Science.gov

Sample records for distribution system water

  1. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  2. Water Treatment Technology - Distribution Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on distribution systems provides instructional materials for six competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: types of pipe for distribution systems, types…

  3. BIOFILM IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the world there are millions of miles of water distribution pipe lines which provide potable water for use by individuals and industry. Some of these water distribution systems have been in service well over one hundred years. Treated water moving through a distributio...

  4. Silver disinfection in water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestry Rodriguez, Nadia

    Silver was evaluated as disinfectant to maintain water quality in water distribution system. It was used to inhibit growth of two opportunistic bacteria in planktonik form and in biofilm formation in Robbins devices with stainless steel and PVC surfaces. The results of this work show that silver is a potential secondary disinfectant to be used in water distribution systems.

  5. Energy optimization of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Energy costs associated with pumping treated water into the distribution system and boosting water pressures where necessary is one of the largest expenditures in the operating budget of a municipality. Due to the size and complexity of Detroit`s water transmission system, an energy optimization project has been developed to better manage the flow of water in the distribution system in an attempt to reduce these costs.

  6. STANDARDIZED COST FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a significant number of water supply distribution systems in the United States that are deteriorating, resulting in a potential threat to the future quality of drinking water. orrective measures will directly influence the cost of providing water. t would be useful to h...

  7. BIOFILMS IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtually anywhere a surface comes into contact with the water in a distribution system, one can find biofilms. Biofilms are formed in distribution system pipelines when microbial cells attach to pipe surfaces and multiply to form a film or slime layer on the pipe. Probably withi...

  8. Distilled Water Distribution Systems. Laboratory Design Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, J.C.

    Factors concerning water distribution systems, including an evaluation of materials and a recommendation of materials best suited for service in typical facilities are discussed. Several installations are discussed in an effort to bring out typical features in selected applications. The following system types are included--(1) industrial…

  9. Energy optimization of water distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    In order to analyze pump operating scenarios for the system with the computer model, information on existing pumping equipment and the distribution system was collected. The information includes the following: component description and design criteria for line booster stations, booster stations with reservoirs, and high lift pumps at the water treatment plants; daily operations data for 1988; annual reports from fiscal year 1987/1988 to fiscal year 1991/1992; and a 1985 calibrated KYPIPE computer model of DWSD`s water distribution system which included input data for the maximum hour and average day demands on the system for that year. This information has been used to produce the inventory database of the system and will be used to develop the computer program to analyze the system.

  10. High temperature hot water distribution system study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The existing High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System has been plagued with design and construction deficiencies since startup of the HTHW system, in October 1988. In October 1989, after one year of service, these deficiencies were outlined in a technical evaluation. The deficiencies included flooded manholes, sump pumps not hooked up, leaking valves, contaminated HTHW water, and no cathodic protection system. This feasibility study of the High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System was performed under Contract No. DACA0l-94-D-0033, Delivery Order 0013, Modification 1, issued to EMC Engineers, Inc. (EMC), by the Norfolk District Corps of Engineers, on 25 April 1996. The purpose of this study was to determine the existing conditions of the High Temperature Hot Water Distribution System, manholes, and areas of containment system degradation. The study focused on two areas of concern, as follows: * Determine existing conditions and areas of containment system degradation (leaks) in the underground carrier pipes and protective conduit. * Document the condition of underground steel and concrete manholes. To document the leaks, a site survey was performed, using state-of-the-art infrared leak detection equipment and tracer gas leak detection equipment. To document the condition of the manholes, color photographs were taken of the insides of 125 manholes, and notes were made on the condition of these manholes.

  11. COST FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM REHABILITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major challenge for the society in the twenty-first century will be design, rehabilitation, replacement, and optimal management of drinking water distribution systems. A recent survey conducted by the USEPA found that $138B will be needed to maintain and replace existing drinki...

  12. WATER QUALITY EFFECTS RELATED TO BLENDING WATERS IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of blending two or more waters of different quality and to relate their composition to the corrosive effects and calcium carbonate deposition tendency of the water on distribution systems. The EPA mobile water quality monitoring la...

  13. STANDARDIZED COSTS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented within this report are cost data for construction and operation/maintenance of domestic water distribution and transmission pipelines, domestic water pumping stations, and domestic water storage reservoirs. ipeline cost data include costs for commonly utilized pipe mate...

  14. STANDARDIZED COSTS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented within the report are cost data for construction and operation/maintenance of domestic water distribution and transmission pipelines, domestic water pumping stations, and domestic water storage reservoirs. To allow comparison of new construction with rehabilitation of e...

  15. Epidemiology of urban water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardet, Jean-Pierre; Little, Richard

    2014-08-01

    Urban water distribution systems worldwide contain numerous old and fragile pipes that inevitably break, flood streets and damage property, and disrupt economic and social activities. Such breaks often present dramatically in temporal clusters as occurred in Los Angeles during 2009. These clustered pipe breaks share many characteristics with human mortality observed during extreme climatological events such as heat waves or air pollution. Drawing from research and empirical studies in human epidemiology, a framework is introduced to analyze the time variations of disruptive pipe breaks that can help water agencies better understand clustered pipe failures and institute measures to minimize the disruptions caused by them. It is posited that at any time, a cohort of the pipes comprising the water distribution system will be in a weakened state due to fatigue and corrosion. This frail cohort becomes vulnerable during normal operations and ultimately breaks due to rapid increase in crack lengths induced by abnormal stressors. The epidemiological harvesting model developed in this paper simulates an observed time series of monthly pipe breaks and has both explanatory and predictive power. It also demonstrates that models from nonengineering disciplines such as medicine can provide improved insights into the performance of infrastructure systems.

  16. ESTIMATING COSTS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The issue of economic effects and the cost of water supply is a continuing factor in implementing the Safe Drinking Water Act. The cost of distributing water to the final user after it has been treated is of growing concern as well as its quality. There are a significant number o...

  17. GPR-Based Water Leak Models in Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Cabrera, David; Herrera, Manuel; Izquierdo, Joaquín; Ocaña-Levario, Silvia J.; Pérez-García, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of leakage in water distribution systems through the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) as a nondestructive method. Laboratory tests are performed to extract features of water leakage from the obtained GPR images. Moreover, a test in a real-world urban system under real conditions is performed. Feature extraction is performed by interpreting GPR images with the support of a pre-processing methodology based on an appropriate combination of statistical methods and multi-agent systems. The results of these tests are presented, interpreted, analyzed and discussed in this paper.

  18. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. PMID:26409148

  19. 24 CFR 3280.609 - Water distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Water distribution systems. 3280....609 Water distribution systems. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73986, Dec. 9, 2013. (a) Water supply—(1) Supply piping. Piping systems shall be sized to provide an adequate quantity of water to...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.609 - Water distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water distribution systems. 3280....609 Water distribution systems. (a) Water supply—(1) Supply piping. Piping systems shall be sized to provide an adequate quantity of water to each plumbing fixture at a flow rate sufficient to keep...

  1. 24 CFR 3280.609 - Water distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Water distribution systems. 3280....609 Water distribution systems. (a) Water supply—(1) Supply piping. Piping systems shall be sized to provide an adequate quantity of water to each plumbing fixture at a flow rate sufficient to keep...

  2. 24 CFR 3280.609 - Water distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Water distribution systems. 3280....609 Water distribution systems. (a) Water supply—(1) Supply piping. Piping systems shall be sized to provide an adequate quantity of water to each plumbing fixture at a flow rate sufficient to keep...

  3. EPANET - AN ADVANCED WATER QUALITY MODELING PACKAGE FOR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPANET is a third generation software package for modeling water quality within drinking water distribution systems. he program performs extended period simulation of hydraulic and water quality conditions within pressurized pipe networks. n addition to substance concentration wa...

  4. Residential hot water distribution systems: Roundtablesession

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James D.; Klein, Gary; Springer, David; Howard, Bion D.

    2002-08-01

    Residential building practice currently ignores the lossesof energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. Theselosses include: combustion and standby losses from water heaters, thewaste of water (and energy) while waiting for hot water to get to thepoint of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distributionsystem after a draw; heat losses from recirculation systems and thediscarded warmth of waste water as it runs down the drain. Severaltechnologies are available that save energy (and water) by reducing theselosses or by passively recovering heat from wastewater streams and othersources. Energy savings from some individual technologies are reported tobe as much as 30 percent. Savings calculations of prototype systemsincluding bundles of technologies have been reported above 50 percent.This roundtable session will describe the current practices, summarizethe results of past and ongoing studies, discuss ways to think about hotwater system efficiency, and point to areas of future study. We will alsorecommend further steps to reduce unnecessary losses from hot waterdistribution systems.

  5. Distributed information system (water fact sheet)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    During 1982-85, the Water Resources Division (WRD) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) installed over 70 large minicomputers in offices across the country to support its mission in the science of hydrology. These computers are connected by a communications network that allows information to be shared among computers in each office. The computers and network together are known as the Distributed Information System (DIS). The computers are accessed through the use of more than 1500 terminals and minicomputers. The WRD has three fundamentally different needs for computing: data management; hydrologic analysis; and administration. Data management accounts for 50% of the computational workload of WRD because hydrologic data are collected in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Pacific trust territories. Hydrologic analysis consists of 40% of the computational workload of WRD. Cost accounting, payroll, personnel records, and planning for WRD programs occupies an estimated 10% of the computer workload. The DIS communications network is shown on a map. (Lantz-PTT)

  6. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  7. GROWTH OF HETROTROPHIC BIOFILMS IN A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA has designed and constructed a distribution system simulator (DSS) to evaluate factors which influence water quality within water distribution systems. Six individual 25 meter lengths of 15 cm diameter ductile iron pipe are arranged into loop configurations. Each lo...

  8. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  9. OPTIMAL SCHEDULING OF BOOSTER DISINFECTION IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Booster disinfection is the addition of disinfectant at locations distributed throughout a water distribution system. Such a strategy can reduce the mass of disinfectant required to maintain a detectable residual at points of consumption in the distribution system, which may lea...

  10. Microflora of drinking water distributed through decentralized supply systems (Tomsk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvaschevskaya, A. A.; Nalivaiko, N. G.; Shestakova, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    The paper considers microbiological quality of waters from decentralized water supply systems in Tomsk. It has been proved that there are numerous microbial contaminants of different types. The authors claim that the water distributed through decentralized supply systems is not safe to drink without preliminary treatment.

  11. Seismic Fragility of the LANL Fire Water Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mertz Jason Cardon Mike Salmon

    2007-03-30

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a site-wide system fragility assessment. This assessment focuses solely on the performance of the water distribution systems that supply Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR), Weapons Engineering and Tritium Facility (WETF), Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), Waste Characterization, Reduction, Repackaging Facility (WCRRF), and Transuranic Waste Inspectable Storage Project (TWISP). The analysis methodology is based on the American Lifelines Alliance seismic fragility formulations for water systems. System fragilities are convolved with the 1995 LANL seismic hazards to develop failure frequencies. Acceptance is determined by comparing the failure frequencies to the DOE-1020 Performance Goals. This study concludes that: (1) If a significant number of existing isolation valves in the water distribution system are closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in specific nuclear facilities; (2) Then, the water distribution systems for WETF, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP meet the PC-2 performance goal and the water distribution system for CMR is capable of surviving a 0.06g earthquake. A parametric study of the WETF water distribution system demonstrates that: (1) If a significant number of valves in the water distribution system are NOT closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in WETF; (2) Then, the water distribution system for WETF has an annual probability of failure on the order of 4 x 10{sup -3} that does not meet the PC-2 performance goal. Similar conclusions are expected for CMR, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP. It is important to note that some of the assumptions made in deriving the results should be verified by personnel in the safety-basis office and may need to be incorporated in technical surveillance requirements in the existing authorization basis documentation if credit for availability of fire protection water is taken at the PC-2 level earthquake levels

  12. MEASURING AND MODELING VARIATIONS IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors describe a field study that examined the effects of hydraulic mixing on water quality variations in a distribution system. Conducted at the North Penn Water Authority (average production of 5 mgd and 225 mi of distribution pipe), the study incorporated a field samplin...

  13. THE EPANET WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPANET is a Windows program that performs extended period simulation of hydraulic and water-quality behavior within pressurized pipe networks. It tracks the flow of water in each pipe, the pressure at each node, the height of water in each tank, and the concentration of a chemica...

  14. ANIMATION AND VISUALIZATION OF WATER QUALITY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water may undergo a number of changes in the distribution system, making the quality of the water at the customer's tap different from the quality of the water that leaves the treatment plant. Such changes in quality may be caused by chemical or biological variations or by a loss...

  15. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ANALYSIS: FIELD STUDIES, MODELING AND MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The user‘s guide entitled “Water Distribution System Analysis: Field Studies, Modeling and Management” is a reference guide for water utilities and an extensive summarization of information designed to provide drinking water utility personnel (and related consultants and research...

  16. Particulate Arsenic Release in a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace contaminants, such as arsenic, have been shown to accumulate in solids found in drinking water distribution systems. The obvious concern is that the contaminants in these solids could be released back into the water resulting in elevated levels in a consumer’s tap water. Th...

  17. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIA INHABITING A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of chlorination and chloramination treatments on heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) inhabiting a water distribution system simulator was investigated. Notable changes in bacterial densities were observed during this monitoring study. For e...

  18. LOCATING MONITORING STATIONS IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water undergoes changes in quality between the time it leaves the treatment plant and the time it reaches the customer's tap, making it important to select monitoring stations that will adequately monitor these changers. But because there is no uniform schedule or framework for ...

  19. Performance Monitoring of Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Anna; Lanzisera, Steven; Lutz, Jim; Fitting, Christian; Kloss, Margarita; Stiles, Christopher

    2014-08-11

    Current water distribution systems are designed such that users need to run the water for some time to achieve the desired temperature, wasting energy and water in the process. We developed a wireless sensor network for large-scale, long time-series monitoring of residential water end use. Our system consists of flow meters connected to wireless motes transmitting data to a central manager mote, which in turn posts data to our server via the internet. This project also demonstrates a reliable and flexible data collection system that could be configured for various other forms of end use metering in buildings. The purpose of this study was to determine water and energy use and waste in hot water distribution systems in California residences. We installed meters at every end use point and the water heater in 20 homes and collected 1s flow and temperature data over an 8 month period. For a typical shower and dishwasher events, approximately half the energy is wasted. This relatively low efficiency highlights the importance of further examining the energy and water waste in hot water distribution systems.

  20. DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM RELIABILITY: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was to present a tool useful to water utilities that not only could analyze historical distribution system reliability data, but also provide a flexible and expandable mechanism for record-keeping enabling overall management of water work's facilities and...

  1. The Accumulation of Radioactive Contaminants in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accumulation of trace contaminants in drinking water distribution systems has been documented and the subsequent release of the contaminants back to the water is a potential exposure pathway. Radioactive contaminants are of particular concern because of their known health eff...

  2. Dynamics of Biofilm Regrowth in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Husband, S.; Loza, V.; Boxall, J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of biomass within water distribution systems is in the form of attached biofilm. This is known to be central to drinking water quality degradation following treatment, yet little understanding of the dynamics of these highly heterogeneous communities exists. This paper presents original information on such dynamics, with findings demonstrating patterns of material accumulation, seasonality, and influential factors. Rigorous flushing operations repeated over a 1-year period on an operational chlorinated system in the United Kingdom are presented here. Intensive monitoring and sampling were undertaken, including time-series turbidity and detailed microbial analysis using 16S rRNA Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The results show that bacterial dynamics were influenced by differences in the supplied water and by the material remaining attached to the pipe wall following flushing. Turbidity, metals, and phosphate were the main factors correlated with the distribution of bacteria in the samples. Coupled with the lack of inhibition of biofilm development due to residual chlorine, this suggests that limiting inorganic nutrients, rather than organic carbon, might be a viable component in treatment strategies to manage biofilms. The research also showed that repeat flushing exerted beneficial selective pressure, giving another reason for flushing being a viable advantageous biofilm management option. This work advances our understanding of microbiological processes in drinking water distribution systems and helps inform strategies to optimize asset performance. IMPORTANCE This research provides novel information regarding the dynamics of biofilm formation in real drinking water distribution systems made of different materials. This new knowledge on microbiological process in water supply systems can be used to optimize the performance of the distribution network and to guarantee safe and good-quality drinking water to consumers. PMID:27208119

  3. Resistance of Legionella to disinfection in hot water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Saby, S; Vidal, A; Suty, H

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency of various disinfection treatments against Legionella was tested on a hot water distribution system (HWDS) pilot unit. The results demonstrated clearly that most Legionella in the networks were fixed in the biofilm at the surface of the pipe (more than 98% for each loop). Chemical treatments (continuous chlorination, hyperchlorination, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid mixing) commonly used for the eradication of Legionella in hot water distribution networks appeared to be inadequate for eradicating the bacteria in the biofilm. Unfortunately, the biofilm contained most of the pathogens in an HWDS whereas legislation is only restricted to the Legionella concentration in the water phase. Thermal treatment appeared to be efficient to disinfect most of the biofilm but seemed to promote the biofilm re-growth as well. It was then concluded that the best solution to prevent Legionella contamination in hot water distribution systems would be to have perfect control of the temperature in the networks (temperature > 55 degrees C at all points). Nevertheless, in many cases it is difficult to have such control, so during the time necessary to modify networks, the best solution to control Legionella proliferation appears to be to apply a treatment shock (thermal or chlorination as a function of pipe characteristics). These treatments must be followed by a continuous chlorination that is totally controlled and equipped with alarm systems. This study demonstrates that biofilm sampling devices must be installed in hot water distribution systems to anticipate Legionella contamination and correctly determine the efficiency of the treatments. PMID:16312947

  4. CORROSION AND CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION INDEX IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion in water distribution systems was studied to gain a better understanding of the processes and to develop control strategies. Equations and calculation methods for determining the pH(sub s) were developed using a chemical model with and without ionic speciation. Several ...

  5. URBAN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: A U.S. PERSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will examine several case studies that illustrate the critical role drinking water treatment and distribution systems play in protecting public health. It will also present a case study that documents the dramatic impact that the regulations promulgated under the Safe...

  6. EFFECT OF THE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM ON DRINKING WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SDWA and its amendments has focused interest on the factors that cause the deterioration of water between the treatment plant and the consumer. The distribution system itself can contribute to this deterioration. Numerous examples of waterborne outbreaks have demonstrated the...

  7. Monitoring Design for Source Identification in Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design of sensor networks for the purpose of monitoring for contaminants in water distribution systems is currently an active area of research. Much of the effort has been directed at the contamination detection problem and the expression of public health protection objective...

  8. Online Toxicity Monitors (OTM) for Distribution System Water Quality Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water distribution systems in the U.S. are vulnerable to episodic contamination events (both unintentional and intentional). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting research to investigate the use of broad-spectrum online toxicity monitors (OTMs) in ...

  9. Metagenomic Analysis of Water Distribution System Bacterial Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial quality of drinking water is assessed using culture-based methods that are highly selective and that tend to underestimate the densities and diversity of microbial populations inhabiting distribution systems. In order to better understand the effect of different dis...

  10. WATER QUALITY IN SOURCE WATER, TREATMENT, AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most drinking water utilities practice the multiple-barrier concept as the guiding principle for providing safe water. This chapter discusses multiple barriers as they relate to the basic criteria for selecting and protecting source waters, including known and potential sources ...

  11. OPERATION OF WATER QUALITY DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking water can change between the discharge from the treatment plant and the point of consumption. n order to study these changes in a systematic manner a Cooperative Agreement was initiated between EPA's Drinking Water Research Division and the North Penn Wate...

  12. OPERATION OF WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking water can change between the discharge from the treatment plant and the point of consumption. In order to study these changes in a systematic manner a Cooperative Agreement was initiated between EPA's Drinking Water Research Division and the North Penn Wat...

  13. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    R. Garrett

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface water distribution system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  14. Asset deterioration and discolouration in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Husband, P S; Boxall, J B

    2011-01-01

    Water Distribution Systems function to supply treated water safe for human consumption and complying with increasingly stringent quality regulations. Considered primarily an aesthetic issue, discolouration is the largest cause of customer dissatisfaction associated with distribution system water quality. Pro-active measures to prevent discolouration are sought yet network processes remain insufficiently understood to fully justify and optimise capital or operational strategies to manage discolouration risk. Results are presented from a comprehensive fieldwork programme in UK water distribution networks that have determined asset deterioration with respect to discolouration. This is achieved by quantification of material accumulating as cohesive layers on pipe surfaces that when mobilised are acknowledged as the primary cause of discolouration. It is shown that these material layers develop ubiquitously with defined layer strength characteristics and at a consistent and repeatable rate dependant on water quality. For UK networks iron concentration in the bulk water is shown as a potential indicator of deterioration rate. With material layer development rates determined, management decisions that balance discolouration risk and expenditure to maintain water quality integrity can be justified. In particular the balance between capital investment such as improving water treatment output or pipe renewal and operational expenditure such as the frequency of network maintenance through flushing may be judged. While the rate of development is shown to be a function of water quality, the magnitude (peak or average turbidity) of discolouration incidents is shown to be dominated by hydraulic conditions. From this it can be proposed that network hydraulic management, such as regular periodic 'stressing', is a potential strategy in reducing discolouration risk. The ultimate application of this is the hydraulic design of self-cleaning networks to maintain discolouration risk

  15. Deposition of manganese in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed Central

    Sly, L I; Hodgkinson, M C; Arunpairojana, V

    1990-01-01

    The deposition of manganese in a water distribution system with manganese-related "dirty water" problems was studied over a 1-year period. Four monitoring laboratories with Robbins biofilm sampling devices fitted to the water mains were used to correlate the relationship among manganese deposition, the level of manganese in the water, and the chlorination conditions. Manganese deposition occurred by both chemical and microbial processes. Chemical deposition occurred when Mn(II) not removed during water treatment penetrated the filters and entered the distribution system, where it was oxidized by chlorine and chlorine dioxide used for disinfection. Microbial deposition occurred in areas with insufficient chlorination to control the growth of manganese-depositing biofilm. At 0.05 mg of Mn(II) per liter, the chemical deposition rate was much greater than microbial deposition. Significant deposition occurred at 0.03 mg of manganese per liter, and dirty water complaints were not eliminated until manganese levels were continuously less than 0.02 mg/liter and chlorination levels were greater than 0.2 mg/liter. A guideline level of 0.01 mg of manganese per liter is recommended. Images PMID:2317040

  16. Distribution system water age can create premise plumbing corrosion hotspots.

    PubMed

    Masters, Sheldon; Parks, Jeffrey; Atassi, Amrou; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-09-01

    Cumulative changes in chemical and biological properties associated with higher "water age" in distribution systems may impact water corrosivity and regulatory compliance with lead and copper action levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of water age and chemistry on corrosivity of various downstream premise plumbing pipe materials and configurations using a combination of controlled laboratory studies and a field survey. Examination of lead pipe, copper pipe with lead solder, and leaded brass materials in a replicated lab rig simulating premise plumbing stagnation events indicated that lead or copper release could increase as much as ∼440 % or decrease as much as 98 % relative to water treatment plant effluent. In field studies at five utilities, trends in lead and copper release were highly dependent on circumstance; for example, lead release increased with water age in 13 % of cases and decreased with water age in 33 % of conditions tested. Levels of copper in the distribution system were up to 50 % lower and as much as 30 % higher relative to levels at the treatment plant. In many cases, high-risks of elevated lead and copper did not co-occur, demonstrating that these contaminants will have to be sampled separately to identify "worst case" conditions for human exposure and monitoring. PMID:26251058

  17. Elevated Natural Source Water Ammonia and Nitrification in the Distribution Systems of Four Water Utilities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrification in drinking water distribution systems is a concern of many drinking water systems. Although chloramination as a source of nitrification (i.e., addition of excess ammonia or breakdown of chloramines) has drawn the most attention, many source waters contain signific...

  18. Physical Modeling of Scaled Water Distribution System Networks.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hern, Timothy J.; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Orear, Leslie ,; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.; Paul Molina; Ross Johnson

    2005-10-01

    Threats to water distribution systems include release of contaminants and Denial of Service (DoS) attacks. A better understanding, and validated computational models, of the flow in water distribution systems would enable determination of sensor placement in real water distribution networks, allow source identification, and guide mitigation/minimization efforts. Validation data are needed to evaluate numerical models of network operations. Some data can be acquired in real-world tests, but these are limited by 1) unknown demand, 2) lack of repeatability, 3) too many sources of uncertainty (demand, friction factors, etc.), and 4) expense. In addition, real-world tests have limited numbers of network access points. A scale-model water distribution system was fabricated, and validation data were acquired over a range of flow (demand) conditions. Standard operating variables included system layout, demand at various nodes in the system, and pressure drop across various pipe sections. In addition, the location of contaminant (salt or dye) introduction was varied. Measurements of pressure, flowrate, and concentration at a large number of points, and overall visualization of dye transport through the flow network were completed. Scale-up issues that that were incorporated in the experiment design include Reynolds number, pressure drop across nodes, and pipe friction and roughness. The scale was chosen to be 20:1, so the 10 inch main was modeled with a 0.5 inch pipe in the physical model. Controlled validation tracer tests were run to provide validation to flow and transport models, especially of the degree of mixing at pipe junctions. Results of the pipe mixing experiments showed large deviations from predicted behavior and these have a large impact on standard network operations models.3

  19. Identification and characterization of steady and occluded water in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huiyan; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Hongwei; Tian, Yimei; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Weigao; Li, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Deterioration and leakage of drinking water in distribution systems have been a major issue in the water industry for years, which are associated with corrosion. This paper discovers that occluded water in the scales of the pipes has an acidic environment and high concentration of iron, manganese, chloride, sulfate and nitrate, which aggravates many pipeline leakage accidents. Six types of water samples have been analyzed under the flowing and stagnant periods. Both the water in the exterior of the tubercles and stagnant water carry suspended iron particles, which explains the occurrence of "red water" when the system hydraulic conditions change. Nitrate is more concentrated in occluded water under flowing condition in comparison with that in flowing water. However, the concentration of nitrate in occluded water under stagnant condition is found to be less than that in stagnant water. A high concentration of manganese is found to exist in steady water, occluded water and stagnant water. These findings impact secondary pollution and the corrosion of pipes and containers used in drinking water distribution systems. The unique method that taking occluded water from tiny holes which were drilled from the pipes' exteriors carefully according to the positions of corrosion scales has an important contribution to research on corrosion in distribution systems. And this paper furthers our understanding and contributes to the growing body of knowledge regarding occluded environments in corrosion scales. PMID:25460754

  20. Bacterial Composition in a Metropolitan Drinking Water Distribution System Utilizing Different Source Waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial community structure was investigated from bulk phase water samples of multiple collection sites from two service areas within the Cincinnati drinking water distribution system (DWDS). Each area is associated with a different primary source of water (i.e., groundwat...

  1. Influence of Water Age on Reclaimed Water Quality in Distribution Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated chemical and microbial water quality changes in two reclaimed waters as a function of residence time within distribution systems or storage time in tanks. Here we report the microbial water quality changes with particular focus on the incidence of waterborne and waterbased patho...

  2. Desorption of arsenic from drinking water distribution system solids.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Rachel C; Lytle, Darren A; Dionysious, Dionysios D

    2007-04-01

    Previous work has shown that arsenic can accumulate in drinking water distribution system (DWDS) solids (Lytle et al., 2004) when arsenic is present in the water. The release of arsenic back into the water through particulate transport and/or chemical release (e.g. desorption, dissolution) could result in elevated arsenic levels at the consumers' tap. The primary objective of this work was to examine the impact of pH and orthophosphate on the chemical release (i.e. desorption) of arsenic from nine DWDS solids collected from utilities located in the Midwest. Arsenic release comparisons were based on the examination of arsenic and other water quality parameters in leach water after contact with the solids over the course of 168~hours. Results showed that arsenic was released from solids and suggested that arsenic release was a result of desorption rather than dissolution. Arsenic release generally increased with increasing initial arsenic concentration in the solid and increasing pH levels (in the test range of 7 to 9). Finally, orthophosphate (3 and 5 mg PO(4)/L) increased arsenic release at all pH values examined. Based on the study results, utilities with measurable levels of arsenic present in their water should be aware that some water quality changes can cause arsenic release in the DWDS potentially resulting in elevated levels at the consumer's tap. PMID:17033727

  3. Analysis of residual chlorine in simple drinking water distribution system with intermittent water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Roopali V.; Patel, H. M.

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of residual chlorine concentration at various locations in drinking water distribution system is essential final check to the quality of water supplied to the consumers. This paper presents a methodology to find out the residual chlorine concentration at various locations in simple branch network by integrating the hydraulic and water quality model using first-order chlorine decay equation with booster chlorination nodes for intermittent water supply. The explicit equations are developed to compute the residual chlorine in network with a long distribution pipe line at critical nodes. These equations are applicable to Indian conditions where intermittent water supply is the most common system of water supply. It is observed that in intermittent water supply, the residual chlorine at farthest node is sensitive to water supply hours and travelling time of chlorine. Thus, the travelling time of chlorine can be considered to justify the requirement of booster chlorination for intermittent water supply.

  4. Mapping Climate Change Vulnerability Distribution of Water Resources in a Regional Water Supply System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Tung, C.; Li, M.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, the threat of increasing frequency of extreme weather rise up human attention on climate change. It is important to know how climate change might effect regional water resources, however, there is not much information to help government understanding how climate change will effect the water resources locally. To a regional water supply system, there might be some hotspots more vulnerable to climate. For example, the water supply of some area is from the water of river. When the storm occurred, the water can't be treated due to high density of suspended sediment in the river. Then the water supply in this area is more vulnerable to climate. This study used an integrated tool - TaiWAP (Taiwan Water Resources Assessment Program) for climate change vulnerability assessment on water resources, which includes 10 GCMs output of SRES A2, A1B, B2 scenarios, weather generator, GWLF model, and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) tool. A water supply system is very complex which needs dynamic modeling to determine the vulnerability distribution. This study used a system dynamics model- VENSIM connected with TaiWAP to simulate a water supply system and evaluate vulnerability of each unit in a water supply system. The vulnerable hotspots will be indicated in the system and the adaptive strategies will be applied to strengthen the local vulnerable area. The adaptive capacity will be enhanced to mitigate climate change impacts on water supply system locally to achieve sustainable water uses.

  5. Robust optimization for water distribution systems least cost design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelman, Lina; Housh, Mashor; Ostfeld, Avi

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the least cost design problem of a water distribution system is to find its minimum cost with discrete diameters as decision variables and hydraulic controls as constraints. The goal of a robust least cost design is to find solutions which guarantee its feasibility independent of the data (i.e., under model uncertainty). A robust counterpart approach for linear uncertain problems is adopted in this study, which represents the uncertain stochastic problem as its deterministic equivalent. Robustness is controlled by a single parameter providing a trade-off between the probability of constraint violation and the objective cost. Two principal models are developed: uncorrelated uncertainty model with implicit design reliability, and correlated uncertainty model with explicit design reliability. The models are tested on three example applications and compared for uncertainty in consumers' demands. The main contribution of this study is the inclusion of the ability to explicitly account for different correlations between water distribution system demand nodes. In particular, it is shown that including correlation information in the design phase has a substantial advantage in seeking more efficient robust solutions.

  6. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olivieri, V.P.; Snead, M.C.; Kruse, C.W.; Kawata, K.

    1986-11-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants - free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide - when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min.

  7. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems.

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, V P; Snead, M C; Krusé, C W; Kawata, K

    1986-01-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants--free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide--when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min. PMID:3028767

  8. Detection of contamination of municipal water distribution systems

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    2012-01-17

    A system for the detection of contaminates of a fluid in a conduit. The conduit is part of a fluid distribution system. A chemical or biological sensor array is connected to the conduit. The sensor array produces an acoustic signal burst in the fluid upon detection of contaminates in the fluid. A supervisory control system connected to the fluid and operatively connected to the fluid distribution system signals the fluid distribution system upon detection of contaminates in the fluid.

  9. Impact of Arsenic Treatment Systems on Distribution System Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program, 50 arsenic removal treatment systems were installed and their performance evaluated over a period of one to three years. The program was limited to small systems whose population served were less than 10,000. Ten of the systems were ...

  10. The Challenge of Providing Safe Water with an Intermittently Supplied Piped Water Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpel, E.; Nelson, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    An increasing number of urban residents in low- and middle-income countries have access to piped water; however, this water is often not available continuously. 84% of reporting utilities in low-income countries provide piped water for fewer than 24 hours per day (van den Berg and Danilenko, 2010), while no major city in India has continuous piped water supply. Intermittent water supply leaves pipes vulnerable to contamination and forces households to store water or rely on alternative unsafe sources, posing a health threat to consumers. In these systems, pipes are empty for long periods of time and experience low or negative pressure even when water is being supplied, leaving them susceptible to intrusion from sewage, soil, or groundwater. Households with a non-continuous supply must collect and store water, presenting more opportunities for recontamination. Upgrading to a continuous water supply, while an obvious solution to these challenges, is currently out of reach for many resource-constrained utilities. Despite its widespread prevalence, there are few data on the mechanisms causing contamination in an intermittent supply and the frequency with which it occurs. Understanding the impact of intermittent operation on water quality can lead to strategies to improve access to safe piped water for the millions of people currently served by these systems. We collected over 100 hours of continuous measurements of pressure and physico-chemical water quality indicators and tested over 1,000 grab samples for indicator bacteria over 14 months throughout the distribution system in Hubli-Dharwad, India. This data set is used to explore and explain the mechanisms influencing water quality when piped water is provided for a few hours every 3-5 days. These data indicate that contamination occurs along the distribution system as water travels from the treatment plant to reservoirs and through intermittently supplied pipes to household storage containers, while real

  11. Condition Assessment Technologies for Water Transmission and Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program, this research was conducted to identify and characterize the state of the technology for structural condition assessment of drinking water transmission and distribution syst...

  12. Condition Assessment of Drinking Water Transmission and Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Condition assessment of water transmission and distribution mains is the collection of data and information through direct and/or indirect methods, followed by analysis of the data and information, to make a determination of the current and/or future structural, water quality, an...

  13. IMPACT ON WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM BIOFILM DENSITIES FROM REVERSE OSMOSIS MEMBRANE TREATMENT OF SUPPLY WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of potable water is such that the concentration of nutrients available for growth of microorganisms within distribution systems is limited. In such systems carbon is often the growth limiting nutrient. Research conducted in the Netherlands has indicated that low level...

  14. Detection of mutagens in water-distribution systems after disinfection.

    PubMed

    Guzzella, Licia; Di Caterino, Filomena; Monarca, Silvano; Zani, Claudia; Feretti, Donatella; Zerbini, Ilaria; Nardi, Giuseppe; Buschini, Annamaria; Poli, Paola; Rossi, Carlo

    2006-09-19

    This research examined the quality of water-before and after distribution-of four drinking-water production plants located in Northern Italy, two of which collected water from local aquifers and two from the River Po. A battery of genotoxicity assays for monitoring drinking-water was performed to assess the quality of the water produced by the treatment plants under study. Three different sampling stations were selected at each plant, one right at the outlet of the treatment plant and two along with the distribution pipelines. Raw river water was also sampled and analysed as a control. The water samples (500 l) were concentrated on silica C18 cartridges and the extracts were tested in in vitro mutagenicity assays (Salmonella/microsome assay with strains TA 98 and TA 100; SOS Chromotest with Escherichia coli strain PQ37); gene conversion, point mutation and mitochondrial DNA mutability assays with the diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7 and a toxicity test using the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox). The Microtox test and the mitochondrial DNA mutability assay showed the greatest sensitivity towards toxic or mutagenic substances in the water extracts considered. The results show that this battery of short-term tests is applicable in the routine monitoring of drinking-water quality before and after distribution. PMID:16863700

  15. Multi-objective optimization of water quality, pumps operation, and storage sizing of water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Wojciech; Ostfeld, Avi

    2013-01-30

    A multi-objective methodology utilizing the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2) linked to EPANET for trading-off pumping costs, water quality, and tanks sizing of water distribution systems is developed and demonstrated. The model integrates variable speed pumps for modeling the pumps operation, two water quality objectives (one based on chlorine disinfectant concentrations and one on water age), and tanks sizing cost which are assumed to vary with location and diameter. The water distribution system is subject to extended period simulations, variable energy tariffs, Kirchhoff's laws 1 and 2 for continuity of flow and pressure, tanks water level closure constraints, and storage-reliability requirements. EPANET Example 3 is employed for demonstrating the methodology on two multi-objective models, which differ in the imposed water quality objective (i.e., either with disinfectant or water age considerations). Three-fold Pareto optimal fronts are presented. Sensitivity analysis on the storage-reliability constraint, its influence on pumping cost, water quality, and tank sizing are explored. The contribution of this study is in tailoring design (tank sizing), pumps operational costs, water quality of two types, and reliability through residual storage requirements, in a single multi-objective framework. The model was found to be stable in generating multi-objective three-fold Pareto fronts, while producing explainable engineering outcomes. The model can be used as a decision tool for both pumps operation, water quality, required storage for reliability considerations, and tank sizing decision-making. PMID:23262407

  16. Discolouration in potable water distribution systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Vreeburg, J H G; Boxall, J B

    2007-02-01

    A large proportion of the customer contacts that drinking water supply companies receive stem from the occurrence of discoloured water. Currently, such complaints are dealt with in a reactive manner. However, water companies are being driven to implement planned activities to control discolouration prior to contacts occurring. Hence improved understanding of the dominant processes and predictive and management tools are needed. The material responsible for discolouration has a variety of origins and a range of processes and mechanisms may be associated with its accumulation within distribution systems. Irrespective of material origins, accumulation processes and mechanisms, discolouration events occur as a result of systems changes leading to mobilisation of the accumulations from within the network. Despite this conceptual understanding, there are very few published practicable tools and techniques available to aid water companies in the planned management and control of discolouration problems. Two recently developed and published, but different approaches to address this are reviewed here: the PODDS model which was developed to predict levels of turbidity as a result of change in hydraulic conditions, but which is semi-empirical and requires calibration; and the resuspension potential method which was developed to directly measure discolouration resulting from a controlled change in hydraulic conditions, providing a direct assessment of discolouration risk, although intrinsically requiring the limited generation of discoloured water within a live network. Both these methods support decision making on the need for maintenance operations. While risk evaluation and implementation of appropriate maintenance can be implemented to control discolouration risk, new material will continue to accumulate and hence an ongoing programme of maintenance is required. One sustainable measure to prevent such re-accumulation of material is the adoption of a self-cleaning threshold

  17. SOLAR POWERED WATER COLLECTION, CONTAINMENT, AND SELF REGULATING DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2009, over 40 million pounds of Carbon Dioxide were released annually in an effort to water large planters. In addition, over 364 million gallons of water are used to maintain their health. By implementing a system within the planters that allows for onsite water storage wi...

  18. A Visual Insight into the Degradation of Metals Used in Drinking Water Distribution Systems Using AFM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the fundamental corrosion and passivation of metallic copper used in drinking water distribution materials is important in understanding the overall mechanism of the corrosion process. Copper pipes are widely used for drinking water distribution systems and although it...

  19. Dynamic simulation of multicomponent reaction transport in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Munavalli, G R; Mohan Kumar, M S M S

    2004-04-01

    Given the presence of nutrients, regrowth of bacteria within a distribution system is possible. The bacterial growth phenomena, which can be studied by developing a multicomponent (substrate, biomass and disinfectant) reaction transport model, is governed by its relationship with the substrate (organic carbon) and disinfectant (chlorine). The multicomponent reaction transport model developed in the present study utilizes the simplified expressions for the basic processes (in bulk flow and at pipe wall) such as bacterial growth and decay, attachment to and detachment from the surface, substrate utilization and disinfectant action involved in the model. The usefulness of the model is further enhanced by the incorporation of an expression for bulk reaction parameter relating it with the organic carbon. The model is validated and applied to study the sensitive behavior of the components using a hypothetical network. The developed model is able to simulate the biodegradable organic carbon threshold in accordance with the values reported in the literature. The spread of contaminant intruded into the system at any location can also be simulated by the model. The multicomponent model developed is useful for water supply authorities in identifying the locations with high substrate concentrations, bacterial growth and lower chlorine residuals. PMID:15087178

  20. Distribution System Water Quality Affects Responses of Opportunistic Pathogen Gene Markers in Household Water Heaters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Masters, Sheldon; Falkinham, Joseph O; Edwards, Marc A; Pruden, Amy

    2015-07-21

    Illustrative distribution system operation and management practices shaped the occurrence and persistence of Legionella spp., nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and two amoebae host (Acanthamoeba spp., Vermamoeba vermiformis) gene markers in the effluent of standardized simulated household water heaters (SWHs). The interplay between disinfectant type (chlorine or chloramine), water age (2.3-5.7 days) and materials (polyvinyl chloride (PVC), cement or iron) in upstream simulated distribution systems (SDSs) profoundly influenced levels of pathogen gene markers in corresponding SWH bulk waters. For example, Legionella spp. were 3-4 log higher in SWHs receiving water from chloraminated vs chlorinated SDSs, because of disinfectant decay from nitrification. By contrast, SWHs fed with chlorinated PVC SDS water not only harbored the lowest levels of all pathogen markers, but effluent from the chlorinated SWHs were even lower than influent levels in several instances (e.g., 2 log less Legionella spp. and NTM for PVC and 3-5 log less P. aeruginosa for cement). However, pathogen gene marker influent levels correlated positively to effluent levels in the SWHs (P < 0.05). Likewise, microbial community structures were similar between SWHs and the corresponding SDS feed waters. This study highlights the importance and challenges of distribution system management/operation to help control opportunistic pathogens. PMID:26121595

  1. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional plating methods were used to quantify heterotrophic bacteria from a drinking water distribution system. Three media, plate count agar (PCA), R2A agar and sheep blood agar (TSA-SB) were used to determine heterotrophic plate count (HPC) levels. Grab samples were collec...

  2. THE EPANET PROGRAMMER'S TOOLKIT FOR ANALYSIS OF WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPANET Programmer's Toolkit is a collection of functions that helps simplify computer programming of water distribution network analyses. the functions can be used to read in a pipe network description file, modify selected component properties, run multiple hydraulic and wa...

  3. MODELING CHLORINE RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass-transfer-based model is developed for predicting chlorine decay in drinking-water distribution networks. The model considers first-order reactions of chlorine to occur both in the bulk flow and at the pipe wall. The overall rate of the wall reaction is a function of the ...

  4. STRATEGIES FOR MONITORING THE BACTERIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF WATER SUPPLY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring strategies for characterizing the bacteriological quality of water in the distribution system require a complete understanding of a variety of interrelated aspects that include treated water quality, water supply retention in storage and infrastructure deterioration in...

  5. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from non-disinfected drinking water distribution systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence attributable to virus intrusions into non-disinfecting municipal distribution systems. Viruses were enumerat...

  6. Channel Extension in Deep-Water Distributive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyal, D. C.; Sheets, B. A.

    2007-12-01

    acceleration to Fr'-critical conditions and the formation of a depositional hydraulic jump, which perturbs sediment transport and ends channel extension. Similar morphodynamic length scale controls are observed in shallow water fan-delta experiments (e.g., SAFL DB-03) and in 2-D depositional cyclic steps. The experiments seem to explain two interesting observations from the earlier self-organized fan experiments and from real submarine fans. Firstly, the observation of 'perched' fills at the steep entrances to salt withdrawal minibasins (e.g., in the Gulf of Mexico) suggesting higher sedimentation rates (or inefficient sediment transport) on higher slopes (initially higher than at the slope break downstream). Secondly, strong progradation as the fan evolves and slope decreases in 'perched' fans suggests increasing flow efficiency on lower slopes, at least over a certain window of parameter space. Apparently deep water systems have a tendency to self-regulate even when flows differ significantly in initial density. The observed modulation to Fr'-critical flow appears to be an important control on length scales in deep- water distributive channel systems, potentially explaining strong deepwater progradation or 'delta-like' patterns that have remained paradoxical. Near critical conditions have been inferred from observations of many active submarine fans but the extent to which these results from conservative density currents apply to non-conservative and potentially 'ignitive' turbidity currents is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  7. USE OF NETWORK MODELS FOR ESTIMATING EXPOSURE OF CONSUMERS TO CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of contaminants in a drinking water distribution system can result in exposure of consumers to contaminated water. Whether the contaminants result from waterborne outbreaks that accidentally enter the system or through purposeful acts, the movement of the resulting ...

  8. GEOCHEMISTRY OF SULFUR IN IRON CORROSION SCALES FOUND IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron-sulfur geochemistry is important in many natural and engineered environments, including drinking water systems. In the anaerobic environment beneath scales of corroding iron drinking water distribution system pipes, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) produce sulfide from natu...

  9. Decontamination Methods For Drinking Water Treatment And Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Once contamination has occurred in drinking water systems and the contaminated segment has been isolated from other parts of the system, there will be great urgency to decontaminate the areas as rapidly and cost effectively as possible. This article describes available and deve...

  10. Rehabilitation of Wastewater Collection and Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nation’s 54,000 drinking water systems and 16,000 wastewater systems are nearing the end of their useful life and need to be replaced/repaired to comply with federal regulations. Rehabilitation includes a broad spectrum of approaches, from repair to replacement that attempt ...

  11. Influence of water quality on nitrifier regrowth in two full-scale drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel B; Van Dyke, Michele I; Anderson, William B; Huck, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    The potential for regrowth of nitrifying microorganisms was monitored in 2 full-scale chloraminated drinking water distribution systems in Ontario, Canada, over a 9-month period. Quantitative PCR was used to measure amoA genes from ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and these values were compared with water quality parameters that can influence nitrifier survival and growth, including total chlorine, ammonia, temperature, pH, and organic carbon. Although there were no severe nitrification episodes, AOB and AOA were frequently detected at low concentrations in samples collected from both distribution systems. A culture-based presence-absence test confirmed the presence of viable nitrifiers. AOB were usually present in similar or greater numbers than AOA in both systems. As well, AOB showed higher regrowth potential compared with AOA in both systems. Statistically significant correlations were measured between several water quality parameters of relevance to nitrification. Total chlorine was negatively correlated with both nitrifiers and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, and ammonia levels were positively correlated with nitrifiers. Of particular importance was the strong correlation between HPC and AOB, which reinforced the usefulness of HPC as an operational parameter to measure general microbiological conditions in distribution systems. PMID:26518069

  12. MONOCHLORAMINE DECAY IN MODEL AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WATER. (R826832)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Chloramines have long been used to provide a disinfecting residual in distribution systems where it is difficult to maintain a free chlorine residual or where disinfection by-product (DBP) formation is of concern. While chloramines are generally considered les...

  13. Water Distribution System Operation and Maintenance. A Field Study Training Program. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerri, Kenneth D.; And Others

    Proper installation, inspection, operation, maintenance, repair and management of water distribution systems have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance cost and effectiveness of the systems. The objective of this manual is to provide water distribution system operators with the knowledge and skills required to operate and maintain…

  14. Investigations into Drinking Water Distribution System Nitrification: EPA Microelectrode Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproduct Rules, chloramination for secondary disinfection in the United States is predicted to increase to 57% of all surface and 7% of all ground water treatment systems. Chloramination comes with the risk of di...

  15. LEAK DETECTION AND WIRELESS TELEMETRY FOR WATER DISTRIBUTION AND SEWERAGE SYSTEMS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    According to the study EPA 2000 Community Water System Survey Data on Pipe Assets, the infrastructure for water distribution and sewerage systems is aging and requires replacement.  In addition, in EPA’s September 2002 report Clean Water and Drinking Water Infr...

  16. Disinfectant Penetration into Nitrifying Drinking Water Distribution System Biofilm Using Microelectrodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrification within drinking water distribution systems reduces water quality, causes difficulties maintaining adequate disinfectant residual, and poses public health concerns including exposure to nitrite, nitrate, and opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms. Monochloramine is...

  17. Aging Water Infrastructure Program at U.S. EPA: Rehabilitation of Water Distribution and Wastewater Collection Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several EPA projects are currently underway to encourage technology development and dissemination in key aspects of the condition assessment and rehabilitation of water and wastewater systems. The progress on one of these projects, "Rehabilitation of Water Distribution and Waste...

  18. Study On Burst Location Technology under Steady-state in Water Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianpin; Li, Shuping; Wang, Shaowei; He, Fang; He, Zhixun; Cao, Guodong

    2010-11-01

    According to the characteristics of hydraulic information under the state of burst in water distribution system, to get the correlation of monitoring values and burst location and locate the position of burst on time by mathematical fitting. This method can effectively make use of the information of SCADA in water distribution system to active locating burst position. A new idea of burst location in water distribution systems to shorten the burst time, reduce the impact on urban water supply, economic losses and waste of water resources.

  19. Assessing microbiological water quality in drinking water distribution systems with disinfectant residual using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Simon; Lipphaus, Patrick; Green, James; Parsons, Simon; Weir, Paul; Juskowiak, Kes; Jefferson, Bruce; Jarvis, Peter; Nocker, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Flow cytometry (FCM) as a diagnostic tool for enumeration and characterization of microorganisms is rapidly gaining popularity and is increasingly applied in the water industry. In this study we applied the method to obtain a better understanding of total and intact cell concentrations in three different drinking water distribution systems (one using chlorine and two using chloramines as secondary disinfectants). Chloramine tended to result in lower proportions of intact cells than chlorine over a wider residual range, in agreement with existing knowledge that chloramine suppresses regrowth more efficiently. For chlorinated systems, free chlorine concentrations above 0.5 mg L(-1) were found to be associated with relatively low proportions of intact cells, whereas lower disinfectant levels could result in substantially higher percentages of intact cells. The threshold for chlorinated systems is in good agreement with guidelines from the World Health Organization. The fact that the vast majority of samples failing the regulatory coliform standard also showed elevated proportions of intact cells suggests that this parameter might be useful for evaluating risk of failure. Another interesting parameter for judging the microbiological status of water, the biological regrowth potential, greatly varied among different finished waters providing potential help for investment decisions. For its measurement, a simple method was introduced that can easily be performed by water utilities with FCM capability. PMID:25123436

  20. PHYSIO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF IRON TUBERCULATION FROM A SINGLE DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion of iron pipes in Drinking Water Distribution Systems (DWDS) contributes to the formation of tubercles whose physio-chemical properties are influenced by the composition of the waters in the distribution system. Thus the objective of this study was to assess the extent o...

  1. Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James D.

    2004-03-31

    Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include: the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy to reheat water that was already heated once before. A feasibility study and an action plan for a proposed research project involving residential hot water distribution systems is being developed. The feasibility study will use past work to estimate of hot water and energy loses caused by current hot water distribution systems in residences. Proposed research project, or roadmap, will develop recommendations for improvements to residential hot water distribution systems. The roadmap addresses the technical obstacles and gaps in our knowledge that prevent water and energy reductions and market adoption of water- and energy-efficient technologies. The initial results of the feasibility study are presented here along with a discussion of a roadmap to improve the efficiency of residential hot water distribution systems.

  2. NONPHOTOSYNTHETIC PIGMENTED BACTERIA IN A POTABLE WATER TREATMENT AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of pigmented bacteria in potable water from raw source water through treatment to distribution water, including dead-end locations, was compared at sample sites in a large municipal water system. edia used to enumerate heterotrophic bacteria and differentiate pigme...

  3. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  4. Virus contamination from operation and maintenance practices in small drinking water distribution systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the association of common events in drinking water distribution systems with contamination of household tap water with human enteric viruses. Viruses were enumerated by qPCR in the tap water of 14 municipal systems that use non-disinfected groundwater. Ultra-violet disinfection was install...

  5. IRON TUBERCULATION: PHYSIO-CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A SINGLE PIPE FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nature of iron tubercles inside unlined iron pipes of drinking water distribution systems are influenced by water quality and therefore susceptible to changes in water chemistry. The underlying assumption is that tubercles in a system have similar physio-chemical properties. ...

  6. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options with Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, E.

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. Transient System Simulation Tool (TRNSYS) is a full distribution system developed that has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. In this study, the Building America team built upon previous analysis modeling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall, 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  7. ATRAZOME CHLORINATION TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS UNDER DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination is a commonly-used disinfectant step in drinking water treatment. Should free chlorine be added to water used as a drinking water source, it is widely understood that many biological species in the water, along with dissolved organic and inorganic chemicals, will rea...

  8. Evaluation of Current Water Treatment and Distribution System Optimization to Provide Safe Drinking Water from Various Source Water Types and Conditions (Deliverable 5.2.C.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly, drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) are being challenged by changes in the quality of their source waters and by their aging treatment and distribution system infrastructure. Individually or in combination, factors such as shrinking water and financial resources...

  9. EFFECTS OF MIXING AND AGING ON WATER QUALITY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM STORAGE FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aging of water in distribution system storage facilities can lead to deterioration of the water quality due to loss of disinfectant residual and bacterial regrowth. Facilities should be operated to insure that the age of the water is not excessive taking into account the quality...

  10. Microbial Community Profile of a Lead Service Line Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A corroded lead water pipe was removed from a drinking water distribution system and the microbial community was profiled using 16S rDNA techniques. This is the first report of the characterization of biofilm on a surface of a corroded lead drinking water pipe. The majority of ...

  11. MODELING THE IMPACTS OF FIRE FLOWS ON DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM WATER QUALITY, DESIGN AND OPERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In most water distribution systems, a significant amount of the piping and storage capacity is used to provide adequate quantities of water during fire conditions. This increased capacity results in higher capital costs and potential negative impacts on water quality due to longe...

  12. Diversity of free-living amoebae in a dual distribution (potable and recycled) water system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free-living amoebae are known to facilitate the growth of water associated pathogens. This study, for the first time, explored the diversity of free-living amoebae in a dual distribution (potable and recycled) water system in Rouse Hill NSW, Australia. Water and biofilm samples w...

  13. Injection of Contaminants into a Simulated Water Distribution System Equipped with Continuous Multi-Parameter Water Monitors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s Technology Testing and Evaluation Program has been charged by EPA to evaluate the performance of commercially available water security-related technologies. Multi-parameter water monitors for distributions systems have been evaluated as such a water security techn...

  14. EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS TO DOMESTIC WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SALT LAKE COUNTY, UTAH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Highland, Lynn M.

    1985-01-01

    A magnitude-7. 5 earthquake occurring along the central portion of the Wasatch Fault, Utah, may cause significant damage to Salt Lake County's domestic water system. This system is composed of water treatment plants, aqueducts, distribution mains, and other facilities that are vulnerable to ground shaking, liquefaction, fault movement, and slope failures. Recent investigations into surface faulting, landslide potential, and earthquake intensity provide basic data for evaluating the potential earthquake hazards to water-distribution systems in the event of a large earthquake. Water supply system components may be vulnerable to one or more earthquake-related effects, depending on site geology and topography. Case studies of water-system damage by recent large earthquakes in Utah and in other regions of the United States offer valuable insights in evaluating water system vulnerability to earthquakes.

  15. 24 CFR 3280.609 - Water distribution systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... not be permitted. Those pipe dopes, solder, fluxes, oils, solvents, chemicals, or other substances...-free (as defined in section 109(c)(2) of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986) with solders... nontoxic and shall be applied to male threads only. (3) Solder fittings. Joints in copper water tubes...

  16. MIXING IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM STORAGE TANKS: ITS EFFECT ON WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nearly all distribution systems in the US include storage tanks and reservoirs. They are the most visible components of a wate distribution system but are generally the least understood in terms of their impact on water quality. Long residence times in storage tanks can have nega...

  17. CHLORINE DECAY AND BIOFILM STUDIES IN A PILOT SCALE DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION DEAD END PIPE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine decay experiments using a pilot-scale water distribution dead end pipe system were conducted to define relationships between chlorine decay and environmental factors. These included flow rate, biomass concentration and biofilm density, and initial chlorine concentrations...

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum, Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacteria previously reported as the cause of hyp...

  19. Spatial Description of Drinking Water Bacterial Community Structures in Bulk Water Samples Collected in a Metropolitan Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The description of microorganisms inhabiting drinking water distribution systems has commonly been performed using techniques that are biased towards easy to culture bacterial populations. As most environmental microorganisms cannot be grown on artificial media, our understanding...

  20. Evaluation of select sensors for real-time monitoring of Escherichia coli in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Miles, Syreeta L; Sinclair, Ryan G; Riley, Mark R; Pepper, Ian L

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated real-time sensing of Escherichia coli as a microbial contaminant in water distribution systems. Most sensors responded to increased E. coli concentrations, showing that select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes and be utilized as part of a contaminant warning system. PMID:21357435

  1. Water Quality in Small Community Distribution Systems. A Reference Guide for Operators

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed this reference guide to assist the operators and managers of small- and medium-sized public water systems. This compilation provides a comprehensive picture of the impact of the water distribution system network on dist...

  2. Bacterial regrowth in water reclamation and distribution systems revealed by viable bacterial detection assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-wen; Li, Dan; Gu, April Z; Zeng, Si-yu; He, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Microbial regrowth needs to be managed during water reclamation and distribution. The aim of present study was to investigate the removal and regrowth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella in water reclamation and distribution system by using membrane integrity assay (PMA-qPCR), reverse transcriptional activity assay (Q-RT-PCR) and culture-based assay, and also to evaluate the relationships among bacterial regrowth, and environmental factors in the distribution system. The results showed that most of the water reclamation processes potentially induced bacteria into VBNC state. The culturable E. coli and Salmonella regrew 1.8 and 0.7 log10 in distribution system, which included reactivation of bacteria in the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state and reproduction of culturable bacteria. The regrowth of culturable E. coli and Salmonella in the distribution system mainly depended on the residual chlorine levels, with correlations (R(2)) of -0.598 and -0.660. The abundances of membrane integrity and reverse transcriptional activity bacteria in reclamation effluents had significant correlations with the culturable bacteria at the end point of the distribution system, demonstrating that PMA-qPCR and Q-RT-PCR are sensitive and accurate tools to determine and predict bacterial regrowth in water distribution systems. This study has improved our understanding of microbial removal and regrowth in reclaimed water treatment and distribution systems. And the results also recommended that more processes should be equipped to remove viable bacteria in water reclamation plants for the sake of inhibition microbial regrowth during water distribution and usages. PMID:26595310

  3. URBAN WATER SYSTEM PATHOGEN ASSESSMENT: SIGNIFICANCE OF DISTRIBUTION BIOFILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), while not new to science is now providing a fundamental role in framing water guidelines internationally as well as identifying research gaps to be filled. Professor Ashbolt has been instrumental in working QMRA concepts into WHO gui...

  4. State of Technology for Rehabilitation of Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact that the lack of investment in water infrastructure will have on the performance of aging underground infrastructure over time is well documented and the needed funding estimates range as high as $325 billion over the next 20 years. With the current annual replacement...

  5. Transformation of Bisphenol A in Water Distribution Systems, A Pilot-scale Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halogenations of bisphenol A (BPA) in a pilot-scale water distribution system (WDS) of cement-lined ductile cast iron pipe were investigated under the condition: pH 7.3±0.3, water flow velocity of 1.0 m/s, and 25 °C ± 1 °C in water temperature. The testing water was chlorinated f...

  6. Condition Assessment of Ferrous Water Transmission and Distribution Systems State of Technology Review Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This White Paper was developed to serve as the basis for discussion at a Technology Forum on Condition Assessment of Water Transmission and Distribution Systems that was held on September 9 and 10, 2008, at Edison, NJ. It was distributed to the Forum participants for review in a...

  7. PHYLOGENETIC DIVERSITY IN DRINKING WATER BACTERIA IN A DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work was carried out to characterize the composition of microbial populations in a distribution system simulator (DSS) by direct sequence analysis of 16S rDNA clone libraries. Bacterial populations were examined in chlorinated distribution water and chloraminated DSS feed an...

  8. Dual Water Systems: Characterization and Performance for Distribution of Reclaimed Water (WaterRF Report 4333)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research tasks included: an inventory of cases where dual systems have been implemented; formulation of a protocol to identify claimed benefits, costs, and risks; collection of data (quantitative and anecdotal) to assess performance; display of data in the form of performance...

  9. Microbial Community Dynamics of a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system (i.e. loop). The loop (BW-AB-I) received chlorinated municipal water (BW-C) amended with ammonia (2mg/L monochloramine). After six years of continuous operation, the operational ...

  10. Controlling Disinfection Residual Losses in Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Results from Experimental Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has become generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. These reactions may be physical, chemical and/or microbiological in nature. Perhaps one of the most serious aspects of water...

  11. Controlling Disinfection Residual Losses in Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Results from Experimental Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. These reactions may be physical, chemical and/or microbiological in nature. Perhaps one of the most serious aspects of water quality...

  12. Second-Order Chlorine Decay and Trihalomethanes Formation in a Pilot-Scale Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is well known that model-building of chlorine decay in real water distribution systems is difficult because chlorine decay is influenced by many factors (e.g., bulk water demand, pipe-wall demand, piping material, flow velocity, and residence time). In this paper, experiments ...

  13. DESIGN OF SUSTAINABLE WATER SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR PIGNON, HAITI

    EPA Science Inventory

    In conducting a survey of the population we found that Pignon is in need of a sustainable water supply and distribution system. We had no prior available data on the town, so we collected elevation data, figured water demand and modeled it against the supply, mapped the entire...

  14. ASSESSING AND PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF CONTAMINANTS IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote monitoring data, field studies, and the modeling software ? EPANET, can be used by drinking water utilities and consulting engineers to predict flow dynamics and information on the spatial distribution and concentration of contaminants in a drinking water system. A field ...

  15. THE OCCURRENCE OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION IN LEAD PIPE SCALES FROM DOMESTIC DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that contaminants, such as Al, As and Ra, can accumulate in drinking water distribution system solids. The release of accumulated contaminants back into the water supply could result in elevated levels at consumers’ taps, and current monitoring practices d...

  16. A Comprehensive Investigation of Copper Pitting Corrosion in a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper pipe pitting is a complicated corrosion process for which exact causes and solutions are uncertain. This paper presents the findings of a comprehensive investigation of a cold water copper pitting corrosion problem in a drinking water distribution system, including a refi...

  17. Hydraulic model analysis of water distribution system, Rockwell International, Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Perstein, J.; Castellano, J.A.

    1989-01-20

    Rockwell International requested an analysis of the existing plant site water supply distribution system at Rocky Flats, Colorado, to determine its adequacy. On September 26--29, 1988, Hughes Associates, Inc., Fire Protection Engineers, accompanied by Rocky Flats Fire Department engineers and suppression personnel, conducted water flow tests at the Rocky Flats plant site. Thirty-seven flows from various points throughout the plant site were taken on the existing domestic supply/fire main installation to assure comprehensive and thorough representation of the Rocky Flats water distribution system capability. The analysis was completed in four phases which are described, together with a summary of general conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Optimal reconstruction of historical water supply to a distribution system: A. Methodology.

    PubMed

    Aral, M M; Guan, J; Maslia, M L; Sautner, J B; Gillig, R E; Reyes, J J; Williams, R C

    2004-09-01

    The New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS), with support from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted an epidemiological study of childhood leukaemia and nervous system cancers that occurred in the period 1979 through 1996 in Dover Township, Ocean County, New Jersey. The epidemiological study explored a wide variety of possible risk factors, including environmental exposures. ATSDR and NJDHSS determined that completed human exposure pathways to groundwater contaminants occurred in the past through private and community water supplies (i.e. the water distribution system serving the area). To investigate this exposure, a model of the water distribution system was developed and calibrated through an extensive field investigation. The components of this water distribution system, such as number of pipes, number of tanks, and number of supply wells in the network, changed significantly over a 35-year period (1962--1996), the time frame established for the epidemiological study. Data on the historical management of this system was limited. Thus, it was necessary to investigate alternative ways to reconstruct the operation of the system and test the sensitivity of the system to various alternative operations. Manual reconstruction of the historical water supply to the system in order to provide this sensitivity analysis was time-consuming and labour intensive, given the complexity of the system and the time constraints imposed on the study. To address these issues, the problem was formulated as an optimization problem, where it was assumed that the water distribution system was operated in an optimum manner at all times to satisfy the constraints in the system. The solution to the optimization problem provided the historical water supply strategy in a consistent manner for each month of the study period. The non-uniqueness of the selected historical water supply strategy was addressed by the formulation of a second

  19. Optimization Model of Water Distribution System Using Heuristic Algorithm to Sketch Vulnerability Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Y.-C.; Tung, C.-P.

    2012-04-01

    With the development of society, more and more people move to a city, which results in heavily increase of clean water demand. The study area, Kaohsiung city, is the second largest city with many industrial activities in Taiwan, and rainfall concentrates extremely in the wet season. The ratio of rainfall for wet and dry season is 9:1, and thus water supply for agriculture, industry and increasing population becomes more and more difficult while this city develops further and especially when droughts happen. To solve above problem, a robust pipe network with well-designed water supply distribution system becomes much more important. The purpose of this research is to find the optimal solution for water distribution system, which decides the amount of water for all nodes in the network and results in the smallest amount of people affected by shortage of water when the water network faces different degree of droughts. In this research, EPANET2 is used to simulate water distribution for different drought conditions. On the other hand, EPANET2 simulation and GIS population information are combined to calculate how many people are affected for each node in the network; then we can know the total affected people in the whole city for each water distribution alternative. Finally, heuristic algorithm is applied to find the optimal solution for different degree of droughts. Furthermore, by comparing the optimal solutions, the water supply vulnerability map can be drawn for Kaohsiung city, which reveals the weaker part of Kaohsiung and should be strengthened first for future extreme climate. Keywords: Water Supply Distribution System, Heuristic Algorithm, EPANET2, Vulnerability Map, and Optimization Model

  20. Water Distribution System Deficiencies and Gastrointestinal Illness: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Joshua S.; Colford, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Water distribution systems are vulnerable to performance deficiencies that can cause (re)contamination of treated water and plausibly lead to increased risk of gastrointestinal illness (GII) in consumers. Objectives: It is well established that large system disruptions in piped water networks can cause GII outbreaks. We hypothesized that routine network problems can also contribute to background levels of waterborne illness and conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the impact of distribution system deficiencies on endemic GII. Methods: We reviewed published studies that compared direct tap water consumption to consumption of tap water re-treated at the point of use (POU) and studies of specific system deficiencies such as breach of physical or hydraulic pipe integrity and lack of disinfectant residual. Results: In settings with network malfunction, consumers of tap water versus POU-treated water had increased GII [incidence density ratio (IDR) = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.79]. The subset of nonblinded studies showed a significant association between GII and tap water versus POU-treated water consumption (IDR = 1.52; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.20), but there was no association based on studies that blinded participants to their POU water treatment status (IDR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.90, 1.08). Among studies focusing on specific network deficiencies, GII was associated with temporary water outages (relative risk = 3.26; 95% CI: 1.48, 7.19) as well as chronic outages in intermittently operated distribution systems (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% CI: 1.26, 2.07). Conclusions: Tap water consumption is associated with GII in malfunctioning distribution networks. System deficiencies such as water outages also are associated with increased GII, suggesting a potential health risk for consumers served by piped water networks. Citation: Ercumen A, Gruber JS, Colford JM Jr. 2014. Water distribution system deficiencies and gastrointestinal illness: a systematic review and

  1. THE USE AND EFFECTIVENESS OF DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is being developed as a background document on the existing literature information, data and research regarding for what purposes systems apply disinfectant residuals to drinking water within or immediately prior to entering the distribution system, as well as the effe...

  2. Linking Health Concepts in the Assessment and Evaluation of Water Distribution Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karney, Bryan W.; Filion, Yves R.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of health is not only a specific criterion for evaluation of water quality delivered by a distribution system but also a suitable paradigm for overall functioning of the hydraulic and structural components of the system. This article views health, despite its complexities, as the only criterion with suitable depth and breadth to allow…

  3. Effect of PVC and iron materials on Mn(II) deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, José M; Reyes, Lourdes P; Alvarado, Carmen N; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2006-08-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and iron pipe materials differentially impacted manganese deposition within a drinking water distribution system that experiences black water problems because it receives soluble manganese from a surface water reservoir that undergoes biogeochemical cycling of manganese. The water quality study was conducted in a section of the distribution system of Tegucigalpa, Honduras and evaluated the influence of iron and PVC pipe materials on the concentrations of soluble and particulate iron and manganese, and determined the composition of scales formed on PVC and iron pipes. As expected, total Fe concentrations were highest in water from iron pipes. Water samples obtained from PVC pipes showed higher total Mn concentrations and more black color than that obtained from iron pipes. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that manganese was incorporated into the iron tubercles and thus not readily dislodged from the pipes by water flow. The PVC pipes contained a thin surface scale consisting of white and brown layers of different chemical composition; the brown layer was in contact with the water and contained 6% manganese by weight. Mn composed a greater percentage by weight of the PVC scale than the iron pipe scale; the PVC scale was easily dislodged by flowing water. This research demonstrates that interactions between water and the infrastructure used for its supply affect the quality of the final drinking water. PMID:16765409

  4. Comparison of Microbial Communities in a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system. After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The study was organized ...

  5. Regrowth of potential opportunistic pathogens and algae in reclaimed-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Jjemba, Patrick K; Weinrich, Lauren A; Cheng, Wei; Giraldo, Eugenio; Lechevallier, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    A study of the quality of reclaimed water in treated effluent, after storage, and at three points in the distribution system of four plants in California, Florida, Massachusetts, and New York was conducted for 1 year. The plants had different treatment processes (conventional versus membrane bioreactor), production capacities, and methods for storage of the water, and the intended end uses of the water were different. The analysis focused on the occurrence of indicator bacteria (heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms, Escherichia coli, and enterococci) and opportunistic pathogens (Aeromonas spp., enteropathogenic E. coli O157:H7, Legionella spp., Mycobacterium spp., and Pseudomonas spp.), as well as algae. Using immunological methods, E. coli O157:H7 was detected in the effluent of only one system, but it was not detected at the sampling points, suggesting that its survival in the system was poor. Although all of the treatment systems effectively reduced the levels of bacteria in the effluent, bacteria regrew in the reservoir and distribution systems because of the loss of residual disinfectant and high assimilable organic carbon levels. In the systems with open reservoirs, algal growth reduced the water quality by increasing the turbidity and accumulating at the end of the distribution system. Opportunistic pathogens, notably Aeromonas, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Pseudomonas, occurred more frequently than indicator bacteria (enterococci, coliforms, and E. coli). The Mycobacterium spp. were very diverse and occurred most frequently in membrane bioreactor systems, and Mycobacterium cookii was identified more often than the other species. The public health risk associated with these opportunistic pathogens in reclaimed water is unknown. Collectively, our results show the need to develop best management practices for reclaimed water to control bacterial regrowth and degradation of water before it is utilized at the point of use. PMID:20453149

  6. The spatial distribution of pollutants in pipe-scale of large-diameter pipelines in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingqing; Chen, Huanyu; Yao, Lingdan; Wei, Zongyuan; Lou, Liping; Shan, Yonggui; Endalkachew, Sahle-Demessie; Mallikarjuna, Nadagouda; Hu, Baolan; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    In large-diameter drinking water pipelines, spatial differences in hydraulic and physiochemical conditions may also result in spatial variations in pipe corrosion, biofilm growth and pollutant accumulation. In this article, the spatial distributions of various metals and organic contaminants in two 19-year-old grey cast iron pipes which had an internal diameter of 600mm (DN600), were investigated and analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Energy Dispersive Spectrometer, X-ray Diffraction, etc. The spatial distribution of heavy metals varied significantly across the pipe section, and iron, manganese, lead, copper, and chromium were highest in concentration in the upper portion pipe-scales. However, the highest aluminum and zinc content was detected in the lower portion pipe-scales. Apart from some common types of hydrocarbons formed by microbial metabolites, there were also some microalgae metabolites and exogenous contaminants accumulated in pipe-scale, which also exhibited high diversity between different spatial locations. The spatial distributions of the physical and chemical properties of pipe-scale and contaminants were quite different in large-diameter pipes. The finding put forward higher requirements on the research method about drinking water distribution system chemical safety. And the scientific community need understand trend and dynamics of drinking water pipe systems better. PMID:27244696

  7. Water security: continuous monitoring of water distribution systems for chemical agents by SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inscore, Frank; Shende, Chetan; Sengupta, Atanu; Farquharson, Stuart

    2007-04-01

    Ensuring safe water supplies requires continuous monitoring for potential poisons and portable analyzers to map distribution in the event of an attack. In the case of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) analyzers are needed that have sufficient sensitivity (part-per-billion), selectivity (differentiate the CWA from its hydrolysis products), and speed (less than 10 minutes) to be of value. We have been investigating the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to meet these requirements by detecting CWAs and their hydrolysis products in water. The expected success of SERS is based on reported detection of single molecules, the one-to-one relationship between a chemical and its Raman spectrum, and the minimal sample preparation requirements. Recently, we have developed a simple sampling device designed to optimize the interaction of the target molecules with the SERS-active material with the goal of increasing sensitivity and decreasing sampling times. This sampling device employs a syringe to draw the water sample containing the analyte into a capillary filled with the SERS-active material. Recently we used such SERS-active capillaries to measure 1 ppb cyanide in water. Here we extend these measurements to nerve agent hydrolysis products using a portable Raman analyzer.

  8. Corrosion and Scaling Potential in Drinking Water Distribution System of Tabriz, Northwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taghipour, Hassan; Shakerkhatibi, Mohammad; Pourakbar, Mojtaba; Belvasi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Background: This paper discusses the corrosion and scaling potential of Tabriz drinking water distribution system in Northwest of Iran. Internal corrosion of piping is a serious problem in drinking water industry. Corrosive water can cause intrusion of heavy metals especially lead in to water, therefore effecting public health. The aim of this study was to determine corrosion and scaling potential in potable water distribution system of Tabriz during the spring and summer in 2011. Methods: This study was carried out using Langlier Saturation Index, Ryznar Stability Index, Puckorius Scaling Index, and Aggressiveness indices. Eighty samples were taken from all over the city within two seasons, spring, and summer. Related parameters including temperature, pH, total dissolved solids, calcium hardness, and total alkalinity in all samples were measured in laboratory according to standard method manual. For the statistical analysis of the results, SPSS software (version 11.5) was used Results: The mean and standard deviation values of Langlier, Ryznar, Puckorius and Aggressiveness Indices were equal to -0.68 (±0.43), 8.43 (±0.55), 7.86 (±0.36) and 11.23 (±0.43), respectively. By survey of corrosion indices, it was found that Tabriz drinking water is corrosive. Conclusion: In order to corrosion control, it is suggested that laboratorial study with regard to the distribution system condition be carried out to adjust effective parameters such as pH. PMID:24688924

  9. Bacterial Composition of Biofilms Collected From Two Service Areas in a Metropolitan Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development and succession of bacteria were examined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries generated from various biofilms within a metropolitan water distribution system. Biofilms were obtained from off-line devices using polycarbonate coupons from annular reactors incubated for ...

  10. Rehabilitation of Wastewater Collection and Water Distribution Systems -State of Technology Review Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This White Paper is intended to provide an overview of the current state-of-the-practice and current state-of-the-art for rehabilitation of pipes and structures within the wastewater collection and water distribution systems. Rehabilitation is defined as repair, renewal, and rep...

  11. PHYLOGENETIC AFFILIATION OF WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM BACTERIAL ISOLATES USING 16S RDNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previously described study, only 15% of the bacterial strains isolated from a water distribution system (WDS) grown on R2A agar were identifiable using fatty acid methyl esthers (FAME) profiling. The lack of success was attributed to the use of fatty acid databases of bacter...

  12. Mineralogical and Molecular Microbial Characterization of a Lead Pipe Removed from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA) Lead and Copper Rule established an action level for lead of 0.0 15 mg/L in a 1 liter first draw sample at the consumer's tap. Lead corrosion and solubility in drinking water distribution systems are largely controlled by the fo...

  13. Decision Support for Renewal of Wastewater Collections and Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decision of how to accomplish the renewal of existing wastewater collection and water distribution systems involves the evaluation of many criteria and parameters. These criteria must be evaluated thoroughly to determine the best way of rehabilitating or replacing these sys...

  14. DECISION SUPPORT FOR RENEWAL OF WASTEWATER COLLECTIONS AND WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decision of how to accomplish the renewal of existing wastewater collection and water distribution systems involves the evaluation of many criteria and parameters. These criteria must be evaluated thoroughly to determine the best way of rehabilitating or replacing these syste...

  15. The Adsorption of Arsenic on Iron Pipes in Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to remain compliant with the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper rule, it is pivotal to understand the relationship between factors affecting lead release in drinking water distribution systems. Lead solids were synthesized in cell experiments using a pH range of 6-11 with both 1...

  16. High-throughput profiling of antibiotic resistance genes in drinking water treatment plants and distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Like; Ouyang, Weiying; Qian, Yanyun; Su, Chao; Su, Jianqiang; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are present in surface water and often cannot be completely eliminated by drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). Improper elimination of the ARG-harboring microorganisms contaminates the water supply and would lead to animal and human disease. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to determine the most effective ways by which DWTPs can eliminate ARGs. Here, we tested water samples from two DWTPs and distribution systems and detected the presence of 285 ARGs, 8 transposases, and intI-1 by utilizing high-throughput qPCR. The prevalence of ARGs differed in the two DWTPs, one of which employed conventional water treatments while the other had advanced treatment processes. The relative abundance of ARGs increased significantly after the treatment with biological activated carbon (BAC), raising the number of detected ARGs from 76 to 150. Furthermore, the final chlorination step enhanced the relative abundance of ARGs in the finished water generated from both DWTPs. The total enrichment of ARGs varied from 6.4-to 109.2-fold in tap water compared to finished water, among which beta-lactam resistance genes displayed the highest enrichment. Six transposase genes were detected in tap water samples, with the transposase gene TnpA-04 showing the greatest enrichment (up to 124.9-fold). We observed significant positive correlations between ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) during the distribution systems, indicating that transposases and intI-1 may contribute to antibiotic resistance in drinking water. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the diversity and abundance of ARGs in drinking water treatment systems utilizing high-throughput qPCR techniques in China. PMID:26890482

  17. Second-order chlorine decay and trihalomethanes formation in a pilot-scale water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Yu, Jieze; Zhang, Tu-qiao; Mao, Xinwei; Shao, Weiyun

    2012-08-01

    It is well known that model-building of chlorine decay in real water distribution systems is difficult because chlorine decay is influenced by many factors (e.g., bulk water demand, pipe-wall demand, piping material, flow velocity, and residence time). In this paper, experiments were run to investigate the kinetic model of chlorine decay and the formation model of trihalomethanes (THMs) in pilot-scale water distribution systems. Experimental results show that the rate constants of chlorine decay, including wall decay and bulk decay, increasing with temperature. Moreover, the kinetic model of chlorine decay and the formation model of THMs describe experiment data of pilot-scale water distribution systems. The effect of different piping material on chlorine decay and THMs formation were also investigated. The rate constants of chlorine decay are ranked in order: stainless steel pipe, ductile iron pipe, and last, polyethelene pipe because wall decay is the largest in stainless steel pipe than that in other piping material. Correspondingly, the rate of THMs formation follows the order of stainless steel pipe, ductile iron pipe, and last, polyethelene pipe because of less chlorine in bulk water reacting with the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). PMID:22953450

  18. Controllability analysis as a pre-selection method for sensor placement in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Diao, Kegong; Rauch, Wolfgang

    2013-10-15

    Detection of contamination events in water distribution systems is a crucial task for maintaining water security. Online monitoring is considered as the most cost-effective technology to protect against the impacts of contaminant intrusions. Optimization methods for sensor placement enable automated sensor layout design based on hydraulic and water quality simulation. However, this approach results in an excessive computational burden. In this paper we outline the application of controllability analysis as preprocessing method for sensor placement. Based on case studies we demonstrate that the method decreases the number of decision variables for subsequent optimization dramatically to app. 30 to 40 percent. PMID:23948563

  19. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  20. An integrated logit model for contamination event detection in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Housh, Mashor; Ostfeld, Avi

    2015-05-15

    The problem of contamination event detection in water distribution systems has become one of the most challenging research topics in water distribution systems analysis. Current attempts for event detection utilize a variety of approaches including statistical, heuristics, machine learning, and optimization methods. Several existing event detection systems share a common feature in which alarms are obtained separately for each of the water quality indicators. Unifying those single alarms from different indicators is usually performed by means of simple heuristics. A salient feature of the current developed approach is using a statistically oriented model for discrete choice prediction which is estimated using the maximum likelihood method for integrating the single alarms. The discrete choice model is jointly calibrated with other components of the event detection system framework in a training data set using genetic algorithms. The fusing process of each indicator probabilities, which is left out of focus in many existing event detection system models, is confirmed to be a crucial part of the system which could be modelled by exploiting a discrete choice model for improving its performance. The developed methodology is tested on real water quality data, showing improved performances in decreasing the number of false positive alarms and in its ability to detect events with higher probabilities, compared to previous studies. PMID:25770443

  1. Reclaimed water as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes: distribution system and irrigation implications.

    PubMed

    Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Ma, Yanjun; O'Brien, Maureen; Pruden, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Treated wastewater is increasingly being reused to achieve sustainable water management in arid regions. The objective of this study was to quantify the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in recycled water, particularly after it has passed through the distribution system, and to consider point-of-use implications for soil irrigation. Three separate reclaimed wastewater distribution systems in the western U.S. were examined. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to quantify ARGs corresponding to resistance to sulfonamides (sul1, sul2), macrolides (ermF), tetracycline [tet(A), tet(O)], glycopeptides (vanA), and methicillin (mecA), in addition to genes present in waterborne pathogens Legionella pneumophila (Lmip), Escherichia coli (gadAB), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ecfx, gyrB). In a parallel lab study, the effect of irrigating an agricultural soil with secondary, chlorinated, or dechlorinated wastewater effluent was examined in batch microcosms. A broader range of ARGs were detected after the reclaimed water passed through the distribution systems, highlighting the importance of considering bacterial re-growth and the overall water quality at the point of use (POU). Screening for pathogens with qPCR indicated presence of Lmip and gadAB genes, but not ecfx or gyrB. In the lab study, chlorination was observed to reduce 16S rRNA and sul2 gene copies in the wastewater effluent, while dechlorination had no apparent effect. ARGs levels did not change with time in soil slurries incubated after a single irrigation event with any of the effluents. However, when irrigated repeatedly with secondary wastewater effluent (not chlorinated or dechlorinated), elevated levels of sul1 and sul2 were observed. This study suggests that reclaimed water may be an important reservoir of ARGs, especially at the POU, and that attention should be directed toward the fate of ARGs in irrigation water and the implications for human health. PMID:23755046

  2. Household Water Systems: Tailoring Treatment Alternatives to Contaminants in Groundwater and Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SSWR Webinar will provide an overview of ORD point-of-use/point-of entry research studies. The presentation will document the applicability of POU/POE devices and the regulatory requirements for household water systems under the Safe Drinking Water Act. The presentation wi...

  3. Impact of particles on sediment accumulation in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Vreeburg, J H G; Schippers, D; Verberk, J Q J C; van Dijk, J C

    2008-10-01

    Discolouration of drinking water is one of the main reasons customers complain to their water company. Though corrosion of cast iron is often seen as the main source for this problem, the particles originating from the treatment plant play an important and potentially dominant role in the generation of a discolouration risk in drinking water distribution systems. To investigate this thesis a study was performed in a drinking water distribution system. In two similar isolated network areas the effect of particles on discolouration risk was studied with particle counting, the Resuspension Potential Method (RPM) and assessment of the total accumulated sediment. In the 'Control Area', supplied with normal drinking water, the discolouration risk was regenerated within 1.5 year. In the 'Research Area', supplied with particle-free water, this will take 10-15 years. An obvious remedy for controlling the discolouration risk is to improve the treatment with respect to the short peaks that are caused by particle breakthrough. PMID:18789809

  4. Importance of exposure model in estimating impacts when a water distribution system is contaminated.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M. J.; Janke, R.; Environmental Science Division; USEPA

    2008-09-01

    The quantity of a contaminant ingested by individuals using tap water drawn from a water distribution system during a contamination event depends on the concentration of the contaminant in the water and the volume of water ingested. If the concentration varies with time, the actual time of exposure affects the quantity ingested. The influence of the timing of exposure and of individual variability in the volume of water ingested on estimated impacts for a contamination event has received limited attention. We examine the significance of ingestion timing and variability in the volume of water ingested by using a number of models for ingestion timing and volume. Contaminant concentrations were obtained from simulations of an actual distribution system for cases involving contaminant injections lasting from 1 to 24 h. We find that assumptions about exposure can significantly influence estimated impacts, especially when injection durations are short and impact thresholds are high. The influence of ingestion timing and volume should be considered when assessing impacts for contamination events.

  5. Core-satellite populations and seasonality of water meter biofilms in a metropolitan drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Ling, Fangqiong; Hwang, Chiachi; LeChevallier, Mark W; Andersen, Gary L; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-03-01

    Drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) harbor the microorganisms in biofilms and suspended communities, yet the diversity and spatiotemporal distribution have been studied mainly in the suspended communities. This study examined the diversity of biofilms in an urban DWDS, its relationship with suspended communities and its dynamics. The studied DWDS in Urbana, Illinois received conventionally treated and disinfected water sourced from the groundwater. Over a 2-year span, biomass were sampled from household water meters (n=213) and tap water (n=20) to represent biofilm and suspended communities, respectively. A positive correlation between operational taxonomic unit (OTU) abundance and occupancy was observed. Examined under a 'core-satellite' model, the biofilm community comprised 31 core populations that encompassed 76.7% of total 16 S rRNA gene pyrosequences. The biofilm communities shared with the suspended community highly abundant and prevalent OTUs, which related to methano-/methylotrophs (i.e., Methylophilaceae and Methylococcaceae) and aerobic heterotrophs (Sphingomonadaceae and Comamonadaceae), yet differed by specific core populations and lower diversity and evenness. Multivariate tests indicated seasonality as the main contributor to community structure variation. This pattern was resilient to annual change and correlated to the cyclic fluctuations of core populations. The findings of a distinctive biofilm community assemblage and methano-/methyltrophic primary production provide critical insights for developing more targeted water quality monitoring programs and treatment strategies for groundwater-sourced drinking water systems. PMID:26251872

  6. Bacterial community of iron tubercles from a drinking water distribution system and its occurrence in stagnant tap water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Jia, Rui-Bao; Li, Li

    2013-07-01

    Bacteria in drinking water distribution systems can cause deterioration of the water quality, and the microbial quality of tap water is closely related to consumer health. In the present study, the potential effects of bacteria attached to cast iron pipes on tap water in a distribution system were investigated. Comparison of the bacterial community composition of pipe tubercles with that of stagnant tap water samples based on a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the communities were related. Specifically, the main bacterial members were identical to each other. The bacterial community was found to be dominated by Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, which included Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, Lactococcus, Brevundimonas, Rheinheimera, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, and Herbaspirillum. Heterotrophic bacteria proliferation was observed during the period of stagnation, followed by a decrease of assimilable organic carbon and a slight increase of microbially available phosphorus. These findings indicated that the regrowth of bacteria might be boosted by the release of nutrients such as phosphorus from the pipe walls, as well as the decline of residual chlorine during stagnation. Inorganic contaminants at low levels, including Al, Mn, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cu, and Ni, were detected in tubercles and were concentrated in particulates from tap water following the release of iron during stagnation. PMID:23702591

  7. Using Amplicon Sequencing To Characterize and Monitor Bacterial Diversity in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jennifer L. A.; Weyrich, Laura S.; Sawade, Emma; Drikas, Mary; Cooper, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water assessments use a variety of microbial, physical, and chemical indicators to evaluate water treatment efficiency and product water quality. However, these indicators do not allow the complex biological communities, which can adversely impact the performance of drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs), to be characterized. Entire bacterial communities can be studied quickly and inexpensively using targeted metagenomic amplicon sequencing. Here, amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene region was performed alongside traditional water quality measures to assess the health, quality, and efficiency of two distinct, full-scale DWDSs: (i) a linear DWDS supplied with unfiltered water subjected to basic disinfection before distribution and (ii) a complex, branching DWDS treated by a four-stage water treatment plant (WTP) prior to disinfection and distribution. In both DWDSs bacterial communities differed significantly after disinfection, demonstrating the effectiveness of both treatment regimes. However, bacterial repopulation occurred further along in the DWDSs, and some end-user samples were more similar to the source water than to the postdisinfection water. Three sample locations appeared to be nitrified, displaying elevated nitrate levels and decreased ammonia levels, and nitrifying bacterial species, such as Nitrospira, were detected. Burkholderiales were abundant in samples containing large amounts of monochloramine, indicating resistance to disinfection. Genera known to contain pathogenic and fecal-associated species were also identified in several locations. From this study, we conclude that metagenomic amplicon sequencing is an informative method to support current compliance-based methods and can be used to reveal bacterial community interactions with the chemical and physical properties of DWDSs. PMID:26162884

  8. Coliform non-compliance nightmares in water-supply distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geldreich, E.E.

    1988-01-01

    Coliform occurrences in distribution systems have created a great concern for both utilities and water authorities because of the implied public-health implications and failure to meet Federal regulations. Many of the known cases involve systems in the east and midwest. The common denominator being systems that have significant amounts of pipe networks over 75 years old and all are treating surface waters. Origins for these contamination events can be found in source-water fluctuations, failures in treatment-barrier protection, or loss of pipe-network integrity. Once passage into the distribution network has been achieved, some of the coliforms (Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter) and other heterotrophic bacteria adapt to the pipe environment, finding protection and nutrient support in pipe sediments. Under conditions of seasonal warm waters (10 degC) and availability of assimilable organics in the pipe sediments and tubercles, colonization grows into biofilms that may slough-off into the water supply, creating a coliform non-compliance problem. Significance of these occurrences and control measures are part of a realistic action plan presented for guidance.

  9. Redox gradients in distribution systems influence water quality, corrosion, and microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Masters, Sheldon; Wang, Hong; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Simulated distribution systems (SDSs) defined the interplay between disinfectant type (free chlorine and chloramines), water age (1-10.2 days), and pipe material (PVC, iron and cement surfaces) on water chemistry, redox zones and infrastructure degradation. Redox gradients developed as a function of water age and pipe material affected the quality of water consumers would receive. Free chlorine was most stable in the presence of PVC while chloramine was most stable in the presence of cement. At a 3.6 day water age the residual in the chlorinated PVC SDS was more than 3.5 times higher than in the chlorinated iron or cement systems. In contrast, the residual in the chloraminated cement SDS was more than 10 times greater than in the chloraminated iron or PVC systems. Near the point of entry to the SDSs where disinfectant residuals were present, free chlorine tended to cause as much as 4 times more iron corrosion when compared to chloramines. Facultative denitrifying bacteria were ubiquitous, and caused complete loss of nitrogen at distal points in systems with iron, and these bacteria co-occurred with very severe pitting attack (1.6-1.9 mm/year) at high water age. PMID:25462724

  10. A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline by using distributed optical fiber vibration sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Sun, Zhenshi; Qian, Ya; Zhang, Tao; Rao, Yunjiang

    2015-07-01

    A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline with a distributed optical fiber vibration sensing (DOVS) system based on the phase-sensitive OTDR technology is studied in this paper. By monitoring one end of a common communication optical fiber cable, which is laid in the inner wall of the pipe, we can detect and locate the water leakages easily. Different apertures under different pressures are tested and it shows that the DOVS has good responses when the aperture is equal or larger than 4 mm and the inner pressure reaches 0.2 Mpa for a steel pipe with DN 91cm×EN 2cm.

  11. Evaluating the risk of water distribution system failure: A shared frailty model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.; Thurnau, Robert C.

    2011-12-01

    Condition assessment (CA) Modeling is drawing increasing interest as a technique that can assist in managing drinking water infrastructure. This paper develops a model based on the application of a Cox proportional hazard (PH)/shared frailty model and applies it to evaluating the risk of failure in drinking water networks using data from the Laramie Water Utility (located in Laramie, Wyoming, USA). Using the risk model a cost/ benefit analysis incorporating the inspection value method (IVM), is used to assist in making improved repair, replacement and rehabilitation decisions for selected drinking water distribution system pipes. A separate model is developed to predict failures in prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP). Various currently available inspection technologies are presented and discussed.

  12. Methodological approaches for studying the microbial ecology of drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, Isabel; Boxall, Joby B; Deines, Peter; Sekar, Raju; Fish, Katherine E; Biggs, Catherine A

    2014-11-15

    The study of the microbial ecology of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) has traditionally been based on culturing organisms from bulk water samples. The development and application of molecular methods has supplied new tools for examining the microbial diversity and activity of environmental samples, yielding new insights into the microbial community and its diversity within these engineered ecosystems. In this review, the currently available methods and emerging approaches for characterising microbial communities, including both planktonic and biofilm ways of life, are critically evaluated. The study of biofilms is considered particularly important as it plays a critical role in the processes and interactions occurring at the pipe wall and bulk water interface. The advantages, limitations and usefulness of methods that can be used to detect and assess microbial abundance, community composition and function are discussed in a DWDS context. This review will assist hydraulic engineers and microbial ecologists in choosing the most appropriate tools to assess drinking water microbiology and related aspects. PMID:25105587

  13. Seattle distribution system corrosion control study. Volume 2. Tolt River water pilot plant study

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, C.E.; Hoyt, B.P.

    1984-03-01

    For 6 months, the Seattle Water Department conducted a corrosion treatment pilot plant study, obtaining data on the treatment of Tolt River water with lime/sodium carbonate, lime/sodium bicarbonate, and lime/bicarbonate/silicate. Continuous-flow pipe coupon tests were conducted to determine corrosion rates, penetration rates, and corrosion types for copper, galvanized steel and black steel pipes. Metal leaching tests were conducted using small diameter pipes. Research showed that using lime plus sodium carbonate, lime plus sodium bicarbonate, and lime plus bicarbonate plus silicate will significantly reduce corrosion in home plumbing systems. Based on this pilot study, lime plus sodium carbonate treatment is recommended for the Cedar River water supply at an average dosage of 1.7 mg/L CaO. This dose should achieve an average distribution system pH of 7.9 and an alkalinity of 18 mg/l CaCO3.

  14. Sulfate Reducing Bacteria and Mycobacteria Dominate the Biofilm Communities in a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Smith, C Kimloi; LaPara, Timothy M; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2015-07-21

    The quantity and composition of bacterial biofilms growing on 10 water mains from a full-scale chloraminated water distribution system were analyzed using real-time PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene and next-generation, high-throughput Illumina sequencing. Water mains with corrosion tubercles supported the greatest amount of bacterial biomass (n = 25; geometric mean = 2.5 × 10(7) copies cm(-2)), which was significantly higher (P = 0.04) than cement-lined cast-iron mains (n = 6; geometric mean = 2.0 × 10(6) copies cm(-2)). Despite spatial variation of community composition and bacterial abundance in water main biofilms, the communities on the interior main surfaces were surprisingly similar, containing a core group of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) assigned to only 17 different genera. Bacteria from the genus Mycobacterium dominated all communities at the main wall-bulk water interface (25-78% of the community), regardless of main age, estimated water age, main material, and the presence of corrosion products. Further sequencing of the mycobacterial heat shock protein gene (hsp65) provided species-level taxonomic resolution of mycobacteria. The two dominant Mycobacteria present, M. frederiksbergense (arithmetic mean = 85.7% of hsp65 sequences) and M. aurum (arithmetic mean = 6.5% of hsp65 sequences), are generally considered to be nonpathogenic. Two opportunistic pathogens, however, were detected at low numbers: M. hemophilum (arithmetic mean = 1.5% of hsp65 sequences) and M. abscessus (arithmetic mean = 0.006% of hsp65 sequences). Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfovibrio, which have been implicated in microbially influenced corrosion, dominated all communities located underneath corrosion tubercules (arithmetic mean = 67.5% of the community). This research provides novel insights into the quantity and composition of biofilms in full-scale drinking water distribution systems, which is critical for assessing the risks to public health and to the

  15. Community shift of biofilms developed in a full-scale drinking water distribution system switching from different water sources.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiying; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Junpeng; Qiao, Yu; Xu, Chen; Liu, Yao; Qian, Lin; Li, Wenming; Dong, Bingzhi

    2016-02-15

    The bacterial community of biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) with various water sources has been rarely reported. In this research, biofilms were sampled at three points (A, B, and C) during the river water source phase (phase I), the interim period (phase II) and the reservoir water source phase (phase III), and the biofilm community was determined using the 454-pyrosequencing method. Results showed that microbial diversity declined in phase II but increased in phase III. The primary phylum was Proteobacteria during three phases, while the dominant class at points A and B was Betaproteobacteria (>49%) during all phases, but that changed to Holophagae in phase II (62.7%) and Actinobacteria in phase III (35.6%) for point C, which was closely related to its water quality. More remarkable community shift was found at the genus level. In addition, analysis results showed that water quality could significantly affect microbial diversity together, while the nutrient composition (e.g. C/N ration) of the water environment might determine the microbial community. Furthermore, Mycobacterium spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were detected in the biofilm, which should give rise to attention. This study revealed that water source switching produced substantial impact on the biofilm community. PMID:26674678

  16. Investigation of Cost and Energy Optimization of Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Cherchi, Carla; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Gordon, Matthew; Bunn, Simon; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-11-17

    Holistic management of water and energy resources through energy and water quality management systems (EWQMSs) have traditionally aimed at energy cost reduction with limited or no emphasis on energy efficiency or greenhouse gas minimization. This study expanded the existing EWQMS framework and determined the impact of different management strategies for energy cost and energy consumption (e.g., carbon footprint) reduction on system performance at two drinking water utilities in California (United States). The results showed that optimizing for cost led to cost reductions of 4% (Utility B, summer) to 48% (Utility A, winter). The energy optimization strategy was successfully able to find the lowest energy use operation and achieved energy usage reductions of 3% (Utility B, summer) to 10% (Utility A, winter). The findings of this study revealed that there may be a trade-off between cost optimization (dollars) and energy use (kilowatt-hours), particularly in the summer, when optimizing the system for the reduction of energy use to a minimum incurred cost increases of 64% and 184% compared with the cost optimization scenario. Water age simulations through hydraulic modeling did not reveal any adverse effects on the water quality in the distribution system or in tanks from pump schedule optimization targeting either cost or energy minimization. PMID:26461069

  17. Stimulation of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) production by actinomycetes after cyclic chlorination in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Yi, Min; Alum, Absar

    2015-01-01

    The impact of fluctuation in chlorine residual on actinomycetes and the production of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were studied in cast-iron and PVC model distribution systems. Actinomycetes were spiked in each system and continued operation for a 12-day non-chlorine experiment, resulting in no changes in actinomycetes and MIB concentrations. Three cyclic chlorination events were performed and chlorine residuals were maintained as follows: 1.0 mg L(-1) for 24 h, 0 mg L(-1) for 48 h, 0.5 mg L(-1) for 48 h, 0 mg L(-1) for 48 h and 2 mg L(-1) for 24 h. After each chlorination event, 2 -3 log decrease in actinomycetes was noted in both systems. However, within 48 h at 0 mg L(-1) chlorine, the actinomycetes recovered to the pre-chlorination levels. On the contrary, MIB concentration in both systems remained un-impacted after the first cycle and increased by fourfold (< 5 to > 20 mg L(-1)) after the second cycle, which lasted through the third cycle despite the fact that actinomycetes numbers fluctuated 2-3 logs during this time period. For obtaining biofilm samples from field, water meters were collected from municipality drinking water distribution systems located in central Arizona. The actinomycetes concentration in asbestos cement pipe and cast iron pipe averaged 3.1 × 10(3) and 1.9 × 10(4) CFU cm(-2), respectively. The study shows that production of MIB is associated with changes in chlorine residual in the systems. This is the first report of cyclic chlorine shock as a stimulus for MIB production by actinomycetes in drinking water distribution system's ecology. PMID:25723062

  18. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATER ICE AND CHROMOPHORES ACROSS SATURN'S SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Ciarniello, M.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Hedman, M. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Flamini, E.

    2013-04-01

    Over the past eight years, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini orbiter has returned hyperspectral images in the 0.35-5.1 {mu}m range of the icy satellites and rings of Saturn. These very different objects show significant variations in surface composition, roughness, and regolith grain size as a result of their evolutionary histories, endogenic processes, and interactions with exogenic particles. The distributions of surface water ice and chromophores, i.e., organic and non-icy materials, across the Saturnian system, are traced using specific spectral indicators (spectral slopes and absorption band depths) obtained from rings mosaics and disk-integrated satellites observations by VIMS. Moving from the inner C ring to Iapetus, we found a marking uniformity in the distribution of abundance of water ice. On the other hand, the distribution of chromophores is much more concentrated in the rings particles and on the outermost satellites (Rhea, Hyperion, and Iapetus). A reduction of red material is observed on the satellites' surfaces orbiting within the E ring environment likely due to fine particles from Enceladus' plumes. Once the exogenous dark material covering the Iapetus' leading hemisphere is removed, the texture of the water ice-rich surfaces, inferred through the 2 {mu}m band depth, appears remarkably uniform across the entire system.

  19. Nonphotosynthetic pigmented bacteria in a potable water treatment and distribution system.

    PubMed Central

    Reasoner, D J; Blannon, J C; Geldreich, E E; Barnick, J

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of pigmented bacteria in potable water, from raw source water through treatment to distribution water, including dead-end locations, was compared at sample sites in a large municipal water system. Media used to enumerate heterotrophic bacteria and differentiate pigmented colonies were standard method plate count (SPC), m-SPC, and R2A agars, incubated up to 7 days at 35 degrees C. The predominant pigmented bacteria at most sample locations were yellow and orange, with a small incidence of pink organisms at the flowing distribution site. Seasonal variations were seen, with the yellow and orange organisms shifting in dominance. SPC agar was the least productive medium for both heterotroph counts and pigmented bacteria differentiation. At the flowing distribution site, percentages of pigmented bacteria on SPC medium ranged from 2.3 to 9.67 times less than on m-SPC and from 2.3 to 9.86 times less than on R2A. At the same site, seasonal trends in the percentage of pigmented bacteria were the same for m-SPC and R2A media, and the highest and lowest percentages occurred in the fall and winter, respectively. At site 6, there appeared to be an inverse relationship between the yellow and orange pigmented groups, but upon analysis, this did not hold and all correlations between yellow and orange pigmented bacteria were positive. The study results indicate that pigmented bacteria could readily be detected by using plate counting media developed for heterotroph enumeration in potable waters with incubation periods of 7 days. Pigmented bacteria can be used as an additional marker for monitoring changes in water quality. High numbers of heterotrophs, including pigmented forms, were found at dead-end locations, usually in the absence of a free chlorine residual and when the water temperature was greater than 16 degrees C. The association of some pigmented bacteria with nosocomial and other infections raises concern that the organisms may have originated from the

  20. Optimal design and operation of booster chlorination stations layout in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Ohar, Ziv; Ostfeld, Avi

    2014-07-01

    This study describes a new methodology for the disinfection booster design, placement, and operation problem in water distribution systems. Disinfectant residuals, which are in most cases chlorine residuals, are assumed to be sufficient to prevent growth of pathogenic bacteria, yet low enough to avoid taste and odor problems. Commonly, large quantities of disinfectants are released at the sources outlets for preserving minimum residual disinfectant concentrations throughout the network. Such an approach can cause taste and odor problems near the disinfectant injection locations, but more important hazardous excessive disinfectant by-product formations (DBPs) at the far network ends, of which some may be carcinogenic. To cope with these deficiencies booster chlorination stations were suggested to be placed at the distribution system itself and not just at the sources, motivating considerable research in recent years on placement, design, and operation of booster chlorination stations in water distribution systems. The model formulated and solved herein is aimed at setting the required chlorination dose of the boosters for delivering water at acceptable residual chlorine and TTHM concentrations for minimizing the overall cost of booster placement, construction, and operation under extended period hydraulic simulation conditions through utilizing a multi-species approach. The developed methodology links a genetic algorithm with EPANET-MSX, and is demonstrated through base runs and sensitivity analyses on a network example application. Two approaches are suggested for dealing with water quality initial conditions and species periodicity: (1) repetitive cyclical simulation (RCS), and (2) cyclical constrained species (CCS). RCS was found to be more robust but with longer computational time. PMID:24762553

  1. Preliminary assessment of the interaction of introduced biological agents with biofilms in water distribution systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Caldwell, Sara; Jones, Howland D. T.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Souza, Caroline Ann; McGrath, Lucas K.

    2005-12-01

    Basic research is needed to better understand the potential risk of dangerous biological agents that are unintentionally or intentionally introduced into a water distribution system. We report on our capabilities to conduct such studies and our preliminary investigations. In 2004, the Biofilms Laboratory was initiated for the purpose of conducting applied research related to biofilms with a focus on application, application testing and system-scale research. Capabilities within the laboratory are the ability to grow biofilms formed from known bacteria or biofilms from drinking water. Biofilms can be grown quickly in drip-flow reactors or under conditions more analogous to drinking-water distribution systems in annular reactors. Biofilms can be assessed through standard microbiological techniques (i .e, aerobic plate counts) or with various visualization techniques including epifluorescent and confocal laser scanning microscopy and confocal fluorescence hyperspectral imaging with multivariate analysis. We have demonstrated the ability to grow reproducible Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms in the annular reactor with plate counts on the order of 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/cm{sup 2}. Stationary phase growth is typically reached 5 to 10 days after inoculation. We have also conducted a series of pathogen-introduction experiments, where we have observed that both polystyrene microspheres and Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) stay incorporated in the biofilms for the duration of our experiments, which lasted as long as 36 days. These results indicated that biofilms may act as a safe harbor for bio-pathogens in drinking water systems, making it difficult to decontaminate the systems.

  2. Simulation of external contamination into water distribution systems through defects in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, P. A.; Mora, J. J.; García, F. J.; López, G.

    2009-04-01

    Water quality can be defined as a set of properties (physical, biological and chemical) that determine its suitability for human use or for its role in the biosphere. In this contribution we focus on the possible impact on water distribution systems quality of external contaminant fluids entering through defects in pipes. The physical integrity of the distribution system is a primary barrier against the entry of external contaminants and the loss in quality of the treated drinking water, but this integrity can be broken. Deficiencies in physical and hydraulic integrity can lead into water losses, but also into the influx of contaminants through pipes walls, either through breaks coming from external subsoil waters, or via cross connections coming from sewerage or other facilities. These external contamination events (the so called pathogen intrusion phenomenon) can act as a source of income by introducing nutrients and sediments as well as decreasing disinfectant concentrations within the distribution system, thus resulting in a degradation of the distribution water quality. The objective of this contribution is to represent this pathogen intrusion phenomenon. The combination of presence of defects in the infrastructures (equipment failure), suppression and back-siphonage and lack of disinfection is the cause of propagation of contamination in the clean current of water. Intrusion of pathogenic microorganisms has been studied and registered even in well maintained services. Therefore, this situation can happen when negative pressure conditions are achieved in the systems combined with the presence of defects in pipes nearby the suppression. A simulation of the process by which the external fluids can come inside pipes across their defects in a steady-state situation will be considered, by using different techniques to get such a successful modeling, combining numerical and experimental simulations. The proposed modeling process is based on experimental and

  3. Simulation of external contamination into water distribution systems through defects in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, P. A.; Mora, J. J.; García, F. J.; López, G.

    2009-04-01

    Water quality can be defined as a set of properties (physical, biological and chemical) that determine its suitability for human use or for its role in the biosphere. In this contribution we focus on the possible impact on water distribution systems quality of external contaminant fluids entering through defects in pipes. The physical integrity of the distribution system is a primary barrier against the entry of external contaminants and the loss in quality of the treated drinking water, but this integrity can be broken. Deficiencies in physical and hydraulic integrity can lead into water losses, but also into the influx of contaminants through pipes walls, either through breaks coming from external subsoil waters, or via cross connections coming from sewerage or other facilities. These external contamination events (the so called pathogen intrusion phenomenon) can act as a source of income by introducing nutrients and sediments as well as decreasing disinfectant concentrations within the distribution system, thus resulting in a degradation of the distribution water quality. The objective of this contribution is to represent this pathogen intrusion phenomenon. The combination of presence of defects in the infrastructures (equipment failure), suppression and back-siphonage and lack of disinfection is the cause of propagation of contamination in the clean current of water. Intrusion of pathogenic microorganisms has been studied and registered even in well maintained services. Therefore, this situation can happen when negative pressure conditions are achieved in the systems combined with the presence of defects in pipes nearby the suppression. A simulation of the process by which the external fluids can come inside pipes across their defects in a steady-state situation will be considered, by using different techniques to get such a successful modeling, combining numerical and experimental simulations. The proposed modeling process is based on experimental and

  4. Risk Factors for Contamination of Hotel Water Distribution Systems by Legionella Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Mouchtouri, Varvara; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Tsakalof, Andreas; Kapoula, Christina; Goutziana, Georgia; Vatopoulos, Alkiviadis; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2007-01-01

    The Legionella colonization frequency at 385 Greek hotel hot and cold water distribution systems was 20.8%. Legionella contamination was associated with the presence of an oil heater (odds ratio [OR] = 2.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.12 to 3.70), with the sample temperature (OR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.1 to 0.5), with seasonal operation (OR = 3.23, 95% CI = 1.52 to 6.87), and with the presence of an independent disinfection system (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.15 to 0.62). The same water temperatures, free-chlorine levels, and pHs differently affect the survival of various Legionella spp. PMID:17261527

  5. Estimating the environmental and resource costs of leakage in water distribution systems: A shadow price approach.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Senante, María; Mocholí-Arce, Manuel; Sala-Garrido, Ramon

    2016-10-15

    Water scarcity is one of the main problems faced by many regions in the XXIst century. In this context, the need to reduce leakages from water distribution systems has gained almost universal acceptance. The concept of sustainable economic level of leakage (SELL) has been proposed to internalize the environmental and resource costs within economic level of leakage calculations. However, because these costs are not set by the market, they have not often been calculated. In this paper, the directional-distance function was used to estimate the shadow price of leakages as a proxy of their environmental and resource costs. This is a pioneering approach to the economic valuation of leakage externalities. An empirical application was carried out for the main Chilean water companies. The estimated results indicated that for 2014, the average shadow price of leakages was approximately 32% of the price of the water delivered. Moreover, as a sensitivity analysis, the shadow prices of the leakages were calculated from the perspective of the water companies' managers and the regulator. The methodology and findings of this study are essential for supporting the decision process of reducing leakage, contributing to the improvement of economic, social and environmental efficiency and sustainability of urban water supplies. PMID:27289397

  6. Quantification, Distribution, and Possible Source of Bacterial Biofilm in Mouse Automated Watering Systems

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas R; Maute, Carrie J; Cadillac, Joan M; Lee, Ji Young; Righter, Daniel J; Hugunin, Kelly MS; Deininger, Rolf A; Dysko, Robert C

    2008-01-01

    The use of automated watering systems for providing drinking water to rodents has become commonplace in the research setting. Little is known regarding bacterial biofilm growth within the water piping attached to the racks (manifolds). The purposes of this project were to determine whether the mouse oral flora contributed to the aerobic bacterial component of the rack biofilm, quantify bacterial growth in rack manifolds over 6 mo, assess our rack sanitation practices, and quantify bacterial biofilm development within sections of the manifold. By using standard methods of bacterial identification, the aerobic oral flora of 8 strains and stocks of mice were determined on their arrival at our animal facility. Ten rack manifolds were sampled before, during, and after sanitation and monthly for 6 mo. Manifolds were evaluated for aerobic bacterial growth by culture on R2A and trypticase soy agar, in addition to bacterial ATP quantification by bioluminescence. In addition, 6 racks were sampled at 32 accessible sites for evaluation of biofilm distribution within the watering manifold. The identified aerobic bacteria in the oral flora were inconsistent with the bacteria from the manifold, suggesting that the mice do not contribute to the biofilm bacteria. Bacterial growth in manifolds increased while they were in service, with exponential growth of the biofilm from months 3 to 6 and a significant decrease after sanitization. Bacterial biofilm distribution was not significantly different across location quartiles of the rack manifold, but bacterial levels differed between the shelf pipe and connecting elbow pipes. PMID:18351724

  7. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) and Environmental isolates associated with a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system. After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The distribution system ...

  8. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) and Environmental Isolates Associated with a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification - poster #2168

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system. After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The distribution system wa...

  9. The decay of chlorine associated with the pipe wall in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Hallam, N B; West, J R; Forster, C F; Powell, J C; Spencer, I

    2002-08-01

    Free chlorine decay rates in water distribution systems for bulk and wall demands should be modelled separately as they have different functional dependencies. Few good quality determinations of in situ wall demand have been made due to the difficulty of monitoring live systems and due to their complexity. Wall demands have been calculated from field measurements at 11 locations in a distribution system fed from a single source. A methodology for the laboratory determination has been evolved and shown to give results that are similar to the in situ results. Pipe materials were classified as either having high reactivity (unlined iron mains) or low reactivity (PVC, MDPE and cement-lined ductile iron). The results indicate that wall decay rates for the former are limited by chlorine transport and for the latter by pipe material characteristics. The wall decay rate is inversely related to initial chlorine concentration for low reactivity pipes. In general, water velocity increases wall decay rates though the statistical confidence is low for low reactivity pipes. A moderate biofilm coating did not influence the wall decay rate for low reactivity pipes. PMID:12230193

  10. Distributed sensor for water and pH measurements using fiber optics and swellable polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, W. C.; Culshaw, B.; McKenzie, I.; Konstantakis, M.; Graham, N. B.; Moran, C.; Santos, F.; Bergqvist, E.; Carlstrom, B.

    1995-01-01

    We report on the design, construction and test of a generic form of sensor for making distributed measurements of a range of chemical parameters. The technique combines optical time-domain reflectometry with chemically sensitive water-swellable polymers (hydrogels). Initial experiments have concentrated on demonstrating a distributed water detector; however, gels have been developed that enable this sensor to be

  11. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CAST IRON PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colored water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to red depending on water chemistry and particle properties. The release of iron from distribution system materials such as...

  12. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CAST IRON PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Colored water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to red depending on water chemistry and particle properties. The release of iron from distribution system materials such a...

  13. A perspective on cost-effectiveness of greenhouse gas reduction solutions in water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Thomas P.; Horvath, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Water distribution systems (WDSs) face great challenges as aging infrastructures require significant investments in rehabilitation, replacement, and expansion. Reducing environmental impacts as WDSs develop is essential for utility managers and policy makers. This study quantifies the existing greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of common WDS elements using life-cycle assessment (LCA) while identifying the greatest opportunities for emission reduction. This study addresses oversights of the related literature, which fails to capture several WDS elements and to provide detailed life-cycle inventories. The life-cycle inventory results for a US case study utility reveal that 81% of GHGs are from pumping energy, where a large portion of these emissions are a result of distribution leaks, which account for 270 billion l of water losses daily in the United States. Pipe replacement scheduling is analyzed from an environmental perspective where, through incorporating leak impacts, a tool reveals that optimal replacement is no more than 20 years, which is in contrast to the US average of 200 years. Carbon abatement costs (CACs) are calculated for different leak reduction scenarios for the case utility that range from -130 to 35 t-1 CO2(eq). Including life-cycle modeling in evaluating pipe materials identified polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cement-lined ductile iron (DICL) as the Pareto efficient options, however; utilizing PVC presents human health risks. The model developed for the case utility is applied to California and Texas to determine the CACs of reducing leaks to 5% of distributed water. For California, annual GHG savings from reducing leaks alone (3.4 million tons of CO2(eq)) are found to exceed California Air Resources Board’s estimate for energy efficiency improvements in the state’s water infrastructure.

  14. Effects of the Shuttle Orbiter fuselage and elevon on the molecular distribution of water vapor from the flash evaporator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R. G.; Kelso, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    A concern has arisen regarding the emissive distribution of water molecules from the shuttle orbiter flash evaporator system (FES). The role of the orbiter fuselage and elevon in affecting molecular scattering distributions was nuclear. The effect of these components were evaluated. Molecular distributions of the water vapor effluents from the FE were measured. These data were compared with analytically predicted values and the resulting implications were calculated.

  15. Chlorine fate and transport in drinking water distribution systems: Results from experimental and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.

    2011-12-01

    It has become generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through microbiological and chemical reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. The most serious aspect of water quality deterioration in a network is the loss of the disinfectant residual that can weaken the barrier against microbial contamination. Studies have suggested that one factor contributing to the loss of disinfectant residuals is the reaction between bulk phase disinfectants and pipe wall material. Free chlorine loss in corroded metal and PVC pipes, subject to changes in velocity, was assessed during an experiment conducted under controlled conditions in a specially constructed pipe loop located at the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio (USA). These studies demonstrated that in older unlined metal pipes, the loss of chlorine residual increases with velocity but that wall demand in PVC was negligible.

  16. Flow field distribution of liquid film of water lubricated bearing-rotor coupling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q. L.; Hu, J. N.; Ye, X. Y.; Zhang, D. S.; Zheng, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    According to the desalination high-pressure pump water lubricated bearing-rotor coupling systems flow field distribution of liquid film in the starting transient process and its power transmission mechanism can lay the foundation of further exploring and judging lubrication state at the boot process. By using the computational fluid dynamics Fluent secondary development platform and calling the relevant DEFINE macro function to achieve the translation and rotation movement of the journal, we will use the dynamic grid technique to realize the automatic calculation and grid update of water lubricated bearings 3d unsteady liquid film flow field, and finally we will dispose the results of numerical simulation and get the pressure. When the eccentricity is large, film thickness was negatively correlated with the pressure, and positive with the velocity. Differential pressure was negatively correlated with velocity. When the eccentricity is small, film thickness is no significant relationship with differential pressure and velocity. Differential pressure has little difference with velocity.

  17. DISTRIBUTION OF LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA SEROGROUPS ISOLATED FROM WATER SYSTEMS OF PUBLIC FACILITIES IN BUSAN, SOUTH KOREA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Yeong; Park, Eun-Hee; Park, Yon-Koung; Park, Sun-Hee; Sung, Gyung-Hye; Park, Hye-Young; Lee, Young-Choon

    2016-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the major causes of legionellosis worldwide. The distribution of L. pneumophila was investigated in water systems of public facilities in Busan, South Korea during 2007 and 2013-2014. L. pneumophila was isolated from 8.3% of 3,055 samples, of which the highest isolation rate (49%) was from ships and the lowest 4% from fountains. Serogroups of L. pneumophila isolated in 2007 were distributed among serogroups (sgs) 1-7 with the exception of sg 4, while those of isolates during 2013 and 2014 included also 11 sgs ( 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 15). L. pneumophila sg 1 was predominated among isolates from fountains (75%), hotels (60%), buildings (44%), hospitals (38%), and public baths (37%), whereas sg 3 and sg 7 was the most prevalent from ships (46%) and factories (40%), respectively. The predominated serogroup of L. pneumophila isolates from hot and cooling tower water was sg 1 (35% and 46%, respectively), while from cold water was sg 3 (29%). These results should be useful for epidemiological surveys to identify sources of outbreaks of legionellosis in Busan, South Korea. PMID:27405130

  18. A new analytical approach to understanding nanoscale lead-iron interactions in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Benjamin F; Gagnon, Graham A

    2016-07-01

    High levels of iron in distributed drinking water often accompany elevated lead release from lead service lines and other plumbing. Lead-iron interactions in drinking water distribution systems are hypothesized to be the result of adsorption and transport of lead by iron oxide particles. This mechanism was explored using point-of-use drinking water samples characterized by size exclusion chromatography with UV and multi-element (ICP-MS) detection. In separations on two different stationary phases, high apparent molecular weight (>669 kDa) elution profiles for (56)Fe and (208)Pb were strongly correlated (average R(2)=0.96, N=73 samples representing 23 single-unit residences). Moreover, (56)Fe and (208)Pb peak areas exhibited an apparent linear dependence (R(2)=0.82), consistent with mobilization of lead via adsorption to colloidal particles rich in iron. A UV254 absorbance peak, coincident with high molecular weight (56)Fe and (208)Pb, implied that natural organic matter was interacting with the hypothesized colloidal species. High molecular weight UV254 peak areas were correlated with both (56)Fe and (208)Pb peak areas (R(2)=0.87 and 0.58, respectively). On average, 45% (std. dev. 10%) of total lead occurred in the size range 0.05-0.45 μm. PMID:26971028

  19. Chlorine resistance patterns of bacteria from two drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed Central

    Ridgway, H F; Olson, B H

    1982-01-01

    The relative chlorine sensitivities of bacteria isolated from chlorinated and unchlorinated drinking water distribution systems were compared by two independent methods. One method measured the toxic effect of free chlorine on bacteria, whereas the other measured the effect of combined chlorine. Bacteria from the chlorinated system were more resistant to both the combined and free forms of chlorine than those from the unchlorinated system, suggesting that there may be selection for more chlorine-tolerant microorganisms in chlorinated waters. Bacteria retained on the surfaces of 2.0-microns Nuclepore membrane filters were significantly more resistant to free chlorine compared to the total microbial population recovered on 0.2-micron membrane filters, presumably because aggregated cells or bacteria attached to suspended particulate matter exhibit more resistance than unassociated microorganisms. In accordance with this hypothesis, scanning electron microscopy of suspended particulate matter from the water samples revealed the presence of attached bacteria. The most resistant microorganisms were able to survive a 2-min exposure to 10 mg of free chlorine per liter. These included gram-positive spore-forming bacilli, actinomycetes, and some micrococci. The most sensitive bacteria were readily killed by chlorine concentrations of 1.0 mg liter-1 or less, and included most gram-positive micrococci, Corynebacterium/Arthrobacter, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas/Alcaligenes, Flavobacterium/Moraxella, and Acinetobacter. Images PMID:7149722

  20. The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal, distributed system using brokering architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Satoko; Sekioka, Shinichi; Kuroiwa, Kaori; Kudo, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal is a one of the DIAS (Data Integration and Analysis System, http://www.editoria.u-tokyo.ac.jp/projects/dias/?locale=en_US) systems for data distribution for users including, but not limited to, scientists, decision makers and officers like river administrators. This portal has two main functions; one is to search and access data and the other is to register and share use cases which use datasets provided via this portal. This presentation focuses on the first function, to search and access data. The Portal system is distributed in the sense that, while the portal system is located in Tokyo, the data is located in archive centers which are globally distributed. For example, some in-situ data is archived at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, USA. The NWP station time series and global gridded model output data is archived at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPIM) in cooperation with the World Data Center for Climate in Hamburg, Germany. Part of satellite data is archived at DIAS storage at the University of Tokyo, Japan. This portal itself does not store data. Instead, according to requests made by users on the web page, it retrieves data from distributed data centers on-the-fly and lets them download and see rendered images/plots. Although some data centers have unique meta data format and/or data search protocols, our portal's brokering function enables users to search across various data centers at one time, like one-stop shopping. And this portal is also connected to other data brokering systems, including GEOSS DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). As a result, users can search over thousands of datasets, millions of files at one time. Our system mainly relies on the open source software GI-cat (http://essi-lab.eu/do/view/GIcat), Opensearch protocol and OPeNDAP protocol to enable the above functions. Details on how it works will be introduced during the

  1. The Toms River Childhood Cancer Cluster: Coupled Groundwater and Water Distribution System Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, J. F.; Normani, S. D.

    2003-12-01

    Toms River, New Jersey is the location of a statistically significant childhood cancer cluster. A 1995 cancer investigation indicated that relative to the state, the Toms River section of Dover Township had excess childhood cancer incidence for all malignant cancers combined, brain and central nervous system (CNS) cancers, and leukemia. Children under the age of five were found to have a seven-fold increase in brain and CNS cancer. The community's concern focused on the possibility that exposure to environmental contaminants may be related to the incidence of these childhood cancers. Two Superfund sites in Dover Township were implicated as having a possible impact on the local water supply. One of these, the Reich Farm site, is a source of contaminants to the aquifer that serves a major well field for Toms River. Contaminants in the aquifer include TCE, PCE and styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) trimer. In 1997, the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry began an epidemiology study to evaluate the relationship between the environmental exposure pathways and the elevated childhood cancer incidence. Toxicity studies for the SAN trimer were also initiated. Groundwater modeling was undertaken to establish the historical relationship between the Reich Farm site and the municipal well field and to aid in the management and protection of the aquifer and well field to ensure both water quality and quantity. The modeling of the water distribution system for Toms River was also part of the study. Groundwater flow from the Reich Farm Superfund site to the municipal well field for Toms River was modeled for a thirty-year time period using MODFLOW. To account for the growth and development of the well field within the modeling domain, a transient model was constructed. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and databases to manage, maintain, and compile field observations for model input and calibration was

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum, Strains Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacteria previously reported as the cause of hyp...

  3. Comparison of Microbial Communities in a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Episodes of Nitrification (poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial populations were examined in a simulated chloraminated drinking water distribution system (i.e. PVC pipe loop). After six months of continuous operation, coupons were incubated in CDC reactors receiving water from the simulated system to study biofilm development. The s...

  4. Multiobjective optimization of water distribution systems accounting for economic cost, hydraulic reliability, and greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenyan; Maier, Holger R.; Simpson, Angus R.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, three objectives are considered for the optimization of water distribution systems (WDSs): the traditional objectives of minimizing economic cost and maximizing hydraulic reliability and the recently proposed objective of minimizing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is particularly important to include the GHG minimization objective for WDSs involving pumping into storages or water transmission systems (WTSs), as these systems are the main contributors of GHG emissions in the water industry. In order to better understand the nature of tradeoffs among these three objectives, the shape of the solution space and the location of the Pareto-optimal front in the solution space are investigated for WTSs and WDSs that include pumping into storages, and the implications of the interaction between the three objectives are explored from a practical design perspective. Through three case studies, it is found that the solution space is a U-shaped curve rather than a surface, as the tradeoffs among the three objectives are dominated by the hydraulic reliability objective. The Pareto-optimal front of real-world systems is often located at the "elbow" section and lower "arm" of the solution space (i.e., the U-shaped curve), indicating that it is more economic to increase the hydraulic reliability of these systems by increasing pipe capacity (i.e., pipe diameter) compared to increasing pumping power. Solutions having the same GHG emission level but different cost-reliability tradeoffs often exist. Therefore, the final decision needs to be made in conjunction with expert knowledge and the specific budget and reliability requirements of the system.

  5. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting <6 μg AsL(-1) in finished water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (p<0.001) increased dissolved and total As concentrations to levels up to 16 and 95 μg L(-1), respectively. Similar treatments in the presence of biofilm (SBC) resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in dissolved and total recoverable As up to 20 and 47 μg L(-1), respectively, exceeding the regulatory As limit. Whether or not, our laboratory-based results truly represent mechanisms operating in disinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field. PMID:24365518

  6. Legionella species colonization of water distribution systems, pools and air conditioning systems in cruise ships and ferries

    PubMed Central

    Goutziana, Georgia; Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Karanika, Maria; Kavagias, Antonios; Stathakis, Nikolaos E; Gourgoulianis, Kostantinos; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Background Legionnaires' disease continues to be a public health concern in passenger ships. This study was scheduled in order to investigate Legionella spp. colonization of water distribution systems (WDS), recreational pools, and air-conditioning systems on board ferries and cruise ships in an attempt to identify risk factors for Legionella spp. colonization associated with ship water systems and water characteristics. Methods Water systems of 21 ferries and 10 cruise ships including WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were investigated for the presence of Legionella spp. Results The 133 samples collected from the 10 cruise ships WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were negative for Legionella spp. Of the 21 ferries WDS examined, 14 (66.7%) were legionellae-positive. A total of 276 samples were collected from WDS and air conditioning systems. Legionella spp. was isolated from 37.8% of the hot water samples and 17.5% of the cold water samples. Of the total 96 positive isolates, 87 (90.6%) were L. pneumophila. Legionella spp. colonization was positively associated with ship age. The temperature of the hot water samples was negatively associated with colonization of L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 and that of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14. Increases in pH ≥7.8 and total plate count ≥400 CFU/L, correlated positively with the counts of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14 and Legionella spp. respectively. Free chlorine of ≥0.2 mg/L inhibited colonization of Legionella spp. Conclusion WDS of ferries can be heavily colonized by Legionella spp. and may present a risk of Legionnaires' disease for passengers and crew members. Guidelines and advising of Legionnaires' disease prevention regarding ferries are needed, in particular for operators and crew members. PMID:19025638

  7. Draft Genome of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome of two Sphingopyxis spp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (in...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome of two Sphingopyxis spp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (in...

  9. Assessing potential impacts associated with contamination events in water distribution systems : a sensitivity analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M. J.; Janke, R.; Taxon, T. N.

    2010-11-01

    An understanding of the nature of the adverse effects that could be associated with contamination events in water distribution systems is necessary for carrying out vulnerability analyses and designing contamination warning systems. This study examines the adverse effects of contamination events using models for 12 actual water systems that serve populations ranging from about 104 to over 106 persons. The measure of adverse effects that we use is the number of people who are exposed to a contaminant above some dose level due to ingestion of contaminated tap water. For this study the number of such people defines the impact associated with an event. We consider a wide range of dose levels in order to accommodate a wide range of potential contaminants. For a particular contaminant, dose level can be related to a health effects level. For example, a dose level could correspond to the median lethal dose, i.e., the dose that would be fatal to 50% of the exposed population. Highly toxic contaminants may be associated with a particular response at a very low dose level, whereas contaminants with low toxicity may only be associated with the same response at a much higher dose level. This report focuses on the sensitivity of impacts to five factors that either define the nature of a contamination event or involve assumptions that are used in assessing exposure to the contaminant: (1) duration of contaminant injection, (2) time of contaminant injection, (3) quantity or mass of contaminant injected, (4) population distribution in the water distribution system, and (5) the ingestion pattern of the potentially exposed population. For each of these factors, the sensitivities of impacts to injection location and contaminant toxicity are also examined. For all the factors considered, sensitivity tends to increase with dose level (i.e., decreasing toxicity) of the contaminant, with considerable inter-network variability. With the exception of the population distribution (factor 4

  10. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7. PMID:27090705

  11. Microbial community response to chlorine conversion in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Proctor, Caitlin R; Edwards, Marc A; Pryor, Marsha; Santo Domingo, Jorge W; Ryu, Hodon; Camper, Anne K; Olson, Andrew; Pruden, Amy

    2014-09-16

    Temporary conversion to chlorine (i.e., "chlorine burn") is a common approach to controlling nitrification in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems, yet its effectiveness and mode(s) of action are not fully understood. This study characterized occurrence of nitrifying populations before, during and after a chlorine burn at 46 sites in a chloraminated distribution system with varying pipe materials and levels of observed nitrification. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene markers present in nitrifying populations indicated higher frequency of detection of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) (72% of samples) relative to ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) (28% of samples). Nitrospira nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were detected at 45% of samples, while presence of Nitrobacter NOB could not be confirmed at any of the samples. During the chlorine burn, the numbers of AOA, AOB, and Nitrospira greatly reduced (i.e., 0.8-2.4 log). However, rapid and continued regrowth of AOB and Nitrospira were observed along with nitrite production in the bulk water within four months after the chlorine burn, and nitrification outbreaks appeared to worsen 6-12 months later, even after adopting a twice annual burn program. Although high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed a distinct community shift and higher diversity index during the chlorine burn, it steadily returned towards a condition more similar to pre-burn than burn stage. Significant factors associated with nitrifier and microbial community composition included water age and sampling location type, but not pipe material. Overall, these results indicate that there is limited long-term effect of chlorine burns on nitrifying populations and the broader microbial community. PMID:25118569

  12. Understanding, Monitoring, and Controlling Biofilm Growth in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanly; Gunawan, Cindy; Barraud, Nicolas; Rice, Scott A; Harry, Elizabeth J; Amal, Rose

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), biofilms are the predominant mode of microbial growth, with the presence of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) protecting the biomass from environmental and shear stresses. Biofilm formation poses a significant problem to the drinking water industry as a potential source of bacterial contamination, including pathogens, and, in many cases, also affecting the taste and odor of drinking water and promoting the corrosion of pipes. This article critically reviews important research findings on biofilm growth in DWDS, examining the factors affecting their formation and characteristics as well as the various technologies to characterize and monitor and, ultimately, to control their growth. Research indicates that temperature fluctuations potentially affect not only the initial bacteria-to-surface attachment but also the growth rates of biofilms. For the latter, the effect is unique for each type of biofilm-forming bacteria; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, for example, grow more-developed biofilms at a typical summer temperature of 22 °C compared to 12 °C in fall, and the opposite occurs for the pathogenic Vibrio cholerae. Recent investigations have found the formation of thinner yet denser biofilms under high and turbulent flow regimes of drinking water, in comparison to the more porous and loosely attached biofilms at low flow rates. Furthermore, in addition to the rather well-known tendency of significant biofilm growth on corrosion-prone metal pipes, research efforts also found leaching of growth-promoting organic compounds from the increasingly popular use of polymer-based pipes. Knowledge of the unique microbial members of drinking water biofilms and, importantly, the influence of water characteristics and operational conditions on their growth can be applied to optimize various operational parameters to minimize biofilm accumulation. More-detailed characterizations of the biofilm population size and structure are now

  13. Temperature diagnostic to identify high risk areas and optimize Legionella pneumophila surveillance in hot water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Emilie; Fey, Stéphanie; Charron, Dominique; Lalancette, Cindy; Cantin, Philippe; Dolcé, Patrick; Laferrière, Céline; Déziel, Eric; Prévost, Michèle

    2015-03-15

    Legionella pneumophila is frequently detected in hot water distribution systems and thermal control is a common measure implemented by health care facilities. A risk assessment based on water temperature profiling and temperature distribution within the network is proposed, to guide effective monitoring strategies and allow the identification of high risk areas. Temperature and heat loss at control points (water heater, recirculation, representative points-of-use) were monitored in various sections of five health care facilities hot water distribution systems and results used to develop a temperature-based risk assessment tool. Detailed investigations show that defective return valves in faucets can cause widespread temperature losses because of hot and cold water mixing. Systems in which water temperature coming out of the water heaters was kept consistently above 60 °C and maintained above 55 °C across the network were negative for Legionella by culture or qPCR. For systems not meeting these temperature criteria, risk areas for L. pneumophila were identified using temperature profiling and system's characterization; higher risk was confirmed by more frequent microbiological detection by culture and qPCR. Results confirmed that maintaining sufficiently high temperatures within hot water distribution systems suppressed L. pneumophila culturability. However, the risk remains as shown by the persistence of L. pneumophila by qPCR. PMID:25622002

  14. INTERRELATIONSHIP OF BACTERIAL COUNTS WITH OTHER FINISHED WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS WITHIN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research program was to obtain realistic information concerning the interrelationships between temperature, chlorine, turbidity, coliforms, and Standard Plate Count (SPC) densities present in finished water after treatment and distribution. Bacterial identif...

  15. Assessing the impact of water treatment on bacterial biofilms in drinking water distribution systems using high-throughput DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jennifer L A; Monis, Paul; Fabris, Rolando; Ho, Lionel; Braun, Kalan; Drikas, Mary; Cooper, Alan

    2014-12-01

    Biofilm control in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) is crucial, as biofilms are known to reduce flow efficiency, impair taste and quality of drinking water and have been implicated in the transmission of harmful pathogens. Microorganisms within biofilm communities are more resistant to disinfection compared to planktonic microorganisms, making them difficult to manage in DWDSs. This study evaluates the impact of four unique drinking water treatments on biofilm community structure using metagenomic DNA sequencing. Four experimental DWDSs were subjected to the following treatments: (1) conventional coagulation, (2) magnetic ion exchange contact (MIEX) plus conventional coagulation, (3) MIEX plus conventional coagulation plus granular activated carbon, and (4) membrane filtration (MF). Bacterial biofilms located inside the pipes of each system were sampled under sterile conditions both (a) immediately after treatment application ('inlet') and (b) at a 1 km distance from the treatment application ('outlet'). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the outlet biofilms were more diverse than those sampled at the inlet for all treatments. The lowest number of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and lowest diversity was observed in the MF inlet. However, the MF system revealed the greatest increase in diversity and OTU count from inlet to outlet. Further, the biofilm communities at the outlet of each system were more similar to one another than to their respective inlet, suggesting that biofilm communities converge towards a common established equilibrium as distance from treatment application increases. Based on the results, MF treatment is most effective at inhibiting biofilm growth, but a highly efficient post-treatment disinfection regime is also critical in order to prevent the high rates of post-treatment regrowth. PMID:25038469

  16. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, Evelyn; Craddick, William G; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Wendt, Robert L; Woodbury, Professor Keith A.

    2007-09-01

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program

  17. Distribution and Respiratory Activity of Mycobacteria in Household Water System of Healthy Volunteers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. PMID:25350137

  18. DECISION-SUPPORT TOOLS FOR PREDICTING THE PERFORMANCE OF WATER DISTRIBUTION AND WASTEWATER COLLECTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water and wastewater infrastructure systems represent a major capital investment; utilities must ensure they are getting the highest yield possible on their investment, both in terms of dollars and water quality. Accurate information related to equipment, pipe characteristics, lo...

  19. DECISION-SUPPORT TOOLS FOR PREDICTING THE PERFORMANCE OF WATER DISTRIBUTION AND WASTEWATER COLLECTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water and wastewater infrastructure systems represent a major capital investment; utilities must ensure they are getting the highest yield possible on their investment, both in terms of dollars and water quality. Accurate information related to equipment, pipe characteristics, l...

  20. Thermal disinfection of hotels, hospitals, and athletic venues hot water distribution systems contaminated by Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Mouchtouri, Varvara; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2007-11-01

    Legionella spp. (> or = 500 cfu liter(-1)) were detected in 92 of 497 water distribution systems (WDS) examined. Thermal disinfection was applied at 33 WDS. After the first and second application of the disinfection procedure, 15 (45.4%) and 3 (9%) positive for remedial actions WDS were found, respectively. Legionella pneumophila was more resistant to thermal disinfection than Legionella non-pneumophila spp. (relative risk [RR]=5.4, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=1-35). WDS of hotels with oil heater were more easily disinfected than those with electrical or solar heater (RR=0.4 95% CI=0.2-0.8). Thermal disinfection seems not to be efficient enough to eliminate legionellae, unless repeatedly applied and in combination with extended heat flushing, and faucets chlorine disinfection. PMID:17980243

  1. THE PERSISTENCE OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA INI A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AFTER THE ADDITION OF FILTRATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that drinking water may be a source of pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections in humans. One method by which NTM are believed to enter drinking water distribution systems is by their intracellular colonization of protozoa. Our goal was to determ...

  2. Formation and Release Behavior of Iron Corrosion Products under the Influence of Bacterial Communities in a Simulated Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the effects of biofilm on the iron corrosion, iron release and associated corrosion by-products is critical for maintaining the water quality and the integrity of drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this work, iron corrosion experiments under sterilized a...

  3. THE PERSISTENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AFTER THE ADDITION OF FILTRATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that drinking water may be a source of pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections in humans. One method by which NTM are believed to enter drinking water distribution systems is by their intracellular location within protozoa. Our goal was to determ...

  4. The Occurrence of Contaminant Accumulation in Lead Pipe Scales from Domestic Drinking Water Distribution Systems-ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that contaminants such as Al, As and Ra, can accumulate in drinking water distribution system solids. The release of accumulated contaminants back into the water supply could conceivably result in elevated levels at consumers’ taps. The current regulatory...

  5. A Long-Term Study of the Microbial Community Structure in a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free chlorine is used as the primary disinfectant in most drinking water distribution systems(DWDS). However, chlorine disinfection promotes the formation of disinfectant by-products (DBPs)and as a result, many US water treatment facilities use chloramination to ensure regulatory...

  6. USING CONTINUOUS MONITORS FOR CONDUCTING TRACER STUDIES IN WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of online monitors for conducting a distribution system tracer study is proving to be an essential tool to accurately understand the flow dynamics in a distribution system. In a series of field testing sponsored by U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Greater ...

  7. [Inactivation of the chlorine-resistant bacteria isolated from the drinking water distribution system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Qiao; Duan, Xiao-Di; Lu, Pin-Pin; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation experiments of seven strains of chlorine-resistant bacteria, isolated from a drinking water distribution system, were conducted with four kinds of disinfectants. All the bacteria showed high resistance to chlorine, especially for Mycobacterium mucogenicum. The CT value of 99.9% inactivation for M. mucogenicum, Sphingomonas sanguinis and Methylobacterium were 120 mg x (L x min)(-1), 7 mg x (L x min)(-1) and 4 mg x (L x min)(-1), respectively. The results of inactivation experiments showed that chlorine dioxide and potassium monopersulfate could inactive 5 lg of M. mucogenicum within 30 min, which showed significantly higher efficiency than free chlorine and monochloramine. Free chlorine was less effective because the disinfectant decayed very quickly. Chloramination needed higher concentration to meet the disinfection requirements. The verified dosage of disinfectants, which could effectively inactivate 99.9% of the highly chlorine-resistant M. mucogenicum within 1 h, were 3.0 mg/L monochloramine, 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide (as Cl2), and 1.0 mg/L potassium monopersulfate (as Cl2). It was suggested that the water treatment plants increase the concentration of monochloramine or apply chlorine dioxide intermittently to control the disinfectant-resistant bacteria. PMID:22452196

  8. The effect of material choice on biofilm formation in a model warm water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Waines, Paul L; Moate, Roy; Moody, A John; Allen, Mike; Bradley, Graham

    2011-11-01

    Water distribution systems (WDS) are composed of a variety of materials and may harbour potential pathogens within surface-attached microbial biofilms. Biofilm formation on four plumbing materials, viz. copper, stainless steel 316 (SS316), ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) and cross-linked polyethylene (PEX), was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM)/confocal microscopy, ATP-/culture-based analysis, and molecular analysis. Material 'inserts' were incorporated into a mains water fed, model WDS. All materials supported biofilm growth to various degrees. After 84 days, copper and SS316 showed no significant overall differences in terms of the level of biofilm formation observed, whilst PEX supported a significantly higher level of biofilm. EPDM exhibited gross contamination by a complex, multispecies biofilm, at a level significantly higher than was observed on the other materials, regardless of the analytical method used. PCR-DGGE analysis showed clear differences in the composition of the biofilm community on all materials after 84 days. The primary conclusion of this study has been to identify EPDM as a potentially unsuitable material for use as a major component in WDS. PMID:22117115

  9. A combined NLP-differential evolution algorithm approach for the optimization of looped water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feifei; Simpson, Angus R.; Zecchin, Aaron C.

    2011-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel optimization approach for the least cost design of looped water distribution systems (WDSs). Three distinct steps are involved in the proposed optimization approach. In the first step, the shortest-distance tree within the looped network is identified using the Dijkstra graph theory algorithm, for which an extension is proposed to find the shortest-distance tree for multisource WDSs. In the second step, a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver is employed to optimize the pipe diameters for the shortest-distance tree (chords of the shortest-distance tree are allocated the minimum allowable pipe sizes). Finally, in the third step, the original looped water network is optimized using a differential evolution (DE) algorithm seeded with diameters in the proximity of the continuous pipe sizes obtained in step two. As such, the proposed optimization approach combines the traditional deterministic optimization technique of NLP with the emerging evolutionary algorithm DE via the proposed network decomposition. The proposed methodology has been tested on four looped WDSs with the number of decision variables ranging from 21 to 454. Results obtained show the proposed approach is able to find optimal solutions with significantly less computational effort than other optimization techniques.

  10. Progress on water data integration and distribution: a summary of select U.S. Geological Survey data systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, David L.; Lucido, Jessica M.; Kreft, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical water-resources issues ranging from flood response to water scarcity make access to integrated water information, services, tools, and models essential. Since 1995 when the first water data web pages went online, the U.S. Geological Survey has been at the forefront of water data distribution and integration. Today, real-time and historical streamflow observations are available via web pages and a variety of web service interfaces. The Survey has built partnerships with Federal and State agencies to integrate hydrologic data providing continuous observations of surface and groundwater, temporally discrete water quality data, groundwater well logs, aquatic biology data, water availability and use information, and tools to help characterize the landscape for modeling. In this paper, we summarize the status and design patterns implemented for selected data systems. We describe how these systems contribute to a U.S. Federal Open Water Data Initiative and present some gaps and lessons learned that apply to global hydroinformatics data infrastructure.

  11. Variability of invertebrate abundance in drinking water distribution systems in the Netherlands in relation to biostability and sediment volumes.

    PubMed

    van Lieverloo, J Hein M; Hoogenboezem, Wim; Veenendaal, Gerrit; van der Kooij, Dick

    2012-10-15

    A survey of invertebrates in drinking water from treatment works, internal taps and hydrants on mains was carried out by almost all water companies in the Netherlands from September 1993 to August 1995. Aquatic sow bugs (Asellidae, 1-12 mm) and oligochaeta worms (Oligochaeta, 1-100 mm), both known to have caused rare though embarrassing consumer complaints, were found to form 98% of the mean biomass in water flushed from mains. Their numbers in the mains water ranged up to 1500 (mean 37) Asellidae m(-3) and up to 9900 (mean 135) Oligochaeta m(-3). Smaller crustaceans (0.5-2 mm) dominated the numbers in water from mains. e.g. water fleas (Cladocera and Copepoda up to 14,000 m(-3)). Common invertebrates in treated water and in tap water were Rotifera (<1 mm) and nematode worms (Nematoda, <2 mm). No Asellidae, large Oligochaeta (>5 mm) or other large invertebrates were found in 1560 samples of 200 l treated water or tap water. Large variations in invertebrate abundance were found within and between distribution systems. Of the variability of mean biomass in mains per system, 55%, 60% and 63% could statistically be explained by differences in the Biofilm Formation Rate, non-particulate organic matter and the permanganate index of the treated water of the treatment works respectively. A similar correlation was found between mean invertebrate biomass and mean sediment volumes in the distribution systems (R(2) = 52%). PMID:22840474

  12. TESTING AND VERIFICATION OF REAL-TIME WATER QUALITY MONITORING SENSORS IN A DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AGAINST INTRODUCED CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water distribution systems reach the majority of American homes, business and civic areas, and are therefore an attractive target for terrorist attack via direct contamination, or backflow events. Instrumental monitoring of such systems may be used to signal the prese...

  13. Chlorine decay in drinking-water transmission and distribution systems: pipe service age effect.

    PubMed

    Al-Jasser, A O

    2007-01-01

    Water quality can deteriorate in the transmission and distribution system beyond the treatment plant. Minimizing the potential for biological regrowth can be attained by chlorinating the finished water. While flowing through pipes, the chlorine concentration decreases for different reasons. Reaction with the pipe material itself and the reaction with both the biofilm and tubercles formed on the pipe wall are known as pipe wall demand, which may vary with pipe parameters. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of the service age of pipes on the effective chlorine wall decay constant. Three hundred and two pipe sections of different sizes and eight different pipe materials were collected and tested for their chlorine first-order wall decay constants. The results showed that pipe service age was an important factor that must not be ignored in some pipes such as cast iron, steel, cement-lined ductile iron (CLDI), and cement-lined cast iron (CLCI) pipes especially when the bulk decay is not significant relative to the wall decay. For the range of the 55 years of pipe service age used in this study, effective wall decay constants ranged from a decrease by -92% to an increase by +431% from the corresponding values in the recently installed pipes. The effect of service age on the effective wall decay constants was most evident in cast iron pipes, whereas steel pipes were less affected. Effective chlorine wall decay for CLCI and CLDI pipes was less affected by service age as compared to steel and cast iron pipes. Chlorine wall decay constants for PVC, uPVC, and polyethylene pipes were affected negatively by pipe service age and such effect was relatively small. PMID:17140619

  14. Transformation of bisphenol A in water distribution systems: a pilot-scale study.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Zilong; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Liu, Jingqing; Mao, Xinwei; Zhang, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Halogenations of bisphenol A (BPA) in a pilot-scale water distribution system (WDS) of a cement-lined ductile cast iron pipe were investigated. The water in the pilot-scale WDS was chlorinated with a free chlorine concentration of 0.7 mg L(-1) using sodium hypochlorite, and with an initial BPA concentration of 100 μg L(-1) was spiked in the WDS. Halogenated compounds in the BPA experiments were identified using EI/GC/MS and GC. Several BPA congeners, including 2-chlorobisphenol A (MCBPA), dichlorobisphenol A (D2-CBPA), 2,2',6-trichlorobisphenol A (T3CBPA), 2,2',6,6'-tetrachlorobisphenol A (T4CBPA), 2-bromobisphenol A (MBBPA), and bromochlorobisphenol A (MBMCBPA) were found. Moreover, further halogenation yielded other reaction intermediates, including 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (T3CP), dichlorobisphenol A, bromodichlorophenol, and dibromochlorophenol. After halogenation for 120min, most of the abovementioned reaction intermediates disappeared and were replaced by trihalomethanes (THMs). Based on these experimental findings, the halogenation process of BPA oxidation in a WDS includes three stages: (1) halogenation on the aromatic ring; (2) chlorine or bromine substitution followed by cleavage of the α-C bond on the isopropyl moiety with a positive partial charge and a β'-C bond on the benzene moiety with a negative partial charge; and (3) THMs and a minor HAA formation from phenolic intermediates through the benzene ring opening with a chlorine and bromine substitution of the hydrogen on the carbon atoms. The oxidation mechanisms of the entire transformation from BPA to THM/HAA in the WDS were proposed. PMID:25550112

  15. Failure mechanisms and lifetime prediction methodology for polybutylene pipe in water distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiqun

    Polybutylene (PB) is a semicrystalline thermoplastics. It has been widely used in potable water distribution piping system. However, field practice shows that failure occurs much earlier than the expected service lifetime. What are the causes and how to appropriately evaluate its lifetime motivate this study. In this thesis, three parts of work have been done. First is the understanding of PB, which includes material thermo and mechanical characterization, aging phenomena and notch sensitivity. The second part analyzes the applicability of the existing lifetime testing method for PB. It is shown that PB is an anomaly in terms of the temperature-lifetime relation because of the fracture mechanism transition across the testing temperature range. The third part is the development of the methodology of lifetime prediction for PB pipe. The fracture process of PB pipe consists of three stages, i.e., crack initiation, slow crack growth (SCG) and crack instability. The practical lifetime of PB pipe is primarily determined by the duration of the first two stages. The mechanism of crack initiation and the quantitative estimation of the time to crack initiation are studied by employing environment stress cracking technique. A fatigue slow crack growth testing method has been developed and applied in the study of SCG. By using Paris-Erdogan equation, a model is constructed to evaluate the time for SCG. As a result, the total lifetime is determined. Through this work, the failure mechanisms of PB pipe has been analyzed and the lifetime prediction methodology has been developed.

  16. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: relevance to drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10(6) M(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 0.1 g L(-1) CuO at 21 ± 1 °C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH(-) is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes. PMID:23796229

  17. Phase equilibria and distribution constants of metal ions in diantipyryl alkane-organic acid-hydrochloric acid-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtev, M. I.; Popova, O. N.; Yuminova, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of antipyrine and its derivatives (diantipyryl alkanes) to form separating systems in the presence of salicylic (sulfosalicylic) acid and hydrochloric acid and water is studied. The optimum volume of the organic phase, the composition of complexes, and the mechanism for the distribution of metal ions are determined, depending on the concentrations of the main components and the salting-out agent. The complex distribution and extraction constants are calculated.

  18. Investigation of film formation in water-distribution systems by field-emission SEM and spectroscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Friedman, R.M.; Cortez, E.

    1996-12-31

    EPA has set limits on the concentration of heavy metals in drinking water supplies to protect the public health. Furthermore, the failure of pipes in the water distribution system from corrosion represents a massive investment in rebuilding its infrastructure. We have initiated a program to study the formation of corrosion-inhibition films formed in potable water delivery systems using various chemical phosphate treatments. In particular, blends of ortho- and polyphosphates have recently been used to reduce both lead and copper leaching. Several factors are important to the successful implementation of the phosphate technologies, including film thickness and porosity, rate and stability of formation and water quality conditions. In an attempt to understand the performance of these phosphate blends, advanced analytical techniques have been employed to study the nucleation and growth mechanisms of the passivation films in a variety of water systems. We report here some preliminary results on the study of the film formation by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) technique.

  19. Health Implications of PAH Release from Coated Cast Iron Drinking Water Distribution Systems in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Bianca M.; de Jongh, Cindy M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coal tar and bitumen have been historically used to coat the insides of cast iron drinking water mains. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may leach from these coatings into the drinking water and form a potential health risk for humans. Objective: We estimated the potential human cancer risk from PAHs in coated cast iron water mains. Method: In a Dutch nationwide study, we collected drinking water samples at 120 locations over a period of 17 days under various operational conditions, such as undisturbed operation, during flushing of pipes, and after a mains repair, and analyzed these samples for PAHs. We then estimated the health risk associated with an exposure scenario over a lifetime. Results: During flushing, PAH levels frequently exceeded drinking water quality standards; after flushing, these levels dropped rapidly. After the repair of cast iron water mains, PAH levels exceeded the drinking water standards for up to 40 days in some locations. Conclusions: The estimated margin of exposure for PAH exposure through drinking water was > 10,000 for all 120 measurement locations, which suggests that PAH exposure through drinking water is of low concern for consumer health. However, factors that differ among water systems, such as the use of chlorination for disinfection, may influence PAH levels in other locations. PMID:23425894

  20. High temperature hot water distribution system study, Directorate of Public Works, Fort Drum, New York; executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The existing High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System has been plagued with design and construction deficiencies since startup of the HTHW system, in October 1988. In October 1989, after one year of service, these deficiencies were outlined in a technical evaluation. The deficiencies included flooded manholes, sump pumps not hooked up, leaking valves, contaminated HTHW water, and no cathodic protection system. This feasibility study of the High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System was performed under Contract No. DACA01-94-D-0033, Delivery Order 0013, Modification 1, issued to EMC Engineers, Inc. (EMC), by the Norfolk District Corps of Engineers, on 25 April 1996. The purpose of this study was to determine the existing conditions of the High Temperature Hot Water Distribution System, manholes, and areas of containment system degradation. The study focused on two areas of concern, as follows: (1) Determine existing conditions and areas of containment system degradation (leaks) in the underground carrier pipes and protective conduit. (2) Document the condition of underground steel and concrete manholes. To document the leaks, a site survey was performed, using state-of-the-art infrared leak detection equipment and tracer gas leak detection equipment. To document the condition of the manholes, color photographs were taken of the insides of 125 manholes, and notes were made on the condition of these manholes.

  1. Asellus aquaticus as a Potential Carrier of Escherichia coli and Other Coliform Bacteria into Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Sarah C. B.; Arvin, Erik; Nissen, Erling; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Individuals of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, enter drinking water distribution systems in temperate parts of the world, where they establish breeding populations. We analysed populations of surface water A. aquaticus from two ponds for associated faecal indicator bacteria and assessed the risk of A. aquaticus transporting bacteria into distribution systems. Concentrations of up to two E. coli and five total coliforms·mL−1 were measured in the water and 200 E. coli and >240 total coliforms·mL−1 in the sediments of the investigated ponds. Concentrations of A. aquaticus associated bacteria never exceeded three E. coli and six total coliforms·A. aquaticus−1. During exposure to high concentrations of coliforms, concentrations reached 350 coliforms·A. aquaticus−1. A. aquaticus associated E. coli were only detected as long as E. coli were present in the water and sediment. The calculated probability of exceeding drinking water guideline values in non-disinfected systems by intrusion of A. aquaticus was low. Only in scenarios with narrow pipes and low flows, did total coliforms exceed guideline values, implying that the probability of detection by routine monitoring is also low. The study expands the knowledge base for evaluating incidents with presence of coliform indicators in drinking water by showing that intruding A. aquaticus were not important carriers of E. coli or other coliform bacteria even when emerging from faecally contaminated waters. PMID:23455399

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum Strains Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Revetta, Randy P

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium previously reported to be the cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis from contaminated metalworking fluid aerosols, is becoming a public health concern. PMID:26744376

  3. Comparison between Synthesized Lead Particles and Lead Solids Formed on Surfaces in Real Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to compare the properties of lead solids formed during bench-scale precipitation experiments to solids found on lead pipe removed from real drinking water distribution systems and metal coupons used in pilot scale corrosion testing. Specifically, so...

  4. PREDICTING LEAD DISSOLUTION IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: EFFECT OF FLUORIDE ADDITIVES ON LEAD SOLUBILITY AND CORROSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many water systems have encountered difficulties in meeting the action levels established by the Lead and Copper Rule. Several chemical parameters contribute to the corrosion of lead plumbing and may influence the nature of the passivating films formed on distribution materials....

  5. THE MINERALOGY OF PB SCALES IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS AS REVEALED BY COMBINED XRD AND MICRO-RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolving Pb from lead service lines and Pb-containing brasses and solders has become a major health issue for many water distribution systems. Knowledge of the mineralogy of scales in these pipes is key to modeling this dissolution. The traditional method of determining their ...

  6. EPA Support of Technology Development for Rehabilitation of Wastewater Collection and Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nation’s 54,000 drinking water systems and 16,000 wastewater systems are nearing the end of their useful life and need to be replaced/repaired to comply with federal regulations. Rehabilitation includes a broad spectrum of approaches, from repair to replacement, that attempt...

  7. Temperature distribution of a hot water storage tank in a simulated solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    A 2,300-liter hot water storage tank was studied under conditions simulating a solar heating and cooling system. The initial condition of the tank, ranging from 37 C at the bottom to 94 C at the top, represented a condition midway through the start-up period of the system. During the five-day test period, the water in the tank gradually rose in temperature but in a manner that diminished its temperature stratification. Stratification was found not to be an important factor in the operation of the particular solar system studied.

  8. An efficient hybrid approach for multiobjective optimization of water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Feifei; Simpson, Angus R.; Zecchin, Aaron C.

    2014-05-01

    An efficient hybrid approach for the design of water distribution systems (WDSs) with multiple objectives is described in this paper. The objectives are the minimization of the network cost and maximization of the network resilience. A self-adaptive multiobjective differential evolution (SAMODE) algorithm has been developed, in which control parameters are automatically adapted by means of evolution instead of the presetting of fine-tuned parameter values. In the proposed method, a graph algorithm is first used to decompose a looped WDS into a shortest-distance tree (T) or forest, and chords (Ω). The original two-objective optimization problem is then approximated by a series of single-objective optimization problems of the T to be solved by nonlinear programming (NLP), thereby providing an approximate Pareto optimal front for the original whole network. Finally, the solutions at the approximate front are used to seed the SAMODE algorithm to find an improved front for the original entire network. The proposed approach is compared with two other conventional full-search optimization methods (the SAMODE algorithm and the NSGA-II) that seed the initial population with purely random solutions based on three case studies: a benchmark network and two real-world networks with multiple demand loading cases. Results show that (i) the proposed NLP-SAMODE method consistently generates better-quality Pareto fronts than the full-search methods with significantly improved efficiency; and (ii) the proposed SAMODE algorithm (no parameter tuning) exhibits better performance than the NSGA-II with calibrated parameter values in efficiently offering optimal fronts.

  9. Application of portable fluorescence spectrophotometry for integrity testing of recycled water dual distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Hambly, Adam C; Henderson, Rita K; Baker, Andy; Stuetz, Richard M; Khan, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Water utilities supplying recycled water to households via a "third-pipe" or "dual reticulation" system have a need for a rapid, portable method to detect cross-connections within potable water reticulation networks. This study evaluates portable fluorimetry as a technique for cross-connection detection in the field. For the first time, an investigation of a full-scale dual reticulation water-recycling network has been carried out to identify cross-connections using a portable fluorimeter. We determined that this can be carried out with a 3 mL water sample, and unlike methods that are currently in use for cross-connection detection, can be achieved quickly without disruption to water flow or availability within the network. It was also revealed that fluorescence trigger values could be established with high levels of confidence by sampling less than 2.5% of the network. Fluorescence analysis was also able to uncover a single, real cross-connection event. As such, this paper is a fundamental demonstration of fluorescence as a reliable, highly portable technique for cross-connection detection within dual reticulation water recycling networks and further establishes the abilities of fluorescence devices as valuable field instruments for water quality monitoring. PMID:25506735

  10. Pipeline materials modify the effectiveness of disinfectants in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Lehtola, Markku J; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Lampola, Tiia; Hirvonen, Arja; Vartiainen, Terttu; Martikainen, Pertti J

    2005-05-01

    We studied how pipe material can modify the effectiveness of UV- and chlorine disinfection in drinking water and biofilms. This study was done with two pipe materials: copper and composite plastic (polyethylene, PE) in a pilot scale water distribution network. UV-disinfection decreased viable bacterial numbers in the pilot waterworks and outlet water of pipes on average by 79%, but in biofilms its disinfecting effect was minor. Chlorine decreased effectively the microbial numbers in water and biofilms of PE pipes. In outlet water from copper pipes, the effect of chlorination was weaker; microbial numbers increased back to the level before chlorination within a few days. In the biofilms present in the copper pipes, chlorine decreased microbial numbers only in front of the pipeline. One reason for weaker efficiency of chlorine in copper pipes was that its concentration declined more rapidly in the copper pipes than in the PE pipes. These results means that copper pipes may require a higher chlorine dosage than plastic pipes to achieve effective disinfection of the pipes. PMID:15869778

  11. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Fanto, Susan V.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  12. Analysis of polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2010-09-17

    Sulfide and polysulfides are strong nucleophiles and reducing agents that participate in many environmentally significant processes such as the formation of sulfide minerals and volatile organic sulfur compounds. Their presence in drinking water distribution systems are of particular concern and need to be assessed, since these species consume disinfectants and dissolved oxygen, react with metal ions to produce insoluble metal sulfides, and cause taste and odour problems. The analysis of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems is challenging due to their low concentrations, thermal instability and their susceptibility to undergo oxidation and disproportionation reactions. This paper reports on the development and optimisation of a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for the determination of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems. The method uses methyl iodide to derivatize sulfide and polysulfides into their corresponding dimethyl(poly)sulfides, which are then extracted using solid-phase microextraction in the headspace mode and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Good sensitivity was achieved for the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides, with detection limits ranging from 50 to 240 ng L(-1). The method also demonstrated good precision (repeatability: 3-7%) and good linearity over two orders of magnitude. Matrix effects from raw drinking water containing organic carbon (3.8 mg L(-1)) and from sediment material from a drinking water distribution system were shown to have no interferences in the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides. The method provides a rapid, robust, and reliable mean to analyse trace levels of sulfides and polysulfides in aqueous systems. The new method described here is more accessible and user-friendly than methods based on closed-loop stripping analysis, which have been traditionally used for the analysis of these compounds. The optimised method was used to analyse samples collected

  13. Microbial quality and molecular identification of cultivable microorganisms isolated from an urban drinking water distribution system (Limassol, Cyprus).

    PubMed

    Botsaris, George; Kanetis, Loukas; Slaný, Michal; Parpouna, Christiana; Makris, Konstantinos C

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms can survive and multiply in aged urban drinking water distribution systems, leading to potential health risks. The objective of this work was to investigate the microbial quality of tap water and molecularly identify its predominant cultivable microorganisms. Tap water samples collected from 24 different households scattered in the urban area of Limassol, Cyprus, were microbiologically tested following standard protocols for coliforms, E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Enterococcus spp., and total viable count at 22 and 37 °C. Molecular identification was performed on isolated predominant single colonies using 16SrRNA sequencing. Approximately 85% of the household water samples were contaminated with one or more microorganisms belonging to the genera of Pseudomonas, Corynebacterium, Agrobacterium, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Delftia, Acinetobacter, Enterococcus, Enterobacter, and Aeromonas. However, all samples tested were free from E. coli. This is the first report in Cyprus molecularly confirming specific genera of relevant microbial communities in tap water. PMID:26559553

  14. Microbial distribution in the Environmental Control and Life Support System water recovery test conducted at NASA, MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, J. J.; Roman, M. C.; Kilgore, B. A.; Huff, T. L.; Obenhuber, D. C.; Terrell, D. W.; Wilson, M. E.; Jackson, N. E.

    1991-01-01

    NASA/MSFC is developing a physical/chemical treatment system to reclaim wastewater for reuse on Space Station Freedom (SSF). Integrated testing of hygiene and potable water subsystems assessed the capability to reclaim water to SSF specifications. The test was conducted from May through July 1990 with a total of 47 days of system test operation. Water samples were analyzed using standard cultural methods employing membrane filtration and spread plate techniques and epifluorescence microscopy. Fatty acid methyl ester and biochemical profiles were used for microbial identification. Analysis of waste and product water produced by the subsystems demonstrated the effective reduction of viable microbial populations greater than 8.0E + 06 colony forming units (CFU) per 100 mL to an average of 5 CFU/100 mL prior to distribution into storage tanks.

  15. Sensor-enabled chem/bio contamination detection system dedicated to situational awareness of water distribution security status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Mark D.; Smith, Eddy D.; VanBlaricum, Vicki; Hock, Vincent F.; Kroll, Dan; Russell, Kevin J.

    2010-04-01

    Both real events and models have proven that drinking water systems are vulnerable to deliberate and/or accidental contamination. Additionally, homeland security initiatives and modeling efforts have determined that it is relatively easy to orchestrate the contamination of potable water supplies. Such contamination can be accomplished with classic and non-traditional chemical agents, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), and/or toxic industrial materials (TIMs). Subsequent research and testing has developed a proven network for detection and response to these threats. The method uses offthe- shelf, broad-spectrum analytical instruments coupled with advanced interpretive algorithms. The system detects and characterizes any backflow events involving toxic contaminants by employing unique chemical signature (fingerprint) response data. This instrumentation has been certified by the Office of Homeland Security for detecting deliberate and/or accidental contamination of critical water infrastructure. The system involves integration of several mature technologies (sensors, SCADA, dynamic models, and the HACH HST Guardian Blue instrumentation) into a complete, real-time, management system that also can be used to address other water distribution concerns, such as corrosion. This paper summarizes the reasons and results for installing such a distribution-based detection and protection system.

  16. The distribution of bromide in water in the Floridan aquifer system, Duval County, northeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, E.R.; Taylor, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Although Duval County, Florida, has ample ground-water resources for public supply, the potential exists for a problem with excessive disinfectant by-products. These disinfectant by-products result from the treatment of raw water containing low concentrations of bromide and naturally occurring organic compounds. Because of this potential problem, the relation of bromide concentrations to aquifer tapped, well location and depth, and chemical characteristics of water in the Floridan aquifer system underlying Duval County were studied to determine if these relations could be applied to delineate water with low-bromide concentrations for future supplies. In 1992, water samples from 106 wells that tap the Floridan aquifer system were analyzed for bromide and major dissolved constituents. A comparison of bromide concentrations from the 1992 sampling with data from earlier studies (1979-80) indicates that higher bromide concentrations were detected during the earlier studies. The difference between the old and new data is probably because of a change in analytical methodology in the analysis of samples. Bromide concentrations exceeded the detection limit (0.10 milligrams per liter) in water from 28 of the 106 wells (26 percent) sampled in 1992. The maximum concentration was 0.56 milligrams per liter. There were no relations between bromide and major dissolved constituents, well depth, or aquifer tapped that would be useful for determining bromide concentrations. Areal patterns of bromide occurrence are not clearly defined, but areas with relatively high bromide concentrations tend to be located in a triangular area near the community of Sunbeam, Florida, and along the St. Johns River throughout Duval County.

  17. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes

  18. Impact of bromide on halogen incorporation into organic moieties in chlorinated drinking water treatment and distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Allard, S; Gruchlik, Y; McDonald, S; Joll, C A; Heitz, A

    2016-01-15

    The impact of elevated bromide concentrations (399 to 750 μg/L) on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs), namely trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX), in two drinking water systems was investigated. Bromine was the main halogen incorporated into all of the DBP classes and into organic carbon, even though chlorine was present in large excess to maintain a disinfectant residual. Due to the higher reactivity of bromine compared to chlorine, brominated DBPs were rapidly formed, followed by a slower increase in chlorinated DBPs. Higher bromine substitution and incorporation factors for individual DBP classes were observed for the chlorinated water from the groundwater source (lower concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)), which contained a higher concentration of bromide, than for the surface water source (higher DOC). The molar distribution of adsorbable organic bromine to chlorine (AOBr/AOCl) for AOX in the groundwater distribution system was 1.5:1 and almost 1:1 for the surface water system. The measured (regulated) DBPs only accounted for 16 to 33% of the total organic halogen, demonstrating that AOX measurements are essential to provide a full understanding of the formation of halogenated DBPs in drinking waters. In addition, the study demonstrated that a significant proportion (up to 94%) of the bromide in source waters can be converted AOBr. An evaluation of AOBr and AOCl through a second groundwater treatment plant that uses conventional treatment processes for DOC removal produced 70% of AOX as AOBr, with 69% of the initial source water bromide converted to AOBr. Exposure to organobromine compounds is suspected to result in greater adverse health consequences than their chlorinated analogues. Therefore, this study highlights the need for improved methods to selectively reduce the bromide content in source waters. PMID:26490534

  19. Microbial analysis of in situ biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems: implications for monitoring and control of drinking water quality.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, Isabel; Jackson, M; Solomon, C; Boxall, J

    2016-04-01

    Biofilm formation in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) is influenced by the source water, the supply infrastructure and the operation of the system. A holistic approach was used to advance knowledge on the development of mixed species biofilms in situ, by using biofilm sampling devices installed in chlorinated networks. Key physico-chemical parameters and conventional microbial indicators for drinking water quality were analysed. Biofilm coverage on pipes was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The microbial community structure, bacteria and fungi, of water and biofilms was assessed using pyrosequencing. Conventional wisdom leads to an expectation for less microbial diversity in groundwater supplied systems. However, the analysis of bulk water showed higher microbial diversity in groundwater site samples compared with the surface water site. Conversely, higher diversity and richness were detected in biofilms from the surface water site. The average biofilm coverage was similar among sites. Disinfection residual and other key variables were similar between the two sites, other than nitrates, alkalinity and the hydraulic conditions which were extremely low at the groundwater site. Thus, the unexpected result of an exceptionally low diversity with few dominant genera (Pseudomonas and Basidiobolus) in groundwater biofilm samples, despite the more diverse community in the bulk water, is attributed to the low-flow hydraulic conditions. This finding evidences that the local environmental conditions are shaping biofilm formation, composition and amount, and hence managing these is critical for the best operation of DWDS to safeguard water quality. PMID:26637423

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Pfaller, Stacy; Revetta, Randy P

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of twoSphingopyxissp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (intI1) gene associated with sulfonamide (sul1) and puromycin (pac) antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:27034493

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Two Sphingopyxis sp. Strains, Dominant Members of the Bacterial Community Associated with a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Stacy; Revetta, Randy P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of two Sphingopyxis sp. strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. Both strains are ubiquitous residents and early colonizers of water distribution systems. Genomic annotation identified a class 1 integron (intI1) gene associated with sulfonamide (sul1) and puromycin (pac) antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:27034493

  2. [Evaluation of chlorine dioxide concentrations needed to effectively control contamination by Legionella spp in hospital hot water distribution systems].

    PubMed

    Fusaroli, Paolo; Ravaioli, Cinzia; Gabutti, Giovanni; Caroli, Maria; Stefanati, Armando

    2016-01-01

    This aim of the study was to identify effective levels of ClO2 for control of Legionella spp. contamination in the hot water (45-55 °C.) distribution system of a 579-bed hospital in Ravenna (Italy). Overall, 663 hot water samples were collected from the hospital's sinks and shower taps and were analyzed. Trend line analysis, which describes the trend in the number of positive samples collected according to disinfectant concentration, shows that the lowest number of positive samples was achieved with concentrations of ClO2 between 0.22 and 0, 32 mg /l. PMID:27336956

  3. Characterization of biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system with UV/Cl2 disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Li, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Chun; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-09-01

    The effect of UV/Cl2 disinfection on the biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). Passivation occurred more rapidly in the AR with UV/Cl2 than in the one with Cl2 alone, decreasing iron release for higher corrosivity of water. Based on functional gene, pyrosequencing assays and principal component analysis, UV disinfection not only reduced the required initial chlorine dose, but also enhanced denitrifying functional bacteria advantage in the biofilm of corrosion scales. The nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Dechloromonas exhibited the greatest corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4 in the AR with UV/Cl2, while the rhizobia Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium, and the NRB Sphingomonas, Brucella producing siderophores had weaker corrosion-inhibition effect by capturing iron in the AR with Cl2. These results indicated that the microbial redox cycling of iron was possibly responsible for higher corrosion inhibition and lower effect of water Larson-Skold Index (LI) changes on corrosion. This finding could be applied toward the control of water quality in drinking water distribution systems. PMID:24859195

  4. Spatio-temporal variability of tastes and odors of drinking water within a distribution system.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Francois; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sérodes, Jean B; Bouchard, Christian

    2012-08-30

    The threshold of human perception in the detection of tastes and odors (T&O) relating to compounds in drinking water is variable. For example, chlorine can be detected at the ppm level and geosmin can be perceived at the ppt level. In this paper, sensory tests (using a human panel), physicochemical analyses (total and free residual chlorine, temperature, metals, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol (2MIB)) and microbiological analyses (algae, Actinomycetes and heterotrophic plate count) were performed for water samples collected during a seventeen-month period at ten different locations of a municipal distribution network of Quebec City (Canada). The results showed that different flavors(1) assessed by a panel and aggregated into global flavor intensity (GFI) vary considerably spatially and seasonally. Multiple regression analysis showed that the factors best explaining the variability of GFI are (in order) the season, the location, the concentration of total residual chlorine and the presence of cyanobacteria. Results also demonstrate that chlorine has a masking effect on other T&O. PMID:22513044

  5. The use of Jatropha curcas to achieve a self sufficient water distribution system: A case study in rural Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Alexandra

    The use of Jatropha curcas as a source of oil for fueling water pumps holds promise for rural communities struggling to achieve water security in arid climates. The potential for use in developing communities as an affordable, sustainable fuel source has been highly recommended for many reasons: it is easily propagated, drought resistant, grows rapidly, and has high-oil-content seeds, as well as medicinal and economic potential. This study uses a rural community in Senegal, West Africa, and calculates at what level of Jatropha curcas production the village is able to be self-sufficient in fueling their water system to meet drinking, sanitation and irrigation requirements. The current water distribution system was modelled to represent irrigation requirements for nine different Jatropha curcas cultivation and processing schemes. It was found that a combination of using recycled greywater for irrigation and a mechanical press to maximize oil recovered from the seeds of mature Jatropha curcas trees, would be able to operate the water system with no diesel required.

  6. A continuous active monitoring approach to identify cross-connections between potable water and effluent distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Friedler, E; Alfiya, Y; Shaviv, A; Gilboa, Y; Harussi, Y; Raize, O

    2015-03-01

    A continuous active monitoring approach was developed for identification of cross-connections between potable water supply systems and treated wastewater effluent reuse distribution systems. The approach is based on monitoring the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) at the potable water system while injecting sulfite (a reducing agent) into the effluent line. A sharp decrease in the ORP of the potable water would indicate a cross-connection event. The approach was tested in batch experiments on treated municipal wastewater effluent of varying degree of treatment, and at dilution ratios of up to 1:100 (effluent/potable). The approach was then examined under continuous flow conditions, which simulated cross-connection events at various dilution ratios (up to 1:100). In the continuous runs, differences between the potable water ORP and the effluent-potable water mixture (containing sulfite as sodium bisulfite (SBS)) ORP were 450-630 mV. This suggests high potential for identifying a cross-connection event. Implementation of the approach includes adding sulfite to effluent used for agricultural irrigation; hence, possible effects on soil and on crops were studied in soil columns and pots planted with basil (Ocimum basilicum) as a model plant. No negative effects of sulfite addition to the irrigation effluent were observed in the irrigated soils and plants, and therefore, it could be safely implemented also in agricultural applications. PMID:25701471

  7. Impact of Bioreactor Environment and Recovery Method on the Profile of Bacterial Populations from Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xia; Jellison, Kristen L.; Huynh, Kevin; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Multiple rotating annular reactors were seeded with biofilms flushed from water distribution systems to assess (1) whether biofilms grown in bioreactors are representative of biofilms flushed from the water distribution system in terms of bacterial composition and diversity, and (2) whether the biofilm sampling method affects the population profile of the attached bacterial community. Biofilms were grown in bioreactors until thickness stabilized (9 to 11 weeks) and harvested from reactor coupons by sonication, stomaching, bead-beating, and manual scraping. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons was used to profile bacterial populations from flushed biofilms seeded into bioreactors as well as biofilms recovered from bioreactor coupons by different methods. β diversity between flushed and reactor biofilms was compared to β diversity between (i) biofilms harvested from different reactors and (ii) biofilms harvested by different methods from the same reactor. These analyses showed that average diversity between flushed and bioreactor biofilms was double the diversity between biofilms from different reactors operated in parallel. The diversity between bioreactors was larger than the diversity associated with different biofilm recovery methods. Compared to other experimental variables, the method used to recover biofilms had a negligible impact on the outcome of water biofilm analyses based on 16S amplicon sequencing. Results from this study show that biofilms grown in reactors over 9 to 11 weeks are not representative models of the microbial populations flushed from a distribution system. Furthermore, the bacterial population profile of biofilms grown in replicate reactors from the same flushed water are likely to diverge. However, four common sampling protocols, which differ with respect to disruption of bacterial cells, provide similar information with respect to the 16S rRNA population profile of the biofilm community. PMID:26196282

  8. Assessing the Spatial Distribution of Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure via Public Drinking Water Pipes Using Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kate; Fletcher, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful tool for assessing exposure in epidemiologic studies. We used GIS to determine the geographic extent of contamination by perfluorooctanoic acid, C8 (PFOA) that was released into the environment from the DuPont Washington Works Facility located in Parkersburg, West Virginia. Methods Paper maps of pipe distribution networks were provided by six local public water districts participating in the community cross-sectional survey, the C8 Health Project. Residential histories were also collected in the survey and geocoded. We integrated the pipe networks and geocoded addresses to determine which addresses were serviced by one of the participating water districts. The GIS-based water district assignment was then compared to the participants' self-reported source of public drinking water. Results There were a total of 151,871 addresses provided by the 48,800 participants of the C8 Health Project that consented to geocoding. We were able to successfully geocode 139,067 (91.6%) addresses, and of these, 118,209 (85.0%) self-reported water sources were confirmed using the GIS-based method of water district assignment. Furthermore, the GIS-based method corrected 20,858 (15.0%) self-reported public drinking water sources. Over half (54%) the participants in the lowest GIS-based exposure group self-reported being in a higher exposed water district. Conclusions Not only were we able to correct erroneous self-reported water sources, we were also able to assign water districts to participants with unknown sources. Without the GIS-based method, the reliance on only self-reported data would have resulted in exposure misclassification. PMID:24010064

  9. Origin of the difference in the distribution behavior of tellurium and selenium in a soil water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Teppei; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2008-03-01

    The distribution behavior of tellurium (Te) between soil and water in a synthetic soil-water system was studied coupled with the speciation of Te both in soil and water phases by using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a high-performance liquid chromatography connected to an ICP-MS (HPLC-ICP-MS), respectively. The results were compared with a similar data set for Se, which was simultaneously obtained in this study. The oxidation states and host phases of Te and Se in the soil samples were given by XAFS, while the oxidation states in water were given by HPLC-ICP-MS. It was found that both Te and Se in soil are mainly associated with Fe(III) hydroxides under oxic conditions. From the EXAFS analyses, the outer-sphere complex is important for the Se(VI) sorbed on Fe(III) hydroxides in soils, while Se(IV), Te(IV), and Te(VI) form inner-sphere complexes. Under reducing condition, it was found that Te(0) and Se(0) species were formed and that Se was more readily reduced to Se(0) than Te, as is predicted from their Eh-pH diagrams. The reduction process from hexavalent to zerovalent species was different between Se and Te, that is, the direct reduction from Se(VI) to Se(0) was observed for Se, while Te was reduced stepwise from Te(VI) to Te(0) via Te(IV). In terms of the distribution between soil and water, Se distribution to water was much higher than that of Te under wide redox conditions. For Se, selenate is the predominant species in water even under reducing condition due to the much higher solubility of Se(VI) than Se(IV). Furthermore, a much smaller distribution of Te in water was primarily due to the larger affinities of Te(IV) and Te(VI) to Fe(III) hydroxides than Se(VI), which originates from the formation of the inner-sphere complexes of Te(IV) and Te(VI) to Fe(III) hydroxides.

  10. Microbial community structures in a closed raw water distribution system biofilm as revealed by 454-pyrosequencing analysis and the effect of microbial biofilm communities on raw water quality.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianghan; Liang, Heng; Yan, Lijun; Ma, Jun; Yang, Yanling; Li, Guibai

    2013-11-01

    This is the first report on the characterization of the microbial biofilm community structure and water quality change along a closed and stable raw water distribution system. 454-pyrosequencing was employed to investigate the microbial communities in four biofilm samples. 25,426 optimized sequences were obtained. Results showed Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum in each biofilm sample. The abundance of Nitrospiraes in M6 biofilm, Firmicutes in M8 biofilm, Actinobacteria in M9 biofilm were higher by comparing with other three biofilm samples. The M6 microbial biofilm community structure was similar to that of M7, dissimilar to that of M9. Dissolved oxygen and nitrogen was probably major factors to influence the microbial biofilm communities. Nitrospiraes in M6 biofilm and Firmicutes in M8 biofilm were crucial to remove ammonia nitrogen and nitrate in raw water. How to enrich functional microbes in biofilm to pretreat raw water is an important area of future research. PMID:24055963

  11. Characterization and identification of a chlorine-resistant bacterium, Sphingomonas TS001, from a model drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Liu, Wenjun; Cui, Lifeng; Zhang, Minglu; Wang, Bei

    2013-08-01

    This study describes the identification and characterization of a new chlorine resistant bacterium, Sphingomonas TS001, isolated from a model drinking water distribution system. The isolate was identified by 16s rRNA gene analysis and morphological and physiological characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that TS001 belongs to the genus Sphingomonas. The model distribution system HPC results showed that, when the chlorine residual was greater than 0.7 mg L(-1), 100% of detected heterotrophic bacteria (HPC) was TS001. The bench-scale inactivation efficiency testing showed that this strain was very resistant to chlorine, and 4 mg L(-1) of chlorine with 240 min retention time provided only approximately 5% viability reduction of TS001. In contrast, a 3-log inactivation (99.9%) was obtained for UV fluencies of 40 mJ cm(-2). A high chlorine-resistant and UV sensitive bacterium, Sphingomonas TS001, was documented for the first time. PMID:23648446

  12. A robust hybrid fuzzy-simulated annealing-intelligent water drops approach for tuning a distribution static compensator nonlinear controller in a distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri Tolabi, Hajar; Hosseini, Rahil; Shakarami, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-06-01

    This article presents a novel hybrid optimization approach for a nonlinear controller of a distribution static compensator (DSTATCOM). The DSTATCOM is connected to a distribution system with the distributed generation units. The nonlinear control is based on partial feedback linearization. Two proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers regulate the voltage and track the output in this control system. In the conventional scheme, the trial-and-error method is used to determine the PID controller coefficients. This article uses a combination of a fuzzy system, simulated annealing (SA) and intelligent water drops (IWD) algorithms to optimize the parameters of the controllers. The obtained results reveal that the response of the optimized controlled system is effectively improved by finding a high-quality solution. The results confirm that using the tuning method based on the fuzzy-SA-IWD can significantly decrease the settling and rising times, the maximum overshoot and the steady-state error of the voltage step response of the DSTATCOM. The proposed hybrid tuning method for the partial feedback linearizing (PFL) controller achieved better regulation of the direct current voltage for the capacitor within the DSTATCOM. Furthermore, in the event of a fault the proposed controller tuned by the fuzzy-SA-IWD method showed better performance than the conventional controller or the PFL controller without optimization by the fuzzy-SA-IWD method with regard to both fault duration and clearing times.

  13. Spatio-temporal distribution of stream-aquifer water exchanges along a multi-layer aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhri, A.; Flipo, N.; Faycal, R.; Anne, J.; Ludovic, B.; Patrick, G.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the spatial and temporal variability of stream-aquifer water exchanges along a 6 km-stream network in a multi-layer aquifer system. With an area of 104 km2, the Orgeval experimental basin is located 70 km east from Paris. It drains a multi-layer aquifer system, which is composed of two main geological formations: the Oligocene (upper aquifer unit) and the Eocene (lower aquifer unit). These two aquifer units are separated by a clayey aquitard. Five MOLONARI stations (MOnitoring LOcal des échanges NAppe-RIvière) have been deployed along the stream-network to monitor stream-aquifer exchanges over years, based on continuous pressure and temperature measurements (15 min-time step). The five MOLONARI stations are distributed in two upstream, two intermediate, and one downstream site. The two upstream sites are connected to the upper aquifer unit, and the downstream one is connected to the lower aquifer unit. One year (april2012-july 2013) of hydrological data are hereafter analyzed. We first focus on the spatial distribution of the stream-aquifer exchanges along the multi-layer aquifer system during the low flow period. Results display an upstream-downstream functional gradient, with upstream gaining stream and downstream losing stream. This spatial distribution is due to the multi-layer nature of the aquifer system, whose lower aquifer unit is depleted. Then it appears that the downstream losing streams temporally switch into gaining ones during extreme hydrological events (December 2012 and January 2013), while the upstream streams remain gaining streams even during the flood peak when overflow drastically reduces the water exchanges. To illustrate the spatial distribution of the stream-aquifer exchanges' temporal variability three extreme hydrological events of various intensity are analyzed.

  14. Microbial Community Dynamics of an Urban Drinking Water Distribution System Subjected to Phases of Chloramination and Chlorination Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chiachi; Ling, Fangqiong; Andersen, Gary L.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Water utilities in parts of the U.S. control microbial regrowth in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) by alternating postdisinfection methods between chlorination and chloramination. To examine how this strategy influences drinking water microbial communities, an urban DWDS (population ≅ 40,000) with groundwater as the source water was studied for approximately 2 years. Water samples were collected at five locations in the network at different seasons and analyzed for their chemical and physical characteristics and for their microbial community composition and structure by examining the 16S rRNA gene via terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA pyrosequencing technology. Nonmetric multidimension scaling and canonical correspondence analysis of microbial community profiles could explain >57% of the variation. Clustering of samples based on disinfection types (free chlorine versus combined chlorine) and sampling time was observed to correlate to the shifts in microbial communities. Sampling location and water age (<21.2 h) had no apparent effects on the microbial compositions of samples from most time points. Microbial community analysis revealed that among major core populations, Cyanobacteria, Methylobacteriaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae were more abundant in chlorinated water, and Methylophilaceae, Methylococcaceae, and Pseudomonadaceae were more abundant in chloraminated water. No correlation was observed with minor populations that were detected frequently (<0.1% of total pyrosequences), which were likely present in source water and survived through the treatment process. Transient microbial populations including Flavobacteriaceae and Clostridiaceae were also observed. Overall, reversible shifts in microbial communities were especially pronounced with chloramination, suggesting stronger selection of microbial populations from chloramines than chlorine. PMID:22941076

  15. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R L; Boxall, J B

    2013-02-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisation of material from the pipe walls to the network using a full scale, temperature-controlled experimental pipeline facility accurately representative of live DWDS. Analysis of pyrosequencing and water physico-chemical data showed that habitat type (water vs. biofilm) and hydraulic conditions influenced bacterial community structure and composition in our experimental DWDS. Bacterial community composition clearly differed between biofilms and bulk water samples. Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant phyla in biofilms while Alphaproteobacteria was predominant in bulk water samples. This suggests that bacteria inhabiting biofilms, predominantly species belonging to genera Pseudomonas, Zooglea and Janthinobacterium, have an enhanced ability to express extracellular polymeric substances to adhere to surfaces and to favour co-aggregation between cells than those found in the bulk water. Highest species richness and diversity were detected in 28 days old biofilms with this being accentuated at highly varied flow conditions. Flushing altered the pipe-wall bacterial community structure but did not completely remove bacteria from the pipe walls, particularly under highly varied flow conditions, suggesting that under these conditions more compact biofilms were generated. This research brings new knowledge regarding the influence of different hydraulic regimes on the composition and structure of bacterial communities within DWDS and the implication that this

  16. Public health and pipe breaks in water distribution systems: analysis with internet search volume as a proxy.

    PubMed

    Shortridge, Julie E; Guikema, Seth D

    2014-04-15

    Drinking water distribution infrastructure has been identified as a factor in waterborne disease outbreaks and improved understanding of the public health risks associated with distribution system failures has been identified as a priority area for research. Pipe breaks may pose a risk, as their occurrence and repair can result in low or negative pressure, potentially allowing contamination of drinking water from adjacent soils. However, measuring this phenomenon is challenging because the most likely health impact is mild gastrointestinal (GI) illness, which is unlikely to result in a doctor or hospital visit. Here we present a novel method that uses data mining techniques and internet search volume to assess the relationship between pipe breaks and symptoms of GI illness in two U.S. cities. Weekly search volume for the terms diarrhea and vomiting was used as the response variable with the number of pipe breaks in each city as a covariate as well as additional covariates to control for seasonal patterns, search volume persistence, and other sources of GI illness. The fit and predictive accuracy of multiple regression and data mining techniques were compared, with the best performance obtained using random forest and bagged regression tree models. Pipe breaks were found to be an important and positively correlated predictor of internet search volume in multiple models in both cities, supporting previous investigations that indicated an increased risk of GI illness from distribution system disturbances. PMID:24495984

  17. Seasonal and spatial evolution of trihalomethanes in a drinking water distribution system according to the treatment process.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Tello, A; Arias-Borrego, A; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2015-11-01

    This paper comparatively shows the influence of four water treatment processes on the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in a water distribution system. The study was performed from February 2005 to January 2012 with analytical data of 600 samples taken in Aljaraque water treatment plant (WTP) and 16 locations along the water distribution system (WDS) in the region of Andévalo and the coast of Huelva (southwest Spain), a region with significant seasonal and population changes. The comparison of results in the four different processes studied indicated a clear link of the treatment process with the formation of THM along the WDS. The most effective treatment process is preozonation and activated carbon filtration (P3), which is also the most stable under summer temperatures. Experiments also show low levels of THMs with the conventional process of preoxidation with potassium permanganate (P4), delaying the chlorination to the end of the WTP; however, this simple and economical treatment process is less effective and less stable than P3. In this study, strong seasonal variations were obtained (increase of THM from winter to summer of 1.17 to 1.85 times) and a strong spatial variation (1.1 to 1.7 times from WTP to end points of WDS) which largely depends on the treatment process applied. There was also a strong correlation between THM levels and water temperature, contact time and pH. On the other hand, it was found that THM formation is not proportional to the applied chlorine dose in the treatment process, but there is a direct relationship with the accumulated dose of chlorine. Finally, predictive models based on multiple linear regressions are proposed for each treatment process. PMID:26431706

  18. High Efficiency Integrated Space Conditioning, Water Heating and Air Distribution System for HUD-Code Manufactured Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Henry DeLima; Joe Akin; Joseph Pietsch

    2008-09-14

    Recognizing the need for new space conditioning and water heating systems for manufactured housing, DeLima Associates assembled a team to develop a space conditioning system that would enhance comfort conditions while also reducing energy usage at the systems level. The product, Comboflair® was defined as a result of a needs analysis of project sponsors and industry stakeholders. An integrated system would be developed that would combine a packaged airconditioning system with a small-duct, high-velocity air distribution system. In its basic configuration, the source for space heating would be a gas water heater. The complete system would be installed at the manufactured home factory and would require no site installation work at the homesite as is now required with conventional split-system air conditioners. Several prototypes were fabricated and tested before a field test unit was completed in October 2005. The Comboflair® system, complete with ductwork, was installed in a 1,984 square feet, double-wide manufactured home built by Palm Harbor Homes in Austin, TX. After the home was transported and installed at a Palm Harbor dealer lot in Austin, TX, a data acquisition system was installed for remote data collection. Over 60 parameters were continuously monitored and measurements were transmitted to a remote site every 15 minutes for performance analysis. The Comboflair® system was field tested from February 2006 until April 2007. The cooling system performed in accordance with the design specifications. The heating system initially could not provide the needed capacity at peak heating conditions until the water heater was replaced with a higher capacity standard water heater. All system comfort goals were then met. As a result of field testing, we have identified improvements to be made to specific components for incorporation into production models. The Comboflair® system will be manufactured by Unico, Inc. at their new production facility in St. Louis

  19. The Accumulation Of Radium And Other Radionuclides In Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tendency for iron solid surfaces to adsorb trace contaminants such as arsenic is well known and has become the basis for several drinking water treatment approaches. It is reasonable to assume that iron-based solids, such as corrosion deposits present in drinking water distr...

  20. MANAGING WATER QUALITY IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: SIMULATING TTHM AND CHLORINE RESIDUAL PROPAGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Act and its Amendments are posing a major challenge to drinking water utilities in the United States. tilities are being forced to find A balance between minimizing the formation of disinfection by-products while at the same time providing protection again...

  1. SEATTLE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CORROSION CONTROL STUDY. VOLUME I: CEDAR RIVER WATER PILOT PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted in Seattle, Washington, to evaluate the use of lime and sodium bicarbonate in surface water supplies to control corrosion of plumbing materials. Continuous-flow pipe-coupon test loops were used to test the effectiveness of two water treatments - addition of ...

  2. SEATTLE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CORROSION CONTROL STUDY. VOLUME 2. TOLT RIVER WATER PILOT PLANT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    For 6 months, the Seattle Water Department conducted a corrosion treatment pilot plant study, obtaining data on the treatment of Tolt River water with lime/sodium carbonate, lime/sodium bicarbonate, and lime/bicarbonate/silicate. Continuous-flow pipe coupon tests were conducted t...

  3. The Impact of Water Quality, Corrosion Inhibitors and Plumbing Age on Copper Release in Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) in 1991, which established a copper action level of 1.3 mg/L in the consumers’ tap water. As a result, researchers have examined the effects of water chemistry on the solubility of copper to esta...

  4. Chlorination of bromide-containing waters: enhanced bromate formation in the presence of synthetic metal oxides and deposits formed in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-15

    Bromate formation from the reaction between chlorine and bromide in homogeneous solution is a slow process. The present study investigated metal oxides enhanced bromate formation during chlorination of bromide-containing waters. Selected metal oxides enhanced the decay of hypobromous acid (HOBr), a requisite intermediate during the oxidation of bromide to bromate, via (i) disproportionation to bromate in the presence of nickel oxide (NiO) and cupric oxide (CuO), (ii) oxidation of a metal to a higher valence state in the presence of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and (iii) oxygen formation by NiO and CuO. Goethite (α-FeOOH) did not enhance either of these pathways. Non-charged species of metal oxides seem to be responsible for the catalytic disproportionation which shows its highest rate in the pH range near the pKa of HOBr. Due to the ability to catalyze HOBr disproportionation, bromate was formed during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of CuO and NiO, whereas no bromate was detected in the presence of Cu2O and α-FeOOH for analogous conditions. The inhibition ability of coexisting anions on bromate formation at pH 8.6 follows the sequence of phosphate > sulfate > bicarbonate/carbonate. A black deposit in a water pipe harvested from a drinking water distribution system exerted significant residual oxidant decay and bromate formation during chlorination of bromide-containing waters. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses showed that the black deposit contained copper (14%, atomic percentage) and nickel (1.8%, atomic percentage). Cupric oxide was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). These results indicate that bromate formation may be of concern during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in distribution systems containing CuO and/or NiO. PMID:23866145

  5. Corrosion control study of a typical large usage water distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Hock, V.F.; Cardenas, H.E.; Zelsdorf, E.D.; Smothers, K.W.; Anderson, J.

    1995-12-01

    This corrosion control study was based on, and closely followed, the AWWA Guidance Manual and AWWARF pipe loop protocol. The primary objective of this study was to provide a corrosion control recommendation for the site to satisfy State of Maryland and EPA requirements to define and maintain optimal corrosion control treatment. A second objective was to identify technical and cost constraints that may affect the application of specific corrosion control treatments in finished water. Blended zinc potassium polyphosphate/zinc orthophosphate showed lower corrosion rates and reduced lead concentrations in finished water for the majority of days studied in plant pipe loop models and remote location (barracks) pipe loop models. Blended potassium monophosphate/potassium tripolyphosphate followed a close second in overall efficacy. The pH adjusted and control strategies exhibited little demonstrated corrosion control benefit. Recommendations based on this study included (1) addition of blended zinc potassium polyphosphate/zinc orthophosphate with a residual concentration between 2.0 and 4.5 mg/L, (2) installation of a chemical feed to buffer well water with sodium bicarbonate to stabilize alkalinity when 100% well water is used, and (3) investigation of lime addition to raw well water to control buffer capacity in the combined raw well water/surface water.

  6. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AEROMONAS ISOLATES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Members of the bacterial genus Aeromonas are commonly isolated from both fresh and salt waters worldwide and some are believed to cause infections in humans, including gastroenteritis and wound infections. Currently, aeromonads are on the United States Environmental Protection A...

  7. Performance and reliability analysis of water distribution systems under cascading failures and the identification of crucial pipes.

    PubMed

    Shuang, Qing; Zhang, Mingyuan; Yuan, Yongbo

    2014-01-01

    As a mean of supplying water, Water distribution system (WDS) is one of the most important complex infrastructures. The stability and reliability are critical for urban activities. WDSs can be characterized by networks of multiple nodes (e.g. reservoirs and junctions) and interconnected by physical links (e.g. pipes). Instead of analyzing highest failure rate or highest betweenness, reliability of WDS is evaluated by introducing hydraulic analysis and cascading failures (conductive failure pattern) from complex network. The crucial pipes are identified eventually. The proposed methodology is illustrated by an example. The results show that the demand multiplier has a great influence on the peak of reliability and the persistent time of the cascading failures in its propagation in WDS. The time period when the system has the highest reliability is when the demand multiplier is less than 1. There is a threshold of tolerance parameter exists. When the tolerance parameter is less than the threshold, the time period with the highest system reliability does not meet minimum value of demand multiplier. The results indicate that the system reliability should be evaluated with the properties of WDS and the characteristics of cascading failures, so as to improve its ability of resisting disasters. PMID:24551102

  8. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  9. Effect of monochloramine treatment on colonization of a hospital water distribution system by Legionella spp.: a 1 year experience study.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Benedetta; Scurti, Maria; Dormi, Ada; Grottola, Antonella; Zanotti, Andrea; Cristino, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Contamination of hot water distribution systems by Legionella represents a great challenge due to difficulties associated with inactivating microorganisms, preserving the water characteristics. The aim of this study was to examine over the course of 1 year in 11 fixed sites, the impact of monochloramine disinfection on Legionella, heterotrophic bacteria (36 °C), Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination, and chemical parameters of a plumbing system in an Italian hospital. Three days after installation (T0), in the presence of monochloramine concentration between 1.5 and 2 mg/L, 10/11 sites (91%) were contaminated by L. pneumophila serogroups 3 and 10. After these results, the disinfectant dosage was increased to between 6 and 10 mg/L, reducing the level of Legionella by three logarithmic unit by 2 months postinstallation (T2) until 6 months later (T3). One year later (T4), there was a significant reduction (p = 0.0002) at 8/11 (73%) sites. Our data showed also a significant reduction of heterotrophic bacteria (36 °C) in 6/11 (55%) sites at T4 (p = 0.0004), by contrast the contamination of P. aeruginosa found at T0 in two sites persisted up until T4. The results of the present study show that monochloramine is a promising disinfectant that can prevent Legionella contamination of hospital water supplies. PMID:25723867

  10. Drip Line Flushing with Chlorine May Not Be Effective in Reducing Bacterial Loads in Irrigation Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Mary Theresa; Marine, Sasha C; Everts, Kathryne L; Micallef, Shirley A

    2016-06-01

    Irrigation water distribution systems are used to supply water to produce crops, but the system may also provide a protected environment for the growth of human pathogens present in irrigation water. In this study, the effects of drip tape installation depth and sanitization on the microbial quality of irrigation groundwater were evaluated. Drip tape lines were installed on the soil surface or 5 or 10 cm below the soil surface. Water samples were collected from the irrigation source and the end of each drip line every 2 weeks over an 11-week period, and the levels of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, aerobic mesophilic bacteria, and enterococci were quantified. Half of the lines installed at each depth were flushed with sodium hypochlorite for 1 h during week 6 to achieve a residual of 10 ppm at the end of the line. There was a statistically significant (P = 0.01) effect of drip tape installation depth and sanitizer application on the recovery of E. coli, with increased levels measured at the 5-cm depth and in nonsanitized lines, although the levels were at the limit of detection, potentially confounding the results. There was no significant effect of drip tape depth on total coliforms, aerobic mesophiles, or enterococci. In contrast, a statistically significant increase (P < 0.01) in the recovery of total coliforms was recorded from the ends of lines that received chlorine. This may be indicative of shedding of cells owing to degradation of biofilms that formed on the inner walls of the lines. These findings emphasize the need to better understand conditions that may lead to corrosion and increases in bacterial loads inside drip lines during flushing. Recommendations to growers should suggest collecting groundwater samples for testing at the end of drip lines rather than at the source. Guidelines on flushing drip lines with chlorine may need to include water pH monitoring, a parameter that influences the corrosive properties of chlorine. PMID:27296607

  11. DBP formation in hot and cold water across a simulated distribution system: effect of incubation time, heating time, pH, chlorine dose, and incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Reckhow, David A

    2013-10-15

    This paper demonstrates that disinfection byproducts (DBP) concentration profiles in heated water were quite different from the DBP concentrations in the cold tap water. Chloroform concentrations in the heated water remained constant or even decreased slightly with increasing distribution system water age. The amount of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) was much higher in the heated water than in the cold water; however, the maximum levels in heated water with different distribution system water ages did not differ substantially. The levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in the heated water were similar to the TCAA levels in the tap water, and a slight reduction was observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. Regardless of water age, significant reductions of nonregulated DBPs were observed after the tap water was heated for 24 h. For tap water with lower water ages, there were significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), chloropicrin (CP), and 1,1-dichloropropane (1,1-DCP) after a short period of heating. Heating of the tap water with low pH led to a more significant increase of chloroform and a more significant short-term increase of DCAN. High pH accelerated the loss of the nonregulated DBPs in the heated water. The results indicated that as the chlorine doses increased, levels of chloroform and DCAA in the heated water increased significantly. However, for TCAA, the thermally induced increase in concentration was only notable for the chlorinated water with very high chlorine dose. Finally, heating may lead to higher DBP concentrations in chlorinated water with lower distribution system temperatures. PMID:24044418

  12. On-Line Water Quality Parameters as Indicators of Distribution System Contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a time when the safety and security of services we have typically taken for granted are under question, a real-time or near real-time method of monitoring changes in water quality parameters could provide a critical line of defense in protecting public health. This study was u...

  13. MONOCHLORAMINE MICROELECTRODE FOR IN SITU APPLICATION WITHIN THE BIOFILM OF CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS- Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many utilities in the United States are using monochloramine as a secondary disinfectant as a result of the implementation of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproduct Rules. A recent survey suggests that an additional 12% of drinking water utilities are c...

  14. Coefficients of caffeine distribution in aliphatic alcohol-ammonium sulfate-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Krivosheeva, O. A.; Mokshina, N. Ya.

    2012-11-01

    The extraction of caffeine with aliphatic alcohols C3-C9 from aqueous solutions in the presence of a salting-out agent (ammonium sulfate) is studied. Quantitative characteristics of extraction are calculated: the distribution coefficients ( D) and the degree of recovery ( R, %). Relations are found between log D of caffeine and the length of the hydrocarbon radical in the alcohol molecule, along with certain physicochemical properties of the extragents.

  15. Piece-wise mixed integer programming for optimal sizing of surge control devices in water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulovich, Olya; Bent, Russell; Judi, David; Perelman, Lina Sela; Ostfeld, Avi

    2015-06-01

    Despite their potential catastrophic impact, transients are often ignored or presented ad hoc when designing water distribution systems. To address this problem, we introduce a new piece-wise function fitting model that is integrated with mixed integer programming to optimally place and size surge tanks for transient control. The key features of the algorithm are a model-driven discretization of the search space, a linear approximation nonsmooth system response surface to transients, and a mixed integer linear programming optimization. Results indicate that high quality solutions can be obtained within a reasonable number of function evaluations and demonstrate the computational effectiveness of the approach through two case studies. The work investigates one type of surge control devices (closed surge tank) for a specified set of transient events. The performance of the algorithm relies on the assumption that there exists a smooth relationship between the objective function and tank size. Results indicate the potential of the approach for the optimal surge control design in water systems.

  16. Flow cytometry and adenosine tri-phosphate analysis: alternative possibilities to evaluate major bacteriological changes in drinking water treatment and distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Dignum, Marco; Magic-Knezev, Aleksandra; Ross, Petra; Rietveld, Luuk; Hammes, Frederik

    2012-10-01

    An ever-growing need exists for rapid, quantitative and meaningful methods to quantify and characterize the effect of different treatment steps on the microbiological processes and events that occur during drinking water treatment and distribution. Here we compared cultivation-independent flow cytometry (FCM) and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) analysis with conventional cultivation-based microbiological methods, on water samples from two full-scale treatment and distribution systems. The two systems consist of nearly identical treatment trains, but their raw water quality and pre-treatment differed significantly. All of the drinking water treatment processes affected the microbiological content of the water considerably, but once treated, the finished water remained remarkably stable throughout the distribution system. Both the FCM and ATP data were able to describe the microbiology of the systems accurately, providing meaningful process data when combined with other parameters such as dissolved organic carbon analysis. Importantly, the results highlighted a complimentary value of the two independent methods: while similar trends were mostly observed, variations in ATP-per-cell values between water samples were adequately explained by differences in the FCM fingerprints of the samples. This work demonstrates the value of alternative microbial methods for process/system control, optimization and routine monitoring of the general microbial quality of water during treatment and distribution. PMID:22763289

  17. Differentiation of Aeromonas isolated from drinking water distribution systems using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Maura J; Best, Jennifer M; Smallwood, Anthony W; Kostich, Mitchell; Rodgers, Mark; Shoemaker, Jody A

    2007-03-01

    The genus Aeromonas is one of several medically significant genera that have gained prominence due to their evolving taxonomy and controversial role in human diseases. In this study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to analyze the whole cells of both reference strains and unknown Aeromonas isolates obtained from water distribution systems. A library of over 45 unique m/z signatures was created from 40 strains that are representative of the 17 recognized species of Aeromonas, as well as 3 reference strains from genus Vibrio and 2 reference strains from Plesiomonas shigelloides. The library was used to help speciate 52 isolates of Aeromonas. The environmental isolates were broken up into 2 blind studies. Group 1 contained isolates that had a recognizable phenotypic profile and group 2 contained isolates that had an atypical phenotypic profile. MALDI-MS analysis of the water isolates in group 1 matched the phenotypic identification in all cases. In group 2, the MALDI-MS-based determination confirmed the identity of 18 of the 27 isolates. These results demonstrate that MALDI-MS analysis can rapidly and accurately classify species of the genus Aeromonas, making it a powerful tool especially suited for environmental monitoring and detection of microbial hazards in drinking water. PMID:17269751

  18. Water distribution in multilayers of weak polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Tanchak, Oleh M; Yager, Kevin G; Fritzsche, Helmut; Harroun, Thad; Katsaras, John; Barrett, Christopher J

    2006-05-23

    The water localization in thin polyelectrolyte multilayers assembled from poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) was investigated with neutron reflectivity in an atmosphere of controlled humidity and with bulk water. Water was found to be distributed asymmetrically within the multilayer and to localize preferentially at the polymer surface. The diffusion of water into the multilayer did not completely penetrate to the substrate, but instead there appeared to be an exclusion zone near the Si substrate. These results help to explain previous observations of anomalous water transport kinetics in weak polyelectrolyte systems. PMID:16700605

  19. Visible paper chip immunoassay for rapid determination of bacteria in water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sai; Tang, Yanyan; Liu, Jingqing; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-03-01

    Paper chips for immunoassay were patterned by screen printing of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or wax pencil drawing. The methods for paper chip patterning are cheap, convenient, rapid and suitable for most laboratories. The whole time for patterning a paper chip is no more than 10 min. Visible immunoassay for the detection of bacteria (Escherichia coli ) has been realized using the paper chip, on which the antibody for capturing E. Coli was immobilized on the detection zones of the paper chip, while the detection antibody was labeled with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a signal reporter. After an immunological reaction, the AuNPs bound on the paper chip can effectively catalyse the reduction of silver ions during the silver enhancing step, generating a visible result that can be read by naked eyes. The quantitative results can be acquired by scanning the silver stained paper chip with a commercial scanner/or digital camera. The density of E. coli in water samples can be measured after calibrating the gray value of silver stained spots with the logarithmic number of bacteria. The time and reagents consumed on the paper chip immunoassay is much smaller than those of conventional ELISA, while the sensitivity of the paper chip immunoassay is comparable to conventional ELISA. The technology proposed in this work displays a great potential in the in-situ analysis when daily monitoring of water quality are required. PMID:24468352

  20. Optimal calibration method for water distribution water quality model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng Yi

    2006-01-01

    A water quality model is to predict water quality transport and fate throughout a water distribution system. The model is not only a promising alternative for analyzing disinfectant residuals in a cost-effective manner, but also a means of providing enormous engineering insights into the characteristics of water quality variation and constituent reactions. However, a water quality model is a reliable tool only if it predicts what a real system behaves. This paper presents a methodology that enables a modeler to efficiently calibrate a water quality model such that the field observed water quality values match with the model simulated values. The method is formulated to adjust the global water quality parameters and also the element-dependent water quality reaction rates for pipelines and tank storages. A genetic algorithm is applied to optimize the model parameters by minimizing the difference between the model-predicted values and the field-observed values. It is seamlessly integrated with a well-developed hydraulic and water quality modeling system. The approach has provided a generic tool and methodology for engineers to construct the sound water quality model in expedient manner. The method is applied to a real water system and demonstrated that a water quality model can be optimized for managing adequate water supply to public communities. PMID:16854809

  1. Hydrogeology, Water Quality, and Distribution and Sources of Salinity in the Floridan Aquifer System, Martin and St. Lucie Counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2004-01-01

    system; the top and base of this zone are present at the top of the aquifer system and within the Lower Floridan aquifer, respectively. The base of the brackish-water zone, which can approximate a brackish-water/saltwater interface, was determined in 13 wells, mostly using resistivity geophysical logs. The depth to the saltwater interface was calculated using the Ghyben-Herzberg approximation and estimated predevelopment hydraulic heads in the Upper Floridan aquifer. In five of six inland area wells, the depth to the base of the brackish-water zone was substantially shallower than the estimated predevelopment interface (260 feet or greater), whereas in five of seven coastal area wells, the difference was not large (less than about 140 feet). Confining units in the inland area, such as dense dolomite, may prevent an interface from forming at its equilibrium position. Because of head decline, the calculated interface using recent (May 2001) water levels is as much as 640 ft above the base of the brackish water zone (in the northern part of the coastal area). Isotopic data collected during this study, including deuterium and oxygen-18 (18O/16O), the ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86, and carbon-13 (13C/12C) and carbon-14, provide evidence for differences in the Floridan aquifer system ground-water geochemistry and its evolution between inland and coastal areas. Ground water from the inland area tends to be older than water from the coastal area, particularly where inland area water temperature is elevated. Isotopic data together with an anomalous vertical distribution of salinity in the coastal area indicate that the coastal area was invaded with seawater in relatively recent geologic time, and this water has not been completely flushed out by the modern-day flow system. Upward leakage from the Lower to Upper Floridan aquifer of high salinity water occurs through structural deformities, such as faults or fracture zones or associated dissolution features

  2. Characterization of elemental and structural composition of corrosion scales and deposits formed in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ching-Yu; Korshin, Gregory V; Valentine, Richard L; Hill, Andrew S; Friedman, Melinda J; Reiber, Steve H

    2010-08-01

    Corrosion scales and deposits formed within drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) have the potential to retain inorganic contaminants. The objective of this study was to characterize the elemental and structural composition of extracted pipe solids and hydraulically-mobile deposits originating from representative DWDSs. Goethite (alpha-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) and siderite (FeCO(3)) were the primary crystalline phases identified in most of the selected samples. Among the major constituent elements of the deposits, iron was most prevalent followed, in the order of decreasing prevalence, by sulfur, organic carbon, calcium, inorganic carbon, phosphorus, manganese, magnesium, aluminum and zinc. The cumulative occurrence profiles of iron, sulfur, calcium and phosphorus for pipe specimens and flushed solids were similar. Comparison of relative occurrences of these elements indicates that hydraulic disturbances may have relatively less impact on the release of manganese, aluminum and zinc, but more impact on the release of organic carbon, inorganic carbon, and magnesium. PMID:20576284

  3. Diversity, Community Composition, and Dynamics of Nonpigmented and Late-Pigmenting Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria in an Urban Tap Water Production and Distribution System

    PubMed Central

    Dubrou, S.; Konjek, J.; Macheras, E.; Welté, B.; Guidicelli, L.; Chignon, E.; Joyeux, M.; Gaillard, J. L.; Heym, B.; Tully, T.

    2013-01-01

    Nonpigmented and late-pigmenting rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) have been reported to commonly colonize water production and distribution systems. However, there is little information about the nature and distribution of RGM species within the different parts of such complex networks or about their clustering into specific RGM species communities. We conducted a large-scale survey between 2007 and 2009 in the Parisian urban tap water production and distribution system. We analyzed 1,418 water samples from 36 sites, covering all production units, water storage tanks, and distribution units; RGM isolates were identified by using rpoB gene sequencing. We detected 18 RGM species and putative new species, with most isolates being Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium llatzerense. Using hierarchical clustering and principal-component analysis, we found that RGM were organized into various communities correlating with water origin (groundwater or surface water) and location within the distribution network. Water treatment plants were more specifically associated with species of the Mycobacterium septicum group. On average, M. chelonae dominated network sites fed by surface water, and M. llatzerense dominated those fed by groundwater. Overall, the M. chelonae prevalence index increased along the distribution network and was associated with a correlative decrease in the prevalence index of M. llatzerense, suggesting competitive or niche exclusion between these two dominant species. Our data describe the great diversity and complexity of RGM species living in the interconnected environments that constitute the water production and distribution system of a large city and highlight the prevalence index of the potentially pathogenic species M. chelonae in the distribution network. PMID:23835173

  4. 30 CFR 71.602 - Drinking water; distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drinking water; distribution. 71.602 Section 71... Drinking Water § 71.602 Drinking water; distribution. (a) Water shall be piped or transported in sanitary containers. Water systems and appurtenances thereto shall be constructed and maintained in accordance...

  5. 30 CFR 71.602 - Drinking water; distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drinking water; distribution. 71.602 Section 71... Drinking Water § 71.602 Drinking water; distribution. (a) Water shall be piped or transported in sanitary containers. Water systems and appurtenances thereto shall be constructed and maintained in accordance...

  6. 30 CFR 71.602 - Drinking water; distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drinking water; distribution. 71.602 Section 71... Drinking Water § 71.602 Drinking water; distribution. (a) Water shall be piped or transported in sanitary containers. Water systems and appurtenances thereto shall be constructed and maintained in accordance...

  7. 30 CFR 71.602 - Drinking water; distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drinking water; distribution. 71.602 Section 71... Drinking Water § 71.602 Drinking water; distribution. (a) Water shall be piped or transported in sanitary containers. Water systems and appurtenances thereto shall be constructed and maintained in accordance...

  8. 30 CFR 71.602 - Drinking water; distribution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drinking water; distribution. 71.602 Section 71... Drinking Water § 71.602 Drinking water; distribution. (a) Water shall be piped or transported in sanitary containers. Water systems and appurtenances thereto shall be constructed and maintained in accordance...

  9. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Strains Closely Related to Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae Group, Isolated from Biofilms in a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of four Mycobacterium chelonae group strains from biofilms obtained after a ‘chlorine burn’ in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. These opportunistic pathogens have been detected in drinking and hospital water distr...

  10. Water losses dynamic modelling in water distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puleo, Valeria; Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, one of the main concerns of the water system managers have been the minimisation of water losses, that frequently reach values of 30% or even 70% of the volume supplying the water distribution network. The economic and social costs associated with water losses in modern water supply systems are rapidly rising to unacceptably high levels. Furthermore, the problem of the water losses assumes more and more importance mainly when periods of water scarcity occur or when not sufficient water supply takes part in areas with fast growth. In the present analysis, a dynamic model was used for estimating real and apparent losses of a real case study. A specific nodal demand model reflecting the user's tank installation and a specific apparent losses module were implemented. The results from the dynamic model were compared with the modelling estimation based on a steady-state approach.

  11. SUSTAINABLE WATER EXTRACTION AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FOR AGRICULTURAL APPLICATIONS IN NAMAWANGA, KENYA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to ensure that the pumps are successful when installed for the community, working prototypes were tested, analyzed, and modified. The chief concerns of our functional analysis were the flow rate of the pump, the stability/durability of the system, total pumping head, ...

  12. Stability of fluoride complex with silica and its distribution in natural water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberson, C.E.; Barnes, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Fluoride reacts with silicic acid to form SiF2-6. A fluoride electrode was used to obtain an equilibrium constant of 1030.18 for the reaction:Si(OH) 0 6 + 6F-+4H+ = SiF 2- 6 + 4H2O at 25??C. Although there may be some experimental evidence for existence of traces of species containing less than six F- ions per silicon (n = 6), the species SiF2-6 predominates for n values from about 0.1 to 6. Silicic-acid complexing with fluoride is important only in solutions which have rather low pH and low concentrations of other cations which compete with silicon for fluoride. Computations for cold volcanic condensates from Hawaii indicate that for some samples much of the silicon is complexed by fluoride as SiF2-6. However, in most cooled acidic natural water samples Al and Fe are more important than Si in complexing fluoride. ?? 1978.

  13. Video Distribution Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davoust, David

    1994-01-01

    Describes video distribution systems as a way of giving control of all monitors in a classroom to the teacher. Examples of their use are given, including distribution in language labs and distribution from a media lab to classrooms throughout a school building; and information about five vendors is included. (LRW)

  14. Distribution coefficients of purine alkaloids in water-ammonium sulfate-alkyl acetate-dialkyl phthalate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Krivosheeva, O. A.; Mokshina, N. Ya.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of purine alkaloids (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline) was studied in the systems: alkyl acetates-dialkyl phtalate-salting-out agent (ammonium sulfate). The quantitative characteristics of the extraction-distribution coefficients ( D) and the degree of extraction ( R, %) are calculated. The relationships between the distribution coefficients of alkaloids and the length of the hydrocarbon radical in the molecule of alkyl acetate (dialkyl phtalate) are determined. The possibility of predicting the distribution coefficients is demonstrated.

  15. Smart distribution systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Yazhou; Liu, Chen -Ching; Xu, Yin

    2016-04-19

    The increasing importance of system reliability and resilience is changing the way distribution systems are planned and operated. To achieve a distribution system self-healing against power outages, emerging technologies and devices, such as remote-controlled switches (RCSs) and smart meters, are being deployed. The higher level of automation is transforming traditional distribution systems into the smart distribution systems (SDSs) of the future. The availability of data and remote control capability in SDSs provides distribution operators with an opportunity to optimize system operation and control. In this paper, the development of SDSs and resulting benefits of enhanced system capabilities are discussed. Amore » comprehensive survey is conducted on the state-of-the-art applications of RCSs and smart meters in SDSs. Specifically, a new method, called Temporal Causal Diagram (TCD), is used to incorporate outage notifications from smart meters for enhanced outage management. To fully utilize the fast operation of RCSs, the spanning tree search algorithm is used to develop service restoration strategies. Optimal placement of RCSs and the resulting enhancement of system reliability are discussed. Distribution system resilience with respect to extreme events is presented. Furthermore, test cases are used to demonstrate the benefit of SDSs. Active management of distributed generators (DGs) is introduced. Future research in a smart distribution environment is proposed.« less

  16. COMPARISON OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AND FROM THE POPULATION SERVED BY THE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Current evidence suggests that drinking water, soil, and produce are potential sources of Mycobacterium avium infections, a pathogen not known to be transmitted person-to-person.

    Methods: We sampled water during 2000-2002 from a large municipal drinking water ...

  17. Bacterial community dynamics during the early stages of biofilm formation in a chlorinated experimental drinking water distribution system: implications for drinking water discolouration

    PubMed Central

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R; Boxall, J

    2014-01-01

    Aims To characterize bacterial communities during the early stages of biofilm formation and their role in water discolouration in a fully representative, chlorinated, experimental drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Methods and Results Biofilm development was monitored in an experimental DWDS over 28 days; subsequently the system was disturbed by raising hydraulic conditions to simulate pipe burst, cleaning or other system conditions. Biofilm cell cover was monitored by fluorescent microscopy and a fingerprinting technique used to assess changes in bacterial community. Selected samples were analysed by cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Fingerprinting analysis revealed significant changes in the bacterial community structure over time (P < 0·05). Cell coverage increased over time accompanied by an increase in bacterial richness and diversity. Conclusions Shifts in the bacterial community structure were observed along with an increase in cell coverage, bacterial richness and diversity. Species related to Pseudomonas spp. and Janthinobacterium spp. dominated the process of initial attachment. Based on fingerprinting results, the hydraulic regimes did not affect the bacteriological composition of biofilms, but they did influence their mechanical stability. Significance and Importance of the Study This study gives a better insight into the early stages of biofilm formation in DWDS and will contribute to the improvement of management strategies to control the formation of biofilms and the risk of discolouration. PMID:24712449

  18. Distribution, partitioning and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the water-SPM-sediment system of Lake Chaohu, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ning; He, Wei; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Xiu; He, Qi-Shuang; Yang, Bin; Wang, Qing-Mei; Yang, Chen; Jiang, Yu-Jiao; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Xu, Fu-Liu; Zhao, Xiao-Li

    2014-10-15

    The residual levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the water, suspended particular matter (SPM) and sediment from Lake Chaohu were measured with a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The spatial-temporal distributions and the SPM-water partition of PAHs and their influencing factors were investigated. The potential sources and contributions of PAHs in the sediment were estimated by positive matrix factorization (PMF) and probabilistic stable isotopic analysis (PSIA). The results showed that the average residual levels of total PAHs (PAH16) in the water, SPM and sediment were 170.7 ± 70.8 ng/L, 210.7 ± 160.7 ng/L and 908.5 ± 1878.1 ng/g dry weight, respectively. The same spatial distribution trend of PAH16 in the water, SPM and sediment was found from high to low: river inflows>western lake>eastern lake>water source area. There was an obvious seasonal trend of PAH16 in the water, while no obvious seasonal trend was found in the SPM. The residues and distributions of PAHs in the water, SPM and sediment relied heavily on carbon content. Significant Pearson correlations were found between LogKoc and LogKow as well as some hydro-meteorological factors. Three major sources of PAHs including coal and biomass combustions, and vehicle emissions were identified. PMID:25103197

  19. Distributed generation systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Barklund, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given on a distributed generation systems model developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and its application to a situation within the Idaho Power Company`s service territory. The objectives of the work were to develop a screening model for distributed generation alternatives, to develop a better understanding of distributed generation as a utility resource, and to further INEL`s understanding of utility concerns in implementing technological change.

  20. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KRAJEWSKI,R.F.; ANDREWS,J.W.; WEI,G.

    1999-09-01

    A laboratory experiment has been conducted which tests for the effects of distribution system purging on system Delivery Effectiveness (DE) as defined in ASHRAE 152P. The experiment is described in its configuration, instrumentation, and data acquisition system. Data gathered in the experiment is given and discussed. The results show that purging of the distribution system alone does not offer any improvement of the system DE. Additional supporting tests were conducted regarding experimental simulations of buffer zones and bare pipe and are also discussed.

  1. A flow path model for regional water distribution optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chen; Hsu, Nien-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Ming; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2009-09-01

    We develop a flow path model for the optimization of a regional water distribution system. The model simultaneously describes a water distribution system in two parts: (1) the water delivery relationship between suppliers and receivers and (2) the physical water delivery network. In the first part, the model considers waters from different suppliers as multiple commodities. This helps the model clearly describe water deliveries by identifying the relationship between suppliers and receivers. The physical part characterizes a physical water distribution network by all possible flow paths. The flow path model can be used to optimize not only the suppliers to each receiver but also their associated flow paths for supplying water. This characteristic leads to the optimum solution that contains the optimal scheduling results and detailed information concerning water distribution in the physical system. That is, the water rights owner, water quantity, water location, and associated flow path of each delivery action are represented explicitly in the results rather than merely as an optimized total flow quantity in each arc of a distribution network. We first verify the proposed methodology on a hypothetical water distribution system. Then we apply the methodology to the water distribution system associated with the Tou-Qian River basin in northern Taiwan. The results show that the flow path model can be used to optimize the quantity of each water delivery, the associated flow path, and the water trade and transfer strategy.

  2. Advanced Distribution Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avazov, Artur R.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the advisability of using advanced distribution management systems in the electricity distribution networks area and considers premises of implementing ADMS within the Smart Grid era. Also, it gives the big picture of ADMS and discusses the ADMS advantages and functionalities.

  3. Risk- and robustness-based solutions to a multi-objective water distribution system rehabilitation problem under uncertainty .

    PubMed

    Kapelan, Z; Savic, D A; Walters, G A; Babayan, A V

    2006-01-01

    The water distribution system (WDS) rehabilitation problem is defined here as a multi-objective optimisation problem under uncertainty. Two alternative problem formulations are considered. The first objective in both approaches is to minimise the total rehabilitation cost. The second objective is to either maximise the overall WDS robustness or to minimise the total WDS risk. The WDS robustness is defined as the probability of simultaneously satisfying minimum pressure head constraints at all nodes in the network. Total risk is defined as the sum of nodal risks, where nodal risk is defined as the product of the probability of pressure failure at that node and consequence of such failure. Decision variables are the alternative rehabilitation options for each pipe in the network. The only source of uncertainty is the future water consumption. Uncertain demands are modelled using any probability density functions (PDFs) assigned in the problem formulation phase. The corresponding PDFs of the analysed nodal heads are calculated using the Latin Hypercube sampling technique. The optimal rehabilitation problem is solved using the newly developed rNSGAII method which is a modification of the well-known NSGAII optimisation algorithm. In rNSGAII a small number of demand samples are used for each fitness evaluation leading to significant computational savings when compared to the full sampling approach. The two alternative approaches are tested, verified and their performance compared on the New York tunnels case study. The results obtained demonstrate that both new methodologies are capable of identifying the robust (near) Pareto optimal fronts while making significant computational savings. PMID:16532736

  4. Saturn's Stratospheric Water Vapor Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesman, Brigette E.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Romani, Paul N.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2015-11-01

    Water is a sought after commodity in the solar system. It is used as an indication of life, planetary formation timescales, and signatures of past cometary impacts. In Saturn’s atmosphere there are two sources of water: an internal primordial reservoir that is confined to the troposphere, and an external source of unknown origin that delivers water to the stratosphere. Potential sources of stratospheric water include: Saturn’s main rings (via neutral infall and/or ions transported along magnetic field lines - “Ring Rain”), interplanetary dust particles, and the E-ring that is supplied with water from the plumes of Enceladus. Measuring the latitudinal and seasonal variation of H2O on Saturn will constrain the source of Saturn’s stratospheric water.Cassini’s Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O on Saturn at wavelengths of 40 and 50 microns. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using our retrieved temperatures, we derive the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level for comparison with water-source models. The latitudinal variation of stratospheric water vapor will be presented as a first step in understanding the external source of water on Saturn. The observed local maximum near Saturn’s equator supports either a neutral infall from the rings or a source in the E-ring. We will look for secondary maxima at mid-latitudes to determine whether “Ring Rain” also contributes to the inventory of water in Saturn’s upper atmosphere.

  5. Saturn's Stratospheric Water Vapor Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesman, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Water is a sought after commodity in the solar system. It is used as an indication of life, planetary formation timescales, and signatures of past cometary impacts. In Saturn's atmosphere there are two sources of water: an internal primordial reservoir that is confined to the troposphere, and an external source of unknown origin that delivers water to the stratosphere. Potential sources of stratospheric water include: Saturn's main rings (via neutral infall and/or ions transported along magnetic field lines - "Ring Rain"), interplanetary dust particles, and the E-ring that is supplied with water from the plumes of Enceladus. Measuring the latitudinal and seasonal variation of H2O on Saturn will constrain the source of Saturn's stratospheric water. Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) has detected emission lines of H2O on Saturn at wavelengths of 40 and 50 microns. CIRS also retrieves the temperature of the stratosphere using CH4 lines at 7.7 microns. Using our retrieved temperatures, we derive the mole fraction of H2O at the 0.5-5 mbar level for comparison with water-source models. The latitudinal variation of stratospheric water vapor between 2004-2009 will be presented as a first step in understanding the external source of water on Saturn. The observed local maximum near Saturn's equator supports either a neutral infall from the rings or a source in the E-ring. We will look for secondary maxima at mid-latitudes to determine whether "Ring Rain" also contributes to the inventory of water in Saturn's upper atmosphere.

  6. Distribution system simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K. A.; Kirkham, H.; Rahman, S.

    1986-01-01

    In a series of tests performed under the Department of Energy auspices, power line carrier propagation was observed to be anomalous under certain circumstances. To investigate the cause, a distribution system simulator was constructed. The simulator was a physical simulator that accurately represented the distribution system from below power frequency to above 50 kHz. Effects such as phase-to-phase coupling and skin effect were modeled. Construction details of the simulator, and experimental results from its use are presented.

  7. Distribution of pesticides in n-hexane/water and n-hexane/acetonitrile systems and estimation of possibilities of their extraction isolation and preconcentration from various matrices.

    PubMed

    Zayats, M F; Leschev, S M; Petrashkevich, N V; Zayats, M A; Kadenczki, L; Szitás, R; Szemán Dobrik, H; Keresztény, N

    2013-04-24

    Distribution of 150 most widely used pesticides of different chemical classes (amides, anilinopirimidines, aromatics, benzenesulfonates, carbamates, dicarboximides, organophosphorus compounds, phenyl esters, phenylureas, pyrazoles, pyrethroids, pyrimidines, strobilurins, sulfamides, triazines, triazoles, etc.) in n-hexane/water and n-hexane/acetonitrile systems was investigated at 25°C. Distribution constants of pesticides (P) have been calculated as ratio of pesticide concentration in n-hexane to its concentration in water or acetonitrile phase. HPLC and GC methods were used for pesticides determination in phases. It was found that the overwhelming majority of pesticides are hydrophobic, i.e. in n-hexane/water system LgP≫0, and the difference in LgP values can reach 9.1 units. Replacement of water for acetonitrile leads to dramatic fall of LgP values reaching 9.5 units. The majority of LgP values in this case are negative and their differences is strongly leveled in comparison with a hexane/water system. Thus, maximal difference in pesticides LgP values for n-hexane/acetonitrile system is 3.2 units. It is shown that n-hexane can be used for selective and efficient extraction and preconcentration of pesticides from water matrices. On the other hand, acetonitrile is effective for the isolation and preconcentration of pesticides from hydrocarbon and vegetable oil matrices. The distribution constants described in the paper may be effectively used for the estimation of possibilities of extraction isolation, preconcentration and separation of pesticides. PMID:23567114

  8. Water and solute distributions in the soil/saprolite continuum under on-site wastewater disposal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Surbrugg, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The expansion of housing developments in rural areas of North Carolina has created an increasing need to identify suitable soil and saprolite for on-site wastewater disposal. Physical, chemical, and hydraulic characteristics of soil and saprolite were assessed at three operating on-site wastewater disposal systems in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. The distribution patterns of selected inorganic wastewater chemicals, soil pH, and soil electrical conductivity (EC) were determined within the drainfields at all three sites. Chemical concentrations of NH[sub 4]-N, NO[sub 3]-N, NO[sub 3]-N, Ca, Mg, Na, K, and Cl in the drainfield soils were compared to background concentrations in similar soils outside each drainfield. The hydraulic performance was evaluated. Soil particle size was an important soil physical property influencing water movement, especially in the deeper C (saprolite) horizon. Specific surface area appeared to be related to CEC and inferred the possibility for limited attenuation of wastewater pollutants in coarse-textured saprolite. Lower concentrations of some inorganic chemicals in the drainfield soils were related to leaching of cations and anions by the wastewater and the low soil CEC. Significantly higher concentrations of some chemicals were found in one drainfield, presumably because of a low hydraulic conductivity in the clayey textured Bt and BC horizons, reduced nitrification rates, and higher wastewater chemical concentrations. On-site wastewater disposal systems installed in soils that are shallow to saprolite appear to function properly in treating wastewater when the soil and saprolite horizons have suitable soil textures, CEC's, and hydraulic conductivities.

  9. Molecular characterization of natural biofilms from household taps with different materials: PVC, stainless steel, and cast iron in drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Yu, Zhisheng; Chen, Xi; Liu, Ruyin; Zhang, Hongxun

    2013-09-01

    Microorganism in drinking water distribution system may colonize in biofilms. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversities were analyzed in both water and biofilms grown on taps with three different materials (polyvinyl chloride (PVC), stainless steel, and cast iron) from a local drinking water distribution system. In total, five clone libraries (440 sequences) were obtained. The taxonomic composition of the microbial communities was found to be dominated by members of Proteobacteria (65.9-98.9 %), broadly distributed among the classes Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Other bacterial groups included Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus. Moreover, a small proportion of unclassified bacteria (3.5-10.6 %) were also found. This investigation revealed that the bacterial communities in biofilms appeared much more diversified than expected and more care should be taken to the taps with high bacterial diversity. Also, regular monitor of outflow water would be useful as potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected. In addition, microbial richness and diversity in taps ranked in the order as: PVC < stainless steel < cast iron. All the results interpreted that PVC would be a potentially suitable material for use as tap component in drinking water distribution system. PMID:23143469

  10. A component-based, integrated spatially distributed hydrologic/water quality model: AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) overview and application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AgroEcoSystem-Watershed (AgES-W) is a modular, Java-based spatially distributed model which implements hydrologic/water quality simulation components. The AgES-W model was previously evaluated for streamflow and recently has been enhanced with the addition of nitrogen (N) and sediment modeling compo...

  11. Open Data, Open Specifications and Free and Open Source Software: A powerful mix to create distributed Web-based water information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Carolina; Brovelli, Maria Antonia; Moreno, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    We are in an age when water resources are increasingly scarce and the impacts of human activities on them are ubiquitous. These problems don't respect administrative or political boundaries and they must be addressed integrating information from multiple sources at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Communication, coordination and data sharing are critical for addressing the water conservation and management issues of the 21st century. However, different countries, provinces, local authorities and agencies dealing with water resources have diverse organizational, socio-cultural, economic, environmental and information technology (IT) contexts that raise challenges to the creation of information systems capable of integrating and distributing information across their areas of responsibility in an efficient and timely manner. Tight and disparate financial resources, and dissimilar IT infrastructures (data, hardware, software and personnel expertise) further complicate the creation of these systems. There is a pressing need for distributed interoperable water information systems that are user friendly, easily accessible and capable of managing and sharing large volumes of spatial and non-spatial data. In a distributed system, data and processes are created and maintained in different locations each with competitive advantages to carry out specific activities. Open Data (data that can be freely distributed) is available in the water domain, and it should be further promoted across countries and organizations. Compliance with Open Specifications for data collection, storage and distribution is the first step toward the creation of systems that are capable of interacting and exchanging data in a seamlessly (interoperable) way. The features of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) offer low access cost that facilitate scalability and long-term viability of information systems. The World Wide Web (the Web) will be the platform of choice to deploy and access these systems

  12. Distributed ecohydrological modelling to evaluate irrigation system performance in Sirsa district, India II: Impact of viable water management scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Jhorar, R. K.; van Dam, J. C.; Feddes, R. A.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryThis study focuses on the identification of appropriate strategies to improve water management and productivity in an irrigated area of 4270 km 2 in India (Sirsa district). The field scale ecohydrological model SWAP in combination with field experiments, remote sensing and GIS has been applied in a distributed manner generating the required hydrological and biophysical variables to evaluate alternative water management scenarios at different spatial and temporal scales. Simulation results for the period 1991-2001 show that the water and salt limited crop production is 1.2-2.0 times higher than the actual recorded crop production. Improved crop husbandry in terms of improved crop varieties, timely sowing, better nutrient supply and more effective weed, pest and disease control, will increase crop yields and water productivity in Sirsa district. The scenario results further showed that reduction of seepage losses to 25-30% of the total canal inflow and reallocation of 15% canal water inflow from the northern to the central canal commands will improve significantly the long term water productivity, halt the rising and declining groundwater levels, and decrease the salinization in Sirsa district.

  13. Distributed Computerized Catalog System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.; Wagner, David A.

    1995-01-01

    DarkStar Distributed Catalog System describes arbitrary data objects in unified manner, providing end users with versatile, yet simple search mechanism for locating and identifying objects. Provides built-in generic and dynamic graphical user interfaces. Design of system avoids some of problems of standard DBMS, and system provides more flexibility than do conventional relational data bases, or object-oriented data bases. Data-collection lattice partly hierarchical representation of relationships among collections, subcollections, and data objects.

  14. A steam-water distribution matrix equation of the whole thermal system for coal-fired power plant and its general construction regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chunfa; Yan Shunlin; Fan Hansong; Cao Xianchang; Wu Chunsheng

    1999-07-01

    In this paper the authors provide a steam-water distribution equation of the whole thermal system for coal-fired power plant and its general construction regulations. The use of the equation may simplify traditional thermal calculation of coal-fired power plant. And the equation's analytic character provides a strict base of theory and a new method for energy conservation of coal-fired power plant and especially for the research of local ration analysis for thermal system's energy conservation potential.

  15. Molecular Survey of the Occurrence of Legionella spp., Mycobacterium spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Amoeba Hosts in Two Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Edwards, Marc; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of opportunistic pathogens via public water systems is of growing concern. The purpose of this study was to identify patterns of occurrence among three opportunistic pathogens (Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) relative to biotic and abiotic factors in two representative chloraminated drinking water distribution systems using culture-independent methods. Generally, a high occurrence of Legionella (≥69.0%) and mycobacteria (100%), lower occurrence of L. pneumophila (≤20%) and M. avium (≤33.3%), and rare detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (≤13.3%) were observed in both systems according to quantitative PCR. Also, Hartmanella vermiformis was more prevalent than Acanthamoeba, both of which are known hosts for opportunistic pathogen amplification, the latter itself containing pathogenic members. Three-minute flushing served to distinguish distribution system water from plumbing in buildings (i.e., premise plumbing water) and resulted in reduced numbers of copies of Legionella, mycobacteria, H. vermiformis, and 16S rRNA genes (P < 0.05) while yielding distinct terminal restriction fragment polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles of 16S rRNA genes. Within certain subgroups of samples, some positive correlations, including correlations of numbers of mycobacteria and total bacteria (16S rRNA genes), H. vermiformis and total bacteria, mycobacteria and H. vermiformis, and Legionella and H. vermiformis, were noted, emphasizing potential microbial ecological relationships. Overall, the results provide insight into factors that may aid in controlling opportunistic pathogen proliferation in real-world water systems. PMID:22752174

  16. Distribution of Asellus aquaticus and microinvertebrates in a non-chlorinated drinking water supply system--effects of pipe material and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Sarah C B; Nissen, Erling; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2011-05-01

    Danish drinking water supplies based on ground water without chlorination were investigated for the presence of the water louse, Asellus aquaticus, microinvertebrates (<2 mm) and annelida. In total, 52 water samples were collected from fire hydrants at 31 locations, and two elevated tanks (6000 and 36,000 m(3)) as well as one clean water tank at a waterworks (700 m(3)) were inspected. Several types of invertebrates from the phyla: arthropoda, annelida (worms), plathyhelminthes (flatworms) and mollusca (snails) were found. Invertebrates were found at 94% of the sampling sites in the piped system with A. aquaticus present at 55% of the sampling sites. Populations of A. aquaticus were present in the two investigated elevated tanks but not in the clean water tank at a waterworks. Both adult and juvenile A. aquaticus (length of 2-10 mm) were found in tanks as well as in pipes. A. aquaticus was found only in samples collected from two of seven investigated distribution zones (zone 1 and 2), each supplied directly by one of the two investigated elevated tanks containing A. aquaticus. Microinvertebrates were distributed throughout all zones. The distribution pattern of A. aquaticus had not changed considerably over 20 years when compared to data from samples collected in 1988-89. Centrifugal pumps have separated the distribution zones during the whole period and may have functioned as physical barriers in the distribution systems, preventing large invertebrates such as A. aquaticus to pass alive. Another factor characterising zone 1 and 2 was the presence of cast iron pipes. The frequency of A. aquaticus was significantly higher in cast iron pipes than in plastic pipes. A. aquaticus caught from plastic pipes were mainly single living specimens or dead specimens, which may have been transported passively trough by the water flow, while cast iron pipes provided an environment suitable for relatively large populations of A. aquaticus. Sediment volume for each sample was

  17. Distributed Experiment Automation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Gennadi

    2003-03-01

    Module based distributed system for controlling and automation scientific experiments were developed. System divides in five main layers: 1. Data processing and presentation modules, 2. Controllers - support primary command evaluation, data analysis and synchronization between Device Drivers. 3. Data Server. Provide real time data storage and management. 4. Device Drivers, support communication, preliminary signals acquisitions and control of peripheral devices. 5. Utility - batch processing, login, errors of execution handling, experimental data persistent storage and management, modules and devices monitoring, alarm state, remote components messaging and notification processing. System used networking (DCOM protocol) for communication between distributed modules. Configuration, modules parameters, data and commands links defined in scripting file (XML format). This modular structure allows great flexibility and extensibility as modules can be added and configured as required without any extensive programming.

  18. Hydronic distribution system computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Strasser, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A computer model of a hot-water boiler and its associated hydronic thermal distribution loop has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It is intended to be incorporated as a submodel in a comprehensive model of residential-scale thermal distribution systems developed at Lawrence Berkeley. This will give the combined model the capability of modeling forced-air and hydronic distribution systems in the same house using the same supporting software. This report describes the development of the BNL hydronics model, initial results and internal consistency checks, and its intended relationship to the LBL model. A method of interacting with the LBL model that does not require physical integration of the two codes is described. This will provide capability now, with reduced up-front cost, as long as the number of runs required is not large.

  19. Distributed Optimization System

    DOEpatents

    Hurtado, John E.; Dohrmann, Clark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2004-11-30

    A search system and method for controlling multiple agents to optimize an objective using distributed sensing and cooperative control. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace. The objective can be: chemical sources, temperature sources, radiation sources, light sources, evaders, trespassers, explosive sources, time dependent sources, time independent sources, function surfaces, maximization points, minimization points, and optimal control of a system such as a communication system, an economy, a crane, and a multi-processor computer.

  20. Distributed Data Management and Distributed File Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girone, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The LHC program has been successful in part due to the globally distributed computing resources used for collecting, serving, processing, and analyzing the large LHC datasets. The introduction of distributed computing early in the LHC program spawned the development of new technologies and techniques to synchronize information and data between physically separated computing centers. Two of the most challenges services are the distributed file systems and the distributed data management systems. In this paper I will discuss how we have evolved from local site services to more globally independent services in the areas of distributed file systems and data management and how these capabilities may continue to evolve into the future. I will address the design choices, the motivations, and the future evolution of the computing systems used for High Energy Physics.

  1. Distributed Deliberative Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-García, Juan A.; Díaz-Agudo, Belén; González-Sanz, Sergio; Sanchez, Lara Quijano

    Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is one of most successful applied AI technologies of recent years. Although many CBR systems reason locally on a previous experience base to solve new problems, in this paper we focus on distributed retrieval processes working on a network of collaborating CBR systems. In such systems, each node in a network of CBR agents collaborates, arguments and counterarguments its local results with other nodes to improve the performance of the system's global response. We describe D2ISCO: a framework to design and implement deliberative and collaborative CBR systems that is integrated as a part of jcolibritwo an established framework in the CBR community. We apply D2ISCO to one particular simplified type of CBR systems: recommender systems. We perform a first case study for a collaborative music recommender system and present the results of an experiment of the accuracy of the system results using a fuzzy version of the argumentation system AMAL and a network topology based on a social network. Besides individual recommendation we also discuss how D2ISCO can be used to improve recommendations to groups and we present a second case of study based on the movie recommendation domain with heterogeneous groups according to the group personality composition and a group topology based on a social network.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE ABILITY OF CHLORINE TO INACTIVATE SELECTED ORGANISMS FROM THE BIOFILM OF A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR FOLLOWING A LONG-TERM WASTEWATER CROSS-CONNECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water distribution system simulator (DSS) from the U.S. EPA was operated with a direct cross-connection of 0.3% wastewater to system volume per day for 70 d. During the cross-connection, tap water, wastewater, and system discharge water were monitored to ensure that ...

  3. Distributed System Design Checklist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Brendan; Driscoll, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a design checklist targeted to fault-tolerant distributed electronic systems. Many of the questions and discussions in this checklist may be generally applicable to the development of any safety-critical system. However, the primary focus of this report covers the issues relating to distributed electronic system design. The questions that comprise this design checklist were created with the intent to stimulate system designers' thought processes in a way that hopefully helps them to establish a broader perspective from which they can assess the system's dependability and fault-tolerance mechanisms. While best effort was expended to make this checklist as comprehensive as possible, it is not (and cannot be) complete. Instead, we expect that this list of questions and the associated rationale for the questions will continue to evolve as lessons are learned and further knowledge is established. In this regard, it is our intent to post the questions of this checklist on a suitable public web-forum, such as the NASA DASHLink AFCS repository. From there, we hope that it can be updated, extended, and maintained after our initial research has been completed.

  4. High-performance size exclusion chromatography with a multi-wavelength absorbance detector study on dissolved organic matter characterisation along a water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiping; Sawade, Emma; Cook, David; Chow, Christopher W K; Drikas, Mary; Jin, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the associations between dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics and potential nitrification occurrence in the presence of chloramine along a drinking water distribution system. High-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) coupled with a multiple wavelength detector (200-280nm) was employed to characterise DOM by molecular weight distribution, bacterial activity was analysed using flow cytometry, and a package of simple analytical tools, such as dissolved organic carbon, absorbance at 254nm, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia and total disinfectant residual were also applied and their applicability to indicate water quality changes in distribution systems were also evaluated. Results showed that multi-wavelength HPSEC analysis was useful to provide information about DOM character while changes in molecule weight profiles at wavelengths less than 230nm were also able to be related to other water quality parameters. Correct selection of the UV wavelengths can be an important factor for providing appropriate indicators associated with different DOM compositions. DOM molecular weight in the range of 0.2-0.5kDa measured at 210nm correlated positively with oxidised nitrogen concentration (r=0.99), and the concentrations of active bacterial cells in the distribution system (r=0.85). Our study also showed that the changes of DOM character and bacterial cells were significant in those sampling points that had decreases in total disinfectant residual. HPSEC-UV measured at 210nm and flow cytometry can detect the changes of low molecular weight of DOM and bacterial levels, respectively, when nitrification occurred within the chloraminated distribution system. PMID:27266320

  5. Automated Gas Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, Allen; Clark, Henry

    2012-10-01

    The cyclotron of Texas A&M University is one of the few and prized cyclotrons in the country. Behind the scenes of the cyclotron is a confusing, and dangerous setup of the ion sources that supplies the cyclotron with particles for acceleration. To use this machine there is a time consuming, and even wasteful step by step process of switching gases, purging, and other important features that must be done manually to keep the system functioning properly, while also trying to maintain the safety of the working environment. Developing a new gas distribution system to the ion source prevents many of the problems generated by the older manually setup process. This developed system can be controlled manually in an easier fashion than before, but like most of the technology and machines in the cyclotron now, is mainly operated based on software programming developed through graphical coding environment Labview. The automated gas distribution system provides multi-ports for a selection of different gases to decrease the amount of gas wasted through switching gases, and a port for the vacuum to decrease the amount of time spent purging the manifold. The Labview software makes the operation of the cyclotron and ion sources easier, and safer for anyone to use.

  6. Planning Systems for Distributed Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Theresa G.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph representation presents an overview of the mission planning process involving distributed operations (such as the International Space Station (ISS)) and the computer hardware and software systems needed to support such an effort. Topics considered include: evolution of distributed planning systems, ISS distributed planning, the Payload Planning System (PPS), future developments in distributed planning systems, Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE) and Next Generation distributed planning systems.

  7. Biofilm formation in an experimental water distribution system: the contamination of non-touch sensor taps and the implication for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ginny; Stevenson, David; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Parks, Simon; Ngabo, Didier; Bennett, Allan M; Walker, Jimmy T

    2015-01-01

    Hospital tap water is a recognised source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. U.K. guidance documents recommend measures to control/minimise the risk of P. aeruginosa in augmented care units but these are based on limited scientific evidence. An experimental water distribution system was designed to investigate colonisation of hospital tap components. P. aeruginosa was injected into 27 individual tap 'assemblies'. Taps were subsequently flushed twice daily and contamination levels monitored over two years. Tap assemblies were systematically dismantled and assessed microbiologically and the effect of removing potentially contaminated components was determined. P. aeruginosa was repeatedly recovered from the tap water at levels above the augmented care alert level. The organism was recovered from all dismantled solenoid valves with colonisation of the ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) diaphragm confirmed by microscopy. Removing the solenoid valves reduced P. aeruginosa counts in the water to below detectable levels. This effect was immediate and sustained, implicating the solenoid diaphragm as the primary contamination source. PMID:26652665

  8. Further development and implementation of the DIWA distributed hydrological model-based integrated hydroinformatics system in the Danube River Basin for supporting decision making in water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J. A.; Réti, G. Z.; Tóth, T.

    2012-04-01

    Today, the most significant mission of the decision makers on integrated water management issues is to carry out sustainable management for sharing the resources between a variety of users and the environment under conditions of considerable uncertainty (such as climate/land use/population/etc. change) conditions. In light of this increasing water management complexity, we consider that the most pressing needs is to develop and implement up-to-date Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) for aiding decision-making processes to improve water management. One of the most important parts of such an SDSS is a distributed hydrologic model-based integrated hydroinformatics system to analyze the different scenarios. The less successful statistical and/or empirical model-experiments of earlier decades have highlighted the importance of paradigm shift in hydrological modelling approach towards the physically based distributed models, to better describe the complex hydrological processes even on catchments of more ten thousands of square km. Answers to questions like what are the effects of human actions in the catchment area (e. g. forestation or deforestation) or the changing of climate/land use on the flood, drought, or water scarcity, or what is the optimal strategy for planning and/or operating reservoirs, have become increasingly important. Nowadays the answers to this kind of questions can be provided more easily than before. The progress of applied mathematical methods, the advanced state of computer technology as well as the development of remote sensing and meteorological radar technology have accelerated the research capable of answering these questions using well-designed integrated hydroinformatics systems. With most emphasis on the recent years of extensive scientific and computational development HYDROInform UnLtd developed a distributed hydrological model-based integrated hydroinformatics system for supporting the various decisions in water management. Our

  9. Distributed road assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  10. Distribution of Sequence-Based Types of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 Strains Isolated from Cooling Towers, Hot Springs, and Potable Water Systems in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Zhu, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 causes Legionnaires' disease. Water systems contaminated with Legionella are the implicated sources of Legionnaires' disease. This study analyzed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in China using sequence-based typing. Strains were isolated from cooling towers (n = 96), hot springs (n = 42), and potable water systems (n = 26). Isolates from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems were divided into 25 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD], 0.711), 19 STs (IOD, 0.934), and 3 STs (IOD, 0.151), respectively. The genetic variation among the potable water isolates was lower than that among cooling tower and hot spring isolates. ST1 was the predominant type, accounting for 49.4% of analyzed strains (n = 81), followed by ST154. With the exception of two strains, all potable water isolates (92.3%) belonged to ST1. In contrast, 53.1% (51/96) and only 14.3% (6/42) of cooling tower and hot spring, respectively, isolates belonged to ST1. There were differences in the distributions of clone groups among the water sources. The comparisons among L. pneumophila strains isolated in China, Japan, and South Korea revealed that similar clones (ST1 complex and ST154 complex) exist in these countries. In conclusion, in China, STs had several unique allelic profiles, and ST1 was the most prevalent sequence type of environmental L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates, similar to its prevalence in Japan and South Korea. PMID:24463975

  11. Distribution of sequence-based types of legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains isolated from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tian; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Zhu, Bingqing; Shao, Zhujun

    2014-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 causes Legionnaires' disease. Water systems contaminated with Legionella are the implicated sources of Legionnaires' disease. This study analyzed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in China using sequence-based typing. Strains were isolated from cooling towers (n = 96), hot springs (n = 42), and potable water systems (n = 26). Isolates from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems were divided into 25 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD], 0.711), 19 STs (IOD, 0.934), and 3 STs (IOD, 0.151), respectively. The genetic variation among the potable water isolates was lower than that among cooling tower and hot spring isolates. ST1 was the predominant type, accounting for 49.4% of analyzed strains (n = 81), followed by ST154. With the exception of two strains, all potable water isolates (92.3%) belonged to ST1. In contrast, 53.1% (51/96) and only 14.3% (6/42) of cooling tower and hot spring, respectively, isolates belonged to ST1. There were differences in the distributions of clone groups among the water sources. The comparisons among L. pneumophila strains isolated in China, Japan, and South Korea revealed that similar clones (ST1 complex and ST154 complex) exist in these countries. In conclusion, in China, STs had several unique allelic profiles, and ST1 was the most prevalent sequence type of environmental L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates, similar to its prevalence in Japan and South Korea. PMID:24463975

  12. Examination and characterization of distribution system biofilms.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Babcock, T M; Lee, R G

    1987-01-01

    Investigations concerning the role of distribution system biofilms on water quality were conducted at a drinking water utility in New Jersey. The utility experienced long-term bacteriological problems in the distribution system, while treatment plant effluents were uniformly negative for coliform bacteria. Results of a monitoring program showed increased coliform levels as the water moved from the treatment plant through the distribution system. Increased coliform densities could not be accounted for by growth of the cells in the water column alone. Identification of coliform bacteria showed that species diversity increased as water flowed through the study area. All materials in the distribution system had high densities of heterotrophic plate count bacteria, while high levels of coliforms were detected only in iron tubercles. Coliform bacteria with the same biochemical profile were found both in distribution system biofilms and in the water column. Assimilable organic carbon determinations showed that carbon levels declined as water flowed through the study area. Maintenance of a 1.0-mg/liter free chlorine residual was insufficient to control coliform occurrences. Flushing and pigging the study area was not an effective control for coliform occurrences in that section. Because coliform bacteria growing in distribution system biofilms may mask the presence of indicator organisms resulting from a true breakdown of treatment barriers, the report recommends that efforts continue to find methods to control growth of coliform bacteria in pipeline biofilms. Images PMID:3435140

  13. Examination and characterization of distribution system biofilms.

    PubMed

    LeChevallier, M W; Babcock, T M; Lee, R G

    1987-12-01

    Investigations concerning the role of distribution system biofilms on water quality were conducted at a drinking water utility in New Jersey. The utility experienced long-term bacteriological problems in the distribution system, while treatment plant effluents were uniformly negative for coliform bacteria. Results of a monitoring program showed increased coliform levels as the water moved from the treatment plant through the distribution system. Increased coliform densities could not be accounted for by growth of the cells in the water column alone. Identification of coliform bacteria showed that species diversity increased as water flowed through the study area. All materials in the distribution system had high densities of heterotrophic plate count bacteria, while high levels of coliforms were detected only in iron tubercles. Coliform bacteria with the same biochemical profile were found both in distribution system biofilms and in the water column. Assimilable organic carbon determinations showed that carbon levels declined as water flowed through the study area. Maintenance of a 1.0-mg/liter free chlorine residual was insufficient to control coliform occurrences. Flushing and pigging the study area was not an effective control for coliform occurrences in that section. Because coliform bacteria growing in distribution system biofilms may mask the presence of indicator organisms resulting from a true breakdown of treatment barriers, the report recommends that efforts continue to find methods to control growth of coliform bacteria in pipeline biofilms. PMID:3435140

  14. CASE FOR DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was to present a tool useful to water utilities that not only could analyze historical distribution system reliability data, but also provide a flexible and expandable mechanism for record-keeping enabling overall management of water work's facilities and...

  15. Water quality analysis in rivers with non-parametric probability distributions and fuzzy inference systems: application to the Cauca River, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Duque, William; Osorio, Carolina; Piamba, Christian; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2013-02-01

    The integration of water quality monitoring variables is essential in environmental decision making. Nowadays, advanced techniques to manage subjectivity, imprecision, uncertainty, vagueness, and variability are required in such complex evaluation process. We here propose a probabilistic fuzzy hybrid model to assess river water quality. Fuzzy logic reasoning has been used to compute a water quality integrative index. By applying a Monte Carlo technique, based on non-parametric probability distributions, the randomness of model inputs was estimated. Annual histograms of nine water quality variables were built with monitoring data systematically collected in the Colombian Cauca River, and probability density estimations using the kernel smoothing method were applied to fit data. Several years were assessed, and river sectors upstream and downstream the city of Santiago de Cali, a big city with basic wastewater treatment and high industrial activity, were analyzed. The probabilistic fuzzy water quality index was able to explain the reduction in water quality, as the river receives a larger number of agriculture, domestic, and industrial effluents. The results of the hybrid model were compared to traditional water quality indexes. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it considers flexible boundaries between the linguistic qualifiers used to define the water status, being the belongingness of water quality to the diverse output fuzzy sets or classes provided with percentiles and histograms, which allows classify better the real water condition. The results of this study show that fuzzy inference systems integrated to stochastic non-parametric techniques may be used as complementary tools in water quality indexing methodologies. PMID:23266912

  16. Evaluation of corrosion and scaling tendency indices in a drinking water distribution system: a case study of Bandar Abbas city, Iran.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Vali; Dindarloo, Kavoos; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Rezaei, Leila

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion and scaling is a major problem in water distribution systems, thus evaluation of water corrosivity properties is a routine test in water networks. To evaluate water stability in the Bandar Abbas water distribution system, the network was divided into 15 clusters and 45 samples were taken. Langelier, Ryznar, Puckorius, Larson-Skold (LS) and Aggressive indices were determined and compared to the marble test. The mean parameters included were pH (7.8 ± 0.1), electrical conductivity (1,083.9 ± 108.7 μS/cm), total dissolved solids (595.7 ± 54.7 mg/L), Cl (203.5 ± 18.7 mg/L), SO₄(174.7 ± 16.0 mg/L), alkalinity (134.5 ± 9.7 mg/L), total hardness (156.5 ± 9.3 mg/L), HCO₃(137.4 ± 13.0 mg/L) and calcium hardness (71.8 ± 4.3 mg/L). According to the Ryznar, Puckorius and Aggressive Indices, all samples were stable; based on the Langelier Index, 73% of samples were slightly corrosive and the rest were scale forming; according to the LS index, all samples were corrosive. Marble test results showed tested water of all 15 clusters tended to scale formation. Water in Bandar Abbas is slightly scale forming. The most appropriate indices for the network conditions are the Aggressive, Puckorius and Ryznar indices that were consistent with the marble test. PMID:25719479

  17. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  18. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, David

    1997-01-01

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  19. Investigation of factors affecting the accumulation of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride piping used in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ryan K; Lin, Po-Hsun; Edwards, Marc; Richardson, Ruth E

    2011-04-01

    Plastic piping made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and chlorinated PVC (CPVC), is being increasingly used for drinking water distribution lines. Given the formulation of the material from vinyl chloride (VC), there has been concern that the VC (a confirmed human carcinogen) can leach from the plastic piping into drinking water. PVC/CPVC pipe reactors in the laboratory and tap samples collected from consumers homes (n = 15) revealed vinyl chloride accumulation in the tens of ng/L range after a few days and hundreds of ng/L after two years. While these levels did not exceed the EPA's maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 μg/L, many readings that simulated stagnation times in homes (overnight) exceeded the MCL-Goal of 0 μg/L. Considerable differences in VC levels were seen across different manufacturers, while aging and biofilm effects were generally small. Preliminary evidence suggests that VC may accumulate not only via chemical leaching from the plastic piping, but also as a disinfection byproduct (DBP) via a chlorine-dependent reaction. This is supported from studies with CPVC pipe reactors where chlorinated reactors accumulated more VC than dechlorinated reactors, copper pipe reactors that accumulated VC in chlorinated reactors and not in dechlorinated reactors, and field samples where VC levels were the same before and after flushing the lines where PVC/CPVC fittings were contributing. Free chlorine residual tests suggest that VC may be formed as a secondary, rather than primary, DBP. Further research and additional studies need to be conducted in order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and tease apart relative contributions of VC accumulation from PVC/CPVC piping and chlorine-dependent reactions. PMID:21420710

  20. Wash water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Rousseau, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The Wash Water Recovery System (WWRS) is intended for use in processing shower bath water onboard a spacecraft. The WWRS utilizes flash evaporation, vapor compression, and pyrolytic reaction to process the wash water to allow recovery of potable water. Wash water flashing and foaming characteristics, are evaluated physical properties, of concentrated wash water are determined, and a long term feasibility study on the system is performed. In addition, a computer analysis of the system and a detail design of a 10 lb/hr vortex-type water vapor compressor were completed. The computer analysis also sized remaining system components on the basis of the new vortex compressor design.

  1. AN OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S DRINKING WATER TREATMENT AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide an overview of drinking water research being conducted by the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) of the U.S. EPA. The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) is an internationally known water research organization establi...

  2. Process evaluation distributed system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffatt, Christopher L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The distributed system includes a database server, an administration module, a process evaluation module, and a data display module. The administration module is in communication with the database server for providing observation criteria information to the database server. The process evaluation module is in communication with the database server for obtaining the observation criteria information from the database server and collecting process data based on the observation criteria information. The process evaluation module utilizes a personal digital assistant (PDA). A data display module in communication with the database server, including a website for viewing collected process data in a desired metrics form, the data display module also for providing desired editing and modification of the collected process data. The connectivity established by the database server to the administration module, the process evaluation module, and the data display module, minimizes the requirement for manual input of the collected process data.

  3. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-09-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work, we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyα photons, since the Lyα line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more extended distribution of warm water vapor, while dust growth and settling tends to reduce the amount of warm water vapor. Based on typical assumptions regarding the elemental oxygen abundance and the water chemistry, the column density of warm water vapor can be as high as 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. A small amount of hot water vapor with temperature higher than ∼300 K exists in a more extended region in the upper atmosphere of the disk. Cold water vapor with temperature lower than 100 K is distributed over the entire disk, produced by photodesorption of the water ice.

  4. Intermediate water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Anderson, A. R. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A water recovery system for collecting, storing, and processing urine, wash water, and humidity condensates from a crew of three aboard a spacecraft is described. The results of a 30-day test performed on a breadboard system are presented. The intermediate water recovery system produced clear, sterile, water with a 96.4 percent recovery rate from the processed urine. Recommendations for improving the system are included.

  5. A Long-Term Study of the Microbial Community Structure in a Simulated Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many US water treatment facilities use chloramination to limit regulated disinfectant by-product formation. However, chloramination has been shown to promote nitrifying bacteria, and 30 to 63% of water utilities using secondary chloramine disinfection experience nitrification ep...

  6. Fuzzy probabilistic design of water distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangtao; Kapelan, Zoran

    2011-05-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to present a fuzzy probabilistic approach for optimal design and rehabilitation of water distribution systems, combining aleatoric and epistemic uncertainties in a unified framework. The randomness and imprecision in future water consumption are characterized using fuzzy random variables whose realizations are not real but fuzzy numbers, and the nodal head requirements are represented by fuzzy sets, reflecting the imprecision in customers' requirements. The optimal design problem is formulated as a two-objective optimization problem, with minimization of total design cost and maximization of system performance as objectives. The system performance is measured by the fuzzy random reliability, defined as the probability that the fuzzy head requirements are satisfied across all network nodes. The satisfactory degree is represented by necessity measure or belief measure in the sense of the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence. An efficient algorithm is proposed, within a Monte Carlo procedure, to calculate the fuzzy random system reliability and is effectively combined with the nondominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGAII) to derive the Pareto optimal design solutions. The newly proposed methodology is demonstrated with two case studies: the New York tunnels network and Hanoi network. The results from both cases indicate that the new methodology can effectively accommodate and handle various aleatoric and epistemic uncertainty sources arising from the design process and can provide optimal design solutions that are not only cost-effective but also have higher reliability to cope with severe future uncertainties.

  7. THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE, SULFATE, BICARBONATE AND ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON THE RELEASE OF IRON FROM A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM PIPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    “Colored water” describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron where the actual suspension color may range from light yellow to red due to water chemistry and particle properties. This iron can originate from the source water and f...

  8. Contamination of the cold water distribution system of health care facilities by Legionella pneumophila: do we know the true dimension?

    PubMed

    Arvand, M; Jungkind, K; Hack, A

    2011-01-01

    German water guidelines do not recommend routine assessment of cold water for Legionella in healthcare facilities, except if the water temperature at distal sites exceeds 25°C. This study evaluates Legionella contamination in cold and warm water supplies of healthcare facilities in Hesse, Germany, and analyses the relationship between cold water temperature and Legionella contamination. Samples were collected from four facilities, with cases of healthcare-associated Legionnaires' disease or notable contamination of their water supply. Fifty-nine samples were from central lines and 625 from distal sites, comprising 316 cold and 309 warm water samples. Legionella was isolated from central lines in two facilities and from distal sites in four facilities. 17% of all central and 32% of all distal samples were contaminated. At distal sites, cold water samples were more frequently contaminated with Legionella (40% vs 23%, p <0.001) and with higher concentrations of Legionella (≥1,000 colony-forming unit/100 ml) (16% vs 6%, p<0.001) than warm water samples. There was no clear correlation between the cold water temperature at sampling time and the contamination rate. 35% of cold water samples under 20 °C at collection were contaminated. Our data highlight the importance of assessing the cold water supply of healthcare facilities for Legionella in the context of an intensified analysis. PMID:21527132

  9. Characterization of Cloud Water-Content Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    The development of realistic cloud parameterizations for climate models requires accurate characterizations of subgrid distributions of thermodynamic variables. To this end, a software tool was developed to characterize cloud water-content distributions in climate-model sub-grid scales. This software characterizes distributions of cloud water content with respect to cloud phase, cloud type, precipitation occurrence, and geo-location using CloudSat radar measurements. It uses a statistical method called maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the probability density function of the cloud water content.

  10. The Saguaro distributed operating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Gregory R.; Schlichting, Richard D.

    1989-05-01

    The progress achieved over the final year of the Saguaro distributed operating system project is presented. The primary achievements were in related research, including SR distributed programming language, the MLP system for constructing distributed mixed-language programs, the Psync interprocess communication mechanism, a configurable operating system kernal called the x-kernal, and the development of language mechanisms for performing failure handling in distributed programming languages.

  11. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for the hydrogeologic units of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Belcher, W.R.; Sweetkind, D.S.; Elliott, P.E.

    2002-11-19

    The use of geologic information such as lithology and rock properties is important to constrain conceptual and numerical hydrogeologic models. This geologic information is difficult to apply explicitly to numerical modeling and analyses because it tends to be qualitative rather than quantitative. This study uses a compilation of hydraulic-conductivity measurements to derive estimates of the probability distributions for several hydrogeologic units within the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, a geologically and hydrologicaly complex region underlain by basin-fill sediments, volcanic, intrusive, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Probability distributions of hydraulic conductivity for general rock types have been studied previously; however, this study provides more detailed definition of hydrogeologic units based on lithostratigraphy, lithology, alteration, and fracturing and compares the probability distributions to the aquifer test data. Results suggest that these probability distributions can be used for studies involving, for example, numerical flow modeling, recharge, evapotranspiration, and rainfall runoff. These probability distributions can be used for such studies involving the hydrogeologic units in the region, as well as for similar rock types elsewhere. Within the study area, fracturing appears to have the greatest influence on the hydraulic conductivity of carbonate bedrock hydrogeologic units. Similar to earlier studies, we find that alteration and welding in the Tertiary volcanic rocks greatly influence conductivity. As alteration increases, hydraulic conductivity tends to decrease. Increasing degrees of welding appears to increase hydraulic conductivity because welding increases the brittleness of the volcanic rocks, thus increasing the amount of fracturing.

  12. Safety review of the DCS (Distributed Control System) controlled full scale SRAT/SME (Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator) for water runs

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, B.A.

    1988-01-29

    This memorandum addresses safety concerns of the Full Scale Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) resulting from the installation of the new Distributed Control System (DCS). The present configuration of the SRAT/SME with DCS has been determined to be safe for operational testing with water. Another memorandum will be written after experience has been gained during water runs for actual operation. Previous safety evaluations and process hazard reviews for this facility have addressed normal industrial safety hazards and hazards associated with formic acid handling and operation with organics in the feed. Process operation with the new DCS controls will be very similar to the earlier operation controlled by the Modicon programmable logic controller (PLC). The interlocks for the SRAT/SME that were in the PLC have been programmed into the new DCS and will be reviewed here. 6 refs.

  13. Analysis of Distribution System and Domestic Service Line Pipe Deposits to Understand Water Treatment/Metal Release Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project puts the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) into a unique position of being able to bring analytical tools to bear to solve or anticipate future drinking water infrastructure water quality and metallic or cement material performance problems, for which little...

  14. ADHydro: A Parallel Implementation of a Large-scale High-Resolution Multi-Physics Distributed Water Resources Model Using the Charm++ Run Time System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, R. C.; Ogden, F. L.; Lai, W.; Moreno, H. A.; Pureza, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based watershed models are useful tools for hydrologic studies, water resources management and economic analyses in the contexts of climate, land-use, and water-use changes. This poster presents a parallel implementation of a quasi 3-dimensional, physics-based, high-resolution, distributed water resources model suitable for simulating large watersheds in a massively parallel computing environment. Developing this model is one of the objectives of the NSF EPSCoR RII Track II CI-WATER project, which is joint between Wyoming and Utah EPSCoR jurisdictions. The model, which we call ADHydro, is aimed at simulating important processes in the Rocky Mountain west, including: rainfall and infiltration, snowfall and snowmelt in complex terrain, vegetation and evapotranspiration, soil heat flux and freezing, overland flow, channel flow, groundwater flow, water management and irrigation. Model forcing is provided by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and ADHydro is coupled with the NOAH-MP land-surface scheme for calculating fluxes between the land and atmosphere. The ADHydro implementation uses the Charm++ parallel run time system. Charm++ is based on location transparent message passing between migrateable C++ objects. Each object represents an entity in the model such as a mesh element. These objects can be migrated between processors or serialized to disk allowing the Charm++ system to automatically provide capabilities such as load balancing and checkpointing. Objects interact with each other by passing messages that the Charm++ system routes to the correct destination object regardless of its current location. This poster discusses the algorithms, communication patterns, and caching strategies used to implement ADHydro with Charm++. The ADHydro model code will be released to the hydrologic community in late 2014.

  15. Water Purification Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A water purification/recycling system developed by Photo-Catalytics, Inc. (PCI) for NASA is commercially available. The system cleanses and recycles water, using a "photo-catalysis" process in which light or radiant energy sparks a chemical reaction. Chemically stable semiconductor powders are added to organically polluted water. The powder absorbs ultraviolet light, and pollutants are oxidized and converted to carbon dioxide. Potential markets for the system include research and pharmaceutical manufacturing applications, as well as microchip manufacture and wastewater cleansing.

  16. Distribution system harmonic filter planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ortmeyer, T.H.; Hiyama, Takashi

    1996-10-01

    A planning methodology for distribution system harmonic filtering is proposed. The method is intended for use on radial distribution systems with no large harmonic sources. It is proposed that 60 hertz var planning be done first to allocate the var resources. Following this process, the harmonic filter planning can be readily accomplished. Characteristics of the distribution systems and the harmonic sources are exploited to provide a practical filter planning technique which is effective and efficient.

  17. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. PMID:25150521

  18. Water Supply Infrastructure System Surety

    SciTech Connect

    EKMAN,MARK E.; ISBELL,DARYL

    2000-01-06

    The executive branch of the United States government has acknowledged and identified threats to the water supply infrastructure of the United States. These threats include contamination of the water supply, aging infrastructure components, and malicious attack. Government recognition of the importance of providing safe, secure, and reliable water supplies has a historical precedence in the water works of the ancient Romans, who recognized the same basic threats to their water supply infrastructure the United States acknowledges today. System surety is the philosophy of ''designing for threats, planning for failure, and managing for success'' in system design and implementation. System surety is an alternative to traditional compliance-based approaches to safety, security, and reliability. Four types of surety are recognized: reactive surety; proactive surety, preventative surety; and fundamental, inherent surety. The five steps of the system surety approach can be used to establish the type of surety needed for the water infrastructure and the methods used to realize a sure water infrastructure. The benefit to the water industry of using the system surety approach to infrastructure design and assessment is a proactive approach to safety, security, and reliability for water transmission, treatment, distribution, and wastewater collection and treatment.

  19. MICROBIOLOGICAL ALTERATIONS IN DISTRIBUTED WATER TREATED WITH GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to examine the effect of granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment on the microbiological characteristics of potable water in distribution systems. Data was collected from both field and pilot plant studies. Field monitoring studies from two water tre...

  20. Characterisation of the Physical Composition and Microbial Community Structure of Biofilms within a Model Full-Scale Drinking Water Distribution System

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Katherine E.; Collins, Richard; Green, Nicola H.; Sharpe, Rebecca L.; Douterelo, Isabel; Osborn, A. Mark; Boxall, Joby B.

    2015-01-01

    Within drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), microorganisms form multi-species biofilms on internal pipe surfaces. A matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) is produced by the attached community and provides structure and stability for the biofilm. If the EPS adhesive strength deteriorates or is overcome by external shear forces, biofilm is mobilised into the water potentially leading to degradation of water quality. However, little is known about the EPS within DWDS biofilms or how this is influenced by community composition or environmental parameters, because of the complications in obtaining biofilm samples and the difficulties in analysing EPS. Additionally, although biofilms may contain various microbial groups, research commonly focuses solely upon bacteria. This research applies an EPS analysis method based upon fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with digital image analysis (DIA), to concurrently characterize cells and EPS (carbohydrates and proteins) within drinking water biofilms from a full-scale DWDS experimental pipe loop facility with representative hydraulic conditions. Application of the EPS analysis method, alongside DNA fingerprinting of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities, was demonstrated for biofilms sampled from different positions around the pipeline, after 28 days growth within the DWDS experimental facility. The volume of EPS was 4.9 times greater than that of the cells within biofilms, with carbohydrates present as the dominant component. Additionally, the greatest proportion of EPS was located above that of the cells. Fungi and archaea were established as important components of the biofilm community, although bacteria were more diverse. Moreover, biofilms from different positions were similar with respect to community structure and the quantity, composition and three-dimensional distribution of cells and EPS, indicating that active colonisation of the pipe wall is an important

  1. Model of phase distribution of hydrophobic organic chemicals in cyclodextrin-water-air-solid sorbent systems as a function of salinity, temperature, and the presence of multiple CDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanford, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental and other applications of cyclodextrins (CD) often require usage of high concentra- tion aqueous solutions of derivatized CDs. In an effort to reduce the costs, these studies also typically use technical grades where the purity of the CD solution and the degree of substitution has not been reported. Further, this grade of CD often included high levels of salt and it is commonly applied in high salinity systems. The mathematical models for water and air partitioning coefficients of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOC) with CDs that have been used in these studies under-estimate the level of HOC within CDs. This is because those models (1) do not take into account that high concentrations of CDs result in significantly lower levels of water in solution and (2) they do not account for the reduction in HOC aqueous solubility due to the presence of salt. Further, because they have poor knowledge of the CD molar concentration in their solu- tions, it is difficult to draw comparisons between studies. Herein is developed a mathematical model where cyclo- dextrin is treated as a separate phase whose relative volume is calculated from its apparent molar volume in solution and the CD concentration of the solution. The model also accounts for the affects of temperature and the presence of salt in solution through inclusion of modified versions of the Van't Hoff and Setschenow equations. With these capabilities, additional equations have been developed for calculating HOC phase distribution in air-water-CD-solid sorbent systems for a single HOC and between water and CD for a system containing multiple HOCs as well as multiple types of cyclodextrin.

  2. Arsenic Accumulation and Release Studies Using a Cast Iron Pipe Section from a Drinking Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tendency of iron solid surfaces to adsorb arsenic and other ions is well known and has become the basis for several drinking water treatment approaches that remove these contaminants. It is reasonable to assume that iron-based solids, such as corrosion deposits present in dri...

  3. CHARACTERIZING THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE AND CHLORAMINES ON THE FORMATION OF BIOFILM IN A SIMULATED DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking wate treatment in the US has played a major role in protecting public health through the reduction of wateborne disease. However, carcinogenic and toxic contaminants continue to threaten the quality of surface and ground water in the US. The passage of the Safe Drinking ...

  4. SEATTLE DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM CORROSION CONTROL STUDY. VOLUME III: POTENTIAL FOR DRINKING WATER CONTAMINATION FROM TIN/ANTIMONY SOLDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to evaluate the potential for leaching of metals into drinking water from tin/antimony solder. The study consisted of five research phases: (1) A theoretical investigation of the corrosion products formed from the solder was conducted using pe-pH diagrams...

  5. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION FOR THE CONTAINMENT, TREATMENT, AND DECONTAMINATION OF SELECTED MATERIALS USED IN THE WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The safety and security of water supplies has come under reassessment in the past year. Issues ranging from public safety and health, ecological, and national security are under consideration. The terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001 and the subsequent del...

  6. Characterization of chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water microbial communities in a distribution system simulator using pyrosequencing data analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular analysis of drinking water microbial communities has focused primarily on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Since this approach provides limited information on function potential of microbial communities, analysis of whole-metagenome pyrosequencing data was used to...

  7. Geohydrology and Numerical Simulation of Alternative Pumping Distributions and the Effects of Drought on the Ground-Water Flow System of Tinian, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water in a freshwater lens is the main source of freshwater on Tinian, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Four major geologic units make up the island with high-permeability limestone units overlying low-permeability volcanic rocks. Estimates of limestone hydraulic conductivity range from 21 to 23,000 feet per day. Estimates of water-budget components for Tinian are 82 inches per year of rainfall, about 6 inches per year of runoff, 46 inches per year of evapotranspiration, and 30 inches per year of recharge. From 1990?97, ground-water withdrawal from the Municipal well, the major source of water, averaged about 780 gallons per minute. A two-dimensional, steady-state, ground-water flow model using the computer code SHARP was developed for Tinian, to enhance the understanding of (1) the distribution of aquifer hydraulic properties, (2) the conceptual framework of the ground-water flow system, and (3) the effects of various pumping distributions and drought on water levels and the freshwater/saltwater transition zone. For modeling purposes, Tinian was divided into three horizontal hydraulic-conductivity zones: (1) highly permeable limestone, (2) less-permeable, clay-rich limestone, and (3) low-permeability volcanic rocks. The following horizontal hydraulic conductivities were estimated: (1) 10,500 feet per day for the highly permeable limestone, (2) 800 feet per day for the less-permeable clay-rich limestone, and (3) 0.2 foot per day for the volcanic rocks. To estimate the hydrologic effects of different pumping distributions on the aquifer, three different steady-state pumping scenarios were simulated, (1) a scenario with no ground-water pumping, (2) a 2001-pumping scenario, and (3) a maximum-pumping scenario. The results of the no-pumping scenario showed that the freshwater/saltwater interface beneath the Municipal well would be about 7 feet deeper and ground-water discharge to the coast would be higher along both the east and west coasts of the

  8. Distributed systems status and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreidler, David; Vickers, David

    1990-01-01

    Concepts are investigated for an automated status and control system for a distributed processing environment. System characteristics, data requirements for health assessment, data acquisition methods, system diagnosis methods and control methods were investigated in an attempt to determine the high-level requirements for a system which can be used to assess the health of a distributed processing system and implement control procedures to maintain an accepted level of health for the system. A potential concept for automated status and control includes the use of expert system techniques to assess the health of the system, detect and diagnose faults, and initiate or recommend actions to correct the faults. Therefore, this research included the investigation of methods by which expert systems were developed for real-time environments and distributed systems. The focus is on the features required by real-time expert systems and the tools available to develop real-time expert systems.

  9. Distributed proximity sensor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to sensors embedded on the surface of a robot hand, or other moving member. By distributing proximity sensors capable of detecting distances and angles to points on the surface of an object, information is obtained for achieving noncontacting shape and distance perception, i.e., for automatic determination of the object's shape, direction, and distance, as well as the orientation of the object relative to the robot hand or other moving member.

  10. A prototype Distributed Audit System

    SciTech Connect

    Banning, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Security auditing systems are used to detect and assess unauthorized or abusive system usage. Historically, security audits were confined to a single computer system. Recent work examines ways of extending auditing to include heterogeneous groups of computers (distributed system). This paper describes the design and prototype development of a Distributed Audit System (DAS) which was developed with funding received from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and through the Master`s thesis effort performed by the author at California State University, Long Beach. The DAS is intended to provide collection, transfer, and control of audit data on distributed, heterogeneous hosts.

  11. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  12. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  13. Automated Power-Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Cindy; Anderson, Paul M.; Martin, James A.

    1990-01-01

    Automated power-distribution system monitors and controls electrical power to modules in network. Handles both 208-V, 20-kHz single-phase alternating current and 120- to 150-V direct current. Power distributed to load modules from power-distribution control units (PDCU's) via subsystem distributors. Ring busses carry power to PDCU's from power source. Needs minimal attention. Detects faults and also protects against them. Potential applications include autonomous land vehicles and automated industrial process systems.

  14. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  15. Purge water management system

    DOEpatents

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Williams, Daniel W.

    1996-01-01

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  16. WATERBORNE PATHOGEN INVASIONS: A CASE FOR WATER QUALITY PROTECTION IN DISTRIBUTION PROTECTION IN DISTRIBUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    No degree of treatment will insure the delivery of a safe water supplyto the consumer's tap when the distribution system is subject to cross-connections water pressure losses, frequent line breaks, open reservoirs and infrastructure deterioration. n one recent U.S. outbreak, wate...

  17. Exploiting replication in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.; Joseph, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques are examined for replicating data and execution in directly distributed systems: systems in which multiple processes interact directly with one another while continuously respecting constraints on their joint behavior. Directly distributed systems are often required to solve difficult problems, ranging from management of replicated data to dynamic reconfiguration in response to failures. It is shown that these problems reduce to more primitive, order-based consistency problems, which can be solved using primitives such as the reliable broadcast protocols. Moreover, given a system that implements reliable broadcast primitives, a flexible set of high-level tools can be provided for building a wide variety of directly distributed application programs.

  18. Impact of Arsenic Treatment Techniques on Distribution Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will summarize the results of the distribution water quality studies (arsenic, lead, and copper) of the demonstration program. The impact of the treatment systems by type of system (adsorptive media, coagulation/filtration, ion exchange, etc) will be shown by co...

  19. Biological Instability in a Chlorinated Drinking Water Distribution Network

    PubMed Central

    Nescerecka, Alina; Rubulis, Janis; Vital, Marius; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of a drinking water distribution system is to deliver drinking water to the consumer, preferably with the same quality as when it left the treatment plant. In this context, the maintenance of good microbiological quality is often referred to as biological stability, and the addition of sufficient chlorine residuals is regarded as one way to achieve this. The full-scale drinking water distribution system of Riga (Latvia) was investigated with respect to biological stability in chlorinated drinking water. Flow cytometric (FCM) intact cell concentrations, intracellular adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), heterotrophic plate counts and residual chlorine measurements were performed to evaluate the drinking water quality and stability at 49 sampling points throughout the distribution network. Cell viability methods were compared and the importance of extracellular ATP measurements was examined as well. FCM intact cell concentrations varied from 5×103 cells mL−1 to 4.66×105 cells mL−1 in the network. While this parameter did not exceed 2.1×104 cells mL−1 in the effluent from any water treatment plant, 50% of all the network samples contained more than 1.06×105 cells mL−1. This indisputably demonstrates biological instability in this particular drinking water distribution system, which was ascribed to a loss of disinfectant residuals and concomitant bacterial growth. The study highlights the potential of using cultivation-independent methods for the assessment of chlorinated water samples. In addition, it underlines the complexity of full-scale drinking water distribution systems, and the resulting challenges to establish the causes of biological instability. PMID:24796923

  20. Suspended Microplastics in the Surface Water of the Yangtze Estuary System, China: First Observations on Occurrence, Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.

    2014-12-01

    Levels of microplastics (MPs) in China are completely unknown. Here suspended MPs were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively for the Yangtze Estuary and East China Sea. MPs were extracted via a floatation method. MPs were then counted and categorized according to shape and size under a dissecting microscope. The MP densities were 4137.3±2461.5 and 0.167±0.138 n/m3 in the estuarine and the sea waters, respectively. Plastic abundances varied strongly in the estuary. Higher density in the C transect corroborated that rivers were the important sources of MP to the marine environment. MPs (0.5-5mm) constituted more than 90% of total plastics. Plastic particles (> 5 mm) were observed with a maximum size of 12.46 mm. The most frequent plastics were fibres, followed by granules and films. Plastic spherules occurred sparsely. Transparent and coloured plastics comprised the majority of the particle colours. This study provides clues in understanding MPs fate and potential source.

  1. Distributed systems and Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Viewgraphs of two briefings designed to provide information to the Software I and V Study Group to help complete the I and V study task are given. The information is taken from the areas of Ada real-time processing support, Ada run-time environments, Ada program construction, object oriented design, and Ada/UNIX/POSIX interfaces. Also covered are the development, integration, and verification of Ada systems; fault tolerance and Ada; and Ada programming standards, techniques, and tools.

  2. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The performance of a waste water reclamation system is monitored by introducing a non-pathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, into the waste-water prior to treatment and, thereafter, testing the reclaimed water for the presence of the marker virus. A test sample is first concentrated by absorbing any marker virus onto a cellulose acetate filter in the presence of a trivalent cation at low pH and then flushing the filter with a limited quantity of a glycine buffer solution to desorb any marker virus present on the filter. Photo-optical detection of indirect passive immune agglutination by polystyrene beads indicates the performance of the water reclamation system in removing the marker virus. A closed system provides for concentrating any marker virus, initiating and monitoring the passive immune agglutination reaction, and then flushing the system to prepare for another sample.

  3. Flood Inundation Models using Airborne Laser Altimetry (LIDAR) to Establish Significance of Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Indicators for Ordinary High Water Marks in Arid Southwestern Stream Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericsson, M. P.; Lichvar, R. W.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2004-12-01

    "Waters of the United States" (WoUS) are identified by use of physical features in the field to determine the location of the "Ordinary High Water Mark" (OHWM) and the limits of the Federal jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act (33 CFR 328.3). Arid fluvial systems that dominate the western landscape are critically important environments that provide valuable ecological benefits to the nation. These arid streams and rivers recognized as WoUS convey floodwaters and help ameliorate flood damage; maintain water quality and quantity; provide habitat for plants, aquatic organisms and wildlife, which determine the physical characteristics and biological productivity of downstream environments. Recent research efforts have identified a variety of field OWHM indicators useful for delineation purposes in the arid west. As part of that same ongoing effort, testing the reliability of the field OHWM indicators in identifying WoUS boundaries has provided insight to the distribution patterns of physical and biological features in response to a suite of discharges of varying magnitude and frequency. The objective of this research is to utilize 1-D HEC-RAS flood inundation models (2, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 year return intervals) for two intermittent stream channel reaches at different landscape positions in the Mojave Desert, California using highly accurate lidar topographic data and detailed field mapping results to test the reliability of the field OHWM features in identifying the WoUS boundary and to better understand the frequency of inundation necessary for creation and maintenance of the various field OHWM features. Our preliminary results show that 80-90 percent of the OHWM indicators are located within or near the active floodplain, and some are sorting along the bankfull channel. Surficial textural differences and vegetative cover patterns are sorting along the active floodplain boundaries while the distribution of other vegetative indicators within the stream channel

  4. The effect of applying a pipe-joint lubricant to connect ductile iron pipe on off-flavors in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wiesenthal, K E; Amah, G; Lam, T; Suffet, I H

    2004-01-01

    This study was used to help define the contribution to taste and odor problems caused by the application of a pipe-joint lubricant to connect ductile iron pipe in drinking water distribution systems. Tyton Joint Lubricant (TJL) was studied. The lubricant produced odors that are continually oxidized by chlorine or oxygen. The mechanism of oxidative rancidity, one of the major causes of food spoilage is the apparent mechanism of oxidation. The odors produced by the lubricant were characterized by a Flavor Profile Analysis (FPA) panel as well as GC/MS and Sensory GC analysis. The most common odors perceived in the TJL water samples for the first six days were waxy/oily and soapy odors with a rancid oil, odor note. The waxy/oily and soapy odors decreased with time in the chlorine medium as the rancid oily odor note increased. Numerous aldehydes, ketones, alcohols and borneol compounds, produced from the lubricants, were tentatively identified and linked to the odors perceived by the FPA panel. PMID:15237630

  5. Pyrosequencing analysis of bacterial communities in biofilms from different pipe materials in a city drinking water distribution system of East China.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongxing; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Shuai; Lou, Liping; Cheng, Dongqing; He, Xiaofang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Shangde; Fu, Liusong; Liu, Jingqing; Hu, Baolan

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) could cause several types of problems, such as the deterioration of water quality, corrosion of pipe walls, and potential proliferation of opportunistic pathogens. In this study, ten biofilm samples from different pipe materials, including ductile cast iron pipe (DCIP), gray cast iron pipe (GCIP), galvanized steel pipe (GSP), stainless steel clad pipe (SSCP), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), were collected from an actual DWDS to investigate the effect of pipe material on bacterial community. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and culture-based method were used to quantify bacteria. 454 pyrosequencing was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that the numbers of total bacteria and culturable heterotrophic bacteria from iron pipes were higher than that in PVC, while the numbers of Shigella and vibrios were low in biofilms from iron pipes. Bacterial community analysis showed that Hyphomicrobium or Desulfovibrio were the predominant microorganism in iron pipes, whereas Sphingomonas or Pseudomonas were dominant in other types of pipe. This study revealed differences in bacterial communities in biofilms among different pipe materials, and the results were useful for pipeline material selection in DWDSs. PMID:26311220

  6. Influencing factors in the occurrence of injured coliforms in the drinking water distribution system in the city of La Plata, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, María Alejandra; Del Coco, Valeria Fernanda; Minvielle, Marta Cecilia; Basualdo, Juan Angel

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influencing factors in the occurrence of coliforms in the drinking water in La Plata (Argentina) from June 1999 to June 2001. A total of 180 samples were collected from Rio de La Plata (102 samples) and Puelche Aquifer (78 samples); 45 samples were collected for each of the four seasons. The membrane filter procedure was used for isolating bacteria, and each sample was tested for chlorine and pH. The highest percentage of samples positive for coliforms in the two tested media was obtained in summer while the highest percentage of negative samples was obtained in winter. No Escherichia coli was isolated. The percentage of injured coliforms fluctuated between 70 and 100%. The most frequently isolated bacteria was Enterobacter cloacae in summer, Enterobacter agglomerans in autumn and Klebsiella oxytoca in winter and spring. Significant correlations were observed between coliforms and the distance from the initial treatment point, and with the level of free chlorine. We conclude that drinking water contamination in La Plata occurs in the distribution system due to increased temperatures and reduced disinfectant levels, which result in bacterial regrowth. PMID:20154384

  7. Exploring the biological stability situation of a full scale water distribution system in south China by three biological stability evaluation methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junpeng; Li, Wei-Ying; Wang, Feng; Qian, Lin; Xu, Chen; Liu, Yao; Qi, Wanqi

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial regrowth especially opportunistic pathogens regrowth and contamination in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) have become an emerging threat to public health in the whole world. To explore bacterial regrowth and biological stability, assimilable organic carbon (AOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and bacterial regrowth potential (BRP) were evaluated in a full scale DWDS and bench tests in South China. A significant correlation between BRP and AOC in both water treatment processes (WTP) and DWDS was obtained. For BRP and BDOC, the correlation was more significant in WTP than in DWDS. Both AOC and BRP were significantly correlated with UV254, total organic carbon (TOC), and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) (p < 0.01), whereas BDOC was only significantly associated with UV254, temperature and chlorine residual (p < 0.01). Through a bench test, when chlorine was higher than 0.5 mg/L, the HPC level was low and AOC concentration almost unchanged. On contrary the HPC level increased quickly and declined slightly, with chlorine lower than 0.15 mg/L, which was in accordance with the large amount of biological stability data obtained from DWDS. Through another bench test, the HPC level was positively correlated to AOC concentration and when AOC was below 135 μg/L, the growth rate of HPC was low, which was verified by the analysis of biological stability data from DWDS. PMID:27421100

  8. Surface effects on phase distributions of a fast-quenched miscibility gap type system - Succinonitrile-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Fanning, U. S.

    1986-01-01

    If a binary homogeneous melt is cooled into an immiscible region, the newly formed second phase will generally have a density different from the parent phase, and will separate readily by sedimentation. Observation of solidification processes in microgravity indicates that outside of sedimentation, at least two other important effets can separate the phases: (1) preferential wetting, and (2) thermal migration of second-phase droplets due to interfacial tension gradients. The latter effect would drive the minority phase along the thermal gradient toward the hottest part (assuming the interfacial tension decreases with increasing temperature), which is usually away from the crucible wall. On the other hand, if the minority phase preferentially wets the crucible, a minority phase layer which thickens as initial solution compositions approach critical, will form adjacent to the solid surface and remain in the coldest region of the ingot. This study presents compelling preliminary evidence that these two effects do exist and that they compete with one another. However, the temperature dependence of preferential wetting below T(c) for the current system of study is, as yet, undetermined. These effects are sensitive to the initial concentration of a hypermonotectic solution cooling through a miscibility gap.

  9. Sediment distribution patterns and the development of the marsh system rimming a shallow-water shelf embayment: Waccasassa Bay, Levy Co. , FL

    SciTech Connect

    Goodbred, S.L.; Hine, A.C. . Dept. Marine Science); Stumpf, R. . Center for Coastal Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Waccasassa Bay is a wide-mouthed, open basin located at the head of a 35 km wide coastal reentrant along Florida's west-central marsh coast. It is an ideal shallow-water shelf embayment, being characterized as a microtidal, low-wave energy, freshwater-influenced, shallow-water depositional basin. The embayment is rimmed by a contiguous, open-marine Juncus roemerianus marsh, typical of the wetlands along this coast. A series of large, relict, subtidal oyster bioherms traverse the central channel of the embayment, a site at which there are also submarine freshwater springs. Approximately 100 km of high resolution seismic reflection data and side scan sonar data were collected across the embayment. Ground-truthing was performed using probe rod transects and surface sediment grab samples. These data show a high diversity and zonal distribution of bottom sediments, ranging from coarse, shelly sands to detrital coralline algae. However, unlike the nearshore zones north and south of Waccasassa Bay, sediment cover over 90% of the basin is less than 1 m in thickness, and exposed bedrock is common. The Waccasassa Bay basin is largely an exposed shallow limestone shelf. This contrasts with Crystal Bay, a shelf embayment to the south, which contains several distinct coastal facies averaging 3 m in thickness. Initial research onshore shows that the sediment veneer of the coastal marshes along the embayment is thin, on the order of 1-2 m, suggesting long term instability of the system. The marsh sediments also appear to have little siliciclastic content. Vibracore and probe rod transects provide a stratigraphic framework from which to reconstruct the geologic history of these wetlands. The results will allow the Waccasassa Bay marsh/shelf embayment system to be compared with other systems along this coast and elsewhere.

  10. Particle size distribution and removal efficiency for three types of clarifiers in a warm-water, low-salinity, recirculating aquaculture system for juvenile red drum culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recirculating aquaculture systems offer a solution to declining natural finfish stocks while limiting nutrient outputs and eutrophication of effluent waters. Because water is reused in these systems, the solids must be efficiently removed by mechanical treatment devices otherwise the solids buildup...

  11. POLRADS: polarization radiance distribution measurement system.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kenneth J; Souaidia, Nordine

    2010-09-13

    While the upwelling radiance distribution in the ocean can be highly polarized, there are few measurements of this parameter in the open ocean. To obtain the polarized in-water upwelling spectral radiance distribution data we have developed the POLRADS instrument. This instrument is based on the NuRADS radiance distribution camera systems in which linear polarizer's have been installed. By combining simultaneous images from three NuRADS instruments, three Stokes parameters (I, Q, U) for the water leaving radiance can be obtained for all upwelling angles simultaneously. This system measures the Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I with a 0.05-0.06 uncertainty and I with a 7-10% uncertainty. PMID:20940862

  12. The Raid distributed database system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhargava, Bharat; Riedl, John

    1989-01-01

    Raid, a robust and adaptable distributed database system for transaction processing (TP), is described. Raid is a message-passing system, with server processes on each site to manage concurrent processing, consistent replicated copies during site failures, and atomic distributed commitment. A high-level layered communications package provides a clean location-independent interface between servers. The latest design of the package delivers messages via shared memory in a configuration with several servers linked into a single process. Raid provides the infrastructure to investigate various methods for supporting reliable distributed TP. Measurements on TP and server CPU time are presented, along with data from experiments on communications software, consistent replicated copy control during site failures, and concurrent distributed checkpointing. A software tool for evaluating the implementation of TP algorithms in an operating-system kernel is proposed.

  13. Viral and bacterial production in the North Water: in situ measurements, batch-culture experiments and characterization and distribution of a virus host system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Nielsen, Torkel G.; Bjørnsen, Peter K.

    Growth and viral lysis of bacterioplankton at subzero temperatures were measured in the North Water polynya in July 1998. In situ measurements of bacterial carbon consumption in surface waters ranged from 15 to 63 μg C l -1 d -1 in the eastern and 6 to 7 μg C l -1 d -1 in the northern part of the polynya. Both bacterial abundance and activity appeared to increase in response to the decay of the phytoplankton bloom that developed in the North Water. Organic carbon was the limiting substrate for bacteria in the polynya since addition of glucose, but not inorganic nutrients, to batch cultures increased both the carrying capacity of the substrate and the growth rate of the bacteria. Bacterial growth rates ranged from 0.11 to 0.40 d -1, corresponding to bacterial generation times of 1.7-6.3 d. The in situ viral production rate was estimated both from the frequency of visibly infected cells and from the rate of viral production in batch cultures; it ranged from 0.04 to 0.52 d -1 and from 0.25 to 0.47 d -1, respectively. From 6% to 28% of bacterial production was found to be lost due to viral lysis. The average virus-bacteria ratio was 5.1±3.1, with the abundance of viruses being correlated positively with bacterial production. A Pseudoalteromonas sp. bacterial host and an infective virus were isolated from the polynya; characteristics and distribution of the virus-host system were examined. The Pseudoalteromonas sp. showed psychrotolerant growth and sustained significant production of viruses at 0°C. The virus-host system was found throughout the polynya. Overall the results suggested that a large amount of organic carbon released during the development and breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom was consumed by planktonic bacteria and that the microbial food web was an important and dynamic component of the planktonic food web in the North Water.

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF WATER VAPOR IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Snell, Ronald L.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Hollenbach, David J.; Kaufman, Michael J.; Li Di; Neufeld, David A. E-mail: vtolls@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: mkaufman@email.sjsu.edu E-mail: neufeld@pha.jhu.edu

    2011-01-20

    We report the results of a large-area study of water vapor along the Orion Molecular Cloud ridge, the purpose of which was to determine the depth-dependent distribution of gas-phase water in dense molecular clouds. We find that the water vapor measured toward 77 spatial positions along the face-on Orion ridge, excluding positions surrounding the outflow associated with BN/KL and IRc2, display integrated intensities that correlate strongly with known cloud surface tracers such as CN, C{sub 2}H, {sup 13}CO J = 5-4, and HCN, and less well with the volume tracer N{sub 2}H{sup +}. Moreover, at total column densities corresponding to A{sub V}< 15 mag, the ratio of H{sub 2}O to C{sup 18}O integrated intensities shows a clear rise approaching the cloud surface. We show that this behavior cannot be accounted for by either optical depth or excitation effects, but suggests that gas-phase water abundances fall at large A{sub V}. These results are important as they affect measures of the true water-vapor abundance in molecular clouds by highlighting the limitations of comparing measured water-vapor column densities with such traditional cloud tracers as {sup 13}CO or C{sup 18}O. These results also support cloud models that incorporate freeze out of molecules as a critical component in determining the depth-dependent abundance of water vapor.

  15. Prototype water reuse system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchetti, G.; Gray, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    A small-scale water reuse system (150 L/min) was developed to create an environment for observing fish under a variety of temperature regimes. Key concerns of disease control, water quality, temperature control, and efficiency and case of operation were addressed. Northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) were held at loading densities ranging from 0.11 to 0.97 kg/L per minute and at temperatures from 10 to 20°C for 6 months with no disease problems or degradation ofwater quality in the system. The system required little maintenance during 2 years of operation.

  16. Sequence-based typing of Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from hospital water distribution systems as a complementary element of risk assessment of legionellosis in Poland.

    PubMed

    Pancer, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Many factors affect the risk of Legionella infection, such as the design, construction and maintenance of water distribution systems, the presence of individuals who may be exposed and their vulnerability to infection, and the degree of water system colonization and properties of Legionella strains. For epidemiological investigations, two properties of the Legionella strains are usually determined: serotyping and genotyping (sequence-based typing, SBT). In Poland, data regarding legionellosis are fragmentary, despite the fact that this has been a notifiable disease since 2002. The number of reported cases is very low; moreover, the main method of diagnosis is serological examination (delayed diagnosis and cheaper methods), and only single cases of LD were confirmed by culture of bacteria. Therefore, after 10 years of mandatory reporting of the Legionella spp. infection in Poland, the real epidemiological situation is still unknown; however, risk assessment should be carried out, especially in hospitals. In the presented study, comparison of the sequence types of 111 isolated L. pneumophila strains (from hospital water systems) with those present in the EWGLI SBT data was undertaken for complex risk analysis as a complementary element. In total, strains of L. pneumophila belonging to 12 out of 19 STs determined in the presented study were previously reported to the EWGLI SBT database (ST1, ST42, ST59, ST81, ST87, ST114, ST152, ST191, ST371, ST421, ST461, ST520). Among these strains, only 7 STs were previously reported in the amount of ≥10 (mainly ST1, ST42, ST81). Analysis of EWGLI data were carried out and, proportionally, the highest percentage of hospital-acquired strains (clinical and environmental) was found for ST 81, ST421 and ST152, but the largest number was for ST1. Based on the EWGLI data and the presented results, it was found that persistent colonization of HWS of 3 hospitals by strains belonging to ST42, ST1, ST87 indicated an increased risk of

  17. Distribution System of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, JD

    2003-04-23

    The distribution system of the future is going to be as much of a revolution to the electric energy industry as the wireless telephone has been to consumer communications. An electricity market transformation must occur before the changes can take place, but this evolution is already starting to occur in many parts of the country. In this paper, we discuss a vision for a future distribution system, areas that will be key for technology development, and the advantages of the new electricity market. Present day distribution systems are in a sense, unintelligent. Distribution systems respond to faults, or short circuits, by sensing the very high fault current and then opening circuit breakers to isolate the fault. Some newer automated systems determine fault location and then close other circuit breakers to provide an alternate path for power after the fault so that the number of customers left without power is minimized, but the extent of the reconfiguration is limited. Distribution systems also have some methods to regulate voltage, but there is little real time local response to contingencies such as loss of a transmission line or a generator. In present day distribution systems, there is very little control of load, or demand response, and Distributed Energy Resources (DER, distributed generation, storage, and responsive load) located in the distribution system are prohibited from even regulating voltage. In fact, industry standards and utility interconnection agreements typically require that when a contingency occurs on a distribution or transmission system that results in a voltage or frequency excursion, the DER is to disconnect rather than help. There is a pressing need to evolve the distribution system model to one that can respond to contingencies sensed locally, and has the local intelligence and autonomy to deal with contingencies such as unusual loading, transmission congestion, and line outages. Markets must be simple for customers to participate in the

  18. How robust are distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    A distributed system is made up of large numbers of components operating asynchronously from one another and hence with imcomplete and inaccurate views of one another's state. Load fluctuations are common as new tasks arrive and active tasks terminate. Jointly, these aspects make it nearly impossible to arrive at detailed predictions for a system's behavior. It is important to the successful use of distributed systems in situations in which humans cannot provide the sorts of predictable realtime responsiveness of a computer, that the system be robust. The technology of today can too easily be affected by worn programs or by seemingly trivial mechanisms that, for example, can trigger stock market disasters. Inventors of a technology have an obligation to overcome flaws that can exact a human cost. A set of principles for guiding solutions to distributed computing problems is presented.

  19. Water Purification Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Clearwater Pool Technologies employs NASA-developed silver/copper ionization to purify turtle and dolphin tanks, cooling towers, spas, water recycling systems, etc. The pool purifier consists of a microcomputer to monitor water conditions, a pair of metallic electrodes, and a rheostat controller. Ions are generated by passing a low voltage current through the electrodes; the silver ions kill the bacteria, and the copper ions kill algae. This technology has found broad application because it offers an alternative to chemical disinfectants. It was originally developed to purify water on Apollo spacecraft. Caribbean Clear has been using NASA's silver ionization technology for water purification for more than a decade. Two new products incorporate advancements of the basic technology. One is the AquaKing, a system designed for areas with no source of acceptable drinking water. Another is the Caribbean Clear Controller, designed for commercial pool and water park applications where sanitizing is combined with feedback control of pH and an oxidizer, chlorine or bromine. The technology was originally developed to purify water on Apollo spacecraft.

  20. Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Nitrification: Batch and Biofilm Inactivation Studies, Model Nitrifying Biofilm Investigations, and Evaluation of Operational Responses to Nitrification Episodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies are currently underway to help fill knowledge gaps that exist in the general understanding of nitrification episodes. One of these gaps includes the need for growth and inactivation kinetic parameters for nitrifiers representative of those inhabiting distribution systems ...

  1. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  2. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A monitoring system developed to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water is described. A nonpathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. Detection of the marker virus consists of two major components, concentration and isolation of the marker virus, and detection of the marker virus. The concentration system involves adsorption of virus to cellulose acetate filters in the presence of trivalent cations and low pH with subsequent desorption of the virus using volumes of high pH buffer. The detection of the virus is performed by a passive immune agglutination test utilizing specially prepared polystyrene particles. An engineering preliminary design was performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation are presented. The instrument consists of reagent pump/metering system, reagent storage containers, a filter concentrator, an incubation/detector system, and an electronic readout and control system.

  3. DIstributed VIRtual System (DIVIRS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, Clifford B.

    1995-01-01

    As outlined in our continuation proposal 92-ISI-50R (revised) on NASA cooperative agreement NCC2-539, we are (1) developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to develop and execute parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; (2) developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented in item one; (3) continuing the development of file and information systems based on the Virtual System Model; and (4) incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed in items 1 through 3 to be used on an open network. The goal throughout our work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. We believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. Our work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  4. Distributed Virtual System (DIVIRS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, B. Clifford

    1993-01-01

    As outlined in our continuation proposal 92-ISI-50R (revised) on contract NCC 2-539, we are (1) developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to program parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; (2) developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented in item one; (3) continuing the development of file and information systems based on the virtual system model; and (4) incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed in items 1 through 3 to be used on an open network. The goal throughout our work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. We believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. Our work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  5. DIstributed VIRtual System (DIVIRS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, B. Clifford

    1994-01-01

    As outlined in our continuation proposal 92-ISI-. OR (revised) on NASA cooperative agreement NCC2-539, we are (1) developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to develop and execute parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; (2) developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented in item one; (3) continuing the development of file and information systems based on the Virtual System Model; and (4) incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed in items 1 through 3 to be used on an open network. The goal throughout our work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. We believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. Our work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  6. Distributed Virtual System (DIVIRS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, B. Clifford

    1993-01-01

    As outlined in the continuation proposal 92-ISI-50R (revised) on NASA cooperative agreement NCC 2-539, the investigators are developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to develop and execute parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented; continuing the development of file and information systems based on the Virtual System Model; and incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed to be used on an open network. The goal throughout the work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. The authors believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. The work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  7. Water distribution characteristics of spray nozzles in a cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovic, Pavol

    2015-05-01

    Water distribution characteristics of spray nozzles with spray plates used to distribute cooling water to the cooling fills in a cooling tower is one of the important parameters for the selection of nozzles. Water distribution characteristic describes the distribution of water from the axis of the nozzle along a fill. One of the parameters affecting the water distribution characteristic of the nozzle is airflow velocity of counter flow airstream. Water distribution characteristics are commonly measured using by a set of containers. The problem with this method of the measurement of characteristics is block of the airflow with collections of containers. Therefore, this work is using the visualization method.

  8. Factors Affecting Occurrence and Distribution of Selected Contaminants in Ground Water From Selected Areas in the Piedmont Aquifer System, Eastern United States, 1993-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Falls, William F.; Ferrari, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Tammy M.; Harned, Douglas A.; Sadorf, Eric M.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2006-01-01

    Results of ground-water sampling from 255 wells and 19 springs in 11 studies done by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program within the Piedmont Aquifer System (PAS) were analyzed to determine the factors affecting occurrence and distribution of selected contaminants. The contaminants, which were selected on the basis of potential human-health effects, included nitrate, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and radon. The PAS was subdivided on the basis of the general rock type of the aquifers into three areas for the study-crystalline, carbonate, and siliciclastic. The 11 studies were designed to areally represent an individual aquifer rock type and overall are representative of the PAS in their distribution; 7 studies are in the crystalline-rock aquifers, 3 studies are in the siliciclastic-rock aquifers, and 1 study is in the carbonate-rock aquifers. Four of the studies were focused on land use, 1 in an agricultural area and 3 in urban areas. The remaining studies had wells representing a range of land-use types. Analysis of results of nitrate sampling indicated that in 8 of the 10 areas where nitrate concentrations were measured, median concentrations of nitrate were below 3 mg/L (milligrams per liter); 2 of the 10 areas had statistically significant higher median concentrations when compared to the other 8 areas. The agricultural land-use study in the carbonate-rock aquifer in the Lower Susquehanna River Basin had the highest median nitrate concentration (11 mg/L), and 60 percent of the wells sampled exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 mg/L. The major aquifer study in the crystalline-rock aquifer of the Lower Susquehanna River Basin Study Unit had the second-highest median nitrate concentration. Nitrate concentrations were positively correlated to the percentage of agricultural land use around the well, the total input of nitrogen from all sources

  9. Enhanced distributed energy resource system

    DOEpatents

    Atcitty, Stanley; Clark, Nancy H.; Boyes, John D.; Ranade, Satishkumar J.

    2007-07-03

    A power transmission system including a direct current power source electrically connected to a conversion device for converting direct current into alternating current, a conversion device connected to a power distribution system through a junction, an energy storage device capable of producing direct current connected to a converter, where the converter, such as an insulated gate bipolar transistor, converts direct current from an energy storage device into alternating current and supplies the current to the junction and subsequently to the power distribution system. A microprocessor controller, connected to a sampling and feedback module and the converter, determines when the current load is higher than a set threshold value, requiring triggering of the converter to supply supplemental current to the power transmission system.

  10. Distributed Supervisory Protection Interlock System

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, H.V.; Agostini, R.C.; Barker, L.; Cherkassky, R.; Constant, T.; Matheson, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Distributed Supervisory Protection Interlock System, DSPI, is under development at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for requirements in the areas of personnel protection, beam containment and equipment protection interlocks. The DSPI system, distributed over the application site, consists of segments with microprocessor-based controller and I/O modules, local area networks for communication, and a global supervisor computer. Segments are implemented with commercially available controller and I/O modules arranged in local interlock clusters, and associated software. Segments provide local interlock data acquisition, processing and control. Local area networks provide the communication backbone between segments and a global supervisor processor. The supervisor processor monitors the overall system, reports detail status and provides human interfaces. Details of an R and D test system, which will implement the requirements for personnel protection of 4 typical linear accelerator sectors, will be described. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. BENEFITS OF MAINTAINING A CHLORINE RESIDUAL IN WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protection afforded the water consumer by the maintenance of a chlorine residual in water distribution systems was evaluated in laboratory holding tanks and reservoirs and existing municipal water distribution systems. In the laboratory studies, tap water, adjusted to the app...

  12. Properly Understanding the Impacts of Distributed Resources on Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Li, Huijuan; Adhikari, Sarina; Kueck, John D

    2010-01-01

    The subject paper discusses important impacts of distributed resources on distribution networks and feeders. These include capacity, line losses, voltage regulation, and central system support (such as volt/var via central generators and substation) as the number, placement and penetration levels of distributed resources are varied. Typically, the impacts of distributed resources on the distribution system are studied by using steady-state rather than dynamic analysis tools. However, the response time and transient impacts of both system equipment (such as substation/feeder capacitors) and distributed resources needs to be taken into account and only dynamic analysis will provide the full impact results. ORNL is wrapping up a study of distributed resources interconnected to a large distribution system considering the above variables. A report of the study and its results will be condensed into a paper for this panel session. The impact of distributed resources will vary as the penetration level reaches the capacity of the distribution feeder/system. The question is how high of a penetration of distributed resource can be accommodated on the distribution feeder/system without any major changes to system operation, design and protection. The impacts most surely will vary depending upon load composition, distribution and level. Also, it is expected that various placement of distributed resources will impact the distribution system differently.

  13. The ATLAS distributed analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legger, F.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In the LHC operations era, analysis of the multi-petabyte ATLAS data sample by globally distributed physicists is a challenging task. To attain the required scale the ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of Grid computing, realized in the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), the largest distributed computational resource existing in the sciences. The ATLAS experiment currently stores over 140 PB of data and runs about 140,000 concurrent jobs continuously at WLCG sites. During the first run of the LHC, the ATLAS Distributed Analysis (DA) service has operated stably and scaled as planned. More than 1600 users submitted jobs in 2012, with 2 million or more analysis jobs per week, peaking at about a million jobs per day. The system dynamically distributes popular data to expedite processing and maximally utilize resources. The reliability of the DA service is high and steadily improving; Grid sites are continually validated against a set of standard tests, and a dedicated team of expert shifters provides user support and communicates user problems to the sites. Both the user support techniques and the direct feedback of users have been effective in improving the success rate and user experience when utilizing the distributed computing environment. In this contribution a description of the main components, activities and achievements of ATLAS distributed analysis is given. Several future improvements being undertaken will be described.

  14. Water resource systems group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stedinger, Jery R.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    The 11th meeting of the Water Resource Systems Group was held at the University of Washington (Seattle), August 7-8, 1987. These systems group meetings, which are informal gatherings of professionals who have an interest in the educational and research aspects of water resources systems analysis, have usually been held on university campuses. The 30 attendees of the 1987 meeting represented a cross section of university faculty and graduate students, government managers and researchers, and engineering consultants.The meeting opened with short discussions by Steve Burges (University of Washington), Chuck Howard (CDD Howard and Associates, Victoria, Canada), David Dawdy (consultant, San Francisco, Calif.), and Jon Liebman (University of Illinois, Urbana) outlining their views of current issues in the water resources area. Burges emphasized the limitations and inadequacies of many of the models currently used in hydrology: rainfall runoff models may not adequately capture the physical characteristics of the movement of water into channels, vadose and saturated zone pollutant transport models are incapable of reproducing many of the features observed in the field, and many streamflow forecasting models used for reservoir operations have been constructed to reproduce average conditions but break down under the extreme conditions (floods and droughts) where they are most needed.

  15. Distributed optimization system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hurtado, John E.; Dohrmann, Clark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2003-06-10

    A search system and method for controlling multiple agents to optimize an objective using distributed sensing and cooperative control. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace. The objective can be: chemical sources, temperature sources, radiation sources, light sources, evaders, trespassers, explosive sources, time dependent sources, time independent sources, function surfaces, maximization points, minimization points, and optimal control of a system such as a communication system, an economy, a crane, and a multi-processor computer.

  16. World-wide distribution automation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Devaney, T.M.

    1994-12-31

    A worldwide power distribution automation system is outlined. Distribution automation is defined and the status of utility automation is discussed. Other topics discussed include a distribution management system, substation feeder, and customer functions, potential benefits, automation costs, planning and engineering considerations, automation trends, databases, system operation, computer modeling of system, and distribution management systems.

  17. Water distributions in PS-b-P(S-g-PEO) block grafted copolymer system in aqueous solutions revealed by contrast variation SANS study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Hong, Kunlun; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily; Liu, Yun; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Gregory Scott

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we present a contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of PS-b-P(S-g-PEO) block graft copolymers in aqueous media at a concentration of 10 mg/ml. Through varying the solvent D2O/H2O ratio, the scattering contributions from the water molecules and the micellar constituent components can be determined. Based on the commonly used core-shell model, a theoretical coherent scattering cross section incorporating the effect of water penetration is developed and used to analyze the SANS I(Q), we have successfully quantified the micellar structure and the number of - water molecules associated with the core and corona. We have found that the overall micellar hydration level increase with the increase in the molecular weight of hydrophilic PEO side chains. This study provides key information in understanding solvent distributions within self-assembled amphiphilic block grafted copolymers.

  18. Oceanic Satellite Data Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Satellite Data Distribution System (SDDS) serves to process satellite-derived ocean observations, generate ocean analysis and forecast products, and distribute the products to a limited set of commercial users. The SDDS functions in series with the U.S. Navy Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center (FNOC) to provide products on a near-real-time basis to commercial marine industries. Conventional meteorological and oceanographic observations provided to FNOC serve as the input set to the numerical analysis and forecast models. Large main-frame computers are used to analyze and forecast products on a routine, operational basis (at 6-hour and 12-hour synoptic times). The products, reformatted to meet commercial users needs, are transferred to a NASA-owned computer for storage and distribution. Access to the information is possible either by a commercial dial-up packet-switching network or by a direct computer-computer connection.

  19. CEBAF Distributed Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Thomas Powers

    2005-05-01

    There are thousands of signals distributed throughout Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) that are useful for troubleshooting and identifying instabilities. Many of these signals are only available locally or monitored by systems with small bandwidths that cannot identify fast transients. The Distributed Data Acquisition (Dist DAQ) system will sample and record these signals simultaneously at rates up to 40 Msps. Its primary function will be to provide waveform records from signals throughout CEBAF to the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). The waveforms will be collected after the occurrence of an event trigger. These triggers will be derived from signals such as periodic timers or accelerator faults. The waveform data can then be processed to quickly identify beam transport issues, thus reducing down time and increasing CEBAF performance. The Dist DAQ system will be comprised of multiple standalone chassis distributed throughout CEBAF. They will be interconnected via a fiber optic network to facilitate the global triggering of events. All of the chassis will also be connected directly to the CEBAF Ethernet and run EPICS locally. This allows for more flexibility than the typical configuration of a single board computer and other custom printed circuit boards (PCB) installed in a card cage.

  20. Remote water monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Haynes, D. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A remote water monitoring system is described that integrates the functions of sampling, sample preservation, sample analysis, data transmission and remote operation. The system employs a floating buoy carrying an antenna connected by lines to one or more sampling units containing several sample chambers. Receipt of a command signal actuates a solenoid to open an intake valve outward from the sampling unit and communicates the water sample to an identifiable sample chamber. Such response to each signal receipt is repeated until all sample chambers are filled in a sample unit. Each sample taken is analyzed by an electrochemical sensor for a specific property and the data obtained is transmitted to a remote sending and receiving station. Thereafter, the samples remain isolated in the sample chambers until the sampling unit is recovered and the samples removed for further laboratory analysis.

  1. Characteristics of the deep ocean carbon system during the past 150,000 years: ΣCO2 distributions, deep water flow patterns, and abrupt climate change

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Edward A.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of carbon isotopes and cadmium in bottom-dwelling foraminifera from ocean sediment cores have advanced our knowledge of ocean chemical distributions during the late Pleistocene. Last Glacial Maximum data are consistent with a persistent high-ΣCO2 state for eastern Pacific deep water. Both tracers indicate that the mid-depth North and tropical Atlantic Ocean almost always has lower ΣCO2 levels than those in the Pacific. Upper waters of the Last Glacial Maximum Atlantic are more ΣCO2-depleted and deep waters are ΣCO2-enriched compared with the waters of the present. In the northern Indian Ocean, δ13C and Cd data are consistent with upper water ΣCO2 depletion relative to the present. There is no evident proximate source of this ΣCO2-depleted water, so I suggest that ΣCO2-depleted North Atlantic intermediate/deep water turns northward around the southern tip of Africa and moves toward the equator as a western boundary current. At long periods (>15,000 years), Milankovitch cycle variability is evident in paleochemical time series. But rapid millennial-scale variability can be seen in cores from high accumulation rate series. Atlantic deep water chemical properties are seen to change in as little as a few hundred years or less. An extraordinary new 52.7-m-long core from the Bermuda Rise contains a faithful record of climate variability with century-scale resolution. Sediment composition can be linked in detail with the isotope stage 3 interstadials recorded in Greenland ice cores. This new record shows at least 12 major climate fluctuations within marine isotope stage 5 (about 70,000–130,000 years before the present). PMID:11607737

  2. Water-Pressure Distribution on Seaplane Float

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, F L

    1929-01-01

    The investigation presented in this report was conducted for the purpose of determining the distribution and magnitude of water pressures likely to be experienced on seaplane hulls in service. It consisted of the development and construction of apparatus for recording water pressures lasting one one-hundredth second or longer and of flight tests to determine the water pressures on a UO-1 seaplane float under various conditions of taxiing, taking off, and landing. The apparatus developed was found to operate with satisfactory accuracy and is suitable for flight tests on other seaplanes. The tests on the UO-1 showed that maximum pressures of about 6.5 pounds per square inch occur at the step for the full width of the float bottom. Proceeding forward from the step the maximum pressures decrease in magnitude uniformly toward the bow, and the region of highest pressures narrows toward the keel. Immediately abaft the step the maximum pressures are very small, but increase in magnitude toward the stern and there once reached a value of about 5 pounds per square inch. (author)

  3. Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Brenda; Lamb, Rynn

    2015-01-01

    When emergencies occur, first responders and disaster response teams often need rapid access to aerial photography and satellite imagery that is acquired before and after the event. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) provides quick and easy access to pre- and post-event imagery and geospatial datasets that support emergency response and recovery operations. The HDDS provides a single, consolidated point-of-entry and distribution system for USGS-hosted remotely sensed imagery and other geospatial datasets related to an event response. The data delivery services are provided through an interactive map-based interface that allows emergency response personnel to rapidly select and download pre-event ("baseline") and post-event emergency response imagery.

  4. The data distribution satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Ronald C.; Weinberg, Aaron

    1991-01-01

    The Data Distributed Satellite (DDS) will be capable of providing the space research community with inexpensive and easy access to space payloads and space data. Furthermore, the DDS is shown to be a natural outgrowth of advances and evolution in both NASA's Space Network and commercial satellite communications. The roadmap and timescale for this evolution is described along with key demonstrations, proof-of-concept models, and required technology development that will support the projected system evolution toward the DDS.

  5. Using self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces to calculate size distributions of neutral and charged clusters for the sulfuric acid-water binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.; Froyd, K. D.; Toon, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    We construct tables of reaction enthalpies and entropies for the association reactions involving sulfuric acid vapor, water vapor, and the bisulfate ion. These tables are created from experimental measurements and quantum chemical calculations for molecular clusters and a classical thermodynamic model for larger clusters. These initial tables are not thermodynamically consistent. For example, the Gibbs free energy of associating a cluster consisting of one acid molecule and two water molecules depends on the order in which the cluster was assembled: add two waters and then the acid or add an acid and a water and then the second water. We adjust the values within the tables using the method of Lagrange multipliers to minimize the adjustments and produce self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces for the neutral clusters and the charged clusters. With the self-consistent Gibbs free energy surfaces, we calculate size distributions of neutral and charged clusters for a variety of atmospheric conditions. Depending on the conditions, nucleation can be dominated by growth along the neutral channel or growth along the ion channel followed by ion-ion recombination.

  6. Physiochemical Characterization of Five Iron Tubercles from a Single Drinking Water Distribution System: Possible New Insights on Their Formation and Growth

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiochemical data on five iron tubercles from a single Distribution System (DS) are divided into two groups based on internal morphology and the predominate core iron mineral phases, α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, or Fe3O4, yet all three coexist in each tubercle. Cond...

  7. Effect of Revised Nebular Water Distribution on Nebular Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, K. E.; Sears, W. D.; Sharp, C.; Lunine, J. I.

    1997-07-01

    The distribution of water in the solar nebula is important both because water is extremely abundant and because it condenses out at 5 AU, allowing ice and vapor to affect the chemistry of the nebula and forming solar system bodies. In one previous examination of the distribution of nebular water, (Stevenson, D. J. and Lunine, J. I. 1988, Icarus 75, 146), vapor is transported across the condensation front by eddy diffusion and rapidly condenses out as ice. The ice is assumed to suffer little effect from gas drag or other transport processes and so remains in the condensation zone. The model predicts that the inner 5 AU of the nebula becomes severely depleted in water vapor in as little as 10(5) yr. However, in recent work (Cyr, K. E. et al. 1997, Icarus submitted) we found that gas drag effects in Stevenson and Lunine (1988) had been underestimated and that ice particles could drift back inward of 5 AU significant distances and sublimate, re-injecting the nebula with water vapor. Our expanded water transport model which incorporated both diffusion and drift processes still predicts an overall depletion in water vapor, but with a zone of local vapor enhancement on the order of 20-100% from 1-2 AU, which gradually drops off out to 5 AU. Thus, unlike Steveson and Lunine, we find a radial dependence to the water vapor depletion pattern and thus to the reducing nature and C/O ratio in the inner nebula. We will consider the overall effect of the radial dependence of water depletion on nebular chemistry, using a chemical equilibrium code that computes abundances of nebular elements and major molecular C, N, S species. In particular, we will examine changes in local [CO]/[CH4] and [N2]/[NH3] ratios due to the radially dependent decrease in oxygen fugacity, and the implications for forming solar system bodies.

  8. EQUITY EVALUATION OF PADDY IRRIGATION WATER DISTRIBUTION BY SOCIETY-JUSTICE-WATER DISTRIBUTION RULE HYPOTHESIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanji, Hajime; Kiri, Hirohide; Kobayashi, Shintaro

    When total supply is smaller than total demand, it is difficult to apply the paddy irrigation water distribution rule. The gap must be narrowed by decreasing demand. Historically, the upstream served rule, rotation schedule, or central schedule weight to irrigated area was adopted. This paper proposes the hypothesis that these rules are dependent on social justice, a hypothesis called the "Society-Justice-Water Distribution Rule Hypothesis". Justice, which means a balance of efficiency and equity of distribution, is discussed under the political philosophy of utilitarianism, liberalism (Rawls), libertarianism, and communitarianism. The upstream served rule can be derived from libertarianism. The rotation schedule and central schedule can be derived from communitarianism. Liberalism can provide arranged schedule to adjust supply and demand based on "the Difference Principle". The authors conclude that to achieve efficiency and equity, liberalism may provide the best solution after modernization.

  9. Modeling human-water-systems: towards a comprehensive and spatially distributed assessment of co-evolutions for river basins in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahe, Peter; Nilson, Enno; Knoche, Malte; Ebner von Eschenbach, Anna-Dorothea

    2016-05-01

    In the context of river basin and flood risk management there is a growing need to improve the understanding of and the feedbacks between the driving forces "climate and socio-economy" and water systems. We make use of a variety of data resources to illustrate interrelationships between different constituents of the human-water-systems. Taking water storage for energy production as an example we present a first analysis on the co-evolution of socio-economic and hydrological indicators. The findings will serve as for the development of conceptual, but fully coupled socio-hydrological models for selected sectors and regions. These models will be used to generate integrated scenarios of the climate and socio-economic change.

  10. Small Aircraft Data Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazanoff, Seth L.; Dinardo, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    The CARVE Small Aircraft Data Distribution System acquires the aircraft location and attitude data that is required by the various programs running on a distributed network. This system distributes the data it acquires to the data acquisition programs for inclusion in their data files. It uses UDP (User Datagram Protocol) to broadcast data over a LAN (Local Area Network) to any programs that might have a use for the data. The program is easily adaptable to acquire additional data and log that data to disk. The current version also drives displays using precision pitch and roll information to aid the pilot in maintaining a level-level attitude for radar/radiometer mapping beyond the degree available by flying visually or using a standard gyro-driven attitude indicator. The software is designed to acquire an array of data to help the mission manager make real-time decisions as to the effectiveness of the flight. This data is displayed for the mission manager and broadcast to the other experiments on the aircraft for inclusion in their data files. The program also drives real-time precision pitch and roll displays for the pilot and copilot to aid them in maintaining the desired attitude, when required, during data acquisition on mapping lines.

  11. Distributed antenna system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    System and methods are disclosed for employing one or more radiators having non-unique phase centers mounted to a body with respect to a plurality of transmitters to determine location characteristics of the body such as the position and/or attitude of the body. The one or more radiators may consist of a single, continuous element or of two or more discrete radiation elements whose received signals are combined. In a preferred embodiment, the location characteristics are determined using carrier phase measurements whereby phase center information may be determined or estimated. A distributed antenna having a wide angle view may be mounted to a moveable body in accord with the present invention. The distributed antenna may be utilized for maintaining signal contact with multiple spaced apart transmitters, such as a GPS constellation, as the body rotates without the need for RF switches to thereby provide continuous attitude and position determination of the body.

  12. Smart Water: Energy-Water Optimization in Drinking Water Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project aims to develop and commercialize a Smart Water Platform – Sensor-based Data-driven Energy-Water Optimization technology in drinking water systems. The key technological advances rely on cross-platform data acquisition and management system, model-based real-time sys...

  13. Groundwater-fed irrigation impacts spatially distributed temporal scaling behavior of the natural system: a spatio-temporal framework for understanding water management impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, Laura E.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-03-01

    Regional scale water management analysis increasingly relies on integrated modeling tools. Much recent work has focused on groundwater-surface water interactions and feedbacks. However, to our knowledge, no study has explicitly considered impacts of management operations on the temporal dynamics of the natural system. Here, we simulate twenty years of hourly moisture dependent, groundwater-fed irrigation using a three-dimensional, fully integrated, hydrologic model (ParFlow-CLM). Results highlight interconnections between irrigation demand, groundwater oscillation frequency and latent heat flux variability not previously demonstrated. Additionally, the three-dimensional model used allows for novel consideration of spatial patterns in temporal dynamics. Latent heat flux and water table depth both display spatial organization in temporal scaling, an important finding given the spatial homogeneity and weak scaling observed in atmospheric forcings. Pumping and irrigation amplify high frequency (sub-annual) variability while attenuating low frequency (inter-annual) variability. Irrigation also intensifies scaling within irrigated areas, essentially increasing temporal memory in both the surface and the subsurface. These findings demonstrate management impacts that extend beyond traditional water balance considerations to the fundamental behavior of the system itself. This is an important step to better understanding groundwater’s role as a buffer for natural variability and the impact that water management has on this capacity.

  14. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHANGES IN SOURCE WATER TREATMENT: REFLECTIONS IN DISTRIBUTION WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial quality in the distribution system is a reflection of raw source water characteristics, treatment process configurations and their modifications. ased on case history experiences there may at times be a microbial breakthrough that is caused by fluctuations in raw surfac...

  15. Television Distribution System for Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Australia Education Dept., Adelaide.

    This report covers a 12-month study and actual trial of a video distribution system for a primary school. It consisted of a main aerial distribution into a distribution junction box which also took video cassette recorders. The whole system was designed to distribute both in RF and video frequencies. Some ways of using the system have also been…

  16. 21 CFR 1250.82 - Potable water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potable water systems. 1250.82 Section 1250.82... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.82 Potable water systems. The following conditions must be met by vessel water systems used for the storage and distribution of water which has...

  17. 21 CFR 1250.82 - Potable water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potable water systems. 1250.82 Section 1250.82... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.82 Potable water systems. The following conditions must be met by vessel water systems used for the storage and distribution of water which has...

  18. 21 CFR 1250.82 - Potable water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potable water systems. 1250.82 Section 1250.82... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.82 Potable water systems. The following conditions must be met by vessel water systems used for the storage and distribution of water which has...

  19. 21 CFR 1250.82 - Potable water systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potable water systems. 1250.82 Section 1250.82... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.82 Potable water systems. The following conditions must be met by vessel water systems used for the storage and distribution of water which has...

  20. Video distribution system cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershkoff, I.; Haspert, J. K.; Morgenstern, B.

    1980-01-01

    A cost model that can be used to systematically identify the costs of procuring and operating satellite linked communications systems is described. The user defines a network configuration by specifying the location of each participating site, the interconnection requirements, and the transmission paths available for the uplink (studio to satellite), downlink (satellite to audience), and voice talkback (between audience and studio) segments of the network. The model uses this information to calculate the least expensive signal distribution path for each participating site. Cost estimates are broken downy by capital, installation, lease, operations and maintenance. The design of the model permits flexibility in specifying network and cost structure.

  1. Duplex Direct Data Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenfield, Israel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing and demonstrating communications and network technologies that are helping to enable the near-Earth space Internet. GRC envisions several service categories. The first of these categories is direct data distribution or D3 (pronounced "D-cubed"). Commercially provided D3 will make it possible to download a data set from a spacecraft, like the International Space Station. as easily as one can extract a file from a remote server today, using a file transfer protocol. In a second category, NASA spacecraft will make use of commercial satellite communication (SATCOM) systems. Some of those services will come from purchasing time on unused transponders that cover landmasses. While it is likely there will be gaps in service coverage, Internet services should be available using these systems. This report addresses alternative methods of implementing a full duplex enhancement of the GRC developed experimental Ka-Band Direct Data Distribution (D3) space-to-ground communication link. The resulting duplex version is called the Duplex Direct Data Distribution (D4) system. The D4 system is intended to provide high-data-rate commercial direct or internet-based communications service between the NASA spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO) and the respective principal investigators associated with these spacecraft. Candidate commercial services were assessed regarding their near-term potential to meet NASA requirements. Candidates included Ka-band and V-band geostationary orbit and non-geostationary orbit satellite relay services and direct downlink ("LEO teleport") services. End-to-end systems concepts were examined and characterized in terms of alternative link layer architectures. Alternatives included a Direct Link, a Relay Link, a Hybrid Link, and a Dual Mode Link. The direct link assessment examined sample ground terminal placements and antenna angle issues. The SATCOM-based alternatives examined existing or proposed commercial

  2. Job Measurement Standards and Workload Planning in Distribution System Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Water Works Association Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This report describes methods and benefits of applying standard work measurement and planning techniques to water distribution system work. The three sections of the report discuss: a general work standards survey; application; and consideration of benefits. (CS)

  3. Distribution System Voltage Regulation by Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ceylan, Oguzhan; Liu, Guodong; Xu, Yan; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a control method to regulate voltages in 3 phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems. A constrained optimization problem to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output is solved by harmony search algorithm. IEEE 13 Bus Distribution Test System was modified to test three different cases: a) only voltage regulator controlled system b) only DER controlled system and c) both voltage regulator and DER controlled system. The simulation results show that systems with both voltage regulators and DER control provide better voltage profile.

  4. Water distribution in traditionally irrigated valleys under different scenarios of water availability in Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, J. J.; Fernald, A.; Gutierrez, K. Y.; Ochoa, C. G.; Guldan, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Population growth and water scarcity are factors that increase pressures on water resources of the semiarid southwestern United States. In these areas, groundwater recharge and delayed return flow to rivers are hydrological benefits of traditional irrigation systems. A broad spatial-temporal analysis of the dynamics of surface water and groundwater interactions is necessary to improve water planning and management. Our study at three northern New Mexico agricultural valleys with low to high water availability was carried out to characterize surface water and groundwater interactions and to quantify different water budget components. The study sites were instrumented to collect weather data, water flows from rivers and acequias, shallow groundwater level fluctuations, soil physical properties and irrigation and crop management on irrigated lands. From one crop field of our study sites, results showed up to 38 cm of water level response after the beginning of an irrigation event. Other results in our study sites, showed water level response up to 80 cm after canal flow started and ditch seepage of 12% of the total valley surface water flow. Preliminary field scale results from our three study sites showed that deep percolation from irrigation is the major component of the total water budget with 43, 46 and 52% from low, medium and high water availability sites respectively. This farm scale study revealed that, water availability drives the amount of applied water and the irrigation schedule on the farms that in turn drive deep percolation and shallow aquifer recharge. It appears that traditional irrigation is an important source of groundwater recharge in our study valleys. From the ongoing study, we expect to get detailed information about the water distribution over larger spatial scales using field measurements and geographic information systems-based land use classification.

  5. Depositional characteristics and spatial distribution of deep-water sedimentary systems on the northwestern middle-lower slope of the Northwest Sub-Basin, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Xie, Xinong; Van Rooij, David; Vandorpe, Thomas; Huang, Li; Guo, Laiyuan; Su, Ming

    2013-12-01

    Based upon 2D seismic data, this study confirms the presence of a complex deep-water sedimentary system within the Pliocene-Quaternary strata on the northwestern lower slope of the Northwest Sub-Basin, South China Sea. It consists of submarine canyons, mass-wasting deposits, contourite channels and sheeted drifts. Alongslope aligned erosive features are observed on the eastern upper gentle slopes (<1.2° above 1,500 m), where a V-shaped downslope canyon presents an apparent ENE migration, indicating a related bottom current within the eastward South China Sea Intermediate Water Circulation. Contourite sheeted drifts are also generated on the eastern gentle slopes (~1.5° in average), below 2,100 m water depth though, referring to a wide unfocused bottom current, which might be related to the South China Sea Deep Water Circulation. Mass wasting deposits (predominantly slides and slumps) and submarine canyons developed on steeper slopes (>2°), where weaker alongslope currents are probably dominated by downslope depositional processes on these unstable slopes. The NNW-SSE oriented slope morphology changes from a three-stepped terraced outline (I-II-III) east of the investigated area, into a two-stepped terraced (I-II) outline in the middle, and into a unitary steep slope (II) in the west, which is consistent with the slope steepening towards the west. Such morphological changes may have possibly led to a westward simplification of composite deep-water sedimentary systems, from a depositional complex of contourite depositional systems, mass-wasting deposits and canyons, on the one hand, to only sliding and canyon deposits on the other hand.

  6. Napa Earthquake impact on water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    South Napa earthquake occurred in Napa, California on August 24 at 3am, local time, and the magnitude is 6.0. The earthquake was the largest in SF Bay Area since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Economic loss topped $ 1 billion. Wine makers cleaning up and estimated the damage on tourism. Around 15,000 cases of lovely cabernet were pouring into the garden at the Hess Collection. Earthquake potentially raise water pollution risks, could cause water crisis. CA suffered water shortage recent years, and it could be helpful on how to prevent underground/surface water pollution from earthquake. This research gives a clear view on drinking water system in CA, pollution on river systems, as well as estimation on earthquake impact on water supply. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River delta (close to Napa), is the center of the state's water distribution system, delivering fresh water to more than 25 million residents and 3 million acres of farmland. Delta water conveyed through a network of levees is crucial to Southern California. The drought has significantly curtailed water export, and salt water intrusion reduced fresh water outflows. Strong shaking from a nearby earthquake can cause saturated, loose, sandy soils liquefaction, and could potentially damage major delta levee systems near Napa. Napa earthquake is a wake-up call for Southern California. It could potentially damage freshwater supply system.

  7. User Registration Systems for Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. J.; Cechini, M.; Pilone, D.; Mitchell, A.

    2010-12-01

    As NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) systems have evolved over the years, most of the EOSDIS data are now available to users via anonymous on-line access. Although the changes have improved the dissemination efficiency of earth science data, the anonymous access has made it difficult to characterize users, capture metrics on the value of EOSDIS and provide customized services that benefit users. As the number of web-based applications continues to grow, data centers and application providers have implemented their own user registration systems and provided new tools and interfaces for their registered users. This has led to the creation of independent registration systems for accessing data and interacting with online tools and services. The user profile information maintained at each of these registration systems is not consistent and the registration enforcement varies by system as well. This problem is in no way unique to EOSDIS and represents a general challenge to the distributed computing community. In a study done in 2007(http://www2007.org/papers/paper620.pd), the average user has approximately 7 passwords for about 25 accounts and enters a password 8 times a day. These numbers have only increased in the last three years. To try and address this, a number of solutions have been offered including Single Sign-On solutions using a common backend like Microsoft Active Directory or an LDAP server, trust based identity providers like OpenID, and various forms of authorization delegation like OAuth or SAML/XACML. This talk discusses the differences between authentication and authorization, the state of the more popular user registration solutions available for distributed use, and some of the technical and policy drivers that need to be considered when incorporating a user registration system into your application.

  8. Monitoring the DIRAC distributed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santinelli, R.; Seco, M.; Nandakumar, R.; LHCb DIRAC Team

    2010-04-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, is intended to reliably run large data mining activities. The DIRAC system consists of various services (which wait to be contacted to perform actions) and agents (which carry out periodic activities) to direct jobs as required. An important part of ensuring the reliability of the infrastructure is the monitoring and logging of these DIRAC distributed systems. The monitoring is done collecting information from two sources - one is from pinging the services or by keeping track of the regular heartbeats of the agents, and the other from the analysis of the error messages generated both by agents and services and collected by a logging system. This allows us to ensure that the components are running properly and to collect useful information regarding their operations. The process status monitoring is displayed using the SLS sensor mechanism that also automatically allows to plot various quantities and keep a history of the system. A dedicated GridMap interface (ServiceMap) allows production shifters and experts to have an immediate, high-impact view of all LHCb critical services status while offering the possibility to refer to details of the SLS and SAM sensors. Error types and statistics provided by the logging service can be accessed via dedicated web interfaces on the DIRAC portal or programmatically via the python based API and CLI.

  9. High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars.

    PubMed

    Bandfield, Joshua L

    2007-05-01

    Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of <1-2 m) of Mars at high latitudes. These models have been mainly supported by the observed presence of large concentrations of hydrogen detected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite of instruments on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The models and measurements are consistent with a water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has predicted that the depth at which water ice is stable can be highly variable, owing to local surface heterogeneities such as rocks and slopes, and the thermal inertia of the ground cover. Measurements have, however, been limited to the footprint (several hundred kilometres) of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer suite, preventing the observations from documenting more detailed water-ice distributions. Here I show that by observing the seasonal temperature response of the martian surface with the Thermal Emission Imaging System on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, it is possible to observe such heterogeneities at subkilometre scale. These observations show significant regional and local water-ice depth variability, and, in some cases, support distributions in the subsurface predicted by atmospheric exchange and vapour diffusion models. The presence of water ice where it follows the depth of stability under current climatic conditions implies an active martian water cycle that responds to orbit-driven climate cycles. Several regions also have apparent deviations from the theoretical stability level, indicating that additional factors influence the ice-table depth. The high-resolution measurements show that the depth to the water-ice table is highly variable within the potential Phoenix spacecraft landing ellipses, and is likely to be variable at scales that may be sampled by the spacecraft. PMID:17476262

  10. Water Purification, Distribution and Sewage Disposal. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    This document, designed to serve as a training manual for technical instructors and as a field resource reference for Peace Corps volunteers, consists of nine units. Unit topics focus on: (1) water supply sources; (2) water treatment; (3) planning water distribution systems; (4) characteristics of an adequate system; (5) construction techniques;…

  11. MEASURING & MODELING VARIATIONS IN DISTRIBUTION WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently most interest in drinking water quality has been in the finished water as it leaves the treatment plant. he Safe Drinking Water requires that MCLs be met at the consumers tap. ecause finished water may undergo substantial changes while being transported through the...

  12. Building a generalized distributed system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    A number of topics related to building a generalized distributed system model are discussed. The effects of distributed database modeling on evaluation of transaction rollbacks, the measurement of effects of distributed database models on transaction availability measures, and a performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems are covered.

  13. The Planetary Data System Distributed Inventory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; McMahon, Susan K.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of the World Wide Web (Web) and the ability to easily put data repositories on-line has resulted in a proliferation of digital libraries. The heterogeneity of the underlying systems, the autonomy of the individual sites, and distributed nature of the technology has made both interoperability across the sites and the search for resources within a site major research topics. This article will describe a system that addresses both issues using standard Web protocols and meta-data labels to implement an inventory of on-line resources across a group of sites. The success of this system is strongly dependent on the existence of and adherence to a standards architecture that guides the management of meta-data within participating sites.

  14. The distribution of water frost on Charon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Shriver, Scott K.

    1994-01-01

    We present high-spatial-resolution imaging observations of the Pluto-Charon system taken with ProtoCAM on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Our dataset consists of measurements from eight nights at widely separated rotational longitudes and covering five wavelengths -- standard J, H, and K, plus two special narrow band filters at 1.5 and 1.75 microns. The relative flux contributions of Pluto and Charon were extracted, when possible, by fitting a two-source Gaussian image model to the observed images. At K, we find the Charon-Pluto magnitude difference to be on average 1.8 mag, somewhat less than the value of 2.2 mag found by Bosh et al. (1992). The average differential magnitude at 1.5 and 1.75 microns is 2.0 and 1.6, respectively. The larger magnitude difference at 1.5 microns is due to a water-frost absorption band on the surface of Charon. Our observations are consistent with a surface of Charon dominated by water frost at all longitudes.

  15. Tying California's Water System Together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M. S.; Singh, K.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents updates to a relatively integrated hydro-economic model of California's water supply system (CALVIN), showing how future sustainable groundwater management and climate change are likely to affect the operation of California's statewide water supply system, and particularly the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. California's water system connects most parts of the state, so that water policy changes in one part of the state can affect water management and deliveries in distant parts of California. This provides a high level of robustness in this system, and geographically disperses the impacts of local actions.

  16. A distributed program composition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    A graphical technique for creating distributed computer programs is investigated and a prototype implementation is described which serves as a testbed for the concepts. The type of programs under examination is restricted to those comprising relatively heavyweight parts that intercommunicate by passing messages of typed objects. Such programs are often presented visually as a directed graph with computer program parts as the nodes and communication channels as the edges. This class of programs, called parts-based programs, is not well supported by existing computer systems; much manual work is required to describe the program to the system, establish the communication paths, accommodate the heterogeneity of data types, and to locate the parts of the program on the various systems involved. The work described solves most of these problems by providing an interface for describing parts-based programs in this class in a way that closely models the way programmers think about them: using sketches of diagraphs. Program parts, the computational modes of the larger program system are categorized in libraries and are accessed with browsers. The process of programming has the programmer draw the program graph interactively. Heterogeneity is automatically accommodated by the insertion of type translators where necessary between the parts. Many decisions are necessary in the creation of a comprehensive tool for interactive creation of programs in this class. Possibilities are explored and the issues behind such decisions are presented. An approach to program composition is described, not a carefully implemented programming environment. However, a prototype implementation is described that can demonstrate the ideas presented.

  17. Interoperability of heterogeneous distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaschke, C.; Essendorfer, B.; Kerth, C.

    2016-05-01

    To achieve knowledge superiority in today's operations interoperability is the key. Budget restrictions as well as the complexity and multiplicity of threats combined with the fact that not single nations but whole areas are subject to attacks force nations to collaborate and share information as appropriate. Multiple data and information sources produce different kinds of data, real time and non-real time, in different formats that are disseminated to the respective command and control level for further distribution. The data is most of the time highly sensitive and restricted in terms of sharing. The question is how to make this data available to the right people at the right time with the right granularity. The Coalition Shared Data concept aims to provide a solution to these questions. It has been developed within several multinational projects and evolved over time. A continuous improvement process was established and resulted in the adaptation of the architecture as well as the technical solution and the processes it supports. Coming from the idea of making use of existing standards and basing the concept on sharing of data through standardized interfaces and formats and enabling metadata based query the concept merged with a more sophisticated service based approach. The paper addresses concepts for information sharing to facilitate interoperability between heterogeneous distributed systems. It introduces the methods that were used and the challenges that had to be overcome. Furthermore, the paper gives a perspective how the concept could be used in the future and what measures have to be taken to successfully bring it into operations.

  18. Automated Water-Purification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, Harlow G.; Hames, Peter S.; Menninger, Fredrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Reverse-osmosis system operates and maintains itself with minimal human attention, using programmable controller. In purifier, membranes surround hollow cores through which clean product water flows out of reverse-osmosis unit. No chemical reactions or phase changes involved. Reject water, in which dissolved solids concentrated, emerges from outer membrane material on same side water entered. Flow controls maintain ratio of 50 percent product water and 50 percent reject water. Membranes expected to last from 3 to 15 years.

  19. Protection of Active Distribution Systems with DGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akila, Abdelrahman Ahmed; Helal, Ahmed; Eldesouki, Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Distribution systems are traditionally designed as radial passive systems fed from a single source. Protection coordination of such systems has been easily established assuming the system radiality. Insertion of distributed generators (DGs) into distribution systems makes the distribution system to be more active which causes redistribution of fault currents magnitudes and directions. This causes negative impacts on the original protection system coordination, since the distribution system losses its radiality and passiveness. Recently protection coordination in the presence of distributed generation has been paid a great attention. Researchers proposed various solutions to solve the protection coordination problem caused by adding DG into the distribution network. In this paper, the proposed solutions for the protection coordination problem considering the DG insertion will be illustrated, classified, and criticized.

  20. MICROBIAL GROWTH IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water is not sterile. Microbes are commonly found in delivered water. Some survive treatment, while others may be introduced due to cross connections, line breaks, or by other means. Biofilm forms in drinking water pipes when bacteria and other organisms adhere to pip...

  1. Low jitter RF distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  2. Vertical Distribution of Water at Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    Phoenix results, combined with coordinated observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Phoenix lander site, indicate that the water vapor is nonuniform (i.e., not well mixed) up to a calculated cloud condensation level. It is important to understand the mixing profile of water vapor because (a) the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere up to a cloud condensation level is common in retrievals of column water abundances which are in turn used to understand the seasonal and interannual behavior of water, (b) there is a long history of observations and modeling that conclude both that water vapor is and is not well-mixed, and some studies indicate that the water vapor vertical mixing profile may, in fact, change with season and location, (c) the water vapor in the lowest part of the atmosphere is the reservoir that can exchange with the regolith and higher amounts may have an impact on the surface chemistry, and (d) greater water vapor abundances close to the surface may enhance surface exchange thereby reducing regional transport, which in turn has implications to the net transport of water vapor over seasonal and annual timescales.

  3. Global Distribution and Prevalence of Arcobacter in Food and Water.

    PubMed

    Hsu, T-T D; Lee, J

    2015-12-01

    The emerging foodborne and waterborne pathogen, Arcobacter, has been linked to various gastrointestinal diseases. Currently, 19 species are established or proposed; consequently, there has been an increase in the number of publications regarding Arcobacter since it was first introduced in 1991. To better understand the potential public health risks posed by Arcobacter, this review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the global distribution and the prevalence of Arcobacter in food and water. Arcobacter spp. were identified in food animals, food-processing environments and a variety of foods, including vegetables, poultry, beef, dairy products, seafood, pork, lamb and rabbit. A wide range of waterbodies has been reported to be contaminated with Arcobacter spp., such as wastewater, seawater, lake and river water, drinking water, groundwater and recreational water. In addition, Arcobacter has also been isolated from pets, domestic birds, wildlife, zoo and farm animals. It is expected that advancements in molecular techniques will facilitate better detection worldwide and aid in understanding the pathogenicity of Arcobacter. However, more extensive and rigorous surveillance systems are needed to better understand the occurrence of Arcobacter in food and water in various regions of the world, as well as uncover other potential public health risks, that is antibiotic resistance and disinfection efficiency, to reduce the possibility of foodborne and waterborne infections. PMID:26172312

  4. Computer security in DOE distributed computing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    The modernization of DOE facilities amid limited funding is creating pressure on DOE facilities to find innovative approaches to their daily activities. Distributed computing systems are becoming cost-effective solutions to improved productivity. This paper defines and describes typical distributed computing systems in the DOE. The special computer security problems present in distributed computing systems are identified and compared with traditional computer systems. The existing DOE computer security policy supports only basic networks and traditional computer systems and does not address distributed computing systems. A review of the existing policy requirements is followed by an analysis of the policy as it applies to distributed computing systems. Suggested changes in the DOE computer security policy are identified and discussed. The long lead time in updating DOE policy will require guidelines for applying the existing policy to distributed systems. Some possible interim approaches are identified and discussed. 2 refs.

  5. Water preheater system

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, Ph.E.

    1985-03-12

    A heat transfer liquid collects heat in a solar collector and transfers the heat to water in a preheater heat exchanger. Use of a negative-pressure collector by means of an ejector and pressure relief valve allows inexpensive and readily available materials to be used in the collector. Preferably, the preheat heat exchanger is a converted gas hot water heater in which the heat transfer liquid is sprayed onto a portion of the storage tank and is collected in a reservoir. The negative-pressure solar collector can also be used to heat swimming pool water.

  6. Size distribution studies of 137Cs in river water in the Abukuma Riverine system following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Aya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Iwatani, Hokuto; Chiga, Haruka; Fan, Qiaohui; Onda, Yuichi; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of (137)Cs in size fractionated samples in river water from the Abukuma River system, (the Kuchibuto and Abukuma Rivers, five sampling events for three sites) was studied from June 2011--approximately some three months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident until December 2012. The total concentration of (137)Cs (mBq/L) in river water was generally high at the upper stream site in the Yamakiya District within the evacuation/off-limits zone. The (137)Cs concentration was about 1Bq/L for the first sampling campaign (June 2011) at all sites, but then decreased substantially to about one-tenth of that by the time of a second sampling campaign (November or December 2011). The (137)Cs in the <0.45 μm fraction was present exclusively as a dissolved species rather than as a species adsorbed on suspended solids or complexed with organic materials. The contribution of the dissolved fraction ranged from 1.2 to 48.9% (averaged 20%) of the total concentration of (137)Cs throughout the observation period. The maximum contribution of (137)Cs was found in the silt size fraction (3-63 μm), which can be explained by the relatively large Kd values and the suspended solids (SS) concentration of this size fraction. Although the concentration (Bq/g) of (137)Cs in each size fraction did not show any significant trends and/or variations for any of the sampling campaign, Kd values for each site increased with time. Furthermore, it was found that the Kd values decreased with distance from the headstream in the off-limits zone. Thus, the data acquired in this study give an overview of the radiological situation for Fukushima including temporal and spatial variation of radiocaesium in a natural riverine system, within a few years after the accident. PMID:24929977

  7. First principles simulations of fluid water: The radial distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, José; Lewis, James P.; Sankey, Otto F.

    1997-03-01

    We apply a recently developed first principles but simplified molecular dynamics method to the simulation of water at different conditions. The computational simplicity of this method allows its application to systems containing a significant number of molecules, yet still taking explicitly into account the quantum electronic structure of the system. In the present work we simulate a system of 216 H2O molecules with periodic boundary conditions at two different densities (ρ=1.0 g/cm3 and ρ=0.72 g/cm3 and temperatures ranging from ˜300 K to ˜580 K. The effect of density and temperature on the structure of water is analyzed by means of the partial radial distribution functions gOO, gOH and gHH . We find an important reduction of the hydrogen-bond peak for water at the supercritical conditions ρ= 0.72 g/cm3, T=580 K, in good agreement with recent experimental results.

  8. Water distribution in dentin matrices: bound vs. unbound water

    PubMed Central

    Agee, Kelli A.; Prakki, Anuradha; Abu-Haimed, Tariq; Naguib, Ghada H.; Nawareg, Manar Abu; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Scheffel, Debora L.S.; Chen, Chen; Jang, Seung Soon; Hwang, Hyea; Brackett, Martha; Grégoire, Geneviéve; Tay, Franklin R.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Pashley, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This work measured the amount of bound versus unbound water in completely-demineralized dentin. Methods Dentin beams prepared from extracted human teeth were completely demineralized, rinsed and dried to constant mass. They were rehydrated in 41% relative humidity (RH), while gravimetrically measuring their mass increase until the first plateau was reached at 0.064 (vacuum) or 0.116 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite). The specimens were then exposed to 60% RH until attaining the second plateau at 0.220 (vacuum) or 0.191 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite), and subsequently exposed to 99% RH until attaining the third plateau at 0.493 (vacuum) or 0.401 g H2O/g dry mass (Drierite). Results Exposure of the first layer of bound water to 0% RH for 5 min produced a −0.3% loss of bound water; in the second layer of bound water it caused a −3.3% loss of bound water; in the third layer it caused a −6% loss of bound water. Immersion in 100% ethanol or acetone for 5 min produced a 2.8 and 1.9% loss of bound water from the first layer, respectively; it caused a −4 and −7% loss of bound water in the second layer, respectively; and a −17 and −23% loss of bound water in the third layer.. Bound water represented 21–25% of total dentin water. Chemical dehydration of water-saturated dentin with ethanol/acetone for 1 min only removed between 25 to 35% of unbound water, respectively. Significance Attempts to remove bound water by evaporation were not very successful. Chemical dehydration with 100% acetone was more successful than 100% ethanol especially the third layer of bound water. Since unbound water represents between 75–79% of total matrix water, the more such water can be removed, the more resin can be infiltrated. PMID:25612786

  9. Research in Distributed Real-Time Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes the progress we have made on our study of issues concerning the schedulability of real-time systems. Our study has produced several results in the scalability issues of distributed real-time systems. In particular, we have used our techniques to resolve schedulability issues in distributed systems with end-to-end requirements. During the next year (1997-98), we propose to extend the current work to address the modeling and workload characterization issues in distributed real-time systems. In particular, we propose to investigate the effect of different workload models and component models on the design and the subsequent performance of distributed real-time systems.

  10. COMMUNITY WATER SYSTEM SURVEY (CWSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The CWSS is a national random sample of approximately 2,000 community water systems. The primary purpose of the CWSS is to provide OGWDW with data on the financial and operating characteristics of water systems. This information is used to support the o...

  11. Solar hot-water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design data brochure describes domestic solar water system that uses direct-feed system designed to produce 80 gallons of 140 F hot water per day to meet needs of single family dwelling. Brochure also reviews annual movements of sun relative to earth and explains geographic considerations in collector orientation and sizing.

  12. GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION, REDOX ZONATION, AND CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION AT A GROUNDWATER/SURFACE WATER INTERFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three transects along a groundwater/surface water interface were characterized for spatial distributions of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and geochemical conditions to evaluate the natural bioremediation potential of this environmental system. Partly on the basis of ground p...

  13. Performance related issues in distributed database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    The key elements of research performed during the year long effort of this project are: Investigate the effects of heterogeneity in distributed real time systems; Study the requirements to TRAC towards building a heterogeneous database system; Study the effects of performance modeling on distributed database performance; and Experiment with an ORACLE based heterogeneous system.

  14. A Survey on Distributed File System Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomer, J.

    2015-05-01

    Distributed file systems provide a fundamental abstraction to location-transparent, permanent storage. They allow distributed processes to co-operate on hierarchically organized data beyond the life-time of each individual process. The great power of the file system interface lies in the fact that applications do not need to be modified in order to use distributed storage. On the other hand, the general and simple file system interface makes it notoriously difficult for a distributed file system to perform well under a variety of different workloads. This has lead to today's landscape with a number of popular distributed file systems, each tailored to a specific use case. Early distributed file systems merely execute file system calls on a remote server, which limits scalability and resilience to failures. Such limitations have been greatly reduced by modern techniques such as distributed hash tables, content-addressable storage, distributed consensus algorithms, or erasure codes. In the light of upcoming scientific data volumes at the exabyte scale, two trends are emerging. First, the previously monolithic design of distributed file systems is decomposed into services that independently provide a hierarchical namespace, data access, and distributed coordination. Secondly, the segregation of storage and computing resources yields to a storage architecture in which every compute node also participates in providing persistent storage.

  15. Evaluation of Select Sensors for Real-Time Monitoring of Escherichia coli in Water Distribution Systems▿

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Syreeta L.; Sinclair, Ryan G.; Riley, Mark R.; Pepper, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated real-time sensing of Escherichia coli as a microbial contaminant in water distribution systems. Most sensors responded to increased E. coli concentrations, showing that select sensors can detect microbial water quality changes and be utilized as part of a contaminant warning system. PMID:21357435

  16. Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loenen, A.; van Dijk, M.; van Verseveld, W.; Berger, H.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the Dutch large rivers, canals and lakes are controlled by the Dutch water authorities. The main reasons concern safety, navigation and fresh water supply. Historically the separate water bodies have been controlled locally. For optimizating management of these water systems an integrated approach was required. Presented is a platform which integrates data from all control objects for monitoring and control purposes. The Operational Management System for Regulated Water Systems (IWP) is an implementation of Delft-FEWS which supports operational control of water systems and actively gives advice. One of the main characteristics of IWP is that is real-time collects, transforms and presents different types of data, which all add to the operational water management. Next to that, hydrodynamic models and intelligent decision support tools are added to support the water managers during their daily control activities. An important advantage of IWP is that it uses the Delft-FEWS framework, therefore processes like central data collection, transformations, data processing and presentation are simply configured. At all control locations the same information is readily available. The operational water management itself gains from this information, but it can also contribute to cost efficiency (no unnecessary pumping), better use of available storage and advise during (water polution) calamities.

  17. Intelligent Systems for Power Management and Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    The motivation behind an advanced technology program to develop intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) systems is described. The program concentrates on developing digital control and distributed processing algorithms for PMAD components and systems to improve their size, weight, efficiency, and reliability. Specific areas of research in developing intelligent DC-DC converters and distributed switchgear are described. Results from recent development efforts are presented along with expected future benefits to the overall PMAD system performance.

  18. Assessing Global Water System Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braimoh, Ademola K.; Craswell, Eric T.

    2006-04-01

    Rapid growth of global change science has led to improved knowledge about interdependencies in the global water cycle and recognition that the global water system consists of physical, human, and biogeochemical components [Vörösmarty et al., 2004]. Traditionally, water research is spread over a number of scientific disciplines. However, for water science to effectively inform policy for sustainable water management, research about the dynamics of water in the context of global change needs to be holistic, must integrate the existing knowledge base, and should synthesize knowledge about how the interactions between nature and society at various scales are affecting the global water system. This article assesses the level of interdisciplinarity in water science programs by comparing the activities of international waterrelated projects with the Global Water System Project (GWSP) activity profile (http://www.gwsp.org). The GWSP is a project of the Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) comprising the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (http:// www.igbp.kva.se/cgi-bin/php/frameset.php), the International Human Dimension Programme on Global Environmental Change (www.ihdp.org), the World Climate Research Programme (http://www.wmo.ch/web/wcrp/wcrp-home.html), and the DIVERSITAS international program on biodiversity science (http://www.diversitasinternational.org/). GWSP's attributes include its scientific and policy-informing orientation, global perspective, integrative and interdisciplinary approach, and multitemporal investigation of human impacts on water resources.

  19. Model for Planning Water-Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu; Mays, Larry W.

    1981-08-01

    A mathematical programing model which has a nonlinear objective function and linear constraints is developed for the planning of composite regional water-energy systems and is solved using the largescale generalized reduced-gradient technique. Three interacting subsystems (the water subsystem, the power generation subsystem, and the coal and synthetic natural gas subsystem) are modeled to define the interlinked water-energy system. The objective of the model is to minimize the sum of the capital, operating, and distribution costs incurred in meeting future water, gas, coal and power demands within a region. The nonlinear objective function represents an improvement over existing models, as it permits analysis of nonlinear system response and economies of scale. The model is applied to a region located in northeastern Texas.

  20. Accuracy analysis of distributed simulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Guo, Jing

    2010-08-01

    Existed simulation works always emphasize on procedural verification, which put too much focus on the simulation models instead of simulation itself. As a result, researches on improving simulation accuracy are always limited in individual aspects. As accuracy is the key in simulation credibility assessment and fidelity study, it is important to give an all-round discussion of the accuracy of distributed simulation systems themselves. First, the major elements of distributed simulation systems are summarized, which can be used as the specific basis of definition, classification and description of accuracy of distributed simulation systems. In Part 2, the framework of accuracy of distributed simulation systems is presented in a comprehensive way, which makes it more sensible to analyze and assess the uncertainty of distributed simulation systems. The concept of accuracy of distributed simulation systems is divided into 4 other factors and analyzed respectively further more in Part 3. In Part 4, based on the formalized description of framework of accuracy analysis in distributed simulation systems, the practical approach are put forward, which can be applied to study unexpected or inaccurate simulation results. Following this, a real distributed simulation system based on HLA is taken as an example to verify the usefulness of the approach proposed. The results show that the method works well and is applicable in accuracy analysis of distributed simulation systems.