib concentrations, diffuse alectinib distributions were found in the brain of the Mdr1a/b knockout versus FVB mice. These results indicate the potential for using quantitative MSI for clarifying drug distribution in the brain on a microscopic level, in addition to suggesting a possible use in designing studies for anticancer drug development and translational research. PMID:27026287

  5. The Keck Planet Search: Detectability and the Minimum Mass and Orbital Period Distribution of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew; Butler, R. Paul; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Vogt, Steven S.; Wright, Jason T.; Fischer, Debra A.

    2008-05-01

    We analyze 8 years of precise radial velocity measurements from the Keck Planet Search, characterizing the detection threshold, selection effects, and completeness of the survey. We first carry out a systematic search for planets, by assessing the false-alarm probability associated with Keplerian orbit fits to the data. This allows us to understand the detection threshold for each star in terms of the number and time baseline of the observations, and the underlying "noise" from measurement errors, intrinsic stellar jitter, or additional low-mass planets. We show that all planets with orbital periods P < 2000 days, velocity amplitudes K > 20 m s-1, and eccentricities e lsim 0.6 have been announced, and we summarize the candidates at lower amplitudes and longer orbital periods. For the remaining stars, we calculate upper limits on the velocity amplitude of a companion. For orbital periods less than the duration of the observations, these are typically 10 m s-1 and increase vprop P2 for longer periods. We then use the nondetections to derive completeness corrections at low amplitudes and long orbital periods and discuss the resulting distribution of minimum mass and orbital period. We give the fraction of stars with a planet as a function of minimum mass and orbital period and extrapolate to long-period orbits and low planet masses. A power-law fit for planet masses >0.3 MJ and periods < 2000 days gives a mass-period distribution dN = CMαPβd ln Md ln P with α = -0.31 ± 0.2, β = 0.26 ± 0.1, and the normalization constant C such that 10.5% of solar type stars have a planet with mass in the range 0.3-10 MJ and orbital period 2-2000 days. The orbital period distribution shows an increase in the planet fraction by a factor of ≈5 for orbital periods gsim300 days. Extrapolation gives 17%-20% of stars having gas giant planets within 20 AU. Finally, we constrain the occurrence rate of planets orbiting M dwarfs compared to FGK dwarfs, taking into account differences in

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Isotope Distributions In Proteomic Mass Spectrometry Using Least-Squares Fourier Transform Convolution

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Edit; Bunner, Anne E.; Sykes, Michael T.; Williamson, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry involves comparison of the amplitudes of peaks resulting from different isotope labeling patterns, including fractional atomic labeling and fractional residue labeling. We have developed a general and flexible analytical treatment of the complex isotope distributions that arise in these experiments, using Fourier transform convolution to calculate labeled isotope distributions and least-squares for quantitative comparison with experimental peaks. The degree of fractional atomic and fractional residue labeling can be determined from experimental peaks at the same time as the integrated intensity of all of the isotopomers in the isotope distribution. The approach is illustrated using data with fractional 15N-labeling and fractional 13C-isoleucine labeling. The least-squares Fourier transform convolution approach can be applied to many types of quantitive proteomic data, including data from stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture and pulse labeling experiments. PMID:18522437

  7. Cluster mass fraction and size distribution determined by fs-time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaoming; Shim, Bonggu; Arefiev, Alexey; Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Downer, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of supersonic gas jets is important for accurate interpretation and control of laser-cluster experiments. While average size and total atomic density can be found by standard Rayleigh scatter and interferometry, cluster mass fraction and size distribution are usually difficult to measure. Here we determine the cluster fraction and the size distribution with fs-time-resolved refractive index and absorption measurements in cluster gas jets after ionization and heating by an intense pump pulse. The fs-time-resolved refractive index measured with frequency domain interferometer (FDI) shows different contributions from monomer plasma and cluster plasma in the time domain, enabling us to determine the cluster fraction. The fs-time-resolved absorption measured by a delayed probe shows the contribution from clusters of various sizes, allowing us to find the size distribution.

  8. Collisional evolution - an analytical study for the nonsteady-state mass distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, R. Vieira

    1999-05-01

    To study the collisional evolution of asteroidal groups we can use an analytical solutionfor the self-similar collision cascades. This solution is suitable to study the steady-state massdistribution of the collisional fragmentation. However, out of the steady-state conditions, thissolution is not satisfactory for some values of the collisional parameters. In fact, for some valuesfor the exponent of the mass distribution power law of an asteroidal group and its relation to theexponent of the function which describes how rocks break we arrive at singular points for theequation which describes the collisional evolution. These singularities appear since someapproximations are usually made in the laborious evaluation of many integrals that appear in theanalytical calculations. They concern the cutoff for the smallest and the largest bodies. Thesesingularities set some restrictions to the study of the analytical solution for the collisionalequation. To overcome these singularities we performed an algebraic computationconsidering the smallest and the largest bodies and we obtained the analytical expressions for theintegrals that describe the collisional evolution without restriction on the parameters. However,the new distribution is more sensitive to the values of the collisional parameters. In particular thesteady-state solution for the differential mass distribution has exponents slightly different from11⧸6 for the usual parameters in the Asteroid Belt. The sensitivity of this distribution with respectto the parameters is analyzed for the usual values in the asteroidal groups. With anexpression for the mass distribution without singularities, we can evaluate also its time evolution.We arrive at an analytical expression given by a power series of terms constituted by a smallparameter multiplied by the mass to an exponent, which depends on the initial power lawdistribution. This expression is a formal solution for the equation which describes the collisionalevolution

  9. Estimates and distribution of body mass index in a sample of Malaysian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zalilah, M S; Mirnalini, K; Khor, G L; Merlin, A; Bahaman, A S; Norimah, K

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on the estimates and distribution of body mass index in a sample of Malaysian adolescents. The study utilized a cross-sectional design and multi-stage random sampling of secondary schools to select 5 urban and 9 rural schools in Kedah and Penang. A total of 6555 male and female adolescents (11-15 years old) of Malay, Chinese and Indian ethnic groups were measured for weights and heights for body mass index calculation. Information on household demographic and socioeconomic were obtained from parents through self-administered questionnaires. Analyses of body mass index distribution by location, ethnicity, gender and age were conducted using Chi-square test of SPSS 11.5. More of the rural (12.1%) and urban (19.4%) adolescents were underweight and overweight, respectively. While in all ethnic, gender and age groups, rural adolescents were more likely to be underweight, more of the urban adolescents were overweight. The prevalence of underweight was highest among the Indians (19.2%) and lowest in Chinese (7.2%). The prevalence of overweight in the three ethnic groups was in the range of 18-19%. More male than female adolescents were underweight (15% vs 7.8%) and overweight (19.5% vs 16.7%). Consistent patterns were also observed across location, ethnic and age groups. As age increased, the prevalence of overweight decreased across the ethnic and gender groups. The reported findings can serve as current reference on body mass index distribution of Malaysian adolescents and a basis for future efforts in health and nutrition interventions for Malaysian children and adolescents. PMID:16708734

  10. Comparing Spatial Distributions of Solar Prominence Mass Derived from Coronal Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Alexander, David; Kucera, Therese

    2010-01-01

    In the present work we extend the use of this mass-inference technique to a sample of prominences observed in at least two coronal lines. This approach, in theory, allows a direct calculation of prominence mass and helium abundance and how these properties vary spatially and temporally. Our motivation is two-fold: to obtain a He(exp 0)/H(exp 0) abundance ratio, and to determine how the relative spatial distribution of the two species varies in prominences. The first of these relies on the theoretical expectation that the amount of absorption at each EUV wavelength is well-characterized. However, in this work we show that due to a saturation of the continuum absorption in the 625 A and 368 A lines (which have much higher opacity compared to 195 A-) the uncertainties in obtaining the relative abundances are too high to give meaningful estimates. This is an important finding because of its impact on future studies in this area. The comparison of the spatial distribution of helium and hydrogen presented here augments previous observational work indicating that cross-field diffusion of neutrals is an important mechanism for mass loss. Significantly different loss timescales for neutral He and H (helium drains much more rapidly than hydrogen) can impact prominence structure, and both the present and past studies suggest this mechanism is playing a role in structure and possibly dynamics. Section 2 of this paper contains a description of the observations and Section 3 summarizes the method used to infer mass along with the criteria imposed in choosing prominences appropriate for this study. Section 3 also contains a discussion of the problems due to limitations of the available data and the implications for determining relative abundances. We present our results in Section 4, including plots of radial-like scans of prominence mass in different lines to show the spatial distribution of the different species. The last section contains a discussion summarizing the importance

  11. Derivation from first principles of the statistical distribution of the mass peak intensities of MS data.

    PubMed

    Ipsen, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Despite the widespread use of mass spectrometry (MS) in a broad range of disciplines, the nature of MS data remains very poorly understood, and this places important constraints on the quality of MS data analysis as well as on the effectiveness of MS instrument design. In the following, a procedure for calculating the statistical distribution of the mass peak intensity for MS instruments that use analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and electron multipliers is presented. It is demonstrated that the physical processes underlying the data-generation process, from the generation of the ions to the signal induced at the detector, and on to the digitization of the resulting voltage pulse, result in data that can be well-approximated by a Gaussian distribution whose mean and variance are determined by physically meaningful instrumental parameters. This allows for a very precise understanding of the signal-to-noise ratio of mass peak intensities and suggests novel ways of improving it. Moreover, it is a prerequisite for being able to address virtually all data analytical problems in downstream analyses in a statistically rigorous manner. The model is validated with experimental data. PMID:25620060

  12. Vertical distribution of dry mass in cereals straw and its loss during harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajaç, T.; Oleksy, A.; Stokłosa, A.; Klimek-Kopyra, A.; Macuda, J.

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the distribution of mass in the straw of cereal species and also at assessing the straw yield and its losses resulting from the amount of the stubble left in the field. It was found empirically that the wheat culms are composed of five internodes, and in barley, triticale and oats of six. The highest straw mass per 1 cm was found in the second internode in both forms of wheat and winter triticale, whereas barley and oats gathered the highest weight in the first internode. In the southern part of Silesia species and forms of cereals differed in the straw yield, which can be arranged as follows, from the highest: winter wheat > spring wheat, winter triticale, winter barley, and oats > spring barley. Due to the specific distribution of dry matter in each of internodes of both wheat forms - winter and spring, they loose less stubble mass (22 and 24%, respectively), comparing to other cereals, especially spring barley, which loose 31% yield of straw in the stubble of 15 cm height.

  13. Spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet since AD 1900.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K; Korsgaard, Niels J; Bjørk, Anders A; Khan, Shfaqat A; Box, Jason E; Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K; Bamber, Jonathan L; Colgan, William; van den Broeke, Michiel; Siggaard-Andersen, Marie-Louise; Nuth, Christopher; Schomacker, Anders; Andresen, Camilla S; Willerslev, Eske; Kjær, Kurt H

    2015-12-17

    The response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to changes in temperature during the twentieth century remains contentious, largely owing to difficulties in estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of ice mass changes before 1992, when Greenland-wide observations first became available. The only previous estimates of change during the twentieth century are based on empirical modelling and energy balance modelling. Consequently, no observation-based estimates of the contribution from the GIS to the global-mean sea level budget before 1990 are included in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Here we calculate spatial ice mass loss around the entire GIS from 1900 to the present using aerial imagery from the 1980s. This allows accurate high-resolution mapping of geomorphic features related to the maximum extent of the GIS during the Little Ice Age at the end of the nineteenth century. We estimate the total ice mass loss and its spatial distribution for three periods: 1900-1983 (75.1 ± 29.4 gigatonnes per year), 1983-2003 (73.8 ± 40.5 gigatonnes per year), and 2003-2010 (186.4 ± 18.9 gigatonnes per year). Furthermore, using two surface mass balance models we partition the mass balance into a term for surface mass balance (that is, total precipitation minus total sublimation minus runoff) and a dynamic term. We find that many areas currently undergoing change are identical to those that experienced considerable thinning throughout the twentieth century. We also reveal that the surface mass balance term shows a considerable decrease since 2003, whereas the dynamic term is constant over the past 110 years. Overall, our observation-based findings show that during the twentieth century the GIS contributed at least 25.0 ± 9.4 millimetres of global-mean sea level rise. Our result will help to close the twentieth-century sea level budget, which remains crucial for evaluating the reliability of models used to

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet since AD 1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Box, Jason E.; Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Colgan, William; van den Broeke, Michiel; Siggaard-Andersen, Marie-Louise; Nuth, Christopher; Schomacker, Anders; Andresen, Camilla S.; Willerslev, Eske; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to changes in temperature during the twentieth century remains contentious, largely owing to difficulties in estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of ice mass changes before 1992, when Greenland-wide observations first became available. The only previous estimates of change during the twentieth century are based on empirical modelling and energy balance modelling. Consequently, no observation-based estimates of the contribution from the GIS to the global-mean sea level budget before 1990 are included in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Here we calculate spatial ice mass loss around the entire GIS from 1900 to the present using aerial imagery from the 1980s. This allows accurate high-resolution mapping of geomorphic features related to the maximum extent of the GIS during the Little Ice Age at the end of the nineteenth century. We estimate the total ice mass loss and its spatial distribution for three periods: 1900-1983 (75.1 ± 29.4 gigatonnes per year), 1983-2003 (73.8 ± 40.5 gigatonnes per year), and 2003-2010 (186.4 ± 18.9 gigatonnes per year). Furthermore, using two surface mass balance models we partition the mass balance into a term for surface mass balance (that is, total precipitation minus total sublimation minus runoff) and a dynamic term. We find that many areas currently undergoing change are identical to those that experienced considerable thinning throughout the twentieth century. We also reveal that the surface mass balance term shows a considerable decrease since 2003, whereas the dynamic term is constant over the past 110 years. Overall, our observation-based findings show that during the twentieth century the GIS contributed at least 25.0 ± 9.4 millimetres of global-mean sea level rise. Our result will help to close the twentieth-century sea level budget, which remains crucial for evaluating the reliability of models used to

  15. Impact of Climatic Variability on Atmospheric Mass Distribution and GRACE-Derived Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salstein, David A.; Rosen, Richard D.; Ponte, Rui M.; Frey, Herbert (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    During the period we calculated the atmospheric data sets related to its mass and angular momentum distribution. For mass, we determined the various harmonics from the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, especially the low-order harmonics that are useful in studying the gravitation distribution as will be determined from the GRACE mission. Atmospheric mass is also related to the atmospheric loading on the solid Earth; we cooperated with scientists who needed the atmospheric mass information for understanding its contributions to the overall loading, necessary for vertical and horizontal coordinate estimation. We calculated atmospheric angular momentum from the NCEP-NCAR reanalyses and 4 operational meteorological centers, based on the motion (wind) terms and the mass (surface pressure) terms. These are associated with motions of the planet, including its axial component causing changes in the length of day, more related to the winds, and the equatorial component related to motions of the pole, more related to the mass. Tasks related to the ocean mass and angular momentum were added to the project as well. For these we have noted the ocean impact on motions of the pole as well as the torque mechanisms that relate the transfer of angular momentum between oceans and solid earth. The activities of the project may be summarized in the following first manuscript written in December 2002, for a symposium that Dr. Salstein attended on Geodynamics. We have continued to assess ocean angular momentum (OAM) quantities derived from bottom pressure and velocity fields estimated with our finite-difference barotropic (single layer) model. Three years of output (1993-95) from a run without any data constraints was compared to output from a corresponding run that was constrained by altimeter data using a Kalman filter and smoother scheme. Respective OAM time series were combined with corresponding atmospheric series and compared to observed polar motion. The constrained OAM series provided

  16. Using high performance interconnects in a distributed computing and mass storage environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, M.

    1994-12-31

    Detector Collaborations of the HERA Experiments typically involve more than 500 physicists from a few dozen institutes. These physicists require access to large amounts of data in a fully transparent manner. Important issues include Distributed Mass Storage Management Systems in a Distributed and Heterogeneous Computing Environment. At the very center of a distributed system, including tens of CPUs and network attached mass storage peripherals are the communication links. Today scientists are witnessing an integration of computing and communication technology with the {open_quote}network{close_quote} becoming the computer. This contribution reports on a centrally operated computing facility for the HERA Experiments at DESY, including Symmetric Multiprocessor Machines (84 Processors), presently more than 400 GByte of magnetic disk and 40 TB of automoted tape storage, tied together by a HIPPI {open_quote}network{close_quote}. Focussing on the High Performance Interconnect technology, details will be provided about the HIPPI based {open_quote}Backplane{close_quote} configured around a 20 Gigabit/s Multi Media Router and the performance and efficiency of the related computer interfaces.

  17. COMPARING SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE MASS DERIVED FROM CORONAL ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Kucera, Therese; Alexander, David

    2011-01-20

    In a previous study, Gilbert et al. derived the column density and total mass of solar prominences using a new technique, which measures how much coronal radiation in the Fe XII (195 A) spectral band is absorbed by prominence material, while considering the effects of both foreground and background radiation. In the present work, we apply this method to a sample of prominence observations in three different wavelength regimes: one in which only H{sup 0} is ionized (504 A < {lambda} < 911 A), a second where both H{sup 0} and He{sup 0} are ionized (228 A < {lambda} < 504 A), and finally at wavelengths where H{sup 0}, He{sup 0}, and He{sup +} are all ionized ({lambda} < 228 A). This approach, first suggested by Kucera et al., permits the separation of the contributions of neutral hydrogen and helium to the total column density in prominences. Additionally, an enhancement of the technique allowed the calculation of the two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the column density from the continuum absorption in each extreme-ultraviolet observation. We find the total prominence mass is consistently lower in the 625 A observations compared to lines in the other wavelength regimes. There is a significant difference in total mass between the 625 A and 195 A lines, indicating the much higher opacity at 625 A is causing a saturation of the continuum absorption and thus, a potentially large underestimation of mass.

  18. Comparing Spatial Distributions of Solar Prominence Mass Derived from Coronal Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Alexander, David; Kucera, Therese

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, Gilbert et al. derived the column density and total mass of solar prominences using a new technique, which measures how much coronal radiation in the Fe XII (195 Å) spectral band is absorbed by prominence material, while considering the effects of both foreground and background radiation. In the present work, we apply this method to a sample of prominence observations in three different wavelength regimes: one in which only H0 is ionized (504 Å < λ < 911 Å), a second where both H0 and He0 are ionized (228 Å < λ < 504 Å), and finally at wavelengths where H0, He0, and He+ are all ionized (λ < 228 Å). This approach, first suggested by Kucera et al., permits the separation of the contributions of neutral hydrogen and helium to the total column density in prominences. Additionally, an enhancement of the technique allowed the calculation of the two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the column density from the continuum absorption in each extreme-ultraviolet observation. We find the total prominence mass is consistently lower in the 625 Å observations compared to lines in the other wavelength regimes. There is a significant difference in total mass between the 625 Å and 195 Å lines, indicating the much higher opacity at 625 Å is causing a saturation of the continuum absorption and thus, a potentially large underestimation of mass.

  19. Anatomical Distribution of Lipids in Human Brain Cortex by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, Antonio; Astigarraga, Egoitz; Barreda-Gómez, Gabriel; Manuel, Iván; Ferrer, Isidro; Teresa Giralt, María; Ochoa, Begoña; Fresnedo, Olatz; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael; Fernández, José A.

    2011-02-01

    Molecular mass images of tissues will be biased if differences in the physicochemical properties of the microenvironment affect the intensity of the spectra. To address this issue, we have performed—by means of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry—imaging on slices and lipidomic analysis in extracts of frontal cortex, both from the same postmortem tissue samples of human brain. An external calibration was used to achieve a mass accuracy of 10 ppm (1 σ) in the spectra of the extracts, although the final assignment was based on a comparison with previously reported species. The spectra recorded directly from tissue slices (imaging) show excellent s/n ratios, almost comparable to those obtained from the extracts. In addition, they retain the information about the anatomical distribution of the molecular species present in autopsied frozen tissue. Further comparison between the spectra from lipid extracts devoid of proteins and those recorded directly from the tissue unambiguously show that the differences in lipid composition between gray and white matter observed in the mass images are not an artifact due to microenvironmental influences of each anatomical area on the signal intensity, but real variations in the lipid composition.

  20. Surface Area, Volume, Mass, and Density Distributions for Sized Biomass Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan Sampath

    2007-06-30

    This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to June 30, 2007 which covers the entire performance period of the project. 25 individual biomass particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546 in the size range of 100-200 microns) were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and their external surface area, volume, and drag coefficient/mass (C{sub d}/m) ratios were characterized applying highly specialized video based and high-speed diode array imaging systems. Analysis methods were employed using shape and drag information to calculate mass and density distributions for these particles. Results of these measurements and analyses were validated by independent mass measurements using a particle weighing and counting technique. Similar information for 28 PSOC 1451D bituminous coal particles was retrieved from a previously published work. Using these two information, density correlations for coal/biomass blends were developed. These correlations can be used to estimate the density of the blend knowing either the volume fraction or the mass fraction of coal in the blend. The density correlations presented here will be useful in predicting the burning rate of coal/biomass blends in cofiring combustors. Finally, a discussion on technological impacts and economic projections of burning biomass with coal in US power plants is presented.

  1. Implementation of a Campuswide Distributed Mass Storage Service: the Dream Versus Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Stephen; Armstead, Betty Jo

    1996-01-01

    In 1990, a technical team at NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, began defining a Mass Storage Service to pro- wide long-term archival storage, short-term storage for very large files, distributed Network File System access, and backup services for critical data dw resides on workstations and personal computers. Because of software availability and budgets, the total service was phased in over dm years. During the process of building the service from the commercial technologies available, our Mass Storage Team refined the original vision and learned from the problems and mistakes that occurred. We also enhanced some technologies to better meet the needs of users and system administrators. This report describes our team's journey from dream to reality, outlines some of the problem areas that still exist, and suggests some solutions.

  2. Local endwall heat/mass-transfer distributions in pin fin channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Kim, Y. S.; Han, J. C.

    1987-10-01

    Naphthalene sublimination experiments were conducted to study the effects of the pin configuration, the pin length-to-diameter ratio, and the entrance length on local endwall heat/mass transfer in a channel with short pin fins (pin length-to-diameter ratios of 0.5 and 1.0). The detailed distributions of the local endwall heat/mass-transfer coefficient were obtained for staggered and aligned arrays of pin fins, for the spanwise pin spacing-to-diameter ratio of 2.5, and for streamwise pin spacing-to-diameter ratios of 1.25 and 2.5. The Reynolds numbers were kept at about 33,000. Overall- and row-averaged Nusselt numbers compared very well with those from previous heat-transfer studies.

  3. Mass Spectrometry Data from the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Anderson, Gordon

    The mass spectrometry capabilities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are primarily applied to biological research, with an emphasis on proteomics and metabolomics. Many of these cutting-edge mass spectrometry capabilities and bioinformatics methods are housed in the Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility operated by PNNL. These capabilities have been developed and acquired through cooperation between the EMSL national scientific user program and PNNL programmatic research. At the website of the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center, the following resources are made available: PNNL-developed software tools and source code, PNNL-generated raw data and processed results, links to publications that used the data and results available on this site, and tutorials and user manuals. [taken from http://omics.pnl.gov/

  4. An RFID-Based Manufacturing Control Framework for Loosely Coupled Distributed Manufacturing System Supporting Mass Customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruey-Shun; Tsai, Yung-Shun; Tu, Arthur

    In this study we propose a manufacturing control framework based on radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology and a distributed information system to construct a mass-customization production process in a loosely coupled shop-floor control environment. On the basis of this framework, we developed RFID middleware and an integrated information system for tracking and controlling the manufacturing process flow. A bicycle manufacturer was used to demonstrate the prototype system. The findings of this study were that the proposed framework can improve the visibility and traceability of the manufacturing process as well as enhance process quality control and real-time production pedigree access. Using this framework, an enterprise can easily integrate an RFID-based system into its manufacturing environment to facilitate mass customization and a just-in-time production model.

  5. Mass spectrometry imaging reveals the sub-organ distribution of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Suming; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Wan, Qiongqiong; Hou, Jian; He, Qing; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham; Nie, Zongxiu

    2015-02-01

    Label and label-free methods to image carbon-based nanomaterials exist. However, label-based approaches are limited by the risk of tag detachment over time, and label-free spectroscopic methods have slow imaging speeds, weak photoluminescence signals and strong backgrounds. Here, we present a label-free mass spectrometry imaging method to detect carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide and carbon nanodots in mice. The large molecular weights of nanoparticles are difficult to detect using conventional mass spectrometers, but our method overcomes this problem by using the intrinsic carbon cluster fingerprint signal of the nanomaterials. We mapped and quantified the sub-organ distribution of the nanomaterials in mice. Our results showed that most carbon nanotubes and nanodots were found in the outer parenchyma of the kidney, and all three materials were seen in the red pulp of the spleen. The highest concentrations of nanotubes in the spleen were found within the marginal zone.

  6. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  7. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. F.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. Additionally, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  8. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, P.; et al.

    2015-05-21

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modeling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modeling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1 degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  9. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; et al

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Sciencemore » Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. Additionally, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.« less

  10. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-05-01

    We measure the weak lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This pathfinder study is meant to (1) validate the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) imager for the task of measuring weak lensing shapes, and (2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, point spread function (PSF) modelling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well behaved, but the modelling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting Navarro-Frenk-White profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1°(approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.