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Sample records for distribution driving protein

  1. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-07-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures.

  2. Intrinsically disordered proteins drive membrane curvature

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David J.; Houser, Justin R.; Hayden, Carl C.; Sherman, Michael B.; Lafer, Eileen M.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of highly curved membrane structures is essential to cellular physiology. The prevailing view has been that proteins with curvature-promoting structural motifs, such as wedge-like amphipathic helices and crescent-shaped BAR domains, are required for bending membranes. Here we report that intrinsically disordered domains of the endocytic adaptor proteins, Epsin1 and AP180 are highly potent drivers of membrane curvature. This result is unexpected since intrinsically disordered domains lack a well-defined three-dimensional structure. However, in vitro measurements of membrane curvature and protein diffusivity demonstrate that the large hydrodynamic radii of these domains generate steric pressure that drives membrane bending. When disordered adaptor domains are expressed as transmembrane cargo in mammalian cells, they are excluded from clathrin-coated pits. We propose that a balance of steric pressure on the two surfaces of the membrane drives this exclusion. These results provide quantitative evidence for the influence of steric pressure on the content and assembly of curved cellular membrane structures. PMID:26204806

  3. Why does phenology drive species distribution?

    PubMed Central

    Chuine, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Despite the numerous studies which have been conducted during the past decade on species ranges and their relationship to the environment, our understanding of how environmental conditions shape species distribution is still far from complete. Yet, some process-based species distribution models have been able to simulate plants and insects distribution at a global scale. These models strongly rely on the completion of the annual cycle of the species and therefore on their accomplished phenology. In particular, they have shown that the northern limit of species' ranges appears to be caused mainly by the inability to undergo full fruit maturation, while the southern limit appears to be caused by the inability to flower or unfold leaves owing to a lack of chilling temperatures that are necessary to break bud dormancy. I discuss here why phenology is a key adaptive trait in shaping species distribution using mostly examples from plant species, which have been the most documented. After discussing how phenology is involved in fitness and why it is an adaptive trait susceptible to evolve quickly in changing climate conditions, I describe how phenology is related to fitness in species distribution process-based models and discuss the fate of species under climate change scenarios using model projections and experimental or field studies from the literature. PMID:20819809

  4. Conformation Distributions in Adsorbed Proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.; Vrettos, John S.; Smith, Jackson R.; Cicerone, Marcus T.

    2007-03-01

    While the structural basis of protein function is well understood in the biopharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, few methods for the characterization and comparison of protein conformation distributions are available. New methods capable of measuring the stability of protein conformations and the integrity of protein-protein, protein-ligand and protein-surface interactions both in solution and on surfaces are needed to help the development of protein-based products. We are developing infrared spectroscopy methods for the characterization and comparison of molecular conformation distributions in monolayers and in solutions. We have extracted an order parameter describing the orientational and conformational variations of protein functional groups around the average molecular values from a single polarized spectrum. We will discuss the development of these methods and compare them to amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods for albumin in solution and on different polymer surfaces to show that our order parameter is related to protein stability.

  5. What Drives the Translocation of Proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Peskin, Charles S.; Oster, George F.

    1992-05-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems.

  6. What drives the translocation of proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Peskin, C S; Oster, G F

    1992-01-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems. Images PMID:1349170

  7. Fluorescence lifetime distributions in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, J. R.; Gratton, E.; Prendergast, F. G.

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most proteins can be satisfactorily described only using several exponential components. Here it is proposed that continuous lifetime distributions can better represent the observed decay. An approach based on protein dynamics is presented, which provides fluorescence lifetime distribution functions for single tryptophan residue proteins. First, lifetime distributions for proteins interconverting between two conformations, each characterized by a different lifetime value, are derived. The evolution of the lifetime values as a function of the interconversion rate is studied. In this case lifetime distributions can be obtained from a distribution of rates of interconversion between the two conformations. Second, the existence of a continuum of energy substates within a given conformation was considered. The occupation of a particular energy substate at a given temperature is proportional to the Boltzmann factor. The density of energy states of the potential well depends upon the width of the well, which determines the degree of freedom the residue can move in the conformational space. Lifetime distributions can be obtained by association of each energy substate with a different lifetime value and assuming that the average conformation can change as the energy of the substate is increased. Finally, lifetime distributions for proteins interconverting between two conformations, each characterized by a quasi-continuum of energy substates, are presented. The origin of negative components

  8. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  9. High-power CSI-fed induction motor drive with optimal power distribution based control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, S.-S.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, a current source inverter (CSI) fed induction motor drive with an optimal power distribution control is proposed for high-power applications. The CSI-fed drive is configured with a six-step CSI along with a pulsewidth modulated voltage source inverter (PWM-VSI) and capacitors. Due to the PWM-VSI and the capacitor, sinusoidal motor currents and voltages with high quality as well as natural commutation of the six-step CSI can be obtained. Since this CSI-fed drive can deliver required output power through both the six-step CSI and PWM-VSI, this article shows that the kVA ratings of both the inverters can be reduced by proper real power distribution. The optimal power distribution under load requirements, based on power flow modelling of the CSI-fed drive, is proposed to not only minimise the PWM-VSI rating but also reduce the six-step CSI rating. The dc-link current control of the six-step CSI is developed to realise the optimal power distribution. Furthermore, a vector controlled drive for high-power induction motors is proposed based on the optimal power distribution. Experimental results verify the high-power CSI-fed drive with the optimal power distribution control.

  10. Distribution and Evolution of Yersinia Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueming; Huang, He; Hui, Xinjie; Cheng, Xi; White, Aaron P; Zhao, Zhendong; Wang, Yejun

    2016-08-01

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, playing important roles in various protein-protein interaction processes. In Yersinia, the well-characterized type III secreted effector YopM also belongs to the LRR protein family and is encoded by virulence plasmids. However, little has been known about other LRR members encoded by Yersinia genomes or their evolution. In this study, the Yersinia LRR proteins were comprehensively screened, categorized, and compared. The LRR proteins encoded by chromosomes (LRR1 proteins) appeared to be more similar to each other and different from those encoded by plasmids (LRR2 proteins) with regard to repeat-unit length, amino acid composition profile, and gene expression regulation circuits. LRR1 proteins were also different from LRR2 proteins in that the LRR1 proteins contained an E3 ligase domain (NEL domain) in the C-terminal region or an NEL domain-encoding nucleotide relic in flanking genomic sequences. The LRR1 protein-encoding genes (LRR1 genes) varied dramatically and were categorized into 4 subgroups (a to d), with the LRR1a to -c genes evolving from the same ancestor and LRR1d genes evolving from another ancestor. The consensus and ancestor repeat-unit sequences were inferred for different LRR1 protein subgroups by use of a maximum parsimony modeling strategy. Structural modeling disclosed very similar repeat-unit structures between LRR1 and LRR2 proteins despite the different unit lengths and amino acid compositions. Structural constraints may serve as the driving force to explain the observed mutations in the LRR regions. This study suggests that there may be functional variation and lays the foundation for future experiments investigating the functions of the chromosomally encoded LRR proteins of Yersinia. PMID:27217422

  11. Nonlinear ecological processes driving the distribution of marine decapod larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, M.; Carbonell, A.; Tor, A.; Alvarez-Berastegui, D.; Balbín, R.; dos Santos, A.; Alemany, F.

    2015-03-01

    The complexity of the natural processes lead to many nonlinear interacting factors that influence the distribution and survival of marine pelagic species, particularly in their larval phase. The management of these ecosystems requires techniques that unveil those interactions by studying the system globally, including all relevant variables and combining both community and environmental data in a single step. Specifically, we apply an unsupervised neural network, the Self-Organising Map (SOM), to a combined dataset of environmental and decapod larvae community data from the Balearic sea, obtained in two years with contrasting environmental scenarios, as an Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) technique that provides a global and more detailed view of both the environmental processes and their influence on the distribution of such planktonic community. We examine the parental influence on the initial larval distribution by aggregating data by adult habitat, which also increments the signal to noise ratio (mean data patterns over noise due to outliers or measurement errors), and consider the distribution of larvae by development stage (as a proxy of age and hence of potential dispersion). The joined study of parental effect, drifting or concentration events determined by dynamical processes in the whole water column, and lifespan, draws the possible paths followed by larvae, and highlights the more influencing variables in their distribution. Investigation of the different aspects of dynamic height (absolute values, gradients or edges and correlations) clarified the effect of the oceanographic processes on decapods' larvae.

  12. Thermal denaturation of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase: Is aggregation a driving force in protein unfolding?

    PubMed

    Shin, I; Wachtel, E; Roth, E; Bon, C; Silman, I; Weiner, L

    2002-08-01

    A monomeric form of acetylcholinesterase from the venom of Bungarus fasciatus is converted to a partially unfolded molten globule species by thermal inactivation, and subsequently aggregates rapidly. To separate the kinetics of unfolding from those of aggregation, single molecules of the monomeric enzyme were encapsulated in reverse micelles of Brij 30 in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, or in large unilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin/cholesterol at various protein/micelle (vesicle) ratios. The first-order rate constant for thermal inactivation at 45 degrees C, of single molecules entrapped within the reverse micelles (0.031 min(-1)), was higher than in aqueous solution (0.007 min(-1)) or in the presence of normal micelles (0.020 min(-1)). This clearly shows that aggregation does not provide the driving force for thermal inactivation of BfAChE. Within the large unilamellar vesicles, at average protein/vesicle ratios of 1:1 and 10:1, the first-order rate constants for thermal inactivation of the encapsulated monomeric acetylcholinesterase, at 53 degrees C, were 0.317 and 0.342 min(-1), respectively. A crosslinking technique, utilizing the photosensitive probe, hypericin, showed that thermal denaturation produces a distribution of species ranging from dimers through to large aggregates. Consequently, at a protein/vesicle ratio of 10:1, aggregation can occur upon thermal denaturation. Thus, these experiments also demonstrate that aggregation does not drive the thermal unfolding of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase. Our experimental approach also permitted monitoring of recovery of enzymic activity after thermal denaturation in the absence of a competing aggregation process. Whereas no detectable recovery of enzymic activity could be observed in aqueous solution, up to 23% activity could be obtained for enzyme sequestered in the reverse micelles. PMID:12142456

  13. Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2005-07-26

    This report describes complete results of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. This demonstration project was initiated in July 2003 and completed in March 2005. The objective of the project was to develop an integrated power production/variable frequency drive system that could easily be deployed in the oil field that would increase production and decrease operating costs. This report describes all the activities occurred and documents results of the demonstration.

  14. Protein folding as a driving force for dual protein targeting in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kalderon, Bella; Pines, Ophry

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that in eukaryotic cells molecules of one protein can be located in several subcellular locations, a phenomenon termed dual targeting, dual localization, or dual distribution. The differently localized identical or nearly identical proteins are termed “echoforms.” Our conventional definition of dual targeted proteins refers to situations in which one of the echoforms is translocated through/into a membrane. Thus, dual targeted proteins are recognized by at least one organelle's receptors and translocation machineries within the lipid bilayer. In this review we attempt to evaluate mechanisms and situations in which protein folding is the major determinant of dual targeting and of the relative distribution levels of echoforms in the subcellular compartments of the eukaryotic cell. We show that the decisive folding step can occur prior, during or after translocation through the bilayer of a biological membrane. This phenomenon involves folding catalysts in the cell such as chaperones, proteases and modification enzymes, and targeting processes such as signal recognition, translocation through membranes, trapping, retrotranslocation and reverse translocation. PMID:25988164

  15. Mechanical stress and network structure drive protein dynamics during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell shape changes associated with processes like cytokinesis and motility proceed on several second time-scales, but are derived from molecular events, including protein-protein interactions, filament assembly, and force generation by molecular motors, all of which occur much faster [1–4]. Therefore, defining the dynamics of such molecular machinery is critical for understanding cell shape regulation. In addition to signaling pathways, mechanical stresses also direct cytoskeletal protein accumulation [5–7]. A myosin II-based mechanosensory system controls cellular contractility and shape during cytokinesis and under applied stress [6, 8]. In Dictyostelium, this system tunes myosin II accumulation by feedback through the actin network, particularly through the crosslinker cortexillin I. Cortexillin-binding IQGAPs are major regulators of this system. Here, we defined the short time-scale dynamics of key cytoskeletal proteins during cytokinesis and under mechanical stress using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, to examine the dynamic interplay between these proteins. Equatorially enriched proteins including cortexillin I, IQGAP2, and myosin II recovered much more slowly than actin and polar crosslinkers. The mobility of equatorial proteins was greatly reduced at the furrow compared to the interphase cortex, suggesting their stabilization during cytokinesis. This mobility shift did not arise from a single biochemical event, but rather from a global inhibition of protein dynamics by mechanical stress-associated changes in the cytoskeletal structure. Mechanical tuning of contractile protein dynamics provides robustness to the cytoskeletal framework responsible for regulating cell shape and contributes to cytokinesis fidelity. PMID:25702575

  16. A Traction Control Strategy with an Efficiency Model in a Distributed Driving Electric Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Both active safety and fuel economy are important issues for vehicles. This paper focuses on a traction control strategy with an efficiency model in a distributed driving electric vehicle. In emergency situation, a sliding mode control algorithm was employed to achieve antislip control through keeping the wheels' slip ratios below 20%. For general longitudinal driving cases, an efficiency model aiming at improving the fuel economy was built through an offline optimization stream within the two-dimensional design space composed of the acceleration pedal signal and the vehicle speed. The sliding mode control strategy for the joint roads and the efficiency model for the typical drive cycles were simulated. Simulation results show that the proposed driving control approach has the potential to apply to different road surfaces. It keeps the wheels' slip ratios within the stable zone and improves the fuel economy on the premise of tracking the driver's intention. PMID:25197697

  17. Quantification of Drive-Response Relationships Between Residues During Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yifei; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    Mutual correlation and cooperativity are commonly used to describe residue-residue interactions in protein folding/function. However, these metrics do not provide any information on the causality relationships between residues. Such drive-response relationships are poorly studied in protein folding/function and difficult to measure experimentally due to technical limitations. In this study, using the information theory transfer entropy (TE) that provides a direct measurement of causality between two times series, we have quantified the drive-response relationships between residues in the folding/unfolding processes of four small proteins generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Instead of using a time-averaged single TE value, the time-dependent TE is measured with the Q-scores based on residue-residue contacts and with the statistical significance analysis along the folding/unfolding processes. The TE analysis is able to identify the driving and responding residues that are different from the highly correlated residues revealed by the mutual information analysis. In general, the driving residues have more regular secondary structures, are more buried, and show greater effects on the protein stability as well as folding and unfolding rates. In addition, the dominant driving and responding residues from the TE analysis on the whole trajectory agree with those on a single folding event, demonstrating that the drive-response relationships are preserved in the non-equilibrium process. Our study provides detailed insights into the protein folding process and has potential applications in protein engineering and interpretation of time-dependent residue-based experimental observables for protein function. PMID:24223527

  18. A study on tyre force distribution controls for full drive-by-wire electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuta; Kano, Yoshio; Abe, Masato

    2014-05-01

    Feed-forward types of tyre force distribution controls with some norms for motion controls of a full drive-by-wire electric vehicle are presented. One of the norms for the distribution control introduced is minimising tyre workload and another one is minimising tyre dissipation energy due to tyre slip during vehicle motion. The effects of the distribution controls are substantiated using an experimental vehicle on a proving ground. Especially the effects of the tyre force distribution norms on improving vehicle stability and on reducing the tyre energy dissipation caused by tyre slip are investigated.

  19. ENHANCED RECOVERY UTILIZING VARIABLE FREQUENCY DRIVES AND A DISTRIBUTED POWER SYSTEM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Randy Peden; Sanjiv Shah

    2004-02-11

    This report describes the progress made during first six months of the project entitled ''Enhanced Recovery Utilizing Variable Frequency Drives and a Distributed Power System''. During this period, project plan, demonstration plan and project schedule were developed, equipment was ordered and baseline data was collected.

  20. Modeling of the electron distribution based on bremsstrahlung emission during lower hybrid current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.E.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Jobes, F.

    1985-03-01

    Lower hybrid current drive requires the generation of a high energy electron tail anisotropic in velocity. Measurements of bremsstrahlung emission produced by this tail are compared with the calculated emission from reasonable model distributions. The physical basis and the sensitivity of this modeling process are described and the plasma properties of current driven discharges which can be derived from the model are discussed.

  1. X-ray analysis of nonMaxwellian distributions (current drive)

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W.

    1983-06-01

    The plasma bremsstrahlung emission is utilized to determine the shape of the electron velocity distribution in situations where it deviates strongly from a Maxwellian distribution. The instrumentation used to measure the hard x-ray emission is briefly discussed. Model calculations show that polarization measurements give best results for unrelativistic tails with tail temperatures T/sub b/ < 50 keV, whereas measurements of the angular distribution of the x-ray emission based on the forward scattering of bremsstrahlung for relativistic electrons yields the best information for T/sub b/ > 50 keV. The techniques were originally developed in order to analyze runaway discharges. Recently, they found new interest because of the formation of energetic electron tails during current drive. The first x-ray results from the current drive during LH heating on PLT are discussed.

  2. An optimal torque distribution control strategy for four-independent wheel drive electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Goodarzi, Avesta; Khajepour, Amir; Chen, Shih-ken; Litkouhi, Baktiar

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, an optimal torque distribution approach is proposed for electric vehicle equipped with four independent wheel motors to improve vehicle handling and stability performance. A novel objective function is formulated which works in a multifunctional way by considering the interference among different performance indices: forces and moment errors at the centre of gravity of the vehicle, actuator control efforts and tyre workload usage. To adapt different driving conditions, a weighting factors tuning scheme is designed to adjust the relative weight of each performance in the objective function. The effectiveness of the proposed optimal torque distribution is evaluated by simulations with CarSim and Matlab/Simulink. The simulation results under different driving scenarios indicate that the proposed control strategy can effectively improve the vehicle handling and stability even in slippery road conditions.

  3. Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Bozchalui, Mohammed C.; Sharma, Ratnesh; Marnay, Chris; Barbosa-Povoa, Ana; Ferrao, Paulo

    2013-12-06

    The large scale penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) will introduce technical challenges to the distribution grid, but also carries the potential for vehicle-to-grid services. Namely, if available in large enough numbers, EVs can be used as a distributed energy resource (DER) and their presence can influence optimal DER investment and scheduling decisions in microgrids. In this work, a novel EV fleet aggregator model is introduced in a stochastic formulation of DER-CAM [1], an optimization tool used to address DER investment and scheduling problems. This is used to assess the impact of EV interconnections on optimal DER solutions considering uncertainty in EV driving schedules. Optimization results indicate that EVs can have a significant impact on DER investments, particularly if considering short payback periods. Furthermore, results suggest that uncertainty in driving schedules carries little significance to total energy costs, which is corroborated by results obtained using the stochastic formulation of the problem.

  4. Electric Circuit Model Suitable for Common Mode Current Paths Distributing in the Motor Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, Nobuyoshi; Ogata, Mitsukatsu; Harashima, Fumio

    Experimental date are used to analyze conducted EMI noises which are produced in a motor drive system with power converters comprised of a converter and an inverter. The processes are investigated in which common mode noises (voltages and currents) are strongly influenced by voltage fluctuations occurring due to switching operations. It is found that the common mode currents are resonance currents which appear in series resonance circuits distributed in the motor drive system. The circuits have various kinds of resonance frequencies related to voltage fluctuations produced by switching operations and micro-surge voltages generated at the terminal of machines such as an ac rector or a motor. Thus, parameters of the distributed series resonance circuits are estimated using the transient waveforms obtained by separating the common mode current into waves analyzed by the FFT method. It is proved through simulations and experiments that the proposed circuit models closely represent actual electric circuits for common mode current paths distributed in the motor drive system.

  5. Hox proteins drive cell segregation and non-autonomous apical remodelling during hindbrain segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Prin, Fabrice; Serpente, Patricia; Itasaki, Nobue; Gould, Alex P.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes encode a conserved family of homeodomain transcription factors regulating development along the major body axis. During embryogenesis, Hox proteins are expressed in segment-specific patterns and control numerous different segment-specific cell fates. It has been unclear, however, whether Hox proteins drive the epithelial cell segregation mechanism that is thought to initiate the segmentation process. Here, we investigate the role of vertebrate Hox proteins during the partitioning of the developing hindbrain into lineage-restricted units called rhombomeres. Loss-of-function mutants and ectopic expression assays reveal that Hoxb4 and its paralogue Hoxd4 are necessary and sufficient for cell segregation, and for the most caudal rhombomere boundary (r6/r7). Hox4 proteins regulate Eph/ephrins and other cell-surface proteins, and can function in a non-cell-autonomous manner to induce apical cell enlargement on both sides of their expression border. Similarly, other Hox proteins expressed at more rostral rhombomere interfaces can also regulate Eph/ephrins, induce apical remodelling and drive cell segregation in ectopic expression assays. However, Krox20, a key segmentation factor expressed in odd rhombomeres (r3 and r5), can largely override Hox proteins at the level of regulation of a cell surface target, Epha4. This study suggests that most, if not all, Hox proteins share a common potential to induce cell segregation but in some contexts this is masked or modulated by other transcription factors. PMID:24574009

  6. Angular distribution of the bremsstrahlung emission during lower-hybrid current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.

    1985-06-01

    The bremsstrahlung emission from the PLT tokamak during lower-hybrid current drive has been measured as a function of angle between the magnetic field and the emission direction. The emission is peaked strongly in the forward direction, indicating a strong anisotropy of the electron-velocity distribution. The data demonstrate the existence of a nearly flat tail of the velocity distribution, which extends out to approximately 500 keV and which is interpreted as the plateau created by Landau damping of the lower-hybrid waves.

  7. Quasistationary distributions of dissipative nonlinear quantum oscillators in strong periodic driving fields

    PubMed

    Breuer; Huber; Petruccione

    2000-05-01

    The dynamics of periodically driven quantum systems coupled to a thermal environment is investigated. The interaction of the system with the external coherent driving field is taken into account exactly by making use of the Floquet picture. Treating the coupling to the environment within the Born-Markov approximation one finds a Pauli-type master equation for the diagonal elements of the reduced density matrix in the Floquet representation. The stationary solution of the latter yields a quasistationary, time-periodic density matrix which describes the long-time behavior of the system. Taking the example of a periodically driven particle in a box, the stationary solution is determined numerically for a wide range of driving amplitudes and temperatures. It is found that the quasistationary distribution differs substantially from a Boltzmann-type distribution at the temperature of the environment. For large driving fields it exhibits a plateau region describing a nearly constant population of a certain number of Floquet states. This number of Floquet states turns out to be nearly independent of the temperature. The plateau region is sharply separated from an exponential tail of the stationary distribution which expresses a canonical Boltzmann-type distribution over the mean energies of the Floquet states. These results are explained in terms of the structure of the matrix of transition rates for the dissipative quantum system. Investigating the corresponding classical, nonlinear Hamiltonian system, one finds that in the semiclassical range essential features of the quasistationary distribution can be understood from the structure of the underlying classical phase space. PMID:11031530

  8. Spatiotemporal dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors from 1949 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhe; Chen, Lajiao

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal data on human population and its driving factors is critical to understanding and responding to population problems. Unfortunately, such spatio-temporal data on a large scale and over the long term are often difficult to obtain. Here, we present a dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors over a remarkably long period, from 1949 to 2013. Driving factors of population distribution were selected according to the push-pull migration laws, which were summarized into four categories: natural environment, natural resources, economic factors and social factors. Natural environment and natural resources indicators were calculated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques, whereas economic and social factors from 1949 to 2013 were collected from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Compendium of Statistics from 1949 to 2008. All of the data were quality controlled and unified into an identical dataset with the same spatial scope and time period. The dataset is expected to be useful for understanding how population responds to and impacts environmental change. PMID:27377410

  9. Spatiotemporal dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors from 1949 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizhe; Chen, Lajiao

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal data on human population and its driving factors is critical to understanding and responding to population problems. Unfortunately, such spatio-temporal data on a large scale and over the long term are often difficult to obtain. Here, we present a dataset on Chinese population distribution and its driving factors over a remarkably long period, from 1949 to 2013. Driving factors of population distribution were selected according to the push-pull migration laws, which were summarized into four categories: natural environment, natural resources, economic factors and social factors. Natural environment and natural resources indicators were calculated using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) techniques, whereas economic and social factors from 1949 to 2013 were collected from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Compendium of Statistics from 1949 to 2008. All of the data were quality controlled and unified into an identical dataset with the same spatial scope and time period. The dataset is expected to be useful for understanding how population responds to and impacts environmental change. PMID:27377410

  10. Multiple Driving Forces Required for Efficient Secretion of Autotransporter Virulence Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Drobnak, Igor; Braselmann, Esther; Clark, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Autotransporter (AT) proteins are a broad class of virulence proteins from Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that require their own C-terminal transmembrane domain to translocate their N-terminal passenger across the bacterial outer membrane (OM). But given the unavailability of ATP or a proton gradient across the OM, it is unknown what energy source(s) drives this process. Here we used a combination of computational and experimental approaches to quantitatively compare proposed AT OM translocation mechanisms. We show directly for the first time that when translocation was blocked an AT passenger remained unfolded in the periplasm. We demonstrate that AT secretion is a kinetically controlled, non-equilibrium process coupled to folding of the passenger and propose a model connecting passenger conformation to secretion kinetics. These results reconcile seemingly contradictory reports regarding the importance of passenger folding as a driving force for OM translocation but also reveal that another energy source is required to initiate translocation. PMID:25670852

  11. Adult activity and temperature preference drives region-wide damselfly (Zygoptera) distributions under a warming climate

    PubMed Central

    Corser, Jeffrey D.; White, Erin L.; Schlesinger, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We analysed a recently completed statewide odonate Atlas using multivariate linear models. Within a phylogenetically explicit framework, we developed a suite of data-derived traits to assess the mechanistic distributional drivers of 59 species of damselflies in New York State (NYS). We found that length of the flight season (adult breeding activity period) mediated by thermal preference drives regional distributions at broad (105 km2) scales. Species that had longer adult flight periods, in conjunction with longer growing seasons, had significantly wider distributions. These intrinsic traits shape species' responses to changing climates and the mechanisms behind such range shifts are fitness-based metapopulation processes that adjust phenology to the prevailing habitat and climate regime through a photoperiod filter. PMID:25878048

  12. Transcriptional abundance is not the single force driving the evolution of bacterial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite rapid progress in understanding the mechanisms that shape the evolution of proteins, the relative importance of various factors remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the effects of 16 different biological features on the evolutionary rates (ERs) of protein-coding sequences in bacterial genomes. Results Our analysis of 18 bacterial species revealed new correlations between ERs and constraining factors. Previous studies have suggested that transcriptional abundance overwhelmingly constrains the evolution of yeast protein sequences. This transcriptional abundance leads to selection against misfolding or misinteractions. In this study we found that there was no single factor in determining the evolution of bacterial proteins. Not only transcriptional abundance (codon adaptation index and expression level), but also protein-protein associations (PPAs), essentiality (ESS), subcellular localization of cytoplasmic membrane (SLM), transmembrane helices (TMH) and hydropathicity score (HS) independently and significantly affected the ERs of bacterial proteins. In some species, PPA and ESS demonstrate higher correlations with ER than transcriptional abundance. Conclusions Different forces drive the evolution of protein sequences in yeast and bacteria. In bacteria, the constraints are involved in avoiding a build-up of toxic molecules caused by misfolding/misinteraction (transcriptional abundance), while retaining important functions (ESS, PPA) and maintaining the cell membrane (SLM, TMH and HS). Each of these independently contributes to the variation in protein evolution. PMID:23914835

  13. Physical stability of proteins in aqueous solution: mechanism and driving forces in nonnative protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eva Y; Krishnan, Sampathkumar; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2003-09-01

    Irreversible protein aggregation is problematic in the biotechnology industry, where aggregation is encountered throughout the lifetime of a therapeutic protein, including during refolding, purification, sterilization, shipping, and storage processes. The purpose of the current review is to provide a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms by which proteins aggregate and by which varying solution conditions, such as temperature, pH, salt type, salt concentration, cosolutes, preservatives, and surfactants, affect this process. PMID:14567625

  14. Direct yaw moment control for distributed drive electric vehicle handling performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuoping; Leng, Bo; Xiong, Lu; Feng, Yuan; Shi, Fenmiao

    2016-04-01

    For a distributed drive electric vehicle (DDEV) driven by four in-wheel motors, advanced vehicle dynamic control methods can be realized easily because motors can be controlled independently, quickly and precisely. And direct yaw-moment control (DYC) has been widely studied and applied to vehicle stability control. Good vehicle handling performance: quick yaw rate transient response, small overshoot, high steady yaw rate gain, etc, is required by drivers under normal conditions, which is less concerned, however. Based on the hierarchical control methodology, a novel control system using direct yaw moment control for improving handling performance of a distributed drive electric vehicle especially under normal driving conditions has been proposed. The upper-loop control system consists of two parts: a state feedback controller, which aims to realize the ideal transient response of yaw rate, with a vehicle sideslip angle observer; and a steering wheel angle feedforward controller designed to achieve a desired yaw rate steady gain. Under the restriction of the effect of poles and zeros in the closed-loop transfer function on the system response and the capacity of in-wheel motors, the integrated time and absolute error (ITAE) function is utilized as the cost function in the optimal control to calculate the ideal eigen frequency and damper coefficient of the system and obtain optimal feedback matrix and feedforward matrix. Simulations and experiments with a DDEV under multiple maneuvers are carried out and show the effectiveness of the proposed method: yaw rate rising time is reduced, steady yaw rate gain is increased, vehicle steering characteristic is close to neutral steer and drivers burdens are also reduced. The control system improves vehicle handling performance under normal conditions in both transient and steady response. State feedback control instead of model following control is introduced in the control system so that the sense of control intervention to

  15. Direct yaw moment control for distributed drive electric vehicle handling performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuoping; Leng, Bo; Xiong, Lu; Feng, Yuan; Shi, Fenmiao

    2016-05-01

    For a distributed drive electric vehicle (DDEV) driven by four in-wheel motors, advanced vehicle dynamic control methods can be realized easily because motors can be controlled independently, quickly and precisely. And direct yaw-moment control (DYC) has been widely studied and applied to vehicle stability control. Good vehicle handling performance: quick yaw rate transient response, small overshoot, high steady yaw rate gain, etc, is required by drivers under normal conditions, which is less concerned, however. Based on the hierarchical control methodology, a novel control system using direct yaw moment control for improving handling performance of a distributed drive electric vehicle especially under normal driving conditions has been proposed. The upper-loop control system consists of two parts: a state feedback controller, which aims to realize the ideal transient response of yaw rate, with a vehicle sideslip angle observer; and a steering wheel angle feedforward controller designed to achieve a desired yaw rate steady gain. Under the restriction of the effect of poles and zeros in the closed-loop transfer function on the system response and the capacity of in-wheel motors, the integrated time and absolute error (ITAE) function is utilized as the cost function in the optimal control to calculate the ideal eigen frequency and damper coefficient of the system and obtain optimal feedback matrix and feedforward matrix. Simulations and experiments with a DDEV under multiple maneuvers are carried out and show the effectiveness of the proposed method: yaw rate rising time is reduced, steady yaw rate gain is increased, vehicle steering characteristic is close to neutral steer and drivers burdens are also reduced. The control system improves vehicle handling performance under normal conditions in both transient and steady response. State feedback control instead of model following control is introduced in the control system so that the sense of control intervention to

  16. Evidence of Conformational Selection Driving the Formation of Ligand Binding Sites in Protein-Protein Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bohnuud, Tanggis; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    Many protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are compelling targets for drug discovery, and in a number of cases can be disrupted by small molecules. The main goal of this study is to examine the mechanism of binding site formation in the interface region of proteins that are PPI targets by comparing ligand-free and ligand-bound structures. To avoid any potential bias, we focus on ensembles of ligand-free protein conformations obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and deposited in the Protein Data Bank, rather than on ensembles specifically generated for this study. The measures used for structure comparison are based on detecting binding hot spots, i.e., protein regions that are major contributors to the binding free energy. The main tool of the analysis is computational solvent mapping, which explores the surface of proteins by docking a large number of small “probe” molecules. Although we consider conformational ensembles obtained by NMR techniques, the analysis is independent of the method used for generating the structures. Finding the energetically most important regions, mapping can identify binding site residues using ligand-free models based on NMR data. In addition, the method selects conformations that are similar to some peptide-bound or ligand-bound structure in terms of the properties of the binding site. This agrees with the conformational selection model of molecular recognition, which assumes such pre-existing conformations. The analysis also shows the maximum level of similarity between unbound and bound states that is achieved without any influence from a ligand. Further shift toward the bound structure assumes protein-peptide or protein-ligand interactions, either selecting higher energy conformations that are not part of the NMR ensemble, or leading to induced fit. Thus, forming the sites in protein-protein interfaces that bind peptides and can be targeted by small ligands always includes conformational selection, although

  17. Ring of Change: CDC48/p97 Drives Protein Dynamics at Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Franz, André; Ackermann, Leena; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic composition of proteins associated with nuclear DNA is a fundamental property of chromosome biology. In the chromatin compartment dedicated protein complexes govern the accurate synthesis and repair of the genomic information and define the state of DNA compaction in vital cellular processes such as chromosome segregation or transcription. Unscheduled or faulty association of protein complexes with DNA has detrimental consequences on genome integrity. Consequently, the association of protein complexes with DNA is remarkably dynamic and can respond rapidly to cellular signaling events, which requires tight spatiotemporal control. In this context, the ring-like AAA+ ATPase CDC48/p97 emerges as a key regulator of protein complexes that are marked with ubiquitin or SUMO. Mechanistically, CDC48/p97 functions as a segregase facilitating the extraction of substrate proteins from the chromatin. As such, CDC48/p97 drives molecular reactions either by directed disassembly or rearrangement of chromatin-bound protein complexes. The importance of this mechanism is reflected by human pathologies linked to p97 mutations, including neurodegenerative disorders, oncogenesis, and premature aging. This review focuses on the recent insights into molecular mechanisms that determine CDC48/p97 function in the chromatin environment, which is particularly relevant for cancer and aging research. PMID:27200082

  18. Ring of Change: CDC48/p97 Drives Protein Dynamics at Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Franz, André; Ackermann, Leena; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic composition of proteins associated with nuclear DNA is a fundamental property of chromosome biology. In the chromatin compartment dedicated protein complexes govern the accurate synthesis and repair of the genomic information and define the state of DNA compaction in vital cellular processes such as chromosome segregation or transcription. Unscheduled or faulty association of protein complexes with DNA has detrimental consequences on genome integrity. Consequently, the association of protein complexes with DNA is remarkably dynamic and can respond rapidly to cellular signaling events, which requires tight spatiotemporal control. In this context, the ring-like AAA+ ATPase CDC48/p97 emerges as a key regulator of protein complexes that are marked with ubiquitin or SUMO. Mechanistically, CDC48/p97 functions as a segregase facilitating the extraction of substrate proteins from the chromatin. As such, CDC48/p97 drives molecular reactions either by directed disassembly or rearrangement of chromatin-bound protein complexes. The importance of this mechanism is reflected by human pathologies linked to p97 mutations, including neurodegenerative disorders, oncogenesis, and premature aging. This review focuses on the recent insights into molecular mechanisms that determine CDC48/p97 function in the chromatin environment, which is particularly relevant for cancer and aging research. PMID:27200082

  19. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    PubMed Central

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  20. Spatial analysis and quantification of the thermodynamic driving forces in protein-ligand binding: binding site variability.

    PubMed

    Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-02-25

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well-understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provide an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both nonpolar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the "hydrophobic effect". Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. It is notable to have the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  1. Driving force of binding of amyloid {beta}-protein to lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2008-06-06

    Amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}) has been reported to interact with a variety of lipid species, although the thermodynamic driving force remains unclear. We investigated the binding of A{beta}s labeled with the dye diethylaminocoumarin (DAC-A{beta}s) to lipid bilayers under various conditions. DAC-A{beta}-(1-40) electrostatically bound to anionic and cationic lipids at acidic and alkaline interfacial pH, respectively. However, at neutral pH, electroneutral A{beta} did not bind to these lipids, indicating little hydrophobic interaction between A{beta}-(1-40) and the acyl chains of lipids. In contrast, DAC-A{beta} associated with glycolipids even under electroneutral conditions. These results suggested that hydrogen-bonding as well as hydrophobic interactions with sugar groups of glycolipids drive the membrane binding of A{beta}-(1-40)

  2. Host trait combinations drive abundance and canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Cleber Juliano Neves; Dyonisio, Júlio César; Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are strongly dependent on the conditions created by their host's traits and a certain degree of specificity is expected between them, even if these species are largely abundant in a series of tree hosts of a given environment, as in the case of atmospheric bromeliads. Despite their considerable abundance in these environments, we hypothesize that stochasticity alone cannot explain the presence and abundance of atmospheric bromeliads on host trees, since host traits could have a greater influence on the establishment of these bromeliads. We used secondary and reforested seasonal forests and three distinct silvicultures to test whether species richness, phylogenetic diversity and functional diversity of trees can predict the differential presence, abundance and distribution of atmospheric bromeliads on hosts. We compared the observed parameters of their assemblage with null models and performed successive variance hierarchic partitions of abundance and distribution of the assemblage to detect the influence of multiple traits of the tree hosts. Our results do not indicate direct relationships between the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads and phylogenetic or functional diversity of trees, but instead indicate that bromeliads occurred on fewer tree species than expected by chance. We distinguished functional tree patterns that can improve or reduce the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads, and change their distribution on branches and trunk. While individual tree traits are related to increased abundance, species traits are related to the canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages. A balance among these tree functional patterns drives the atmospheric bromeliad assemblage of the forest patches. PMID:26888951

  3. Host trait combinations drive abundance and canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Cleber Juliano Neves; Dyonisio, Júlio César; Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are strongly dependent on the conditions created by their host's traits and a certain degree of specificity is expected between them, even if these species are largely abundant in a series of tree hosts of a given environment, as in the case of atmospheric bromeliads. Despite their considerable abundance in these environments, we hypothesize that stochasticity alone cannot explain the presence and abundance of atmospheric bromeliads on host trees, since host traits could have a greater influence on the establishment of these bromeliads. We used secondary and reforested seasonal forests and three distinct silvicultures to test whether species richness, phylogenetic diversity and functional diversity of trees can predict the differential presence, abundance and distribution of atmospheric bromeliads on hosts. We compared the observed parameters of their assemblage with null models and performed successive variance hierarchic partitions of abundance and distribution of the assemblage to detect the influence of multiple traits of the tree hosts. Our results do not indicate direct relationships between the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads and phylogenetic or functional diversity of trees, but instead indicate that bromeliads occurred on fewer tree species than expected by chance. We distinguished functional tree patterns that can improve or reduce the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads, and change their distribution on branches and trunk. While individual tree traits are related to increased abundance, species traits are related to the canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages. A balance among these tree functional patterns drives the atmospheric bromeliad assemblage of the forest patches. PMID:26888951

  4. 5'-Untranslated region of heat shock protein 70 mRNA drives translation under hypertonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Laura; Alfieri, Roberta R; Petronini, Pier Giorgio; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Brigotti, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    In mammalian cells, adaptation to hypertonic conditions leads to the activation of an array of early (cell shrinkage, regulatory volume increase) and late (accumulation of compatible osmolytes) responses and increased level of HSPs (heat shock proteins). Protein synthesis is strongly inhibited few minutes after the hypertonic challenge as demonstrated in whole cells and as reproduced under controlled conditions in cell-free systems. Different mechanisms known to mediate the accumulation of HSP70, such as mRNA transcription and stabilization, require fully active protein synthesis. We show that the 5'-untranslated region of HSP70 messenger drives a hypertonicity-resistant translation (up to 0.425 osmol/kg of water), whereas cap-dependent protein synthesis is almost totally blocked under the same conditions. The results, obtained in cell-free systems and in whole cells, might help to explain why HSP70 is accumulated in cells when total protein synthesis is impaired. We also observed that translation initiated by viral IRES (from Cricket paralysis virus) is highly efficient in cells exposed to hyperosmolarity, suggesting that the resistance to hypertonic conditions is a more general feature of cap-independent translation. The described mechanism may also play a role in the control of translation of other messengers encoding for proteins involved in the adaptation to hypertonicity. PMID:23291172

  5. Measurements of the Fuel Distribution in Cryogenic D-T Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Chad J.

    In direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, a capsule filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium ice at cryogenic temperature is irradiated by a symmetric arrangements of laser beams to compress and heat the fuel to conditions required for thermonuclear reactions. The areal density (rhoR) of the compressed fuel assembly in a cryogenic implosion is one of the fundamental parameters required to assess the target performance. The rhoR measurements presented here are achieved by measuring the complex neutron energy spectrum resulting from primary and secondary nuclear reactions within the compressed fuel assembly. Advances in neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have made it possible to infer the neutron fraction that elastically scatters off the tritons in the compressed fuel in the energy range from 3.5 -5.5 MeV which is directly proportional to the areal density. In these OMEGA cryogenic campaigns from January 2013 to August 2014, measured low-mode modulations show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Deviations up to 40% in the cold-fuel distribution from spherical symmetry have been inferred from the scattered neutron spectrum. Understanding the mechanism for anisotropic areal density measurements is crucial to improve hydrodynamically equivalent ignition-relevant direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

  6. Temporal behavior of the plasma current distribution in the ASDEX tokamak during lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, K.; Soeldner, F.X.; Eckhartt, D.; Leuterer, F.; Murmann, H.; Derfler, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G.v.; and others

    1987-02-02

    Measurements of the time evolution of the current-density distribution in ASDEX show that lower-hybrid current drive leads to broader profiles, whereby q increases from qapprox. <1 to q>1 in the plasma central region. Simultaneously, the electron temperature is observed to peak, thus demonstrating that the lower-hybrid--driven current distribution is decoupled from the classical conductivity profile.

  7. Physical factors driving intertidal macroalgae distribution: physiological stress of a dominant fucoid at its southern limit.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Brezo; Arenas, F; Rubal, M; Burgués, S; Esteban, R; García-Plazaola, I; Figueroa, F L; Pereira, R; Saldaña, L; Sousa-Pinto, I; Trilla, A; Viejo, R M

    2012-10-01

    Climate change is driving species range shifts worldwide. However, physiological responses related to distributional changes are not fully understood. Oceanographers have reported an increase in ocean temperature in the northwest Iberian Peninsula that is potentially related to the decline in some cold-temperate intertidal macroalgae in the Cantabrian Sea, namely Fucus serratus. Low tide stress could also play a role in this decline. We performed one mensurative (in situ) and two manipulative (in culture) experiments designed to evaluate the interactive effects of some physical factors. The first experiment analysed field response to low tide stress in marginal (mid-Cantabrian Sea and northern Portugal) versus central (Galicia) populations of F. serratus. Then a second experiment was performed that utilized either harsh or mild summer conditions of atmospheric temperature, irradiance, humidity, and wind velocity to compare the responses of individuals from one marginal and one central population to low tide stress. Finally, the combined effect of sea temperature and the other factors was evaluated to detect interactive effects. Changes in frond growth, maximal photosynthetic quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)), temperature, and desiccation were found. Three additive factors (solar irradiation, ocean and air temperatures) were found to drive F. serratus distribution, except under mildly humid conditions that ameliorated atmospheric thermal stress (two additive factors). Mid-Cantabrian Sea temperatures have recently increased, reaching the inhibitory levels suggested in this study of F. serratus. We also expect an additive secondary contribution of low tide stress to this species decline. On the northern Portugal coast, ocean warming plus low tide stress has not reached this species' inhibition threshold. No significant differential responses attributed to the population of origin were found. Mechanistic approaches that are designed to analyse the interactive effects of

  8. Direct TFIIA-TFIID protein contacts drive budding yeast ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Layer, Justin H; Weil, P Anthony

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that yeast TFIID provides coactivator function on the promoters of ribosomal protein-encoding genes (RPGs) by making direct contact with the transactivator repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1). Further, our structural studies of assemblies generated with purified Rap1, TFIID, and TFIIA on RPG enhancer-promoter DNA indicate that Rap1-TFIID interaction induces dramatic conformational rearrangements of enhancer-promoter DNA and TFIID-bound TFIIA. These data indicate a previously unknown yet critical role for yeast TFIIA in the integration of activator-TFIID contacts with promoter conformation and downstream preinitiation complex formation and/or function. Here we describe the use of systematic mutagenesis to define how specific TFIIA contacts contribute to these processes. We have verified that TFIIA is required for RPG transcription in vivo and in vitro, consistent with the existence of a critical Rap1-TFIIA-TFIID interaction network. We also identified essential points of contact for TFIIA and Rap1 within the Rap1 binding domain of the Taf4 subunit of TFIID. These data suggest a mechanism for how interactions between TFIID, TFIIA, and Rap1 contribute to the high rate of transcription initiation seen on RPGs in vivo. PMID:23814059

  9. Ribosome Dwell Times and the Protein Copy Number Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Mieke; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Translation is the cellular process in which ribosomes make proteins from information encoded on messenger RNA (mRNA). We model translation with an exclusion process taking into account the experimentally determined, non-exponential, waiting time between steps of a ribosome. From numerical simulations using realistic parameter values, we determine the distribution P( E) of the number of proteins E produced by one mRNA. We find that for small E this distribution is not geometric. We present a simplified and analytically solvable model that relates P( E) to the distributions of the times to produce the first E proteins.

  10. Protein kinase D1 drives pancreatic acinar cell reprogramming and progression to intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Geou-Yarh; Döppler, Heike; Braun, Ursula B.; Panayiotou, Richard; Scotti Buzhardt, Michele; Radisky, Derek C.; Crawford, Howard C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.; Wang, Q. Jane; Leitges, Michael; Storz, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The transdifferentiation of pancreatic acinar cells to a ductal phenotype (acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, ADM) occurs after injury or inflammation of the pancreas and is a reversible process. However, in the presence of activating Kras mutations or persistent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signalling, cells that underwent ADM can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually pancreatic cancer. In transgenic animal models, ADM and PanINs are initiated by high-affinity ligands for EGF-R or activating Kras mutations, but the underlying signalling mechanisms are not well understood. Here, using a conditional knockout approach, we show that protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is sufficient to drive the reprogramming process to a ductal phenotype and progression to PanINs. Moreover, using 3D explant culture of primary pancreatic acinar cells, we show that PKD1 acts downstream of TGFα and Kras, to mediate formation of ductal structures through activation of the Notch pathway.

  11. The Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Matrix Protein PPXY Late Domain Drives the Production of Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Christopher M.; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A.; Weir, Marion E.; King, Benjamin R.; Klaus, Joseph P.; Krementsov, Dimitry N.; Shirley, David J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses cause severe diseases in humans but establish asymptomatic, lifelong infections in rodent reservoirs. Persistently-infected rodents harbor high levels of defective interfering (DI) particles, which are thought to be important for establishing persistence and mitigating virus-induced cytopathic effect. Little is known about what drives the production of DI particles. We show that neither the PPXY late domain encoded within the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein nor a functional endosomal sorting complex transport (ESCRT) pathway is absolutely required for the generation of standard infectious virus particles. In contrast, DI particle release critically requires the PPXY late domain and is ESCRT-dependent. Additionally, the terminal tyrosine in the PPXY motif is reversibly phosphorylated and our findings indicate that this posttranslational modification may regulate DI particle formation. Thus we have uncovered a new role for the PPXY late domain and a possible mechanism for its regulation. PMID:27010636

  12. The Nuanced Interplay of Intrinsic Disorder and Other Structural Properties Driving Protein Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Joseph; Dos Santos, Helena G; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    Protein evolution often occurs at unequal rates in different sites along an amino acid chain. Site-specific evolutionary rates have been linked to several structural and functional properties of proteins. Previous analyses of this phenomenon have involved relatively small datasets and, in some cases, the interaction among multiple structural factors is not evaluated. Here, we present the results of a large-scale phylogenetic and statistical analysis, testing the effects and interactions of three structural properties on amino acid replacement rates. We used sequence-based computational methods to predict (i) intrinsic disorder propensity, (ii) secondary structure, and (iii) functional domain involvement across millions of amino acid sites in thousands of sequence alignments of metazoan proteins. Our results somewhat corroborate earlier findings that intrinsically disordered sites tend to be more variable than ordered sites, but there is considerable overlap among their rate distributions, and a significant confounding interaction exists between intrinsic disorder and secondary structure. Notably, protein sites that are consistently predicted to be both intrinsically disordered and involved in secondary structures tend to be the most conserved at the amino acid level, suggesting that they are highly constrained and functionally important. In addition, a significant interaction exists between functional domain involvement and secondary structure. These findings suggest that multiple structural drivers of protein evolution should be evaluated simultaneously in order to get a clear picture of their individual effects as well as any confounding interactions among them. PMID:27189555

  13. Analysis of the irregular planar distribution of proteins in membranes.

    PubMed

    Hui, S W; Frank, J

    1985-03-01

    Methods to characterize the irregular but non-random planar distribution of proteins in biological membranes were investigated. The distribution of the proteins constituting the intramembranous particles (IMP) in human erythrocyte membranes was used as an example. The distribution of IMPs was deliberately altered by experimental means. For real space analyses, the IMP positions in freeze fracture micrograph S were determined by an automatic procedure described. Radial distribution and autocorrelation analysis revealed quantitative differences between experimental groups. These methods are more sensitive than the corresponding optical diffraction or Fourier-Bessel analyses of the same IMP distribution data, due to the inability of the diffraction methods to separate contrast and distribution effects. A method to identify IMPs on a non-uniform background is described. PMID:3999133

  14. Spatial Distribution of Intraflagellar Transport Proteins in Vertebrate Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Luby-Phelps, Katharine; Fogerty, Joseph; Baker, Sheila A.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Besharse, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of a ∼17S particle containing at least 16 distinct polypeptides is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. Although both genetic and biochemical evidence suggest a role for IFT in vertebrate photoreceptors, the spatial distribution of IFT proteins within photoreceptors remains poorly defined. We have evaluated the distribution of 4 IFT proteins using a combination of immunocytochemistry and rod-specific over-expression of GFP tagged IFT proteins. Endogenous IFT proteins are most highly concentrated within the inner segment, around the basal body, and within the outer segment IFT proteins are localized in discrete particles along the entire length of the axoneme. IFT52-GFP and IFT57-GFP mimicked this pattern in transgenic Xenopus. PMID:17931679

  15. Stable Kinesin and Dynein Assemblies Drive the Axonal Transport of Mammalian Prion Protein Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Encalada, Sandra E.; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Xia, Chun-hong; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Kinesin and dynein are opposite-polarity microtubule motors that drive the tightly regulated transport of a variety of cargoes. Both motors can bind to cargo but their overall composition on axonal vesicles and whether this composition directly modulates transport activity, is unknown. Here we characterize the intracellular transport and steady state motor subunit composition of mammalian prion protein (PrPC) vesicles. We identify Kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein as major PrPC vesicle motor complexes, and show that their activities are tightly coupled. Regulation of normal retrograde transport by Kinesin-1 is independent of dynein-vesicle attachment, and requires the vesicle association of a complete Kinesin-1 heavy and light chain holoenzyme. Furthermore, motor subunits remain stably associated with stationary as well as with moving vesicles. Our data suggest a coordination model where PrPC vesicles maintain a stable population of associated motors whose activity is modulated by regulatory factors instead of by structural changes to motor-cargo associations. PMID:21335237

  16. Dynamic hydration shell restores Kauzmann's 1959 explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Kauzmann's explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding is reexamined. His explanation said that hydrocarbon hydration shells are formed, possibly of clathrate water, and they explain why hydrocarbons have uniquely low solubilities in water. His explanation was not universally accepted because of skepticism about the clathrate hydration shell. A revised version is given here in which a dynamic hydration shell is formed by van der Waals (vdw) attraction, as proposed in 1985 by Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470–3473]. The vdw hydration shell is implicit in theories of hydrophobicity that contain the vdw interaction between hydrocarbon C and water O atoms. To test the vdw shell model against the known hydration energetics of alkanes, the energetics should be based on the Ben-Naim standard state (solute transfer between fixed positions in the gas and liquid phases). Then the energetics are proportional to n, the number of water molecules correlated with an alkane by vdw attraction, given by the simulations of Jorgensen et al. The energetics show that the decrease in entropy upon hydration is the root cause of hydrophobicity; it probably results from extensive ordering of water molecules in the vdw shell. The puzzle of how hydrophobic free energy can be proportional to nonpolar surface area when the free energy is unfavorable and the only known interaction (the vdw attraction) is favorable, is resolved by finding that the unfavorable free energy is produced by the vdw shell. PMID:25157156

  17. Ergodic protein dynamics underlie the universal shape of protein distribution in populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Naama; Braun, Erez; Rotella, James; Salman, Hanna; Naama Brenner Collaboration; Erez Collaboration; James Rotella; Hanna Salman Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We have previously shown that protein fluctuations in cell populations exhibit a universal distribution shape under a broad range of biological realizations. Here we report new results based on continuous measurement in individual bacteria for over ~ 70 generations, which show that single-cell protein trajectories sample the available states with the same distribution shape as the population, i.e. protein fluctuations are ergodic. Analysis of temporal trajectories reveals that one effective random variable, sampled once each cell cycle, suffices to reconstruct the distribution from the trajectory. This in turn implies that cellular microscopic processes are strongly buffered and population-level protein distributions are insensitive to details of the intracellular dynamics. Probing them thus requires searching for novel universality-breaking experimental perturbations.

  18. Selective condensation drives partitioning and sequential secretion of cyst wall proteins in differentiating Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Christian; Spycher, Cornelia; Hehl, Adrian B

    2010-04-01

    Controlled secretion of a protective extracellular matrix is required for transmission of the infective stage of a large number of protozoan and metazoan parasites. Differentiating trophozoites of the highly minimized protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia secrete the proteinaceous portion of the cyst wall material (CWM) consisting of three paralogous cyst wall proteins (CWP1-3) via organelles termed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). Phylogenetic and molecular data indicate that Diplomonads have lost a classical Golgi during reductive evolution. However, neogenesis of ESVs in encysting Giardia trophozoites transiently provides basic Golgi functions by accumulating presorted CWM exported from the ER for maturation. Based on this "minimal Golgi" hypothesis we predicted maturation of ESVs to a trans Golgi-like stage, which would manifest as a sorting event before regulated secretion of the CWM. Here we show that proteolytic processing of pro-CWP2 in maturing ESVs coincides with partitioning of CWM into two fractions, which are sorted and secreted sequentially with different kinetics. This novel sorting function leads to rapid assembly of a structurally defined outer cyst wall, followed by slow secretion of the remaining components. Using live cell microscopy we find direct evidence for condensed core formation in maturing ESVs. Core formation suggests that a mechanism controlled by phase transitions of the CWM from fluid to condensed and back likely drives CWM partitioning and makes sorting and sequential secretion possible. Blocking of CWP2 processing by a protease inhibitor leads to mis-sorting of a CWP2 reporter. Nevertheless, partitioning and sequential secretion of two portions of the CWM are unaffected in these cells. Although these cysts have a normal appearance they are not water resistant and therefore not infective. Our findings suggest that sequential assembly is a basic architectural principle of protective wall formation and requires minimal Golgi sorting

  19. Selective Condensation Drives Partitioning and Sequential Secretion of Cyst Wall Proteins in Differentiating Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, Christian; Spycher, Cornelia; Hehl, Adrian B.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled secretion of a protective extracellular matrix is required for transmission of the infective stage of a large number of protozoan and metazoan parasites. Differentiating trophozoites of the highly minimized protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia secrete the proteinaceous portion of the cyst wall material (CWM) consisting of three paralogous cyst wall proteins (CWP1–3) via organelles termed encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). Phylogenetic and molecular data indicate that Diplomonads have lost a classical Golgi during reductive evolution. However, neogenesis of ESVs in encysting Giardia trophozoites transiently provides basic Golgi functions by accumulating presorted CWM exported from the ER for maturation. Based on this “minimal Golgi” hypothesis we predicted maturation of ESVs to a trans Golgi-like stage, which would manifest as a sorting event before regulated secretion of the CWM. Here we show that proteolytic processing of pro-CWP2 in maturing ESVs coincides with partitioning of CWM into two fractions, which are sorted and secreted sequentially with different kinetics. This novel sorting function leads to rapid assembly of a structurally defined outer cyst wall, followed by slow secretion of the remaining components. Using live cell microscopy we find direct evidence for condensed core formation in maturing ESVs. Core formation suggests that a mechanism controlled by phase transitions of the CWM from fluid to condensed and back likely drives CWM partitioning and makes sorting and sequential secretion possible. Blocking of CWP2 processing by a protease inhibitor leads to mis-sorting of a CWP2 reporter. Nevertheless, partitioning and sequential secretion of two portions of the CWM are unaffected in these cells. Although these cysts have a normal appearance they are not water resistant and therefore not infective. Our findings suggest that sequential assembly is a basic architectural principle of protective wall formation and requires minimal Golgi

  20. Dietary protein distribution positively influences 24-h muscle protein synthesis in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Mamerow, Madonna M; Mettler, Joni A; English, Kirk L; Casperson, Shanon L; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Layman, Donald K; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2014-06-01

    The RDA for protein describes the quantity that should be consumed daily to meet population needs and to prevent deficiency. Protein consumption in many countries exceeds the RDA; however, intake is often skewed toward the evening meal, whereas breakfast is typically carbohydrate rich and low in protein. We examined the effects of protein distribution on 24-h skeletal muscle protein synthesis in healthy adult men and women (n = 8; age: 36.9 ± 3.1 y; BMI: 25.7 ± 0.8 kg/m2). By using a 7-d crossover feeding design with a 30-d washout period, we measured changes in muscle protein synthesis in response to isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets with protein at breakfast, lunch, and dinner distributed evenly (EVEN; 31.5 ± 1.3, 29.9 ± 1.6, and 32.7 ± 1.6 g protein, respectively) or skewed (SKEW; 10.7 ± 0.8, 16.0 ± 0.5, and 63.4 ± 3.7 g protein, respectively). Over 24-h periods on days 1 and 7, venous blood samples and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were obtained during primed (2.0 μmol/kg) constant infusion [0.06 μmol/(kg⋅min)] of l-[ring-(13)C6]phenylalanine. The 24-h mixed muscle protein fractional synthesis rate was 25% higher in the EVEN (0.075 ± 0.006%/h) vs. the SKEW (0.056 ± 0.006%/h) protein distribution groups (P = 0.003). This pattern was maintained after 7 d of habituation to each diet (EVEN vs. SKEW: 0.077 ± 0.006 vs. 0.056 ± 0.006%/h; P = 0.001). The consumption of a moderate amount of protein at each meal stimulated 24-h muscle protein synthesis more effectively than skewing protein intake toward the evening meal. PMID:24477298

  1. Interpretation of fluorescence decays in proteins using continuous lifetime distributions.

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, J R; Gratton, E; Prendergast, F G

    1987-01-01

    The decay of the tryptophanyl emission in proteins is often complex due to the sensitivity of the tryptophan excited state to its surroundings. The traditional analysis of the decay curve using exponential components is based on the identification of each component with a particular protein conformation. An alternative approach assumes that proteins can exhibit a large number of conformations and that, at room temperature, the interconversion rate between conformations can be of the same order of magnitude as the excited-state decay rate. Following this assumption, the analysis of the protein emission was performed using continuous distributions of lifetime values. The number of average protein conformations, the range of mobility around each conformation, and the rate of interconversion between conformations determines the characteristics of the lifetime distribution. The fluorescence decay from some single tryptophan proteins was measured using multifrequency phase fluorometry and analyzed using a sum of exponentials, unimodal and bimodal probability-density functions, and the analytical form for lifetime distribution obtained for a model in which the tryptophan residue can move in a single potential well. For ribonuclease T1 and neurotoxin variant 3, the sum of two exponentials and bimodal probability-density functions gave comparable results, whereas for phospholipase A2, the description of the decay required three exponentials or bimodal probability-density functions. Also the temperature dependence of the fluorescence decay was investigated. It was found that the lifetime distribution was broader and shifted toward longer lifetime values at lower temperature. The analysis of the decay of tryptophan in buffer and of some tryptophan derivatives gave single-exponential decays. The single-potential well lifetime distribution, which has only three adjustable parameters, gave good fits for all cases investigated, but in the case of phopholipase A2, the temperature

  2. Protein distribution in lupin protein isolates from Lupinus angustifolius L. prepared by various isolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Muranyi, Isabel S; Volke, Daniela; Hoffmann, Ralf; Eisner, Peter; Herfellner, Thomas; Brunnbauer, Markus; Koehler, Peter; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute

    2016-09-15

    Differences in the protein distribution of various protein isolates from Lupinus angustifolius L. Vitabor were identified as affected by the isolation procedure (alkaline and/or salt-induced extraction followed by isoelectric and/or dilutive precipitation). Protein isolates extracted in alkaline solution showed higher protein yields (26.4-31.7%) compared to salt-induced extraction (19.8-30.0%) or combined alkaline and salt-induced extraction (23.3-25.6%). Chemical variations among the protein isolates especially occurred within the albumins. Protein isolates precipitated isoelectrically showed the highest contents, whereas protein isolates precipitated by dilutive showed the lowest contents of conglutin δ. Furthermore, the alkaline subunits of conglutin α and conglutin γ decreased during alkaline extraction compared to salt-induced extraction. A decrease in protein-bound polar and basic amino acids was shown after protein isolation. In contrast, the amounts of nonpolar, aliphatic, aromatic, hydroxylated and sulfur-rich amino acids were higher in the lupin protein isolates compared to the lupin flakes. However, the functional side chains could not be related to the specific molecular arrangements of the protein isolates, as a similar amino acid composition was found among the protein isolates. PMID:27080873

  3. Promoter and signal sequence from filamentous fungus can drive recombinant protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Aravind; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-08-01

    Cross-recognition of promoters from filamentous fungi in yeast can have important consequences towards developing fungal expression systems, especially for the rapid evaluation of their efficacy. A truncated 510bp inducible Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter was tested for the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Kluyveromyces lactis after disrupting its native β-galactosidase (lac4) promoter. The efficiency of the CBH1 secretion signal was also evaluated by fusing it to the lac4 promoter of the yeast, which significantly increased the secretion of recombinant protein in K. lactis compared to the native α-mating factor secretion signal. The fungal promoter is demonstrated to have potential to drive heterologous protein production in K. lactis; and the small sized T. reesei cbh1 secretion signal can mediate the protein secretion in K. lactis with high efficiency. PMID:24661814

  4. When is an ecological network complex? Connectance drives degree distribution and emerging network properties

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Connectance and degree distributions are important components of the structure of ecological networks. In this contribution, we use a statistical argument and simple network generating models to show that properties of the degree distribution are driven by network connectance. We discuss the consequences of this finding for (1) the generation of random networks in null-model analyses, and (2) the interpretation of network structure and ecosystem properties in relationship with degree distribution. PMID:24688835

  5. DPF2 regulates OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Dijuan; Shen, Yuxian; Tao, Xiaofang; Liu, Lihua; Zhong, Yongwang; Fang, Shengyun

    2015-12-01

    The amount of transcription factor OCT4 is strictly regulated. A tight regulation of OCT4 levels is crucial for mammalian embryonic development and oncogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying regulation of OCT4 protein expression and nuclear distribution are largely unknown. Here, we report that DPF2, a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein, is upregulated during H9 cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid. Endogenous interaction between DPF2 and OCT4 in P19 cells was revealed by an immunoprecipitation assay. GST-pull down assay proved that OCT4 protein in H9 cells and recombinant OCT4 can precipitate with DPF2 in vitro. In vitro ubiquitination assay demonstrated DPF2 might serve as an E3 ligase. Knock down of dpf2 using siRNA increased OCT4 protein level and stability in P19 cells. DPF2 siRNAs also up-regulates OCT4 but not NANOG in H9 cells. However, RA fails to downregulates OCT4 protein level in cells infected by lenitviruses containing DPF2 siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of both DPF2 and OCT4 in 293 cells proved the DPF2-OCT4 interaction. DPF2 but not PHD2 mutant DPF2 enhanced ubiquitination and degradation of OCT4 in 293 cells co-expressed DPF2 and OCT4. Both wild type DPF2 and PHD2 mutant DPF2 redistributes nuclear OCT4 without affecting DPF2-OCT4 interaction. Further analysis indicated that DPF2 decreases monomeric and mono-ubiquitinated OCT4, assembles poly-ubiquitin chains on OCT4 mainly through Ub-K48 linkage. These findings contribute to an understanding of how OCT4 protein level and nuclear distribution is regulated by its associated protein. PMID:26417682

  6. Controlling plasma distributions as driving forces for ion migration during fs laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teddy Fernandez, Toney; Siegel, Jan; Hoyo, Jesus; Sotillo, Belen; Fernandez, Paloma; Solis, Javier

    2015-04-01

    The properties of structures written inside dielectrics with high repetition rate femtosecond lasers are known to depend strongly on the complex interplay of a large number of writing parameters. Recently, ion migration within the laser-excited volume has been identified as a powerful mechanism for changing the local element distribution and producing efficient optical waveguides. In this work it is shown that the transient plasma distribution induced during laser irradiation is a reliable monitor for predicting the final refractive index distribution of the waveguide caused by ion migration. By performing in situ plasma emission microscopy during the writing process inside a La-phosphate glass it is found that the long axis of the plasma distribution determines the axis of ion migration, being responsible for the local refractive index increase. This observation is also valid when strong positive or negative spherical aberration is induced, greatly deforming the focal volume and inverting the index profile. Even subtle changes in the writing conditions, such as an inversion of the writing direction (quill writing effect), show up in the form of a modified plasma distribution, which manifests as a modified index distribution. Finally, it is shown that the superior control over the waveguide properties employing the slit shaping technique is caused by the more confined plasma distribution produced. The underlying reasons for this unexpected result are discussed in terms of non-linear propagation and heat accumulation.

  7. Thylakoid protein phosphorylation: Regulation of light energy distribution in photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlan, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has become apparent that green plants possess the ability to adapt to changes in the spectral quality of ambient light. This phenomenon, state transitions, involves a reversible distribution of light energy between the two photosystems in response to changes in the excitation state of photosystems 1 and 2. Thus, the quantum efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport is maintained under different illumination conditions, and damage caused by excessive energetic input of light (photoinhibition) is prevented. This model comprises a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle of three major components: substrates, the protein kinase(s) and protein phosphatase(s) responsible for the specific phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of these of substrates, and the control mechanisms whereby the protein kinase(s) is activated/deactivated in response to redox and /or conformational changes in the thylakoid. This report considers the three components in some detail.

  8. Correcting for the study bias associated with protein–protein interaction measurements reveals differences between protein degree distributions from different cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Serrano, Luis; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks are associated with multiple types of biases partly rooted in technical limitations of the experimental techniques. Another source of bias are the different frequencies with which proteins have been studied for interaction partners. It is generally believed that proteins with a large number of interaction partners tend to be essential, evolutionarily conserved, and involved in disease. It has been repeatedly reported that proteins driving tumor formation have a higher number of PPI partners. However, it has been noticed before that the degree distribution of PPI networks is biased toward disease proteins, which tend to have been studied more often than non-disease proteins. At the same time, for many poorly characterized proteins no interactions have been reported yet. It is unclear to which extent this study bias affects the observation that cancer proteins tend to have more PPI partners. Here, we show that the degree of a protein is a function of the number of times it has been screened for interaction partners. We present a randomization-based method that controls for this bias to decide whether a group of proteins is associated with significantly more PPI partners than the proteomic background. We apply our method to cancer proteins and observe, in contrast to previous studies, no conclusive evidence for a significantly higher degree distribution associated with cancer proteins as compared to non-cancer proteins when we compare them to proteins that have been equally often studied as bait proteins. Comparing proteins from different tumor types, a more complex picture emerges in which proteins of certain cancer classes have significantly more interaction partners while others are associated with a smaller degree. For example, proteins of several hematological cancers tend to be associated with a higher number of interaction partners as expected by chance. Solid tumors, in contrast, are usually associated with a degree

  9. PHEV Energy Use Estimation: Validating the Gamma Distribution for Representing the Random Daily Driving Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2012-01-01

    The petroleum and electricity consumptions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are sensitive to the variation of daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT). Some studies assume DVMT to follow a Gamma distribution, but such a Gamma assumption is yet to be validated. This study finds the Gamma assumption valid in the context of PHEV energy analysis, based on continuous GPS travel data of 382 vehicles, each tracked for at least 183 days. The validity conclusion is based on the found small prediction errors, resulting from the Gamma assumption, in PHEV petroleum use, electricity use, and energy cost. The finding that the Gamma distribution is valid and reliable is important. It paves the way for the Gamma distribution to be assumed for analyzing energy uses of PHEVs in the real world. The Gamma distribution can be easily specified with very few pieces of driver information and is relatively easy for mathematical manipulation. Given the validation in this study, the Gamma distribution can now be used with better confidence in a variety of applications, such as improving vehicle consumer choice models, quantifying range anxiety for battery electric vehicles, investigating roles of charging infrastructure, and constructing online calculators that provide personal estimates of PHEV energy use.

  10. Turbulent unmixing: how marine turbulence drives patchy distributions of motile phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, William; Climent, Eric; Barry, Michael; de Lillo, Filippo; Boffetta, Guido; Cencini, Massimo; Stocker, Roman

    2013-11-01

    Centimeter-scale patchiness in the distribution of phytoplankton increases the efficacy of many important ecological interactions in the marine food web. We show that turbulent fluid motion, usually synonymous with mixing, instead triggers intense small-scale patchiness in the distribution of motile phytoplankton. We use a suite of experiments, direct numerical simulations of turbulence, and analytical tools to show that turbulent shear and acceleration directs the motility of cells towards well-defined regions of flow, increasing local cell concentrations more than ten fold. This motility-driven `unmixing' offers an explanation for why motile cells are often more patchily distributed than non-motile cells and provides a mechanistic framework to understand how turbulence, whose strength varies profoundly in marine environments, impacts ocean productivity.

  11. Ecological gradients driving the distribution of four Ericaceae in boreal Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Thiffault, Nelson; Grondin, Pierre; Noël, Jean; Poirier, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Understory species play a significant role in forest ecosystem dynamics. As such, species of the Ericaceae family have a major effect on the regeneration of tree species in boreal ecosystems. It is thus imperative to understand the ecological gradients controlling their distribution and abundance, so that their impacts can be taken into account in sustainable forest management. Using innovative analytical techniques from landscape ecology, we aimed to position, along ecological gradients, four Ericaceae found in the boreal forest of Quebec (Canada) (Rhododendron groenlandicum, Kalmia angustifolia, Chamaedaphne calyculata, and Vaccinium spp), to regionalize these species into landscape units relevant to forest management, and to estimate the relative importance of several ecological drivers (climate, disturbances, stand attributes, and physical environment) that control the species distribution and abundance. We conducted our study in boreal Quebec, over a study area covering 535,355 km2. We used data from 15,339 ecological survey plots and forest maps to characterize 1422 ecological districts covering the study region. We evaluated the relative proportion of each ericaceous species and explanatory variables at the district level. Vegetation and explanatory variables matrices were used to conduct redundancy, cluster, and variation partitioning analyses. We observed that ericaceous species are mainly distributed in the western part of the study area and each species has a distinct latitudinal and longitudinal gradient distribution. On the basis of these gradients, we delimited 10 homogeneous landscape units distinct in terms of ericaceous species abundance and environmental drivers. The distribution of the ericaceous species along ecological gradients is closely related to the overlaps between the four sets of explanatory variables considered. We conclude that the studied Ericaceae occupy specific positions along ecological gradients and possess a specific abundance

  12. Ecological gradients driving the distribution of four Ericaceae in boreal Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Thiffault, Nelson; Grondin, Pierre; Noël, Jean; Poirier, Véronique

    2015-05-01

    Understory species play a significant role in forest ecosystem dynamics. As such, species of the Ericaceae family have a major effect on the regeneration of tree species in boreal ecosystems. It is thus imperative to understand the ecological gradients controlling their distribution and abundance, so that their impacts can be taken into account in sustainable forest management. Using innovative analytical techniques from landscape ecology, we aimed to position, along ecological gradients, four Ericaceae found in the boreal forest of Quebec (Canada) (Rhododendron groenlandicum, Kalmia angustifolia, Chamaedaphne calyculata, and Vaccinium spp), to regionalize these species into landscape units relevant to forest management, and to estimate the relative importance of several ecological drivers (climate, disturbances, stand attributes, and physical environment) that control the species distribution and abundance. We conducted our study in boreal Quebec, over a study area covering 535,355 km(2). We used data from 15,339 ecological survey plots and forest maps to characterize 1422 ecological districts covering the study region. We evaluated the relative proportion of each ericaceous species and explanatory variables at the district level. Vegetation and explanatory variables matrices were used to conduct redundancy, cluster, and variation partitioning analyses. We observed that ericaceous species are mainly distributed in the western part of the study area and each species has a distinct latitudinal and longitudinal gradient distribution. On the basis of these gradients, we delimited 10 homogeneous landscape units distinct in terms of ericaceous species abundance and environmental drivers. The distribution of the ericaceous species along ecological gradients is closely related to the overlaps between the four sets of explanatory variables considered. We conclude that the studied Ericaceae occupy specific positions along ecological gradients and possess a specific

  13. Nonspecific bridging-induced attraction drives clustering of DNA-binding proteins and genome organization

    PubMed Central

    Brackley, Chris A.; Taylor, Stephen; Papantonis, Argyris; Cook, Peter R.; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to model proteins that diffuse to DNA, bind, and dissociate; in the absence of any explicit interaction between proteins, or between templates, binding spontaneously induces local DNA compaction and protein aggregation. Small bivalent proteins form into rows [as on binding of the bacterial histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS)], large proteins into quasi-spherical aggregates (as on nanoparticle binding), and cylinders with eight binding sites (representing octameric nucleosomal cores) into irregularly folded clusters (like those seen in nucleosomal strings). Binding of RNA polymerase II and a transcription factor (NFκB) to the appropriate sites on four human chromosomes generates protein clusters analogous to transcription factories, multiscale loops, and intrachromosomal contacts that mimic those found in vivo. We suggest that this emergent behavior of clustering is driven by an entropic bridging-induced attraction that minimizes bending and looping penalties in the template. PMID:24003126

  14. The LMP1 oncogene of EBV activates PERK and the unfolded protein response to drive its own synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Yun

    2008-01-01

    The oncogene latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) without a ligand drives proliferation of EBV-infected B cells. Its levels vary in cells of clonal populations by more than 100-fold, which leads to multiple distinct activities of the oncogene. At intermediate levels it drives proliferation, and at high levels it inhibits general protein synthesis by inducing phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). We have found that LMP1 activates PERK to induce phosphorylation of eIF2α, which upregulates activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression. ATF4, in turn, transactivates LMP1's own promoter. LMP1 activates not only PERK but also inositol requiring kinase 1 (IRE1) and ATF6, 3 pathways of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Increasing expression levels of LMP1 induced a dose-dependent increase in IRE1 activity, as measured by its “splicing” of XBP-1. These infected B cells secrete immunoglobins independent of the levels of LMP1, indicating that only a threshold level of XBP-1 is required for the secretion. These findings indicate that LMP1's activation of the UPR is a normal event in a continuum of LMP1's expression that leads both to stimulatory and inhibitory functions and regulates the physiology of EBV-infected B cells in multiple, unexpected modes. PMID:18042799

  15. Examination of the CLIC drive beam pipe design for thermal distortion caused by distributed beam line

    SciTech Connect

    C. Johnson; K. Kloeppel

    1997-01-01

    Beam transport programs are widely used to estimate the distribution of power deposited in accelerator structures by particle beams, either intentionally as for targets or beam dumps or accidentally owing the beam loss incidents. While this is usually adequate for considerations of radiation safety, it does not reveal the expected temperature rise and its effect on structural integrity. To find this, thermal diffusion must be taken into account, requiring another step in the analysis. The method that has been proposed is to use the output of a transport program, perhaps modified, as input for a finite element analysis program that can solve the thermal diffusion equation. At Cern, the design of the CLIC beam pipe has been treated in this fashion. The power distribution produced in the walls by a distributed beam loss was found according to the widely-used electron shower code EGS4. The distribution of power density was then used to form the input for the finite element analysis pro gram ANSYS, which was able to find the expected temperature rise and the resulting thermal distortion. As a result of these studies, the beam pipe design can be modified to include features that will counteract such distortion.

  16. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Gumm, Jordan; Karki, Suman; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale. PMID:26198229

  17. An Overview of Practical Applications of Protein Disorder Prediction and Drive for Faster, More Accurate Predictions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Gumm, Jordan; Karki, Suman; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Protein disordered regions are segments of a protein chain that do not adopt a stable structure. Thus far, a variety of protein disorder prediction methods have been developed and have been widely used, not only in traditional bioinformatics domains, including protein structure prediction, protein structure determination and function annotation, but also in many other biomedical fields. The relationship between intrinsically-disordered proteins and some human diseases has played a significant role in disorder prediction in disease identification and epidemiological investigations. Disordered proteins can also serve as potential targets for drug discovery with an emphasis on the disordered-to-ordered transition in the disordered binding regions, and this has led to substantial research in drug discovery or design based on protein disordered region prediction. Furthermore, protein disorder prediction has also been applied to healthcare by predicting the disease risk of mutations in patients and studying the mechanistic basis of diseases. As the applications of disorder prediction increase, so too does the need to make quick and accurate predictions. To fill this need, we also present a new approach to predict protein residue disorder using wide sequence windows that is applicable on the genomic scale. PMID:26198229

  18. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein’s rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces. PMID:27380265

  19. Spatial scale modulates the strength of ecological processes driving disease distributions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremy M; Civitello, David J; Brace, Amber J; Feichtinger, Erin M; Ortega, C Nicole; Richardson, Jason C; Sauer, Erin L; Liu, Xuan; Rohr, Jason R

    2016-06-14

    Humans are altering the distribution of species by changing the climate and disrupting biotic interactions and dispersal. A fundamental hypothesis in spatial ecology suggests that these effects are scale dependent; biotic interactions should shape distributions at local scales, whereas climate should dominate at regional scales. If so, common single-scale analyses might misestimate the impacts of anthropogenic modifications on biodiversity and the environment. However, large-scale datasets necessary to test these hypotheses have not been available until recently. Here we conduct a cross-continental, cross-scale (almost five orders of magnitude) analysis of the influence of biotic and abiotic processes and human population density on the distribution of three emerging pathogens: the amphibian chytrid fungus implicated in worldwide amphibian declines and West Nile virus and the bacterium that causes Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), which are responsible for ongoing human health crises. In all three systems, we show that biotic factors were significant predictors of pathogen distributions in multiple regression models only at local scales (∼10(2)-10(3) km(2)), whereas climate and human population density always were significant only at relatively larger, regional scales (usually >10(4) km(2)). Spatial autocorrelation analyses revealed that biotic factors were more variable at smaller scales, whereas climatic factors were more variable at larger scales, as is consistent with the prediction that factors should be important at the scales at which they vary the most. Finally, no single scale could detect the importance of all three categories of processes. These results highlight that common single-scale analyses can misrepresent the true impact of anthropogenic modifications on biodiversity and the environment. PMID:27247398

  20. Processes driving short-term temporal dynamics of small mammal distribution in human-disturbed environments.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Julie; Pothier, David; Fortin, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    As the impact of anthropogenic activities intensifies worldwide, an increasing proportion of landscape is converted to early successional stages every year. To understand and anticipate the global effects of the human footprint on wildlife, assessing short-term changes in animal populations in response to disturbance events is becoming increasingly important. We used isodar habitat selection theory to reveal the consequences of timber harvesting on the ecological processes that control the distribution dynamics of a small mammal, the red-backed vole (Myodes gapperi). The abundance of voles was estimated in pairs of cut and uncut forest stands, prior to logging and up to 2 years afterwards. A week after logging, voles did not display any preference between cut and uncut stands, and a non-significant isodar indicated that their distribution was not driven by density-dependent habitat selection. One month after harvesting, however, juvenile abundance increased in cut stands, whereas the highest proportions of reproductive females were observed in uncut stands. This distribution pattern appears to result from interference competition, with juveniles moving into cuts where there was weaker competition with adults. In fact, the emergence of source-sink dynamics between uncut and cut stands, driven by interference competition, could explain why the abundance of red-backed voles became lower in cut (the sink) than uncut (the source) stands 1-2 years after logging. Our study demonstrates that the influences of density-dependent habitat selection and interference competition in shaping animal distribution can vary frequently, and for several months, following anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27003700

  1. The disordered P granule protein LAF-1 drives phase separation into droplets with tunable viscosity and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Elbaum-Garfinkle, Shana; Kim, Younghoon; Szczepaniak, Krzysztof; Chen, Carlos Chih-Hsiung; Eckmann, Christian R.; Myong, Sua; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    P granules and other RNA/protein bodies are membrane-less organelles that may assemble by intracellular phase separation, similar to the condensation of water vapor into droplets. However, the molecular driving forces and the nature of the condensed phases remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans protein LAF-1, a DDX3 RNA helicase found in P granules, phase separates into P granule-like droplets in vitro. We adapt a microrheology technique to precisely measure the viscoelasticity of micrometer-sized LAF-1 droplets, revealing purely viscous properties highly tunable by salt and RNA concentration. RNA decreases viscosity and increases molecular dynamics within the droplet. Single molecule FRET assays suggest that this RNA fluidization results from highly dynamic RNA–protein interactions that emerge close to the droplet phase boundary. We demonstrate than an N-terminal, arginine/glycine rich, intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domain of LAF-1 is necessary and sufficient for both phase separation and RNA–protein interactions. In vivo, RNAi knockdown of LAF-1 results in the dissolution of P granules in the early embryo, with an apparent submicromolar phase boundary comparable to that measured in vitro. Together, these findings demonstrate that LAF-1 is important for promoting P granule assembly and provide insight into the mechanism by which IDP-driven molecular interactions give rise to liquid phase organelles with tunable properties. PMID:26015579

  2. Driving forces for changes in geographical distribution of Ixodes ricinus ticks in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many factors are involved in determining the latitudinal and altitudinal spread of the important tick vector Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Europe, as well as in changes in the distribution within its prior endemic zones. This paper builds on published literature and unpublished expert opinion from the VBORNET network with the aim of reviewing the evidence for these changes in Europe and discusses the many climatic, ecological, landscape and anthropogenic drivers. These can be divided into those directly related to climatic change, contributing to an expansion in the tick’s geographic range at extremes of altitude in central Europe, and at extremes of latitude in Scandinavia; those related to changes in the distribution of tick hosts, particularly roe deer and other cervids; other ecological changes such as habitat connectivity and changes in land management; and finally, anthropogenically induced changes. These factors are strongly interlinked and often not well quantified. Although a change in climate plays an important role in certain geographic regions, for much of Europe it is non-climatic factors that are becoming increasingly important. How we manage habitats on a landscape scale, and the changes in the distribution and abundance of tick hosts are important considerations during our assessment and management of the public health risks associated with ticks and tick-borne disease issues in 21st century Europe. Better understanding and mapping of the spread of I. ricinus (and changes in its abundance) is, however, essential to assess the risk of the spread of infections transmitted by this vector species. Enhanced tick surveillance with harmonized approaches for comparison of data enabling the follow-up of trends at EU level will improve the messages on risk related to tick-borne diseases to policy makers, other stake holders and to the general public. PMID:23281838

  3. Temperature drives global patterns in forest biomass distribution in leaves, stems, and roots

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Peter B.; Luo, Yunjian; Bradford, John B.; Poorter, Hendrik; Perry, Charles H.; Oleksyn, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Whether the fraction of total forest biomass distributed in roots, stems, or leaves varies systematically across geographic gradients remains unknown despite its importance for understanding forest ecology and modeling global carbon cycles. It has been hypothesized that plants should maintain proportionally more biomass in the organ that acquires the most limiting resource. Accordingly, we hypothesize greater biomass distribution in roots and less in stems and foliage in increasingly arid climates and in colder environments at high latitudes. Such a strategy would increase uptake of soil water in dry conditions and of soil nutrients in cold soils, where they are at low supply and are less mobile. We use a large global biomass dataset (>6,200 forests from 61 countries, across a 40 °C gradient in mean annual temperature) to address these questions. Climate metrics involving temperature were better predictors of biomass partitioning than those involving moisture availability, because, surprisingly, fractional distribution of biomass to roots or foliage was unrelated to aridity. In contrast, in increasingly cold climates, the proportion of total forest biomass in roots was greater and in foliage was smaller for both angiosperm and gymnosperm forests. These findings support hypotheses about adaptive strategies of forest trees to temperature and provide biogeographically explicit relationships to improve ecosystem and earth system models. They also will allow, for the first time to our knowledge, representations of root carbon pools that consider biogeographic differences, which are useful for quantifying whole-ecosystem carbon stocks and cycles and for assessing the impact of climate change on forest carbon dynamics. PMID:25225412

  4. Temperature drives global patterns in forest biomass distribution in leaves, stems, and roots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reich, Peter B.; Lou, Yunjian; Bradford, John B.; Poorter, Hendrik; Perry, Charles H.; Oleksyn, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Whether the fraction of total forest biomass distributed in roots, stems, or leaves varies systematically across geographic gradients remains unknown despite its importance for understanding forest ecology and modeling global carbon cycles. It has been hypothesized that plants should maintain proportionally more biomass in the organ that acquires the most limiting resource. Accordingly, we hypothesize greater biomass distribution in roots and less in stems and foliage in increasingly arid climates and in colder environments at high latitudes. Such a strategy would increase uptake of soil water in dry conditions and of soil nutrients in cold soils, where they are at low supply and are less mobile. We use a large global biomass dataset (>6,200 forests from 61 countries, across a 40 °C gradient in mean annual temperature) to address these questions. Climate metrics involving temperature were better predictors of biomass partitioning than those involving moisture availability, because, surprisingly, fractional distribution of biomass to roots or foliage was unrelated to aridity. In contrast, in increasingly cold climates, the proportion of total forest biomass in roots was greater and in foliage was smaller for both angiosperm and gymnosperm forests. These findings support hypotheses about adaptive strategies of forest trees to temperature and provide biogeographically explicit relationships to improve ecosystem and earth system models. They also will allow, for the first time to our knowledge, representations of root carbon pools that consider biogeographic differences, which are useful for quantifying whole-ecosystem carbon stocks and cycles and for assessing the impact of climate change on forest carbon dynamics.

  5. What drives the aerosol distribution in Guangdong--the most developed province in Southern China?

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Wang, Yunpeng

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to investigate the spatial and temporal variations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over Guangdong, the most developed province in China, during 2010-2012. Linear regression and self-organizing maps (SOM) are used to investigate the relationship between AOT and its affecting factors, including Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), elevation, urbanized land fraction, and several socio-economic variables. Results show that the highest values of τ 0.55 mainly occur over the rapidly-developing Pearl River Delta (PRD) region and the eastern coast. Seasonal averaged AOT is highest in summer (0.416), followed by spring (0.351), winter (0.292), and autumn (0.254). From unary linear regression and SOM analysis, AOT is shown to be strongly negatively correlated to NDVI (R(2) = 0.782) and elevation (R(2) = 0.731), and positively correlated with socio-economic factors, especially GDP, industry and vehicle density (R(2) above 0.73), but not primary industry. Multiple linear regression between AOT and the contributing factors shows much higher R(2) values (>0.8), indicative of the clear relationships between AOT and variables. This study illustrates that human activities have strong impacts on aerosols distribution in Guangdong Province. Economic and industrial developments, as well as vehicle density, are the main controlling factors on aerosol distribution. PMID:25096216

  6. What drives the aerosol distribution in Guangdong - the most developed province in Southern China?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lili; Wang, Yunpeng

    2014-08-01

    This paper uses Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to investigate the spatial and temporal variations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over Guangdong, the most developed province in China, during 2010-2012. Linear regression and self-organizing maps (SOM) are used to investigate the relationship between AOT and its affecting factors, including Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), elevation, urbanized land fraction, and several socio-economic variables. Results show that the highest values of τ0.55 mainly occur over the rapidly-developing Pearl River Delta (PRD) region and the eastern coast. Seasonal averaged AOT is highest in summer (0.416), followed by spring (0.351), winter (0.292), and autumn (0.254). From unary linear regression and SOM analysis, AOT is shown to be strongly negatively correlated to NDVI (R2 = 0.782) and elevation (R2 = 0.731), and positively correlated with socio-economic factors, especially GDP, industry and vehicle density (R2 above 0.73), but not primary industry. Multiple linear regression between AOT and the contributing factors shows much higher R2 values (>0.8), indicative of the clear relationships between AOT and variables. This study illustrates that human activities have strong impacts on aerosols distribution in Guangdong Province. Economic and industrial developments, as well as vehicle density, are the main controlling factors on aerosol distribution.

  7. Ecology Drives the Distribution of Specialized Tyrosine Metabolism Modules in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Greene, George H.; McGary, Kriston L.; Rokas, Antonis; Slot, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene clusters encoding accessory or environmentally specialized metabolic pathways likely play a significant role in the evolution of fungal genomes. Two such gene clusters encoding enzymes associated with the tyrosine metabolism pathway (KEGG #00350) have been identified in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The l-tyrosine degradation (TD) gene cluster encodes a functional module that facilitates breakdown of the phenolic amino acid, l-tyrosine through a homogentisate intermediate, but is also involved in the production of pyomelanin, a fungal pathogenicity factor. The gentisate catabolism (GC) gene cluster encodes a functional module likely involved in phenolic compound degradation, which may enable metabolism of biphenolic stilbenes in multiple lineages. Our investigation of the evolution of the TD and GC gene clusters in 214 fungal genomes revealed spotty distributions partially shaped by gene cluster loss and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Specifically, a TD gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between the extremophilic, melanized fungi Exophiala dermatitidis and Baudoinia compniacensis, and a GC gene cluster shows evidence of HGT between Sordariomycete and Dothideomycete grass pathogens. These results suggest that the distribution of specialized tyrosine metabolism modules is influenced by both the ecology and phylogeny of fungal species. PMID:24391152

  8. Ecological segregation drives fine-scale cytotype distribution of Senecio carniolicus in the Eastern Alps

    PubMed Central

    Hülber, Karl; Sonnleitner, Michaela; Flatscher, Ruth; Berger, Andreas; Dobrovsky, Rainer; Niessner, Sophie; Nigl, Thomas; Schneeweiss, Gerald M.; Kubešová, Magdalena; Rauchová, Jana; Suda, Jan; Schönswetter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In order to uncover patterns and processes of segregation of co-existing cytotypes, we investigated a zone in the eastern Alps (Austria) where diploid and hexaploid individuals of the alpine herb Senecio carniolicus Willd. (Asteraceae) co-occur. Linking the fine-scale distribution of cytotypes to environmental and spatial factors revealed segregation along an ecological gradient, which was also reflected in the cytotype-associated plant assemblages. Compared to diploids, hexaploids are found in more species-rich and denser communities. This may be due to their better competitive ability and lower tolerance of abiotic stress compared to the diploids. The lack of any intermediate cytotypes suggests the presence of strong reproductive isolation mechanisms, whose nature is, however, elusive. PMID:22318659

  9. Factors driving changes in freshwater mussel (Bivalvia, Unionida) diversity and distribution in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zieritz, Alexandra; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Bogan, Arthur E; Sousa, Ronaldo; Walton, Samuel; Rahim, Khairul Adha A; Wilson, John-James; Ng, Pei-Yin; Froufe, Elsa; McGowan, Suzanne

    2016-11-15

    Freshwater mussels (Bivalvia, Unionida) fulfil important ecosystem functions and are one of the most threatened freshwater taxa globally. Knowledge of freshwater mussel diversity, distribution and ecology in Peninsular Malaysia is extremely poor, and the conservation status of half of the species presumed to occur in the region has yet to be assessed. We conducted the first comprehensive assessment of Peninsular Malaysia's freshwater mussels based on species presence/absence and environmental data collected from 155 sites spanning all major river catchments and diverse habitat types. Through an integrative morphological-molecular approach we recognised nine native and one widespread non-native species, i.e. Sinanodonta woodiana. Two species, i.e. Pilsbryoconcha compressa and Pseudodon cambodjensis, had not been previously recorded from Malaysia, which is likely a result of morphological misidentifications of historical records. Due to their restriction to single river catchments and declining distributions, Hyriopsis bialata, possibly endemic to Peninsular Malaysia, Ensidens ingallsianus, possibly already extinct in the peninsula, and Rectidens sumatrensis, particularly require conservation attention. Equally, the Pahang, the Perak and the north-western river catchments are of particular conservation value due to the presence of a globally unique freshwater mussel fauna. Statistical relationships of 15 water quality parameters and mussel presence/absence identified acidification and nutrient pollution (eutrophication) as the most important anthropogenic factors threatening freshwater mussel diversity in Peninsular Malaysia. These factors can be linked to atmospheric pollution, deforestation, oil-palm plantations and a lack of functioning waste water treatment, and could be mitigated by establishing riparian buffers and improving waste water treatment for rivers running through agricultural and residential land. PMID:27473771

  10. Distribution of syndecan-1 protein in developing mouse teeth

    PubMed Central

    Filatova, Anna; Pagella, Pierfrancesco; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2014-01-01

    Syndecan-1 is a cell surface proteoglycan involved in the regulation of various biological processes such as proliferation, migration, condensation and differentiation of cells, intercellular communication, and morphogenesis. The extracellular domain of syndecan-1 can bind to extracellular matrix components and signaling molecules, while its intracellular domain interacts with cytoskeletal proteins, thus allowing the transfer of information about extracellular environment changes into the cell that consequently affect cellular behavior. Although previous studies have shown syndecan-1 expression during precise stages of tooth development, there is no equivalent study regrouping the expression patterns of syndecan-1 during all stages of odontogenesis. Here we examined the distribution of syndecan-1 protein in embryonic and post-natal developing mouse molars and incisors. Syndecan-1 distribution in mesenchymal tissues such as dental papilla and dental follicle was correlated with proliferating events and its expression was often linked to stem cell niche territories. Syndecan-1 was also expressed in mesenchymal cells that will differentiate into the dentin producing odontoblasts, but not in differentiated functional odontoblasts. In the epithelium, syndecan-1 was detected in all cell layers, by the exception of differentiated ameloblasts that form the enamel. Furthermore, syndecan-1 was expressed in osteoblast precursors and osteoclasts of the alveolar bone that surrounds the developing tooth germs. Taken together these results show the dynamic nature of syndecan-1 expression during odontogenesis and suggest its implication in various processes of tooth development and homeostasis. PMID:25642191

  11. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  12. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Leyton, Denisse L.; Shiota, Takuya; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-10-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation and assembly module (TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and magnetic contrast neutron reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1 Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines.

  13. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation assembly module (the TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Magnetic Contrast Neutron Reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here, we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines. PMID:25341963

  14. Persistent natural acidification drives major distribution shifts in marine benthic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Linares, C; Vidal, M; Canals, M; Kersting, D K; Amblas, D; Aspillaga, E; Cebrián, E; Delgado-Huertas, A; Díaz, D; Garrabou, J; Hereu, B; Navarro, L; Teixidó, N; Ballesteros, E

    2015-11-01

    Ocean acidification is receiving increasing attention because of its potential to affect marine ecosystems. Rare CO2 vents offer a unique opportunity to investigate the response of benthic ecosystems to acidification. However, the benthic habitats investigated so far are mainly found at very shallow water (less than or equal to 5 m depth) and therefore are not representative of the broad range of continental shelf habitats. Here, we show that a decrease from pH 8.1 to 7.9 observed in a CO2 vent system at 40 m depth leads to a dramatic shift in highly diverse and structurally complex habitats. Forests of the kelp Laminaria rodriguezii usually found at larger depths (greater than 65 m) replace the otherwise dominant habitats (i.e. coralligenous outcrops and rhodolith beds), which are mainly characterized by calcifying organisms. Only the aragonite-calcifying algae are able to survive in acidified waters, while high-magnesium-calcite organisms are almost completely absent. Although a long-term survey of the venting area would be necessary to fully understand the effects of the variability of pH and other carbonate parameters over the structure and functioning of the investigated mesophotic habitats, our results suggest that in addition of significant changes at species level, moderate ocean acidification may entail major shifts in the distribution and dominance of key benthic ecosystems at regional scale, which could have broad ecological and socio-economic implications. PMID:26511045

  15. Protein and nucleotide biosynthesis are coupled by a single rate-limiting enzyme, PRPS2, to drive cancer.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John T; Moreno, Melissa V; Lodi, Alessia; Ronen, Sabrina M; Ruggero, Davide

    2014-05-22

    Cancer cells must integrate multiple biosynthetic demands to drive indefinite proliferation. How these key cellular processes, such as metabolism and protein synthesis, crosstalk to fuel cancer cell growth is unknown. Here, we uncover the mechanism by which the Myc oncogene coordinates the production of the two most abundant classes of cellular macromolecules, proteins, and nucleic acids in cancer cells. We find that a single rate-limiting enzyme, phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate synthetase 2 (PRPS2), promotes increased nucleotide biosynthesis in Myc-transformed cells. Remarkably, Prps2 couples protein and nucleotide biosynthesis through a specialized cis-regulatory element within the Prps2 5' UTR, which is controlled by the oncogene and translation initiation factor eIF4E downstream Myc activation. We demonstrate with a Prps2 knockout mouse that the nexus between protein and nucleotide biosynthesis controlled by PRPS2 is crucial for Myc-driven tumorigenesis. Together, these studies identify a translationally anchored anabolic circuit critical for cancer cell survival and an unexpected vulnerability for "undruggable" oncogenes, such as Myc. PAPERFLICK: PMID:24855946

  16. Multivesicular Bodies in Neurons: Distribution, Protein Content, and Trafficking Functions

    PubMed Central

    VON BARTHELD, CHRISTOPHER S.; ALTICK, AMY L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) are intracellular endosomal organelles characterized by multiple internal vesicles that are enclosed within a single outer membrane. MVBs were initially regarded as purely prelysosomal structures along the degradative endosomal pathway of internalized proteins. MVBs are now known to be involved in numerous endocytic and trafficking functions, including protein sorting, recycling, transport, storage, and release. This review of neuronal MVBs summarizes their research history, morphology, distribution, accumulation of cargo and constitutive proteins, transport, and theories of functions of MVBs in neurons and glia. Due to their complex morphologies, neurons have expanded trafficking and signaling needs, beyond those of “geometrically simpler” cells, but it is not known whether neuronal MVBs perform additional transport and signaling functions. This review examines the concept of compartment-specific MVB functions in endosomal protein trafficking and signaling within synapses, axons, dendrites and cell bodies. We critically evaluate reports of the accumulation of neuronal MVBs based on evidence of stress-induced MVB formation. Furthermore, we discuss potential functions of neuronal and glial MVBs in development, in dystrophic neuritic syndromes, injury, disease, and aging. MVBs may play a role in Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, and Niemann-Pick diseases, some types of frontotemporal dementia, prion and virus trafficking, as well as in adaptive responses of neurons to trauma and toxin or drug exposure. Functions of MVBs in neurons have been much neglected, and major gaps in knowledge currently exist. Developing truly MVB-specific markers would help to elucidate the roles of neuronal MVBs in intra- and intercellular signaling of normal and diseased neurons. PMID:21216273

  17. What factors drive copepod community distribution in the Gulf of Gabes, Eastern Mediterranean Sea?

    PubMed

    Drira, Zaher; Bel Hassen, Malika; Ayadi, Habib; Aleya, Lotfi

    2014-02-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in copepod communities were investigated during four oceanographic cruises conducted between July 2005 and March 2007 aboard the R/V Hannibal. A close relationship was observed between the temperature, salinity, hydrographic properties and water masses characterising the Gulf of Gabes. Indeed, water thermal stratification began in May-June, and a thermocline was established at a 20-m depth, but ranged from 25 m in July to more than 30 m in September. The zooplankton community is dominated by copepods representing 69 % to 83 % of total zooplankton. Spatial and temporal variation of copepods in relation to environmental factors shows their close relationship with the hydrodynamic features of the water column. Thermal stratification in the column, established in summer, supports copepod development. In fact, copepod abundance increases gradually with rising water temperature and salinity, starting from the beginning of thermal stratification (May-June 2006) and lasting until its completion (July 2005 and September 2006). When the water column is well mixed (March 2007), copepod abundance decreased. Our finding shows that temperature and salinity seem to be the most important physical factors and thus strongly influence the taxonomic diversity and distribution of the copepod population. They are characterised by the dominance of Oithona nana, representing 75-86 % of total cyclopoid abundance. The most abundant species during the stratification period were O. nana, Acartia clausi and Stephos marsalensis in July 2005 and September 2006. However, during the mixing period, Euterpina acutifrons was more abundant, representing 21 % of the total. Unlike the copepod community, which is more abundant during the period of high stratification, phytoplankton proliferates during semi-mixed conditions. PMID:24170503

  18. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-12-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites.

  19. Stability enhancement and fuel economy of the 4-wheel-drive hybrid electric vehicles by optimal tyre force distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Avesta; Mohammadi, Masoud

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, vehicle stability control and fuel economy for a 4-wheel-drive hybrid vehicle are investigated. The integrated controller is designed within three layers. The first layer determines the total yaw moment and total lateral force made by using an optimal controller method to follow the desired dynamic behaviour of a vehicle. The second layer determines optimum tyre force distribution in order to optimise tyre usage and find out how the tyres should share longitudinal and lateral forces to achieve a target vehicle response under the assumption that all four wheels can be independently steered, driven, and braked. In the third layer, the active steering, wheel slip, and electrical motor torque controllers are designed. In the front axle, internal combustion engine (ICE) is coupled to an electric motor (EM). The control strategy has to determine the power distribution between ICE and EM to minimise fuel consumption and allowing the vehicle to be charge sustaining. Finally, simulations performed in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment show that the proposed structure could enhance the vehicle stability and fuel economy in different manoeuvres.

  20. Spatial and niche-based ecological processes drive the distribution of endophytic Sebacinales in soil and root of grassland communities.

    PubMed

    López-García, Álvaro; Horn, Sebastian; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The interest in endophytic sebacinalean communities has been increasing during the last decade due to the increased knowledge about their symbiotic life style and potential role for ecosystem functioning. Although they are present in many ecosystems, their abundance in individual plant roots is very limited. This fact affects their study: they are difficult to isolate and to detect in root DNA samples. To advance knowledge of the forces that shape their distribution, we approached the parallel study of sebacinalean communities in roots and soil of grassland. Using a small-scale spatially explicit sampling design, we analysed the contribution of spatial position, soil properties, plant community and phylogenetic components to the variation of sebacinalean communities. The results revealed the presence of 11 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a high coincidence between root and soil communities: on an average a single-OTU per sample was recorded for both sample types. Spatial distance was found to mainly drive the distribution of Sebacinales in soil, whereas phylogenetic plus environmental signatures mainly drove their presence in roots. Independently of the sample type, we found clear evidence of environmental filtering caused by soil pH which, furthermore, seemed to control the presence of a specialized sebacinalean OTU. PMID:27090761

  1. Femtosecond structural dynamics drives the trans/cis isomerization in photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Pande, Kanupriya; Hutchison, Christopher D M; Groenhof, Gerrit; Aquila, Andy; Robinson, Josef S; Tenboer, Jason; Basu, Shibom; Boutet, Sébastien; DePonte, Daniel P; Liang, Mengning; White, Thomas A; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Morozov, Dmitry; Oberthuer, Dominik; Gati, Cornelius; Subramanian, Ganesh; James, Daniel; Zhao, Yun; Koralek, Jake; Brayshaw, Jennifer; Kupitz, Christopher; Conrad, Chelsie; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Coe, Jesse D; Metz, Markus; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Grant, Thomas D; Koglin, Jason E; Ketawala, Gihan; Fromme, Raimund; Šrajer, Vukica; Henning, Robert; Spence, John C H; Ourmazd, Abbas; Schwander, Peter; Weierstall, Uwe; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N; Moffat, Keith; van Thor, Jasper J; Schmidt, Marius

    2016-05-01

    A variety of organisms have evolved mechanisms to detect and respond to light, in which the response is mediated by protein structural changes after photon absorption. The initial step is often the photoisomerization of a conjugated chromophore. Isomerization occurs on ultrafast time scales and is substantially influenced by the chromophore environment. Here we identify structural changes associated with the earliest steps in the trans-to-cis isomerization of the chromophore in photoactive yellow protein. Femtosecond hard x-ray pulses emitted by the Linac Coherent Light Source were used to conduct time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography on photoactive yellow protein microcrystals over a time range from 100 femtoseconds to 3 picoseconds to determine the structural dynamics of the photoisomerization reaction. PMID:27151871

  2. Dominant Driving Force for Protein Folding -- A Result from Analyzing the Statistical Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Tang, Chao; Wingreen, Ned

    1997-03-01

    In a statistical approach, the energy of a particular substructure in proteins is related to its number of appearance in the protein structure data bank via a Boltzmann factor. Such knowledge based potentials are widely used in protein structure prediction. A well known example is the inter-residue contact energies between different types of amino acids -- a 20× 20 matrix derived by Miyazawa and Jernigan (MJ). We have analyzed the MJ matrix using the method of eigenvalue decomposition. We find that the MJ matrix can be accurately reconstructed by using only the two largest eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors. The matrix elements can be simply expressed as M_ij=C_0+C_1(q_i+q_j)+C_2q_iq_j, with C's constants, and 20 q values associated with 20 amino acids. We find that this regularity is due to hydrophobic force and a force of demixing, the latter obeying Hildebrand's solubility theory for simple liquids.

  3. Protein-Protein Interactions in Clathrin Vesicular Assembly: Radial Distribution of Evolutionary Constraints in Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gadkari, Rupali A.; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms clathrin-coated vesicles are instrumental in the processes of endocytosis as well as intracellular protein trafficking. Hence, it is important to understand how these vesicles have evolved across eukaryotes, to carry cargo molecules of varied shapes and sizes. The intricate nature and functional diversity of the vesicles are maintained by numerous interacting protein partners of the vesicle system. However, to delineate functionally important residues participating in protein-protein interactions of the assembly is a daunting task as there are no high-resolution structures of the intact assembly available. The two cryoEM structures closely representing intact assembly were determined at very low resolution and provide positions of Cα atoms alone. In the present study, using the method developed by us earlier, we predict the protein-protein interface residues in clathrin assembly, taking guidance from the available low-resolution structures. The conservation status of these interfaces when investigated across eukaryotes, revealed a radial distribution of evolutionary constraints, i.e., if the members of the clathrin vesicular assembly can be imagined to be arranged in spherical manner, the cargo being at the center and clathrins being at the periphery, the detailed phylogenetic analysis of these members of the assembly indicated high-residue variation in the members of the assembly closer to the cargo while high conservation was noted in clathrins and in other proteins at the periphery of the vesicle. This points to the strategy adopted by the nature to package diverse proteins but transport them through a highly conserved mechanism. PMID:22384024

  4. Timing and distribution of protein ingestion during prolonged recovery from resistance exercise alters myofibrillar protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Areta, José L; Burke, Louise M; Ross, Megan L; Camera, Donny M; West, Daniel W D; Broad, Elizabeth M; Jeacocke, Nikki A; Moore, Daniel R; Stellingwerff, Trent; Phillips, Stuart M; Hawley, John A; Coffey, Vernon G

    2013-01-01

    Quantity and timing of protein ingestion are major factors regulating myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS). However, the effect of specific ingestion patterns on MPS throughout a 12 h period is unknown. We determined how different distributions of protein feeding during 12 h recovery after resistance exercise affects anabolic responses in skeletal muscle. Twenty-four healthy trained males were assigned to three groups (n= 8/group) and undertook a bout of resistance exercise followed by ingestion of 80 g of whey protein throughout 12 h recovery in one of the following protocols: 8 × 10 g every 1.5 h (PULSE); 4 × 20 g every 3 h (intermediate: INT); or 2 × 40 g every 6 h (BOLUS). Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and after 1, 4, 6, 7 and 12 h post exercise. Resting and post-exercise MPS (l-[ring-13C6] phenylalanine), and muscle mRNA abundance and cell signalling were assessed. All ingestion protocols increased MPS above rest throughout 1–12 h recovery (88–148%, P < 0.02), but INT elicited greater MPS than PULSE and BOLUS (31–48%, P < 0.02). In general signalling showed a BOLUS>INT>PULSE hierarchy in magnitude of phosphorylation. MuRF-1 and SLC38A2 mRNA were differentially expressed with BOLUS. In conclusion, 20 g of whey protein consumed every 3 h was superior to either PULSE or BOLUS feeding patterns for stimulating MPS throughout the day. This study provides novel information on the effect of modulating the distribution of protein intake on anabolic responses in skeletal muscle and has the potential to maximize outcomes of resistance training for attaining peak muscle mass. PMID:23459753

  5. Reproductive Aging Drives Protein Accumulation in the Uterus and Limits Lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Stephanie M.; Hinkson, Izumi V.; Elias, Joshua E.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by widespread physiological and molecular changes, but the mechanisms that determine the rate at which these changes occur are not well understood. In this study, we identify a novel link between reproductive aging and somatic aging in C. elegans. By measuring global age-related changes in the proteome, we identify a previously uncharacterized group of secreted proteins in the adult uterus that dramatically increase in abundance with age. This accumulation is blunted in animals with an extended reproductive period and accelerated in sterile animals lacking a germline. Uterine proteins are not removed in old post-reproductive animals or in young vulvaless worms, indicating that egg-laying is necessary for their rapid removal in wild-type young animals. Together, these results suggest that age-induced infertility contributes to extracellular protein accumulation in the uterus with age. Finally, we show that knocking down multiple age-increased proteins simultaneously extends lifespan. These results provide a mechanistic example of how the cessation of reproduction contributes to detrimental changes in the soma, and demonstrate how the timing of reproductive decline can influence the rate of aging. PMID:26656270

  6. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    PubMed Central

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed ‘clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length. PMID:26027519

  7. A Relay Network of Extracellular Heme-Binding Proteins Drives C. albicans Iron Acquisition from Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Kuznets, Galit; Vigonsky, Elena; Weissman, Ziva; Lalli, Daniela; Gildor, Tsvia; Kauffman, Sarah J.; Turano, Paola; Becker, Jeffrey; Lewinson, Oded; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Iron scavenging constitutes a crucial challenge for survival of pathogenic microorganisms in the iron-poor host environment. Candida albicans, like many microbial pathogens, is able to utilize iron from hemoglobin, the largest iron pool in the host's body. Rbt5 is an extracellular glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored heme-binding protein of the CFEM family that facilitates heme-iron uptake by an unknown mechanism. Here, we characterize an additional C. albicans CFEM protein gene, PGA7, deletion of which elicits a more severe heme-iron utilization phenotype than deletion of RBT5. The virulence of the pga7−/− mutant is reduced in a mouse model of systemic infection, consistent with a requirement for heme-iron utilization for C. albicans pathogenicity. The Pga7 and Rbt5 proteins exhibit distinct cell wall attachment, and discrete localization within the cell envelope, with Rbt5 being more exposed than Pga7. Both proteins are shown here to efficiently extract heme from hemoglobin. Surprisingly, while Pga7 has a higher affinity for heme in vitro, we find that heme transfer can occur bi-directionally between Pga7 and Rbt5, supporting a model in which they cooperate in a heme-acquisition relay. Together, our data delineate the roles of Pga7 and Rbt5 in a cell surface protein network that transfers heme from extracellular hemoglobin to the endocytic pathway, and provide a paradigm for how receptors embedded in the cell wall matrix can mediate nutrient uptake across the fungal cell envelope. PMID:25275454

  8. RNA polymerase III drives alternative splicing of the potassium channel–interacting protein contributing to brain complexity and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Massone, Sara; Vassallo, Irene; Castelnuovo, Manuele; Fiorino, Gloria; Gatta, Elena; Robello, Mauro; Borghi, Roberta; Tabaton, Massimo; Russo, Claudio; Dieci, Giorgio; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein isoforms that are conditionally or differentially expressed in specific tissues. The discovery of factors that control alternative splicing might clarify the molecular basis of biological and pathological processes. We found that IL1-α−dependent up-regulation of 38A, a small ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase III–transcribed RNA, drives the synthesis of an alternatively spliced form of the potassium channel–interacting protein (KCNIP4). The alternative KCNIP4 isoform cannot interact with the γ-secretase complex, resulting in modification of γ-secretase activity, amyloid precursor protein processing, and increased secretion of β-amyloid enriched in the more toxic Aβ x-42 species. Notably, synthesis of the variant KCNIP4 isoform is also detrimental to brain physiology, as it results in the concomitant blockade of the fast kinetics of potassium channels. This alternative splicing shift is observed at high frequency in tissue samples from Alzheimer’s disease patients, suggesting that RNA polymerase III cogenes may be upstream determinants of alternative splicing that significantly contribute to homeostasis and pathogenesis in the brain. PMID:21624954

  9. Protein Kinase Cι Drives a NOTCH3-dependent Stem-like Phenotype in Mutant KRAS Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed A; Justilien, Verline; Jamieson, Lee; Murray, Nicole R; Fields, Alan P

    2016-03-14

    We report that the protein kinase Cι (PKCι) oncogene controls expression of NOTCH3, a key driver of stemness, in KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). PKCι activates NOTCH3 expression by phosphorylating the ELF3 transcription factor and driving ELF3 occupancy on the NOTCH3 promoter. PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signaling controls the tumor-initiating cell phenotype by regulating asymmetric cell division, a process necessary for tumor initiation and maintenance. Primary LADC tumors exhibit PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signaling, and combined pharmacologic blockade of PKCι and NOTCH synergistically inhibits tumorigenic behavior in vitro and LADC growth in vivo demonstrating the therapeutic potential of PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signal inhibition to more effectively treat KRAS LADC. PMID:26977885

  10. Electrostatic Interactions between Elongated Monomers Drive Filamentation of Drosophila Shrub, a Metazoan ESCRT-III Protein.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Brian J; Tibbe, Christine; Jeon, Hyesung; Drabek, Andrew A; Klein, Thomas; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a conserved protein complex that facilitates budding and fission of membranes. It executes a key step in many cellular events, including cytokinesis and multi-vesicular body formation. The ESCRT-III protein Shrub in flies, or its homologs in yeast (Snf7) or humans (CHMP4B), is a critical polymerizing component of ESCRT-III needed to effect membrane fission. We report the structural basis for polymerization of Shrub and define a minimal region required for filament formation. The X-ray structure of the Shrub core shows that individual monomers in the lattice interact in a staggered arrangement using complementary electrostatic surfaces. Mutations that disrupt interface salt bridges interfere with Shrub polymerization and function. Despite substantial sequence divergence and differences in packing interactions, the arrangement of Shrub subunits in the polymer resembles that of Snf7 and other family homologs, suggesting that this intermolecular packing mechanism is shared among ESCRT-III proteins. PMID:27452459

  11. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  12. Heterogeneous distribution of TRPC proteins in the embryonic cortex.

    PubMed

    Boisseau, Sylvie; Kunert-Keil, Christiane; Lucke, Silke; Bouron, Alexandre

    2009-03-01

    The present study was initiated to gain some information about the tissue distribution of transient receptor potential proteins of C-type (TRPC), a family of voltage-independent cation channels, at the beginning of neurogenesis in the telencephalon of embryonic mice. The mRNAs of all known TRPCs (TRPC1-TRPC7) could be found in the cortex at E13. TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC5 were the main isoforms, whereas the mRNAs for TRPC2, TRPC4, TRPC6 and TRPC7 were less abundant. The distribution throughout the cortical wall of TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC6 was studied by means of immuno-histochemistry. The data collected pointed to a heterogeneous expression of the channels. Three groups were identified. The first one comprises TRPC1, specifically found in the preplate but only in some post-mitotic neurons. It was mainly observed in a subset of cells distinct from the Cajal-Retzius cells. The second group is composed of TRPC3. It was found in non-neuronal cells and also in dividing (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive) cells, indicating that TRPC3 is present in precursor cells. The third group contains TRPC6 detected in neuronal and in dividing non-neuronal cells. Double immunostaining experiments showed that TRPC3-positive cells also express TRPC6. Collectively, this report highlights a specific TRPC expression pattern in the immature cortical wall. PMID:18989690

  13. Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response Drives Enhanced Metabolism and Chemoresistance in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Andrea L.; Dechkovskaia, Anjelika M.; Herring, Matthew; Winston, Benjamin A.; Lencioni, Alex M.; Russell, Rae L.; Madsen, Helen; Nega, Meheret; Dusto, Nathaniel L.; White, Jason; Bigner, Darell D.; Nicchitta, Christopher V.; Serkova, Natalie J.; Graner, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-based cytoprotective mechanism acting to prevent pathologies accompanying protein aggregation. It is frequently active in tumors, but relatively unstudied in gliomas. We hypothesized that UPR stress effects on glioma cells might protect tumors from additional exogenous stress (ie, chemotherapeutics), postulating that protection was concurrent with altered tumor cell metabolism. Using human brain tumor cell lines, xenograft tumors, human samples and gene expression databases, we determined molecular features of glioma cell UPR induction/activation, and here report a detailed analysis of UPR transcriptional/translational/metabolic responses. Immunohistochemistry, Western and Northern blots identified elevated levels of UPR transcription factors and downstream ER chaperone targets in gliomas. Microarray profiling revealed distinct regulation of stress responses between xenograft tumors and parent cell lines, with gene ontology and network analyses linking gene expression to cell survival and metabolic processes. Human glioma samples were examined for levels of the ER chaperone GRP94 by immunohistochemistry and for other UPR components by Western blotting. Gene and protein expression data from patient gliomas correlated poor patient prognoses with increased expression of ER chaperones, UPR target genes, and metabolic enzymes (glycolysis and lipogenesis). NMR-based metabolomic studies revealed increased metabolic outputs in glucose uptake with elevated glycolytic activity as well as increased phospholipid turnover. Elevated levels of amino acids, antioxidants, and cholesterol were also evident upon UPR stress; in particular, recurrent tumors had overall higher lipid outputs and elevated specific UPR arms. Clonogenicity studies following temozolomide treatment of stressed or unstressed cells demonstrated UPR-induced chemoresistance. Our data characterize the UPR in glioma cells and human tumors, and

  14. Induction of the unfolded protein response drives enhanced metabolism and chemoresistance in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Epple, Laura M; Dodd, Rebecca D; Merz, Andrea L; Dechkovskaia, Anjelika M; Herring, Matthew; Winston, Benjamin A; Lencioni, Alex M; Russell, Rae L; Madsen, Helen; Nega, Meheret; Dusto, Nathaniel L; White, Jason; Bigner, Darell D; Nicchitta, Christopher V; Serkova, Natalie J; Graner, Michael W

    2013-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-based cytoprotective mechanism acting to prevent pathologies accompanying protein aggregation. It is frequently active in tumors, but relatively unstudied in gliomas. We hypothesized that UPR stress effects on glioma cells might protect tumors from additional exogenous stress (ie, chemotherapeutics), postulating that protection was concurrent with altered tumor cell metabolism. Using human brain tumor cell lines, xenograft tumors, human samples and gene expression databases, we determined molecular features of glioma cell UPR induction/activation, and here report a detailed analysis of UPR transcriptional/translational/metabolic responses. Immunohistochemistry, Western and Northern blots identified elevated levels of UPR transcription factors and downstream ER chaperone targets in gliomas. Microarray profiling revealed distinct regulation of stress responses between xenograft tumors and parent cell lines, with gene ontology and network analyses linking gene expression to cell survival and metabolic processes. Human glioma samples were examined for levels of the ER chaperone GRP94 by immunohistochemistry and for other UPR components by Western blotting. Gene and protein expression data from patient gliomas correlated poor patient prognoses with increased expression of ER chaperones, UPR target genes, and metabolic enzymes (glycolysis and lipogenesis). NMR-based metabolomic studies revealed increased metabolic outputs in glucose uptake with elevated glycolytic activity as well as increased phospholipid turnover. Elevated levels of amino acids, antioxidants, and cholesterol were also evident upon UPR stress; in particular, recurrent tumors had overall higher lipid outputs and elevated specific UPR arms. Clonogenicity studies following temozolomide treatment of stressed or unstressed cells demonstrated UPR-induced chemoresistance. Our data characterize the UPR in glioma cells and human tumors, and

  15. Single molecule compression reveals intra-protein forces drive cytotoxin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Sun, Jielin; Shen, Yi; Shao, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a prototypical member of a large family of pore-forming proteins that undergo a significant reduction in height during the transition from the membrane-assembled prepore to the membrane-inserted pore. Here, we show that targeted application of compressive forces can catalyze this conformational change in individual PFO complexes trapped at the prepore stage, recapitulating this critical step of the spontaneous process. The free energy landscape determined from these measurements is in good agreement with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations showing that an equivalent internal force is generated by the interaction of the exposed hydrophobic residues with the membrane. This hydrophobic force is transmitted across the entire structure to produce a compressive stress across a distant, otherwise stable domain, catalyzing its transition from an extended to compact conformation. Single molecule compression is likely to become an important tool to investigate conformational transitions in membrane proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08421.001 PMID:26652734

  16. MECHANISM AND HYDROPHOBIC FORCES DRIVING MEMBRANE PROTEIN INSERTION OF SUBUNIT II OF CYTOCHROME BO OXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Nil; Dalbey, Ross E.; Yuan, Jijun

    2009-01-01

    Subunit II (CyoA) of cytochrome bo oxidase, which spans the inner membrane twice in bacteria, has several unusual features in membrane biogenesis. It is synthesized with an amino-terminal signal peptide. In addition, distinct pathways are used to insert the two ends of the protein. The amino-terminal domain is inserted by the YidC pathway whereas the large carboxyl-terminal domain is translocated by the SecYEG pathway. Insertion of the protein is also pmf-independent. In this study we examined the topogenic requirements and mechanism of insertion of CyoA in bacteria. We find that both the signal peptide and the first membrane spanning region are required for insertion of the amino-terminal periplasmic loop. The pmf-independence of insertion of the first periplasmic loop is due to the loop’s neutral net charge. We observe also that the introduction of negatively charged residues into the periplasmic loop makes insertion pmf dependent, whereas the addition of positively charged residues prevents insertion unless the pmf is abolished. Insertion of the carboxyl-terminal domain in the full-length CyoA occurs by a sequential mechanism even when the CyoA amino and carboxyl-terminal domains are swapped with other domains. However, when a long spacer peptide is added to increase the distance between the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains, insertion no longer occurs by a sequential mechanism. PMID:18155041

  17. Note: On the Universality of Proximal Radial Distribution Functions of Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Bin; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-03-10

    Protein hydration is important to protein structure and function. Molecular distribution functions have been an invaluable tool to study protein hydration. Proximal radial distribution functions (pRDFs) have been postulated as being transferable across proteins based on evidence collected from two proteins [V. A. Makarov, B. K. Andrews, and B. M. Pettitt, Biopolymers 45(7), 469 (1998)]. Here we selected nine proteins with different sizes as well as different secondary topologies. We show that pRDFs are universal for proteins with compact structures. We further compare these pRDFs with those calculated from polyglycines that have no defined structures to consider the extent of the validity of this approach.

  18. Note: On the universality of proximal radial distribution functions of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bin; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-03-01

    Protein hydration is important to protein structure and function. Molecular distribution functions have been an invaluable tool to study protein hydration. Proximal radial distribution functions (pRDFs) have been postulated as being transferable across proteins based on evidence collected from two proteins [V. A. Makarov, B. K. Andrews, and B. M. Pettitt, Biopolymers 45(7), 469 (1998)]. Here we selected nine proteins with different sizes as well as different secondary topologies. We show that pRDFs are universal for proteins with compact structures. We further compare these pRDFs with those calculated from polyglycines that have no defined structures to consider the extent of the validity of this approach.

  19. CROSS DRIVE: A Collaborative and Distributed Virtual Environment for Exploitation of Atmospherical and Geological Datasets of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencetti, Michele

    2016-07-01

    European space exploration missions have produced huge data sets of potentially immense value for research as well as for planning and operating future missions. For instance, Mars Exploration programs comprise a series of missions with launches ranging from the past to beyond present, which are anticipated to produce exceptional volumes of data which provide prospects for research breakthroughs and advancing further activities in space. These collected data include a variety of information, such as imagery, topography, atmospheric, geochemical datasets and more, which has resulted in and still demands, databases, versatile visualisation tools and data reduction methods. Such rate of valuable data acquisition requires the scientists, researchers and computer scientists to coordinate their storage, processing and relevant tools to enable efficient data analysis. However, the current position is that expert teams from various disciplines, the databases and tools are fragmented, leaving little scope for unlocking its value through collaborative activities. The benefits of collaborative virtual environments have been implemented in various industrial fields allowing real-time multi-user collaborative work among people from different disciplines. Exploiting the benefits of advanced immersive virtual environments (IVE) has been recognized as an important interaction paradigm to facilitate future space exploration. The current work is mainly aimed towards the presentation of the preliminary results coming from the CROSS DRIVE project. This research received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 607177 and is mainly aimed towards the implementation of a distributed virtual workspace for collaborative scientific discovery, mission planning and operations. The purpose of the CROSS DRIVE project is to lay foundations of collaborative European workspaces for space science. It will demonstrate the feasibility and

  20. ESCRT-III drives the final stages of CUPS maturation for unconventional protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Curwin, Amy J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Teis, David; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Ronchi, Paolo; Malhotra, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional secretory pathway exports proteins that bypass the endoplasmic reticulum. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, conditions that trigger Acb1 secretion via this pathway generate a Grh1 containing compartment composed of vesicles and tubules surrounded by a cup-shaped membrane and collectively called CUPS. Here we report a quantitative assay for Acb1 secretion that reveals requirements for ESCRT-I, -II, and -III but, surprisingly, without the involvement of the Vps4 AAA-ATPase. The major ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 localizes transiently to CUPS and this was accelerated in vps4Δ cells, correlating with increased Acb1 secretion. Microscopic analysis suggests that, instead of forming intraluminal vesicles with the help of Vps4, ESCRT-III/Snf7 promotes direct engulfment of preexisting Grh1 containing vesicles and tubules into a saccule to generate a mature Acb1 containing compartment. This novel multivesicular / multilamellar compartment, we suggest represents the stable secretory form of CUPS that is competent for the release of Acb1 to cells exterior. PMID:27115345

  1. Plasma Membrane-Targeted PIN Proteins Drive Shoot Development in a Moss

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Tom A.; Liu, Maureen M.; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Bierfreund, Nicole M.; Braun, Marion; Coudert, Yoan; Dennis, Ross J.; O’Connor, Devin; Wang, Xiao Y.; White, Chris D.; Decker, Eva L.; Reski, Ralf; Harrison, C. Jill

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Plant body plans arise by the activity of meristematic growing tips during development and radiated independently in the gametophyte (n) and sporophyte (2n) stages of the life cycle during evolution. Although auxin and its intercellular transport by PIN family efflux carriers are primary regulators of sporophytic shoot development in flowering plants, the extent of conservation in PIN function within the land plants and the mechanisms regulating bryophyte gametophytic shoot development are largely unknown. Results We have found that treating gametophytic shoots of the moss Physcomitrella patens with exogenous auxins and auxin transport inhibitors disrupts apical function and leaf development. Two plasma membrane-targeted PIN proteins are expressed in leafy shoots, and pin mutants resemble plants treated with auxins or auxin transport inhibitors. PIN-mediated auxin transport regulates apical cell function, leaf initiation, leaf shape, and shoot tropisms in moss gametophytes. pin mutant sporophytes are sometimes branched, reproducing a phenotype only previously seen in the fossil record and in rare natural moss variants. Conclusions Our results show that PIN-mediated auxin transport is an ancient, conserved regulator of shoot development. PMID:25448003

  2. ESCRT-III drives the final stages of CUPS maturation for unconventional protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Curwin, Amy J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Teis, David; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Ronchi, Paolo; Malhotra, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional secretory pathway exports proteins that bypass the endoplasmic reticulum. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, conditions that trigger Acb1 secretion via this pathway generate a Grh1 containing compartment composed of vesicles and tubules surrounded by a cup-shaped membrane and collectively called CUPS. Here we report a quantitative assay for Acb1 secretion that reveals requirements for ESCRT-I, -II, and -III but, surprisingly, without the involvement of the Vps4 AAA-ATPase. The major ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 localizes transiently to CUPS and this was accelerated in vps4Δ cells, correlating with increased Acb1 secretion. Microscopic analysis suggests that, instead of forming intraluminal vesicles with the help of Vps4, ESCRT-III/Snf7 promotes direct engulfment of preexisting Grh1 containing vesicles and tubules into a saccule to generate a mature Acb1 containing compartment. This novel multivesicular / multilamellar compartment, we suggest represents the stable secretory form of CUPS that is competent for the release of Acb1 to cells exterior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16299.001 PMID:27115345

  3. Purifying selection drives the evolution of surfactant protein C (SP-C) independently of body temperature regulation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Potter, Sally; Orgeig, Sandra; Donnellan, Stephen; Daniels, Christopher B

    2007-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant system of heterothermic mammals must be capable of dealing with the effect of low body temperatures on the physical state of the lipid components. We have shown previously that there is a modest increase in surfactant cholesterol during periods of torpor, however these changes do not fully explain the capacity of surfactant to function under the wide range of physical conditions imposed by torpor. Here we examine indirectly the role of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in adapting to variable body temperatures by testing for the presence of positive (adaptive) selection during evolutionary transitions between heterothermy and homeothermy. We sequenced SP-C from genomic DNA of 32 mammalian species from groups of closely related heterothermic and homeothermic species (contrasts). We used phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood estimates of rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions and fully Bayesian inference of these sequences to determine whether the mode of body temperature regulation exerts a selection pressure driving the molecular adaptation of SP-C. The protein sequence of SP-C is highly conserved with synonymous or highly conservative amino acid substitutions being predominant. The evolution of SP-C among mammals is characterised by high codon usage bias and high rates of transition/transversion. The only contrast to show evidence of positive selection was that of the bears (Ursus americanus and U. maritimus). The significance of this result is unclear. We show that SP-C is under strong evolutionary constraints, driven by purifying selection, presumably to maintain protein function despite variation in the mode of body temperature regulation. PMID:20483290

  4. A Direct-Push Sample-Freezing Drive Shoe for Collecting Sediment Cores with Intact Pore Fluid, Microbial, and Sediment Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Trost, J.; Christy, T. M.; Mason, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic and biological reactions in shallow groundwater and bottom sediments are central to understanding groundwater contaminant attenuation and biogeochemical cycles. The laminar flow regime in unconsolidated surficial aquifers creates narrow reaction zones. Studying these reaction zones requires fine-scale sampling of water together with adjacent sediment in a manner that preserves in situ redox conditions. Collecting representative samples of these narrow zones with traditional subsurface sampling equipment is challenging. For example, use of a basket type core catcher for saturated, non-cohesive sediments results in loss of fluid and sediments during retrieval. A sample-freezing drive shoe designed for a wire line piston core sampler allowed collection of cores with intact sediment, microbial, and pore fluid distributions and has been the basis for studies documenting centimeter-scale variations in aquifer microbial populations (Murphy and Herkelrath, 1996). However, this freezing drive shoe design is not compatible with modern-day direct push sampling rigs. A re-designed sample-freezing drive shoe compatible with a direct-push dual-tube coring system was developed and field-tested. The freezing drive shoe retained sediment and fluid distributions in saturated sediment core samples by freezing a 10 centimeter plug below the core sample with liquid CO­2. Core samples collected across the smear zone at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, were successfully extracted without loss of fluid or sediment. Multiple core sections from different depths in the aquifer were retrieved from a single hole. This new design makes a highly effective sampling technology available on modern-day direct push sampling equipment to inform myriad questions about subsurface biogeochemistry processes. The re-design of the freezing drive shoe was supported by the USGS Innovation Center for Earth Sciences. References: Murphy, Fred, and W. N. Herkelrath. "A sample

  5. Electrostatic Contributions Drive the Interaction Between Staphylococcus aureus Protein Efb-C and its Complement Target C3d

    SciTech Connect

    Haspel, N.; Ricklin, D.; Geisbrecht, B.V.; Kavraki, L.E.; Lambris, J.D.

    2008-11-13

    The C3-inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties.

  6. Coagulation factor Xa drives tumor cells into apoptosis through BH3-only protein Bim up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Borensztajn, Keren S. . E-mail: K.S.Borensztajn@amc.uva.nl; Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Groot, Angelique P.; Brueggemann, Lois W.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2007-07-15

    Coagulation Factor (F)Xa is a serine protease that plays a crucial role during blood coagulation by converting prothrombin into active thrombin. Recently, however, it emerged that besides this role in coagulation, FXa induces intracellular signaling leading to different cellular effects. Here, we show that coagulation factor (F)Xa drives tumor cells of epithelial origin, but not endothelial cells or monocytes, into apoptosis, whereas it even enhances fibroblast survival. FXa signals through the protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 to activate extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38. This activation is associated with phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB, and in tumor cells with up-regulation of the BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein Bim, leading to caspase-3 cleavage, the main hallmark of apoptosis. Transfection of tumor cells with dominant negative forms of CREB or siRNA for either PAR-1, Bim, ERK1 and/or p38 inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of FXa. In fibroblasts, FXa-induced PAR-1 activation leads to down-regulation of Bim and pre-treatment with PAR-1 or Bim siRNA abolishes proliferation. We thus provide evidence that beyond its role in blood coagulation, FXa plays a key role in cellular processes in which Bim is the central player in determining cell survival.

  7. Tsc1 deficiency impairs mammary development in mice by suppression of AKT, nuclear ERα, and cell-cycle-driving proteins.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenqi; Zheng, Hang; Zhou, Ling; Ou, Yanhua; Huang, Bin; Yan, Bo; Qin, Zhenshu; Yang, Cuilan; Su, Yongchun; Bai, Xiaochun; Guo, Jiasong; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Loss of Tsc1/Tsc2 results in excess cell growth that eventually forms hamartoma in multiple organs. Our study using a mouse model with Tsc1 conditionally knockout in mammary epithelium showed that Tsc1 deficiency impaired mammary development. Phosphorylated S6 was up-regulated in Tsc1(-/-) mammary epithelium, which could be reversed by rapamycin, suggesting that mTORC1 was hyperactivated in Tsc1(-/-) mammary epithelium. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin restored the development of Tsc1(-/-) mammary glands whereas suppressed the development of Tsc1(wt/wt) mammary glands, indicating that a modest activation of mTORC1 is critical for mammary development. Phosphorylated PDK1 and AKT, nuclear ERα, nuclear IRS-1, SGK3, and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4 and their target pRB were all apparently down-regulated in Tsc1(-/-) mammary glands, which could be reversed by rapamycin, suggesting that suppression of AKT by hyperactivation of mTORC1, inhibition on nuclear ERα signaling, and down-regulation of cell-cycle-driving proteins play important roles in the retarded mammary development induced by Tsc1 deletion. This study demonstrated for the first time the in vivo role of Tsc1 in pubertal mammary development of mice, and revealed that loss of Tsc1 does not necessarily lead to tissue hyperplasia. PMID:26795955

  8. The DEG/ENaC cation channel protein UNC-8 drives activity-dependent synapse removal in remodeling GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Miller-Fleming, Tyne W; Petersen, Sarah C; Manning, Laura; Matthewman, Cristina; Gornet, Megan; Beers, Allison; Hori, Sayaka; Mitani, Shohei; Bianchi, Laura; Richmond, Janet; Miller, David M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic programming and neural activity drive synaptic remodeling in developing neural circuits, but the molecular components that link these pathways are poorly understood. Here we show that the C. elegans Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel (DEG/ENaC) protein, UNC-8, is transcriptionally controlled to function as a trigger in an activity-dependent mechanism that removes synapses in remodeling GABAergic neurons. UNC-8 cation channel activity promotes disassembly of presynaptic domains in DD type GABA neurons, but not in VD class GABA neurons where unc-8 expression is blocked by the COUP/TF transcription factor, UNC-55. We propose that the depolarizing effect of UNC-8-dependent sodium import elevates intracellular calcium in a positive feedback loop involving the voltage-gated calcium channel UNC-2 and the calcium-activated phosphatase TAX-6/calcineurin to initiate a caspase-dependent mechanism that disassembles the presynaptic apparatus. Thus, UNC-8 serves as a link between genetic and activity-dependent pathways that function together to promote the elimination of GABA synapses in remodeling neurons. PMID:27403890

  9. The DEG/ENaC cation channel protein UNC-8 drives activity-dependent synapse removal in remodeling GABAergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Fleming, Tyne W; Petersen, Sarah C; Manning, Laura; Matthewman, Cristina; Gornet, Megan; Beers, Allison; Hori, Sayaka; Mitani, Shohei; Bianchi, Laura; Richmond, Janet; Miller, David M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic programming and neural activity drive synaptic remodeling in developing neural circuits, but the molecular components that link these pathways are poorly understood. Here we show that the C. elegans Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel (DEG/ENaC) protein, UNC-8, is transcriptionally controlled to function as a trigger in an activity-dependent mechanism that removes synapses in remodeling GABAergic neurons. UNC-8 cation channel activity promotes disassembly of presynaptic domains in DD type GABA neurons, but not in VD class GABA neurons where unc-8 expression is blocked by the COUP/TF transcription factor, UNC-55. We propose that the depolarizing effect of UNC-8-dependent sodium import elevates intracellular calcium in a positive feedback loop involving the voltage-gated calcium channel UNC-2 and the calcium-activated phosphatase TAX-6/calcineurin to initiate a caspase-dependent mechanism that disassembles the presynaptic apparatus. Thus, UNC-8 serves as a link between genetic and activity-dependent pathways that function together to promote the elimination of GABA synapses in remodeling neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14599.001 PMID:27403890

  10. Electrostatic contributions drive the interaction between Staphylococcus aureus protein Efb-C and its complement target C3d

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Nurit; Ricklin, Daniel; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Lambris, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The C3–inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb-C) defines a novel three-helix bundle motif that regulates complement activation. Previous crystallographic studies of Efb-C bound to its cognate subdomain of human C3 (C3d) identified Arg-131 and Asn-138 of Efb-C as key residues for its activity. In order to characterize more completely the physical and chemical driving forces behind this important interaction, we employed in this study a combination of structural, biophysical, and computational methods to analyze the interaction of C3d with Efb-C and the single-point mutants R131A and N138A. Our results show that while these mutations do not drastically affect the structure of the Efb-C/C3d recognition complex, they have significant adverse effects on both the thermodynamic and kinetic profiles of the resulting complexes. We also characterized other key interactions along the Efb-C/C3d binding interface and found an intricate network of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that anchor Efb-C to C3d, resulting in its potent complement inhibitory properties. PMID:18687868

  11. Protein kinase Cδ upregulation in microglia drives neuroinflammatory responses and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in experimental models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard; Singh, Neeraj; Lawana, Vivek; Ghosh, Anamitra; Harischandra, Dilshan S; Jin, Huajun; Hogan, Colleen; Sarkar, Souvarish; Rokad, Dharmin; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-09-01

    Chronic microglial activation has been linked to the progressive degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons evidenced in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The exact etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Although both oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are identified as co-contributors in PD pathogenesis, signaling mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative processes have yet to be defined. Indeed, we recently identified that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) activation is critical for induction of dopaminergic neuronal loss in response to neurotoxic stressors. However, it remains to be defined whether PKCδ activation contributes to immune signaling events driving microglial neurotoxicity. In the present study, we systematically investigated whether PKCδ contributes to the heightened microglial activation response following exposure to major proinflammatory stressors, including α-synuclein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We report that exposure to the aforementioned inflammatory stressors dramatically upregulated PKCδ with a concomitant increase in its kinase activity and nuclear translocation in both BV-2 microglial cells and primary microglia. Importantly, we also observed a marked upregulation of PKCδ in the microglia of the ventral midbrain region of PD patients when compared to age-matched controls, suggesting a role for microglial PKCδ in neurodegenerative processes. Further, shRNA-mediated knockdown and genetic ablation of PKCδ in primary microglia blunted the microglial proinflammatory response elicited by the inflammogens, including ROS generation, nitric oxide production, and proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release. Importantly, we found that PKCδ activated NFκB, a key mediator of inflammatory signaling events, after challenge with inflammatory stressors, and that transactivation of NFκB led to translocation of the p65 subunit to the nucleus, IκBα degradation and phosphorylation of p65

  12. Protein Kinase Cδ Upregulation in Microglia Drives Neuroinflammatory Responses and Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Experimental Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Richard; Singh, Neeraj; Lawana, Vivek; Ghosh, Anamitra; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Jin, Huajun; Hogan, Colleen; Sarkar, Souvarish; Rokad, Dharmin; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation has been linked to the progressive degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons evidenced in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The exact etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Although both oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are identified as co-contributors in PD pathogenesis, signaling mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative processes have yet to be defined. Indeed, we recently identified that protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) activation is critical for induction of dopaminergic neuronal loss in response to neurotoxic stressors. However, it remains to be defined whether PKCδ activation contributes to immune signaling events driving microglial neurotoxicity. In the present study, we systematically investigated whether PKCδ contributes to the heightened microglial activation response following exposure to major proinflammatory stressors, including α-synuclein, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We report that exposure to the aforementioned inflammatory stressors dramatically upregulated PKCδ with a concomitant increase in its kinase activity and nuclear translocation in both BV-2 microglial cells and primary microglia. Importantly, we also observed a marked upregulation of PKCδ in the microglia of the ventral midbrain region of PD patients when compared to age-matched controls, suggesting a role for microglial PKCδ in neurodegenerative processes. Further, shRNA-mediated knockdown and genetic ablation of PKCδ in primary microglia blunted the microglial proinflammatory response elicited by the inflammogens, including ROS generation, nitric oxide production, and proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release. Importantly, we found that PKCδ activated NFκB, a key mediator of inflammatory signaling events, after challenge with inflammatory stressors, and that transactivation of NFκB led to translocation of the p65 subunit to the nucleus, IκBα degradation and phosphorylation of p65

  13. CARd-3D: Carbon Distribution in 3D Structure Program for Globular Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ekambaram, Rajasekaran; Kannaiyan, Akila; Marimuthu, Vijayasarathy; Swaminathan, Vinobha Chinnaiah; Renganathan, Senthil; Perumal, Ananda Gopu

    2014-01-01

    Spatial arrangement of carbon in protein structure is analyzed here. Particularly, the carbon fractions around individual atoms are compared. It is hoped that it follows the principle of 31.45% carbon around individual atoms. The results reveal that globular protein's atoms follow this principle. A comparative study on monomer versus dimer reveal that carbon is better distributed in dimeric form than in its monomeric form. Similar study on solid versus liquid structures reveals that the liquid (NMR) structure has better carbon distribution over the corresponding solid (X-Ray) structure. The carbon fraction distributions in fiber and toxin protein are compared. Fiber proteins follow the principle of carbon fraction distribution. At the same time it has another broad spectrum of carbon distribution than in globular proteins. The toxin protein follows an abnormal carbon fraction distribution. The carbon fraction distribution plays an important role in deciding the structure and shape of proteins. It is hoped to help in understanding the protein folding and function. PMID:24748753

  14. Spatial distribution of proteins in the quagga mussel adhesive apparatus.

    PubMed

    Rees, David J; Hanifi, Arash; Manion, Joseph; Gantayet, Arpita; Sone, Eli D

    2016-01-01

    The invasive freshwater mollusc Dreissena bugensis (quagga mussel) sticks to underwater surfaces via a proteinacious 'anchor' (byssus), consisting of a series of threads linked to adhesive plaques. This adhesion results in the biofouling of crucial underwater industry infrastructure, yet little is known about the proteins responsible for the adhesion. Here the identification of byssal proteins extracted from freshly secreted byssal material is described. Several new byssal proteins were observed by gel electrophoresis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to characterize proteins in different regions of the byssus, particularly those localized to the adhesive interface. Byssal plaques and threads contain in common a range of low molecular weight proteins, while several proteins with higher mass were observed only in the plaque. At the adhesive interface, a plaque-specific ~8.1 kDa protein had a relative increase in signal intensity compared to the bulk of the plaque, suggesting it may play a direct role in adhesion. PMID:26825294

  15. Heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled biomineralizaiton proteins in calcite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuang; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Biominerals are highly ordered crystals mediated by organic matters especially proteins in organisms. However, how specific proteins are distributed inside biominerals are not well understood. In the present study, we use fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to label extracted proteins from the shells of bivalve Pinctada fucata. By confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observe a heterogeneous distribution of dye-labelled proteins inside synthetic calcite at the microscale. Proteins from the prismatic calcite layers accumulate at the edge of crystals while proteins from the nacreous aragonite layers accumulate at the center of crystals. Raman and X-ray powder diffraction show that both the proteins cannot alter the crystal phase. Scanning electron microscope demonstrates both proteins are able to affect the crystal morphology. This study may provide a direct approach for the visualization of protein distributions in crystals by small-molecule dye-labelled proteins as the additives in the crystallization process and improve our understanding of intracrystalline proteins distribution in biogenic calcites. PMID:26675363

  16. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgart, Vlad; Jia, Tao; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2011-08-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distribution. Additionally, if gene expression is repressed such that observed protein bursts arise only from single mRNAs, we show how observations of protein burst distributions (repressed and unrepressed) can be used to completely determine the mRNA burst distribution. Assuming independent contributions from individual bursts, we derive analytical expressions connecting means and variances for burst and steady-state protein distributions. Finally, we validate our general analytical results by considering a specific reaction scheme involving regulation of protein bursts by small RNAs. For a range of parameters, we derive analytical expressions for regulated protein distributions that are validated using stochastic simulations. The analytical results obtained in this work can thus serve as useful inputs for a broad range of studies focusing on stochasticity in gene expression.

  17. TEXTING WHILE DRIVING: EVALUATION OF GLANCE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR FREQUENT/INFREQUENT TEXTERS AND KEYPAD/TOUCHPAD TEXTERS

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Siby; Pollatsek, Alexander; Fisher, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Summary The threat that cell-phones pose to driving has been a well researched topic. There are fewer studies of the threat that texting creates for drivers, but the risks are obvious and the few existing studies confirm this. What is not obvious is whether frequent texters will expose themselves to the same risks as infrequent texters. This is important to know because many texters, especially teens who text frequently, may consider themselves immune to the dangers of texting while driving. As such, a comparison of frequent and infrequent texters was undertaken on a driving simulator. It is also not immediately clear what effects the different types of interfaces have on driving performance while text messaging. The interfaces under evaluation included keypad or “qwerty” phones (e.g., Blackberries) and touchpad phones (iPhone). It was found that the frequent and infrequent texters were equally likely to glance at least once for more than 2s inside the vehicle while sending a text message. It was also found that touchpad texters had a larger number of glances above the 2s threshold than keypad users, though this difference was not significant. The implications of this for future public policy are discussed. PMID:25279388

  18. Isolation of a Thiamine-binding Protein from Rice Germ and Distribution of Similar Proteins.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M; Yoshida, T; Toda, T; Iwashima, A; Mitsunaga, T

    1996-01-01

    A thiamine-binding protein was purified from rice germ (Oryza sativa L.) by extraction, salting-out with ammonium sulfate, and column chromatography. From the results of molecular mass, Kd and Bmax values for thiamine-binding, binding specificity for thiamine phosphates and analog, the protein was suggested to be identical to the thiamine-binding protein in rice bran. The thiamine-binding protein w as more efficiently purified from rice germ than from rice bran. The protein was rich in glutamic acid (and/or glutamine) and glycine. The protein did not show immunological similarity to thiamine-binding proteins in buckwheat and sesame seeds. However proteins similar to the thiamine-binding protein from rice germ existed in gramineous seeds. They were suggested to have thiamine-binding activity and to be of the same molecular mass as the thiamine-binding protein. PMID:27299548

  19. Detecting patterns of protein distribution and gene expression in silico

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Michael T.; Bassett, Doug; Morrell, James C.; Gatto, Gregory J.; Bai, Jianwu; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Hieter, Phil; Gould, Stephen J.

    1999-01-01

    Most biological information is contained within gene and genome sequences. However, current methods for analyzing these data are limited primarily to the prediction of coding regions and identification of sequence similarities. We have developed a computer algorithm, CoSMoS (for context sensitive motif searches), which adds context sensitivity to sequence motif searches. CoSMoS was challenged to identify genes encoding peroxisome-associated and oleate-induced genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, we searched for genes capable of encoding proteins with a type 1 or type 2 peroxisomal targeting signal and for genes containing the oleate-response element, a cis-acting element common to fatty acid-regulated genes. CoSMoS successfully identified 7 of 8 known PTS-containing peroxisomal proteins and 13 of 14 known oleate-regulated genes. More importantly, CoSMoS identified an additional 18 candidate peroxisomal proteins and 300 candidate oleate-regulated genes. Preliminary localization studies suggest that these include at least 10 previously unknown peroxisomal proteins. Phenotypic studies of selected gene disruption mutants suggests that several of these new peroxisomal proteins play roles in growth on fatty acids, one is involved in peroxisome biogenesis and at least two are required for synthesis of lysine, a heretofore unrecognized role for peroxisomes. These results expand our understanding of peroxisome content and function, demonstrate the utility of CoSMoS for context-sensitive motif scanning, and point to the benefits of improved in silico genome analysis. PMID:10077615

  20. Universal distribution of mutational effects on protein stability, uncoupling of protein robustness from sequence evolution and distinct evolutionary modes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Guilhem; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-05-01

    Robustness to destabilizing effects of mutations is thought of as a key factor of protein evolution. The connections between two measures of robustness, the relative core size and the computationally estimated effect of mutations on protein stability (ΔΔG), protein abundance and the selection pressure on protein-coding genes (dN/dS) were analyzed for the organisms with a large number of available protein structures including four eukaryotes, two bacteria and one archaeon. The distribution of the effects of mutations in the core on protein stability is universal and indistinguishable in eukaryotes and bacteria, centered at slightly destabilizing amino acid replacements, and with a heavy tail of more strongly destabilizing replacements. The distribution of mutational effects in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans is significantly shifted toward strongly destabilizing replacements which is indicative of stronger constraints that are imposed on proteins in hyperthermophiles. The median effect of mutations is strongly, positively correlated with the relative core size, in evidence of the congruence between the two measures of protein robustness. However, both measures show only limited correlations to the expression level and selection pressure on protein-coding genes. Thus, the degree of robustness reflected in the universal distribution of mutational effects appears to be a fundamental, ancient feature of globular protein folds whereas the observed variations are largely neutral and uncoupled from short term protein evolution. A weak anticorrelation between protein core size and selection pressure is observed only for surface residues in prokaryotes but a stronger anticorrelation is observed for all residues in eukaryotic proteins. This substantial difference between proteins of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is likely to stem from the demonstrable higher compactness of prokaryotic proteins.

  1. Note: On the universality of proximal radial distribution functions of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    Protein hydration is important to protein structure and function. Molecular distribution functions have been an invaluable tool to study protein hydration. Proximal radial distribution functions (pRDFs) have been postulated as being transferable across proteins based on evidence collected from two proteins [V. A. Makarov, B. K. Andrews, and B. M. Pettitt, Biopolymers 45(7), 469 (1998)]. Here we selected nine proteins with different sizes as well as different secondary topologies. We show that pRDFs are universal for proteins with compact structures. We further compare these pRDFs with those calculated from polyglycines that have no defined structures to consider the extent of the validity of this approach. PMID:21405193

  2. Link Protein N-terminal Peptide Binds to Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Type II Receptor and Drives Matrix Protein Expression in Rabbit Intervertebral Disc Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zili; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Hutton, William C.; Yoon, S. Tim

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and associated spinal disorders are leading sources of morbidity, and they can be responsible for chronic low back pain. Treatments for degenerative disc diseases continue to be a challenge. Intensive research is now focusing on promoting regeneration of degenerated discs by stimulating production of the disc matrix. Link protein N-terminal peptide (LPP) is a proteolytic fragment of link protein, an important cross-linker and stabilizer of the major structural components of cartilage, aggrecan and hyaluronan. In this study we investigated LPP action in rabbit primary intervertebral disc cells cultured ex vivo in a three-dimensional alginate matrix. Our data reveal that LPP promotes disc matrix production, which was evidenced by increased expression of the chondrocyte-specific transcription factor SOX9 and the extracellular matrix macromolecules aggrecan and collagen II. Using colocalization and pulldown studies we further document a noggin-insensitive direct peptide-protein association between LPP and BMP-RII. This association mediated Smad signaling that converges on BMP genes leading to expression of BMP-4 and BMP-7. Furthermore, through a cell-autonomous loop BMP-4 and BMP-7 intensified Smad1/5 signaling though a feedforward circuit involving BMP-RI, ultimately promoting expression of SOX9 and downstream aggrecan and collagen II genes. Our data define a complex regulatory signaling cascade initiated by LPP and suggest that LPP may be a useful therapeutic substitute for direct BMP administration to treat IVD degeneration and to ameliorate IVD-associated chronic low back pain. PMID:23940040

  3. Physical distribution and characteristics of meat & bone meal protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meat & bone meal (MBM) is a high-protein commodity produced by the rendering of fat from unmarketable animal tissue. Concerns related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy have progressively restricted MBM’s conventional use as a feed ingredient. Consequently, significant attention has focused on th...

  4. Composition and Molecular Weight Distribution of Carob Germ Proteins Fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochemical properties of carob germ proteins were analyzed using a combination of selective extraction, reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), size exclusion chromatography coupled with multi-angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALS) and electrophoretic analysis. Using a mo...

  5. Hyperdimensional analysis of amino acid pair distributions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Svend B; Mortensen, Rasmus J; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik M; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Arnason, Omar; Söring, Jón; Petersen, Steffen B

    2011-01-01

    Our manuscript presents a novel approach to protein structure analyses. We have organized an 8-dimensional data cube with protein 3D-structural information from 8706 high-resolution non-redundant protein-chains with the aim of identifying packing rules at the amino acid pair level. The cube contains information about amino acid type, solvent accessibility, spatial and sequence distance, secondary structure and sequence length. We are able to pose structural queries to the data cube using program ProPack. The response is a 1, 2 or 3D graph. Whereas the response is of a statistical nature, the user can obtain an instant list of all PDB-structures where such pair is found. The user may select a particular structure, which is displayed highlighting the pair in question. The user may pose millions of different queries and for each one he will receive the answer in a few seconds. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the data cube as well as the programs, we have selected well known structural features, disulphide bridges and salt bridges, where we illustrate how the queries are posed, and how answers are given. Motifs involving cysteines such as disulphide bridges, zinc-fingers and iron-sulfur clusters are clearly identified and differentiated. ProPack also reveals that whereas pairs of Lys residues virtually never appear in close spatial proximity, pairs of Arg are abundant and appear at close spatial distance, contrasting the belief that electrostatic repulsion would prevent this juxtaposition and that Arg-Lys is perceived as a conservative mutation. The presented programs can find and visualize novel packing preferences in proteins structures allowing the user to unravel correlations between pairs of amino acids. The new tools allow the user to view statistical information and visualize instantly the structures that underpin the statistical information, which is far from trivial with most other SW tools for protein structure analysis. PMID:22174733

  6. Universal protein distributions in a model of cell growth and division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Naama; Newman, C. M.; Osmanović, Dino; Rabin, Yitzhak; Salman, Hanna; Stein, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    Protein distributions measured under a broad set of conditions in bacteria and yeast were shown to exhibit a common skewed shape, with variances depending quadratically on means. For bacteria these properties were reproduced by temporal measurements of protein content, showing accumulation and division across generations. Here we present a stochastic growth-and-division model with feedback which captures these observed properties. The limiting copy number distribution is calculated exactly, and a single parameter is found to determine the distribution shape and the variance-to-mean relation. Estimating this parameter from bacterial temporal data reproduces the measured distribution shape with high accuracy and leads to predictions for future experiments.

  7. Cyanobacterial Two-Component Proteins: Structure, Diversity, Distribution, and Evolution†

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Mark K.; Houmard, Jean

    2006-01-01

    A survey of the already characterized and potential two-component protein sequences that exist in the nine complete and seven partially annotated cyanobacterial genome sequences available (as of May 2005) showed that the cyanobacteria possess a much larger repertoire of such proteins than most other bacteria. By analysis of the domain structure of the 1,171 potential histidine kinases, response regulators, and hybrid kinases, many various arrangements of about thirty different modules could be distinguished. The number of two-component proteins is related in part to genome size but also to the variety of physiological properties and ecophysiologies of the different strains. Groups of orthologues were defined, only a few of which have representatives with known physiological functions. Based on comparisons with the proposed phylogenetic relationships between the strains, the orthology groups show that (i) a few genes, some of them clustered on the genome, have been conserved by all species, suggesting their very ancient origin and an essential role for the corresponding proteins, and (ii) duplications, fusions, gene losses, insertions, and deletions, as well as domain shuffling, occurred during evolution, leading to the extant repertoire. These mechanisms are put in perspective with the different genetic properties that cyanobacteria have to achieve genome plasticity. This review is designed to serve as a basis for orienting further research aimed at defining the most ancient regulatory mechanisms and understanding how evolution worked to select and keep the most appropriate systems for cyanobacteria to develop in the quite different environments that they have successfully colonized. PMID:16760311

  8. Robust assessment of protein complex formation in vivo via single-molecule intensity distributions of autofluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckel, Tobias; Semrau, Stefan; Schaaf, Marcel J. M.; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The formation of protein complexes or clusters in the plasma membrane is essential for many biological processes, such as signaling. We develop a tool, based on single-molecule microscopy, for following cluster formation in vivo. Detection and tracing of single autofluorescent proteins have become standard biophysical techniques. The determination of the number of proteins in a cluster, however, remains challenging. The reasons are (i) the poor photophysical stability and complex photophysics of fluorescent proteins and (ii) noise and autofluorescent background in live cell recordings. We show that, despite those obstacles, the accurate fraction of signals in which a certain (or set) number of labeled proteins reside, can be determined in an accurate an robust way in vivo. We define experimental conditions under which fluorescent proteins exhibit predictable distributions of intensity and quantify the influence of noise. Finally, we confirm our theoretical predictions by measurements of the intensities of individual enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) molecules in living cells. Quantification of the average number of EYFP-C10HRAS chimeras in diffraction-limited spots finally confirm that the membrane anchor of human Harvey rat sarcoma (HRAS) heterogeneously distributes in the plasma membrane of living Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  9. The Measurement and Interpretation of Dietary Protein Distribution During a Rugby Preseason.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Kristen; Slater, Gary; King, Neil; Byrne, Nuala

    2015-08-01

    Evidence suggests that increasing protein distribution may be desirable to promote muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in combination with resistance exercise. However, there is a threshold above which additional protein consumption has limited benefit for MPS and may promote protein loss due to increased oxidation. This study aimed to measure daily protein intake and protein distribution in a cohort of rugby players. Twenty-five developing elite rugby union athletes (20.5 ± 2.3 years, 100.2 ± 13.3 kg, 184.4 ± 7.4 cm) were assessed at the start and end of a rugby preseason. Using a 7-day food diary the reported daily protein intake was 2.2 ± 0.7 g · kg · day(-1) which exceeds daily recommendations. The reported carbohydrate intake was 3.6 ± 1.3 g · kg · day(-1) which may reflect a suboptimal intake or dietary underreporting. In general, the rugby athletes were regularly consuming more than 20 g of protein; 3.8 ± 0.9 times per day (68 ± 18% of eating occasions). In addition to documenting current dietary intakes, an excess protein estimation score was calculated to determine how frequently the rugby athletes consumed protein above a known effective dose with a margin of error. 2.0 ± 0.9 eating occasions contained protein in excess of doses (20 g) known to promote MPS. Therefore, it is currently unclear whether the consumption of regular large doses of protein will benefit rugby athletes via increasing protein distribution, or whether high protein intakes may have unintended effects including a reduction in carbohydrate and/or energy intake. PMID:25675306

  10. Effect of mahlep on molecular weight distribution of cookie flour gluten proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Size Exclusion-High performance Chromatography (SE-HPLC) has been extensively used in molecular weight distribution analysis of wheat proteins. In this study the protein analysis was conducted on different cookie dough blends with different percentages of some ingredients. The mean chromatography ...

  11. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  12. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving stylesmore » in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.« less

  13. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a ‘holding trap’ rather than a ‘folding trap’ mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16177.001 PMID:27343349

  14. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a 'holding trap' rather than a 'folding trap' mechanism. PMID:27343349

  15. Calcium distribution in globoid crystals of cucurbita cotyledon protein bodies.

    PubMed

    Lott, J N; Spitzer, E; Vollmer, C M

    1979-05-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis was used to investigate the location of globoid crystals with relatively high Ca levels within cotyledons of Cucurbita maxima, Cucurbita mixta, and Cucurbita andreana. The small globoid crystals in both upper and lower epidermal cells commonly contained Ca. Ca was present in globoid crystals of all provascular regions with the exception of the very small provascular regions of C. maxima. In C. maxima and C. mixta cotyledons, some cases were observed where Ca was found in the globoid crystals of the first layer of mesophyll cells surrounding the provascular region, but in general Ca was absent from globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells. In C. andreana, globoid crystals of palisade and spongy mesophyll cells commonly contained at least some Ca. Cell position and cell type are factors affecting the Ca content of globoid crystals in protein bodies. PMID:16660825

  16. Most RNAs regulating ribosomal protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli are narrowly distributed to Gammaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yang; Deiorio-Haggar, Kaila; Anthony, Jon; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, 12 distinct RNA structures within the transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins interact with specific ribosomal proteins to allow autogenous regulation of expression from large multi-gene operons, thus coordinating ribosomal protein biosynthesis across multiple operons. However, these RNA structures are typically not represented in the RNA Families Database or annotated in genomic sequences databases, and their phylogenetic distribution is largely unknown. To investigate the extent to which these RNA structures are conserved across eubacterial phyla, we created multiple sequence alignments representing 10 of these messenger RNA (mRNA) structures in E. coli. We find that while three RNA structures are widely distributed across many phyla of bacteria, seven of the RNAs are narrowly distributed to a few orders of Gammaproteobacteria. To experimentally validate our computational predictions, we biochemically confirmed dual L1-binding sites identified in many Firmicute species. This work reveals that RNA-based regulation of ribosomal protein biosynthesis is used in nearly all eubacterial phyla, but the specific RNA structures that regulate ribosomal protein biosynthesis in E. coli are narrowly distributed. These results highlight the limits of our knowledge regarding ribosomal protein biosynthesis regulation outside of E. coli, and the potential for alternative RNA structures responsible for regulating ribosomal proteins in other eubacteria. PMID:23396277

  17. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors BAC Effects Prevention Additional Resources How big is the problem? In 2014, 9,967 people ... Driving: A Threat to Everyone (October 2011) Additional Data Drunk Driving State Data and Maps Motor Vehicle ...

  18. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  19. Regular Patterns for Proteome-Wide Distribution of Protein Abundance across Species

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Wu, Songfeng; Zhu, Yunping; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Pengyuan; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2012-01-01

    A proteome of the bio-entity, including cell, tissue, organ, and organism, consists of proteins of diverse abundance. The principle that determines the abundance of different proteins in a proteome is of fundamental significance for an understanding of the building blocks of the bio-entity. Here, we report three regular patterns in the proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species such as human, mouse, fly, worm, yeast, and bacteria: in most cases, protein abundance is positively correlated with the protein's origination time or sequence conservation during evolution; it is negatively correlated with the protein's domain number and positively correlated with domain coverage in protein structure, and the correlations became stronger during the course of evolution; protein abundance can be further stratified by the function of the protein, whereby proteins that act on material conversion and transportation (mass category) are more abundant than those that act on information modulation (information category). Thus, protein abundance is intrinsically related to the protein's inherent characters of evolution, structure, and function. PMID:22427835

  20. A Common Signal Patch Drives AP-1 Protein-dependent Golgi Export of Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangming; Ortega, Bernardo; Kim, Boyoung; Welling, Paul A

    2016-07-15

    Nearly all members of the inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channel family share a cytoplasmic domain structure that serves as an unusual AP-1 clathrin adaptor-dependent Golgi export signal in one Kir channel, Kir2.1 (KCNJ2), raising the question whether Kir channels share a common Golgi export mechanism. Here we explore this idea, focusing on two structurally and functionally divergent Kir family members, Kir2.3 (KCNJ4) and Kir4.1/5.1 (KCNJ10/16), which have ∼50% amino identity. We found that Golgi export of both channels is blocked upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of the AP-1 γ subunit, as predicted for the common AP-1-dependent trafficking process. A comprehensive mutagenic analysis, guided by homology mapping in atomic resolution models of Kir2.1, Kir2.3, and Kir4.1/5.1, identified a common structure that serves as a recognition site for AP-1 binding and governs Golgi export. Larger than realized from previous studies with Kir2.1, the signal is created by a patch of residues distributed at the confluence of cytoplasmic N and C termini. The signal involves a stretch of hydrophobic residues from the C-terminal region that form a hydrophobic cleft, an adjacent cluster of basic residues within the N terminus, and a potential network of salt bridges that join the N- and C-terminal poles together. Because patch formation and AP-1 binding are dependent on proper folding of the cytoplasmic domains, the signal provides a common quality control mechanism at the Golgi for Kir channels. These findings identify a new proteostatic mechanism that couples protein folding of channels to forward trafficking in the secretory pathway. PMID:27226616

  1. Subcellular distribution of small GTP binding proteins in pancreas: Identification of small GTP binding proteins in the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.K. )

    1990-02-01

    Subfractionation of a canine pancreatic homogenate was performed by several differential centrifugation steps, which gave rise to fractions with distinct marker profiles. Specific binding of guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S)) was assayed in each fraction. Enrichment of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding was greatest in the interfacial smooth microsomal fraction, expected to contain Golgi and other smooth vesicles. There was also marked enrichment in the rough microsomal fraction. Electron microscopy and marker protein analysis revealed the rough microsomes (RMs) to be highly purified rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The distribution of small (low molecular weight) GTP binding proteins was examined by a ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot-overlay assay. Several apparent GTP binding proteins of molecular masses 22-25 kDa were detected in various subcellular fractions. In particular, at least two such proteins were found in the Golgi-enriched and RM fractions, suggesting that these small GTP binding proteins were localized to the Golgi and RER. To more precisely localize these proteins to the RER, native RMs and RMs stripped of ribosomes by puromycin/high salt were subjected to isopycnic centrifugation. The total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding, as well as the small GTP binding proteins detected by the ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot overlay, distributed into fractions of high sucrose density, as did the RER marker ribophorin I. Consistent with a RER localization, when the RMS were stripped of ribosomes and subjected to isopycnic centrifugation, the total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding and the small GTP binding proteins detected in the blot-overlay assay shifted to fractions of lighter sucrose density along with the RER marker.

  2. Rim formation is not a prerequisite for distribution of cone photoreceptor outer segment proteins

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Han, Zongchao; Naash, Muna I.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration slow (RDS/PRPH2) is critical for the formation of the disc/lamella rim in photoreceptor outer segments (OSs), but plays a different role in rods vs. cones. Without RDS, rods fail to form OSs, however, cones lacking RDS (in the rds−/−/Nrl−/−) exhibit balloon-like OSs devoid of lamellae. We show that distribution of most proteins in the lamella and PM domains is preserved even in the absence of RDS, rim, and lamella structures. However, the rim protein prominin-1 exhibits altered trafficking and OS localization, suggesting that proper targeting and distribution of rim proteins may require RDS. Our ultrastructural studies show that in cones, OS formation is initiated by the growth of opsin-containing membrane with RDS-mediated rim formation as a secondary step. This is directly opposite to rods and significantly advances our understanding of the role of the rim in cone OS morphogenesis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the unique folded lamella architecture of the cone OS may maximize density or proximity of phototransduction proteins, but is not required for OS function or for protein distribution and retention in different membrane domains.—Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Han, Z., Naash, M. I. Rim formation is not a prerequisite for distribution of cone photoreceptor outer segment proteins. PMID:24736412

  3. Effects of Acids, Bases, and Heteroatoms on Proximal Radial Distribution Functions for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao Linh; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-01-01

    The proximal distribution of water around proteins is a convenient method of quantifying solvation. We consider the effect of charged and sulfur-containing amino acid side-chain atoms on the proximal radial distribution function (pRDF) of water molecules around proteins using side-chain analogs. The pRDF represents the relative probability of finding any solvent molecule at a distance from the closest or surface perpendicular protein atom. We consider the near-neighbor distribution. Previously, pRDFs were shown to be universal descriptors of the water molecules around C, N, and O atom types across hundreds of globular proteins. Using averaged pRDFs, a solvent density around any globular protein can be reconstructed with controllable relative error. Solvent reconstruction using the additional information from charged amino acid side-chain atom types from both small models and protein averages reveals the effects of surface charge distribution on solvent density and improves the reconstruction errors relative to simulation. Solvent density reconstructions from the small-molecule models are as effective and less computationally demanding than reconstructions from full macromolecular models in reproducing preferred hydration sites and solvent density fluctuations. PMID:26388706

  4. Effects of Acids, Bases, and Heteroatoms on Proximal Radial Distribution Functions for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao Linh; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-04-14

    The proximal distribution of water around proteins is a convenient method of quantifying solvation. We consider the effect of charged and sulfur-containing amino acid side-chain atoms on the proximal radial distribution function (pRDF) of water molecules around proteins using side-chain analogs. The pRDF represents the relative probability of finding any solvent molecule at a distance from the closest or surface perpendicular protein atom. We consider the near-neighbor distribution. Previously, pRDFs were shown to be universal descriptors of the water molecules around C, N, and O atom types across hundreds of globular proteins. Using averaged pRDFs, a solvent density around any globular protein can be reconstructed with controllable relative error. Solvent reconstruction using the additional information from charged amino acid side-chain atom types from both small models and protein averages reveals the effects of surface charge distribution on solvent density and improves the reconstruction errors relative to simulation. Solvent density reconstructions from the small-molecule models are as effective and less computationally demanding than reconstructions from full macromolecular models in reproducing preferred hydration sites and solvent density fluctuations. PMID:26388706

  5. Intracellular distribution of an integral nuclear pore membrane protein fused to green fluorescent protein--localization of a targeting domain.

    PubMed

    Söderqvist, H; Imreh, G; Kihlmark, M; Linnman, C; Ringertz, N; Hallberg, E

    1997-12-15

    The 121-kDa pore membrane protein (POM121) is a bitopic integral membrane protein specifically located in the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope with its short N-terminal tail exposed on the luminal side and its major C-terminal portion adjoining the nuclear pore complex. In order to locate a signal for targeting of POM121 to the nuclear pores, we overexpressed selected regions of POM121 alone or fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transiently transfected COS-1 cells or in a stably transfected neuroblastoma cell line. Microscopic analysis of the GFP fluorescence or immunostaining was used to determine the intracellular distribution of the overexpressed proteins. The endofluorescent GFP tag had no effect on the distribution of POM121, since the chimerical POM121-GFP fusion protein was correctly targeted to the nuclear pores of both COS-1 cells and neuroblastoma cells. Based on the differentiated intracellular sorting of the POM121 variants, we conclude that the first 128 amino acids of POM121 contains signals for targeting to the continuous endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope membrane system but not specifically to the nuclear pores and that a specific nuclear pore targeting signal is located between amino acids 129 and 618 in the endoplasmically exposed portion of POM121. PMID:9461306

  6. Effects of molecular noise on bistable protein distributions in rod-shaped bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wettmann, L.; Bonny, M.; Kruse, K.

    2014-01-01

    The distributions of many proteins in rod-shaped bacteria are far from homogeneous. Often they accumulate at the cell poles or in the cell centre. At the same time, the copy number of proteins in a single cell is relatively small making the patterns noisy. To explore limits to protein patterns due to molecular noise, we studied a generic mechanism for spontaneous polar protein assemblies in rod-shaped bacteria, which are based on cooperative binding of proteins to the cytoplasmic membrane. For mono-polar assemblies, we find that the switching time between the two poles increases exponentially with the cell length and with the protein number. This feature could be beneficial to organelle maintenance in ageing bacteria. PMID:25485085

  7. [Protein fraction distribution in milling and screened physical fractions of grain amaranth].

    PubMed

    Búcaro Segura, María Ester; Bressani, Ricardo

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the protein distribution based on solubility in physical fractions of amaranth flour, in particular between the flour from the germ and that from the perisperm. The protein distribution was obtained applying a series of solvents sequentially utilized in the classical methodology of Osborne & Mendel. The sample of A. cruentus weighing 2000 g was divided into 4 subsamples of 500 g each. One was left as the control while the other 3 were ground individually with a mill. Each flour was screened through 18, 20, 30 and 40 mesh screens, so that 5 fractions were obtained from each of the whole grain flours. Samples of each screened fractions were observed by stereoscopy and analyzed for moisture, fat and protein. This characterization suggested that the fraction above the 30 mesh screen and the flour which passed the 40 mesh screen probably were the perisperm and germ respectively. The 30 mesh sample contained 2.34 fat and 9.05% protein while the 40 mesh contained 16.18% fat and 26.46% protein. The extraction and partitioning of the proteins indicated that the most important fractions in germ and perisperm were the water soluble and glutelins measured by Kjeldahl. The relationship of the water soluble + globulin to glutelins ratio was 2.1 to 1 in the whole grain, 1.9 to 1 in the perisperm and 1.7 to 1 in the germ. The distribution of proteins was very much alike between germ and perisperm. The levels of prolamines were quite low. The protein extraction of the perisperm proteins retained on the 30 mesh screen was low (71.1%) measured by Kjeldahl and 47.4% with the Bradford method to measure protein. PMID:12184151

  8. The rice RING finger E3 ligase, OsHCI1, drives nuclear export of multiple substrate proteins and its heterogeneous overexpression enhances acquired thermotolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung Don; Cho, Hyun Yong; Park, Yong Chan; Ham, Deok Jae; Lee, Ju Kyong; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2013-01-01

    Thermotolerance is very important for plant survival when plants are subjected to lethally high temperature. However, thus far little is known about the functions of RING E3 ligase in response to heat shock in plants. This study found that one rice gene encoding the RING finger protein was specifically induced by heat and cold stress treatments but not by salinity or dehydration and named it OsHCI1 (Oryza sativa heat and cold induced 1). Subcellular localization results showed that OsHCI1 was mainly associated with the Golgi apparatus and moved rapidly and extensively along the cytoskeleton. In contrast, OsHCI1 may have accumulated in the nucleus under high temperatures. OsHCI1 physically interacted with nuclear substrate proteins including a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. Transient co-overexpression of OsHCI1 and each of three nuclear proteins showed that their fluorescent signals moved into the cytoplasm as punctuate formations. Heterogeneous overexpression of OsHCI1 in Arabidopsis highly increased survival rate through acquired thermotolerance. It is proposed that OsHCI1 mediates nuclear–cytoplasmic trafficking of nuclear substrate proteins via monoubiquitination and drives an inactivation device for the nuclear proteins under heat shock. PMID:23698632

  9. Isotopomer distributions in amino acids from a highly expressed protein as a proxy for those from total protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Afshan; Shaikh, Afshan S.; Tang, Yinjie; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D.

    2008-06-27

    {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis provides valuable information about bacterial physiology. Though many biological processes rely on the synergistic functions of microbial communities, study of individual organisms in a mixed culture using existing flux analysis methods is difficult. Isotopomer-based flux analysis typically relies on hydrolyzed amino acids from a homogeneous biomass. Thus metabolic flux analysis of a given organism in a mixed culture requires its separation from the mixed culture. Swift and efficient cell separation is difficult and a major hurdle for isotopomer-based flux analysis of mixed cultures. Here we demonstrate the use of a single highly-expressed protein to analyze the isotopomer distribution of amino acids from one organism. Using the model organism E. coli expressing a plasmid-borne, his-tagged Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), we show that induction of GFP does not affect E. coli growth kinetics or the isotopomer distribution in nine key metabolites. Further, the isotopomer labeling patterns of amino acids derived from purified GFP and total cell protein are indistinguishable, indicating that amino acids from a purified protein can be used to infer metabolic fluxes of targeted organisms in a mixed culture. This study provides the foundation to extend isotopomer-based flux analysis to study metabolism of individual strains in microbial communities.

  10. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  11. Exact protein distributions for stochastic models of gene expression using partitioning of Poisson processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Platini, Thierry; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2013-04-01

    Stochasticity in gene expression gives rise to fluctuations in protein levels across a population of genetically identical cells. Such fluctuations can lead to phenotypic variation in clonal populations; hence, there is considerable interest in quantifying noise in gene expression using stochastic models. However, obtaining exact analytical results for protein distributions has been an intractable task for all but the simplest models. Here, we invoke the partitioning property of Poisson processes to develop a mapping that significantly simplifies the analysis of stochastic models of gene expression. The mapping leads to exact protein distributions using results for mRNA distributions in models with promoter-based regulation. Using this approach, we derive exact analytical results for steady-state and time-dependent distributions for the basic two-stage model of gene expression. Furthermore, we show how the mapping leads to exact protein distributions for extensions of the basic model that include the effects of posttranscriptional and posttranslational regulation. The approach developed in this work is widely applicable and can contribute to a quantitative understanding of stochasticity in gene expression and its regulation.

  12. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  13. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-Living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Dow, Charles L.; McDermott, Timothy R.; Macur, Richard E.; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1–0.8, 0.8–3.0, and 3.0–20 μm) were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water) to 25:1 (vent water). Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea) were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 and V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), SO42-, O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however, mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (> 3 μm) and contained higher predicted operational taxonomic unit richness and microbial diversities (genus level) than free-living ones (<0.8 μm). Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. PMID:26973602

  14. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-Living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Dow, Charles L; McDermott, Timothy R; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1-0.8, 0.8-3.0, and 3.0-20 μm) were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water) to 25:1 (vent water). Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea) were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 and V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), SO4 (2-), O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however, mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (> 3 μm) and contained higher predicted operational taxonomic unit richness and microbial diversities (genus level) than free-living ones (<0.8 μm). Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. PMID:26973602

  15. Distribution of the scaffolding proteins PSD-95, PSD-93, and SAP97 in isolated PSDs.

    PubMed

    DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Galbraith, James A; Dosemeci, Ayse; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S

    2006-12-01

    We compared the distribution of three scaffolding proteins, all belonging to a family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases, thought to have key roles in the organization of the postsynaptic density (PSD). Isolated PSDs readily adhered to treated glass coverslips where they were labeled with immunogold and rotary shadowed for analysis by EM. The distribution of proteins within individual PSDs were measured by counting and mapping individual immunogold particles. PSD-95, as previously described, is distributed evenly throughout the PSD. We find here that PSD-93 has a nearly identical distribution suggesting that PSD-95 and PSD-93 could perform similar roles. SAP97, in contrast, is concentrated near edges of cleft sides of the PSDs, and in small clumps on their cytoplasmic sides. The homogenous distribution of PSD-95 and PSD-93 throughout the PSD is consistent with their being part of a backbone that stabilizes their various binding partners within the PSD. The distribution of SAP97 confirms that this protein is actually an integral component of the PSD, and suggests that it may have a role in inserting or stabilizing its main binding partner, Glu-R1, at the edge of the PSD. PMID:18392731

  16. Effect of surface charge distribution on the adsorption orientation of proteins to lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption orientation of the proteins lysozyme and ribonuclease A (RNase A) to a neutral 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and a negatively charged stearic acid lipid film was investigated by means of X-ray reflectivity. Both proteins adsorbed to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, whereas at the neutral monolayer, no adsorption was observed. For acquiring comprehensive information on the proteins' adsorption, X-ray reflectivity data were combined with electron densities obtained from crystallographic data. With this method, it is possible to determine the orientation of adsorbed proteins in solution underneath lipid monolayers. While RNase A specifically coupled with its positively charged active site to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, lysozyme prefers an orientation with its long axis parallel to the Langmuir film. In comparison to the electrostatic maps of the proteins, our results can be explained by the discriminative surface charge distribution of lysozyme and RNase A. PMID:20707324

  17. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  18. Single-point single-molecule FRAP distinguishes inner and outer nuclear membrane protein distribution.

    PubMed

    Mudumbi, Krishna C; Schirmer, Eric C; Yang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The normal distribution of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) is disrupted in several human diseases. NETs are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum and then transported from the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Quantitative determination of the distribution of NETs on the ONM and INM is limited in available approaches, which moreover provide no information about translocation rates in the two membranes. Here we demonstrate a single-point single-molecule FRAP microscopy technique that enables determination of distribution and translocation rates for NETs in vivo. PMID:27558844

  19. Single-point single-molecule FRAP distinguishes inner and outer nuclear membrane protein distribution

    PubMed Central

    Mudumbi, Krishna C; Schirmer, Eric C; Yang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The normal distribution of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) is disrupted in several human diseases. NETs are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum and then transported from the outer nuclear membrane (ONM) to the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Quantitative determination of the distribution of NETs on the ONM and INM is limited in available approaches, which moreover provide no information about translocation rates in the two membranes. Here we demonstrate a single-point single-molecule FRAP microscopy technique that enables determination of distribution and translocation rates for NETs in vivo. PMID:27558844

  20. Methods for developing time-series climate surfaces to drive topographically distributed energy- and water-balance models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Susong, D.; Marks, D.; Garen, D.

    1999-01-01

    Topographically distributed energy- and water-balance models can accurately simulate both the development and melting of a seasonal snowcover in the mountain basins. To do this they require time-series climate surfaces of air temperature, humidity, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and thermal radiation. If data are available, these parameters can be adequately estimated at time steps of one to three hours. Unfortunately, climate monitoring in mountain basins is very limited, and the full range of elevations and exposures that affect climate conditions, snow deposition, and melt is seldom sampled. Detailed time-series climate surfaces have been successfully developed using limited data and relatively simple methods. We present a synopsis of the tools and methods used to combine limited data with simple corrections for the topographic controls to generate high temporal resolution time-series images of these climate parameters. Methods used include simulations, elevational gradients, and detrended kriging. The generated climate surfaces are evaluated at points and spatially to determine if they are reasonable approximations of actual conditions. Recommendations are made for the addition of critical parameters and measurement sites into routine monitoring systems in mountain basins.Topographically distributed energy- and water-balance models can accurately simulate both the development and melting of a seasonal snowcover in the mountain basins. To do this they require time-series climate surfaces of air temperature, humidity, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and thermal radiation. If data are available, these parameters can be adequately estimated at time steps of one to three hours. Unfortunately, climate monitoring in mountain basins is very limited, and the full range of elevations and exposures that affect climate conditions, snow deposition, and melt is seldom sampled. Detailed time-series climate surfaces have been successfully developed using limited

  1. What do metabolic rates tell us about thermal niches? Mechanisms driving crayfish distributions along an altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Stoffels, Rick J; Richardson, Adam J; Vogel, Matthew T; Coates, Simon P; Müller, Warren J

    2016-01-01

    Humans are rapidly altering thermal landscapes, so a central challenge to organismal ecologists is to better understand the thermal niches of ectotherms. However, there is much disagreement over how we should go about this. Some ecologists assume that a statistical model of abundance as a function of habitat temperature provides a sufficient approximation of the thermal niche, but ecophysiologists have shown that the relationship between fitness and temperature can be complicated, and have stressed the need to elucidate the causal mechanisms underlying the response of species to thermal change. Towards this end, we studied the distribution of two crayfishes, Euastacus woiwuru and Euastacus armatus, along an altitudinal gradient, and for both species conducted experiments to determine the temperature-dependence of: (1) aerobic scope (the difference between maximum and basal metabolic rate; purported to be a proxy of the thermal niche); and (2) burst locomotor performance (primarily fuelled using anaerobic pathways). E. woiwuru occupied cooler habitats than E. armatus, but we found no difference in aerobic scope between these species. In contrast, locomotor performance curves differed significantly and strongly between species, with peak locomotor performances of E. woiwuru and E. armatus occurring at ~10 and ~18 °C, respectively. Crayfish from different thermal landscapes may have similar aerobic thermal performance curves but different anaerobic thermal performance curves. Our results support a growing body of literature implying different components of ectotherm fitness have different thermal performance curves, and further challenge our understanding of the ecology and evolution of thermal niches. PMID:26440800

  2. LDRD Final Report (08-ERD-037): Important Modes to Drive Protein MD Simulations to the Next Conformational Level

    SciTech Connect

    Sadigh, B

    2011-04-07

    Every action in biology is performed by dynamic proteins that convert between multiple states in order to engage their functions. Often binding to various ligands is essential for the rates of desired transitions to be enhanced. The goal of computational biology is to study these transitions and discover the different states to fully understand the protein's normal and diseased function, design drugs to target/bias specific states, and understand all of the interactions in between. We have developed a new methodology that is capable of calculating the absolute free energy of proteins while taking into account all the interactions with the solvent molecules. The efficiency of the new scheme is an order of magnitude greater than any existing technique. This method is now implemented in the massively parallel popular MD program package NAMD. This now makes it possible to calculate the relative stability of different conformational states of biological macromolecules as well as their binding free energies to various ligands.

  3. Rho-associated protein kinase modulates neurite extension by regulating microtubule remodeling and vinculin distribution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke’en; Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Jing; Li, Sumei; Guo, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase is an essential regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics during the process of neurite extension. However, whether Rho kinase regulates microtubule remodeling or the distribution of adhesive proteins to mediate neurite outgrowth remains unclear. By specifically modulating Rho kinase activity with pharmacological agents, we studied the morpho-dynamics of neurite outgrowth. We found that lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of Rho kinase, inhibited neurite outgrowth, which could be reversed by Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho kinase. Meanwhile, reorganization of microtubules was noticed during these processes, as indicated by their significant changes in the soma and growth cone. In addition, exposure to lysophosphatidic acid led to a decreased membrane distribution of vinculin, a focal adhesion protein in neurons, whereas Y-27632 recruited vinculin to the membrane. Taken together, our data suggest that Rho kinase regulates rat hippocampal neurite growth and microtubule formation via a mechanism associated with the redistribution of vinculin. PMID:25206623

  4. Expression and distribution of amyloid precursor protein-like protein-2 in Alzheimer's disease and in normal brain.

    PubMed Central

    Crain, B. J.; Hu, W.; Sze, C. I.; Slunt, H. H.; Koo, E. H.; Price, D. L.; Thinakaran, G.; Sisodia, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid precursor-like protein-2 (APLP-2) belongs to a family of homologous amyloid precursor-like proteins. In the present study we report on the expression and distribution of APLP-2 in fetal and adult human brain and in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate that APLP-2 mRNAs encoding isoforms predicted to undergo post-translational modification by chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans are elevated in fetal and aging brains relative to the brains of young adults. Immunocytochemical labeling with APLP-2-specific antibodies demonstrates APLP-2 immunoreactivity in cytoplasmic compartments in neurons and astrocytes, in large part overlapping the distribution of the amyloid precursor protein. In Alzheimer's disease brain, APLP-2 antibodies also label a subset of neuritic plaques. APLP-2 immunoreactivity is particularly conspicuous in large dystrophic neurites that also label with antibodies specific for APP and chromogranin A. In view of the age-dependent increase in levels of chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan-modified forms of APLP-2 in aging brain and the accumulation of APLP-2 in dystrophic presynaptic elements, we suggest that APLP-2 may play roles in neuronal sprouting or in the aggregation, deposition, and/or persistence of beta-amyloid deposits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8863657

  5. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Giampieri, Enrico; De Cecco, Marco; Remondini, Daniel; Sedivy, John; Castellani, Gastone

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF) undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction), and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome. PMID:26115222

  6. Cellular distribution of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins in Vicia faba L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, V.; Assmann, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of calmodulin (CaM) and CaM-binding proteins within Vicia faba was investigated. Both CaM and CaM-binding proteins were found to be differentially distributed among organs, tissues, and protoplast types. CaM levels, on a per protein basis, were found to be the highest in leaf epidermis, containing 3-fold higher levels of CaM than in total leaf. Similarly, guard cell and epidermal cell protoplasts were also found to have higher levels of CaM than mesophyll cell protoplasts. 125I-CaM blot overlay assays were performed to qualitatively examine CaM-binding proteins in these protoplast types as well as in whole tissues and organs. CaM-binding proteins with Mr 52,000, 78,000, and 115,000 were common in all metabolically active plant parts. Unique CaM-binding protein bands were detected in guard cell protoplasts (Mr 39,000, 88,000), stems (Mr 45,000, 60,000, 64,000), and roots (Mr 62,000), suggesting the presence of specialized CaM-dependent processes in these cells and organs.

  7. Dystroglycan protein distribution coincides with basement membranes and muscle differentiation during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Claire; Winder, Steven J; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle

    2007-09-01

    Using immunohistochemistry, we have examined beta-Dystroglycan protein distribution in the mouse embryo at embryonic stages E9.5 to E11.5. Our data show that Dystroglycan expression correlates with basement membranes in many tissues, such as the notochord, neural tube, promesonephros, and myotome. In the myotome, we describe the timing of Dystroglycan protein re-distribution at the surface of myogenic precursor cells as basement membrane assembles into a continuous sheet. We also report on non-basement-membrane-associated Dystroglycan expression in the floor plate and the myocardium. This distribution often corresponds to sites of expression previously reported in adults, suggesting that Dystroglycan is continuously produced during development. PMID:17676646

  8. Actin Interacting Protein1 and Actin Depolymerizing Factor Drive Rapid Actin Dynamics in Physcomitrella patens[W

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Robert C.; Pattavina, Kelli A.; Tüzel, Erkan; Vidali, Luis; Bezanilla, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    The remodeling of actin networks is required for a variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes. In plants, several actin binding proteins have been implicated in remodeling cortical actin filaments (F-actin). However, the extent to which these proteins support F-actin dynamics in planta has not been tested. Using reverse genetics, complementation analyses, and cell biological approaches, we assessed the in vivo function of two actin turnover proteins: actin interacting protein1 (AIP1) and actin depolymerizing factor (ADF). We report that AIP1 is a single-copy gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens. AIP1 knockout plants are viable but have reduced expansion of tip-growing cells. AIP1 is diffusely cytosolic and functions in a common genetic pathway with ADF to promote tip growth. Specifically, ADF can partially compensate for loss of AIP1, and AIP1 requires ADF for function. Consistent with a role in actin remodeling, AIP1 knockout lines accumulate F-actin bundles, have fewer dynamic ends, and have reduced severing frequency. Importantly, we demonstrate that AIP1 promotes and ADF is essential for cortical F-actin dynamics. PMID:22003077

  9. Finite-temperature local protein sequence alignment: percolation and free-energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, S; Melchert, O; Hartmann, A K

    2009-12-01

    Sequence alignment is a tool in bioinformatics that is used to find homological relationships in large molecular databases. It can be mapped on the physical model of directed polymers in random media. We consider the finite-temperature version of local sequence alignment for proteins and study the transition between the linear phase and the biologically relevant logarithmic phase, where the free energy grows linearly or logarithmically with the sequence length. By means of numerical simulations and finite-size-scaling analysis, we determine the phase diagram in the plane that is spanned by the gap costs and the temperature. We use the most frequently used parameter set for protein alignment. The critical exponents that describe the parameter-driven transition are found to be explicitly temperature dependent. Furthermore, we study the shape of the (free-) energy distribution close to the transition by rare-event simulations down to probabilities on the order 10(-64). It is well known that in the logarithmic region, the optimal score distribution (T=0) is described by a modified Gumbel distribution. We confirm that this also applies for the free-energy distribution (T>0). However, in the linear phase, the distribution crosses over to a modified Gaussian distribution. PMID:20365196

  10. A PDZ protein regulates the distribution of the transmembrane semaphorin, M-SemF.

    PubMed

    Wang, L H; Kalb, R G; Strittmatter, S M

    1999-05-14

    M-SemF is a membrane-associated, neurally enriched member of the semaphorin family of axon guidance signals. We considered whether the cytoplasmic domain of M-SemF might possess a signaling function and/or might control the distribution of M-SemF on the cell surface. We identify a PDZ-containing neural protein as an M-SemF cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (SEMCAP-1). SEMCAP-2 is a closely related nonneuronal protein. SEMCAP-1 has recently also been identified as GIPC, by virtue of its interaction with the RGS protein GAIP in vitro (De Vries, L., Lou, X., Zhao, G., Zheng, B., and Farquhar, M. G. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 95, 12340-12345). Expression studies support the notion that SEMCAP-1(GIPC) interacts with M-SemF, but not GAIP, in brain. Lung SEMCAP-2 and SEMCAP-1(GIPC) are potential partners for both GAIP and M-SemF. The protein interaction requires the single PDZ domain of SEMCAP-1(GIPC) and the carboxyl-terminal four residues of M-SemF, ESSV. While SEMCAP-1(GIPC) also interacts with SemC, it does not interact with other proteins containing a class I PDZ binding motif, nor does M-SemF interact with other class I PDZ proteins. Co-expression of SEMCAP-1(GIPC) induces the redistribution of dispersed M-SemF into detergent-resistant aggregates in HEK293 cells. Thus, SEMCAP-1(GIPC) appears to regulate the subcellular distribution of M-SemF in brain, and SEMCAPs could link M-SemF to G protein signal transduction pathways. PMID:10318831

  11. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  12. Protein Adsorption Patterns and Analysis on IV Nanoemulsions—The Key Factor Determining the Organ Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Cornelia M.; Jansch, Mirko; Müller, Rainer H.

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous nanoemulsions have been on the market for parenteral nutrition since the 1950s; meanwhile, they have also been used successfully for IV drug delivery. To be well tolerable, the emulsions should avoid uptake by the MPS cells of the body; for drug delivery, they should be target-specific. The organ distribution is determined by the proteins adsorbing them after injection from the blood (protein adsorption pattern), typically analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 2-D PAGE. The article reviews the 2-D PAGE method, the analytical problems to be faced and the knowledge available on how the composition of emulsions affects the protein adsorption patterns, e.g., the composition of the oil phase, stabilizer layer and drug incorporation into the interface or oil core. Data were re-evaluated and compared, and the implications for the in vivo distribution are discussed. Major results are that the interfacial composition of the stabilizer layer is the main determining factor and that this composition can be modulated by simple processes. Drug incorporation affects the pattern depending on the localization of the drug (oil core versus interface). The data situation regarding in vivo effects is very limited; mainly, it has to be referred to in the in vivo data of polymeric nanoparticles. As a conclusion, determination of the protein adsorption patterns can accelerate IV nanoemulsion formulation development regarding optimized organ distribution and related pharmacokinetics. PMID:24300396

  13. Wide distribution of cysteine-rich secretory proteins in snake venoms: isolation and cloning of novel snake venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Hyodo, Fumiko; Morita, Takashi

    2003-04-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are found in epididymis and granules of mammals, and they are thought to function in sperm maturation and in the immune system. Recently, we isolated and obtained clones for novel snake venom proteins that are classified as CRISP family proteins. To elucidate the distribution of snake venom CRISP family proteins, we evaluated a wide range of venoms for immuno-cross-reactivity. Then we isolated, characterized, and cloned genes for three novel CRISP family proteins (piscivorin, ophanin, and catrin) from the venom of eastern cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus piscivorus), king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). Our results show the wide distribution of snake venom CRISP family proteins among Viperidae and Elapidae from different continents, indicating that CRISP family proteins compose a new group of snake venom proteins. PMID:12646276

  14. Few Residues within an Extensive Binding Interface Drive Receptor Interaction and Determine the Specificity of Arrestin Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Gimenez, Luis E.; Francis, Derek J.; Hanson, Susan M.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Klug, Candice S.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2011-01-01

    Arrestins bind active phosphorylated forms of G protein-coupled receptors, terminating G protein activation, orchestrating receptor trafficking, and redirecting signaling to alternative pathways. Visual arrestin-1 preferentially binds rhodopsin, whereas the two non-visual arrestins interact with hundreds of G protein-coupled receptor subtypes. Here we show that an extensive surface on the concave side of both arrestin-2 domains is involved in receptor binding. We also identified a small number of residues on the receptor binding surface of the N- and C-domains that largely determine the receptor specificity of arrestins. We show that alanine substitution of these residues blocks the binding of arrestin-1 to rhodopsin in vitro and of arrestin-2 and -3 to β2-adrenergic, M2 muscarinic cholinergic, and D2 dopamine receptors in intact cells, suggesting that these elements critically contribute to the energy of the interaction. Thus, in contrast to arrestin-1, where direct phosphate binding is crucial, the interaction of non-visual arrestins with their cognate receptors depends to a lesser extent on phosphate binding and more on the binding to non-phosphorylated receptor elements. PMID:21471193

  15. Nodes with high centrality in protein interaction networks are responsible for driving signaling pathways in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abedi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In spite of huge efforts, chronic diseases remain an unresolved problem in medicine. Systems biology could assist to develop more efficient therapies through providing quantitative holistic sights to these complex disorders. In this study, we have re-analyzed a microarray dataset to identify critical signaling pathways related to diabetic nephropathy. GSE1009 dataset was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database and the gene expression profile of glomeruli from diabetic nephropathy patients and those from healthy individuals were compared. The protein-protein interaction network for differentially expressed genes was constructed and enriched. In addition, topology of the network was analyzed to identify the genes with high centrality parameters and then pathway enrichment analysis was performed. We found 49 genes to be variably expressed between the two groups. The network of these genes had few interactions so it was enriched and a network with 137 nodes was constructed. Based on different parameters, 34 nodes were considered to have high centrality in this network. Pathway enrichment analysis with these central genes identified 62 inter-connected signaling pathways related to diabetic nephropathy. Interestingly, the central nodes were more informative for pathway enrichment analysis compared to all network nodes and also 49 differentially expressed genes. In conclusion, we here show that central nodes in protein interaction networks tend to be present in pathways that co-occur in a biological state. Also, this study suggests a computational method for inferring underlying mechanisms of complex disorders from raw high-throughput data. PMID:26557424

  16. Distribution of protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation systems across all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Dragutin; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Josip; Ćetković, Helena; Žaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in regulation of many cellular pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) consists of chains of repeating ADP-ribose nucleotide units and is synthesized by the family of enzymes called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification can be removed by the hydrolytic action of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3 (ARH3). Hydrolytic activity of macrodomain proteins (MacroD1, MacroD2 and TARG1) is responsible for the removal of terminal ADP-ribose unit and for complete reversion of protein ADP-ribosylation. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is widely utilized in eukaryotes and PARPs are present in representatives from all six major eukaryotic supergroups, with only a small number of eukaryotic species that do not possess PARP genes. The last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed at least five types of PARP proteins that include both mono and poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases. Distribution of PARGs strictly follows the distribution of PARP proteins in eukaryotic species. At least one of the macrodomain proteins that hydrolyse terminal ADP-ribose is also always present. Therefore, we can presume that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed a fully functional and reversible PAR metabolism and that PAR signalling provided the conditions essential for survival of the ancestral eukaryote in its ancient environment. PARP proteins are far less prevalent in bacteria and were probably gained through horizontal gene transfer. Only eleven bacterial species possess all proteins essential for a functional PAR metabolism, although it is not known whether PAR metabolism is truly functional in bacteria. Several dsDNA viruses also possess PARP homologues, while no PARP proteins have been identified in any archaeal genome. Our analysis of the distribution of enzymes involved in PAR metabolism provides insight into the evolution of these important signalling systems, as well as

  17. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  18. Assessing protein conformational sampling methods based on bivariate lag-distributions of backbone angles

    PubMed Central

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Huang, Jianhua Z.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in the past decades, protein structure prediction remains one of the major unsolved problems in computational biology. Angular-sampling-based methods have been extensively studied recently due to their ability to capture the continuous conformational space of protein structures. The literature has focused on using a variety of parametric models of the sequential dependencies between angle pairs along the protein chains. In this article, we present a thorough review of angular-sampling-based methods by assessing three main questions: What is the best distribution type to model the protein angles? What is a reasonable number of components in a mixture model that should be considered to accurately parameterize the joint distribution of the angles? and What is the order of the local sequence–structure dependency that should be considered by a prediction method? We assess the model fits for different methods using bivariate lag-distributions of the dihedral/planar angles. Moreover, the main information across the lags can be extracted using a technique called Lag singular value decomposition (LagSVD), which considers the joint distribution of the dihedral/planar angles over different lags using a nonparametric approach and monitors the behavior of the lag-distribution of the angles using singular value decomposition. As a result, we developed graphical tools and numerical measurements to compare and evaluate the performance of different model fits. Furthermore, we developed a web-tool (http://www.stat.tamu.edu/∼madoliat/LagSVD) that can be used to produce informative animations. PMID:22926831

  19. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... stay safe with a cell phone in the car. ... for Disease Control and Prevention Injury Prevention & Control. Motor Vehicle Safety. www.cdc.gov/motorvehiclesafety/distracted_driving . Accessed May ...

  20. Driving Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... drivers’ flexibility and coordination, and reduced driving errors. S l Hand grip strengthening to help you hold on to the steering wheel l Shoulder and upper arm flexibility exercises to make ...

  1. Distracted Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... combines all three types of distraction. 3 How big is the problem? Deaths In 2013, 3,154 ... European countries. More A CDC study analyzed 2011 data on distracted driving, including talking on a cell ...

  2. Chibby drives β catenin cytoplasmic accumulation leading to activation of the unfolded protein response in BCR-ABL1+ cells.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Manuela; Leo, Elisa; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Campi, Virginia; Borsi, Enrica; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease caused by the constitutive tyrosine kinase (TK) activity of the BCR-ABL fusion protein. However, the phenotype of leukemic stem cells (LSC) is sustained by β catenin rather than by the BCR-ABL TK. β catenin activity in CML is contingent upon its stabilization proceeding from the BCR-ABL-induced phosphorylation at critical residues for interaction with the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/Axin/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) destruction complex or GSK3 inactivating mutations. Here we studied the impact of β catenin antagonist Chibby (CBY) on β catenin signaling in BCR-ABL1+ cells. CBY is a small conserved protein which interacts with β catenin and impairs β catenin-mediated transcriptional activation through two distinct molecular mechanisms: 1) competition with T cell factor (TCF) or lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) for β catenin binding; and 2) nuclear export of β catenin via interaction with 14-3-3. We found that its enforced expression in K562 cell line promoted β catenin cytoplasmic translocation resulting in inhibition of target gene transcription. Moreover, cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pathway known as unfolded protein response (UPR). CBY-driven cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin is also a component of BCR-ABL1+ cell response to the TK inhibitor Imatinib (IM). It evoked the UPR activation leading to the induction of BCL2-interacting mediator of cell death (BIM) by UPR sensors. BIM, in turn, contributed to the execution phase of apoptosis in the activation of ER resident caspase 12 and mobilization of Ca(2+) stores. PMID:23707389

  3. Phenotype Clustering of Breast Epithelial Cells in Confocal Imagesbased on Nuclear Protein Distribution Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Fuhui; Peng, Hanchuan; Sudar, Damir; Levievre, Sophie A.; Knowles, David W.

    2006-09-05

    Background: The distribution of the chromatin-associatedproteins plays a key role in directing nuclear function. Previously, wedeveloped an image-based method to quantify the nuclear distributions ofproteins and showed that these distributions depended on the phenotype ofhuman mammary epithelial cells. Here we describe a method that creates ahierarchical tree of the given cell phenotypes and calculates thestatistical significance between them, based on the clustering analysisof nuclear protein distributions. Results: Nuclear distributions ofnuclear mitotic apparatus protein were previously obtained fornon-neoplastic S1 and malignant T4-2 human mammary epithelial cellscultured for up to 12 days. Cell phenotype was defined as S1 or T4-2 andthe number of days in cultured. A probabilistic ensemble approach wasused to define a set of consensus clusters from the results of multipletraditional cluster analysis techniques applied to the nucleardistribution data. Cluster histograms were constructed to show how cellsin any one phenotype were distributed across the consensus clusters.Grouping various phenotypes allowed us to build phenotype trees andcalculate the statistical difference between each group. The resultsshowed that non-neoplastic S1 cells could be distinguished from malignantT4-2 cells with 94.19 percent accuracy; that proliferating S1 cells couldbe distinguished from differentiated S1 cells with 92.86 percentaccuracy; and showed no significant difference between the variousphenotypes of T4-2 cells corresponding to increasing tumor sizes.Conclusion: This work presents a cluster analysis method that canidentify significant cell phenotypes, based on the nuclear distributionof specific proteins, with high accuracy.

  4. Distinct distribution of specific members of protein 4.1 genefamily in the mouse nephron

    SciTech Connect

    Ramez, Mohamed; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel; Cluzeaud, Francoise; Chanan, Sumita; Patterson, Michael; Walensky, Loren D.; Marfatia, Shirin; Baines, Anthony J.; Chasis, Joel A.; Conboy, John G.; Mohandas, Narla; Gascard, Philippe

    2002-12-11

    Background: Protein 4.1 is an adapter protein which linksthe actin cytoskeleton to various transmembrane proteins. 4.1 proteinsare encoded by four homologous genes, 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1B, whichundergo complex alternative splicing. Here we performed a detailedcharacterization of the expression of specific 4.1 proteins in the mousenephron. Methods: Distribution of renal 4.1 proteins was investigated bystaining of paraformaldehyde fixed mouse kidney sections with antibodieshighly specific for each 4.1 protein. Major 4.1 splice forms, amplifiedfrom mouse kidney marathon cDNA, were expressed in transfected COS-7cells in order to assign species of known exon composition to proteinsdetected in kidney. Results: A 105kDa4.1R splice form, initiating atATG-2 translation initiation site and lacking exon 16, but including exon17B, was restricted to thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. A 95kDa 4.1Nspliceform,lacking exons 15 and 17D, was expressed in either descendingor ascending thin limb of Henle'sloop, distal convoluted tubule and allregions of the collecting duct system. A major 108kDa 4.1B spliceform,initiating at a newly characterized ATG translation initiation site, andlacking exons 15, 17B, and 21, was present only in Bowman's capsule andproximal convoluted tubule (PCT). There was no expression of 4.1G inkidney. Conclusion: Distinct distribution of 4.1 proteins along thenephron suggests their involvement in targeting of selected transmembraneproteins in kidney epithelium andtherefore in regulation of specifickidney functions.

  5. Simultaneous detection of the two main proliferation driving EBV encoded proteins, EBNA-2 and LMP-1 in single B cells.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Abu E; Nagy, Noémi; Sohlberg, Ebba; Ádori, Mónika; Claesson, Hans-Erik; Klein, George; Klein, Eva

    2012-11-30

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is carried by almost all adults, mostly without clinical manifestations. Latent virus infection of B lymphocytes induces activation and proliferation that can be demonstrated in vitro. In healthy individuals, generation of EBV induced malignant proliferation is avoided by continuous immunological surveillance. The proliferation inducing set of the virally encoded genes is expressed exclusively in B cells in a defined differentiation window. It comprises nine EBV encoded nuclear proteins, EBNA 1-6, and three cell membrane associated proteins, LMP-1, 2A and 2B, designated as latency Type III. Outside this window the expression of the viral genes is limited. Healthy carriers harbor a low number of B lymphocytes in which the viral genome is either silent or expresses one virally encoded protein, EBNA-1, latency Type I. In addition, EBV genome carrying B cells can lack either EBNA-2 or LMP-1, latency Type IIa or Type IIb respectively. These cells have no inherent proliferation capacity. Detection of both EBNA-2 and LMP-1 can identify B cells with growth potential. We devised therefore a method for their simultaneous detection in cytospin deposited cell populations. Simultaneous detection of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 was reported earlier in tissues derived from infectious mononucleosis (IM), postransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) and from "humanized" mice infected with EBV. We show for the first time the occurrence of Type IIa and Type IIb cells in cord blood lymphocyte populations infected with EBV in vitro. Further, we confirm the variation of EBNA-2 and LMP-1 expression in several Type III lines and that they vary independently in individual cells. We visualize that in Type III LCL, induced for plasmacytoid differentiation by IL-21 treatment, EBV protein expression changes to Type IIa (EBNA-2 negative LMP-1 positive). We also show that when the proliferation of EBV infected cord blood lymphocyte culture is inhibited by the

  6. iTRAQ-based protein profiling provides insights into the central metabolism changes driving grape berry development and ripening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is an economically important fruit crop. Quality-determining grape components such as sugars, acids, flavors, anthocyanins, tannins, etc., accumulate in the different grape berry development stages. Thus, correlating the proteomic profiles with the biochemical and physiological changes occurring in grape is of paramount importance to advance in our understanding of berry development and ripening processes. Results We report the developmental analysis of Vitis vinifera cv. Muscat Hamburg berries at the protein level from fruit set to full ripening. An iTRAQ-based bottom-up proteomic approach followed by tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification and quantitation of 411 and 630 proteins in the green and ripening phases, respectively. Two key points in development relating to changes in protein level were detected: end of the first growth period (7 mm-to-15 mm) and onset of ripening (15 mm-to-V100, V100-to-110). A functional analysis was performed using the Blast2GO software based on the enrichment of GO terms during berry growth. Conclusions The study of the proteome contributes to decipher the biological processes and metabolic pathways involved in the development and quality traits of fruit and its derived products. These findings lie mainly in metabolism and storage of sugars and malate, energy-related pathways such as respiration, photosynthesis and fermentation, and the synthesis of polyphenolics as major secondary metabolites in grape berry. In addition, some key steps in carbohydrate and malate metabolism have been identified in this study, i.e., PFP-PFK or SuSy-INV switches among others, which may influence the final sugar and acid balance in ripe fruit. In conclusion, some proteins not reported to date have been detected to be deregulated in specific tissues and developmental stages, leading to formulate new hypotheses on the metabolic processes underlying grape berry development. These results open up

  7. A species-specific nucleosomal signature defines a periodic distribution of amino acids in proteins.

    PubMed

    Quintales, Luis; Soriano, Ignacio; Vázquez, Enrique; Segurado, Mónica; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Nucleosomes are the basic structural units of chromatin. Most of the yeast genome is organized in a pattern of positioned nucleosomes that is stably maintained under a wide range of physiological conditions. In this work, we have searched for sequence determinants associated with positioned nucleosomes in four species of fission and budding yeasts. We show that mononucleosomal DNA follows a highly structured base composition pattern, which differs among species despite the high degree of histone conservation. These nucleosomal signatures are present in transcribed and non-transcribed regions across the genome. In the case of open reading frames, they correctly predict the relative distribution of codons on mononucleosomal DNA, and they also determine a periodicity in the average distribution of amino acids along the proteins. These results establish a direct and species-specific connection between the position of each codon around the histone octamer and protein composition. PMID:25854683

  8. A species-specific nucleosomal signature defines a periodic distribution of amino acids in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Quintales, Luis; Soriano, Ignacio; Vázquez, Enrique; Segurado, Mónica; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosomes are the basic structural units of chromatin. Most of the yeast genome is organized in a pattern of positioned nucleosomes that is stably maintained under a wide range of physiological conditions. In this work, we have searched for sequence determinants associated with positioned nucleosomes in four species of fission and budding yeasts. We show that mononucleosomal DNA follows a highly structured base composition pattern, which differs among species despite the high degree of histone conservation. These nucleosomal signatures are present in transcribed and non-transcribed regions across the genome. In the case of open reading frames, they correctly predict the relative distribution of codons on mononucleosomal DNA, and they also determine a periodicity in the average distribution of amino acids along the proteins. These results establish a direct and species-specific connection between the position of each codon around the histone octamer and protein composition. PMID:25854683

  9. Relative Roles of Deterministic and Stochastic Processes in Driving the Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in a Permafrost Core from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Li, Dingyao; Cheng, Gang; Mu, Jing; Wu, Qingbai; Niu, Fujun; Stegen, James C.; An, Lizhe; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the processes that influence the structure of biotic communities is one of the major ecological topics, and both stochastic and deterministic processes are expected to be at work simultaneously in most communities. Here, we investigated the vertical distribution patterns of bacterial communities in a 10-m-long soil core taken within permafrost of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. To get a better understanding of the forces that govern these patterns, we examined the diversity and structure of bacterial communities, and the change in community composition along the vertical distance (spatial turnover) from both taxonomic and phylogenetic perspectives. Measures of taxonomic and phylogenetic beta diversity revealed that bacterial community composition changed continuously along the soil core, and showed a vertical distance-decay relationship. Multiple stepwise regression analysis suggested that bacterial alpha diversity and phylogenetic structure were strongly correlated with soil conductivity and pH but weakly correlated with depth. There was evidence that deterministic and stochastic processes collectively drived bacterial vertically-structured pattern. Bacterial communities in five soil horizons (two originated from the active layer and three from permafrost) of the permafrost core were phylogenetically random, indicator of stochastic processes. However, we found a stronger effect of deterministic processes related to soil pH, conductivity, and organic carbon content that were structuring the bacterial communities. We therefore conclude that the vertical distribution of bacterial communities was governed primarily by deterministic ecological selection, although stochastic processes were also at work. Furthermore, the strong impact of environmental conditions (for example, soil physicochemical parameters and seasonal freeze-thaw cycles) on these communities underlines the sensitivity of permafrost microorganisms to climate change and potentially subsequent

  10. Relative Roles of Deterministic and Stochastic Processes in Driving the Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in a Permafrost Core from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weigang; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Tian; Li, Dingyao; Cheng, Gang; Mu, Jing; Wu, Qingbai; Niu, Fujun; Stegen, James C; An, Lizhe; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the processes that influence the structure of biotic communities is one of the major ecological topics, and both stochastic and deterministic processes are expected to be at work simultaneously in most communities. Here, we investigated the vertical distribution patterns of bacterial communities in a 10-m-long soil core taken within permafrost of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. To get a better understanding of the forces that govern these patterns, we examined the diversity and structure of bacterial communities, and the change in community composition along the vertical distance (spatial turnover) from both taxonomic and phylogenetic perspectives. Measures of taxonomic and phylogenetic beta diversity revealed that bacterial community composition changed continuously along the soil core, and showed a vertical distance-decay relationship. Multiple stepwise regression analysis suggested that bacterial alpha diversity and phylogenetic structure were strongly correlated with soil conductivity and pH but weakly correlated with depth. There was evidence that deterministic and stochastic processes collectively drived bacterial vertically-structured pattern. Bacterial communities in five soil horizons (two originated from the active layer and three from permafrost) of the permafrost core were phylogenetically random, indicator of stochastic processes. However, we found a stronger effect of deterministic processes related to soil pH, conductivity, and organic carbon content that were structuring the bacterial communities. We therefore conclude that the vertical distribution of bacterial communities was governed primarily by deterministic ecological selection, although stochastic processes were also at work. Furthermore, the strong impact of environmental conditions (for example, soil physicochemical parameters and seasonal freeze-thaw cycles) on these communities underlines the sensitivity of permafrost microorganisms to climate change and potentially subsequent

  11. Arabinogalactan proteins in root and pollen-tube cells: distribution and functional aspects

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Coimbra, Sílvia; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Mollet, Jean-Claude; Driouich, Azeddine

    2012-01-01

    Background Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are complex proteoglycans of the cell wall found in the entire plant kingdom and in almost all plant organs. AGPs encompass a large group of heavily glycosylated cell-wall proteins which share common features, including the presence of glycan chains especially enriched in arabinose and galactose and a protein backbone particularly rich in hydroxyproline residues. However, AGPs also exhibit strong heterogeneities among their members in various plant species. AGP ubiquity in plants suggests these proteoglycans are fundamental players for plant survival and development. Scope In this review, we first present an overview of current knowledge and specific features of AGPs. A section devoted to major tools used to study AGPs is also presented. We then discuss the distribution of AGPs as well as various aspects of their functional properties in root tissues and pollen tubes. This review also suggests novel directions of research on the role of AGPs in the biology of roots and pollen tubes. PMID:22786747

  12. [Distribution of proteins in neural membranes as a factor of reabsorption of endoneural (interstitial) fluid].

    PubMed

    Banin, V V; Gasymov, E K

    1990-09-01

    An investigation on distribution of horseradish peroxidase (HP) product in the sciatic nerve membranes of albino rats, after HP intravenous injection, has been performed. Getting into the interstitial space of epineurium across the microvessel walls, HP spreads as far as the internal layer of the perineural membrane, forming a distinct gradient of concentration of protein at its border. In 60 min after injection of the tracer the value of the perineural-endoneural gradient for proteins is about 70-80% of the value of the plasma-endoneural gradient. A possible mechanism of the endoneural fluid evacuation, connected with various values of protein concentration in the endoneural space and within the nerve perineural membrane is discussed. PMID:2275614

  13. The neuronal extracellular matrix restricts distribution and internalization of aggregated Tau-protein.

    PubMed

    Suttkus, A; Holzer, M; Morawski, M; Arendt, T

    2016-01-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by fibrillary aggregates of Aß and Tau-protein. Formation and progression of these pathological hallmarks throughout the brain follow a specific spatio-temporal pattern which provides the basis for neuropathological staging. Previously, we could demonstrate that cortical and subcortical neurons are less frequently affected by neurofibrillary degeneration if they are enwrapped by a specialized form of the hyaluronan-based extracellular matrix (ECM), the so called 'perineuronal net' (PN). PNs are composed of large aggregating chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans connected to a hyaluronan backbone, stabilized by link proteins and cross-linked via tenascin-R. Recently, PN-associated neurons were shown to be better protected against iron-induced neurodegeneration compared to neurons without PN, indicating a neuroprotective function. Here, we investigated the role of PNs in distribution and internalization of exogenous Tau-protein by using organotypic slice cultures of wildtype mice as well as mice lacking the ECM-components aggrecan, HAPLN1 or tenascin-R. We could demonstrate that PNs restrict both distribution and internalization of Tau. Accordingly, PN-ensheathed neurons were less frequently affected by Tau-internalization, than neurons without PN. Finally, the PNs as well as their three investigated components were shown to modulate the processes of distribution as well as internalization of Tau. PMID:26621125

  14. Nanosecond Motions in Proteins Impose Bounds on the Timescale Distributions of Local Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Okan, Osman Burak; Atilgan, Ali Rana; Atilgan, Canan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We elucidate the physics of protein dynamical transition via 10–100-ns molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures spanning 160–300 K. By tracking the energy fluctuations, we show that the protein dynamical transition is marked by a crossover from nonstationary to stationary processes that underlie the dynamics of protein motions. A two-timescale function captures the nonexponential character of backbone structural relaxations. One timescale is attributed to the collective segmental motions and the other to local relaxations. The former is well defined by a single-exponential, nanosecond decay, operative at all temperatures. The latter is described by a set of processes that display a distribution of timescales. Although their average remains on the picosecond timescale, the distribution is markedly contracted at the onset of the transition. It is shown that the collective motions impose bounds on timescales spanned by local dynamical processes. The nonstationary character below the transition implicates the presence of a collection of substates whose interactions are restricted. At these temperatures, a wide distribution of local-motion timescales, extending beyond that of nanoseconds, is observed. At physiological temperatures, local motions are confined to timescales faster than nanoseconds. This relatively narrow window makes possible the appearance of multiple channels for the backbone dynamics to operate. PMID:19804740

  15. Distributions of experimental protein structures on coarse-grained free energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Kannan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Yuan; Jernigan, Robert L.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting conformational changes of proteins is needed in order to fully comprehend functional mechanisms. With the large number of available structures in sets of related proteins, it is now possible to directly visualize the clusters of conformations and their conformational transitions through the use of principal component analysis. The most striking observation about the distributions of the structures along the principal components is their highly non-uniform distributions. In this work, we use principal component analysis of experimental structures of 50 diverse proteins to extract the most important directions of their motions, sample structures along these directions, and estimate their free energy landscapes by combining knowledge-based potentials and entropy computed from elastic network models. When these resulting motions are visualized upon their coarse-grained free energy landscapes, the basis for conformational pathways becomes readily apparent. Using three well-studied proteins, T4 lysozyme, serum albumin, and sarco-endoplasmic reticular Ca2+ adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA), as examples, we show that such free energy landscapes of conformational changes provide meaningful insights into the functional dynamics and suggest transition pathways between different conformational states. As a further example, we also show that Monte Carlo simulations on the coarse-grained landscape of HIV-1 protease can directly yield pathways for force-driven conformational changes.

  16. Distribution of language-related Cntnap2 protein in neural circuits critical for vocal learning

    PubMed Central

    Condro, Michael C.; White, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Variants of the contactin associated protein-like 2 (Cntnap2) gene are risk factors for language-related disorders including autism spectrum disorder, specific language impairment, and stuttering. Songbirds are useful models for study of human speech disorders due to their shared capacity for vocal learning, which relies on similar cortico-basal ganglia circuitry and genetic factors. Here, we investigate Cntnap2 protein expression in the brain of the zebra finch, a songbird species in which males, but not females, learn their courtship songs. We hypothesize that Cntnap2 has overlapping functions in vocal learning species, and expect to find protein expression in song-related areas of the zebra finch brain. We further expect that the distribution of this membrane-bound protein may not completely mirror its mRNA distribution due to the distinct subcellular localization of the two molecular species. We find that Cntnap2 protein is enriched in several song control regions relative to surrounding tissues, particularly within the adult male, but not female, robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), a cortical song control region analogous to human layer 5 primary motor cortex. The onset of this sexually dimorphic expression coincides with the onset of sensorimotor learning in developing males. Enrichment in male RA appears due to expression in projection neurons within the nucleus, as well as to additional expression in nerve terminals of cortical projections to RA from the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the nidopallium. Cntnap2 protein expression in zebra finch brain supports the hypothesis that this molecule affects neural connectivity critical for vocal learning across taxonomic classes. PMID:23818387

  17. COMMENT: No warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coule, D. H.

    1998-08-01

    The warp drive spacetime of Alcubierre is impossible to set up without first being able to distribute matter at tachyonic speed, put roughly, you need one to make one! However, over small distances, where the energy conditions possibly can be violated, one can envision opening the light-cones to increase the apparent speed of light.

  18. Role of microtubules in the intracellular distribution of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Mas, P; Beachy, R N

    2000-10-24

    Despite its central role in virus infection, little is known about the mechanisms of intracellular trafficking of virus components within infected cells. In this study, we followed the dynamics of tobacco mosaic virus movement protein (MP) distribution in living protoplasts after disruption of microtubules (MTs) by cold treatment and subsequent rewarming to 29 degrees C. At early stages of infection, cold treatment (4 degrees C) caused the accumulation of MP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in large virus replication bodies that localized in perinuclear positions, whereas at midstages of infection, the association of MP:GFP with MTs was disrupted. Rewarming the protoplasts to 29 degrees C reestablished the association of MTs with the replication bodies that subsequently spread throughout the cytoplasm and to the periphery of the cell. The role of MTs in the intracellular distribution of the MP also was analyzed by examining the distribution pattern of a nonfunctional mutant of MP (TAD5). Like MP:GFP, TAD5:GFP interacted with the endoplasmic reticulum membranes and colocalized with its viral RNA but did not colocalize with MTs. The involvement of MTs in the intracellular distribution of tobacco mosaic virus MP is discussed. PMID:11050252

  19. The distribution of cell surface proteins on spreading cells. Comparison of theory with experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, B; Wiegel, F W

    1988-01-01

    Bretscher (1983) has shown that on uniformly spread giant HeLa cells, the receptors for low density lipoprotein (LDL) and transferrin are concentrated toward the periphery of the cells. To explain these nonuniform distributions, he proposed that on giant HeLa cells, recycling receptors return to the cell surface at the cell's leading edge. Since the distribution of coated pits on these cells is uniform, Bretscher and Thomson (1983) proposed that there is a bulk membrane flow toward the cell centers. Here we present a mathematical model that allows us to predict the distribution of cell surface proteins on a thin circular cell, when exocytosis occurs at the cell periphery and endocytosis occurs uniformly over the cell surface. We show that on such a cell, a bulk membrane flow will be generated, whose average velocity is zero at the cell center and increases linearly with the distance from the cell center. Our model predicts that proteins that aggregate in coated pits will have concentrations that are maximal at the cell periphery. We fit our theory to the data of Bretscher and Thomson (1983) on the distribution of ferritin receptors for the following cases: the receptors move by diffusion alone; they move by bulk membrane flow alone; they move by a combination of diffusion and bulk membrane flow. From our fits we show that tau m greater than 3.5 tau p, where tau m and tau p are the lifetimes of the membrane and the ferritin receptor on the cell surface, and that tau pD less than 6.9 X 10(-7) cm2, where D is the ferritin receptor diffusion coefficient. Surprisingly, we obtain the best fits to the data when we neglect membrane flow. Our model predicts that for proteins that are excluded from coated pits, the protein concentration will be Gaussian, being maximal at the cell center and decreasing with the distance from the cell center. If on giant HeLa cells a protein with such a distribution could be found, it would strongly support Bretcher's proposal that there is an

  20. Whole-genome duplications followed by tandem duplications drive diversification of the protein modifier SUMO in Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Valentin; Vlachakis, Georgios; Schranz, M Eric; van den Burg, Harrold A

    2016-07-01

    The ubiquitin-like modifier (UBL) SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier) regulates protein function. Structural rather than sequence homology typifies UBL families. However, individual UBL types, such as SUMO, show remarkable sequence conservation. Selection pressure also operates at the SUMO gene copy number, as increased SUMO levels activate immunity and alter flowering time in Arabidopsis. We show how, despite this selection pressure, the SUMO family has diversified into eight paralogues in Arabidopsis. Relationships between the paralogues were investigated using genome collinearity and gene tree analysis. We show that palaeopolyploidy followed by tandem duplications allowed expansion and then diversification of the SUMO genes. For example, Arabidopsis SUMO5 evolved from the pan-eudicot palaeohexaploidy event (gamma), which yielded three SUMO copies. Two gamma copies were preserved as archetype SUMOs, suggesting subfunctionalization, whereas the third copy served as a hotspot for SUMO diversification. The Brassicaceae-specific alpha duplication then caused the duplication of one archetype gamma copy, which, by subfunctionalization, allowed the retention of both SUMO1 and SUMO2. The other archetype gamma copy was simultaneously pseudogenized (SUMO4/6). A tandem duplication of SUMO2 subsequently yielded SUMO3 in the Brassicaceae crown group. SUMO3 potentially neofunctionalized in Arabidopsis, but it is lost in many Brassicaceae. Our advanced methodology allows the study of the birth and fixation of other paralogues in plants. PMID:26934536

  1. The human SKA complex drives the metaphase-anaphase cell cycle transition by recruiting protein phosphatase 1 to kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Sushama; Janczyk, Paweł Ł; Qu, Qianhui; Brautigam, Chad A; Stukenberg, P Todd; Yu, Hongtao; Gorbsky, Gary J

    2016-01-01

    The spindle- and kinetochore-associated (Ska) complex is essential for normal anaphase onset in mitosis. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of Ska1 binds microtubules and was proposed to facilitate kinetochore movement on depolymerizing spindle microtubules. Here, we show that Ska complex recruits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to kinetochores. This recruitment requires the Ska1 CTD, which binds PP1 in vitro and in human HeLa cells. Ska1 lacking its CTD fused to a PP1-binding peptide or fused directly to PP1 rescues mitotic defects caused by Ska1 depletion. Ska1 fusion to catalytically dead PP1 mutant does not rescue and shows dominant negative effects. Thus, the Ska complex, specifically the Ska1 CTD, recruits PP1 to kinetochores to oppose spindle checkpoint signaling kinases and promote anaphase onset. Microtubule binding by Ska, rather than acting in force production for chromosome movement, may instead serve to promote PP1 recruitment to kinetochores fully attached to spindle microtubules at metaphase. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12902.001 PMID:26981768

  2. Counterion Distribution Around Protein-SNAs probed by Small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Kurinji; Bedzyk, Michael; Kewalramani, Sumit; Moreau, Liane; Mirkin, Chad

    Protein-DNA conjugates couple the advanced cell transfection capabilities of spherical DNA architecture and the biocompatible enzymatic activity of a protein core to potentially create therapeutic agents with dual functionality. An understanding of their stabilizing ionic environment is crucial to better understand and predict their properties. Here, we use Small-angle X-ray scattering techniques to decipher the structure of the counterion cloud surrounding these DNA coated nanoparticles. Through the use of anomalous scattering techniques we have mapped the local concentrations of Rb+ ions in the region around the Protein-DNA constructs. These results are further corroborated with simulations using a geometric model for the excess charge density as function of radial distance from the protein core. Further, we investigate the influence of solution ionic strength on the structure of the DNA corona and demonstrate a reduction in the extension of the DNA corona with increasing concentration of NaCl in solution for the case of both single and double stranded DNA shells. Our work reveals the distribution of counterions in the vicinity of Protein-DNA conjugates and decouples the effect of solution ionic strength on the thickness of the DNA layer.

  3. Distribution of EphA5 receptor protein in the developing and adult mouse nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Margaret A.; Crockett, David P.; Nowakowski, Richard S.; Gale, Nicholas W.; Zhou, Renping

    2009-01-01

    The EphA5 receptor tyrosine kinase plays key roles in axon guidance during development. However, the presence of EphA5 protein in the nervous system has not been fully characterized. To better examine EphA5 localization, mutant mice, in which the EphA5 cytoplasmic domain was replaced with β-galactosidase, were analyzed for both temporal and regional changes in the distribution of EphA5 protein in the developing and adult nervous system. During embryonic development, high levels of EphA5 protein were found in the retina, olfactory bulb, cerebral neocortex, hippocampus, pretectum, tectum, cranial nerve nuclei, and the spinal cord. Variations in intensity were observed as development proceeded. Staining of pretectal nuclei, tectal nuclei, and other areas of the mesencephalon became more diffuse after maturity whereas the cerebral neocortex gained more robust intensity. In the adult, receptor protein continued to be detected in many areas including the olfactory nuclei, neocortex, piriform cortex, induseum griseum, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, hypothalamus and septum. In addition, EphA5 protein was found in the claustrum, stria terminalis, barrel cortex, striatal patches, and along discrete axon tracts within the corpus callosum of the adult. These observations suggest that EphA5 function is not limited to the developing mouse brain and may play a role in synaptic plasticity in the adult. PMID:19326470

  4. Vibrational relaxation as the driving force for wavelength conversion in the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein.

    PubMed

    Götze, Jan P; Karasulu, Bora; Patil, Mahendra; Thiel, Walter

    2015-12-01

    We present a computationally derived energy transfer model for the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP), which invokes vibrational relaxation in the two lowest singlet excited states rather than internal conversion between them. The model allows an understanding of the photoinduced processes without assuming further electronic states or a dependence of the 2Ag state character on the vibrational sub-state. We report molecular dynamics simulations (CHARMM22 force field) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations on PCP. In the latter, the QM region containing a single peridinin (Per) chromophore or a Per-Chl a (chlorophyll a) pair is treated by density functional theory (DFT, CAM-B3LYP) for geometries and by DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) for excitation energies. The calculations show that Per has a bright, green light absorbing 2Ag state, in addition to the blue light absorbing 1Bu state found in other carotenoids. Both states undergo a strong energy lowering upon relaxation, leading to emission in the red, while absorbing in the blue or green. The orientation of their transition dipole moments indicates that both states are capable of excited-state energy transfer to Chl a, without preference for either 1Bu or 2Ag as donor state. We propose that the commonly postulated partial intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character of a donating Per state can be assigned to the relaxed 1Bu state, which takes on ICT character. By assuming that both 1Bu and 2Ag are able to donate to the Chl a Q band, one can explain why different chlorophyll species in PCP exhibit different acceptor capabilities. PMID:26231454

  5. Monomeric C-reactive protein-a key molecule driving development of Alzheimer’s disease associated with brain ischaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, M.; Matou, S.; Zeinolabediny, Y.; Corpas, R.; Weston, R.; Liu, D.; Boras, E.; Di Napoli, M.; Petcu, E.; Sarroca, S.; Popa-Wagner, A.; Love, S.; Font, M. A.; Potempa, L. A.; Al-baradie, R.; Sanfeliu, C.; Revilla, S.; Badimon, L.; Krupinski, J.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) increases dramatically in patients with ischaemic stroke. Monomeric C-reactive protein (mCRP) appears in the ECM of ischaemic tissue after stroke, associating with microvasculature, neurons and AD-plaques, Aβ, also, being able to dissociate native-CRP into inflammatory, mCRP in vivo. Here, mCRP injected into the hippocampal region of mice was retained within the retrosplenial tract of the dorsal 3rd ventrical and surrounding major vessels. Mice developed behavioural/cognitive deficits within 1 month, concomitant with mCRP staining within abnormal looking neurons expressing p-tau and in beta-amyloid 1-42-plaque positive regions. mCRP co-localised with CD105 in microvessels suggesting angiogenesis. Phospho-arrays/Western blotting identified signalling activation in endothelial cells and neurons through p-IRS-1, p-Tau and p-ERK1/2-which was blocked following pre-incubation with mCRP-antibody. mCRP increased vascular monolayer permeability and gap junctions, increased NCAM expression and produced haemorrhagic angiogenesis in mouse matrigel implants. mCRP induced tau244–372 aggregation and assembly in vitro. IHC study of human AD/stroke patients revealed co-localization of mCRP with Aβ plaques, tau-like fibrils and IRS-1/P-Tau positive neurons and high mCRP-levels spreading from infarcted core regions matched reduced expression of Aβ/Tau. mCRP may be responsible for promoting dementia after ischaemia and mCRP clearance could inform therapeutic avenues to reduce the risk of future dementia. PMID:26335098

  6. Monomeric C-reactive protein--a key molecule driving development of Alzheimer's disease associated with brain ischaemia?

    PubMed

    Slevin, M; Matou, S; Zeinolabediny, Y; Corpas, R; Weston, R; Liu, D; Boras, E; Di Napoli, M; Petcu, E; Sarroca, S; Popa-Wagner, A; Love, S; Font, M A; Potempa, L A; Al-Baradie, R; Sanfeliu, C; Revilla, S; Badimon, L; Krupinski, J

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases dramatically in patients with ischaemic stroke. Monomeric C-reactive protein (mCRP) appears in the ECM of ischaemic tissue after stroke, associating with microvasculature, neurons and AD-plaques, Aβ, also, being able to dissociate native-CRP into inflammatory, mCRP in vivo. Here, mCRP injected into the hippocampal region of mice was retained within the retrosplenial tract of the dorsal 3rd ventrical and surrounding major vessels. Mice developed behavioural/cognitive deficits within 1 month, concomitant with mCRP staining within abnormal looking neurons expressing p-tau and in beta-amyloid 1-42-plaque positive regions. mCRP co-localised with CD105 in microvessels suggesting angiogenesis. Phospho-arrays/Western blotting identified signalling activation in endothelial cells and neurons through p-IRS-1, p-Tau and p-ERK1/2-which was blocked following pre-incubation with mCRP-antibody. mCRP increased vascular monolayer permeability and gap junctions, increased NCAM expression and produced haemorrhagic angiogenesis in mouse matrigel implants. mCRP induced tau244-372 aggregation and assembly in vitro. IHC study of human AD/stroke patients revealed co-localization of mCRP with Aβ plaques, tau-like fibrils and IRS-1/P-Tau positive neurons and high mCRP-levels spreading from infarcted core regions matched reduced expression of Aβ/Tau. mCRP may be responsible for promoting dementia after ischaemia and mCRP clearance could inform therapeutic avenues to reduce the risk of future dementia. PMID:26335098

  7. Subcellular distribution of docking/fusion proteins in neutrophils, secretory cells with multiple exocytic compartments.

    PubMed

    Brumell, J H; Volchuk, A; Sengelov, H; Borregaard, N; Cieutat, A M; Bainton, D F; Grinstein, S; Klip, A

    1995-12-15

    Neutrophils contain at least four distinct types of secretory organelles, which undergo exocytosis during infection and inflammation. The signaling pathways leading to secretion of individual granules and their kinetics of exocytosis vary greatly, causing temporal and regional differences in docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. As a step toward understanding the processes underlying differential granular secretion in neutrophils, we assessed the presence and distribution of a number of proteins reported to be involved in vesicular docking and/or fusion in other systems. Specific Abs were used for immunoblotting of cells fractionated by density gradients and free-flow electrophoresis, and for localization by confocal immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Syntaxin 1, VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)-1, synaptosome-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and cellubrevin were not detectable in human neutrophils. In contrast, syntaxin 4, VAMP-2, and the 39-kDa isoform of secretory carrier membrane protein (SCAMP) were present. SCAMP was found mainly in secondary and tertiary granules and in a fraction containing secretory vesicles, but was virtually absent from the primary (lysosomal) granules. This profile is consistent with the proposed "post-Golgi" distribution of SCAMP. VAMP-2 was largely absent from primary and secondary granules, but concentrated in tertiary granules and secretory vesicles. This pattern of distribution parallels the increasing sensitivity of these exocytic compartments to intracellular free calcium. Accordingly, ionomycin induced translocation of VAMP-2 toward the plasma membrane. Syntaxin 4 was found almost exclusively in the plasma membrane, and it accumulated in lamellipodia of migrating cells. This regional accumulation may contribute to localized secretion into the phagosomal lumen. PMID:7499863

  8. Distribution of proteins within different compartments of tendon varies according to tendon type.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Karunaseelan, Kabelan J; Ng Chieng Hin, Jade; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-09-01

    Although the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the energetic cost of locomotion. To maximise energy storage and return, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible and elastic than tendons with a purely positional function. These properties are conferred in part by a specialisation of a specific compartment of the tendon, the interfascicular matrix, which enables sliding and recoil between adjacent fascicles. However, the composition of the interfascicular matrix is poorly characterised and we therefore tested the hypothesis that the distribution of elastin and proteoglycans differs between energy-storing and positional tendons, and that protein distribution varies between the fascicular matrix and the interfascicular matrix, with localisation of elastin and lubricin to the interfascicular matrix. Protein distribution in the energy-storing equine superficial digital flexor tendon and positional common digital extensor tendon was assessed using histology and immunohistochemistry. The results support the hypothesis, demonstrating enrichment of lubricin in the interfascicular matrix in both tendon types, where it is likely to facilitate interfascicular sliding. Elastin was also localised to the interfascicular matrix, specifically in the energy-storing superficial digital flexor tendon, which may account for the greater elasticity of the interfascicular matrix in this tendon. A differential distribution of proteoglycans was identified between tendon types and regions, which may indicate a distinct role for each of these proteins in tendon. These data provide important advances into fully characterising structure-function relationships within tendon. PMID:27113131

  9. Shaping protein distributions in stochastic self-regulated gene expression networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pájaro, Manuel; Alonso, Antonio A.; Vázquez, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we study connections between dynamic behavior and network parameters, for self-regulatory networks. To that aim, a method to compute the regions in the space of parameters that sustain bimodal or binary protein distributions has been developed. Such regions are indicative of stochastic dynamics manifested either as transitions between absence and presence of protein or between two positive protein levels. The method is based on the continuous approximation of the chemical master equation, unlike other approaches that make use of a deterministic description, which as will be shown can be misleading. We find that bimodal behavior is a ubiquitous phenomenon in cooperative gene expression networks under positive feedback. It appears for any range of transcription and translation rate constants whenever leakage remains below a critical threshold. Above such a threshold, the region in the parameters space which sustains bimodality persists, although restricted to low transcription and high translation rate constants. Remarkably, such a threshold is independent of the transcription or translation rates or the proportion of an active or inactive promoter and depends only on the level of cooperativity. The proposed method can be employed to identify bimodal or binary distributions leading to stochastic dynamics with specific switching properties, by searching inside the parameter regions that sustain such behavior.

  10. Cytokinetic investigations in human breast cancer by flow cytometrically recorded DNA/protein distributions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, H; Görlich, M; Frege, J; Granetzny, A; Streller, B; Nitschke, U; Weiher, U

    1996-01-01

    This prospective study characterizes T1-T2 breast carcinomas (N = 114) and fibroadenomas (N = 16) by cell kinetic parameters derived from flow cytometrically recorded DNA/protein histograms. Ploidy level, cell cycle distribution and the number of cell subpopulations (SP) characterized by correlating DNA and protein values were assessed. The subpopulations were derived from the three-dimensional plot. The estrogen receptor (ER) status was determined biochemically (N = 61). Within the G1/0 cell peak 1-6 SP were evident in principle. Depending on the number of SP, two subsets were established: subset 1 with < or = 2 SP, subset 2 with > or = 3 SP. They differed significantly in proliferative activity expressed in the percentage of cells in the G2M phase. Subset 2 showed the higher activity. Analysis of subset distributions revealed that subset 1 prevails in favourable prognostic cases as ER positive cases (P < 0.03), lobular carcinomas (P < 0.01) and LN- cases (P < 0.03), whereas subset 2 prevails in the unfavourable counterparts. Analysis of variance showed that the main effect on proliferative activity indicated by G2M% is due to subpopulation composition rather than histologic type, nodal status or ER status (P < 0.01, P < 0.002, P < 0.05), not even due to ploidy level (P < 0.0001). The rationale for subset stratification may be cytogenetic variability connected with protein content heterogeneity accounting for kinetic SP. PMID:8789270

  11. G-protein alpha subunits distribution in the cyprid of Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite) (Cirripedia, Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Gallus, Lorenzo; Ferrando, Sara; Gambardella, Chiara; Amaroli, Andrea; Faimali, Marco; Piazza, Veronica; Masini, Maria Angela

    2012-12-01

    The acorn barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a marine crustacean with six nauplius and one cyprid larval stages and a sessile adult, that represent one of the main constituents of sea biofouling. The cyprid is the last larval stage, specialized for settlement, and the study of its biology is interesting also in the frame of antifouling strategies. In this study, a novel approach to the neurobiology of B. amphitrite cyprid has undertaken, studying immunohistochemically the distribution of some G-protein α subunits (Gαs, Gαo Gαi, and Gαq) on B. amphitrite cyprid. Gαs-like immunoreactivity was observed in the intestinal mucosa, oral cone, epithelial cells along the outer face of the mantle and thorax; Gαo into the fibers of the neuropile of the central nervous system; Gαi in oil cells, epithelial cells, and limbs and thorax muscles; Gαq was not detected. The results suggest the involvement of the G-protein α subunits in different tissues and functions that seem to be in agreement with the distribution of the ones from the same class of G-proteins in vertebrates. PMID:22833248

  12. Expected distributions of root-mean-square positional deviations in proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitera, Jed W

    2014-06-19

    The atom positional root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) is a standard tool for comparing the similarity of two molecular structures. It is used to characterize the quality of biomolecular simulations, to cluster conformations, and as a reaction coordinate for conformational changes. This work presents an approximate analytic form for the expected distribution of RMSD values for a protein or polymer fluctuating about a stable native structure. The mean and maximum of the expected distribution are independent of chain length for long chains and linearly proportional to the average atom positional root-mean-square fluctuations (RMSF). To approximate the RMSD distribution for random-coil or unfolded ensembles, numerical distributions of RMSD were generated for ensembles of self-avoiding and non-self-avoiding random walks. In both cases, for all reference structures tested for chains more than three monomers long, the distributions have a maximum distant from the origin with a power-law dependence on chain length. The purely entropic nature of this result implies that care must be taken when interpreting stable high-RMSD regions of the free-energy landscape as "intermediates" or well-defined stable states. PMID:24655018

  13. Protein-protein interfaces from cytochrome c oxidase I evolve faster than nonbinding surfaces, yet negative selection is the driving force.

    PubMed

    Aledo, Juan Carlos; Valverde, Héctor; Ruíz-Camacho, Manuel; Morilla, Ian; López, Francisco Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory complexes are encoded by two genomes (mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA] and nuclear DNA [nDNA]). Although the importance of intergenomic coadaptation is acknowledged, the forces and constraints shaping such coevolution are largely unknown. Previous works using cytochrome c oxidase (COX) as a model enzyme have led to the so-called "optimizing interaction" hypothesis. According to this view, mtDNA-encoded residues close to nDNA-encoded residues evolve faster than the rest of positions, favoring the optimization of protein-protein interfaces. Herein, using evolutionary data in combination with structural information of COX, we show that failing to discern the effects of interaction from other structural and functional effects can lead to deceptive conclusions such as the "optimizing hypothesis." Once spurious factors have been accounted for, data analysis shows that mtDNA-encoded residues engaged in contacts are, in general, more constrained than their noncontact counterparts. Nevertheless, noncontact residues from the surface of COX I subunit are a remarkable exception, being subjected to an exceptionally high purifying selection that may be related to the maintenance of a suitable heme environment. We also report that mtDNA-encoded residues involved in contacts with other mtDNA-encoded subunits are more constrained than mtDNA-encoded residues interacting with nDNA-encoded polypeptides. This differential behavior cannot be explained on the basis of predicted thermodynamic stability, as interactions between mtDNA-encoded subunits contribute more weakly to the complex stability than those interactions between subunits encoded by different genomes. Therefore, the higher conservation observed among mtDNA-encoded residues involved in intragenome interactions is likely due to factors other than structural stability. PMID:25359921

  14. Unusual cerebral vascular prion protein amyloid distribution in scrapie-infected transgenic mice expressing anchorless prion protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In some prion diseases, misfolded aggregated protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) is found in brain as amyloid, which can cause cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Small diffusible precursors of PrPres amyloid might flow with brain interstitial fluid (ISF), possibly accounting for the perivascular and intravascular distribution of PrPres amyloid. We previously reported that PrPres amyloid in scrapie-infected transgenic mice appeared to delay clearance of microinjected brain ISF tracer molecules. Results Here we studied distribution of PrPres amyloid on capillaries, arteries and veins to test whether vascular specificity of PrPres corresponded to distribution of ISF tracer molecules. To distinguish PrPres-positive arteries from veins and capillaries, scrapie-infected mouse brains were studied by immunodetection of alpha smooth muscle actin. ISF was studied using fluorescein-labeled ovalbumin microinjected into brain as a tracer. In infected preclinical or clinical mice, PrPres was found mostly on capillaries (73-78%). Lower levels were found on arteries (11-14%) and veins (11-13%). Compared to PrPres, ISF tracer was found at higher levels on capillaries (96-97%), and the remaining tracer was found at a skewed ratio of 4 to 1 on arteries and veins respectively. Conclusions PrPres association with blood vessels suggested that ISF flow might transport diffusible PrPres precursor molecules to perivascular sites. However, the different vascular specificity of PrPres and ISF tracer indicated that ISF flow did not alone control PrPres dissemination. Possibly blood vessel basement membrane (BM) components, such as glucosaminoglycans, might concentrate small PrPres aggregates and serve as scaffolds for PrP conversion on multiple vessel types. PMID:24252347

  15. VCP binding influences intracellular distribution of the slow Wallerian degeneration protein, Wld(S).

    PubMed

    Wilbrey, Anna L; Haley, Jane E; Wishart, Thomas M; Conforti, Laura; Morreale, Giacomo; Beirowski, Bogdan; Babetto, Elisabetta; Adalbert, Robert; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Smith, Trevor; Wyllie, David J A; Ribchester, Richard R; Coleman, Michael P

    2008-07-01

    Wallerian degeneration slow (Wld(S)) mice express a chimeric protein that delays axonal degeneration. The N-terminal domain (N70), which is essential for axonal protection in vivo, binds valosin-containing protein (VCP) and targets both Wld(S) and VCP to discrete nuclear foci. We characterized the formation, composition and localization of these potentially important foci. Missense mutations show that the N-terminal sixteen residues (N16) of Wld(S) are essential for both VCP binding and targeting Wld(S) to nuclear foci. Removing N16 abolishes foci, and VCP binding sequences from ataxin-3 or HrdI restore them. In vitro, these puncta co-localize with proteasome subunits. In vivo, Wld(S) assumes a range of nuclear distribution patterns, including puncta, and its neuronal expression and intranuclear distribution is region-specific and varies between spontaneous and transgenic Wld(S) models. We conclude that VCP influences Wld(S) intracellular distribution, and thus potentially its function, by binding within the N70 domain required for axon protection. PMID:18468455

  16. Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sludge organic matter pools as a driving force of their fate during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Aemig, Quentin; Chéron, Claire; Delgenès, Nadine; Jimenez, Julie; Houot, Sabine; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Patureau, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The fate of organic matter during anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge was studied in batch systems thanks to a sequential chemical fractionation of the particulate phase coupled to fluorescence spectroscopy. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) distribution within the organic pools was characterized from their analysis in the residual fraction after each extraction. Both methods were combined to understand the link between PAHs presence in organic pools and their spectral characterization after extraction. Two batch systems (sludge and inoculum mixture) were set up to study the impact of PAHs spiking on their fate and distribution. The sequential fractionation allowed us to extract and characterize about 50% of total Chemical Oxygen Demand. Moreover, fluorescence spectroscopy helped us to understand the organic pools evolution: the most easily extracted pools composed of protein-like molecules were highly degraded meaning that chemical accessibility mimics the bioaccessibility to degrading microorganisms. PAHs were present in all pools of organic matter but native PAHs were mainly present in low accessible (hardly extractable) fractions and during anaerobic digestion, they accumulated in the non-accessible (non extractable) fraction. Spiked PAHs were more dissipated during anaerobic digestion since spiking made them present in more accessible fractions. During the anaerobic digestion, contrary to native PAHs, spiked ones relocated toward less accessible organic fractions confirming the ageing phenomenon. PCA analysis showed that, in spiked mixture, PAHs presence in organic pools is linked to both PAHs physical-chemical properties and quality/quantity of the associated organic pools. PMID:26690050

  17. Ubiquitous distribution of salts and proteins in spider glue enhances spider silk adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chaurasia, Vishal; Jain, Dharamdeep; Blackledge, Todd A.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Modern orb-weaving spiders use micron-sized glue droplets on their viscid silk to retain prey in webs. A combination of low molecular weight salts and proteins makes the glue viscoelastic and humidity responsive in a way not easily achieved by synthetic adhesives. Optically, the glue droplet shows a heterogeneous structure, but the spatial arrangement of its chemical components is poorly understood. Here, we use optical and confocal Raman microscopy to show that salts and proteins are present ubiquitously throughout the droplet. The distribution of adhesive proteins in the peripheral region explains the superior prey capture performance of orb webs as it enables the entire surface area of the glue droplet to act as a site for prey capture. The presence of salts throughout the droplet explains the recent Solid-State NMR results that show salts directly facilitate protein mobility. Understanding the function of individual glue components and the role of the droplet's macro-structure can help in designing better synthetic adhesives for humid environments. PMID:25761668

  18. Ubiquitous distribution of salts and proteins in spider glue enhances spider silk adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Chaurasia, Vishal; Jain, Dharamdeep; Blackledge, Todd A.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Modern orb-weaving spiders use micron-sized glue droplets on their viscid silk to retain prey in webs. A combination of low molecular weight salts and proteins makes the glue viscoelastic and humidity responsive in a way not easily achieved by synthetic adhesives. Optically, the glue droplet shows a heterogeneous structure, but the spatial arrangement of its chemical components is poorly understood. Here, we use optical and confocal Raman microscopy to show that salts and proteins are present ubiquitously throughout the droplet. The distribution of adhesive proteins in the peripheral region explains the superior prey capture performance of orb webs as it enables the entire surface area of the glue droplet to act as a site for prey capture. The presence of salts throughout the droplet explains the recent Solid-State NMR results that show salts directly facilitate protein mobility. Understanding the function of individual glue components and the role of the droplet's macro-structure can help in designing better synthetic adhesives for humid environments.

  19. Immunohistochemical detection and distribution of prion protein in a goat with natural scrapie.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Reginald A; Rock, Matthew J; Anderson, Anne K; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2003-03-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from a 3-year-old female Angora goat suffering from clinical scrapie were immunostained after hydrated autoclaving using a monoclonal antibody (mAb, F99/97.6.1; IgG1) specific for a conserved epitope on the prion protein. Widespread and prominent deposition of the scrapie isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) was observed in the brain, brainstem, spinal cord, retina, postganglionic neurons associated with parasympathetic ganglia of myenteric and submucosal plexuses, Peyer's patches, peripheral lymph nodes, and pharyngeal and palatine tonsils. The goat was homozygous for PrP alleles encoding 5 octapeptide repeat sequences in the N-terminal region of the prion protein and isoleucine at codon 142, a genotype associated with high susceptibility and short incubation times in goats. The results of this study indicate that mAb F99/97.6.1 is useful for detection of PrPSc deposition, and this is a specific and reliable immunohistochemical adjunct to histopathology for diagnosis of natural caprine scrapie, although precise determination of the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the assay as a diagnostic test for scrapie in goats will require examination of a sufficiently large sample size. As with ovine scrapie, prion protein is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, gastrointestinal tract, and lymphoid tissues in natural caprine scrapie. PMID:12661726

  20. Function and subnuclear distribution of Rpp21, a protein subunit of the human ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease P.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrous, N; Reiner, R; Wesolowski, D; Mann, H; Guerrier-Takada, C; Altman, S

    2001-01-01

    Rpp21, a protein subunit of human nuclear ribonuclease P (RNase P) was cloned by virtue of its homology with Rpr2p, an essential subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear RNase P. Rpp21 is encoded by a gene that resides in the class I gene cluster of the major histocompatibility complex, is associated with highly purified RNase P, and binds precursor tRNA. Rpp21 is predominantly localized in the nucleoplasm but is also observed in nucleoli and Cajal bodies when expressed at high levels. Intron retention and splice-site selection in Rpp21 precursor mRNA regulate the intranuclear distribution of the protein products and their association with the RNase P holoenzyme. Our study reveals that dynamic nuclear structures that include nucleoli, the perinucleolar compartment and Cajal bodies are all involved in the production and assembly of human RNase P. PMID:11497433

  1. Collective motions of rigid fragments in protein structures from smoothed electron density distributions.

    PubMed

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2008-07-15

    In this work, the Gaussian Network Model (GNM) and Anisotropic Network Model (ANM) approaches are applied to describe the dynamics of protein structure graphs built from calculated promolecular electron density (ED) distribution functions. A first set of analyses is carried out on results obtained from ED maxima calculated at various smoothing levels. A second set is achieved for ED networks whose edges are weighted by ED overlap integral values. Results are compared with those obtained through the classical GNM and ANM approaches applied to networks of C(alpha) atoms. It is shown how the network model and the consideration of crystal packing as well as of the side chains may lead to various improvements dependent upon the structure under study. The selected protein structures are Crambin and Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor because of their small size and numerous dynamical data obtained by other authors. PMID:18270960

  2. N-terminal-mediated oligomerization of DnaA drives the occupancy-dependent rejuvenation of the protein on the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Aranovich, Alexander; Braier-Marcovitz, Shani; Ansbacher, Esti; Granek, Rony; Parola, Abraham H.; Fishov, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    DnaA, the initiator of chromosome replication in most known eubacteria species, is activated once per cell division cycle. Its overall activity cycle is driven by ATP hydrolysis and ADP–ATP exchange. The latter can be promoted by binding to specific sequences on the chromosome and/or to acidic phospholipids in the membrane. We have previously shown that the transition into an active form (rejuvenation) is strongly co-operative with respect to DnaA membrane occupancy. Only at low membrane occupancy is DnaA reactivation efficiently catalysed by the acidic phospholipids. The present study was aimed at unravelling the molecular mechanism underlying the occupancy-dependent DnaA rejuvenation. We found that truncation of the DnaA N-terminal completely abolishes the co-operative transformation between the high and low occupancy states (I and II respectively) without affecting the membrane binding. The environmentally sensitive fluorophore specifically attached to the N-terminal cysteines of DnaA reported on occupancy-correlated changes in its vicinity. Cross-linking of DnaA with a short homobifunctional reagent revealed that state II of the protein on the membrane corresponds to a distinct oligomeric form of DnaA. The kinetic transition of DnaA on the membrane surface is described in the present study by a generalized 2D condensation phase transition model, confirming the existence of two states of DnaA on the membrane and pointing to the possibility that membrane protein density serves as an on-off switch in vivo. We conclude that the DnaA conformation attained at low surface density drives its N-terminal-mediated oligomerization, which is presumably a pre-requisite for facilitated nt exchange. PMID:26272946

  3. Ceramic vane drive joint

    DOEpatents

    Smale, Charles H.

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats: role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution in the non-linear pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. The first phase of the research was an attempt to elucidate the causes of intersubject differences in serum protein binding of warfarin in rats. It was found that the distribution of S-warfarin between blood and liver, kidneys, muscle, or fatty tissue was non-linear. Based on the tissue distribution data obtained, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe the time course of S-warfarin concentrations in the serum and tissues of rats. The proposed model was able to display the dose-dependent pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. Namely a lower clearance and a smaller apparent volume of distribution with increasing dose, which appear to be due to the presence of capacity-limited, high-affinity binding sites for warfarin in various tissues. To determine if the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the liver of rats is reversible, concentrations of S-warfarin in the liver and serum of rats were monitored for a very long time after an intravenous injection of a 1 mg/kg dose. In another study in rats, non-radioactive warfarin was found to be able to displace tissue-bound C/sup 14/-warfarin which was administered about 200 hours before the i.v. injection of the non-radioactive warfarin, showing that the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the body is persistent and reversible.

  5. Multiphase Simulated Annealing Based on Boltzmann and Bose-Einstein Distribution Applied to Protein Folding Problem

    PubMed Central

    Liñán-García, Ernesto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan Paulo; González-Barbosa, J. Javier; González-Flores, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    A new hybrid Multiphase Simulated Annealing Algorithm using Boltzmann and Bose-Einstein distributions (MPSABBE) is proposed. MPSABBE was designed for solving the Protein Folding Problem (PFP) instances. This new approach has four phases: (i) Multiquenching Phase (MQP), (ii) Boltzmann Annealing Phase (BAP), (iii) Bose-Einstein Annealing Phase (BEAP), and (iv) Dynamical Equilibrium Phase (DEP). BAP and BEAP are simulated annealing searching procedures based on Boltzmann and Bose-Einstein distributions, respectively. DEP is also a simulated annealing search procedure, which is applied at the final temperature of the fourth phase, which can be seen as a second Bose-Einstein phase. MQP is a search process that ranges from extremely high to high temperatures, applying a very fast cooling process, and is not very restrictive to accept new solutions. However, BAP and BEAP range from high to low and from low to very low temperatures, respectively. They are more restrictive for accepting new solutions. DEP uses a particular heuristic to detect the stochastic equilibrium by applying a least squares method during its execution. MPSABBE parameters are tuned with an analytical method, which considers the maximal and minimal deterioration of problem instances. MPSABBE was tested with several instances of PFP, showing that the use of both distributions is better than using only the Boltzmann distribution on the classical SA. PMID:27413369

  6. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3-4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages.

  7. Statistical prediction of protein structural, localization and functional properties by the analysis of its fragment mass distributions after proteolytic cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Bunde, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Structural, localization and functional properties of unknown proteins are often being predicted from their primary polypeptide chains using sequence alignment with already characterized proteins and consequent molecular modeling. Here we suggest an approach to predict various structural and structure-associated properties of proteins directly from the mass distributions of their proteolytic cleavage fragments. For amino-acid-specific cleavages, the distributions of fragment masses are determined by the distributions of inter-amino-acid intervals in the protein, that in turn apparently reflect its structural and structure-related features. Large-scale computer simulations revealed that for transmembrane proteins, either α-helical or β -barrel secondary structure could be predicted with about 90% accuracy after thermolysin cleavage. Moreover, 3/4 intrinsically disordered proteins could be correctly distinguished from proteins with fixed three-dimensional structure belonging to all four SCOP structural classes by combining 3–4 different cleavages. Additionally, in some cases the protein cellular localization (cytosolic or membrane-associated) and its host organism (Firmicute or Proteobacteria) could be predicted with around 80% accuracy. In contrast to cytosolic proteins, for membrane-associated proteins exhibiting specific structural conformations, their monotopic or transmembrane localization and functional group (ATP-binding, transporters, sensors and so on) could be also predicted with high accuracy and particular robustness against missing cleavages. PMID:26924271

  8. Molecular weight distribution of proteins in hard red spring wheat: Relationship to quality parameters and intra-sample uniformity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular weight distribution (MWD) of proteins extracted from hard spring wheat grain was analyzed by size exclusion HPLC to investigate associations with wheat and breadmaking quality characteristics. Certain protein fractions were found to be related to associations between wheat and breadmaking ...

  9. Drosophila dec-1 eggshell proteins are differentially distributed via a multistep extracellular processing and localization pathway.

    PubMed

    Noguerón, M I; Mauzy-Melitz, D; Waring, G L

    2000-09-15

    In Drosophila the multilayered eggshell forms during late oogenesis between the oocyte and the overlaying follicle cells. Proper eggshell assembly requires wild-type dec-1 gene function. Alternatively spliced dec-1 transcripts encode three proproteins that are cleaved extracellularly in a stage-specific manner to at least five distinct derivatives. Using polyclonal antibodies raised against fusion proteins containing different regions of the dec-1 proteins, we have localized several dec-1 derivatives in the assembling and completed eggshell. Although all of the dec-1 derivatives are generated in the oocyte proximal vitelline membrane layer, they are differentially distributed in the mature egg. Some derivatives are gradually released from the vitelline membrane and become localized within distinct regions of the chorion, while others are taken up by the oocyte or become concentrated in the endochorionic spaces or cavities. The diverse distributions of the dec-1 derivatives suggest that each derivative plays a distinct role in eggshell assembly. These results also suggest that the vitelline membrane layer, by acting as a transient storage site, may control the availability of molecules active in eggshell assembly and by extension perhaps other follicle cell products important in early embryonic pattern formation. PMID:10985863

  10. Changes in the distribution of actin-associated proteins during epidermal wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kubler, M D; Watt, F M

    1993-06-01

    We have examined the distribution of actin filaments and a number of actin-associated proteins during human epidermal wound healing, using a suction blister model in which the epidermis is detached from the dermis, leaving the basement membrane intact. Filamentous actin was found in all the living epidermal layers before, during and after wound healing. alpha-actinin was also present in all the living layers of normal epidermis, but diffuse cytoplasmic staining was observed at the leading edge of migrating epidermis. Vinculin and talin were concentrated at the basement membrane prior to wounding, but were absent from the leading edge during wound healing. In normal epidermis, filamin and gelsolin showed a complementary distribution, with filamin most abundant in the basal layer and gelsolin most abundant suprabasally. The abundance of both proteins was reduced at the leading edge of migrating epidermis. All of the changes were transient, as the expression patterns returned to normal by 1 week after wounding, when the epidermis had reformed. The relevance of these changes to the process of keratinocyte migration is discussed. PMID:8388426