Science.gov

Sample records for distributions starburst models

  1. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: III. Emission Line Diagnostics of Ensembles of H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Leitherer, C; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A

    2006-05-10

    We have built, as far as possible, fully self-consistent models of H II regions around aging clusters of stars. These produce strong emission line diagnostics applicable to either individual H II regions in galaxies, or to the integrated emission line spectra of disk or starburst galaxies. The models assume that the expansion and internal pressure of individual H II regions is driven by the net input of mechanical energy from the central cluster, be it through winds or supernova events. This eliminates the ionization parameter as a free variable, replacing it with a parameter which depends on the ratio of the cluster mass to the pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. These models explain why H II regions with low abundances have high excitation, and demonstrate that at least part of the warm ionized medium is the result of overlapping faint, old, large, and low pressure H II regions. We present a number of line ratios (at both optical and IR wavelengths) that provide reliable abundance diagnostics for either single H II regions or for integrated galaxy spectra, and others that are sensitive to the age of the cluster stars exciting individual H II regions.

  2. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: II. Control of the H II Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A; Leitherer, C

    2006-03-01

    We examine from a theoretical viewpoint how the physical parameters of H II regions are controlled both in normal galaxies and in starburst environments. These parameters are the H II region luminosity function, the time-dependent size, the covering fraction of molecular clouds, the pressure in the ionized gas and the ionization parameter. The factors which control them are the initial mass function of the exciting stars, the cluster mass function, the metallicity and the mean pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the H{alpha} luminosity to the IMF, and find that this can translate to about 30% variation in derived star formation rates. The molecular cloud dissipation timescale is estimated from a case study of M17 to be {approx} 1 Myr. Based upon H II luminosity function fitting for nearby galaxies, we propose that the cluster mass function has a log-normal form peaking at {approx} 185M{sub {circle_dot}}. This suggests that the cluster mass function is the continuation of the stellar IMF to higher mass. The pressure in the H II regions is controlled by the mechanical luminosity flux from the central cluster. Since this is closely related to the ionizing photon flux, we show that the ionization parameter is not a free variable, and that the diffuse ionized medium may be composed of many large, faint and old H II regions. Finally, we derive theoretical probability distributions for the ionization parameter as a function of metallicity and compare these to those derived for SDSS galaxies.

  3. The Effects of Dust on the Ultraviolet Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. D.; Witt, A. N.

    1994-05-01

    The effects of dust on the spectral energy distribution (SED) of starburst regions of galaxies was investigated using Monte Carlo techniques to model the transport of radiation in systems where the dust and stars are mixed. In a recent paper, Calzetti, Kinney, & Storchi-Bergmann (ApJ, 10 July 1994) derive an extinction curve from observations of starburst galaxies assuming the dust is in a screen geometry. This gives an extinction curve where the geometrical effects of mixing of the dust and stars are convolved with the extinguishing effects of the dust. The resulting extinction curve is greyer than the Galactic extinction curve and featureless in the ultraviolet, i.e. lacking both the 2200 Angstroms bump and far-UV rise. In an attempt to explain this ``effective'' starburst extinction curve we have modeled the effects of dust on the SED of starbursts. A simple starburst model was used to determine the different populations of stars as a function of the starburst age. The flux at 23 wavelengths, ranging between 1000 Angstroms to 5500 Angstroms, was computed using Monte Carlo techniques assuming the dust and stars were spherically distributed. The dust was assumed to have similar properties as dust in our Galaxy. The distribution of different star types ranged from mostly centrally located for O stars to constant density for A and later stars. In addition, the fraction of stars lying outside the dust ranged from very few for O stars to a majority for A and later stars. Combining the two models, it was found that the SED was strongly dependent on the distribution of the different types of stars relative to the dust, the age of the starburst, and the amount of dust. The ``effective'' UV extinction curve became greyer and featureless as the amount of dust was increased. For example, the 2200 Angstroms bump was almost non-existent for large amounts of dust. This work was supported by NASA LTSA Grant NAGW-3168.

  4. Gas distribution and starbursts in shell galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, Melinda L.; Hernquist, Lars

    1993-01-01

    Detailed maps of most elliptical galaxies reveal that, whereas the greatest part of their luminous mass originates from a smooth distribution with a surface brightness approximated by a de Vaucouleurs law, a small percentage of their light is contributed by low surface brightness distortions termed 'fine structures'. The sharp-edged features called 'shells' are successfully reproduced by merger and infall models involving accretion from less massive companions. In this context, dwarf spheroidal and compact disk galaxies are likely progenitors of these stellar phenomena. However, it is probable that the sources of shell-forming material also contain significant amounts of gas. This component may play an important role in constraining the formation and evolution of shell galaxies. To investigate the effects of the gaseous component, numerical simulations were performed to study the tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars by more massive primaries, and the evolution of the ensuing debris. The calculations were performed with a hybrid N-body/hydrodynamics code. Collisionless matter is evolved using a conventional N-body technique and gas is treated using smoothed particle hydrodynamics in which self-gravitating fluid elements are represented as particles evolving according to Lagrangian hydrodynamic equations. An isothermal equation of state is employed so the gas remains at a temperature 104 K. Owing to the large mass ratio between the primary and companion, the primary is modeled as a rigid potential and the self-gravity of both galaxies is neglected.

  5. Modeling Small Stellar Populations Using Starburst99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gerardo Arturo; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Stellar populations synthesis models have proven to be excellent tools to learn about galaxy evolution. However, modeling small stellar populations (lower than 105 M⊙) has been an intriguing and continuous to be a field of intensive research. In this work, we have developed a new approach to form stars from clusters first, where massive stars are formed from fractions of mass of small stellar clusters. This new approximation is based on the empirical power law (mc-2) for the mass function of clusters between 20-1100 M⊙ found in recent years and the maximum stellar mass that can be formed in a cluster. Incorporating this new approach to form clusters has made us upgrade the way we integrate the stellar properties and the way that the isochrone is produced with a new technique. To produce the new models we have used the most recent version of Starburst99 that incorporates the most recent stellar evolution models with rotation. On the verge of solving nearby stellar populations and observing small stellar populations across the universe, this new approach brings a new scope on trying to disentangle the nature of hyper and supermassive stars in small stellar populations. In this work we present this new approach and the results when these models are applied to very energetic stellar populations such as the cluster in NGC 3603. Our most important result is that we have modeled the ionizing power of this cluster and some others by forming enough supermassive stars in a cluster of ~104 M⊙.

  6. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. III. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Cannon, John M.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Holtzman, Jon

    2012-11-01

    We map the spatial distribution of recent star formation over a few Multiplication-Sign 100 Myr timescales in 15 starburst dwarf galaxies using the location of young blue helium burning stars identified from optically resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope observations. By comparing the star formation histories from both the high surface brightness central regions and the diffuse outer regions, we measure the degree to which the star formation has been centrally concentrated during the galaxies' starbursts, using three different metrics for the spatial concentration. We find that the galaxies span a full range in spatial concentration, from highly centralized to broadly distributed star formation. Since most starbursts have historically been identified by relatively short timescale star formation tracers (e.g., H{alpha} emission), there could be a strong bias toward classifying only those galaxies with recent, centralized star formation as starbursts, while missing starbursts that are spatially distributed.

  7. EVOLVING STARBURST MODELING OF FAR-INFRARED/SUBMILLIMETER/MILLIMETER LINE EMISSION. II. APPLICATION TO M 82

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Lihong

    2009-11-01

    We present starburst models for far-infrared/sub-millimeter/millimeter line emission of molecular and atomic gas in an evolving starburst region, which is treated as an ensemble of noninteracting hot bubbles that drive spherical shells of swept-up gas into a surrounding uniform gas medium. These bubbles and shells are driven by stellar winds and supernovae within massive star clusters formed during an instantaneous starburst. The underlying stellar radiation from the evolving clusters affects the properties and structure of photodissociation regions (PDRs) in the shells, and hence the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the molecular and atomic line emission from these swept-up shells and the associated parent giant molecular clouds contain a signature of the stage of evolution of the starburst. The physical and chemical properties of the shells and their structure are computed using a simple, well-known similarity solution for the shell expansion, a stellar population synthesis code, and a time-dependent PDR chemistry model. The SEDs for several molecular and atomic lines ({sup 12}CO and its isotope {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, C, O, and C{sup +}) are computed using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line radiative transfer model. By comparing our models with the available observed data of nearby infrared bright galaxies, especially M 82, we constrain the models and in the case of M 82, we provide estimates for the ages (5-6 Myr, 10 Myr) of recent starburst activity. We also derive a total H{sub 2} gas mass of approx(2-3.4) x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun} for the observed regions of the central 1 kpc starburst disk of M 82.

  8. Galactic Center Shells and a Recurrent Starburst Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki

    2003-04-01

    By applying filtering techniques to remove straight filaments in the 20-cm VLA radio image of the Galactic Center Arc region, we have shown that numerous concentric radio shells of radii 5 to 20pc are surrounding the Pistol and Sickle region, which we call Galactic Center Shells (GCS).Each shell has thermal energy of the order of1049-50erg.Several CO-line shells are associated, whose kinetic energies are of the order of 1049-50erg. Summing up the energies of recognized GCSs, the total energy amounts to ˜ 1051erg.The GCSs show an excellent correlation with the FIR shells observed at 16-26μm with the MSX.We propose a model in which GCSs were produced by recurrent and/or intermittent starbursts in the Pistol area during the last million years.The most recent burst occurred some 105 years ago, producing an inner round-shaped shell (GCS I);earlier ones a million years ago produced outer shells (GCS II and III), which a re more deformed by interactions with the surrounding ISM and Sgr A halo.We argue that recurrent starbursts had also occurred in the past, which produced larger scale hyper-shell structures as well.A burst some million years ago produced the Galactic Center Lobe, and a much stronger one 15 million years ago produced the North Polar Spur.

  9. The Vertical Structure of Nuclear Starburst Disks: Testing a Model of AGN Obscuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, David R.; Gohil, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear starburst disks are Eddington-limited, radiation pressure supported disks that may be active in the nuclear environment of active galaxies (ULIRGS and AGNs). Earlier analytical models suggested that, under certain conditions, these disks may be geometrically thick on pc-scales, and thus could be a viable source for AGN obscuration, partcularly at z≤1, when gas factions in galaxies are still significant. Here, we present early results from numerical 2D models of nuclear starburst disks where the vertical structure is calculated explicitly from solving the hydrostatic balance and radiative transfer equations. We quantitatively assess under which conditions the starburst disk may present substantial obscuring columns for AGN observations.

  10. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF POST-STARBURST GALAXIES IN THE NEWFIRM MEDIUM-BAND SURVEY: A LOW CONTRIBUTION FROM TP-AGB STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kriek, Mariska; Conroy, Charlie; Labbe, Ivo; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Quadri, Ryan F.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Rudnick, Gregory

    2010-10-10

    Stellar population synthesis (SPS) models are a key ingredient of many galaxy evolution studies. Unfortunately, the models are still poorly calibrated for certain stellar evolution stages. Of particular concern is the treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, as different implementations lead to systematic differences in derived galaxy properties. Post-starburst galaxies are a promising calibration sample, as TP-AGB stars are thought to be most prominently visible during this phase. Here, we use post-starburst galaxies in the NEWFIRM medium-band survey to assess different SPS models. The available photometry allows the selection of a homogeneous and well-defined sample of 62 post-starburst galaxies at 0.7 {approx_lt} z {approx_lt} 2.0, from which we construct a well-sampled composite spectral energy distribution (SED) over the range 1200-40000 A. The SED is well fit by the Bruzual and Charlot SPS models, while the Maraston models do not reproduce the rest-frame optical and near-infrared parts of the SED simultaneously. When the fitting is restricted to {lambda} < 6000 A, the Maraston models overpredict the near-infrared luminosity, implying that these models give too much weight to TP-AGB stars. Using the flexible SPS models by Conroy et al. and assuming solar metallicity, we find that the contribution of TP-AGB stars to the integrated SED is a factor of {approx}3 lower than predicted by the latest Padova TP-AGB models. Whether this is due to lower bolometric luminosities, shorter lifetimes, and/or heavy dust obscuration of TP-AGB stars remains to be addressed. Altogether, our data demand a low contribution from TP-AGB stars to the SED of post-starburst galaxies.

  11. Starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weedman, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared properties of star-forming galaxies, primarily as determined by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), are compared to X-ray, optical, and radio properties. Luminosity functions are reviewed and combined with those derived from optically discovered samples using 487 Markarian galaxies with redshifts and published IRAS 60 micron fluxes, and 1074 such galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. It is found that the majority of infrared galaxies which could be detected are low luminosity sources already known from the optical samples, but non-infrared surveys have found only a very small fraction of the highest luminosity sources. Distributions of infrared to optical fluxes and available spectra indicate that the majority of IRAS-selected galaxies are starburst galaxies. Having a census of starburst galaxies and associated dust allow severl important global calculations. The source counts are predicted as a function of flux limits for both infrared and radio fluxes. These galaxies are found to be important radio sources at faint flux limits. Taking the integrated flux to z = 3 indicates that such galaxies are a significant component of the diffuse X-ray background, and could be the the dominant component depending on the nature of the X-ray spectra and source evolution.

  12. Models of the Cartwheel ring galaxy: Spokes and starbursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struck-Marcell, Curtis

    1993-01-01

    Recent observations of this famous ring galaxy, including optical and near-infrared CCD surface photometry, and VLA radio continuum and 21 cm line mapping (Higdon 1992b, in prep.), have inspired a renewed modeling effort. Toomre's (1978, in The Large-scale Structure of the Universe, eds. Longair and Einasto) series of restricted three-body simulations demonstrated how the multiple rings could be produced in a nearly head-on galaxy collision. New models with a halo-dominated potential based on the 21 cm rotation curve are able to reproduce such details as the spacing between rings, ring widths, offset of the nucleus, and several kinematical features, thus providing strong support for the collisional theory. The new observations have shown there are little or no old stars in Cartwheel; it may consist almost entirely of gas and stars produced as a result of compression in the ring wave. To model this process Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the Cartwheel disk have been performed. Fixed gravitational potentials were used to represent the Cartwheel and a roughly 30 percent mass collision partner. The interaction dynamics was treated as in the usual restricted three-body approximation, and the effects of local self-gravity between disk particles were calculated. We are particularly interested in testing the theory that enhanced star formation in waves is the result of gravitational instability in the compressed region (see e.g. Kennicutt 1989, ApJ 344, 685). The gas surface density in a number of simulations was initialized to a value slightly below the threshold for local gravitational instability throughout most of the disk. The first ring wave produces relatively modest compressions (a factor of order a few), triggering instability in a narrow range of wavelengths. Self-gravity in the disk is calculated over a comparable range of scales. Simulations were run with isothermal, adiabatic, and adiabatic with radiative cooling characterized by a

  13. Distribution of Molecules in the Circumnuclear Disk and Surrounding Starburst Ring in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068 Observed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, S.; Nakajima, T.; Kohno, K.; Harada, N.; Herbst, E.; Tamura, Y.; Izumi, T.; Taniguchi, A.; Tosaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    We report distributions of several molecular transitions including shock and dust related species (13CO and C18O J = 1-0, 13CN N = 1-0, CS J = 2-1, SO JN = 32-21, HNCO JKa,Kc = 50,5-40,4, HC3N J = 11-10, 12-11, CH3OH JK = 2K-1K, and CH3CN JK = 6K-5K) in the nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 observed with ALMA. The central ˜1' (˜4.3 kpc) of this galaxy was observed in the 100 GHz region with an angular resolution of ˜4" x 2" (290 pc x 140 pc) to study the effects of an active galactic nucleus and its surrounding starburst ring on molecular abundances. We report a classification of molecular distributions into three main categories. Organic molecules such as CH3CN are found to be concentrated in the circumnuclear disk. In the starburst ring, the intensity of methanol at each clumpy region is not consistent with that of 13CO.

  14. Numerical Models of Starburst Galaxies: A Study of Outflows and ISM Morphology in Galactic Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, G. N.; Heitsch, F.

    2014-01-01

    Starbursts and AGN winds in galaxy cores can produce large scale outflows. Whether any given outburst can create an outflow depends on several variables including the rate at which the energy is injected into the interstellar medium (ISM), the distribution of clouds with in the ISM, and the overall shape of the ISM. Previous simulations by Cooper et al. (2008) reproduce linear filaments like that in M 82, but were limited in the parameter space that they could explore. We have modified the public Athena hydro code (Stone et al. 2008) to greatly reduce the computation time of high resolution 3D simulations similar to Cooper et al. (2008) and to handle accurate gas cooling down to lower molecule-forming temperatures (10 K). We are exploring the parameter space of a galactic “blowout”, the origin and evolution of interesting ISM morphology such as the curved filamentary “towers” observed at the center of NGC 3079, and how different ISM morphologies may influence the outflow. These simulations are being compared with spectral imaging obtained with the Herschel space telescope to study the connection between regions of the cold neutral medium, warm neutral medium, and warm ionized medium. Those observations are being presented in another session of this AAS meeting. Our work is supported by NASA/Herschel and NC Space Grant funding.

  15. Cold Galaxies on FIRE: Modeling the Most Luminous Starbursts in the Universe with Cosmological Zoom Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Desika

    2014-10-01

    As the most luminous, heavily star-forming galaxies in the Universe, Submillimeter Galaxies at z 2-4 are key players in galaxy evolution. Since their discovery, SMGs have received significant attention from HST in characterizing their physical morphology, stellar masses, and star formation histories. Unfortunately, these physical constraints have been difficult for theorists to reconcile with galaxy formation simulations. Previous generations of simulations have all either {a} neglected baryons; {b} neglected radiative transfer {and connecting to observations}; or {c} neglected cosmological conditions. Here, we propose to conduct the first ever cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of Submillimeter Galaxy formation that couple with bona fide 3D dust radiative transfer calculations. These ultra-high resolution simulations {parsec-scale} will be the first to resolve the sites of dust obscuration, the cosmic growth history of SMGs, and their evolutionary destiny. Our proposal has two principle goals: {1} Develop the first ever model for SMG formation from cosmological simulations that include both baryons and dust radiative transfer; {2} Capitalize on our parsec-scale resolution to understand the connection between the physical properties of star-forming regions in high-z starbursts, and recent IMF constraints from present-epoch massive galaxies.

  16. Completing the CO spectral line energy distribution for luminous starburst galaxies discovered with the SPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, Manuel; Weiss, Axel; de Breuck, Carlos; Stark, Antony A.; Marrone, Dan; McIntyre, Vince; Vieira, Joaquin; Greve, Thomas; Chapman, Scott; Murphy, Eric; Aguirre, James; Bothwell, Matt; Gullberg, Bitten

    2013-04-01

    We propose to use ATCA to observe the CO J=3-2 line emission in three gravitationally lensed, highly magnified dusty star-forming galaxies at z~2.5 discovered by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) millimeter survey. The redshifts of all targets were identified by the detection of several J>6 CO emission lines with APEX/Z-Spec and confirmed with VLT optical spectroscopy. Two of the sources have significant detections of the CO 1-0 line with ATCA, while CO 1-0 observations of the other source are being requested in a companion proposal. The proposed observations are critical to complete the CO spectral energy distribution (SLED) of these sources and thus "fill the gap" between the high-J CO observed with APEX/Z-Spec and the CO 1-0 line detected with ATCA. This will allow us to constrain the physical conditions of the interstellar medium by comparing the line strengths with large velocity gradient models. The strong magnification is key, allowing us to characterize the CO emission in galaxies that would be otherwise hard to detect.

  17. The Far-Infrared Energy Distributions of Seyfert and Starburst Galaxies in the Local Universe: Infrared Space Observatory Photometry of the 12 Micron Active Galaxy Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Andreani, Paola; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2002-06-01

    New far-infrared photometry with ISOPHOT aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is presented for 58 galaxies with homogeneous published data for another 32 galaxies, all belonging to the 12 μm galaxy sample-in total, 29 Seyfert 1 galaxies, 35 Seyfert 2 galaxies, and 12 starburst galaxies, or about half of the 12 μm active galaxy sample, plus 14 normal galaxies for comparison. ISO and Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data are used to define color-color diagrams and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Thermal dust emission at two temperatures (one cold at 15-30 K and one warm at 50-70 K) can fit the 60-200 μm SED, with a dust emissivity law proportional to the inverse square of the wavelength. Seyfert 1 galaxies and Seyfert 2 galaxies are indistinguishable longward of 100 μm, while, as already seen by IRAS, the former have flatter SEDs shortward of 60 μm. A mild anticorrelation is found between the [200-100] color and the ``60 μm excess.'' We infer that this is due to the fact that galaxies with a strong starburst component and thus a strong 60 μm flux have a steeper far-infrared turnover. In non-Seyfert galaxies, increasing the luminosity corresponds to increasing the star formation rate, which enhances the 25 and 60 μm emission. This shifts the peak emission from around 150 μm in the most quiescent spirals to shorter than 60 μm in the strongest starburst galaxies. To quantify these trends further, we identified with the IRAS colors three idealized infrared SEDs: pure quiescent disk emission, pure starburst emission, and pure Seyfert nucleus emission. Even between 100 and 200 μm, the quiescent disk emission remains much cooler than the starburst component. Seyfert galaxies have 100-200 μm SEDs ranging from pure disks to pure starbursts, with no apparent contribution from their active nuclei at those wavelengths. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France

  18. Starbursts at space ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2006-06-01

    Starbursts are systems with very high star formation rate per unit area. They are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. The similarities between the physical properties of local starbursts and high-z star-forming galaxies, highlight the cosmological relevance of starbursts. On the other hand, nearby starbursts are laboratories where to study violent star formation processes and their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic media, in detail and deeply. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, as they are in the far-infrared, due to the ‘picket-fence’ interstellar dust distribution. After the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. Super-stellar clusters have properties similar to globular clusters. The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV

  19. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  20. Starbursts and their dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin

    1987-01-01

    Detailed mechanisms associated with dynamical process occurring in starburst galaxies are considered including the role of bars, waves, mergers, sinking satellites, self gravitating gas and bulge heating. The current understanding of starburst galaxies both observational and theoretical is placed in the context of theories of galaxy formations, Hubble sequence evolution, starbursts and activity, and the nature of quasar absorption lines.

  1. CO Line Emission from Compact Nuclear Starburst Disks around Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armour, J. N.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2012-06-01

    There is substantial evidence for a connection between star formation in the nuclear region of a galaxy and growth of the central supermassive black hole. Furthermore, starburst activity in the region around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) may provide the obscuration required by the unified model of AGNs. Molecular line emission is one of the best observational avenues to detect and characterize dense, star-forming gas in galactic nuclei over a range of redshift. This paper presents predictions for the carbon monoxide (CO) line features from models of nuclear starburst disks around AGNs. These small-scale (lsim 100 pc), dense and hot starbursts have CO luminosities similar to scaled-down ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and quasar host galaxies. Nuclear starburst disks that exhibit a pc-scale starburst and could potentially act as the obscuring torus show more efficient CO excitation and higher brightness temperature ratios than those without such a compact starburst. In addition, the compact starburst models predict strong absorption when J Upper >~ 10, a unique observational signature of these objects. These findings allow for the possibility that CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) could be used to determine if starburst disks are responsible for the obscuration in z <~ 1 AGNs. Directly isolating the nuclear CO line emission of such compact regions around AGNs from galactic-scale emission will require high-resolution imaging or selecting AGN host galaxies with weak galactic-scale star formation. Stacking individual CO SLEDs will also be useful in detecting the predicted high-J features.

  2. The effect of binary evolution on the theoretically predicted distribution of WR and O-type stars in starburst regions and in abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.; van Bever, J.; De Donder, E.

    1997-01-01

    We first discuss in detail the massive close binary evolutionary model and how it has to be used in a population number synthesis study. We account for the evolution of case A, case B and case C systems, the effect of stellar wind during core hydrogen burning, hydrogen shell burning, the red supergiant phase and the WR phase, the effect of common envelope evolution in binaries with large periods, the consequences of spiral-in in binaries with small mass ratio, the effect of an asymmetric supernova explosion on binary system parameters using recent studies of pulsar velocities, the evolution of binaries with a compact companion. The parameters entering the population model where close binaries are included, are constrained by comparing predictions and observations of the massive star content in regions of continuous star formation. We then critically investigate the influence of massive close binary evolution on the variation of the massive star content in starburst regions. We separately consider regions where, after a long period of continuous star formation, the star formation rate decreases sharply (we propose to call this an abruptly-terminated star formation region) and we show that also in these regions WR/O number ratios are reached which are significantly larger than in regions of continuous star formation. The most important conclusion of the study is that within our present knowledge of observations of massive stars, massive close binary evolution plays an ESSENTIAL role in the evolution of starbursts and abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

  3. High mass stars: starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments. b) The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. c) The role of starbursts in AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media. e) The contribution of starbursts to the reionization of the universe. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution long-slit spectrograph with high spatial resolution and high UV sensitivity is required to further progress in the study of starburst galaxies and their impact on the evolution of galaxies.

  4. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  5. From Starburst to Quiescence: Testing Active Galactic Nucleus feedback in Rapidly Quenching Post-starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-01

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M ⊙) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies "transiting" post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ~0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ~0.1% are QPSBs, and ~0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (gsim 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of >~ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as "dust-obscured galaxies" (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of >~ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post-starburst phase.

  6. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post-starburst

  7. Starbursts in colliding galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, I. F.; Duc, P. A.

    Global starbursts are a consequence of rapid changes in the dynamics of the interstellar gas. The most violent starbursts take place in the nuclear regions of galaxies, when galaxy-galaxy encounters cause a sudden reduction of angular momentum, with the subsequent infall to the central regions of a large fraction of the overall interstellar gas. Although starbursts are also observed in the central regions of isolated barred spiral galaxies, most of the starbursts with bolometric luminosities above 1012Lsun occur in mergers. Super-starbursts in galactic nuclei seem to require high infall rates of interstellar gas that can only be produced during mergers. The authors discuss the phenomenon of extranuclear starbursts in relation to the formation of dwarf galaxies during galaxy-galaxy collisions. As a consequence of tidal interactions a fraction of the less gravitationally bound atomic hydrogen that populates the outskirts of disk galaxies may escape into the intergalactic medium. It is found that the ejected gas may assemble again and collapse, leading to the formation of intergalactic starbursts, namely, tidal dwarf galaxies.

  8. PROPERTIES OF NEARBY STARBURST GALAXIES BASED ON THEIR DIFFUSE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Paglione, Timothy A. D.; Abrahams, Ryan D.

    2012-08-20

    The physical relationship between the far-infrared and radio fluxes of star-forming galaxies has yet to be definitively determined. The favored interpretation, the 'calorimeter model', requires that supernova generated cosmic-ray (CR) electrons cool rapidly via synchrotron radiation. However, this cooling should steepen their radio spectra beyond what is observed, and so enhanced ionization losses at low energies from high gas densities are also required. Further, evaluating the minimum energy magnetic field strength with the traditional scaling of the synchrotron flux may underestimate the true value in massive starbursts if their magnetic energy density is comparable to the hydrostatic pressure of their disks. Gamma-ray spectra of starburst galaxies, combined with radio data, provide a less ambiguous estimate of these physical properties in starburst nuclei. While the radio flux is most sensitive to the magnetic field, the GeV gamma-ray spectrum normalization depends primarily on gas density. To this end, spectra above 100 MeV were constructed for two nearby starburst galaxies, NGC 253 and M82, using Fermi data. Their nuclear radio and far-infrared spectra from the literature are compared to new models of the steady-state CR distributions expected from starburst galaxies. Models with high magnetic fields, favoring galaxy calorimetry, are overall better fits to the observations. These solutions also imply relatively high densities and CR ionization rates, consistent with molecular cloud studies.

  9. EVALUATING THE CALORIMETER MODEL WITH BROADBAND, CONTINUOUS SPECTRA OF STARBURST GALAXIES OBSERVED WITH THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Bower, Geoffrey C. E-mail: gbower@astro.berkeley.ed

    2010-02-20

    Although the relationship between the far-infrared and centimeter-wave radio luminosities of normal galaxies is one of the most striking correlations in astronomy, a solid understanding of its physical basis is lacking. In one interpretation, the 'calorimeter model', rapid synchrotron cooling of cosmic ray electrons is essential in reproducing the observed linear relationship. Observed radio spectra, however, are shallower than what is expected of cooled synchrotron emission. In 2006, Thompson et al. presented a simple parameterized model to explain how relatively shallow observed spectra might arise even in the presence of rapid synchrotron cooling by accounting for ionization losses and other cooling mechanisms. During the commissioning of the 42 element Allen Telescope Array (ATA), we observed the starburst galaxies M82, NGC 253, and Arp 220 at frequencies ranging from 1 to 7 GHz, obtaining unprecedented broadband continuous radio spectra of these sources. We combine our observations with high-frequency data from the literature to separate the spectra into thermal and nonthermal components. The nonthermal components all steepen in the centimeter-wave regime and cannot be well modeled as simple power laws. The model of Thompson et al. is consistent with our M82 results when plausible parameters are chosen, and our results in fact significantly shrink the space of allowed model parameters. The model is only marginally consistent with our NGC 253 data. Assuming the Thompson et al. model, a steep electron energy injection index of p = -2.5 is ruled out in M82 and NGC 253 to >99% confidence. We describe in detail the observing procedures, calibration methods, analysis, and consistency checks used for broadband spectral observations with the ATA.

  10. Massive stars: Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa María

    2007-07-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. b) Stellar clusters are an important mode of star formation in starbursts. c) The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar medium: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s%u22121 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. High-spatial resolution spectra are also needed to isolate the light from the center to the disk in UV luminous galaxies found by GALEX. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution spectrograph with high spatial

  11. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. I. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF EIGHTEEN NEARBY STARBURST DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-RodrIguez, Sebastian

    2010-09-20

    We use archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper, we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only the currently bursting galaxies but also 'fossil' bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D < 8 Mpc) universe. Thirteen of the eighteen galaxies are experiencing ongoing bursts and five galaxies show fossil bursts. From our reconstructed SFHs, it is evident that the elevated SFRs of a burst are sustained for hundreds of Myr with variations on small timescales. A long >100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid 'self-quenching' of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find that the strength of the H{alpha} emission usually correlates with the CMD-based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the H{alpha} emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the H{alpha} emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy.

  12. HerMES: The rest-frame UV emission and a lensing model for the z = 6.34 luminous dusty starburst galaxy HFLS3

    SciTech Connect

    Cooray, Asantha; Calanog, Jae; Casey, C. M.; Ma, Brian; Osage, W. A.; Wardlow, Julie L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Burgarella, D.; Bussmann, R. S.; Clements, D.; Conley, A.; Farrah, D.; Fu, H.; Gavazzi, R.; Ivison, R. J.; La Porte, N.; Lo Faro, B.; Magdis, G.; Oliver, S. J.; and others

    2014-07-20

    We discuss the rest-frame ultraviolet emission from the starbursting galaxy HFLS3 at a redshift of 6.34. The galaxy was discovered in Herschel/SPIRE data due to its red color in the submillimeter wavelengths from 250 to 500 μm. Keck/NIRC2 K{sub s}-band adaptive optics imaging data showed two potential near-IR counterparts near HFLS3. Previously, the northern galaxy was taken to be in the foreground at z = 2.1, while the southern galaxy was assumed to be HFLS3's near-IR counterpart. The recently acquired Hubble/WFC3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data show conclusively that both optically bright galaxies are in the foreground at z < 6. A new lensing model based on the Hubble imaging data and the millimeter-wave continuum emission yields a magnification factor of 2.2 ± 0.3, with a 95% confidence upper limit on the magnification of 3.5. When corrected for lensing, the instantaneous star formation rate is 1320 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, with the 95% confidence lower limit around 830 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The dust and stellar masses of HFLS3 from the same spectral energy distribution (SED) models are at the level of 3 × 10{sup 8} M{sub ☉} and ∼5 × 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, respectively, with large systematic uncertainties on assumptions related to the SED model. With Hubble/WFC3 images, we also find diffuse near-IR emission about 0.5 arcsec (∼3 kpc) to the southwest of HFLS3 that remains undetected in the ACS imaging data. The emission has a photometric redshift consistent with either z ∼ 6 or a dusty galaxy template at z ∼ 2.

  13. HerMES: The Rest-frame UV Emission and a Lensing Model for the z = 6.34 Luminous Dusty Starburst Galaxy HFLS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha; Calanog, Jae; Wardlow, Julie L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Burgarella, D.; Bussmann, R. S.; Casey, C. M.; Clements, D.; Conley, A.; Farrah, D.; Fu, H.; Gavazzi, R.; Ivison, R. J.; La Porte, N.; Lo Faro, B.; Ma, Brian; Magdis, G.; Oliver, S. J.; Osage, W. A.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Rigopoulou, D.; Scott, Douglas; Viero, M.; Watson, D.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the rest-frame ultraviolet emission from the starbursting galaxy HFLS3 at a redshift of 6.34. The galaxy was discovered in Herschel/SPIRE data due to its red color in the submillimeter wavelengths from 250 to 500 μm. Keck/NIRC2 K s -band adaptive optics imaging data showed two potential near-IR counterparts near HFLS3. Previously, the northern galaxy was taken to be in the foreground at z = 2.1, while the southern galaxy was assumed to be HFLS3's near-IR counterpart. The recently acquired Hubble/WFC3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data show conclusively that both optically bright galaxies are in the foreground at z < 6. A new lensing model based on the Hubble imaging data and the millimeter-wave continuum emission yields a magnification factor of 2.2 ± 0.3, with a 95% confidence upper limit on the magnification of 3.5. When corrected for lensing, the instantaneous star formation rate is 1320 M ⊙ yr-1, with the 95% confidence lower limit around 830 M ⊙ yr-1. The dust and stellar masses of HFLS3 from the same spectral energy distribution (SED) models are at the level of 3 × 108 M ⊙ and ~5 × 1010 M ⊙, respectively, with large systematic uncertainties on assumptions related to the SED model. With Hubble/WFC3 images, we also find diffuse near-IR emission about 0.5 arcsec (~3 kpc) to the southwest of HFLS3 that remains undetected in the ACS imaging data. The emission has a photometric redshift consistent with either z ~ 6 or a dusty galaxy template at z ~ 2.

  14. Local starburst galaxies and their descendants. Statistics from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergvall, Nils; Marquart, Thomas; Way, Michael J.; Blomqvist, Anna; Holst, Emma; Ostlin, Goran; Zackrisson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Despite strong interest in the starburst phenomenon in extragalactic astronomy, the concept remains ill-defined. Here we use a strict definition of starburst to examine the statistical properties of starburst galaxies in the local universe. We also seek to establish links between starburst galaxies, post-starburst (hereafter postburst) galaxies, and active galaxies. Data were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. We applied a novel method of treating dust attenuation and derive star formation rates, ages, and stellar masses assuming a two-component stellar population model. Dynamical masses are calculated from the width of the H-alpha line. These masses agree excellently with the photometric masses. The mass (gas+stars) range is approximately 10( exp 9) - 10(exp 11.5) solar mass. As a selection criterion for starburst galaxies, we use, the birthrate parameter, b = SFR/SFR, requiring that b is greater than 3. For postburst galaxies, we use, the equivalent width of Hdelta in absorption with the criterion EW (sub Hdelta_abs) is greater than 6 A. Results. We find that only 1% of star-forming galaxies are starburst galaxies. They contribute 3-6% to the stellar production and are therefore unimportant for the local star formation activity. The median starburst age is 70 Myr roughly independent of mass, indicating that star formation is mainly regulated by local feedback processes. The b-parameter strongly depends on burst age. Values close to b = 60 are found at ages approximately 10 Myr, while almost no starbursts are found at ages greater than 1 Gyr. The median baryonic burst mass fraction of sub-L galaxies is 5% and decreases slowly towards high masses. The median mass fraction of the recent burst in the postburst sample is 5-10%. A smaller fraction of the postburst galaxies, however, originates in non-bursting galaxies. The age-mass distribution of the postburst progenitors (with mass fractions is greater than 3%) is bimodal with a break at logM(solar mass

  15. Multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric observations of the nuclear starburst region of NGC 253: Improved modeling of the supernova and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Lenc, E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of multi-epoch observations of the southern starburst galaxy, NGC 253, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz are presented. As with previous radio interferometric observations of this galaxy, no new sources were discovered. By combining the results of this survey with Very Large Array observations at higher frequencies from the literature, spectra were derived and a free-free absorption model was fitted of 20 known sources in NGC 253. The results were found to be consistent with previous studies. The supernova remnant, 5.48-43.3, was imaged with the highest sensitivity and resolution to date, revealing a two-lobed morphology. Comparisons with previous observations of similar resolution give an upper limit of 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} for the expansion speed of this remnant. We derive a supernova rate of <0.2 yr{sup –1} for the inner 300 pc using a model that improves on previous methods by incorporating an improved radio supernova peak luminosity distribution and by making use of multi-wavelength radio data spanning 21 yr. A star formation rate of SFR(M ≥ 5 M {sub ☉}) < 4.9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} was also estimated using the standard relation between supernova and star formation rates. Our improved estimates of supernova and star formation rates are consistent with studies at other wavelengths. The results of our study point to the possible existence of a small population of undetected supernova remnants, suggesting a low rate of radio supernova production in NGC 253.

  16. Star formation and dynamics in starburst nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A.

    1987-01-01

    A simple model is presented for gas inflow through a disk galaxy driven by interacting galaxies through the action of a non-axisymmetric disturbance acting on the disk whose gas is modelled as an ensemble of gas clouds. Cloud collisions, as well as being a vital process in forcing gas inflow to the center of the disk, are also assumed to generate massive stars. This ever increasing rate of gas flow toward the center of the galaxy and the associated rapid increase in cloud collisions lead to a centrally concentrated starburst. Starbursts have important consequences for the immediate environment of galaxies. Mildly collimated outflows can be driven by a combination of multiple supernovae and OB star winds. Jets associated with activity in the galactic nucleus can interact strongly with a starburst environment.

  17. What Do Star Clusters in Nearby Starburst Galaxies Tell Us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsoon; Lee, M.; Hwang, N.

    2014-01-01

    Nearby starburst galaxies are a good laboratory for the study of starburst processes. M82, one of the most famous starburst galaxies, has been a target for numerous studies of starburst events. Especially, many studies have used star clusters as starburst tracers in M82, but they usually investigated a only small central region. We present a photometric study of star clusters in M82 using wide-field UBVI, YJ, and H band images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. We find ˜1100 star clusters in 12’x8’ field, and estimate ages and masses of about 630 star clusters using spectral energy distribution fitting method. Young star clusters are located in the disk region, while old star clusters are found in both disk and halo regions. Age distribution of star clusters shows three distinguished populations: young (≦ 5 Myr), intermediate-age (about 500 Myr), and old (≧10 Gyr) star clusters. Several massive young star clusters (≥˜105M⊙) are found in the nuclear region, which are regarded as a result of recent starburst. Interestingly, we also find very massive star clusters (≥˜106M⊙) with intermediate-age in the nuclear region, which indicates another starburst event at about 500 Myr ago. This suggests that there are at least two starburst events: 5 Myr and 500 Myr ago, and that the earlier starburst at about 500 Myr ago may be more violent than the recent one. We also find about 30 star clusters in the halo region of M82. They are probably metal-poor old globular clusters belonging to M82 halo. It suggests that starburst galaxies may also be enshrouded by old stellar populations.

  18. THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. V. FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR STARBURST RECYCLING FROM QUANTITATIVE GALAXY MORPHOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Louis E.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dressler, Alan; Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Monson, Andrew; Persson, Eric; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-11-10

    Using J- and K{sub s}-band imaging obtained as part of the IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS), we measure Sérsic indices for 2160 field and cluster galaxies at 0.31 < z < 0.54. Using both mass- and magnitude-limited samples, we compare the distributions for spectroscopically determined passive, continuously star-forming, starburst, and post-starburst systems and show that previously established spatial and statistical connections between these types extend to their gross morphologies. Outside of cluster cores, we find close structural ties between starburst and continuously star-forming, as well as post-starburst and passive types, but not between starbursts and post-starbursts. These results independently support two conclusions presented in Paper II of this series: (1) most starbursts are the product of a non-disruptive triggering mechanism that is insensitive to global environment, such as minor mergers; (2) starbursts and post-starbursts generally represent transient phases in the lives of 'normal' star-forming and quiescent galaxies, respectively, originating from and returning to these systems in closed 'recycling' loops. In this picture, spectroscopically identified post-starbursts constitute a minority of all recently terminated starbursts, largely ruling out the typical starburst as a quenching event in all but the densest environments.

  19. NGC 1614: A Laboratory for Starburst Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Rieke, M. J.; Rieke, G. H.; Quillen, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    The modest extinction and reasonably face-on viewing geometry make the luminous infrared galaxy NGC 1614 an ideal laboratory for study of a powerful starburst. HST/NICMOS observations show: (1) deep CO stellar absorption, tracing a starburst nucleus about 45 pc in diameter; (2) surrounded by an approx. 600 pc diameter ring of supergiant H II regions revealed in Pa-alpha line emission; (3) lying within a molecular ring indicated by its extinction shadow in H - K; and (4) all at the center of a disturbed spiral galaxy. The luminosities of the giant H II regions in the ring axe extremely high, an order of magnitude brighter than 30 Doradus; very luminous H II regions, comparable with 30 Dor, are also found in the spiral arms of the galaxy. Luminous stellar clusters surround the nucleus and lie in the spiral arms, similar to clusters observed in other infrared luminous and ultraluminous galaxies. The star forming activity may have been initiated by a merger between a disk galaxy and a companion satellite, whose nucleus appears in projection about 300 pc to the NE of the nucleus of the primary galaxy. The relation of deep stellar CO bands to surrounding ionized gas ring to molecular gas indicates that the luminous starburst started in the nucleus and is propagating outward into the surrounding molecular ring. This hypothesis is supported by evolutionary starburst modeling that shows that the properties of NGC 1614 can be fitted with two short-lived bursts of star formation separated by 5 Myr (and by inference by a variety of models with a similar duration of star formation). The total dynamical mass of the starburst region of 1.3 x 10(exp 9) solar masses is mostly accounted for by the old pre-starburst stellar population. Although our starburst models use a modified Salpeter initial mass function (turning over near one solar mass), the tight mass budget suggests that the IMF may contain relatively more 10 - 30 solar masses stars and fewer low mass stars than the

  20. Cosmic ray interactions in starbursting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.

    High quality gamma-ray and radio observations of nearby galaxies offer an unprecedented opportunity to quantitatively study the properties of their cosmic ray populations. Accounting for various interactions and energy losses, I developed a multi-component, single-zone model of the cosmic ray populations in the central molecular zones of star-forming galaxies. Using observational knowledge of the interstellar medium and star formation, I successfully predicted the radio, gamma-ray, and neutrino spectra for nearby starbursts. Using chi-squared tests to compare the models with observational radio and gamma-ray data, I placed constraints on magnetic field strengths, cosmic ray energy densities, and galactic wind (advection) speeds. The initial models were applied to and tested on the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. To further test the model and to explore the differences in environment between starbursts and active galactic nuclei, I studied NGC 253 and NGC 1068, both nearby giant spiral galaxies which have been detected in gamma-rays. Additionally, I demonstrated that the excess GeV energy gamma-ray emission in the Galactic Center is likely not diffuse emission from an additional population of cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants. Lastly, I investigated cosmic ray populations in the starburst nuclei of Arp 220, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy which displays a high-intensity mode of star formation more common in young galaxies, and I showed that the nuclei are efficient cosmic-ray proton calorimeters.

  1. Starburst Galaxy NGC 3310

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are studying the colors of star clusters to determine the age and history of starburst galaxies, a technique somewhat similar to the process of learning the age of a tree by counting its rings.

    This month's Hubble Heritage image showcases the galaxy NGC 3310. It is one of several starburst galaxies, which are hotbeds of star formation, being studied by Dr. Gerhardt Meurer and a team of scientists at Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Md.

    The picture, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/26 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but starburst galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue and older stars redder, the colors relate to their ages.

    NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. The new image shows several hundred star clusters, visible as the bright blue, diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy.

    The star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show their ages range between about one million and more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' more than 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when NGC 3310 collided with a companion galaxy.

    These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once

  2. The identification of post-starburst galaxies at z ˜ 1 using multiwavelength photometry: a spectroscopic verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltby, David T.; Almaini, Omar; Wild, Vivienne; Hatch, Nina A.; Hartley, William G.; Simpson, Chris; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James; Rowlands, Kate; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Despite decades of study, we still do not fully understand why some massive galaxies abruptly switch off their star formation in the early Universe, and what causes their rapid transition to the red sequence. Post-starburst galaxies provide a rare opportunity to study this transition phase, but few have currently been spectroscopically identified at high redshift (z > 1). In this paper, we present the spectroscopic verification of a new photometric technique to identify post-starbursts in high-redshift surveys. The method classifies the broad-band optical-near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies using three spectral shape parameters (supercolours), derived from a principal component analysis of model SEDs. When applied to the multiwavelength photometric data in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey, this technique identified over 900 candidate post-starbursts at redshifts 0.5 < z < 2.0. In this study, we present deep optical spectroscopy for a subset of these galaxies, in order to confirm their post-starburst nature. Where a spectroscopic assessment was possible, we find the majority (19/24 galaxies; ˜80 per cent) exhibit the strong Balmer absorption (H δ equivalent width Wλ > 5 Å) and Balmer break, characteristic of post-starburst galaxies. We conclude that photometric methods can be used to select large samples of recently-quenched galaxies in the distant Universe.

  3. The Nature of Starbursts. I. The Star Formation Histories of Eighteen Nearby Starburst Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-Rodríguez, Sebastian; Holtzman, Jon; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin

    2010-09-01

    We use archival Hubble Space Telescope observations of resolved stellar populations to derive the star formation histories (SFHs) of 18 nearby starburst dwarf galaxies. In this first paper, we present the observations, color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and the SFHs of the 18 starburst galaxies, based on a homogeneous approach to the data reduction, differential extinction, and treatment of photometric completeness. We adopt a star formation rate (SFR) threshold normalized to the average SFR of the individual system as a metric for classifying starbursts in SFHs derived from resolved stellar populations. This choice facilitates finding not only the currently bursting galaxies but also "fossil" bursts increasing the sample size of starburst galaxies in the nearby (D < 8 Mpc) universe. Thirteen of the eighteen galaxies are experiencing ongoing bursts and five galaxies show fossil bursts. From our reconstructed SFHs, it is evident that the elevated SFRs of a burst are sustained for hundreds of Myr with variations on small timescales. A long >100 Myr temporal baseline is thus fundamental to any starburst definition or identification method. The longer lived bursts rule out rapid "self-quenching" of starbursts on global scales. The bursting galaxies' gas consumption timescales are shorter than the Hubble time for all but one galaxy confirming the short-lived nature of starbursts based on fuel limitations. Additionally, we find that the strength of the Hα emission usually correlates with the CMD-based SFR during the last 4-10 Myr. However, in four cases, the Hα emission is significantly less than what is expected for models of starbursts; the discrepancy is due to the SFR changing on timescales of a few Myr. The inherently short timescale of the Hα emission limits identifying galaxies as starbursts based on the current characteristics which may or may not be representative of the recent SFH of a galaxy. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  4. THE DRIVING MECHANISM OF STARBURSTS IN GALAXY MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssier, Romain; Chapon, Damien; Bournaud, Frederic

    2010-09-10

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of a major merger of disk galaxies, and study the interstellar medium (ISM) dynamics and star formation (SF) properties. High spatial and mass resolutions of 12 pc and 4 x 10{sup 4} M {sub sun} allow us to resolve cold and turbulent gas clouds embedded in a warmer diffuse phase. We compare lower-resolution models, where the multiphase ISM is not resolved and is modeled as a relatively homogeneous and stable medium. While merger-driven bursts of SF are generally attributed to large-scale gas inflows toward the nuclear regions, we show that once a realistic ISM is resolved, the dominant process is actually gas fragmentation into massive and dense clouds and rapid SF therein. As a consequence, SF is more efficient by a factor of up to {approx}10 and is also somewhat more extended, while the gas density probability distribution function rapidly evolves toward very high densities. We thus propose that the actual mechanism of starburst triggering in galaxy collisions can only be captured at high spatial resolution and when the cooling of gas is modeled down to less than 10{sup 3} K. Not only does our model reproduce the properties of the Antennae system, but it also explains the 'starburst mode' recently revealed in high-redshift mergers compared to quiescent disks.

  5. The Driving Mechanism of Starbursts in Galaxy Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Romain; Chapon, Damien; Bournaud, Frédéric

    2010-09-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of a major merger of disk galaxies, and study the interstellar medium (ISM) dynamics and star formation (SF) properties. High spatial and mass resolutions of 12 pc and 4 × 104 M sun allow us to resolve cold and turbulent gas clouds embedded in a warmer diffuse phase. We compare lower-resolution models, where the multiphase ISM is not resolved and is modeled as a relatively homogeneous and stable medium. While merger-driven bursts of SF are generally attributed to large-scale gas inflows toward the nuclear regions, we show that once a realistic ISM is resolved, the dominant process is actually gas fragmentation into massive and dense clouds and rapid SF therein. As a consequence, SF is more efficient by a factor of up to ~10 and is also somewhat more extended, while the gas density probability distribution function rapidly evolves toward very high densities. We thus propose that the actual mechanism of starburst triggering in galaxy collisions can only be captured at high spatial resolution and when the cooling of gas is modeled down to less than 103 K. Not only does our model reproduce the properties of the Antennae system, but it also explains the "starburst mode" recently revealed in high-redshift mergers compared to quiescent disks.

  6. Distributed generation systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Barklund, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given on a distributed generation systems model developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and its application to a situation within the Idaho Power Company`s service territory. The objectives of the work were to develop a screening model for distributed generation alternatives, to develop a better understanding of distributed generation as a utility resource, and to further INEL`s understanding of utility concerns in implementing technological change.

  7. Mechanical Feedback: From Stellar Wind Bubbles to Starbursts (Invited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oey, M. S.; Clarke, C. J.; Massey, P.

    The current understanding of mechanical feedback is reviewed by evaluating the standard, adiabatic model for shell formation and evolution. This model is relevant to phenomena ranging from individual stellar-wind bubbles to galactic superwinds, forming the basis for our understanding of the multiphase ISM, IGM, and galactic evolutionary processes. Although significant discrepancies between the model and observation have been identified, to date there are none that require a fundamental revision. A variety of evidence, ranging over three orders of magnitude in spatial scale, is broadly consistent with the standard model. This includes kinematics of individual objects, observations of hot gas, the size distribution of HI shells, and outflow rates from starburst galaxies. However, some of the most pressing issues relating to shell evolution are still outstanding and obstruct efforts to resolve key questions like the fate of the hot gas.

  8. Starbursts and dusty tori in distant 3CR radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podigachoski, Pece; Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte; Barthel, Peter; Drouart, Guillaume; Fioc, Michel

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the complete ultraviolet to submillimetre spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of twelve 3CR radio galaxy hosts in the redshift range 1.0 < z < 2.5, which were all detected in the far-infrared by the Herschel Space Observatory. The study employs the new spectro-chemical evolutionary code PÉGASE.3, in combination with recently published clumpy AGN torus models. We uncover the properties of the massive host galaxy stellar populations, the AGN torus luminosities, and the properties of the recent starbursts, which had earlier been inferred in these objects from their infrared SEDs. The PÉGASE.3 fitting yields very luminous (up to 1013 L⊙) young stellar populations with ages of several hundred million years in hosts with masses exceeding 1011 M⊙. Dust masses are seen to increase with redshift, and a surprising correlation - or better upper envelope behaviour - is found between the AGN torus luminosity and the starburst luminosity, as revealed by their associated dust components. The latter consistently exceeds the former by a constant factor, over a range of one order of magnitude in both quantities.

  9. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  10. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  11. Understanding the SEDS of Massive Stars and Radiative Feedback from Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrow, Jordan A.; Oey, M. S.; Pellegrini, E. W.; Veilleux, S.; McDonald, M.; Martin, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    Massive stars strongly influence the properties of their interstellar and intergalactic environments through radiative feedback. The resulting HII regions are used as diagnostics for many galaxy properties, and the radiation from massive stars is thought to be a source for reionization in the early universe. Yet, there are still unanswered questions about the shape of the massive star spectral energy distribution and how far the radiation propagates in a galaxy. We use the emission-line spectra of a sample of single-star HII regions, in conjunction with photoionization simulations, to evaluate the predictions of widely used stellar atmosphere models. The model atmospheres generate simulated HII region spectra that agree well with the observations, except at the highest energy transitions, provided that the nebular density distributions are inhomogeneous. WM-basic atmospheres are better at reproducing the observed nebular spectrum, while TLUSTY atmospheres more closely match the observed rate of ionizing photons. Based on the results of our detailed CLOUDY simulations, we create a new spectral type to stellar effective temperature calibration. We also investigate the galactic parameters that control the propagation of ionizing radiation out of a galaxy by searching for extended, photoionized emission in a sample of nearby, dwarf starburst galaxies. Using narrowband emission-line images taken with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter, we create ionization parameter maps of the starbursts. In NGC 5253, we detect an optically thin ionization cone extending from the central starburst, which is suggestive of the escape of ionizing radiation. The narrow morphology of the cone supports the scenario that an orientation bias contributes to the challenge of detecting Lyman continuum in starbursts and Lyman Break Galaxies.

  12. Vaginal drug distribution modeling.

    PubMed

    Katz, David F; Yuan, Andrew; Gao, Yajing

    2015-09-15

    This review presents and applies fundamental mass transport theory describing the diffusion and convection driven mass transport of drugs to the vaginal environment. It considers sources of variability in the predictions of the models. It illustrates use of model predictions of microbicide drug concentration distribution (pharmacokinetics) to gain insights about drug effectiveness in preventing HIV infection (pharmacodynamics). The modeling compares vaginal drug distributions after different gel dosage regimens, and it evaluates consequences of changes in gel viscosity due to aging. It compares vaginal mucosal concentration distributions of drugs delivered by gels vs. intravaginal rings. Finally, the modeling approach is used to compare vaginal drug distributions across species with differing vaginal dimensions. Deterministic models of drug mass transport into and throughout the vaginal environment can provide critical insights about the mechanisms and determinants of such transport. This knowledge, and the methodology that obtains it, can be applied and translated to multiple applications, involving the scientific underpinnings of vaginal drug distribution and the performance evaluation and design of products, and their dosage regimens, that achieve it. PMID:25933938

  13. Near-IR spectral evolution of dusty starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançon, Ariane; Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    1996-11-01

    We propose a multicomponent analysis of starburst galaxies, based on a model that takes into account the young and evolved stellar components and the gas emission, with their respective extinction, in the frame of a coherent dust distribution pattern. Near-IR signatures are preferentially investigated, in order to penetrate as deep as possible into the dusty starburst cores. We computed the 1.4-2.5 μm spectra of synthetic stellar populations evolving through strong, short timescale bursts of star formation (continuum and lines, R ≃ 500). The evolution model is specifically sensitive to cool stellar populations (AGB and red supergiant stars). It takes advantage of the stellar library of Lançon & Rocca-Volmerange (1992) [A&ASS, 96, 593], observed with the same instrument (FTS/CFHT) as the analysed galaxy sample, so that the instrumental effects are minimised. The main near-IR observable constraints are the molecular signatures of CO and H2O and the slope of the continuum, observed over a range exceptionally broad for spectroscopic data. The H - K colour determined from the spectra measures the intrinsic stellar energy distribution but also differential extinction, which is further constrained by optical emission line ratios. Other observational constraints are the near-IR emission lines (Brγ, He I 2.06 μm, [Fe II] 1.64 μm, H2 2.12 μm) and the far-IR luminosity. The coherence of the results relies on the interpretation in terms of stellar populations from which all observable properties are derived, so that the link between the various wavelength ranges is secured. The luminosity LK is used for the absolute calibration. We apply this approach to the typical spectrum of the core of NGC 1614. Consistent solutions for the starburst characteristics (star-formation rate, IMF, burst age, morphology) are found and the role of each observational constraint in deriving satisfactory models is extensively discussed. The acceptable contamination of the K band light by the

  14. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY ON THE FATE OF IONIZING RADIATION IN LOCAL STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hanish, D. J.; Oey, M. S.; Rigby, J. R.; Lee, J. C.; De Mello, D. F.

    2010-12-20

    The fate of ionizing radiation is vital for understanding cosmic ionization, energy budgets in the interstellar and intergalactic medium, and star formation rate indicators. The low observed escape fractions of ionizing radiation have not been adequately explained, and there is evidence that some starbursts have high escape fractions. We examine the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of a sample of local star-forming galaxies, containing 13 local starburst galaxies and 10 of their ordinary star-forming counterparts, to determine if there exist significant differences in the fate of ionizing radiation in these galaxies. We find that the galaxy-to-galaxy variations in the SEDs are much larger than any systematic differences between starbursts and non-starbursts. For example, we find no significant differences in the total absorption of ionizing radiation by dust, traced by the 24 {mu}m, 70 {mu}m, and 160 {mu}m MIPS bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope, although the dust in starburst galaxies appears to be hotter than that of non-starburst galaxies. We also observe no excess ultraviolet flux in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer bands that could indicate a high escape fraction of ionizing photons in starburst galaxies. The small H{alpha} fractions of the diffuse, warm ionized medium (WIM) in starburst galaxies are apparently due to temporarily boosted H{alpha} luminosity within the star-forming regions themselves, with an independent, constant WIM luminosity. This independence of the WIM and starburst luminosities contrasts with WIM behavior in non-starburst galaxies and underscores our poor understanding of radiation transfer in both ordinary and starburst galaxies.

  15. Neutral Gas and Low-Redshift Starbursts: From Infall to Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne; Oey, M. S.; Salzer, J. J.; Van Sistine, A.; Haynes, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    The interplay of gas inflows, star formation, and feedback drives galaxy evolution, and starburst galaxies provide important laboratories for probing these processes at their most extreme. With two samples of low-redshift starburst galaxies, we examine the conversion of neutral gas into stars and the subsequent effects of stellar feedback on the neutral interstellar medium (ISM). The ALFALFA Hα survey represents a complete, volume-limited sample of HI-selected galaxies with 21 cm spectra and Hα and R-band imaging. By contrasting the starburst galaxies with the rest of the gas-rich galaxy population, we investigate the roles of galaxy morphology, HI kinematics, and the atomic gas supply in triggering extreme levels of star formation. Both an elevated HI gas supply and an external disturbance are necessary to drive the starbursts. While neutral gas may fuel a starburst, it may also increase starbursts' optical depths and hinder the transport of ionizing radiation. In contrast to the expectations for high-redshift star-forming galaxies, neutral gas appears to effectively bar the escape of ionizing radiation in most low-redshift starbursts. To evaluate the impact of radiative feedback in extreme starbursts, we analyze optical spectra of the Green Pea galaxies, a low-redshift sample selected by their intense [O III] λ5007 emission and compact sizes. We use nebular photoionization and stellar population models to constrain the Peas' burst ages, ionizing sources, and optical depths and find that the Peas are likely optically thin to Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation. These young starbursts still generate substantial ionizing radiation, while recent supernovae may have carved holes in the ISM that enhance LyC photon escape into the intergalactic medium. While the ALFALFA survey demonstrates the role of external processes in triggering starbursts, the Green Peas show that starbursts' radiation can escape to affect their external environment.

  16. Starburst Driven Superbubbles Radiating to 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Ryan; Cecil, Gerald; Heitsch, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Starburst driven superbubbles can produce large scale galactic outflows. Whether any given starburst can create an outflow depends on several variables including the rate at which energy and mass are injected into the interstellar medium (ISM), the radiative cooling prescription used, and the overall density distribution of the ISM. We investigate the effect that two different temperature floors in our radiative cooling prescription have on wind kinematics and content. We find that cooling to 10 K instead of to 104 K increases the mass fraction of cold neutral and hot X-ray gas in the galactic wind while halving that in warm Hα. For sufficiently powerful starbursts our cooling prescription does not affect the terminal velocity of gas within the superbubble. Filaments embedded in the hot galactic wind contain warm and cold gas which moves slower than the surrounding wind, with the coldest gas hardly moving with respect to the galaxy. Optically bright filaments form at the edge of merging superbubbles and if anchored to a star forming complex will persist and grow to > 400 pc in length. These filaments are the main source of warm and cold gas being transported into the galactic halo. Using synthetic absorption profiles we measure the velocity of the warm and hot gas phases and find vwarm ∝ vhot0.5. We also find that vhot ∝ SFR0.5, which implies vwarm ∝ SFR0.25. Warm and cold gas embedded in the galactic wind show asymmetric absorption profiles consistent with observations and theoretical predictions. These asymmetries can be used to infer the kinematics of the filaments and associated dense cores.

  17. Stellar Rotation Curves of Starbursting Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zee, Liese; Skillman, Evan D.; Salzer, John J.

    2001-02-01

    A year ago, we successfully completed a pilot project to obtain stellar rotation curves of starbursting dwarf galaxies. These observations provided the first spatially resolved stellar rotation curves of gas-rich dwarf galaxies. We now propose to expand our sample (by a factor of 2) by observing 4 additional dwarf galaxies with the CTIO 4m. The fundamental question to be addressed is whether the gas and stars are kinematically coupled in these small galaxies. These observations will place the first kinematic constraints on evolutionary models for dwarf galaxies.

  18. Imaging the most extreme starbursts in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Alexander; Bremer, Malcolm; Bock, Jamie; Oliver, Sebastien; Ivison, Rob; Farrah, Duncan; Cooray, Asantha; Clements, Dave; Schulz, Bernhard; Riechers, Dominik; Ibar, Edo; Vaccari, Mattia; Glenn, Jason; Omont, Alain; Valiente, Elisabetta; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    The HerMES and H-ATLAS projects, using Herschel/SPIRE data, have discovered a population of ultra-red (hence high-z), faint (hence unlensed), dusty extreme star forming galaxies, which are likely among the most distant, luminous and massive known. Follow up of the first few sources has confirmed that they predominantly lie above z > 4, including one souce at z=6.3. However, current observations of these sources can only probe their young, starbursting stellar populations. In order to form a complete picture of their stellar content, as well as place the starburst within the context of the history of these systems, we request Spitzer observations of 20 such sources. In addition, this data will be sensitive to un-obscured starbursts (LBGs) associated with the same overdensity, allowing us to test whether our targets serve as signposts to high-z protoclusters as suggested by structure formation models.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of Post-starburst Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cales, S. L.; Brotherton, M. S.; Shang, Zhaohui; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Canalizo, G.; Stoll, R.; Ganguly, R.; Vanden Berk, D.; Paul, C.; Diamond-Stanic, A.

    2011-11-01

    We present images of 29 post-starburst quasars (PSQs) from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel Snapshot program. These broadlined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) possess the spectral signatures of massive (M burst ~ 1010 M sun), moderate-aged stellar populations (hundreds of Myr). Thus, their composite nature provides insight into the AGN-starburst connection. We measure quasar-to-host galaxy light contributions via semi-automated two-dimensional light profile fits of point-spread-function-subtracted images. We examine the host morphologies and model the separate bulge and disk components. The HST/ACS-F606W images reveal an equal number of spiral (13/29) and early-type (13/29) hosts, with the remaining three hosts having indeterminate classifications. AGNs hosted by early-type galaxies have on average greater luminosity than those hosted by spiral galaxies. Disturbances such as tidal tails, shells, star-forming knots, and asymmetries are seen as signposts of interaction/merger activity. Disturbances like these were found in 17 of the 29 objects and are evenly distributed among early-type and spiral galaxies. Two of these systems are clearly merging with their companions. Compared to other AGNs of similar luminosity and redshift, these PSQs have a higher fraction of early-type hosts and disturbances. Our most luminous objects with disturbed early-type host galaxies appear to be consistent with merger products. Thus, these luminous galaxies may represent a phase in an evolutionary scenario for merger-driven activity. Our less luminous objects appear to be consistent with Seyfert galaxies not requiring triggering by major mergers. Many of these Seyferts are barred spiral galaxies.

  20. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF POST-STARBURST QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cales, S. L.; Brotherton, M. S.; Shang Zhaohui; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Canalizo, G.; Stoll, R.; Ganguly, R.; Vanden Berk, D.; Paul, C.; Diamond-Stanic, A. E-mail: mbrother@uwyo.edu E-mail: bennert@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: stoll@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: daniel.vandenberk@email.stvincent.edu E-mail: aleks@ucsd.edu

    2011-11-10

    We present images of 29 post-starburst quasars (PSQs) from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide Field Channel Snapshot program. These broadlined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) possess the spectral signatures of massive (M{sub burst} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}), moderate-aged stellar populations (hundreds of Myr). Thus, their composite nature provides insight into the AGN-starburst connection. We measure quasar-to-host galaxy light contributions via semi-automated two-dimensional light profile fits of point-spread-function-subtracted images. We examine the host morphologies and model the separate bulge and disk components. The HST/ACS-F606W images reveal an equal number of spiral (13/29) and early-type (13/29) hosts, with the remaining three hosts having indeterminate classifications. AGNs hosted by early-type galaxies have on average greater luminosity than those hosted by spiral galaxies. Disturbances such as tidal tails, shells, star-forming knots, and asymmetries are seen as signposts of interaction/merger activity. Disturbances like these were found in 17 of the 29 objects and are evenly distributed among early-type and spiral galaxies. Two of these systems are clearly merging with their companions. Compared to other AGNs of similar luminosity and redshift, these PSQs have a higher fraction of early-type hosts and disturbances. Our most luminous objects with disturbed early-type host galaxies appear to be consistent with merger products. Thus, these luminous galaxies may represent a phase in an evolutionary scenario for merger-driven activity. Our less luminous objects appear to be consistent with Seyfert galaxies not requiring triggering by major mergers. Many of these Seyferts are barred spiral galaxies.

  1. Probing a Starburst Galaxy's Superwind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocke, John

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph Science Team for IGM studies proposes to observe the bright QSO/starburst galaxy pair, SBS1108+560/M108 for the following purposes: 1. To measure the FUV brightness of the QSO to determine whether an HST/COS observation is viable and to set its exposure times. 2. To determine the locations of the brighter star forming regions in the disk of M108 to compare wth high resolution HI 21cm, H alpha and soft X-ray continuum maps which show supershells, line-emitting loops and extra-planar clumps of hot gas. 3. To use the relative extinctions of near-side and far-side star forming regions to determine the orientation of M108 in space. This determination is required in order to correctly interpret the kinematics of any QSO absorption line system(s) found in our COS spectrum of SBS1108+560. M108 (NGC3556) is a moderate starburst from the IRAS-selected sample of Lehnert & Heckman, moderately inclined on the sky (75 deg.) and very nearby (14 Mpc). The proximity of SBS1108+560 to M108 (25 kpc) and its location quite close to the minor-axis of M108 make this pairing quite unusual (one of only 3 to be observed by COS) and an important opportunity for understanding the nature and dynamics of starburst superwinds. An important question we hope to answer with this set of GALEX and HST data is whether starburst winds from massive spiral galaxies actually escape the gaalxy's gravitational potential and so enrich the IGM with metals."

  2. NuSTAR Observations of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Andrew; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Wik, Daniel R.; Yukita, Mihoko; Lehmer, Bret; Zezas, Andreas; Maccarone, Tom; Venters, Tonia M.; Antoniou, Vallia; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; NuSTAR Starburst Team

    2016-01-01

    NuSTAR, the first satellite with hard X-ray focusing optics, opens up the possibility to not only detect starburstn galaxies above 10 keV for the first time but also characterize their hard X-ray properties. Here we present an overview of a NuSTAR program to survey seven normal/starburst galaxies: NGC 253, M82, M83, NGC 3256, NGC 3310, Arp 299, and M31. We also discuss data analysis strategies. All galaxies have been observed coordinated with either Chandra or XMM-Newton or both. The main results of these observations were: we characterized the typical starburst spectrum above 10 keV and showed that the spectrum is soft (photon index ~ 3) above 7 keV and determined that individually detected sources are generally black holes in a "transition" accretion state or neutron star systems accreting near the Eddington rate, and variability on time scales of weeks to months is typically detected. In the case of NGC 253 we decomposed the unresolved hard X-ray emission between background, unresolved binaries and truly diffuse flux and found that the diffuse flux upper limit is marginally above model predictions for inverse-Compton scattering of IR photons by cosmic rays.

  3. Near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of violent starburst environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) integral-field spectroscopy (IFS) of violent starburst environments at high spatial (and spectral) resolution has the potential to revolutionise our ideas regarding the local interactions between the newly formed massive stars and the interstellar medium (ISM) of their host galaxies. To illustrate this point, I present NIR IFS analysis of the central starburst region of NGC 1140, obtained with CIRPASS on Gemini-South. While strong [FeII] emission is found throughout the galaxy, higher-order Brackett emission is predominantly associated with the northern starburst region. Based on the spatial distributions of the [FeII] versus Brackett line emission, I conclude that a galaxy-wide starburst was induced several ×107 yr ago, with more recent starburst activity concentrated around the northern starburst region. I look forward and discuss the exciting prospects that IFS at higher spatial (and spectral) resolution will allow us trace (i) the massive outflows ("superwinds") expected to originate in the dense, young massive star clusters commonly found in intense starburst environments, and (ii) their impact on the galaxy's ISM.

  4. The distribution sphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.; Montgomery, F.C.; Morris, R.N.

    1993-08-01

    The equivalent sphere model, which is widely used in calculating the release of fission gases from nuclear fuel, is idealized. The model is based on the diffusion of fission products in and their escape from a homogeneous sphere of fuel; the fission products are generated at a constant rate and undergo radiodecay. The fuel is assumed to be a set of spherical particles with a common radius. The value of the radius is such that the surface-to-volume ratio, S/V, of the set of spherical particles is the same as the S/V of the fuel mass of interest. The release rate depends on the dimensionless quantity {lambda}a{sup 2}/D where {lambda} is the radiodecay constant, a, the equivalent sphere radius and D, the diffusion coefficient. In the limit {lambda}t {much_gt} 1, the steady-state fractional release for isotopes with half-lives less than about 5 d is given by the familiar relation R/B = 3{radical}D/{lambda}a{sup 2} (1). For the spherical particles, S/V = 3/a. However, in important cases, the assumption of a single value of a is inappropriate. Examples of configurations for which multiple values of a are appropriate include powders, hydrolyzed fuel kernels, normally configured HTR fuel particles and perhaps, fuel kernels alone. In the latter case, one can imagine a distribution of values of a whose mean yields the value appropriate for agreement of Eq. (1) with measurement.

  5. The Implications of Extreme Outflows from Extreme Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-05-01

    Interstellar ultraviolet absorption lines provide crucial information about the properties of galactic outflows. In this paper, we augment our previous analysis of the systematic properties of starburst-driven galactic outflows by expanding our sample to include a rare population of starbursts with exceptionally high outflow velocities. In principle, these could be a qualitatively different phenomenon from more typical outflows. However, we find that instead these starbursts lie on, or along the extrapolation of, the trends defined by the more typical systems studied previously by us. We exploit the wide dynamic range provided by this new sample to determine scaling relations of outflow velocity with galaxy stellar mass (M *), circular velocity, star formation rate (SFR), SFR/M *, and SFR/area. We argue that these results can be accommodated within the general interpretational framework we previously advocated, in which a population of ambient interstellar or circumgalactic clouds is accelerated by the combined forces of gravity and the momentum flux from the starburst. We show that this simple physical picture is consistent with both the strong cosmological evolution of galactic outflows in typical star-forming galaxies and the paucity of such galaxies with spectra showing inflows. We also present simple parameterizations of these results that can be implemented in theoretical models and numerical simulations of galaxy evolution.

  6. The Fermi bubbles as starburst wind termination shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.

    2014-10-01

    The enhanced star formation in the inner 100 pc of the Galaxy launches a superwind at ˜1600 km s-1 for M82-like parameters. The ram pressure of the wind is very low compared to more powerful starburst winds. I show that halo gas stops the wind a few kpc from the Galactic Centre. I suggest that the termination shock accelerates cosmic rays, and that the resulting inverse Compton γ-rays are visible as the Fermi bubbles. The bubbles are then wind bubbles, which the starburst can inflate within 10 Myr. They can remain in steady state as long as the starburst lasts. The shock may accelerate PeV electrons and EeV protons. The bubbles may be analogues of galactic wind termination shocks in the intergalactic medium. I discuss the advantages and problems of this model. I note that any jets from Sgr A* must burrow through the starburst wind bubble before reaching the halo gas, which could affect the early evolution of such jets.

  7. The Intrinsic Properties of the Stellar Clusters in the M82 Starburst Complex: Propagating Star Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyapal, S.; Watson, Dan M.; Pipher, J. L.; Forrest, W. J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Smith, H. A.; Fischer, J.; Woodward, Charles E.

    1997-07-01

    Near-Infrared spectroscopy combined with high spatial resolution imaging have been used in this work to probe the central 500 pc of M82. Imaging observations in the 2.36 μm CO band head are added to our previously published near-infrared hydrogen recombination line imaging, near-infrared broadband imaging, and 3.29 μm dust feature imaging observations, in order to study the nature of the starburst stellar population. A starburst model is constructed and compared with the observations of the stellar clusters in the starburst complex. Our analysis implies that the typical age for the starburst clusters is 107 yr. In addition, our high spatial resolution observations indicate that there is an age dispersion within the starburst complex that is correlated with projected distance from the center of the galaxy. The inferred age dispersion is 6 × 106 yr. If the starburst in M82 is propagating outward from the center, this age dispersion corresponds to a velocity of propagation, originating in the center, of ~50 km s-1. Our quantitative analysis also reveals that a Salpeter initial mass function, extending from 0.1 to 100 M⊙, can fit the observed properties of M82 without using up more than 30% of the total dynamical mass in the starburst.

  8. ON THE HYDRODYNAMIC INTERPLAY BETWEEN A YOUNG NUCLEAR STARBURST AND A CENTRAL SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Silich, Sergiy; Wuensch, Richard; Palous, Jan

    2010-06-10

    We present one-dimensional numerical simulations, which consider the effects of radiative cooling and gravity on the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted by stellar winds and supernovae within young nuclear starbursts (NSBs) with a central supermassive black hole (SMBH). The simulations confirm our previous semi-analytic results for low-energetic starbursts, evolving in a quasi-adiabatic regime, and extend them to more powerful starbursts evolving in the catastrophic cooling regime. The simulations show a bimodal hydrodynamic solution in all cases. They present a quasi-stationary accretion flow onto the black hole, defined by the matter reinserted by massive stars within the stagnation volume and a stationary starburst wind, driven by the high thermal pressure acquired in the region between the stagnation and the starburst radii. In the catastrophic cooling regime, the stagnation radius rapidly approaches the surface of the starburst region, as one considers more massive starbursts. This leads to larger accretion rates onto the SMBH and concurrently to powerful winds able to inhibit interstellar matter from approaching the NSB. Our self-consistent model thus establishes a direct physical link between the SMBH accretion rate and the nuclear star formation activity of the host galaxy and provides a good upper limit to the accretion rate onto the central black hole.

  9. Fueling nuclear activity in disk galaxies: Starbursts and monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Clayton H.; Shlosman, Isaac

    1994-03-01

    We study the evolution of the gas distribution in a globally unstable galactic disk with a particular emphasis on the gasdynamics in the central kiloparsec and the fueling activity there. The two-component self-gravitating disk is embedded in a responsive halo of comparable mass. The gas and stars are evolved using a three-dimensional hybrid smoothed particle hydrodynamics/N-body code and the gravitational interactions are calculated using a hierarchical TREE algorithm. A massive 'star formation' is introduced when the gas becomes Jeans unstable and locally exceeds the critical density of approximately 100 solar mass pc-3. The newly formed OB stars deposit energy in the gas by means of radiation-driven winds and supernovae. This energy is partially thermalized (efficiency of a few percent); the rest is radiated away. Models without star formation are evolved for a comparison. The effect of a massive object at the disk center is studied by placing a 'seed' black hole (BH) of 5 x 107 solar mass with an accretion radius of 20 pc. The tendency of the system to form a massive object 'spontaneously' is tested in models without the BH. We find that for models without star formation the bar- or dynamical friction-driven inflows lead to (1) domination of the central kpc by a few massive clouds that evolve into a single object probably via a cloud binary system, with and without a 'seed' BH, (2) accretion onto the BH which has a sporadic character, and (3) formation of remnant disks around the BH with a radius of 60-80 pc which result from the capture and digestion of clouds. For models with star formation, we find that (1) the enrgy input into the gas induces angular momentum loss and inflow rates by a factor less than 3, (2) the star formation is concentrated mainly at the apocenters of the gaseous circulation in the stellar bar and in the nuclear region, (3) the nuclear starburst phase appears to be very luminous approximately 1045-1046 erg/s and episodic with a typical

  10. Photoionization, Shocks or Starbursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Sutherland, R. S.

    2002-02-01

    Since Baldwin, Phillips, & Terlevich and Osterbrock & Veilleux popularized their use, optical diagnostic plots have been used to attempt to distinguish between the various modes of excitation in nuclear emission regions of both active and normal galaxies. Recently, great progress has been made in gathering new observational data, and in building theoretical models to describe the results. We will review these results, and attempt to show what parameters of the nuclear emission regions can be unequivocally derived from optical and UV diagnostics, and point the way towards making further progress in this problem.

  11. ROSAT PSPC observations of two starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkes, N.; Pietsch, W.; Hensler, G.

    1993-12-01

    We present results from ROSAT observations of NGC 1808 and NGC 2903. Exposures of 10 ksec each with the Position-Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) detector show X-ray sources at the central positions of both galaxies which are classified as nuclear starburst galaxies. Both targets, NGC 1808 and NGC 2903 appear slightly extended in X-ray maps in the energy band 0.1-2.4 keV. The X-ray spectrum of NGC 1808 shows almost complete absorption below 0.5 keV, indicating an extremely high hydrogen column density towards that source (NH approx. = 8 x 1021/sq cm resulting from model fits on the PSPC spectrum). In the case of NGC 2903, the number of counts in the ROSAT band is significantly lower than expected from a previous EINSTEIN (HEAO 2) investigation of the source.

  12. Far-infrared activity and starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belfort, P.; Mochkovitch, R.; Dennefeld, M.

    1987-01-01

    After the IRAS discovery of galaxies with large far-infrared to blue luminosity ratio, it has been proposed that an enhanced star formation could be the origin of the far-infrared emission through dust heating. Whether a simple photometric model is able to account for the FIR and optical properties of IRAS galaxies was investigated. The L sub IR/L sub B ratio, (B-V) color and H sub alpha equivalent width of normal spirals are well reproduced with smooth star formation histories. In the case of starburst galaxies, several theoretical diagrams allow us to estimate the burst strength and extinction. L sub IR/L sub B ratio up to 100 can be rather easily reached, whereas extreme values probably require IMF truncated at the low end.

  13. The Nature of Starburst Activity in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Sternberg, A.

    2003-12-01

    We present new evolutionary synthesis models of M82 based mainly on observations consisting of near-infrared integral field spectroscopy and mid-infrared spectroscopy. The models incorporate stellar evolution, spectral synthesis, and photoionization modeling and are optimized forλ=1-45 μm observations of starburst galaxies. The data allow us to model the starburst regions on scales as small as 25 pc. We investigate the initial mass function (IMF) of the stars and constrain quantitatively the spatial and temporal evolution of starburst activity in M82. We find a typical decay timescale for individual burst sites of a few million years. The data are consistent with the formation of very massive stars (>~50-100 Msolar) and require a flattening of the starburst IMF below a few solar masses, assuming a Salpeter slope dN/dm~m-2.35 at higher masses. Our results are well matched by a scenario in which the global starburst activity in M82 occurred in two successive episodes each lasting a few million years, peaking about 107 yr and 5×106yr ago. The first episode took place throughout the central regions of M82 and was particularly intense at the nucleus, while the second episode occurred predominantly in a circumnuclear ring and along the stellar bar. We interpret this sequence as resulting from the gravitational interaction between M82 and its neighbor M81, and subsequent bar-driven evolution. The short burst duration on all spatial scales indicates strong negative feedback effects of starburst activity, both locally and globally. Simple energetics considerations suggest that the collective mechanical energy released by massive stars was able to rapidly inhibit star formation after the onset of each episode. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA. The SWS is a joint project of SRON and

  14. Properties of Dust Extinction in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, D.; Kinney, A. L.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Panagia, N.

    1993-05-01

    We have studied the extinction properties of 38 starburst and Blue Compact galaxies covering the metallicity range 8.3<=log (O/H)<=9.2, by analyzing their UV+optical spectra. The UV spectra come from the compilation of IUE spectra by Kinney et al. (Kinney, Bohlin, Calzetti, Panagia, & Wyse, 1993, ApJS, to appear on the May issue). The optical spectra, spanning the wavelength range 3200-7500 Angstroms, have been observed in a IUE-matched aperture. Following standard techniques, we have derived the selective extinction E(B-V) from the Balmer decrement and the metallicity from the [OII] and [OIII] lines. In order to clarify the properties of dust extinction in the UV for starburst galaxies, we have fitted the observed UV fluxes of our galaxies in the wavelength range 1250-2600 Angstroms according to the power law F(lambda )~lambda (beta ) and studied the behaviour of beta as function of the selective extinction E(B-V). We find that these two quantities are correlated and that there is no difference between the loci occupied by the low and high metallicity galaxies in the plane beta -vs-E(B-V). The correlation indicates that a higher metallicity does not change the characteristics of individual grains, but merely increases their number. On this ground, our conclusion is that the shape of the extinction law in the UV does not depend on metallicity, for extinctions E(B-V)>0.2. Although the low metallicity galaxies in our sample follow neither the Large Magellanic Cloud nor the Small Magellanic Cloud extinction laws, the absence in our spectra of prominent 2200 Angstroms dust features illustrates that a simple application of a galactic extinction law may be inadequate to properly correct the UV spectra. Models of clumpy dust layers and of dust mixed with the ionized gas are currently under analysis.

  15. A dust-obscured massive maximum-starburst galaxy at a redshift of 6.34.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Dominik A; Bradford, C M; Clements, D L; Dowell, C D; Pérez-Fournon, I; Ivison, R J; Bridge, C; Conley, A; Fu, Hai; Vieira, J D; Wardlow, J; Calanog, J; Cooray, A; Hurley, P; Neri, R; Kamenetzky, J; Aguirre, J E; Altieri, B; Arumugam, V; Benford, D J; Béthermin, M; Bock, J; Burgarella, D; Cabrera-Lavers, A; Chapman, S C; Cox, P; Dunlop, J S; Earle, L; Farrah, D; Ferrero, P; Franceschini, A; Gavazzi, R; Glenn, J; Solares, E A Gonzalez; Gurwell, M A; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Hyde, A; Ibar, E; Kovács, A; Krips, M; Lupu, R E; Maloney, P R; Martinez-Navajas, P; Matsuhara, H; Murphy, E J; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H T; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Petitpas, G; Rangwala, N; Roseboom, I G; Scott, D; Smith, A J; Staguhn, J G; Streblyanska, A; Thomson, A P; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Wang, L; Zemcov, M; Zmuidzinas, J

    2013-04-18

    Massive present-day early-type (elliptical and lenticular) galaxies probably gained the bulk of their stellar mass and heavy elements through intense, dust-enshrouded starbursts--that is, increased rates of star formation--in the most massive dark-matter haloes at early epochs. However, it remains unknown how soon after the Big Bang massive starburst progenitors exist. The measured redshift (z) distribution of dusty, massive starbursts has long been suspected to be biased low in z owing to selection effects, as confirmed by recent findings of systems with redshifts as high as ~5 (refs 2-4). Here we report the identification of a massive starburst galaxy at z = 6.34 through a submillimetre colour-selection technique. We unambiguously determined the redshift from a suite of molecular and atomic fine-structure cooling lines. These measurements reveal a hundred billion solar masses of highly excited, chemically evolved interstellar medium in this galaxy, which constitutes at least 40 per cent of the baryonic mass. A 'maximum starburst' converts the gas into stars at a rate more than 2,000 times that of the Milky Way, a rate among the highest observed at any epoch. Despite the overall downturn in cosmic star formation towards the highest redshifts, it seems that environments mature enough to form the most massive, intense starbursts existed at least as early as 880 million years after the Big Bang. PMID:23598341

  16. The rest-frame optical morphology of starburst galaxies at 1 < z < 3.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bomee; Giavalisco, Mauro; Candels, Goods-Hershcel

    2015-01-01

    Using CANDELS combined with GOODS-Herschel in the GOODS-North and South field, we investigate the rest-frame optical morphologies of starburst galaxies at 1 We compare morphologies of MS and SB galaxies using non-parametric (Sersic Index) and parametric measures as well as the visual identification. FIR luminous starburst galaxies are usually interpreted as major wet mergers. We find that the average morphologies of SB galaxies are disky and generally have much more diffuse optical light profile than massive compact early-type galaxies (ETGs), challenging gas-rich merging as the primary dissipative mechanism to assemble very compact, massive galaxies. We find that the sizes of the SB galaxies are clearly larger than those of the MS galaxies on average. NIR to MIR colors of starburst galaxies show no evidence of highly dust-obscured compact component, which could eventually emerge as the massive compact core. Very compact SB galaxies are rather rare, and hence even from a statistical standpoint, our morphological analysis of starburst galaxies does not support the popular mechanism that powerful starburst in a highly dissipative wet merger of gas-rich disks, and subsequent quenching, is the key driver behind the formation of the massive, compact early-type galaxies observed at z~2. The light distribution of the bulk of stars in starburst galaxies is simply not compact enough to eventually evolve into the massive ultra compact ETGs at high redshift universe.

  17. Starburst outflows from nearby galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Starburst outflows from NGC 5461, 1569 and M82 are discussed. The Sc I galaxy, M101, is reknowned for the kpc-size superassociations of star clusters and HII regions that dominate its spiral arms. NGC 5461 is one of the brightest of these superassociations, rivaling the Large Magellanic Cloud in H alpha luminosity. The NGC 5461 superassociation is dominated by a single unresolved HII region of outstanding luminosity (approx. 1000 Orion nebulae). Detailed examination of corresponding continuum images indicates that only the southern plume has any sort of stellar counterpart. The other plumes are clearly diffuse with no underlying hot stars. An image of NGC 1569 is discussed. Besides showing the peculiar arm noted by Zwicky (1971) and the filamentary extensions to the North and South (as noted by Hodge 1974), this image also reveals two arc-like features of diffuse ionized gas to the South. Both arcs are concentric with the bright center of the galaxy - where the super star clusters, A and B are located. The inner arc (Arc 1) appears to follow the same curve as the SW arm thus suggesting that the two features represent limb-brightened fragments of vast superbubble that was blown out by a central starburst sometime in the past. As the classic starburst galaxy, M82 displays all the luminous hallmarks of intense high-mass star formation and outflow activity. The diffuse H alpha and x ray emitting gas along the minor axis provides especially good evidence for a bipolar outflow of hot gas which is shock heating the swept-up interstellar medium (ISM) to temperatures of approx. 10(exp 4) K. An image shows the H alpha emission within the disk and along the minor axis. Another image shows the same field in the light of near-infrared. Both figures are based on charge coupled device images taken with the McGraw-Hill 1.3 m telescope (Waller 1989). The longer wavelength emission clearly shows a more extended morphology along the major axis. The morphological discrepancy is most

  18. The formation of NGC 3603 young starburst cluster: `prompt' hierarchical assembly or monolithic starburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-02-01

    The formation of very young massive clusters or `starburst' clusters is currently one of the most widely debated topic in astronomy. The classical notion dictates that a star cluster is formed in situ in a dense molecular gas clump. The stellar radiative and mechanical feedback to the residual gas energizes the latter until it escapes the system. The newly born gas-free young cluster eventually readjusts with the corresponding mass-loss. Based on the observed substructured morphologies of many young stellar associations, it is alternatively suggested that even the smooth-profiled massive clusters are also assembled from migrating less massive subclusters. A very young (age ≈ 1 Myr), massive (>104 M⊙) star cluster like the Galactic NGC 3603 young cluster (HD 97950) is an appropriate testbed for distinguishing between the above `monolithic' and `hierarchical' formation scenarios. A recent study by Banerjee & Kroupa demonstrates that the monolithic scenario remarkably reproduces the HD 97950 cluster. In particular, its shape, internal motion and the mass distribution of stars are found to follow naturally and consistently from a single model calculation undergoing ≈70 per cent by mass gas dispersal. In this work, we explore the possibility of the formation of the above cluster via hierarchical assembly of subclusters. These subclusters are initially distributed over a wide range of spatial volumes and have various modes of subclustering in both absence and presence of a background gas potential. Unlike the above monolithic initial system that reproduces HD 97950 very well, the same is found to be prohibitive with hierarchical assembly alone (with/without a gas potential). Only those systems which assemble promptly into a single cluster (in ≲1 Myr) from a close separation (all within ≲2 pc) could match the observed density profile of HD 97950 after a similar gas removal. These results therefore suggest that the NGC 3603 young cluster has formed essentially

  19. PHOTODISSOCIATION CHEMISTRY FOOTPRINTS IN THE STARBURST GALAXY NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    MartIn, Sergio; MartIn-Pintado, J.; Viti, S.

    2009-12-01

    UV radiation from massive stars is thought to be the dominant heating mechanism of the nuclear interstellar medium (ISM) in the late stages of evolution of starburst galaxies, creating large photodissociation regions (PDRs) and driving a very specific chemistry. We report the first detection of PDR molecular tracers, namely HOC{sup +} and CO{sup +}, and also confirm the detection of the PDR tracer HCO toward the starburst galaxy NGC 253, claimed to be mainly dominated by shock heating and in an earlier stage of evolution than M 82, the prototypical extragalactic PDR. Our CO{sup +} detection suffers from significant blending to a group of transitions of {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH, tentatively detected for the first time in the extragalactic ISM. These species are efficiently formed in the highly UV-irradiated outer layers of molecular clouds, as observed in the late stage nuclear starburst in M 82. The molecular abundance ratios we derive for these molecules are very similar to those found in M 82. This strongly supports the idea that these molecules are tracing the PDR component associated with the starburst in the nuclear region of NGC 253. The presence of large abundances of PDR molecules in the ISM of NGC 253, which is dominated by shock chemistry, clearly illustrates the potential of chemical complexity studies to establish the evolutionary state of starbursts in galaxies. A comparison with the predictions of chemical models for PDRs shows that the observed molecular ratios are tracing the outer layers of UV-illuminated clouds up to two magnitudes of visual extinction. We combine the column densities of PDR tracers reported in this paper with those of easily photodissociated species, such as HNCO, to derive the fraction of material in the well-shielded core relative to the UV-pervaded envelopes. Chemical models, which include grain formation and photodissociation of HNCO, support the scenario of a photo-dominated chemistry as an explanation to the abundances of the

  20. Recent Star-formation in Post-Starburst Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Shonda; Ganguly, R.; Strom, A.; Cales, S.; Brotherton, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Post-Starburst Quasars (PSQ, alternatively Q+As) show simultaneously the spectrum of a massive A-type stellar population and a quasar. The prototype PSQ, UNJ1025-0040, shows a UV excess over the quasar spectrum, indicating more recent star-formation (Brotherton et al 2002). To gauge the frequency and distribution of these younger stellar populations in PSQs, we have collected GALEX (GR45) and 2MASS photometry for 409 objects. The objects are catalog 609 spectroscopically-selected PSQs from Brotherton et al. (2010) that uses similar criteria as Zabludoff et al. (1996) for post-starburst galaxies (PSG, E+A). For comparison, we have compiled two samples: (1) 16,000 quasars that is matched in redshift (0.01-0.7) and Sloan-u magnitude (16.1-21.2), which is blueward of the Balmer edge and provides the least contamination from the massive stellar population; and (2) 500 PSGs from Goto et al. (2007). 389 (55) PSQs show an NUV (FUV) excess over the expected UV flux if the underlying quasar were ``normal.'’ 126 (460) objects show an NUV (FUV) decrement. The observed NUV to u-band flux ratio of the median PSQ rises from 1 at z=0.01 to 2.5 at z=0.4, while the same for the median QSO remains at 1. The observed FUV to u-band flux ratio of the median QSO rises slightly from 0.6 to 0.8 over the redshift range 0.05-0.2, whereas the median PSQ is nearly a factor of three lower. The disparity between the median PSQ and QSO suggests the presence of young stars that add in NUV light, but not FUV light. To quantify the youth and mass of this putative population, we will present preliminary efforts to model PSQs using two simple stellar populations, an underlying quasar, and dust reddening. We acknowledge funding from GALEX through grant NNX10AC63G.

  1. Hi Gas Cycles and Lyman Continuum Optical Depth in Low-Redshift Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne Elizabeth

    Neutral gas both fuels star formation and determines the propagation of ionizing photons. In this work, we reveal the interactions between H I, star formation, and radiative feedback in two samples of low-redshift starbursts. Using the ALFALFA-Halpha sample, we present the first comparison of starbursts and non-starbursts within a statistically uniform, H I-selected sample. The moderate H I gas fractions of the starbursts relative to non-starbursts indicate efficient HI to H2 conversion and show that the H I supply is largely unaffected by ionizing radiation. Mergers may trigger the more massive starbursts, while the absence of obvious kinematical disturbances in dwarf starbursts may indicate periodic starburst activity, triggered by cycles of gas expulsion and re-accretion. While the ALFALFA-Halpha galaxies demonstrate that starbursts may maintain large H I reservoirs, the more powerful starbursts in the Green Pea (GP) galaxies illustrate the effects of extreme radiative feedback on neutral gas. To investigate whether the enormous [O III]/[O II] ratios in the most extreme GPs indicate LyC escape, we use photoionization modeling to constrain their ionizing sources and optical depths. Radiation from Wolf-Rayet stars or unusually hot O stars reproduces the observed [O III]/[O II] ratios, but no clear signatures of these stars are present. The GP spectra do suggest the presence of shocks, however, and accounting for shock emission necessitates a low optical depth. We therefore suggest that the GPs may be a new class of low-redshift LyC Emitters (LCEs), and we evaluate this scenario using Hubble Space Telescope COS spectra of four GPs. With these spectra, we develop a simple physical picture of the neutral gas optical depth and geometry that explains the previously enigmatic link between Lyalpha, Si II, and Si II* lines observed in high-redshift Lyalpha Emitters. Two GPs are likely optically thin along the line of sight, and their strong, narrow Lyalpha emission, weak

  2. Hydronic distribution system computer model

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Strasser, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A computer model of a hot-water boiler and its associated hydronic thermal distribution loop has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It is intended to be incorporated as a submodel in a comprehensive model of residential-scale thermal distribution systems developed at Lawrence Berkeley. This will give the combined model the capability of modeling forced-air and hydronic distribution systems in the same house using the same supporting software. This report describes the development of the BNL hydronics model, initial results and internal consistency checks, and its intended relationship to the LBL model. A method of interacting with the LBL model that does not require physical integration of the two codes is described. This will provide capability now, with reduced up-front cost, as long as the number of runs required is not large.

  3. The Starburst Cluster Westerlund 1 and its Galactic Siblings -- Observation Confronts Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, W.

    2008-05-01

    Because of their large number of stars spread over the entire stellar mass spectrum, starburst clusters are highly suitable to benchmark and calibrate star-formation models and theories. Among the handful of Galactic starburst clusters, Westerlund 1 with its estimated 150 O-stars, W-R stars, supergiants and hypergiants is the most massive young cluster identified to date in the Milky Way. While previous studies of Westerlund 1 focused largely on optical and X-ray observations of its evolved massive stellar population, we have analyzed near-infrared data, resulting in the first in-depth study of the ``lower-mass'' main sequence and pre-main sequence cluster population, i.e., of stars in the mass range 0.4 to 30 solar masses. The derived properties of the cluster population allow us to test theoretical evolutionary tracks. By comparison of Westerlund 1's half-mass radius with younger starburst clusters like NGC 3603 YC and Arches, and somewhat older massive clusters like RSGC1 and RSGC2, we find evidence for a rapid dissolution of Galactic starburst clusters, which has interesting implications for the long-term survival of starburst clusters, and the question to which extent Galactic starburst clusters might mimic proto-globular clusters.

  4. Dissecting 30 Doradus: Optical and Near Infrared Star Formation History of the starburst cluster NGC2070 from the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, Michele

    2015-08-01

    I will present new results on the star formation history of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on the panchromatic imaging survey Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). Here the focus is on the starburst cluster NGC2070. The star formation history is derived by comparing the deepest ever optical and NIR color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with state-of-the-art synthetic CMDs generated with the latest PARSEC models, which include all stellar phases from pre-main sequence (PMS) to post-main sequence. For the first time in this region we are able to measure the star formation using intermediate and low mass stars simultaneously. Our results suggest that NGC2070 experienced a prolonged activity. I will discuss the detailed star formation history, initial mass function and reddening distribution and how these relate to previous studies of this starburst region.

  5. SAMICS marketing and distribution model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A SAMICS (Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards) was formulated as a computer simulation model. Given a proper description of the manufacturing technology as input, this model computes the manufacturing price of solar arrays for a broad range of production levels. This report presents a model for computing these marketing and distribution costs, the end point of the model being the loading dock of the final manufacturer.

  6. Modeling Natural Variation through Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2004-01-01

    This design study tracks the development of student thinking about natural variation as late elementary grade students learned about distribution in the context of modeling plant growth at the population level. The data-modeling approach assisted children in coordinating their understanding of particular cases with an evolving notion of data as an…

  7. Molecular outflows in starburst nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Nath, Biman B.; Sharma, Prateek; Shchekinov, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations have detected molecular outflows in a few nearby starburst nuclei. We discuss the physical processes at work in such an environment in order to outline a scenario that can explain the observed parameters of the phenomenon, such as the molecular mass, speed and size of the outflows. We show that outflows triggered by OB associations, with NOB ≥ 105 (corresponding to a star formation rate (SFR)≥1 M⊙ yr-1 in the nuclear region), in a stratified disk with mid-plane density n0 ˜ 200-1000 cm-3 and scale height z0 ≥ 200(n0/102 cm-3)-3/5 pc, can form molecules in a cool dense and expanding shell. The associated molecular mass is ≥107 M⊙ at a distance of a few hundred pc, with a speed of several tens of km s-1. We show that a SFR surface density of 10 ≤ ΣSFR ≤ 50 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 favours the production of molecular outflows, consistent with observed values.

  8. Modeling Nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss building models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E that are based on the formalism of double distributions (DDs). We find that the usual "DD+D-term'' construction should be amended by an extra term, generated by GPD E(x,\\xi). Unlike the $D$-term, this function has support in the whole -1 < x< 1 region, and in general does not vanish at the border points|x|=\\xi.

  9. Interpreting the low-frequency radio spectra of starburst galaxies: a pudding of Strömgren spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.

    2013-06-01

    The low-frequency radio emission of starburst galaxies is informative, but it can be absorbed in several ways. Most importantly, starburst galaxies are home to many H II regions, whose free-free absorption blocks low-frequency radio waves. These H II regions are discrete objects, but most multiwavelength models of starbursts assume a uniform medium of ionized gas, if they include the absorption at all. I calculate the effective absorption coefficient of H II regions in starbursts, which is ultimately a cross-section times the density of H II regions. The cross-sections are calculated by assuming that H II regions are Strömgren spheres. The coefficient asymptotes to a constant value at low frequencies, because H II regions partially cover the starburst and are buried part way into the starburst's synchrotron-emitting material. Considering Strömgren spheres around either OB stars or Super Star Clusters, I demonstrate the method by fitting to the low-frequency radio spectrum of M82. I discuss implications of the results for synchrotron spectrum shape, H II region pressure and free-free emission as a star formation rate indicator. However, these results are preliminary and could be affected by systematics. I argue that there is no volume-filling warm ionized medium in starbursts and that H II regions may be the most important absorption process down to ˜10 MHz. Future data at low and high radio frequency will improve our knowledge of the ionized gas.

  10. X-ray Properties of the Central kpc of AGN and Starbursts: The Latest News from Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray properties of 15 nearby (v less than 3,000 km/s) galaxies that possess AGN (active galactic nuclei) and/or starbursts are discussed. Two-thirds have nuclear extended emission on scales from approx. 0.5 to approx. 1.5 kpc that is either clearly associated with a nuclear outflow or morphologically resembles an outflow. Galaxies that are AGN-dominated tend to have linear structures while starburst-dominated galaxies tend to have plume-like structures. Significant X-ray absorption is present in the starburst regions, indicating that a circumnuclear starburst is sufficient to block an AGN at optical wavelengths. Galaxies with starburst activity possess more X-ray point sources within their central kpc than non-starbursts. Many of these sources are more luminous than typical X-ray binaries. The Chandra results are discussed in terms of the starburst-AGN connection, a revised unified model for AGN, and possible evolutionary scenarios.

  11. A perfect starburst cluster made in one go: The NGC 3603 young cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Understanding how distinct, near-spherical gas-free clusters of very young, massive stars shape out of vast, complex clouds of molecular hydrogen is one of the biggest challenges in astrophysics. A popular thought dictates that a single gas cloud fragments into many newborn stars which, in turn, energize and rapidly expel the residual gas to form a gas-free cluster. This study demonstrates that the above classical paradigm remarkably reproduces the well-observed central, young cluster (HD 97950) of the Galactic NGC 3603 star-forming region, in particular, its shape, internal motion, and mass distribution of stars naturally and consistently follow from a single model calculation. Remarkably, the same parameters (star formation efficiency, gas expulsion timescale, and delay) reproduce HD 97950, as were found to reproduce the Orion Nebula Cluster, Pleiades, and R136. The present results therefore provide intriguing evidence of formation of star clusters through single-starburst events followed by significant residual gas expulsion.

  12. Chandra Images the Seething Cauldron of Starburst Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    or a black hole. "Several sources are so bright that they are probably black holes, perhaps left over from past starburst episodes," Garmire explained. The astronomers report that the X-ray emitting gas in the galaxy's core region has a surprisingly hot temperature. "Determining the source of high-energy X rays from M82 may elucidate whether starburst galaxies throughout the universe contribute significantly to the X-ray background radiation that pervades intergalactic space," said Griffiths."The image also shows a chimney-like structure at the base of the galactic wind, which may help us understand how metal-rich starburst gas is dispersed into intergalactic space." "What we don't see may be as important as what we do see," said Garmire. "There is no indication of a single, high luminosity, compact X-ray source from a supermassive black hole at the very center of the galaxy, although considerable evidence exists that such central black holes are present in many or most galaxies.". The astronomers note that recent optical and infrared data suggest most galaxies were starbursts when the universe was young and that their galactic winds may have distributed carbon, oxygen, iron and other heavy atoms that now pervade the Universe. The starburst in M82 is thought to have been caused by a near collision with a large spiral galaxy, M81, about 100 million years ago. At a distance of 11 million light years, M82 is the closest starburst galaxy to our Milky Way Galaxy and provides the best view of this type of galactic structure, which may have played a critical role in the early history of the Universe. The Chandra image was taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) on September 20, 1999 in an observation that lasted about 13 ½ hours. ACIS was built by Penn State Univ. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. To follow Chandra's progress or download images visit the Chandra sites at: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2000/0094/index.html AND http

  13. Starbursts in Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa M.; Cid Fernandes, Roberto

    2005-05-01

    Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (LLAGN), which comprise low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) and transition-type objects (TOs), represent the most common type of nuclear activity. Here, we search for spectroscopic signatures of starbursts and post-starbursts in LLAGN, and investigate their relationship to the ionization mechanism in LLAGN. The method used is based on the stellar population synthesis of the circumnuclear optical continuum of these galaxies. We have found that intermediate-age populations (108-109 yr) are very common in weak-[O I] LLAGN, but that very young stars (≤107 yr) contribute very little to the central optical continuum of these objects. However, ˜ 1 Gyr ago these nuclei harboured starbursts of size ˜ 100 pc and masses 107-108 M⊙. Meanwhile, most of the strong-[O I] LLAGN have predominantly old stellar populations.

  14. Video distribution system cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershkoff, I.; Haspert, J. K.; Morgenstern, B.

    1980-01-01

    A cost model that can be used to systematically identify the costs of procuring and operating satellite linked communications systems is described. The user defines a network configuration by specifying the location of each participating site, the interconnection requirements, and the transmission paths available for the uplink (studio to satellite), downlink (satellite to audience), and voice talkback (between audience and studio) segments of the network. The model uses this information to calculate the least expensive signal distribution path for each participating site. Cost estimates are broken downy by capital, installation, lease, operations and maintenance. The design of the model permits flexibility in specifying network and cost structure.

  15. Modeling Nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss building models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E that are based on the formalism of double distributions (DDs). We found that the usual "DD+D-term" construction should be amended by an extra term, xiE^1_+ (x,xi) built from the alpha/Beta moment of the DD e(Beta,alpha) that generates GPD E(x,xi). Unlike the D-term, this function has support in the whole -1< x<1 region, and in general does not vanish at the border points |x|=xi.

  16. The effect of central starbursts on the interstellar medium of dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Young, David S.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    1994-01-01

    Major starburst events can last tens of millions of years, and in the process they can deposit significant amounts of energy into the surrounding interstellar medium. This energy from supernova and stellar winds imparts enough momentum to the interstellar medium (ISM) that portions of the ISM can become unbound and leave the parent galaxy, taking the metal-enriched stellar debris along. In dwarf galaxies, starbursts can produce enough total energy to unbind most or all of the ambient ISM. Whether this actually occurs is a strong function of the ellipticity of the ISM distribution, with flat disks and spheres being the limiting cases. We calculate whether 'blow out' along the symmetry axis of 'blow away' of the entire ISM occurs during a central starburst in dwarf galaxies as a function of galactic mass, starburst energy, ISM density, and ISM ellipticity. The calculations cover a range of 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 9) solar mass for dwarf galaxies and include 'normal' galaxies of 10(exp 11) solar mass as well. No massive dark matter halos are assumed to be present. We find that for physically reasonable values of total ISM mass and starburst energy a blow out along the symmetry axis occurs in the majority of cases, though a significant fraction of small dwarf galaxies can lose most of their ISM. As no dark matter halos or clumpy ISM distributions are included, it is apparent that the ISM in most dwarf galaxies may be generally resistant to significant disruption by a central starburst event. The effects of this range of behavi or on the metallicities that would be observed in these galaxies is discussed.

  17. High energy (gamma)-ray emission from the starburst nucleus of NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo-Santamaria, E; Torres, D F

    2005-06-15

    The high density medium that characterizes the central regions of starburst galaxies and its power to accelerate particles up to relativistic energies make these objects good candidates as {gamma}-rays sources. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the multifrequency emission of the starburst galaxy NGC 253, from radio to gamma-rays, is presented. The model is in agreement with all current measurements and provides predictions for the high energy behavior of the NGC 253 central region. Prospects for observations with the HESS array and GLAST satellite are especially discussed.

  18. Starbursts and Galaxy Evolution: results from COSMOS survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Hinojosa Goñi, R.; Jairo Méndez Abreu, J.; Sánchez Alméida, J.

    2016-06-01

    The search for starbursts galaxies in COSMOS database by a tailored procedure that uses the photometry from SUBARU, results in 220 targets at z<0.5. The typical mass of the starburst is 10^8 and its distribution is similar to that of the quiescent galaxies in the survey at the same redshift range. From the detailed analysis of the galaxies images using the HST, the star forming clumps are characterized. The galaxies are of three different kinds, Snot, Snot and diffuse light and multiple knots. The mass of the knots are typically one order of magnitude below that of the host galaxy and the clumps in multiple knot galaxies are bigger the closer they are to the center. The sSFR however does not change with the particular position of the burst in their host galaxy, which suggests a similar process independently of their location. This result applies also to the galaxies at the largest z range (0.9). Our interpretation is that the star formation is happening at all possible locations on the galaxy discs, possibly from gas accreted from the halo or the IGM, with clumps which grow as they spiral and get to the centermost regions. Our previous work on nearby SF -tadpole galaxies of similar mass reported metallicity drops coinciding with the location of the burst what we have interpreted as SF driven by cold flows. Our results in COSMOS would be consistent with a similar interpretation and a scenario in which medium mass disks are growing by gas accretion that show up as scattered starbursts knots.

  19. Giant Hα Nebula Surrounding the Starburst Merger NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yagi, Masafumi; Ohyama, Youichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Tanaka, Hisashi; Okamura, Sadanori

    2016-03-01

    We revealed the detailed structure of a vastly extended Hα-emitting nebula (“Hα nebula”) surrounding the starburst/merging galaxy NGC 6240 by deep narrow-band imaging observations with the Subaru Suprime-Cam. The extent of the nebula is ˜90 kpc in diameter and the total Hα luminosity amounts to LHα ≈ 1.6 × 1042 erg s-1. The volume filling factor and the mass of the warm ionized gas are ˜10-4-10-5 and ˜5 × 108 M⊙, respectively. The nebula has a complicated structure, which includes numerous filaments, loops, bubbles, and knots. We found that there is a tight spatial correlation between the Hα nebula and the extended soft-X-ray-emitting gas, both in large and small scales. The overall morphology of the nebula is dominated by filamentary structures radially extending from the center of the galaxy. A large-scale bipolar bubble extends along the minor axis of the main stellar disk. The morphology strongly suggests that the nebula was formed by intense outflows—superwinds—driven by starbursts. We also found three bright knots embedded in a looped filament of ionized gas that show head-tail morphologies in both emission-line and continuum, suggesting close interactions between the outflows and star-forming regions. Based on the morphology and surface brightness distribution of the Hα nebula, we propose the scenario that three major episodes of starburst/superwind activities, which were initiated ˜102 Myr ago, formed the extended ionized gas nebula of NGC 6240. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  20. The Radio–Gamma Correlation in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, B.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of non-thermal electron–proton plasma and its emission processes in starburst galaxies in order to explain the correlation between the luminosity in the radio band and the recently observed gamma luminosity. In doing so, a steady state description of the cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and protons within the spatially homogeneous starburst is considered where continuous momentum losses are included as well as catastrophic losses due to diffusion and advection. The primary source of the relativistic CRs, e.g., supernova remnants, provides a quasi-neutral plasma with a power-law spectrum in momentum where we account for rigidity-dependent differences between the electron and proton spectrum. We examine the resulting leptonic and hadronic radiation processes by synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and hadronic pion production. Finally, the observations of NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, and NGC 1068 in the radio and gamma-ray bands as well as the observed supernova rate are used to constrain a best-fit model. In the case of NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945 our model is able to accurately describe the data, showing that: (i) supernovae are the dominant particle accelerators for NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945, but not for NGC 1068; (ii) all considered starburst galaxies are poor proton calorimeters in which for NGC 253 the escape is predominantly driven by the galactic wind, whereas the diffusive escape dominates in NGC 4945 and M82 (at energies >1 TeV); and (iii) secondary electrons from hadronic pion production are important to model the radio flux, but the associated neutrino flux is below the current observation limit.

  1. The Radio-Gamma Correlation in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, B.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a systematic study of non-thermal electron-proton plasma and its emission processes in starburst galaxies in order to explain the correlation between the luminosity in the radio band and the recently observed gamma luminosity. In doing so, a steady state description of the cosmic-ray (CR) electrons and protons within the spatially homogeneous starburst is considered where continuous momentum losses are included as well as catastrophic losses due to diffusion and advection. The primary source of the relativistic CRs, e.g., supernova remnants, provides a quasi-neutral plasma with a power-law spectrum in momentum where we account for rigidity-dependent differences between the electron and proton spectrum. We examine the resulting leptonic and hadronic radiation processes by synchrotron radiation, inverse Compton scattering, Bremsstrahlung, and hadronic pion production. Finally, the observations of NGC 253, M82, NGC 4945, and NGC 1068 in the radio and gamma-ray bands as well as the observed supernova rate are used to constrain a best-fit model. In the case of NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945 our model is able to accurately describe the data, showing that: (i) supernovae are the dominant particle accelerators for NGC 253, M82, and NGC 4945, but not for NGC 1068; (ii) all considered starburst galaxies are poor proton calorimeters in which for NGC 253 the escape is predominantly driven by the galactic wind, whereas the diffusive escape dominates in NGC 4945 and M82 (at energies >1 TeV); and (iii) secondary electrons from hadronic pion production are important to model the radio flux, but the associated neutrino flux is below the current observation limit.

  2. Evolutionary paths in starbursting transition dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellenbusch, Kate Erika

    2008-10-01

    In this thesis we present an observational optical study of a subgroup of dwarf galaxies which have characteristics of a possible evolutionary transition between actively star-forming systems and inactive dwarf galaxies. The goal of this thesis is to assess the transition nature of these systems and gain insight into their evolutionary histories. Data for the investigation consist primarily of broad-band and narrow-band Ha images taken with the WIYN 0.9m telescope. We find that these galaxies contain central starbursts embedded in older, smooth, elliptical outer stellar envelopes. They also have small HI contents and apparently lack sufficient amounts of ISM to sustain high star formation rates over a significant cosmic timescale; gas exhaustion timescales are < 1 Gyr. We also find these objects have surprisingly high HII region oxygen abundances with values near solar. This suggests the starburst came from internal gas that was previously enriched and that a significant fraction of the synthesized metals are retained. Additionally, these systems are located in loose groups and are not currently interacting with any nearby galaxies. Thus their origins are not immediately clear. We explore possible evolutionary histories for such starburst "transition" dwarf galaxies based on this puzzling set of characteristics and results from moderately deep optical imaging. We consider mechanisms where the starbursts are tied either to interactions with other galaxies or to the state of the interstellar medium.

  3. DIFFUSE HARD X-RAY EMISSION IN STARBURST GALAXIES AS SYNCHROTRON FROM VERY HIGH ENERGY ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the diffuse hard X-ray (2-10 keV) emission from starburst galaxies is a long-standing problem. We suggest that synchrotron emission of 10-100 TeV electrons and positrons (e {sup {+-}}) can contribute to this emission, because starbursts have strong magnetic fields. We consider three sources of e {sup {+-}} at these energies: (1) primary electrons directly accelerated by supernova remnants, (2) pionic secondary e {sup {+-}} created by inelastic collisions between cosmic ray (CR) protons and gas nuclei in the dense interstellar medium of starbursts, and (3) pair e {sup {+-}} produced between the interactions between 10 and 100 TeV {gamma}-rays and the intense far-infrared (FIR) radiation fields of starbursts. We create one-zone steady-state models of the CR population in the Galactic center (R {<=} 112 pc), NGC 253, M82, and Arp 220's nuclei, assuming a power-law injection spectrum for electrons and protons. We consider different injection spectral slopes, magnetic field strengths, CR acceleration efficiencies, and diffusive escape times, and include advective escape, radiative cooling processes, and secondary and pair e {sup {+-}}. We compare these models to extant radio and GeV and TeV {gamma}-ray data for these starbursts, and calculate the diffuse synchrotron X-ray and inverse Compton (IC) luminosities of these starbursts in the models which satisfy multiwavelength constraints. If the primary electron spectrum extends to {approx}PeV energies and has a proton/electron injection ratio similar to the Galactic value, we find that synchrotron emission contributes 2%-20% of their unresolved, diffuse hard X-ray emission. However, there is great uncertainty in this conclusion because of the limited information on the CR electron spectrum at these high energies. IC emission is likewise a minority of the unresolved X-ray emission in these starbursts, from 0.1% in the Galactic center to 10% in Arp 220's nuclei, with the main uncertainty being the starbursts

  4. Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission in Starburst Galaxies as Synchrotron from Very High Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the diffuse hard X-ray (2-10 keV) emission from starburst galaxies is a long-standing problem. We suggest that synchrotron emission of 10-100 TeV electrons and positrons (e ±) can contribute to this emission, because starbursts have strong magnetic fields. We consider three sources of e ± at these energies: (1) primary electrons directly accelerated by supernova remnants, (2) pionic secondary e ± created by inelastic collisions between cosmic ray (CR) protons and gas nuclei in the dense interstellar medium of starbursts, and (3) pair e ± produced between the interactions between 10 and 100 TeV γ-rays and the intense far-infrared (FIR) radiation fields of starbursts. We create one-zone steady-state models of the CR population in the Galactic center (R <= 112 pc), NGC 253, M82, and Arp 220's nuclei, assuming a power-law injection spectrum for electrons and protons. We consider different injection spectral slopes, magnetic field strengths, CR acceleration efficiencies, and diffusive escape times, and include advective escape, radiative cooling processes, and secondary and pair e ±. We compare these models to extant radio and GeV and TeV γ-ray data for these starbursts, and calculate the diffuse synchrotron X-ray and inverse Compton (IC) luminosities of these starbursts in the models which satisfy multiwavelength constraints. If the primary electron spectrum extends to ~PeV energies and has a proton/electron injection ratio similar to the Galactic value, we find that synchrotron emission contributes 2%-20% of their unresolved, diffuse hard X-ray emission. However, there is great uncertainty in this conclusion because of the limited information on the CR electron spectrum at these high energies. IC emission is likewise a minority of the unresolved X-ray emission in these starbursts, from 0.1% in the Galactic center to 10% in Arp 220's nuclei, with the main uncertainty being the starbursts' magnetic field. We also model generic starbursts, including

  5. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes

  6. Ionizing Photon Production and Escape in Extreme Starbursts: the Case of the Green Peas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne; Oey, Sally

    2015-08-01

    With similarities to high-redshift galaxies and potential Lyman continuum (LyC) escape, the low-redshift "Green Pea" (GP) galaxies represent an important test of ionizing photon production and feedback in young massive clusters. Using optical spectra and HST ACS emission-line imaging, we evaluate the ionizing sources, optical depths, and spatial variation of ionization in these unusual starbursts. The GPs’ spectra imply young starburst ages and possible low LyC optical depths. However, CLOUDY photoionization and Starburst99 models have difficulty reproducing all of the observed line ratios and suggest a need for additional hard ionizing sources. New ACS observations of four GPs highlight the extreme, compact nature of these bursts and reveal regions of low optical depth that are the likely sites of LyC escape.

  7. THE ROLE OF STARBURST-ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS COMPOSITES IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY MERGERS: INSIGHTS FROM THE NEW OPTICAL CLASSIFICATION SCHEME

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, T.-T.; Kewley, L. J.; Sanders, D. B. E-mail: kewley@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the fraction of starbursts, starburst-active galactic nucleus (AGN) composites, Seyferts, and low-ionization narrow emission-line region galaxies (LINERs) as a function of infrared luminosity (L{sub IR}) and merger progress for approx500 infrared (IR)-selected galaxies. Using the new optical classifications afforded by the extremely large data set of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we find that the fraction of LINERs in IR-selected samples is rare (<5%) compared with other spectral types. The lack of strong IR emission in LINERs is consistent with recent optical studies suggesting that LINERs contain AGN with lower accretion rates than in Seyfert galaxies. Most previously classified IR-luminous LINERs are classified as starburst-AGN composite galaxies in the new scheme. Starburst-AGN composites appear to 'bridge' the spectral evolution from starburst to AGN in ULIRGs. The relative strength of the AGN versus starburst activity shows a significant increase at high IR luminosity. In ULIRGs (L{sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}), starburst-AGN composite galaxies dominate at early-intermediate stages of the merger, and AGN galaxies dominate during the final merger stages. Our results are consistent with models for IR-luminous galaxies where mergers of gas-rich spirals fuel both starburst and AGN, and where the AGN becomes increasingly dominant during the final merger stages of the most luminous IR objects.

  8. Building a generalized distributed system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    A number of topics related to building a generalized distributed system model are discussed. The effects of distributed database modeling on evaluation of transaction rollbacks, the measurement of effects of distributed database models on transaction availability measures, and a performance analysis of static locking in replicated distributed database systems are covered.

  9. SYNCHRONIZED FORMATION OF STARBURST AND POST-STARBURST GALAXIES IN MERGING CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji; Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2010-07-20

    We propose that synchronized triggering of star formation in gas-rich galaxies is possible during major mergers of cluster of galaxies, based on new numerical simulations of the time evolution of the physical properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) during such a merger event. Our numerical simulations show that the external pressure of the ICM, in which cluster member galaxies are embedded, can increase significantly during cluster merging. As such, efficient star formation can be triggered in gas-rich members as a result of the strong compression of their cold gas by the increased pressure. We also suggest that these star-forming galaxies can subsequently be transformed into post-starburst galaxies, with their spatial distribution within the cluster being different than that of the rest of the population. We discuss whether this possible merger-induced enhancement in the number of star-forming and post-star-forming cluster galaxies is consistent with the observed evolution of galaxies in merging clusters.

  10. Ising model for distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooyberghs, H.; Van Lombeek, S.; Giuraniuc, C.; Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Indekeu, J. O.

    2012-01-01

    An elementary Ising spin model is proposed for demonstrating cascading failures (breakdowns, blackouts, collapses, avalanches, etc.) that can occur in realistic networks for distribution and delivery by suppliers to consumers. A ferromagnetic Hamiltonian with quenched random fields results from policies that maximize the gap between demand and delivery. Such policies can arise in a competitive market where firms artificially create new demand, or in a solidarity environment where too high a demand cannot reasonably be met. Network failure in the context of a policy of solidarity is possible when an initially active state becomes metastable and decays to a stable inactive state. We explore the characteristics of the demand and delivery, as well as the topological properties, which make the distribution network susceptible of failure. An effective temperature is defined, which governs the strength of the activity fluctuations which can induce a collapse. Numerical results, obtained by Monte Carlo simulations of the model on (mainly) scale-free networks, are supplemented with analytic mean-field approximations to the geometrical random field fluctuations and the thermal spin fluctuations. The role of hubs versus poorly connected nodes in initiating the breakdown of network activity is illustrated and related to model parameters.

  11. SN Heating Efficiency of the ISM of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melioli, C.; de Gouveia dal Pino, E. M.; D'Ercole, A.; Raga, A.

    2004-06-01

    The interstellar medium heated by supernova explosions (SN) may acquire an expansion velocity larger than the escape velocity and leave the galaxy through a supersonic wind. Galactic winds are effectively observed in many local starburst galaxies (Lehnert & Heckman 1996). The SN ejecta are transported out of the galaxies by such winds which must affect the chemical evolution of the galaxies. The effectiveness of the processes mentioned above depends on the heating efficiency (HE) of the SNs, i.e., the ratio between the kinetic plus internal energy density of the ambient gas and the SN energy density. In a starburst region, several SN explosions occur at a large rate inside a relatively small volume. If the successive generations of SN remnants (SNRs) interact with each other very fast, then a superbubble of high temperature and low density will rapidly develop, before a significant increase of the ambient gas density that could lead to substantial losses of energy by radiation. In this case, it is common to assume a value for HE of the order of unity, since most of the available energy of the SNs will be transferred to the ambient gas in the form of kinetic and internal energy, instead of being radiated away. However this assumption fails to reproduce both the chemical and dynamical characteristics of most starburst (SB) galaxies. In order to solve this paradigm, we have constructed a simple semi-analytical model, considering the essential ingredients of a SB environment, i.e., a three-phase medium composed by hot diffuse gas, SNRs and clouds, which is able to qualitatively trace the thermalisation history of the ISM in a SB region and determine the HE evolution (Melioli, de Gouveia Dal Pino, & D'Ercole, A&A, 2003, submitted). Our study has also been accompanied by fully 3-D radiative cooling, hydrodynamical simulations of SNR-SNR and SNR-clouds interactions (see Melioli, de Gouveia Dal Pino, & Raga 2003, in preparation).

  12. Model-free distributed learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembo, Amir; Kailath, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Model-free learning for synchronous and asynchronous quasi-static networks is presented. The network weights are continuously perturbed, while the time-varying performance index is measured and correlated with the perturbation signals; the correlation output determines the changes in the weights. The perturbation may be either via noise sources or orthogonal signals. The invariance to detailed network structure mitigates large variability between supposedly identical networks as well as implementation defects. This local, regular, and completely distributed mechanism requires no central control and involves only a few global signals. Thus it allows for integrated on-chip learning in large analog and optical networks.

  13. Excess Submillimeter Emission in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 3310?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M.; Papadopoulos, P. P.; Xilouris, M.; Kuno, N.; Lisenfeld, U.

    2011-10-01

    We present a new observational study of the gas and dust properties in the starburst galaxy NGC 3310, whose bulk interstellar medium (ISM) resides in environments that mark (and bracket) the excitation extremes of the ISM conditions found in infrared luminous galaxies (Zhu et al. 2009). One of our major findings is that the dust emission spectrum in NGC 3310 shows a pronounced submillimeter “excess”. We tried to fit this excess by a cold dust component but very low temperatures were required (Tc ˜ 5-11 K) with a correspondingly low gas-to-dust mass ratio of 5-43. We furthermore show that it is not possible to maintain the large quantities of dust required at these low temperatures in this starburst galaxy. Instead, we conclude that the dust properties need to be different from Galactic dust in order to fit the submillimeter “excess”. We show that the dust spectral energy distribution can be fitted by an enhanced abundance of very small grains and discuss different alternatives.

  14. A statistical study of properties of Seyfert and starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahari, Oved; De Robertis, Michael M.

    1988-01-01

    Spectral and morphological data for 282 Seyfert and emission-line galaxies spanning radio to X-ray wavelengths are compiled. The data include a large number of optical emission-line measurements which have not been reported previously. These data are intended to provide a convenient summary of the relevant properties of these galaxies, as well as a data base to search for correlations among the various parameters in order to obtain a better understanding of the active galaxy phenomenon. The paper presents the data and analyzes the distributions of various properties of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies and starburst galaxies. It is found that Seyferts 2s have a higher 60 micron/forbidden O III 5007 A flux ratio than Seyfert 1s. This result, combined with the fact that Seyfert 2s are more heavily reddened, indicate that they have a higher dust content. It is also found that starburst nuclei are comparable to Seyfert 2s in far-infrared and 20 cm luminosities, although their optical spectra are markedly different.

  15. Hierarchical model for distributed seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Gomez, Javier B.; Pacheco, Amalio F.

    2010-07-15

    A cellular automata model for the interaction between seismic faults in an extended region is presented. Faults are represented by boxes formed by a different number of sites and located in the nodes of a fractal tree. Both the distribution of box sizes and the interaction between them is assumed to be hierarchical. Load particles are randomly added to the system, simulating the action of external tectonic forces. These particles fill the sites of the boxes progressively. When a box is full it topples, some of the particles are redistributed to other boxes and some of them are lost. A box relaxation simulates the occurrence of an earthquake in the region. The particle redistributions mostly occur upwards (to larger faults) and downwards (to smaller faults) in the hierarchy producing new relaxations. A simple and efficient bookkeeping of the information allows the running of systems with more than fifty million faults. This model is consistent with the definition of magnitude, i.e., earthquakes of magnitude m take place in boxes with a number of sites ten times bigger than those boxes responsible for earthquakes with a magnitude m-1 which are placed in the immediate lower level of the hierarchy. The three parameters of the model have a geometrical nature: the height or number of levels of the fractal tree, the coordination of the tree and the ratio of areas between boxes in two consecutive levels. Besides reproducing several seismicity properties and regularities, this model is used to test the performance of some precursory patterns.

  16. Cosmic-ray induced gamma-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D.

    2014-05-09

    Cosmic rays in galaxies interact with the interstellar medium and give us a direct view of nuclear and particle interactions in the cosmos. For example, cosmic-ray proton interactions with interstellar hydrogen produce gamma rays via PcrPism→π{sup 0}→γγ. For a 'normal' star-forming galaxy like the Milky Way, most cosmic rays escape the Galaxy before such collisions, but in starburst galaxies with dense gas and huge star formation rate, most cosmic rays do suffer these interactions [1,2]. We construct a 'thick-target' model for starburst galaxies, in which cosmic rays are accelerated by supernovae, and escape is neglected. This model gives an upper limit to the gamma-ray emission. Only two free parameters are involved in the model: cosmic-ray proton acceleration energy rate from supernova and the proton injection spectral index. The pionic gamma-radiation is calculated from 10 MeV to 10 TeV for the starburst galaxy NGC 253, and compared to Fermi and HESS data. Our model fits NGC 253 well, suggesting that cosmic rays in this starburst are in the thick target limit, and that this galaxy is a gamma-ray calorimeter.

  17. Dense circumnuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C.-E.; Cunningham, M. R.; Green, J. A.; Dawson, J. R.; Jones, P. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Henkel, C.; Baan, W. A.; Martín, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from a study of the dense circumnuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterize the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO+ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circumnuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in seven of the nine galaxies and HNC (1-0) in four. Approximately 7 arcsec resolution maps of the circumnuclear molecular gas are presented. The velocity-integrated intensity ratios, HCO+ (1-0)/HCN (1-0) and HNC (1-0)/HCN (1-0), are calculated. Using these integrated intensity ratios and spatial intensity ratio maps, we identify photon-dominated regions (PDRs) in NGC 1097, NGC 1365 and NGC 1808. We find no galaxy which shows the PDR signature in only one part of the observed nuclear region. We also observe unusually strong HNC emission in NGC 5236, but it is not strong enough to be consistent with X-ray-dominated region chemistry. Rotation curves are derived for five of the galaxies and dynamical mass estimates of the inner regions of three of the galaxies are made.

  18. Extended HCN and HCO+ Emission in the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G.; Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Kepley, A.

    2014-12-01

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO+, HNC, CS, and HC3N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO+ emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO+ observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO+ J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 106 M ⊙ and 21 × 106 M ⊙, or >~ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is >=0.3 M ⊙ yr-1, which would lower the starburst lifetime by >=5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 1052 erg.

  19. EXTENDED HCN AND HCO{sup +} EMISSION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G.; Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Kepley, A.

    2014-12-20

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, and HC{sub 3}N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO{sup +} emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO{sup +} observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO{sup +} J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 21 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, or ≳ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is ≥0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which would lower the starburst lifetime by ≥5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 10{sup 52} erg.

  20. Hierarchical model for distributed seismicity.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Gómez, Javier B; Pacheco, Amalio F

    2010-07-01

    A cellular automata model for the interaction between seismic faults in an extended region is presented. Faults are represented by boxes formed by a different number of sites and located in the nodes of a fractal tree. Both the distribution of box sizes and the interaction between them is assumed to be hierarchical. Load particles are randomly added to the system, simulating the action of external tectonic forces. These particles fill the sites of the boxes progressively. When a box is full it topples, some of the particles are redistributed to other boxes and some of them are lost. A box relaxation simulates the occurrence of an earthquake in the region. The particle redistributions mostly occur upwards (to larger faults) and downwards (to smaller faults) in the hierarchy producing new relaxations. A simple and efficient bookkeeping of the information allows the running of systems with more than fifty million faults. This model is consistent with the definition of magnitude, i.e., earthquakes of magnitude m take place in boxes with a number of sites ten times bigger than those boxes responsible for earthquakes with a magnitude m-1 which are placed in the immediate lower level of the hierarchy. The three parameters of the model have a geometrical nature: the height or number of levels of the fractal tree, the coordination of the tree and the ratio of areas between boxes in two consecutive levels. Besides reproducing several seismicity properties and regularities, this model is used to test the performance of some precursory patterns. PMID:20866700

  1. THE NATURE OF STARBURSTS. II. THE DURATION OF STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Stark, David; Weisz, Daniel; Cannon, John M.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Williams, Benjamin; Dolphin, Andrew; Hidalgo-RodrIguez, Sebastian

    2010-11-20

    The starburst phenomenon can shape the evolution of the host galaxy and the surrounding intergalactic medium. The extent of the evolutionary impact is partly determined by the duration of the starburst, which has a direct correlation with both the amount of stellar feedback and the development of galactic winds, particularly for smaller mass dwarf systems. We measure the duration of starbursts in twenty nearby, ongoing, and 'fossil' starbursts in dwarf galaxies based on the recent star formation histories derived from resolved stellar population data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. Contrary to the shorter times of 3-10 Myr often cited, the starburst durations we measure range from 450to650 Myr in fifteen of the dwarf galaxies and up to 1.3 Gyr in four galaxies; these longer durations are comparable to or longer than the dynamical timescales for each system. The same feedback from massive stars that may quench the flickering star formation does not disrupt the overall burst event in our sample of galaxies. While five galaxies present fossil bursts, fifteen galaxies show ongoing bursts and thus the final durations may be longer than we report here for these systems. One galaxy shows a burst that has been ongoing for only 20 Myr; we are likely seeing the beginning of a burst event in this system. Using the duration of the starbursts, we calculate that the bursts deposited 10{sup 53.9}-10{sup 57.2} erg of energy into the interstellar medium through stellar winds and supernovae, and produced 3%-26% of the host galaxy's mass.

  2. Star and Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z=5.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multiwavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  3. Star and Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z equals 5.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared (IR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multi wavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  4. Star Dust Formation Activities in AzTEC-3: A Starburst Galaxy at z=5.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eliahu

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of of high-redshift ultraluminous infrared OR) galaxies traditionally use the observed optical to submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) and estimates of the dynamical mass as observational constraints to derive the star formation rate (SFR), the stellar mass, and age of these objects. In this lecture we add this constraint to the analysis of AzTEC-3, a starburst galaxy at z=5.3. We construct different stellar and chemical evolutionary scenarios, constrained to produce the inferred dust mass and observed luminosity before the associated stellar mass exceeds the observational limit. A robust result of our models is that all scenarios require most of the radiating dust mass to have been accreted in molecular clouds. Our new procedure highlights the importance of a multi wavelength approach, and of the use of dust evolution models in constraining the age and the star formation activity and history in galaxies.

  5. EXTREMELY RAPID STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN HIGH-SHEAR CIRCUMNUCLEAR STARBURST RINGS: THE UNUSUAL CASE OF NGC 7742

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Anders, Peter E-mail: anders@pku.edu.cn

    2012-10-10

    All known mass distributions of recently formed star cluster populations resemble a 'universal' power-law function. Here we assess the impact of the extremely disruptive environment in NGC 7742's circumnuclear starburst ring on the early evolution of the galaxy's high-mass ({approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }) star cluster population. Surprisingly, and contrary to expectations, at all ages-including the youngest, {approx}< 15 Myr-the cluster mass functions are robustly and verifiably represented by lognormal distributions that resemble those commonly found only for old, evolved globular cluster systems in the local universe. This suggests that the high-shear conditions in the NGC 7742 starburst ring may significantly speed up dynamical star cluster destruction. This enhanced mass-dependent disruption rate at very young ages might be caused by a combination of the starburst ring's high density and the shear caused by the counterrotating gas disk.

  6. From H I to Stars: H I Depletion in Starbursts and Star-forming Galaxies in the ALFALFA Hα Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.; Salzer, J. J.; Van Sistine, A.; Bell, E. F.; Haynes, M. P.

    2015-07-01

    H i in galaxies traces the fuel for future star formation and reveals the effects of feedback on neutral gas. Using a statistically uniform, H i-selected sample of 565 galaxies from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) Hα survey, we explore H i properties as a function of star formation activity. ALFALFA Hα provides R-band and Hα imaging for a volume-limited subset of the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We identify eight starbursts based on Hα equivalent width and six with enhanced star formation relative to the main sequence. Both starbursts and non-starbursts have similar H i-to-stellar mass ratios ({M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}*), which suggests that feedback is not depleting the starbursts’ H i. Consequently, the starbursts do have shorter H i depletion times ({t}{dep}), implying more efficient H i-to-H2 conversion. While major mergers likely drive this enhanced efficiency in some starbursts, the lowest-mass starbursts may experience periodic bursts, consistent with enhanced scatter in {t}{dep} at low {M}*. Two starbursts appear to be pre-coalescence mergers; their elevated {M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}* suggest that H i-to-H2 conversion is still ongoing at this stage. By comparing with the GASS sample, we find that {t}{dep} anticorrelates with stellar surface density for disks, while spheroids show no such trend. Among early-type galaxies, {t}{dep} does not correlate with bulge-to-disk ratio; instead, the gas distribution may determine the star formation efficiency. Finally, the weak connection between galaxies’ specific star formation rates and {M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}* contrasts with the well-known correlation between {M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}* and color. We show that dust extinction can explain the H i-color trend, which may arise from the relationship between {M}*, {M}{{H} {{I}}}, and metallicity.

  7. From H I to Stars: H I Depletion in Starbursts and Star-forming Galaxies in the ALFALFA Hα Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.; Salzer, J. J.; Van Sistine, A.; Bell, E. F.; Haynes, M. P.

    2015-07-01

    H i in galaxies traces the fuel for future star formation and reveals the effects of feedback on neutral gas. Using a statistically uniform, H i-selected sample of 565 galaxies from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) Hα survey, we explore H i properties as a function of star formation activity. ALFALFA Hα provides R-band and Hα imaging for a volume-limited subset of the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We identify eight starbursts based on Hα equivalent width and six with enhanced star formation relative to the main sequence. Both starbursts and non-starbursts have similar H i-to-stellar mass ratios ({M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}*), which suggests that feedback is not depleting the starbursts’ H i. Consequently, the starbursts do have shorter H i depletion times ({t}{dep}), implying more efficient H i-to-H2 conversion. While major mergers likely drive this enhanced efficiency in some starbursts, the lowest-mass starbursts may experience periodic bursts, consistent with enhanced scatter in {t}{dep} at low {M}*. Two starbursts appear to be pre-coalescence mergers; their elevated {M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}* suggest that H i-to-H2 conversion is still ongoing at this stage. By comparing with the GASS sample, we find that {t}{dep} anticorrelates with stellar surface density for disks, while spheroids show no such trend. Among early-type galaxies, {t}{dep} does not correlate with bulge-to-disk ratio; instead, the gas distribution may determine the star formation efficiency. Finally, the weak connection between galaxies’ specific star formation rates and {M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}* contrasts with the well-known correlation between {M}{{H} {{I}}}/{M}* and color. We show that dust extinction can explain the H i–color trend, which may arise from the relationship between {M}*, {M}{{H} {{I}}}, and metallicity.

  8. Ionized Gas Observation Toward a Nearby Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, K.; Sorai, K.; Nakai, N.; Kuno, N.; Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Takano, S.; Kohno, K.; Nakajima, T.

    2015-12-01

    ALMA observation of a hydrogen recombination emission line toward NGC 253 was performed. NGC 253 is a prototypical starburst galaxy in the nearby universe. The recombination line was clearly detected in the central region of NGC 253 with a spatial resolution of few dozens of parsecs at the galaxy. The line and thermal free-free continuum emission show quite similar spatial distribution, and this fact shows the recombination line certainly traces ionized gas formed by young massive stars. Estimated electron temperature (6500-9000K) from the data are similar to those of Galactic HII regions. The recombination line has large velocity width at the center of the galaxy, and the velocity structure is quite different from that of molecular emission line.

  9. Observations of CO J=3-2 in the Outflow of the Starburst Galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaquist, E. R.; Clark, Jason

    2001-05-01

    Observations are presented of the distribution of 12CO J=3-2 emission in the starburst galaxy M82 covering a region 3''×3'' (2.8×2.8 kpc). This area includes the halo region involved in the superwind outflow. More limited coverage is presented for 13CO J=3-2 and C18O J=3-2. The mass of molecular gas in the halo is about 5×108 Msolar, with a dynamical timescale of the order of 107 yr. The results show the region of the outflow at higher CO excitation than previous published observations. Comparison with recently made observations of 12CO J=2-1 shows that the CO gas becomes progressively de-excited at larger distances from the starburst disk, and the isotopic ratio 13CO/12CO J=3-2 also becomes smaller outside the starburst disk. These effects are interpreted as differences in excitation and optical depth between the starburst region and the outflow and outer disk. A comparison between the 12CO J=3-2 emission with a published 850 μm continuum map shows that CO makes a significant contribution to the continuum in this band and that the fractional contribution is greatest near +/-30" from the nucleus approximately along the major axis. The progressively slower rotation of the halo gas with distance above and below the disk, coupled with consideration of the conservation of angular momentum, is analyzed to reveal the pattern of the outflow. The flow appears to diverge more strongly below the disk, with a cone angle of about 90°, which compares to about 40° above the disk. The mass and energetics of the halo molecular gas suggest the possibility that the molecular material and dust in the halo will not escape from M82 but are instead being recycled through the halo after injection as supershells by one or more transient starburst events.

  10. The Systematic Properties of the Warm Phase of Starburst-Driven Galactic Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.; Alexandroff, Rachel M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Overzier, Roderik; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Using ultraviolet absorption lines, we analyze the systematic properties of the warm ionized phase of starburst-driven winds in a sample of 39 low-redshift objects that spans broad ranges in starburst and galaxy properties. Total column densities for the outflows are ˜1021 cm-2. The outflow velocity (vout) correlates only weakly with the galaxy stellar mass ({M}*), or circular velocity (vcir), but strongly with both SFR and SFR/area. The normalized outflow velocity ({v}{out}/{v}{cir}) correlates well with both SFR/area and SFR/{M}*. The estimated outflow rates of warm ionized gas (\\dot{M}) are ˜1-4 times the SFR, and the ratio \\dot{M}/{SFR} does not correlate with vout. We show that a model of a population of clouds accelerated by the combined forces of gravity and the momentum flux from the starburst matches the data. We find a threshold value for the ratio of the momentum flux supplied by the starburst to the critical momentum flux needed for the wind to overcome gravity acting on the clouds (Rcrit). For {R}{crit} \\gt 10 (strong-outflows) the outflow’s momentum flux is similar to the total momentum flux from the starburst and the outflow velocity exceeds the galaxy escape velocity. Neither of these is the case for the weak outflows ({R}{crit} \\lt 10). For the weak-outflows, the data severely disagree with many prescriptions in numerical simulations or semi-analytic models of galaxy evolution. The agreement is better for the strong outflows, and we advocate the use of Rcrit to guide future prescriptions.

  11. Super star clusters in Haro 11: properties of a very young starburst and evidence for a near-infrared flux excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, A.; Östlin, G.; Zackrisson, E.; Hayes, M.; Cumming, R. J.; Micheva, G.

    2010-09-01

    We have used multiband imaging to investigate the nature of an extreme starburst environment in the nearby Lyman break galaxy analogue Haro 11 (ESO350-IG038) by means of its stellar cluster population. The central starburst region has been observed in eight different high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) wavebands, sampling the stellar and gas components from UV to near-infrared. Photometric imaging of the galaxy was also carried out at 2.16μm by NaCo AO instrument at the ESO Very Large Telescope. We constructed integrated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for about 200 star clusters located in the active star-forming regions and compared them with single stellar population models (suitable for physical properties of very young cluster population) in order to derive ages, masses and extinctions of the star clusters. The cluster age distribution we recover confirms that the present starburst has lasted for 40Myr, and shows a peak of cluster formation only 3.5 Myr old. With such an extremely young cluster population, Haro 11 represents a unique opportunity to investigate the youngest phase of the cluster formation process and evolution in starburst systems. We looked for possible relations between cluster ages, extinctions and masses. Extinction tends to diminish as a function of the cluster age, but the spread is large and reaches the highest dispersion for clusters in partial embedded phases (<5Myr). A fraction of low-mass (below 104 Msolar), very young (1-3Myr) clusters is missing, either because they are embedded in the parental molecular cloud and heavily extinguished, or because of blending with neighbouring clusters. The range of the cluster masses is wide; we observe that more than 30 per cent of the clusters have masses above 105 Msolar, qualifying them as super star clusters. Almost half of the cluster sample is affected by flux excesses at wavelengths >8000Å which cannot be explained by simple stellar evolutionary models. Fitting SED models

  12. STAR CLUSTER DISRUPTION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY MESSIER 82

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuo; Li, Chengyuan; De Grijs, Richard; Anders, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution, multiple-passband Hubble Space Telescope images spanning the entire optical/near-infrared wavelength range, we obtained a statistically complete U-band-selected sample of 846 extended star clusters across the disk of the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Based on a careful analysis of the clusters' spectral energy distributions, we determined their galaxy-wide age and mass distributions. The M82 clusters exhibit three clear peaks in their age distribution, thus defining relatively young, log (t yr{sup –1}) ≤ 7.5, intermediate-age, log (t yr{sup –1}) in [7.5, 8.5], and old samples, log (t yr{sup –1}) ≥ 8.5. Comparison of the completeness-corrected mass distributions offers a firm handle on the galaxy's star cluster disruption history. The most massive star clusters in the young and old samples are (almost) all concentrated in the most densely populated central region, while the intermediate-age sample's most massive clusters are more spatially dispersed, which may reflect the distribution of the highest-density gas throughout the galaxy's evolutionary history, combined with the solid-body nature of the galaxy's central region.

  13. Obscured Starburst Activity in High Redshift Clusters and Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, Dale; Lemaux, B.; Lubin, L.; Gal, R.

    2011-01-01

    Using Spitzer MIPS 24um imaging and extensive Keck spectroscopy we have found evidence for environmentally triggered starburst activity within six clusters and groups at z 0.9. I will show that the density of 24um-detected galaxies in the cluster environment is nearly twice that of the surrounding field at this redshift and that this overdensity scales with the cluster's dynamical state. The 24um-bright members often appear optically unremarkable and exhibit only moderate [OII] line emission due to severe obscuration. Although their spatial distribution suggests they are an infalling population, a close examination of their spectral properties, morphologies and optical colors indicate they are not simply analogs of the field population that have yet to be quenched. Using stacked DEIMOS spectra, we find the 24um-detected cluster and group galaxies exhibit elevated levels of Balmer absorption compared to galaxies undergoing normal, continuous star formation. A similar excess is not observed in field galaxies with equivalent infrared luminosities, indicating a greater fraction of the detected cluster and group members have experienced a burst of star formation in the recent past compared to their counterparts in the field. Our results suggest that gas-rich galaxies at high redshift experience a temporary increase in their star formation activity as they assemble into denser environments. Using HST ACS imaging we find that disturbed morphologies are common among the obscured starburst population and become more prevalent in regions of higher galaxy density. We conclude that mergers are the dominant triggering mechanism responsible for the enhanced star formation found in the group galaxies, while a mix of harassment and mergers are likely driving the activity of the cluster galaxies.

  14. SALT/RSS Longslit Spectroscopy of the NGC 1140 Starburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgh, Eric B.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Nordsieck, K. H.; Percival, J. W.; Smith, M. P.; O'Donoghue, D.; Buckley, D. A.; Loaring, N. S.

    2006-06-01

    We present a long-slit spectrum of the amorphous starbursting dwarf galaxy NGC 1140 taken by the Robert Stobie Spectrograph of the Southern African Large Telescope during its commissioning phase in November 2005. A 1.2 arcsecond wide longslit oriented along the major axis in conjunction with a volume phase holographic grating were used to produce a 800 Angstrom wide spectrum, centered on H-alpha, with a resolving power of 5500. Twelve minutes of data were obtained. Emission features from H-alpha, [NII], [SII] and HeI were observed. The peak of the emission features is observed to be 2 arcseconds north of the stellar continuum, consistent with HST imaging of the galaxy, and a bright knot of gas with a velocity offset of 100 km/s is detected about 18 arcseconds south of the continuum peak. The emission lines are well-resolved with FWHM 80-100 km/s in the inner galaxy, typical of intensely star-forming regions, while FWHM 100-140 km/s are seen in the outer galaxy, suggesting a possible galactic wind. The complex velocity field is consistent with the merger model for NGC 1140. The intensity ratio of the [SII] doublet, 6717/6731 is 1.3, indicating a low electron density, and thus modest thermal pressure despite the galaxy's starburst status. The H-alpha/[SII] ratio, which is an indicator of the presence of shocks,varies along the slit with a maximum of 8 at the peak of the gaseous emission and dropping to nearly 2 at the edges of the galaxy, with a value of 3 for the offset knot of gas. Thus shocks could play a role in the outer galaxy, while the knot is more likely a star forming region. We interpret our results in the context of a starburst induced by the merger of two low mass galaxies, as previously discussed by Hunter et al. (1994, ApJS, 91, 79).

  15. Distance distribution in configuration-model networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Mor; Katzav, Eytan; Kühn, Reimer; Biham, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    We present analytical results for the distribution of shortest path lengths between random pairs of nodes in configuration model networks. The results, which are based on recursion equations, are shown to be in good agreement with numerical simulations for networks with degenerate, binomial, and power-law degree distributions. The mean, mode, and variance of the distribution of shortest path lengths are also evaluated. These results provide expressions for central measures and dispersion measures of the distribution of shortest path lengths in terms of moments of the degree distribution, illuminating the connection between the two distributions.

  16. Models for the hotspot distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jurdy, D.M. ); Stefanick, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Published hotspot catalogues all show a hemispheric concentration beyond what can be expected by chance. Cumulative distributions about the center of concentration are described by a power law with a fractal dimension closer to 1 than 2. Random sets of the corresponding sizes do not show this effect. A simple shift of the random sets away from a point would produce distributions similar to those of hotspot sets. The possible relation of the hotspots to the locations of ridges and subduction zones is tested using large sets of randomly-generated points to estimate areas within given distances of the plate boundaries. The probability of finding the observed number of hotspots within 10 of the ridges is about what is expected.

  17. Graphical Models via Univariate Exponential Family Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eunho; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Allen, Genevera I.; Liu, Zhandong

    2016-01-01

    Undirected graphical models, or Markov networks, are a popular class of statistical models, used in a wide variety of applications. Popular instances of this class include Gaussian graphical models and Ising models. In many settings, however, it might not be clear which subclass of graphical models to use, particularly for non-Gaussian and non-categorical data. In this paper, we consider a general sub-class of graphical models where the node-wise conditional distributions arise from exponential families. This allows us to derive multivariate graphical model distributions from univariate exponential family distributions, such as the Poisson, negative binomial, and exponential distributions. Our key contributions include a class of M-estimators to fit these graphical model distributions; and rigorous statistical analysis showing that these M-estimators recover the true graphical model structure exactly, with high probability. We provide examples of genomic and proteomic networks learned via instances of our class of graphical models derived from Poisson and exponential distributions. PMID:27570498

  18. Physical properties and evolutionary state of the Lyman alpha emitting starburst galaxy IRAS 08339+6517

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otí-Floranes, H.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Schaerer, D.; Hayes, M.; Östlin, G.; Atek, H.; Kunth, D.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Though Lyα emission is one of the most used tracers of massive star formation at high redshift, it is strongly affected by neutral gas radiation transfer effects. A correct understanding of these effects is required to properly quantify the star formation rate along the history of the Universe. Aims: We aim to parameterize the escape of Lyα photons as a function of the galaxy properties, in order to properly calibrate the Lyα luminosity as a tracer of star formation intensity at any age of the Universe. Methods: We have embarked on a program to study the properties of the Lyα emission (spectral profile, spatial distribution, relation to Balmer lines intensity,...) in a number of starburst galaxies in the Local Universe. The study is based on Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopic and imaging observations at various wavelengths, X-ray data, and ground-based spectroscopy, complemented with the use of evolutionary population synthesis models. Results: We present here the results obtained for one of those sources, IRAS 08339+6517, a strong Lyα emitter in the Local Universe, which is undergoing an intense episode of massive star formation. We have characterized the properties of the starburst, which transformed 1.4 × 108 M⊙ of gas into stars around 5-6 Myr ago. The mechanical energy released by the central super stellar cluster (SSC), located in the core of the starburst, has created a cavity devoid of gas and dust around it, leaving a clean path through which the UV continuum of the SSC is observed, with almost no extinction. While the average extinction affecting the stellar continuum is significantly larger out of the cavity, with E(B - V) = 0.15 on average, we have not found any evidence for regions with very large extinctions, which could be hiding some young, massive stars not contributing to the global UV continuum. The observed soft and hard X-ray emissions are consistent with this scenario, being originated by the interstellar medium heated by

  19. A very deep IRAS survey - Constraints on the evolution of starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacking, Perry; Condon, J. J.; Houck, J. R.

    1987-05-01

    Counts of sources (primarily starburst galaxies) from a deep 60 microns IRAS survey published by Hacking and Houck (1987) are compared with four evolutionary models. The counts below 100 mJy are higher than expected if no evolution has taken place out to a redshift of approximately 0.2. Redshift measurements of the survey sources should be able to distinguish between luminosity-evolution and density-evolution models and detect as little as a 20 percent brightening or increase in density of infrared sources per billion years ago (H/0/ = 100 km/s per Mpc). Starburst galaxies cannot account for the reported 100 microns background without extreme evolution at high redshifts.

  20. Very deep IRAS survey - constraints on the evolution of starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Hacking, P.; Houck, J.R.; Condon, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    Counts of sources (primarily starburst galaxies) from a deep 60 microns IRAS survey published by Hacking and Houck (1987) are compared with four evolutionary models. The counts below 100 mJy are higher than expected if no evolution has taken place out to a redshift of approximately 0.2. Redshift measurements of the survey sources should be able to distinguish between luminosity-evolution and density-evolution models and detect as little as a 20 percent brightening or increase in density of infrared sources per billion years ago (H/0/ = 100 km/s per Mpc). Starburst galaxies cannot account for the reported 100 microns background without extreme evolution at high redshifts. 21 references.

  1. X-ray emission from starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rephaeli, Yoel; Gruber, Duane; Macdonald, Dan; Persic, Massimo

    1991-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation of X-ray emission from a sample of 53 IRAS-selected candidate starburst galaxies. Superposed soft and hard X-ray emission from these galaxies in the Einstein-IPC and HEAO-1 A-2 and A-4 energy bands, which span 0.5 to 160 keV, is detected at the 99.6 percent confidence level, after allowing for confusion noise in the HEAO-1 data. Above 15 keV the confidence level is 97 percent. The combined spectrum is flat, with a (photon) power-law index of 1.0 +/- 0.3. The contribution of the population of sources represented by this sample to the 3-50 keV residual cosmic X-ray background is estimated to be at least about 4 percent assuming no evolution. Moderate evolution, for which there is some observational evidence, increases this fractional contribution to about 26 percent.

  2. Bright Submillimeter Galaxies: Evidence for Maximal Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretxaga, I.

    2014-09-01

    AzTEC is a sensitive bolometer camera that, coupled with 10 - 15m-class sub-mm telescopes, has mapped more than 3 sq. deg of the extragalactic sky to depths between 0.7 and 1.1 mJy at 1.1mm, prior to its current installation and operation on the 32m Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). These extragalactic surveys targeted towards blank-fields and biased high-z environments alike have allowed us to identify a few thousands of submillimeter galaxies, powerful obscured starbursts at high-redshifts (z > 1), some of which have intrinsic Star Formation Rates SFR > 1000 Msun/yr and furthermore are extremely compact (~ 1 kpc). Our results imply that these extraordinary systems are forming stars in a gravitationally bound regime in which gravity prohibits the formation of superwinds, leading to matter accumulation within the galaxy and further generations of star formation.

  3. New trends in species distribution modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Edwards, Thomas C., Jr.; Graham, Catherine H.; Pearman, Peter B.; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Species distribution modelling has its origin in the late 1970s when computing capacity was limited. Early work in the field concentrated mostly on the development of methods to model effectively the shape of a species' response to environmental gradients (Austin 1987, Austin et al. 1990). The methodology and its framework were summarized in reviews 10–15 yr ago (Franklin 1995, Guisan and Zimmermann 2000), and these syntheses are still widely used as reference landmarks in the current distribution modelling literature. However, enormous advancements have occurred over the last decade, with hundreds – if not thousands – of publications on species distribution model (SDM) methodologies and their application to a broad set of conservation, ecological and evolutionary questions. With this special issue, originating from the third of a set of specialized SDM workshops (2008 Riederalp) entitled 'The Utility of Species Distribution Models as Tools for Conservation Ecology', we reflect on current trends and the progress achieved over the last decade.

  4. Caveats for correlative species distribution modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Kumar, Sunil; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Holcombe, Tracy R.

    2015-01-01

    Correlative species distribution models are becoming commonplace in the scientific literature and public outreach products, displaying locations, abundance, or suitable environmental conditions for harmful invasive species, threatened and endangered species, or species of special concern. Accurate species distribution models are useful for efficient and adaptive management and conservation, research, and ecological forecasting. Yet, these models are often presented without fully examining or explaining the caveats for their proper use and interpretation and are often implemented without understanding the limitations and assumptions of the model being used. We describe common pitfalls, assumptions, and caveats of correlative species distribution models to help novice users and end users better interpret these models. Four primary caveats corresponding to different phases of the modeling process, each with supporting documentation and examples, include: (1) all sampling data are incomplete and potentially biased; (2) predictor variables must capture distribution constraints; (3) no single model works best for all species, in all areas, at all spatial scales, and over time; and (4) the results of species distribution models should be treated like a hypothesis to be tested and validated with additional sampling and modeling in an iterative process.

  5. THE STAR CLUSTER SYSTEM IN THE NEARBY STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sungsoon; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Narae E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-03-20

    We present a photometric study of star clusters in the nearby starburst galaxy M82 based on the UBVI-, YJ- and H-band Hubble Space Telescope images. We find 1105 star clusters with V < 23 mag. Of those, 1070 are located in the disk region, while 35 star clusters are in the halo region. The star clusters in the disk are composed of a dominant blue population with a color peak at (B - V){sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 0.45, and a weaker red population. The luminosity function of the disk clusters shows a power-law distribution with a power-law index {alpha} = -2.04 {+-} 0.03, and the scale height of their distribution is h{sub z} = 9.''64 {+-} 0.''40 (164 {+-} 7 pc), similar to that of the stellar thin disk of M82. We have derived the ages of {approx}630 star clusters using the spectral energy distribution fit method by comparing UBVI(YJ)H-band photometric data with the simple stellar population models. The age distribution of the disk clusters shows that the most dominant cluster population has ages ranging from 100 Myr to 1 Gyr, with a peak at about 500 Myr. This suggests that M82 has undergone a disk-wide star formation about 500 Myr ago, probably through the interaction with M81. The brightest star clusters in the nuclear region are much brighter than those in other regions, indicating that more massive star clusters are formed in the denser environments. On the other hand, the colors of the halo clusters are similar to those of globular clusters in the Milky Way, and their ages are estimated to be older than 1 Gyr. These are probably genuine old globular clusters in M82.

  6. Dust extinction of the stellar continua in starburst galaxies: The ultraviolet and optical extinction law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calzetti, Daniela; Kinney, Anne L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) UV and the optical spectra of 39 starburst and blue compact galaxies in order to study the average properties of dust extinction in extended regions of galaxies. The optical spectra have been obtained using an aperture which matches that of IUE, so comparable regions within each galaxy are sampled. The data from the 39 galaxies are compared with five models for the geometrical distribution of dust, adopting as extinction laws both the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud laws. The commonly used uniform dust screen is included among the models. We find that none of the five models is in satisfactory agreement with the data. In order to understand the discrepancy between the data and the models, we have derived an extinction law directly from the data in the UV and optical wavelength range. The resulting curve is characterized by an overall slope which is more gray than the Milky Way extinction law's slope, and by the absence of the 2175 A dust feature. Remarkably, the difference in optical depth between the Balmer emission lines H(sub alpha) and H(sub beta) is about a factor of 2 larger than the difference in the optical depth between the continuum underlying the two Balmer lines. We interpret this discrepancy as a consequence of the fact that the hot ionizing stars are associated with dustier regions than the cold stellar population is. The absence of the 2175 A dust feature can be due either to the effects of the scattering and clumpiness of the dust or to a chemical composition different from that of the Milky Way dust grains. Disentangling the two interpretations is not easy because of the complexity of the spatial distribution of the emitting regions. The extinction law of the UV and optical spectral continua of extended regions can be applied to the spectra of medium- and high-redshift galaxies, where extended regions of a galaxy are, by necessity, sampled.

  7. Observations of the CO J=6-5 transition in starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. I.; Hills, R. E.; Stutzki, J.; Graf, U. U.; Russell, A. P. G.; Tacconi, L. J.; Genzel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, short-submillimeter observations of carbon monoxide's (CO) mid-J rotational levels have revealed the presence of a large amount of excited molecular gas in luminous giant molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Submillimeter lines are specific probes of excited material: collisional excitation of the level energy of 116 K above ground, and 6-5 transition's critical density is approximately 10(exp 6) cm(exp -3) in optically thin gas. Radiative trapping effects reduce the excitation requirements to some extent, but detection of the CO J=6-5 line is nearly indisputable proof of the existence of gas that is both warm and dense. The excitation conditions also imply that cool (T less than 20 K) molecular clouds within the beam neither emit nor absorb in the short-submillimeter lines; in our Galaxy, clouds with active massive star formation emit the strongest short-submillimeter CO rotational lines. We used these properties to explore the distribution of excited molecular material and physical conditions within the star formation regions of several classical starburst nuclei: NGC253, M82, and IC342. We have used the 6-5 transition as a thermometer of warm molecular gas in starburst nuclei, unambiguously finding that the nuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies is substantially warmer than in typical disk clouds.

  8. Indiana Distributive Education Competency Based Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Rod; And Others

    This Indiana distributive education competency-based curriculum model is designed to help teachers and local administrators plan and conduct a comprehensive marketing and distributive education program. It is divided into three levels--one level for each year of a three-year program. The competencies common to a variety of marketing and…

  9. Transversity distribution functions in the valon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh Yazdi, Z.; Taghavi-Shahri, F.; Arash, F.; Zomorrodian, M. E.

    2014-05-01

    We use the valon model to calculate the transversity distribution functions inside the nucleon. Transversity distributions indicate the probability to find partons with spin aligned (antialigned) to the transversely polarized nucleon. The results are in good agreement with all available experimental data and also global fits.

  10. FISICA observations of the starburst galaxy, NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Raines, S. N.; Gruel, N.; Elston, R.; Guzman, R.; Julian, J.; Boreman, G.; Glenn, P. E.; Hull-Allen, C. G.; Hoffman, J.; Rodgers, M.; Thompson, K.; Flint, S.; Comstock, L.; Myrick, B.

    2006-06-01

    Using the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA) we obtained observations of the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1569. We present our JH band spectra, particularly noting the existence of extended emission in Paschen β and He I.

  11. Modeling neural activity with cumulative damage distributions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Víctor; Tejo, Mauricio; Guiraud, Pierre; Schmachtenberg, Oliver; Orio, Patricio; Marmolejo-Ramos, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    Neurons transmit information as action potentials or spikes. Due to the inherent randomness of the inter-spike intervals (ISIs), probabilistic models are often used for their description. Cumulative damage (CD) distributions are a family of probabilistic models that has been widely considered for describing time-related cumulative processes. This family allows us to consider certain deterministic principles for modeling ISIs from a probabilistic viewpoint and to link its parameters to values with biological interpretation. The CD family includes the Birnbaum-Saunders and inverse Gaussian distributions, which possess distinctive properties and theoretical arguments useful for ISI description. We expand the use of CD distributions to the modeling of neural spiking behavior, mainly by testing the suitability of the Birnbaum-Saunders distribution, which has not been studied in the setting of neural activity. We validate this expansion with original experimental and simulated electrophysiological data. PMID:25998210

  12. An infrared study of starbursts in the interacting galaxy pair Arp 299 (NGC 3690+IC 694)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Takao; Nagata, Tetsuya; Geballe, T.R.; Okuda, Haruyuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Tokyo Univ.; Kyoto Univ.; Joint Astronomy Center, Hilo, HI; Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara )

    1989-05-01

    Extensive infrared observations have been obtained of the three active regions in Arp 299. Multiaperture JHK photometry reveals that the colors of the three regions are totally different from each other, and that there are very red nuclei smaller than 4 arcsec in two of them. Multiaperture spectroscopy of the Br-gamma and the shock-excited H2 lines shows that both the atomic and molecular lines are spatially extended, indicating that Arp 299 is undergoing an active episode of star formation not only in its nuclei but also well outside of them. Although there is some evidence that suggests the presence of a compact, active galactic nucleus, a simple starburst model can explain the bolometric luminosities, production rates of ionizing photons, and H24 line luminosities of each active region in Arp 299. However, each starburst cannot last longer than 10 to the 8th yr. 56 refs.

  13. Incorporating uncertainty in predictive species distribution modelling

    PubMed Central

    Beale, Colin M.; Lennon, Jack J.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the need to solve ecological problems (climate change, habitat fragmentation and biological invasions), there has been increasing interest in species distribution models (SDMs). Predictions from these models inform conservation policy, invasive species management and disease-control measures. However, predictions are subject to uncertainty, the degree and source of which is often unrecognized. Here, we review the SDM literature in the context of uncertainty, focusing on three main classes of SDM: niche-based models, demographic models and process-based models. We identify sources of uncertainty for each class and discuss how uncertainty can be minimized or included in the modelling process to give realistic measures of confidence around predictions. Because this has typically not been performed, we conclude that uncertainty in SDMs has often been underestimated and a false precision assigned to predictions of geographical distribution. We identify areas where development of new statistical tools will improve predictions from distribution models, notably the development of hierarchical models that link different types of distribution model and their attendant uncertainties across spatial scales. Finally, we discuss the need to develop more defensible methods for assessing predictive performance, quantifying model goodness-of-fit and for assessing the significance of model covariates. PMID:22144387

  14. The Role of Radiation Feedback in Starburst Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry; Matzner, C. D.; Seaquist, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Massive bursts of stellar activity in starburst environments feed prodigious amount of energy and momentum into the surrounding neutral clouds. With sufficiently intense irradiation from starbursts, the structure of an HII region will be dominated by radiation pressure rather than ionized gas pressure, and radiative energy input in photodissociation regions (PDRs) becomes more important. This state is of considerable interest because of its role in the formation of massive stars, the disruption of giant molecular clouds, and the evolution of starburst galaxies. We study the role of radiation feedback in starburst environments via both theoretical and observational approaches. We argue that radiation pressure is the underlying mechanism for the remarkable constancy of ionization parameters in starburst environments. We also point out that clumping in the neutral material and compression by stellar wind pressure can act to reduce ionization parameters. We use the Cloudy code to determine effective ionization parameters for a population of static dusty HII regions compressed by both radiation pressure and stellar winds. We conclude that the inner starburst region of M82 and the Antennae Galaxies HII regions are both dominated by a combination of radiation pressure and shocked winds. We investigate radiative energy feedback in starburst environments by observing the nearest starburst region 30 Doradus in the LMC. We observe 30 Doradus using NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) with H2 1-0 S(1), Brγ, and [FeII] lines. While H2 can be either radiative or shock excited, the near infrared [FeII] emission line traces shock activities, and the hydrogen recombination line Brγ arises from regions ionized by UV radiation. Therefore ratios of the three emission lines form very useful diagnostics to assess the fraction of radiative and shock feedback. We preliminarily suggest that radiative energy input in the 30 Doradus PDRs is non-negligible.

  15. Applying various algorithms for species distribution modelling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhai; Wang, Yuan

    2013-06-01

    Species distribution models have been used extensively in many fields, including climate change biology, landscape ecology and conservation biology. In the past 3 decades, a number of new models have been proposed, yet researchers still find it difficult to select appropriate models for data and objectives. In this review, we aim to provide insight into the prevailing species distribution models for newcomers in the field of modelling. We compared 11 popular models, including regression models (the generalized linear model, the generalized additive model, the multivariate adaptive regression splines model and hierarchical modelling), classification models (mixture discriminant analysis, the generalized boosting model, and classification and regression tree analysis) and complex models (artificial neural network, random forest, genetic algorithm for rule set production and maximum entropy approaches). Our objectives are: (i) to compare the strengths and weaknesses of the models, their characteristics and identify suitable situations for their use (in terms of data type and species-environment relationships) and (ii) to provide guidelines for model application, including 3 steps: model selection, model formulation and parameter estimation. PMID:23731809

  16. Do Tidal Interactions Trigger Starbursts in Dwarf Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkus, Charlotte; Cannon, John M.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Johnson, Megan C.; Skillman, Evan D.; Bailin, Jeremy; Ford, Alyson; Koribalski, Baerbel

    2015-01-01

    Starburst dwarf galaxies are extensively studied systems, though the mechanism that triggers starbursts is poorly understood. Tidal interactions and gas accretion are thought to be potential starburst trigger mechanisms, although internal, secular drivers have not been ruled out. If starbursts are a result of external perturbations, then one would expect to see signatures of interaction in the gaseous disk of the galaxy. To examine this hypothesis, we analyze both archival and newly-obtained deep, wide-field HI maps from the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of a sample of nineteen well-studied nearby starburst dwarf galaxies to search for such signs of interactions. Our sample is unique in that we have previously derived the star formation histories from Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the resolved stellar populations for all galaxies. In this work we focus on NGC 784 and NGC 672, which both may lie on a filament of dark matter isolated in space. We evaluate methods to determine the presence and properties of low surface-brightness neutral gas in the outer disk regions. This work serves as a prototype for forthcoming analysis of the full sample. With our results we hope to not only establish an effective data analysis procedure, but to also confirm or rule-out tidal interactions as a triggering mechanism of starbursts in this sample of dwarf galaxies.

  17. The Properties of Post-starburst Quasars Based on Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cales, Sabrina L.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Shang, Zhaohui; Runnoe, Jessie C.; DiPompeo, Michael A.; Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Canalizo, Gabriela; Hiner, Kyle D.; Stoll, R.; Ganguly, Rajib; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of a sample of 38 post-starburst quasars (PSQs) at z ~ 0.3, 29 of which have morphological classifications based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. These broad-lined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) possess the spectral signatures of massive intermediate-aged stellar populations, making them potentially useful for studying connections between nuclear activity and host galaxy evolution. We model the spectra in order to determine the ages and masses of the host stellar populations, and the black hole masses and Eddington fractions of the AGNs. Our model components include an instantaneous starburst, a power law, and emission lines. We find that the PSQs have M BH ~ 108 M ⊙ accreting at a few percent of Eddington luminosity and host ~1010.5 M ⊙ stellar populations which are several hundred Myr to a few Gyr old. We investigate relationships among these derived properties, spectral properties, and morphologies. We find that PSQs hosted in spiral galaxies have significantly weaker AGN luminosities, older starburst ages, and narrow emission-line ratios diagnostic of ongoing star formation when compared to their early-type counterparts. We conclude that the early-type PSQs are likely the result of major mergers and were likely luminous infrared galaxies in the past, while spiral PSQs with more complex star formation histories are triggered by less dramatic events (e.g., harassment, bars). We provide diagnostics to distinguish the early-type and spiral hosts when high spatial resolution imaging is not available.

  18. Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission from the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, David L.; Paglione, Timothy A. D.; Marscher, Alan P.; Jackson, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The starburst galaxy NGC 253 was observed with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) satellite. We obtain a 2 sigma upper limit to the gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV of 8 x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm/s. Because of their large gas column densities and supernova rates, nearby starburst galaxies were predicted to have gamma-ray fluxes detectable by EGRET. Our nondetection of gamma-rays from NGC 253 motivates us to reexamine in detail the premise of supernova acceleration of cosmic rays and the effect of enhanced cloud densities, photon densities, and magnetic fields on the high-energy spectra of galaxies. By modeling the expected gamma-ray and synchrotron spectra from NGC 253, we find that up to 20% of the energy from supernovae is transferred to cosmic rays in the starburst, which is consistent with supernova acceleration models. Our calculations match the EGRET and radio data well with a supernova rate of 0.08/yr, a magnetic field B greater than or approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp -5) G, a density n approximately 300/cu cm, a photon density U(sub ph) approximately 200 eV/cu cm, and an escape timescale tau(sub o) less than or approximately equal to 10 Myr.

  19. Population distribution models: species distributions are better modeled using biologically relevant data partitions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Predicting the geographic distribution of widespread species through modeling is problematic for several reasons including high rates of omission errors. One potential source of error for modeling widespread species is that subspecies and/or races of species are frequently pooled for analyses, which may mask biologically relevant spatial variation within the distribution of a single widespread species. We contrast a presence-only maximum entropy model for the widely distributed oldfield mouse (Peromyscus polionotus) that includes all available presence locations for this species, with two composite maximum entropy models. The composite models either subdivided the total species distribution into four geographic quadrants or by fifteen subspecies to capture spatially relevant variation in P. polionotus distributions. Results Despite high Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) values for all models, the composite species distribution model of P. polionotus generated from individual subspecies models represented the known distribution of the species much better than did the models produced by partitioning data into geographic quadrants or modeling the whole species as a single unit. Conclusions Because the AUC values failed to describe the differences in the predictability of the three modeling strategies, we suggest using omission curves in addition to AUC values to assess model performance. Dividing the data of a widespread species into biologically relevant partitions greatly increased the performance of our distribution model; therefore, this approach may prove to be quite practical and informative for a wide range of modeling applications. PMID:21929792

  20. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of galaxies: introducing the artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, L.; Schurer, A.; Granato, G. L.; Almeida, C.; Baugh, C. M.; Frenk, C. S.; Lacey, C. G.; Paoletti, L.; Petrella, A.; Selvestrel, D.

    2011-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of galaxies is a complex function of the star formation history and geometrical arrangement of stars and gas in galaxies. The computation of the radiative transfer of stellar radiation through the dust distribution is time-consuming. This aspect becomes unacceptable in particular when dealing with the predictions by semi-analytical galaxy formation models populating cosmological volumes, to be then compared with multi-wavelength surveys. Mainly for this aim, we have implemented an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm into the spectro-photometric and radiative transfer code GRASIL in order to compute the SED of galaxies in a short computing time. This allows to avoid the adoption of empirical templates that may have nothing to do with the mock galaxies output by models. The ANN has been implemented to compute the dust emission spectrum (the bottleneck of the computation), and separately for the star-forming molecular clouds (MC) and the diffuse dust (due to their different properties and dependencies). We have defined the input neurons effectively determining their emission, which means this implementation has a general applicability and is not linked to a particular galaxy formation model. We have trained the net for the disc and spherical geometries, and tested its performance to reproduce the SED of disc and starburst galaxies, as well as for a semi-analytical model for spheroidal galaxies. We have checked that for this model both the SEDs and the galaxy counts in the Herschel bands obtained with the ANN approximation are almost superimposed to the same quantities obtained with the full GRASIL. We conclude that this method appears robust and advantageous, and will present the application to a more complex SAM in another paper.

  1. Statistical model with a standard Γ distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, Marco; Chakraborti, Anirban; Kaski, Kimmo

    2004-07-01

    We study a statistical model consisting of N basic units which interact with each other by exchanging a physical entity, according to a given microscopic random law, depending on a parameter λ . We focus on the equilibrium or stationary distribution of the entity exchanged and verify through numerical fitting of the simulation data that the final form of the equilibrium distribution is that of a standard Gamma distribution. The model can be interpreted as a simple closed economy in which economic agents trade money and a saving criterion is fixed by the saving propensity λ . Alternatively, from the nature of the equilibrium distribution, we show that the model can also be interpreted as a perfect gas at an effective temperature T(λ) , where particles exchange energy in a space with an effective dimension D(λ) .

  2. Improving Distributed Diagnosis Through Structural Model Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregon, Anibal; Daigle, Matthew John; Roychoudhury, Indranil; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2011-01-01

    Complex engineering systems require efficient fault diagnosis methodologies, but centralized approaches do not scale well, and this motivates the development of distributed solutions. This work presents an event-based approach for distributed diagnosis of abrupt parametric faults in continuous systems, by using the structural model decomposition capabilities provided by Possible Conflicts. We develop a distributed diagnosis algorithm that uses residuals computed by extending Possible Conflicts to build local event-based diagnosers based on global diagnosability analysis. The proposed approach is applied to a multitank system, and results demonstrate an improvement in the design of local diagnosers. Since local diagnosers use only a subset of the residuals, and use subsystem models to compute residuals (instead of the global system model), the local diagnosers are more efficient than previously developed distributed approaches.

  3. ACA [CI] observations of the starburst galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krips, M.; Martín, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Aalto, S.; Bisbas, T. G.; Bolatto, A. D.; Downes, D.; Eckart, A.; Feruglio, Ch.; García-Burillo, S.; Geach, J.; Greve, T. R.; König, S.; Matsushita, S.; Neri, R.; Offner, S.; Peck, A. B.; Viti, S.; Wagg, J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Carbon monoxide (CO) is widely used as a tracer of the molecular gas in almost all types of environments. However, several shortcomings of CO complicate usaging it as H2 tracer, such as its optical depth effects, the dependence of its abundance on metallicity, or its susceptibility to dissociation in highly irradiated regions. Neutral carbon emission has been proposed to overcome some of these shortcomings and hence to help revealing the limits of CO as a measure of the molecular gas. Aims: We aim to study the general characteristics of the spatially and spectrally resolved carbon line emission in a variety of extragalactic sources and evaluate its potential as complementary H2 tracer to CO. Methods: We used the Atacama Compact Array to map the [CI](3P1-3P0) line emission in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 at unprecedented angular resolution (~3''). This is the first well-resolved interferometric [CI] map of an extragalactic source. Results: We have detected the [CI] line emission at high significance levels along the central disk of NGC 253 and its edges where expanding shells have previously been found in CO. Globally, the distribution of the [CI] line emission strongly resembles that of CO, confirming the results of previous Galactic surveys that [CI] traces the same molecular gas as CO. However, we also identify a significant increase of [CI] line emission with respect to CO in (some of) the outflow or shocked regions of NGC 253, namely the bipolar outflow emerging from the nucleus. A first-order estimate of the [CI] column densities indicates abundances of [CI] that are very similar to the abundance of CO in NGC 253. Interestingly, we find that the [CI] line is marginally optically thick within the disk. Conclusions: The enhancement of the [CI]/CO line ratios (~0.4-0.6) with respect to Galactic values (≤0.1), especially in the shocked regions of NGC 253, clearly indicates that mechanical perturbation such as shocks and the strong radiation

  4. New constraints on the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies using ionization-parameter mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael

    2013-12-10

    The fate of ionizing radiation in starburst galaxies is key to understanding cosmic reionization. However, the galactic parameters on which the escape fraction of ionizing radiation depend are not well understood. Ionization-parameter mapping provides a simple, yet effective, way to study the radiative transfer in starburst galaxies. We obtain emission-line ratio maps of [S III]/[S II] for six, nearby, dwarf starbursts: NGC 178, NGC 1482, NGC 1705, NGC 3125, NGC 7126, and He 2-10. The narrowband images are obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. Using these data, we previously reported the discovery of an optically thin ionization cone in NGC 5253, and here we also discover a similar ionization cone in NGC 3125. This latter cone has an opening angle of 40° ± 5° (0.4 sr), indicating that the passageways through which ionizing radiation may travel correspond to a small solid angle. Additionally, there are three sample galaxies that have winds and/or superbubble activity, which should be conducive to escaping radiation, yet they are optically thick. These results support the scenario that an orientation bias limits our ability to directly detect escaping Lyman continuum in many starburst galaxies. A comparison of the star formation properties and histories of the optically thin and thick galaxies is consistent with the model that high escape fractions are limited to galaxies that are old enough (≳3 Myr) for mechanical feedback to have cleared optically thin passageways in the interstellar medium, but young enough (≲5 Myr) that the ionizing stars are still present.

  5. New Constraints on the Escape of Ionizing Photons from Starburst Galaxies Using Ionization-parameter Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The fate of ionizing radiation in starburst galaxies is key to understanding cosmic reionization. However, the galactic parameters on which the escape fraction of ionizing radiation depend are not well understood. Ionization-parameter mapping provides a simple, yet effective, way to study the radiative transfer in starburst galaxies. We obtain emission-line ratio maps of [S III]/[S II] for six, nearby, dwarf starbursts: NGC 178, NGC 1482, NGC 1705, NGC 3125, NGC 7126, and He 2-10. The narrowband images are obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. Using these data, we previously reported the discovery of an optically thin ionization cone in NGC 5253, and here we also discover a similar ionization cone in NGC 3125. This latter cone has an opening angle of 40° ± 5° (0.4 sr), indicating that the passageways through which ionizing radiation may travel correspond to a small solid angle. Additionally, there are three sample galaxies that have winds and/or superbubble activity, which should be conducive to escaping radiation, yet they are optically thick. These results support the scenario that an orientation bias limits our ability to directly detect escaping Lyman continuum in many starburst galaxies. A comparison of the star formation properties and histories of the optically thin and thick galaxies is consistent with the model that high escape fractions are limited to galaxies that are old enough (gsim3 Myr) for mechanical feedback to have cleared optically thin passageways in the interstellar medium, but young enough (lsim5 Myr) that the ionizing stars are still present.

  6. PROBING ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE: X-RAY BINARIES IN STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Sepinsky, J. F.; Kalogera, V.; Belczynski, K.

    2009-07-10

    We develop population models of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) formed after bursts of star formation and we investigate the effect of electron-capture supernovae (ECS) of massive ONeMg white dwarfs and the hypothesis that ECS events are associated with typically low supernova kicks imparted to the nascent neutron stars. We identify an interesting ECS bump in the time evolution of HMXB numbers; this bump is caused by significantly increased production of wind-fed HMXBs 20-60 Myr post-starburst. The amplitude and age extent of the ECS bump depend on the strength of ECS kicks and the mass range of ECS progenitors. We also find that ECS-HMXBs form through a specific evolutionary channel that is expected to lead to binaries with Be donors in wide orbits. These characteristics, along with their sensitivity to ECS properties, provide us with an intriguing opportunity to probe ECS physics and progenitors through studies of starbursts of different ages. Specifically, the case of the Small Magellanic Cloud, with a significant observed population of Be-HMXBs and starburst activity 30-60 Myr ago, arises as a promising laboratory for understanding the role of ECS in neutron star formation.

  7. Distributed Prognostics based on Structural Model Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Roychoudhury, I.

    2014-01-01

    Within systems health management, prognostics focuses on predicting the remaining useful life of a system. In the model-based prognostics paradigm, physics-based models are constructed that describe the operation of a system and how it fails. Such approaches consist of an estimation phase, in which the health state of the system is first identified, and a prediction phase, in which the health state is projected forward in time to determine the end of life. Centralized solutions to these problems are often computationally expensive, do not scale well as the size of the system grows, and introduce a single point of failure. In this paper, we propose a novel distributed model-based prognostics scheme that formally describes how to decompose both the estimation and prediction problems into independent local subproblems whose solutions may be easily composed into a global solution. The decomposition of the prognostics problem is achieved through structural decomposition of the underlying models. The decomposition algorithm creates from the global system model a set of local submodels suitable for prognostics. Independent local estimation and prediction problems are formed based on these local submodels, resulting in a scalable distributed prognostics approach that allows the local subproblems to be solved in parallel, thus offering increases in computational efficiency. Using a centrifugal pump as a case study, we perform a number of simulation-based experiments to demonstrate the distributed approach, compare the performance with a centralized approach, and establish its scalability. Index Terms-model-based prognostics, distributed prognostics, structural model decomposition ABBREVIATIONS

  8. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  9. Modeling the Pion Generalized Parton Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezrag, C.

    2016-02-01

    We compute the pion Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) in a valence dressed quarks approach. We model the Mellin moments of the GPD using Ansätze for Green functions inspired by the numerical solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger Equations (DSE) and the Bethe-Salpeter Equation (BSE). Then, the GPD is reconstructed from its Mellin moment using the Double Distribution (DD) formalism. The agreement with available experimental data is very good.

  10. Evolutionary model of the personal income distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a qualitative picture of the personal income distribution. Treating an economy as a self-organized system the key idea of the model is that the income distribution contains competitive and non-competitive contributions. The presented model distinguishes between three main income classes. 1. Capital income from private firms is shown to be the result of an evolutionary competition between products. A direct consequence of this competition is Gibrat’s law suggesting a lognormal income distribution for small private firms. Taking into account an additional preferential attachment mechanism for large private firms the income distribution is supplemented by a power law (Pareto) tail. 2. Due to the division of labor a diversified labor market is seen as a non-competitive market. In this case wage income exhibits an exponential distribution. 3. Also included is income from a social insurance system. It can be approximated by a Gaussian peak. A consequence of this theory is that for short time intervals a fixed ratio of total labor (total capital) to net income exists (Cobb-Douglas relation). A comparison with empirical high resolution income data confirms this pattern of the total income distribution. The theory suggests that competition is the ultimate origin of the uneven income distribution.

  11. Densitometry and Thermometry of Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangum, J. G.; Darling, J.; Menten, K. M.; Henkel, C.; Aalto, S.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P.; Ginsburg, A.; Fomalont, E.; Cotton, B.; Kent, B.

    2016-05-01

    With a goal toward deriving the physical conditions in external galaxies, we have conducted a survey and subsequent high spatial resolution imaging of formaldehyde (H2CO) and ammonia (NH3) emission and absorption in a sample of starburst galaxies. In this article we present the results from a subset of this survey which focuses on high spatial resolution measurements of volume density- and kinetic temperature-sensitive transitions of the H2CO molecule. The volume density structure toward the nuclear region of NGC 253 has been derived from θ ≃ 4 arcsec NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) measurements of the 110 - 111 and 211 - 212 K-doublet transitions of H2CO. The kinetic temperature structure toward NGC 253 and NGC 4945 has been derived from θ ≃ 0.5 - 1.0 arcsec measurements of the H2CO 3K-1K+1 - 2K-1K+1 (near 218 GHz) and 5K-1K+1 - 4K-1K+1 (near 365 GHz) transitions acquired using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). These measurements have allowed us to characterize the dense gas and kinetic temperature structure within these star forming galaxies, which is a first step toward associating dense star-forming gas and the heating processes at work within galaxies.

  12. Distributed knowledge model for multiple intelligent agents

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.P.

    1987-01-01

    In the Distributed AI context, there have been some general principles developed to manage the problem solving activities of multiple agents. But there is not yet a domain-independent structure available for organizing multiple agents and managing of the interactions among agents. An organization metaphor is proposed to establish the hierarchical organization as the preferable takes environment for the decision-oriented applications of Distributed AI. As such, distributed problem solving is modeled as organizational problem solving. A generic structure for multiple intelligent agents is then developed. The organization metaphor is a problem-solving method. It outlines the organizational principles for distributed problem solving. However, a problem-solving model does not specify how it itself is to be realized as a computational entity. Therefore, a distributed knowledge model (DKM) is proposed to define the computational constructs in order to realize a distributed problem-solving environment for multiple intelligent agents. A prototype was implemented to show the feasibility of building a multi-agent environment based on DKM.

  13. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  14. Monotonicity-constrained species distribution models.

    PubMed

    Hofner, Benjamin; Müller, Jörg; Hothorn, Torsten

    2011-10-01

    Flexible modeling frameworks for species distribution models based on generalized additive models that allow for smooth, nonlinear effects and interactions are of increasing importance in ecology. Commonly, the flexibility of such smooth function estimates is controlled by means of penalized estimation procedures. However, the actual shape remains unspecified. In many applications, this is not desirable as researchers have a priori assumptions on the shape of the estimated effects, with monotonicity being the most important. Here we demonstrate how monotonicity constraints can be incorporated in a recently proposed flexible framework for species distribution models. Our proposal allows monotonicity constraints to be imposed on smooth effects and on ordinal, categorical variables using an additional asymmetric L2 penalty. Model estimation and variable selection for Red Kite (Milvus milvus) breeding was conducted using the flexible boosting framework implemented in R package mboost. PMID:22073780

  15. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  16. Modeling utilization distributions in space and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keating, K.A.; Cherry, S.

    2009-01-01

    W. Van Winkle defined the utilization distribution (UD) as a probability density that gives an animal's relative frequency of occurrence in a two-dimensional (x, y) plane. We extend Van Winkle's work by redefining the UD as the relative frequency distribution of an animal's occurrence in all four dimensions of space and time. We then describe a product kernel model estimation method, devising a novel kernel from the wrapped Cauchy distribution to handle circularly distributed temporal covariates, such as day of year. Using Monte Carlo simulations of animal movements in space and time, we assess estimator performance. Although not unbiased, the product kernel method yields models highly correlated (Pearson's r - 0.975) with true probabilities of occurrence and successfully captures temporal variations in density of occurrence. In an empirical example, we estimate the expected UD in three dimensions (x, y, and t) for animals belonging to each of two distinct bighorn sheep {Ovis canadensis) social groups in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. Results show the method can yield ecologically informative models that successfully depict temporal variations in density of occurrence for a seasonally migratory species. Some implications of this new approach to UD modeling are discussed. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  17. A Distributive Model of Treatment Acceptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.

    2008-01-01

    A model of treatment acceptability is proposed that distributes overall treatment acceptability into three separate categories of influence. The categories are comprised of societal influences, consultant influences, and influences associated with consumers of treatments. Each of these categories are defined and their inter-relationships within…

  18. Modeling global lightning distributions in a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Colin; Rind, David

    1994-01-01

    A general circulation model (GCM) is used to model global lightning distributions and frequencies. Both total and cloud-to-ground lightning frequencies are modeled using parameterizations that relate the depth of convective clouds to lightning frequencies. The model's simulations of lightning distributions in time and space show good agreement with available observations. The model's annual mean climatology shows a global lightning frequency of 77 flashes per second, with cloud-to-ground lightning making up 25% of the total. The maximum lightning activity in the GCM occurs during the Northern Hemisphere summer, with approximately 91% of all lightning occurring over continental and coastal regions.

  19. Droplet distribution models for visibility calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, F.; Colomb, M.; Egal, F.; Morange, P.; Boreux, J.-J.

    2010-07-01

    More efficient predictions of fog occurrence and visibility are required in order to improve both safety and traffic management in critical adverse weather situations. Observation and simulation of the fog characteristics contribute to a better understanding of the phenomena and to adapt technical solutions against visibility reduction. The simulation of visibility reduction by fog condition using light scattering model depends on the size and concentration of droplets. Therefore it is necessary to include in the software some functions for the droplet distribution model rather than some data file of single measurement. The aim of the present work is to revisit some droplet distribution models of fog (Shettle and Fenn 1979) in order to actualise them by using recent experimental measures. Indeed the models mentioned above were established thanks to experimental data obtained with sensors of 70’s. Actual sensors are able to take into account droplets with radius 0.2 μm which was not the case with older sensors. A surface observation campaign was carried out at Palaiseau and Toulouse, France, between 2006 and 2008. These experiments allowed to collect microphysical data of fog and particularly droplet distributions of the fog, thanks to a "Palas" optical granulometer. Based on these data an analysis is carried out in order to provide a droplet distribution model. The first approach consists in testing the four Gamma laws proposed by Shettle and Fenn (1979). The adjustment of coefficients allows changing the characteristics from advection to radiation fog. These functions did not fit the new set of data collected with the Palas sensor. New algorithms based on Gamma and Lognormal laws are proposed and discussed in comparison to the previous models. For a road application, the coefficients of the proposed models are evaluated for different classes of visibility, ranged from 50 to 200 meters.

  20. Detection of gamma rays from a starburst galaxy.

    PubMed

    Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bühler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L-M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Füssling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J-P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Paz Arribas, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P-O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Superina, G; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2009-11-20

    Starburst galaxies exhibit in their central regions a highly increased rate of supernovae, the remnants of which are thought to accelerate energetic cosmic rays up to energies of approximately 10(15) electron volts. We report the detection of gamma rays--tracers of such cosmic rays--from the starburst galaxy NGC 253 using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The gamma-ray flux above 220 billion electron volts is F = (5.5 +/- 1.0(stat) +/- 2.8(sys)) x 10(-13) cm(-2) s(-1), implying a cosmic-ray density about three orders of magnitude larger than that in the center of the Milky Way. The fraction of cosmic-ray energy channeled into gamma rays in this starburst environment is five times as large as that in our Galaxy. PMID:19779150

  1. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model.

  2. Modeling depth distributions of overland flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark W.; Cox, Nicholas J.; Bracken, Louise J.

    2011-02-01

    Hydrological and erosion models use water depth to estimate routing velocity and resultant erosion at each spatial element. Yet the shear stress distribution imposed on the soil surface and any resulting flow detachment and rill incision is controlled by the full probability distribution of depths of overland flow. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is used in conjunction with simple field-flume experiments to provide high-resolution measures of overland flow depth-distributions for three semi-arid hillslope transects with differing soil properties. A two-parameter gamma distribution is proposed as the optimum model for depths of both interrill and rill flows. The shape and scale parameters are shown to vary consistently with distance downslope reflecting the morphological signature of runoff processes. The scale parameter is related to the general increase of depths with discharge ( P < 0.0001) as flows gradually concentrate; the shape parameter is more related to the soil surface roughness and potentially provides a control on the rate of depth, but also velocity increase with discharge. Such interactions between surface roughness and overland flows are of crucial importance for flow hydraulics and modeling sediment transport.

  3. Modeling Mosquito Distribution. Impact of the Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Y.

    2011-09-01

    In order to use efficiently vector control tools, like insecticides, and mechanical control, it is necessary to provide mosquito density estimate and mosquito distribution, taking into account the environment and entomological knowledges. Mosquito dispersal modeling, together with a compartmental approach, leads to a quasilinear parabolic system. Using the time splitting approach and appropriate numerical methods for each operator, we construct a reliable numerical scheme. Considering various landscapes, we show that the environment can have a strong influence on mosquito distribution and, thus, in the efficiency or not of vector control.

  4. A spectroscopic analysis of the starburst galaxies NGC 3395 and NGC 3396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaks, Kenneth

    2003-11-01

    We have obtained ultraviolet and visible wavelength spectra of 31 bright star forming knots in the interacting galaxies NGC 3395 and NGC 3396 using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The knots are possible super star clusters on the order of ˜100 pc diameter with measured metallicities on the order of 0.5 0.6 Z⊙ . The spectra are consistent with a massive production of hot young stars in a starburst. Ages of the starburst knots were calculated using several diagnostics from the Leitherer et al. Starburst 99 code (SB99) using an Initial Mass Function (IMF) with a power law coefficient α = 2.35 and an upper mass limit of 100 M⊙ . We modeled our star forming knots as instantaneous starbursts with the measured metallicity and we obtained consistent and reasonable estimates of the starburst age. The UV-brightest knots are ˜5 Myr old in both galaxies. We found no age gradient in the galaxies implying the starburst does not propagate across the galaxy but rather occurs simultaneously everywhere. The data are also consistent with the interpretation that the starburst is not only happening more or less simultaneously within each galaxy, it is also occurring simultaneously in both galaxies. If true, the fact that it is occurring simultaneously in both galaxies gives credence to the interaction being the source of the star formation in line with current theory. While our starforming knots were spatially resolved, at high redshift one cannot resolve individual knots and instead has to rely on spatially unresolved spectra. To assess the representativeness of these spectra of the underlying structure, we simulated the spectra one would observe by defining the entire portion of each galaxy observed as an unresolved knot. We found the metallicities for the unresolved knots were very representative of the resolved knots that made them up. We also found that the ages we derived for the unresolved knots were representative of the

  5. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  6. SHAKEN, NOT STIRRED: THE DISRUPTED DISK OF THE STARBURST GALAXY NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-12-10

    Near-infrared images obtained with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the recent history of the nearby Sculptor Group spiral NGC 253, which is one of the nearest starburst galaxies. Bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are traced out to projected distances of {approx}22-26 kpc ({approx}13-15 disk scale lengths) along the major axis. The distribution of stars in the disk is lopsided, in the sense that the projected density of AGB stars in the northeast portion of the disk between 10 and 20 kpc from the galaxy center is {approx}0.5 dex higher than on the opposite side of the galaxy. A large population of red supergiants is also found in the northeast portion of the disk and, with the exception of the central 2 kpc, this area appears to have been the site of the highest levels of star-forming activity in the galaxy during the past {approx}0.1 Gyr. It is argued that such high levels of localized star formation may have produced a fountain that ejected material from the disk, and the extraplanar H I detected by Boomsma et al. may be one manifestation of such activity. Diffuse stellar structures are found in the periphery of the disk, and the most prominent of these is to the south and east of the galaxy. Bright AGB stars, including cool C stars that are identified based on their J - K colors, are detected out to 15 kpc above the disk plane, and these are part of a diffusely distributed, flattened extraplanar component. Comparisons between observed and model luminosity functions suggest that the extraplanar regions contain stars that formed throughout much of the age of the universe. Additional evidence of a diffuse, extraplanar stellar component that contains moderately young stars comes from archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer images. It is suggested that the disk of NGC 253 was disrupted by a tidal encounter with a now defunct companion. This encounter introduced asymmetries that remain to this day, and the projected distribution

  7. Shaken, Not Stirred: The Disrupted Disk of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Near-infrared images obtained with WIRCam on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the recent history of the nearby Sculptor Group spiral NGC 253, which is one of the nearest starburst galaxies. Bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are traced out to projected distances of ~22-26 kpc (~13-15 disk scale lengths) along the major axis. The distribution of stars in the disk is lopsided, in the sense that the projected density of AGB stars in the northeast portion of the disk between 10 and 20 kpc from the galaxy center is ~0.5 dex higher than on the opposite side of the galaxy. A large population of red supergiants is also found in the northeast portion of the disk and, with the exception of the central 2 kpc, this area appears to have been the site of the highest levels of star-forming activity in the galaxy during the past ~0.1 Gyr. It is argued that such high levels of localized star formation may have produced a fountain that ejected material from the disk, and the extraplanar H I detected by Boomsma et al. may be one manifestation of such activity. Diffuse stellar structures are found in the periphery of the disk, and the most prominent of these is to the south and east of the galaxy. Bright AGB stars, including cool C stars that are identified based on their J - K colors, are detected out to 15 kpc above the disk plane, and these are part of a diffusely distributed, flattened extraplanar component. Comparisons between observed and model luminosity functions suggest that the extraplanar regions contain stars that formed throughout much of the age of the universe. Additional evidence of a diffuse, extraplanar stellar component that contains moderately young stars comes from archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer images. It is suggested that the disk of NGC 253 was disrupted by a tidal encounter with a now defunct companion. This encounter introduced asymmetries that remain to this day, and the projected distribution of stars in and around NGC

  8. Building a generalized distributed system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.

    1992-01-01

    The key elements in the second year (1991-92) of our project are: (1) implementation of the distributed system prototype; (2) successful passing of the candidacy examination and a PhD proposal acceptance by the funded student; (3) design of storage efficient schemes for replicated distributed systems; and (4) modeling of gracefully degrading reliable computing systems. In the third year of the project (1992-93), we propose to: (1) complete the testing of the prototype; (2) enhance the functionality of the modules by enabling the experimentation with more complex protocols; (3) use the prototype to verify the theoretically predicted performance of locking protocols, etc.; and (4) work on issues related to real-time distributed systems. This should result in efficient protocols for these systems.

  9. Distributed earth model/orbiter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, Erik; Mcclanahan, Scott; Smith, Gary

    1989-01-01

    Distributed Earth Model/Orbiter Simulation (DEMOS) is a network based application developed for the UNIX environment that visually monitors or simulates the Earth and any number of orbiting vehicles. Its purpose is to provide Mission Control Center (MCC) flight controllers with a visually accurate three dimensional (3D) model of the Earth, Sun, Moon and orbiters, driven by real time or simulated data. The project incorporates a graphical user interface, 3D modelling employing state-of-the art hardware, and simulation of orbital mechanics in a networked/distributed environment. The user interface is based on the X Window System and the X Ray toolbox. The 3D modelling utilizes the Programmer's Hierarchical Interactive Graphics System (PHIGS) standard and Raster Technologies hardware for rendering/display performance. The simulation of orbiting vehicles uses two methods of vector propagation implemented with standard UNIX/C for portability. Each part is a distinct process that can run on separate nodes of a network, exploiting each node's unique hardware capabilities. The client/server communication architecture of the application can be reused for a variety of distributed applications.

  10. Modeling error distributions of growth curve models through Bayesian methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    Growth curve models are widely used in social and behavioral sciences. However, typical growth curve models often assume that the errors are normally distributed although non-normal data may be even more common than normal data. In order to avoid possible statistical inference problems in blindly assuming normality, a general Bayesian framework is proposed to flexibly model normal and non-normal data through the explicit specification of the error distributions. A simulation study shows when the distribution of the error is correctly specified, one can avoid the loss in the efficiency of standard error estimates. A real example on the analysis of mathematical ability growth data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 is used to show the application of the proposed methods. Instructions and code on how to conduct growth curve analysis with both normal and non-normal error distributions using the the MCMC procedure of SAS are provided. PMID:26019004

  11. Modeling Emergent Macrophyte Distributions: Including Sub-dominant Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixed stands of emergent vegetation are often present following drawdowns but models of wetland plant distributions fail to include subdominant species when predicting distributions. Three variations of a spatial plant distribution cellular automaton model were developed to explo...

  12. Grid-Xinanjiang Distributed Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Yao, C.; Yu, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The grid-based distributed Xinanjiang (Grid-Xinanjiang) model by combining the well-tested conceptual rainfall-runoff model and the physically based flow routing model has been developed for hydrologic processes simulation and flood forecasting. The DEM is utilized to derive the flow direction, routing sequencing, hillslope and channel slopes. The developed model includes canopy interception, direct channel precipitation, evapotranspiration, as well as runoff generation via saturation excess mechanism. The diffusion wave considering the influent of upstream inflow, direct channel precipitation and flow partition to the channels is developed to route the hillslope and channel flow on a cell basis. The Grid-Xinanjiang model is applied at a 1-km grid scale in a nested basin located in Huaihe basin, China. The basin with the drainage area of 2692.7 km2, contains five internal points where observed streamflow data are available, and is used to evaluate the developed model for its’ ability on the simulation of hydrologic processes within the basin. Calibration and verification of the Grid-Xinanjiang model are carried out at both daily and hourly time steps. The model is assessed by comparing streamflow and water stage simulation to observations at the basin outlet and gauging stations within the basin and also compared with these simulated with the original Xinanjiang model. The results indicate that the parameter estimation approach is efficient and the developed model can forecast the streamflow and stage hydrograph well.

  13. Feedback from starbursts: 30 Dorado as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; lim, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    Stellar feedback remains a key uncertain aspect in galaxy formation and evolution theories. In addition to the mechanical energy injection from fast stellar winds and supernovae of massive stars, their radiative transfer feedback (via direct and indirect/dust-processed radiation pressures and photo-ionization) has also been proposed to play a significant role in dispersing dense dusty gas and possibly in driving outflows from starburst regions. To test the relative efficiency of these two forms of the stellar feedback, we study the energetics of the Tarantula Nebula (30 Doradus) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The nebula consists of various blisters of diffuse hot plasma enveloped by cool gas. Based on the X-ray spectroscopy of the nebula, using a 100 ks Suzaku X-ray observation, we estimate the thermal energy of the enclosed plasma, accounting for its temperature distribution and foreground absorption variation. The estimated thermal energy is far short of the expected fraction of the mechanical energy input from the central young stellar association (NGC 2070) of the nebula, according to the classic superbubble solution, indicating a substantial loss of energy via probably hot electron-dust interaction and cosmic-ray acceleration, as well as the cool shell formation. We further characterize the kinetic energy of dense dusty gas, using a recently published dust mass map and the velocity dispersion inferred from molecular and HI gases in the nebula. However, this component of the kinetic energy appears to be dominated by the turbulent and bulk motions of HII gas. The total kinetic energy of the nebula is consistent with the expected fraction of the mechanical energy input. Therefore, the radiation transfer feedback does not seem to play a significant role in the expansion of 30 Doradus.

  14. A far-IR view of the starburst-driven superwind in NGC 2146

    SciTech Connect

    Kreckel, K.; Groves, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Meidt, S.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Appleton, P.; Croxall, K. V.; Dale, D. A.; Hunt, L. K.; Beirão, P.; Bolatto, A. D.; Calzetti, D.; Donovan Meyer, J.; Draine, B. T.; Hinz, J.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Murphy, E. J.; Smith, J. D. T.; and others

    2014-07-20

    NGC 2146, a nearby luminous infrared galaxy, presents evidence for outflows along the disk minor axis in all gas phases (ionized, neutral atomic, and molecular). We present an analysis of the multi-phase, starburst-driven superwind in the central 5 kpc as traced in spatially resolved spectral line observations, using far-IR Herschel PACS spectroscopy, to probe the effects on the atomic and ionized gas, and optical integral field spectroscopy to examine the ionized gas through diagnostic line ratios. We observe an increased ∼250 km s{sup –1} velocity dispersion in the [O I] 63 μm, [O III] 88 μm, [N II] 122 μm, and [C II] 158 μm fine-structure lines that is spatially coincident with high excitation gas above and below the disk. We model this with a slow ∼200 km s{sup –1} shock and trace the superwind to the edge of our field of view 2.5 kpc above the disk. We present new SOFIA 37 μm observations to explore the warm dust distribution, and detect no clear dust entrainment in the outflow. The stellar kinematics appear decoupled from the regular disk rotation seen in all gas phases, consistent with a recent merger event disrupting the system. We consider the role of the superwind in the evolution of NGC 2146 and speculate on the evolutionary future of the system. Our observations of NGC 2146 in the far-IR allow an unobscured view of the wind, crucial for tracing the superwind to the launching region at the disk center, and provide a local analog for future ALMA observations of outflows in high-redshift systems.

  15. Spatio-temporal Modeling of Mosquito Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Y.; Dufourd, C.

    2011-11-01

    We consider a quasilinear parabolic system to model mosquito displacement. In order to use efficiently vector control tools, like insecticides, and mechanical control, it is necessary to provide density estimates of mosquito populations, taking into account the environment and entomological knowledges. After a brief introduction to mosquito dispersal modeling, we present some theoretical results. Then, considering a compartmental approach, we get a quasilinear system of PDEs. Using the time splitting approach and appropriate numerical methods for each operator, we construct a reliable numerical scheme. Considering vector control scenarii, we show that the environment can have a strong influence on mosquito distribution and in the efficiency of vector control tools.

  16. Oscillations in SIRS model with distributed delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, S.; Abramson, G.; Gomes, M. F. C.

    2011-06-01

    The ubiquity of oscillations in epidemics presents a long standing challenge for the formulation of epidemic models. Whether they are external and seasonally driven, or arise from the intrinsic dynamics is an open problem. It is known that fixed time delays destabilize the steady state solution of the standard SIRS model, giving rise to stable oscillations for certain parameters values. In this contribution, starting from the classical SIRS model, we make a general treatment of the recovery and loss of immunity terms. We present oscillation diagrams (amplitude and period) in terms of the parameters of the model, showing how oscillations can be destabilized by the shape of the distributions of the two characteristic (infectious and immune) times. The formulation is made in terms of delay equations which are both numerically integrated and linearized. Results from simulations are included showing where they support the linear analysis and explaining why not where they do not. Considerations and comparison with real diseases are presented along.

  17. Class I methanol megamasers: a potential probe of starburst activity and feedback in active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Zhang, J.-S.; Wang, J.-Z.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Wu, Q.-W.; Wu, Z.-Z.

    2016-06-01

    Previous observations have shown that the distribution of 36.2-GHz class I methanol megamaser (MM) emission in Arp 220 is highly correlated with the diffuse X-rays. On this basis it was suggested that methanol MM may be produced either by the effects of galactic-outflow-driven shocks and/or cosmic rays. Here we report the results of a single-dish survey undertaken with the Greenbank Telescope (GBT) to improve our understanding of the pumping conditions of extragalactic class I methanol masers and their relationship to starburst and feedback processes within the host galaxies, towards a sample which includes 16 galaxies which show both extended soft X-ray emission, and either OH or H2O MM emission. Large baseline ripples in the GBT spectra limited our results to tentative detections towards 11 of the target galaxies. Analysis of these tentative detections shows that there are significant correlations between the methanol intensity and the host-galaxy infrared, radio and OH MM emission, but no correlation with the X-ray and H2O MM emission. Some sources show methanol emission significantly offset from the systemic velocity of the galaxy (by up to 1000 km s-1) and we propose that these are associated with galactic-scale outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback. The combined observational properties suggest that class I methanol MMs are related to significant starburst and molecular outflow activity and hence may provide a potential probe of AGN feedback and starburst processes in the host galaxies.

  18. Initial conditions of formation of starburst clusters: constraints from stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sambaran; Kroupa, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    Recent high resolution observations of dense regions of molecular clouds and massive gaseous clumps with instruments like Herschel and ALMA have revealed intricate and filamentary overdensity structures in them. Such progenitors of massive starburst clusters are in contrast with smooth, centrally-pronounced profiles of the latter. In this work, we intend to constrain massive, substructured stellar distributions that would evolve to cluster-like profiles at very young ages (~Myr), as seen in starburst clusters. Taking the well observed NGC3603 Young Cluster (NYC) as an example, we compute the infall and final merger of filament-like compact (0.1-0.3 pc) subclusters, totalling 10000 M_sun, from a range of spatial scales and modes of sub-clustering, using direct N-body calculations. These calculations infer an allowable span of approx. 2.5 pc from which the subclusters can fall in a gas potential and merge to form a single centrally-dense structure in near dynamical equilibrium, within the young age of NYC (1-2 Myr). However, these merged clusters are too compact and centrally overdense compared to typical young clusters. Our N-body calculations, beginning from such compact initial conditions, show that even stellar wind and supernova mass loss, dynamical heating from retaining black holes, external tidal field and heating due to tight O-star binaries together cannot expand these clusters to their observed sizes, even in 100 Myr. Hence an explosive gas dispersal phase seems essential for forming starburst and other young clusters observed in the Milky Way and in the Local Group which can expand the clusters to their observed sizes and concentrations; including that for NYC with approx. 30% clump star formation efficiency. However, some observed massive but highly extended (>10 pc) , >10 Myr old clusters better fit a slow (several Myr timescale) gas dispersal from parsec-scale initial profiles, which can be the future of embedded systems like W3 Main.

  19. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2006-06-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2 in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. Application of a 2-dimensional numerical

  20. MODELING THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y. E-mail: ognedin@umich.ed

    2010-08-01

    Observed metallicities of globular clusters reflect physical conditions in the interstellar medium of their high-redshift host galaxies. Globular cluster systems in most large galaxies display bimodal color and metallicity distributions, which are often interpreted as indicating two distinct modes of cluster formation. The metal-rich and metal-poor clusters have systematically different locations and kinematics in their host galaxies. However, the red and blue clusters have similar internal properties, such as their masses, sizes, and ages. It is therefore interesting to explore whether both metal-rich and metal-poor clusters could form by a common mechanism and still be consistent with the bimodal distribution. We present such a model, which prescribes the formation of globular clusters semi-analytically using galaxy assembly history from cosmological simulations coupled with observed scaling relations for the amount and metallicity of cold gas available for star formation. We assume that massive star clusters form only during mergers of massive gas-rich galaxies and tune the model parameters to reproduce the observed distribution in the Galaxy. A wide, but not the entire, range of model realizations produces metallicity distributions consistent with the data. We find that early mergers of smaller hosts create exclusively blue clusters, whereas subsequent mergers of more massive galaxies create both red and blue clusters. Thus, bimodality arises naturally as the result of a small number of late massive merger events. This conclusion is not significantly affected by the large uncertainties in our knowledge of the stellar mass and cold gas mass in high-redshift galaxies. The fraction of galactic stellar mass locked in globular clusters declines from over 10% at z > 3 to 0.1% at present.

  1. Comparison between fully distributed model and semi-distributed model in urban hydrology modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiba, Abdellah; Gires, Auguste; Giangola-Murzyn, Agathe; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel; Bompard, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Water management in urban areas is becoming more and more complex, especially because of a rapid increase of impervious areas. There will also possibly be an increase of extreme precipitation due to climate change. The aims of the devices implemented to handle the large amount of water generate by urban areas such as storm water retention basins are usually twofold: ensure pluvial flood protection and water depollution. These two aims imply opposite management strategies. To optimize the use of these devices there is a need to implement urban hydrological models and improve fine-scale rainfall estimation, which is the most significant input. In this paper we suggest to compare two models and their sensitivity to small-scale rainfall variability on a 2.15 km2 urban area located in the County of Val-de-Marne (South-East of Paris, France). The average impervious coefficient is approximately 34%. In this work two types of models are used. The first one is CANOE which is semi-distributed. Such models are widely used by practitioners for urban hydrology modeling and urban water management. Indeed, they are easily configurable and the computation time is reduced, but these models do not take fully into account either the variability of the physical properties or the variability of the precipitations. An alternative is to use distributed models that are harder to configure and require a greater computation time, but they enable a deeper analysis (especially at small scales and upstream) of the processes at stake. We used the Multi-Hydro fully distributed model developed at the Ecole des Ponts ParisTech. It is an interacting core between open source software packages, each of them representing a portion of the water cycle in urban environment. Four heavy rainfall events that occurred between 2009 and 2011 are analyzed. The data comes from the Météo-France radar mosaic and the resolution is 1 km in space and 5 min in time. The closest radar of the Météo-France network is

  2. Starburst in the Intragroup Medium of Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.; Tuffs, R.

    1998-01-01

    Based on new ISO mid-infrared observations and ground based H(alpha) and near-infrared observations, we report the detection of a bright starburst in the intragroup medium (IGM) of the famous compact group of galaxies Stephan's Quintet.

  3. The Starburst-AGN Connection under the Multiwavelength Limelight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guainazzi, Matteo

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of a tight relation between supermassive black hole masses, the bulge luminosity, and the stellar velocity dispersion in the local universe galaxies, mounting experimental evidence has been collected pointing to a connection between nuclear activity and star formation over a wide range of redshifts. Although a growing number of galaxies from different samples exhibit simultaneous starburst and AGN phenomenology, it is still a matter of debate whether this is the smoking gun of a causal relation between them, and, if so, with which trend. Basic issues in modern astrophysics, such as the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes, AGN feeding and feedback to the interstellar and intergalactic medium, as well as the role played by the environment on the star formation history are related to this "Starburst-AGN Connection". This Workshop aims at gathering observational and theoretical astronomers so as to answer the following questions: * The "Starburst-AGN Connection": A causal relation? * "Starburst-AGN Connection" at low and high redshift: any evidence for evolution? * Is there a connection between AGN obscuration and star formation? * In which way are the star formation and AGN phenomena affected by the environment? * Do stars contribute to AGN fueling? Multiwavelength observations in the last decade have given a paramount contribution to improve our understanding in this field. The Workshop will build on this panoptic view, and aims at contributing to the scientific case of future ground-based and space large observatories.

  4. Unveil the Nature of Post-Starburst Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhaohui; Brotherton, Michael; Cales, Sabrina; Canalizo, Gabriella; Dale, Daniel; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean

    2006-05-01

    We propose to obtain mid-IR spectra of 16 spectroscopically selected post-starburst quasars in order to fully characterize the properties of this new class. Post-starburst quasars are broad-lined AGN that also posses the spectral signatures of massive, moderate-aged stellar populations (in excess of ten billion solar masses and ages of hundreds of Myrs). This class represents several percent of the quasar population and may explicitly reveal how black hole/bulge correlations arise. We will compare their mid-IR SED and possible PAH features with other classes. The current project, which will also incorporate HST, SDSS, IRTF, KPNO and Keck data, will for the first time determine reliably for a sample of objects the properties of the massive starbursts (ages, masses), their black holes mass, accretion rate, morphologies, environments, and the relationships among these. Beyond just characterizing the properties of these populations, we plan to investigate the hypothesis that post-starburst quasars are an evolutionary phase in the lifetime of most quasars.

  5. Starburst galaxies as seen by gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohm, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Starburst galaxies have a highly increased star-formation rate compared to regular galaxies and inject huge amounts of kinetic power into the interstellar medium via supersonic stellar winds, and supernova explosions. Supernova remnants, which are considered to be the main source of cosmic rays (CRs), form an additional, significant energy and pressure component and might influence the star-formation process in a major way. Observations of starburst galaxies at γ-ray energies give us the unique opportunity to study non-thermal phenomena associated with hadronic CRs and their relation to the star-formation process. In this work, recent observations of starburst galaxies with space and ground-based γ-ray telescopes are being reviewed, and the current state of theoretical work on the γ-ray emission is discussed. A special emphasis is put on the prospects of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array for the study of starburst galaxies in particular and star-forming galaxies in general. xml:lang="fr"

  6. AN IONIZATION CONE IN THE DWARF STARBURST GALAXY NGC 5253

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael; Martin, Crystal L.

    2011-11-01

    There are few observational constraints on how the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies depends on galactic parameters. Here we report on the first major detection of an ionization cone in NGC 5253, a nearby starburst galaxy. This high-excitation feature is identified by mapping the emission-line ratios in the galaxy using [S III] {lambda}9069, [S II] {lambda}6716, and H{alpha} narrowband images from the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. The ionization cone appears optically thin, which suggests the escape of ionizing photons. The cone morphology is narrow with an estimated solid angle covering just 3% of 4{pi} steradians, and the young, massive clusters of the nuclear starburst can easily generate the radiation required to ionize the cone. Although less likely, we cannot rule out the possibility of an obscured active galactic nucleus source. An echelle spectrum along the minor axis shows complex kinematics that are consistent with outflow activity. The narrow morphology of the ionization cone supports the scenario that an orientation bias contributes to the difficulty in detecting Lyman continuum emission from starbursts and Lyman break galaxies.

  7. Multi-Wavelength Diagnostics of Starbirth in Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William

    2005-07-01

    From the Orion Nebula to the Hubble Deep Field, starburst activity can be seen transforming galaxian clouds of gas into populous clusters of stars. The pyrotechnics and chemical enrichment associated with this activity have led to outcomes as ubiquitous as interstellar dust and as exquisite as life on Earth. In this talk, I will focus on the circumstances of star formation in the environmental context of ongoing starburst activity. I begin with the premises that (1) the formation of a single star takes time, (2) the formation of a populous cluster takes even more time, and (3) ``stuff'' happens in the interim. Hubble images of the Orion Nebula and Eagle Nebula show how hot stars can excavate neighboring clouds of gas and photoevaporate the star-forming cores that are exposed. Hubble observations of giant HII regions in M33 reveal a significant variation in the stellar populations, such that the most metal-rich HII regions contain the greatest proportions of the most massive stars. ISO and Spitzer observations of these same HII regions reveal corresponding variations in the nebular response. These multi-wavelength diagnostics of the stellar-nebular feedback in galaxian starbursts suggest a star-forming mechanism which is subject to photo-evaporative ablation -- an erosive process that is mediated by the metal abundance and corresponding amounts of protective dust in the starbursting environment.

  8. Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; He, Hong S.; Palik, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species distribution models require selection of species, study extent and spatial unit, statistical methods, variables, and assessment metrics. If absence data are not available, another important consideration is pseudoabsence generation. Different strategies for pseudoabsence generation can produce varying spatial representation of species. Methodology We considered model outcomes from four different strategies for generating pseudoabsences. We generating pseudoabsences randomly by 1) selection from the entire study extent, 2) a two-step process of selection first from the entire study extent, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from areas with predicted probability <25%, 3) selection from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, 4) a two-step process of selection first for pseudoabsences from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from the areas with predicted probability <25%. We used Random Forests as our statistical method and sixteen predictor variables to model tree species with at least 150 records from Forest Inventory and Analysis surveys in the Laurentian Mixed Forest province of Minnesota. Conclusions Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution models and may be one of the most influential determinants of models. All the pseudoabsence strategies produced mean AUC values of at least 0.87. More importantly than accuracy metrics, the two-step strategies over-predicted species presence, due to too much environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences, whereas models based on random pseudoabsences under-predicted species presence, due to too little environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences. Models using pseudoabsences from surveyed plots produced a balance between areas with high and low predicted probabilities and the strongest relationship between

  9. SPEEDES for distributed information enterprise modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, James P.; Hillman, Robert G.

    2002-07-01

    The Air Force is developing a Distributed Information Enterprise Modeling and Simulation (DIEMS) framework under sponsorship of the High Performance Computer Modernization Office Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (HPCMO/CHSSI). The DIEMS framework provides a design analysis environment for deployable distributed information management systems. DIEMS establishes the necessary analysis capability allowing developers to identify and mitigate programmatic risk early within the development cycle to allow successful deployment of the associated systems. The enterprise-modeling framework builds upon the Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete-Event Simulation (SPEEDES) foundation. This simulation framework will utilize 'Challenge Problem' class resources to address more than five million information objects and hundreds of thousands of clients comprising the future information based force structure. The simulation framework will be capable of assessing deployment aspects such as security, quality of service, and fault tolerance. SPEEDES provides an ideal foundation to support simulation of distributed information systems on a multiprocessor platform. SPEEDES allows the simulation builder to perform optimistic parallel processing on high performance computers, networks of workstations, or combinations of networked computers and HPC platforms.

  10. THE PROPERTIES OF POST-STARBURST QUASARS BASED ON OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Cales, Sabrina L.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Shang, Zhaohui; Runnoe, Jessie C.; DiPompeo, Michael A. E-mail: scales@uwyo.edu E-mail: shang@uwyo.edu E-mail: mdipompe@uwyo.edu; and others

    2013-01-10

    We present optical spectroscopy of a sample of 38 post-starburst quasars (PSQs) at z {approx} 0.3, 29 of which have morphological classifications based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. These broad-lined active galactic nuclei (AGNs) possess the spectral signatures of massive intermediate-aged stellar populations, making them potentially useful for studying connections between nuclear activity and host galaxy evolution. We model the spectra in order to determine the ages and masses of the host stellar populations, and the black hole masses and Eddington fractions of the AGNs. Our model components include an instantaneous starburst, a power law, and emission lines. We find that the PSQs have M {sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun} accreting at a few percent of Eddington luminosity and host {approx}10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun} stellar populations which are several hundred Myr to a few Gyr old. We investigate relationships among these derived properties, spectral properties, and morphologies. We find that PSQs hosted in spiral galaxies have significantly weaker AGN luminosities, older starburst ages, and narrow emission-line ratios diagnostic of ongoing star formation when compared to their early-type counterparts. We conclude that the early-type PSQs are likely the result of major mergers and were likely luminous infrared galaxies in the past, while spiral PSQs with more complex star formation histories are triggered by less dramatic events (e.g., harassment, bars). We provide diagnostics to distinguish the early-type and spiral hosts when high spatial resolution imaging is not available.

  11. A conceptual, distributed snow redistribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, S.; Holzmann, H.

    2015-11-01

    When applying conceptual hydrological models using a temperature index approach for snowmelt to high alpine areas often accumulation of snow during several years can be observed. Some of the reasons why these "snow towers" do not exist in nature are vertical and lateral transport processes. While snow transport models have been developed using grid cell sizes of tens to hundreds of square metres and have been applied in several catchments, no model exists using coarser cell sizes of 1 km2, which is a common resolution for meso- and large-scale hydrologic modelling (hundreds to thousands of square kilometres). In this paper we present an approach that uses only gravity and snow density as a proxy for the age of the snow cover and land-use information to redistribute snow in alpine basins. The results are based on the hydrological modelling of the Austrian Inn Basin in Tyrol, Austria, more specifically the Ötztaler Ache catchment, but the findings hold for other tributaries of the river Inn. This transport model is implemented in the distributed rainfall-runoff model COSERO (Continuous Semi-distributed Runoff). The results of both model concepts with and without consideration of lateral snow redistribution are compared against observed discharge and snow-covered areas derived from MODIS satellite images. By means of the snow redistribution concept, snow accumulation over several years can be prevented and the snow depletion curve compared with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data could be improved, too. In a 7-year period the standard model would lead to snow accumulation of approximately 2900 mm SWE (snow water equivalent) in high elevated regions whereas the updated version of the model does not show accumulation and does also predict discharge with more accuracy leading to a Kling-Gupta efficiency of 0.93 instead of 0.9. A further improvement can be shown in the comparison of MODIS snow cover data and the calculated depletion curve, where

  12. New model for nucleon generalized parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new type of models for nucleon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) H and E. They are heavily based on the fact nucleon GPDs require to use two forms of double distribution (DD) representations. The outcome of the new treatment is that the usual DD+D-term construction should be amended by an extra term, {xi} E{sub +}{sup 1} (x,{xi}) which has the DD structure {alpha}/{beta} e({beta},{alpha}, with e({beta},{alpha}) being the DD that generates GPD E(x,{xi}). We found that this function, unlike the D-term, has support in the whole -1 <= x <= 1 region. Furthermore, it does not vanish at the border points |x|={xi}.

  13. Modeling distributed systems with logic programming languages

    SciTech Connect

    Lenders, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis proposes new concepts for an ideal integrated specification and simulation workstation. The transition model approach to distributed systems specification is improved by the introduction of communicating finite state automata (CFSA), and a Prolog implementation of CFSA. Liveness and safety properties are proved with Prolog. Bidirectional input-output (bi-io), a new input-output mechanism is introduced, which eases distributed systems programming. It generalizes regular input-output mechanisms, replacing two concepts with one single concept. Moreover, it is concise and powerful, and for some applications suppresses deadlock problems. Bi-io is proposed as an extension of Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP). An axiomatic semantics of the extended CSP language is given, which follows the weakest precondition approach. The similarities between CFSA and CSP (with its weakest precondition semantics) suggest that the two descriptive methods should be used together with the ideal specification and simulation workstation.

  14. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza; Wu, Yanling; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  15. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2005-12-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2) in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. A detailed covariance analysis was performed

  16. Applications of species distribution modeling to paleobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenning, Jens-Christian; Fløjgaard, Camilla; Marske, Katharine A.; Nógues-Bravo, David; Normand, Signe

    2011-10-01

    Species distribution modeling (SDM: statistical and/or mechanistic approaches to the assessment of range determinants and prediction of species occurrence) offers new possibilities for estimating and studying past organism distributions. SDM complements fossil and genetic evidence by providing (i) quantitative and potentially high-resolution predictions of the past organism distributions, (ii) statistically formulated, testable ecological hypotheses regarding past distributions and communities, and (iii) statistical assessment of range determinants. In this article, we provide an overview of applications of SDM to paleobiology, outlining the methodology, reviewing SDM-based studies to paleobiology or at the interface of paleo- and neobiology, discussing assumptions and uncertainties as well as how to handle them, and providing a synthesis and outlook. Key methodological issues for SDM applications to paleobiology include predictor variables (types and properties; special emphasis is given to paleoclimate), model validation (particularly important given the emphasis on cross-temporal predictions in paleobiological applications), and the integration of SDM and genetics approaches. Over the last few years the number of studies using SDM to address paleobiology-related questions has increased considerably. While some of these studies only use SDM (23%), most combine them with genetically inferred patterns (49%), paleoecological records (22%), or both (6%). A large number of SDM-based studies have addressed the role of Pleistocene glacial refugia in biogeography and evolution, especially in Europe, but also in many other regions. SDM-based approaches are also beginning to contribute to a suite of other research questions, such as historical constraints on current distributions and diversity patterns, the end-Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions, past community assembly, human paleobiogeography, Holocene paleoecology, and even deep-time biogeography (notably, providing

  17. DANA: distributed numerical and adaptive modelling framework.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Nicolas P; Fix, Jérémy

    2012-01-01

    DANA is a python framework ( http://dana.loria.fr ) whose computational paradigm is grounded on the notion of a unit that is essentially a set of time dependent values varying under the influence of other units via adaptive weighted connections. The evolution of a unit's value are defined by a set of differential equations expressed in standard mathematical notation which greatly ease their definition. The units are organized into groups that form a model. Each unit can be connected to any other unit (including itself) using a weighted connection. The DANA framework offers a set of core objects needed to design and run such models. The modeler only has to define the equations of a unit as well as the equations governing the training of the connections. The simulation is completely transparent to the modeler and is handled by DANA. This allows DANA to be used for a wide range of numerical and distributed models as long as they fit the proposed framework (e.g. cellular automata, reaction-diffusion system, decentralized neural networks, recurrent neural networks, kernel-based image processing, etc.). PMID:22994650

  18. Starburst at the Expanding Molecular Superbubble in M82: Self-induced Starburst at the Inner Edge of the Superbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Satoki; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsuru, Takeshi G.; Vila-Vilaró, Baltasar

    2005-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution (2.3"×1.9" or 43pc×36pc at D=3.9 Mpc) 100 GHz millimeter-wave continuum emission observations with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array toward an expanding molecular superbubble in the central region of M82. The 100 GHz continuum image, which is dominated by free-free emission, revealed that the four strongest peaks are concentrated at the inner edge of the superbubble along the galactic disk. The production rates of Lyman continuum photons calculated from 100 GHz continuum flux at these peaks are an order of magnitude higher than those from the most massive star-forming regions in our Galaxy. At these regions, high-velocity ionized gas (traced by H41α and [Ne II]) can be seen, and H2O and OH masers are also concentrated. The center of the superbubble, on the other hand, is weak in molecular and free-free emissions and strong in diffuse hard X-ray emission. These observations suggest that a strong starburst produced energetic explosions and the resulting plasma and superbubble expansions and induced the present starburst regions traced by our 100 GHz continuum observations at the inner edge of the molecular superbubble. These results, therefore, provide the first clear evidence of self-induced starburst in external galaxies. The starburst at the center of the superbubble, on the other hand, is beginning to cease because of a lack of molecular gas. This kind of intense starburst seems to have occurred several times within 106-107 yr in the central region of M82.

  19. Sparse distributed memory and related models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanerva, Pentti

    1992-01-01

    Described here is sparse distributed memory (SDM) as a neural-net associative memory. It is characterized by two weight matrices and by a large internal dimension - the number of hidden units is much larger than the number of input or output units. The first matrix, A, is fixed and possibly random, and the second matrix, C, is modifiable. The SDM is compared and contrasted to (1) computer memory, (2) correlation-matrix memory, (3) feet-forward artificial neural network, (4) cortex of the cerebellum, (5) Marr and Albus models of the cerebellum, and (6) Albus' cerebellar model arithmetic computer (CMAC). Several variations of the basic SDM design are discussed: the selected-coordinate and hyperplane designs of Jaeckel, the pseudorandom associative neural memory of Hassoun, and SDM with real-valued input variables by Prager and Fallside. SDM research conducted mainly at the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) in 1986-1991 is highlighted.

  20. How can model comparison help improving species distribution models?

    PubMed

    Gritti, Emmanuel Stephan; Gaucherel, Cédric; Crespo-Perez, Maria-Veronica; Chuine, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Today, more than ever, robust projections of potential species range shifts are needed to anticipate and mitigate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity and ecosystem services. Such projections are so far provided almost exclusively by correlative species distribution models (correlative SDMs). However, concerns regarding the reliability of their predictive power are growing and several authors call for the development of process-based SDMs. Still, each of these methods presents strengths and weakness which have to be estimated if they are to be reliably used by decision makers. In this study we compare projections of three different SDMs (STASH, LPJ and PHENOFIT) that lie in the continuum between correlative models and process-based models for the current distribution of three major European tree species, Fagussylvatica L., Quercusrobur L. and Pinussylvestris L. We compare the consistency of the model simulations using an innovative comparison map profile method, integrating local and multi-scale comparisons. The three models simulate relatively accurately the current distribution of the three species. The process-based model performs almost as well as the correlative model, although parameters of the former are not fitted to the observed species distributions. According to our simulations, species range limits are triggered, at the European scale, by establishment and survival through processes primarily related to phenology and resistance to abiotic stress rather than to growth efficiency. The accuracy of projections of the hybrid and process-based model could however be improved by integrating a more realistic representation of the species resistance to water stress for instance, advocating for pursuing efforts to understand and formulate explicitly the impact of climatic conditions and variations on these processes. PMID:23874779

  1. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  2. Dynamics of starbursting dwarf galaxies. III. A H I study of 18 nearby objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Federico; Verheijen, Marc; Fraternali, Filippo

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of starbursting dwarf galaxies, using both new and archival H I observations. We consider 18 nearby galaxies that have been resolved into single stars by HST observations, providing their star formation history and total stellar mass. We find that 9 objects have a regularly rotating H I disk, 7 have a kinematically disturbed H I disk, and 2 show unsettled H I distributions. Two galaxies (NGC 5253 and UGC 6456) show a velocity gradient along the minor axis of the H I disk, which we interpret as strong radial motions. For galaxies with a regularly rotating disk we derive rotation curves, while for galaxies with a kinematically disturbed disk, we estimate the rotation velocities in their outer parts. We derive baryonic fractions within about 3 optical scale lengths and find that, on average, baryons constitute at least 30% of the total mass. Despite the star formation having injected ~1056 ergs in the ISM in the past ~500 Myr, these starbursting dwarfs have both baryonic and gas fractions similar to those of typical dwarf irregulars, suggesting that they did not eject a large amount of gas out of their potential wells. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgH I datacubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A71

  3. A New Database of observed SEDs of Nearby Starburst Galaxies from the UV to the FIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Clayton, G. C.; Gordon, K. D.; Misselt, K. A.; Smith, T. L.

    2000-12-01

    We present a new database of UV to FIR data of about 50 nearby starburst galaxies. The galaxies are selected based upon the availability of IUE data. We have recalibrated the IUE UV spectra for these galaxies by incorporating the most recent improvements in the IUE data calibration. For the spectra in optical range, we include the data from the atlas by Kinney et al. and the results of our own long-slit observations with the Bok telescope (Steward Observatory), complemented by the photometric data from the HST/WFPC2 observations. The NIR data are from the literature, our new observations at CTIO, NASA/IRTF and the Mount Laguana Observatory. In addition, the ISO archive has provided mid-IR spectra for some of the galaxies. The optical to IR data are matched to the IUE aperture. In conjunction with IRAS and ISO FIR fluxes, all these data form a set of observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the nucleus regions of nearby starburst galaxies, which should be useful in studying star formation and dust/gas attenuation in galaxies.

  4. Triggering and Feedback: The Relation between the H I Gas and the Starburst in the Dwarf Galaxy NGC 1569

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühle, S.; Klein, U.; Wilcots, E. M.; Hüttemeister, S.

    2005-08-01

    As part of our study on the impact of violent star formation on the interstellar medium (ISM) of dwarf galaxies, we report observations of neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) in the starburst dwarf galaxy NGC 1569. High-resolution measurements with the Very Large Array (B, C, and D configuration) are aimed at identifying morphological and kinematical signatures in H I caused by the starburst. Our kinematical data suggest a huge hole in the H I distribution, probably due to the large number of supernovae explosions in the center of the galaxy over the past 20 Myr. Investigating the large-scale H I structure, we confirm the existence of a possible H I companion and a so-called H I bridge east of NGC 1569. Furthermore, we report the detection of additional low-intensity H I halo emission, which leads us to suggest a revised halo structure. On the basis of our new picture, we discuss the origin of the halo gas and possible implications for the evolution of the starburst in NGC 1569.

  5. AGN and Starbursts in Dusty Galaxy Mergers: Insights from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Joseph M.

    2014-07-01

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) is combining imaging and spectroscopic data from the Herschel, Spitzer, Hubble, GALEX, Chandra, and XMM-Newton space telescopes augmented with extensive ground-based observations in a multiwavelength study of approximately 180 Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) and 20 Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) that comprise a statistically complete subset of the 60μm-selected IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. The objects span the full range of galaxy environments (giant isolated spirals, wide and close pairs, minor and major mergers, merger remnants) and nuclear activity types (Seyfert 1, Seyfert 2, LINER, starburst/HII), with proportions that depend strongly on the total infrared luminosity. I will review the science motivations and present highlights of recent results selected from over 25 peer-reviewed journal articles published recently by the GOALS Team. Statistical investigations include detection of high-ionization Fe K emission indicative of deeply embedded AGN, comparison of UV and far-IR properties, investigations of the fraction of extended emission as a function of wavelength derived from mid-IR spectroscopy, mid-IR spectral diagnostics and spectral energy distributions revealing the relative contributions of AGN and starbursts to powering the bolometric luminosity, and quantitative structure analyses that delineate the evolution of stellar bars and nuclear stellar cusps during the merger process. Multiwavelength dissections of individual systems have unveiled large populations of young star clusters and heavily obscured AGN in early-stage (II Zw 96), intermediate-stage (Mrk 266, Mrk 273), and late-stage (NGC 2623, IC 883) mergers. A recently published study that matches numerical simulations to the observed morphology and gas kinematics in mergers has placed four systems on a timeline spanning 175-260 million years after their first passages, and modeling of additional (U)LIRGs is underway. A very

  6. The Secrets of the Nearest Starburst Cluster. II. The Present-Day Mass Function in NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolte, Andrea; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandl, Bernhard; Zinnecker, Hans

    2006-07-01

    Based on deep Very Large Telescope Infrared Spectrometer and Array Camera JHK photometry, we have derived the present-day mass function (MF) of the central starburst cluster NGC 3603 YC (Young Cluster) in the giant H II region NGC 3603. The effects of field contamination, individual reddening, and a possible binary contribution are investigated. The MF slopes resulting from the different methods are compared and lead to a surprisingly consistent cluster MF with a slope of Γ=-0.9+/-0.15. Analyzing different radial annuli around the cluster core, no significant change in the slope of the MF is observed. However, mass segregation in the cluster is evidenced by the increasing depletion of the high-mass tail of the stellar mass distribution with increasing radius. We discuss the indications of mass segregation with respect to the changes observed in the binned and cumulative stellar MFs and argue that the cumulative function, as well as the fraction of high- to low-mass stars, provides better indicators for mass segregation than the MF slope alone. Finally, the observed MF and starburst morphology of NGC 3603 YC are discussed in the context of massive local star-forming regions such as the Galactic center Arches cluster, R136/30 Dor in the LMC, and the Orion Trapezium cluster, all providing resolved templates for extragalactic star formation. Despite the similarity in the observed MF slopes, dynamical considerations suggest that the starburst clusters do not form gravitationally bound systems over a Hubble time. Both the environment (gravitational potential of the Milky Way) and the concentration of stars in the cluster core determine the dynamical stability of a dense star cluster, such that the long-term evolution of a starburst is not exclusively determined by the stellar evolution of its members, as frequently assumed for globular cluster systems. Based on observations obtained at the ESO Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile, under programs 63.I-0015 and 65.I

  7. Transfer function modeling of damping mechanisms in distributed parameter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, J. C.; Inman, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    This work formulates a method for the modeling of material damping characteristics in distributed parameter models which may be easily applied to models such as rod, plate, and beam equations. The general linear boundary value vibration equation is modified to incorporate hysteresis effects represented by complex stiffness using the transfer function approach proposed by Golla and Hughes. The governing characteristic equations are decoupled through separation of variables yielding solutions similar to those of undamped classical theory, allowing solution of the steady state as well as transient response. Example problems and solutions are provided demonstrating the similarity of the solutions to those of the classical theories and transient responses of nonviscous systems.

  8. A Distributed Snow Evolution Modeling System (SnowModel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liston, G. E.; Elder, K.

    2004-12-01

    A spatially distributed snow-evolution modeling system (SnowModel) has been specifically designed to be applicable over a wide range of snow landscapes, climates, and conditions. To reach this goal, SnowModel is composed of four sub-models: MicroMet defines the meteorological forcing conditions, EnBal calculates surface energy exchanges, SnowMass simulates snow depth and water-equivalent evolution, and SnowTran-3D accounts for snow redistribution by wind. While other distributed snow models exist, SnowModel is unique in that it includes a well-tested blowing-snow sub-model (SnowTran-3D) for application in windy arctic, alpine, and prairie environments where snowdrifts are common. These environments comprise 68% of the seasonally snow-covered Northern Hemisphere land surface. SnowModel also accounts for snow processes occurring in forested environments (e.g., canopy interception related processes). SnowModel is designed to simulate snow-related physical processes occurring at spatial scales of 5-m and greater, and temporal scales of 1-hour and greater. These include: accumulation from precipitation; wind redistribution and sublimation; loading, unloading, and sublimation within forest canopies; snow-density evolution; and snowpack ripening and melt. To enhance its wide applicability, SnowModel includes the physical calculations required to simulate snow evolution within each of the global snow classes defined by Sturm et al. (1995), e.g., tundra, taiga, alpine, prairie, maritime, and ephemeral snow covers. The three, 25-km by 25-km, Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) mesoscale study areas (MSAs: Fraser, North Park, and Rabbit Ears) are used as SnowModel simulation examples to highlight model strengths, weaknesses, and features in forested, semi-forested, alpine, and shrubland environments.

  9. THE EFFECT OF STARBURST METALLICITY ON BRIGHT X-RAY BINARY FORMATION PATHWAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Kalogera, V.; Sepinsky, J. F.; Prestwich, A.; Zezas, A.; Gallagher, J. S.

    2010-12-20

    We investigate the characteristics of young (<20 Myr) and bright (L{sub X} > 1 x 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}) high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and find the population to be strongly metallicity dependent. We separate the model populations among two distinct formation pathways: (1) systems undergoing active Roche lobe overflow (RLO) and (2) wind accretion systems with donors in the (super)giant stage, which we find to dominate the HMXB population. We find metallicity to primarily affect the number of systems which move through each formation pathway, rather than the observable parameters of systems which move through each individual pathway. We discuss the most important model parameters affecting the HMXB population at both low and high metallicities. Using these results, we show that (1) the population of ultra-luminous X-ray sources can be consistently described by very bright HMXBs which undergo stable RLO with mild super-Eddington accretion and (2) the HMXB population of the bright starburst galaxy NGC 1569 is likely dominated by one extremely metal-poor starburst cluster.

  10. A New Interpretation for the Variation in Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.; Allen, James T.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ferland, Gary J.; Meskhidze, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Starburst galaxies have been easily distinguished from AGN using diagnostic emission line ratio diagrams constraining their excitation mechanism. Previous modeling of the star forming (SF) galaxy sequence outlined on the BPT diagram has led to the interpretation that high metallicity SF galaxies and low ionization SF galaxies are synonymous. Here, we present a new interpretation. Using a large sample of low-z SDSS galaxies, we co-added similar spectra of pure star forming galaxies allowing many weaker emission lines to act as consistency checks on strong line diagnostics. For the first time, we applied a locally optimally-emitting cloud (LOC) model to understand the physical reason for the variation in starburst galaxy emission line spectra. We fit over twenty diagnostic diagrams constraining the excitation mechanism, SED, temperature, density, metallicity, and grain content, making this work far more constrained than previous studies. Our results indicate that low luminosity SF galaxies could simply have less concentrated regions of ionized gas compared to their high luminosity counterparts, but have similar metallicities, thus requiring reevaluation about underlying nature of star forming galaxies.

  11. Starburst galaxies in the COSMOS field: clumpy star-formation at redshift 0 < z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Goñi, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. At high redshift, starburst galaxies present irregular morphologies with 10-20% of their star formation occurring in giant clumps. These clumpy galaxies are considered the progenitors of local disk galaxies. To understand the properties of starbursts at intermediate and low redshift, it is fundamental to track their evolution and the possible link with the systems at higher z. Aims: We present an extensive, systematic, and multiband search and analysis of the starburst galaxies at redshift (0 < z < 0.5) in the COSMOS field, as well as detailed characteristics of their star-forming clumps by using Hubble Space Telescope/Advance Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) images. Methods: The starburst galaxies are identified using a tailor-made intermediate-band color excess selection, tracing the simultaneous presence of Hα and [OIII] emission lines in the galaxies. Our methodology uses previous information from the zCOSMOS spectral database to calibrate the color excess as a function of the equivalent width of both spectral lines. This technique allows us to identify 220 starburst galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 0.5 using the SUBARU intermediate-band filters. Combining the high spatial resolution images from the HST/ACS with ground-based multi-wavelength photometry, we identify and parametrize the star-forming clumps in every galaxy. Their principal properties, sizes, masses, and star formation rates are provided. Results: The mass distribution of the starburst galaxies is remarkably similar to that of the whole galaxy sample with a peak around M/M⊙ ~ 2 × 108 and only a few galaxies with M/M⊙ > 1010. We classify galaxies into three main types, depending on their HST morphology: single knot (Sknot), single star-forming knot plus diffuse light (Sknot+diffuse), and multiple star-forming knots (Mknots/clumpy) galaxy. We found a fraction of Mknots/clumpy galaxy fclumpy = 0.24 considering out total sample of starburst galaxies up to z ~ 0.5. The individual star

  12. Anisotropic distributions in a multiphase transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, You; Xiao, Kai; Feng, Zhao; Liu, Feng; Snellings, Raimond

    2016-03-01

    With a multiphase transport (AMPT) model we investigate the relation between the magnitude, fluctuations, and correlations of the initial state spatial anisotropy ɛn and the final state anisotropic flow coefficients vn in Au+Au collisions at √{s NN}=200 GeV. It is found that the relative eccentricity fluctuations in AMPT account for the observed elliptic flow fluctuations, both are in agreement with the elliptic flow fluctuation measurements from the STAR collaboration. In addition, the studies based on two- and multiparticle correlations and event-by-event distributions of the anisotropies suggest that the elliptic-power function is a promising candidate of the underlying probability density function of the event-by-event distributions of ɛn as well as vn. Furthermore, the correlations between different order symmetry planes and harmonics in the initial coordinate space and final state momentum space are presented. Nonzero values of these correlations have been observed. The comparison between our calculations and data will, in the future, shed new insight into the nature of the fluctuations of the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions.

  13. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

    2006-06-16

    Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase

  14. Starbursts and Wispy Drops : Surfactants Spreading on Gel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Daniels, Karen; Behringer, Robert

    2005-11-01

    We report a phase diagram for a novel instability seen in drops of nonionic surfactant solution (Triton X-305) spreading on viscoelastic agar gel substrate . This system allows us to examine the effect of varying the effective fluidity/stiffness of aqueous substrates. The morphology is strongly affected by the substrate fluidity, ranging from spreading starbursts of arms on weak gels, to wispy drops on intermediate strength gels, to circular drops on stiff gels. We analyze the dynamics of spreading in the starburst phase, where the arm length grows as t ^3/4 at early times, independent of the gel strength and surfactant concentration. The number of arms is proportional to the surfactant concentration and inversely proportional to the gel strength. Ongoing work is exploring the effects of changing the drop volume.

  15. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  16. Starburst or AGN dominance in submm-luminous candidate AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, Kristen; Alexander, Dave; Aretxaga, Itziar; Blain, Andrew; Chapman, Scott; Clements, Dave; Dunlop, James; Dunne, Loretta; Dye, Simon; Farrah, Duncan; Hughes, David; Ivison, Rob; Kim, Sungeun; Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Pope, Alexandra; Rowan-Robinson, Michael; Scott, Douglas; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Vaccari, Mattia; van Kampen, Eelco

    2008-03-01

    It is widely believed that starbursts/ULIRGs and AGN activity are triggered by galaxy interactions and merging; and sub-mm selected galaxies (SMGs) seem to be simply high redshift ULIRGs, observed near the peak of activity. In this evolutionary picture every SMG would host an AGN, which would eventually grow a black hole strong enough to blow off all of the gas and dust leaving an optically luminous QSO. In order to probe this evolutionary sequence, a crucial sub-sample to focus on would be the 'missing link' sources, which demonstrate both strong starburst and AGN signatures and to determine if the starburst is the main power source even in SMGs when we have evidence that an AGN is present. The best way to determine if a dominant AGN is present is to look in the mid-IR for their signatures, since often even deep X-ray observations miss identifying the presence of AGN in heavily dust-obscured SMGs. We have selected a sample of SMGs which are good candidates for harboring powerful AGN on the basis of their IRAC colours (S8um/S4.5um>2). Once we confirm these SMGs are AGN-dominated, we can then perform an audit of the energy balance between star-formation and AGN within this special sub-population of SMGs where the BH has grown appreciably to begin heating the dust emission. The proposed observations with IRS will probe the physics of how SMGs evolve from a cold-dust starburst-dominated ULIRG to an AGN/QSO by measuring the level of the mid-IR continuum, PAH luminosity, and Si absorption in these intermediate `transitory' AGN/SMGs.

  17. The stellar populations in the earliest dusty starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardlow, Julie; Conley, Alexander; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Cooray, Asantha; Riechers, Dominik; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Farrah, Duncan; Omont, Alain

    2014-12-01

    We propose Spitzer IRAC imaging of the two brightest spectroscopically confirmed dusty starburst galaxies at z>4 that do not yet have mid-IR observations. The targeted galaxies are members of a rare class of Herschel sources that provide some of the most stringent constraints on galaxy formation theories. The two targets already have complementary optical and far-IR observations, and the proposed short IRAC data are all that is missing to ~double the number of confirmed z>4 dusty starbursts with well-sampled stellar SEDs. The IRAC data are critical for deriving accurate measurements of physical conditions such as dust extinction and stellar mass to ~30% accuracy (~10x better than otherwise). The proposed data complete the IRAC coverage of the four most luminous confirmed z>4 dusty starburst galaxies, which will be observed with HST in cycle 22. The targets already have CO observations and their [CII] 158 micron emission is being mapped with ALMA in cycle 2; with the addition of the proposed IRAC data we will be able to probe the dust-to-gas and stellar-to-gas mass ratios at the highest redshifts and in the most active galaxies. The IRAC data are also key to determining whether these highest redshift dusty starbursts are markers of overdensities in the early Universe via photometric dropout searches. By probing the details of star-formation in the most extreme sources in the first 1.5 Gyr of the Universe the proposed observations will critically test theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  18. A distributed clients/distributed servers model for STARCAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirenne, B.; Albrecht, M. A.; Durand, D.; Gaudet, S.

    1992-01-01

    STARCAT, the Space Telescope ARchive and CATalogue user interface has been along for a number of years already. During this time it has been enhanced and augmented in a number of different fields. This time, we would like to dwell on a new capability allowing geographically distributed user interfaces to connect to geographically distributed data servers. This new concept permits users anywhere on the internet running STARCAT on their local hardware to access e.g., whichever of the 3 existing HST archive sites is available, or get information on the CFHT archive through a transparent connection to the CADC in BC or to get the La Silla weather by connecting to the ESO database in Munich during the same session. Similarly PreView (or quick look) images and spectra will also flow directly to the user from wherever it is available. Moving towards an 'X'-based STARCAT is another goal being pursued: a graphic/image server and a help/doc server are currently being added to it. They should further enhance the user independence and access transparency.

  19. The escape of Lyman photons from a young starburst: the case of Haro11†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Atek, Hakim; Kunth, Daniel; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Leitherer, Claus; Jiménez-Bailón, Elena; Adamo, Angela

    2007-12-01

    Lyman α (Lyα) is one of the dominant tools used to probe the star-forming galaxy population at high redshift (z). However, astrophysical interpretations of data drawn from Lyα alone hinge on the Lyα escape fraction which, due to the complex radiative transport, may vary greatly. Here, we map the Lyα emission from the local luminous blue compact galaxy Haro11, a known emitter of Lyα and the only known candidate for low-z Lyman continuum emission. To aid in the interpretation, we perform a detailed ultraviolet and optical multiwavelength analysis and model the stellar population, dust distribution, ionizing photon budget, and star-cluster population. We use archival X-ray observations to further constrain properties of the starburst and estimate the neutral hydrogen column density. The Lyα morphology is found to be largely symmetric around a single young star-forming knot and is strongly decoupled from other wavelengths. From general surface photometry, only very slight correlation is found between Lyα and Hα, E(B - V), and the age of the stellar population. Only around the central Lyα bright cluster do we find the Lyα/Hα ratio at values predicted by the recombination theory. The total Lyα escape fraction is found to be just 3 per cent. We compute that ~90 per cent of the Lyα photons that escape do so after undergoing multiple resonance scattering events, masking their point of origin. This leads to a largely symmetric distribution and, by increasing the distance that photons must travel to escape, decreases the escape probability significantly. While dust must ultimately be responsible for the destruction of Lyα, it plays a little role in governing the observed morphology, which is regulated more by interstellar medium kinematics and geometry. We find tentative evidence for local Lyα equivalent width in the immediate vicinity of star clusters being a function of cluster age, consistent with hydrodynamic studies. We estimate the intrinsic production

  20. Searching for Tidal Disruption Events in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevel, David; Arcavi, Iair

    2016-06-01

    Tidal Disruption Events (TDEs) are a class of transient phenomena that occur when a star passes sufficiently close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) to be destroyed by tidal forces. Increasing the number of known TDEs will facilitate the study of SMBHs and black hole accretion physics. Recently it has been shown that TDEs occur most often in quiescent post-starburst galaxies (identified by strong Balmer absorption), some of which are know as "E+A" galaxies. These galaxies may have undergone a merger possibly contributing to the likelihood of TDEs. Using Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) we are conducting a transient survey, called SEATiDE (Searching E+A Galaxies for Tidal Disruption Events), of 100 E+A galaxies. We experiment with different image subtraction techniques to improve our ability of detecting TDE flares in the centers of these galaxies. A future survey will cover an order of magnitude more post-starburst galaxies to measure their TDE rates in more detail with the aim of understanding why TDEs so strongly prefer post-starburst environments.

  1. Ionized gas pressure correlates with star formation intensity in nearby starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianxing; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Yang, Huan

    2016-06-01

    We estimate the electron density of the ionized gas and thus the thermal pressure in HII regions; and compare that to the SFR (star formation rate) surface density for a combined sample of about 40 green peas and Lyman Break Analogs at z < 0.30. The electron density of the ionized gas is measured from sulfur line ratio ([SII] 6716 / 6731). We find that the SFR surface density is correlated with the electron density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the star-forming galaxies with SFR surface density above a certain threshold. This work shows quantitatively the correlation between SFR surface density and electron density and that between SFR surface density and the thermal pressure in HII regions for the nearby starburst galaxies. This is consistent with theoretical models of disks (e.g. Kim et al. (2011) if we assume that the thermal pressure in HII regions is comparable to the total diffuse gas pressure at the midplane of the diffuse neutral gas. It is also in agreement with the results from star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2.5. We might infer that the starburst galaxies at low-redshift (z < 0.3) share similar physical properties to the galaxies at high redshift (z ~ 2.5).

  2. Time domain analysis of the weighted distributed order rheological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lili; Pu, Hai; Li, Yan; Li, Ming

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the fundamental solution and relevant properties of the weighted distributed order rheological model in the time domain. Based on the construction of distributed order damper and the idea of distributed order element networks, this paper studies the weighted distributed order operator of the rheological model, a generalization of distributed order linear rheological model. The inverse Laplace transform on weighted distributed order operators of rheological model has been obtained by cutting the complex plane and computing the complex path integral along the Hankel path, which leads to the asymptotic property and boundary discussions. The relaxation response to weighted distributed order rheological model is analyzed, and it is closely related to many physical phenomena. A number of novel characteristics of weighted distributed order rheological model, such as power-law decay and intermediate phenomenon, have been discovered as well. And meanwhile several illustrated examples play important role in validating these results.

  3. Detection of the 158 Micrometers[CII] Transition at z=1.3: Evidence for a Galaxy-Wide Starburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Nikola, T.; Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Tucker, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of 158 micron [C II] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J142824.0+352619, a hyperluminous ( L(sub IR) approximates 10(exp 13) L (sub solar)) starburst galaxy at z = 1.3. The line is bright, corresponding to a fraction L(sub [Cu II] L(sub Fir) approximates 2 x 10(exp -3) of the far-IR (FIR) continuum. The [C II], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n approximates 10(exp 4.2) /cm(exp 3) , and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field approximately 10(exp 3.2) times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) ratio is higher than observed in local ultralummous infrared galaxies or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [C II], but the L(sub [CII])/L(sub FIR) and L(sub CO)/L(sub FIR) ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies. This suggests that MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a scaled-up version of a starburst nucleus, with the burst extended over several kiloparsecs.

  4. Evolution of M82-like starburst winds revisited: 3D radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melioli, C.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Geraissate, F. G.

    2013-04-01

    In this study we present three-dimensional radiative cooling hydrodynamical simulations of galactic winds generated particularly in M82-like starburst galaxies. We have considered intermittent winds induced by supernova (SN) explosions within super star clusters randomly distributed (in space and time) in the central region of the galaxy (within a radius of R = 150 pc) and were able to reproduce the observed M82 wind conditions with its complex morphological outflow structure. We have found that the environmental conditions in the disc in the nearly recent past are crucial to determine whether the wind will develop a large-scale rich filamentary structure, as in M82 wind, or not. If a sufficiently large number of super stellar clusters are built up in a starburst mainly over a period of a few million years, then the simulations reproduce the multiphase gas observed in M82-like winds, i.e. with filaments of sizes about 20-300 pc, velocities of ˜200-500 km s-1, densities in the range 10-1-10 cm-3, embedded in a hot, low-density gas with a density smaller than 10-2 cm-3 and a velocity of ˜2000 km s-1. Otherwise, a `superbubble-like' wind develops, with very poor or no cold filamentary structures. Also, the numerical evolution of the SN ejecta has allowed us to obtain the abundance distribution over the first ˜3 kpc extension of the wind and we have found that the SN explosions change significantly the metallicity only of the hot, low-density wind component for which we obtained abundances ˜5-10 Z⊙ in fair consistency with the observations. Moreover, we have found that the SN-driven wind transports to outside the disc large amounts of energy, momentum and gas, but the more massive high-density component reaches only intermediate altitudes smaller than 1.5 kpc. Therefore, no significant amounts of gas mass are lost to the intergalactic medium and the mass evolution of the galaxy is not much affected by the starburst events occurring in the nuclear region.

  5. ROSAT observations of NGC 2146: Evidence for a starburst-driven superwind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armus, L.; Heckman, T. M.; Weaver, K. A.; Lehnert, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    We have imaged the edge-on starburst galaxy NGC 2146 with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) and the High Resolution Imager (HRI) on board ROSAT and have compared these data to optical images and long-slit spectra. NGC 2146 possesses a very large X-ray nebula with a half-light radius of 1 min (4 kpc) and a maximum diameter of approximately 4 min, or 17 kpc. The X-ray emission is resolved by the PSPC and preferentially oriented along the minor axis, with a total flux of 1.1 x 10(exp -12) ergs/sq cm/s over 0.2 - 2.4 keV and a luminosity of approximately 3 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The inner X-ray nebula is resolved by the HRI into at least four bright knots together with strong diffuse emission responsible for at least 50% of the flux within a radius of 0.5 min (approximately 2 kpc). The brightest knot has a luminosity of (2 - 3) x 10(exp 39) ergs/s. The X-ray nebula has a spatial extent much larger than the starburst ridge seen at centimeter wavelengths by Kronberg & Biermann (1981) and is oriented in a `X-like' pattern along the galaxy minor axis at a position angle of approximately 30 degrees. This minor-axis X-ray emission is associated with a region of H alpha and dust filaments seen in optical images. Optical spectra show that the emission-line gas along the minor axis is characterized by relatively broad lines (approximately 250 km/s full width half-maximum (FWHM)) and by `shocklike' emission-line flux ratios. Together with the blue-asymmetric nuclear emission-line and NaD interstellar absorption-line profiles, these optical data strongly suggest the presence of a starburst-driven superwind. The X-ray spectrum extracted from the central 5 min contains a strong Fe L emission-line complex at 0.6 - 1.0 keV and a hard excess above 1.0 keV. The spectrum is best described with a two-component model, containing a soft (kT approximately 400 - 500 eV) Raymond-Smith thermal plasma together with either a Gamma = 1.7 power-law or a kT greater than 2.2 ke

  6. A REDLINE STARBURST: CO(2-1) OBSERVATIONS OF AN EDDINGTON-LIMITED GALAXY REVEAL STAR FORMATION AT ITS MOST EXTREME

    SciTech Connect

    Geach, J. E.; Hickox, R. C.; Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Coil, A. L.; Krips, M.; Moustakas, J.; Tremonti, C. A.; Sell, P. H.; Rudnick, G. H.

    2013-04-10

    We report observations of the CO(2-1) emission of SDSS J1506+54, a compact (r{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 135 pc) starburst galaxy at z = 0.6. SDSS J1506+54 appears to be forming stars close to the limit allowed by stellar radiation pressure feedback models: the measured L{sub IR}/L{sup '}{sub CO}{approx}1500 is one of the highest measured for any galaxy. With its compact optical morphology but extended low surface brightness envelope, post-starburst spectral features, high infrared luminosity (L{sub IR} > 10{sup 12.5} L{sub Sun }), low gas fraction (M{sub H{sub 2}}/M{sub *}{approx}15%), and short gas depletion time (tens of Myr), we speculate that this is a feedback-limited central starburst episode at the conclusion of a major merger. Taken as such, SDSS J1504+54 epitomizes the brief closing stage of a classic model of galaxy growth: we are witnessing a key component of spheroid formation during what we term a ''redline'' starburst.

  7. Stochastic Models for the Distribution of Index Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a probability model of the occurrence of index terms used to derive discrete distributions which are mixtures of Poisson and negative binomial distributions. These distributions give better fits than the simpler Zipf distribution, have the advantage of being more explanatory, and can incorporate a time parameter if necessary. (25…

  8. Energy Feedback via Shocks in Starburst Environments: the Case of 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Sherry; Seaquist, Ernie; Matzner, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    We propose to image the entire 30 Doradus nebula in the [FeII] emission line at 1.64 micron with NEWFIRM on the CTIO 4-m telescope. The proposed observation will reveal the spatial distribution of shocks in the region, which serves as a strong complement to the NEWFIRM H_2 and Br(gamma) images we already obtained, and our proposed spectroscopic observations using the NTT. We aim to quantify the fraction of each energy input (shock and radiation) in the 30 Doradus PDR with the H_2/Br(gamma), [FeII]/H_2, and [FeII]/Br(gamma) ratios, and to ultimately better understand subsequent star formation in starburst regions.

  9. ALMA Reveals a Compact Starburst Around a Hidden QSO at z˜5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, R.; Norman, C. A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present ALMA 1.3mm observations of XID403, an SMG at z=4.75 in the Chandra Deep Field South hosting a heavily obscured, Compton-thick QSO. The ALMA data show that the dust heated by star formation is distributed within ˜0.9 kpc from the nucleus (effective radius). The SFR and dust temperature obtained from the Herschel+ALMA far-IR SED, reveal a warm and compact starburst with surface density of 200 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. Our analysis suggest that, besides the mass, SFR and gas consumption timescale, objects like XID403 have also the right size to be the progenitors of the compact quiescent massive galaxies seen at z˜3. It is finally shown that the density of the gas co-spatial with the dust provides a substantial contribution to the absorbing column density towards the QSO as measured from the X-rays.

  10. The values distribution in a competing shares financial market model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponzi, A.; Aizawa, Y.

    2000-06-01

    We present our competing shares financial market model and describe it's behavior by numerical simulation. We show that in the critical region the distribution avalanches of the market value as defined in this model has a power-law distribution with exponent around 2.3. In this region the price returns distribution is truncated Levy stable. .