Science.gov

Sample records for district cooling phase

  1. District cooling in Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, B.

    1996-11-01

    This paper will present the status of the development of district cooling systems in Scandinavia over the last 5 years. It will describe the technologies used in the systems that have been constructed as well as the options considered in different locations. It will identify the drivers for the development of the cooling business to-date, and what future drivers for a continuing development of district cooling in Sweden. To-date, approximately 25 different cities of varying sizes have completed feasibility studies to determine if district cooling is an attractive option. In a survey, that was conducted by the Swedish District Heating Association, some 25 cities expected to have district cooling systems in place by the year 2000. In Sweden, district heating systems with hot water is very common. In many cases, it is simply an addition to the current service for the district heating company to also supply district cooling to the building owners. A parallel from this can be drawn to North America where district cooling systems now are developing rapidly. I am convinced that in these cities a district heating service will be added as a natural expansion of the district cooling company`s service.

  2. City of New York preparing of a district heating and cooling systems Project (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-27

    The project with the greatest, and most immediate potential, is the Brooklyn Navy Yard Complex, which included the Brooklyn Navy Yard Industrial Complex, nearby public housing apartments, Brooklyn Hospital, Cumberland Hospital, the Red Hook Sewage Treatment Plant and Pratt Institute. Initial engineering investigation indicates that five, and probably six, of the 160,000 lb/hr, 500 psi boilers in the generating plant at the Navy Yard can be economically refurbished, and could produce up to 900,000 lbs/hr of steam. Further, at least two of the on site turbines appear to be refurbishable, making possible cogeneration of electricity with district heating and/or cooling. The NYCEO research has shown that an innovative system, using pressurized hot water and heat exchangers (to generate low pressure steam for individual apartment houses) is an effective means to satisfy the heating requirements of New York City's apartment buildings, many of which are already steam heated, while reducing their energy costs and oil consumption. This approach takes advantage of a modern hot water system, while avoiding the disadvantage of expensive building retrofit. Preliminary studies have shown that thermal energy costs to Yard tenants, among the highest anywhere in the USA, will be reduced. These savings will increase long term tenant occupancy as well as ability to create and hold jobs in the area.

  3. Minnesota Project: district heating and cooling through power plant retrofit and distribution network. Final report. Phase 1. [Minnesota Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Appendices are presented for the Minnesota Project: District Heating and Cooling Through Power Plant Retrofit and Distribution Network. These are: SYNTHA results (SYNTHA II is a proprietary program of the SYNTHA Corporation); Market Survey Questionnaire: Environmental Review Procedures; Public Service Commission Regulation of District Heating; Energy Use Normalization Procedures; Power Plant Description; Letters of Commitment; Bond Opinion and Issuance; and Marvin Koeplin Letter, Chairman of Public Service Commission, Moorehead, Minnesota.

  4. Integrating district cooling with cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Spurr, M.

    1996-11-01

    Chillers can be driven with cogenerated thermal energy, thereby offering the potential to increase utilization of cogeneration throughout the year. However, cogeneration decreases electric output compared to condensing power generation in power plants using a steam cycle (steam turbine or gas turbine combined cycle plants). The foregone electric production increases with increasing temperature of heat recovery. Given a range of conditions for key variables (such as cogeneration utilization, chiller utilization, cost of fuel, value of electricity, value of heat and temperature of heat recovered), how do technology alternatives for combining district cooling with cogeneration compare? This paper summarizes key findings from a report recently published by the International Energy Agency which examines the energy efficiency and economics of alternatives for combining cogeneration technology options (gas turbine simple cycle, diesel engine, steam turbine, gas turbine combined cycle) with chiller options (electric centrifugal, steam turbine centrifugal one-stage steam absorption, two-stage steam absorption, hot water absorption).

  5. An assessment of district heating and cooling potential in Joliet, Illinois: Phase I technical and economic feasibility study, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    A preliminary assessment of the technical and economic feasibility of a district heating and cooling (DHC) system serving a portion of Joliet, Illinois, has been completed. The basic system, which was designed to provide thermal and electrical energy services to the assessment area, was found to be economically feasible while providing energy services at prices that are less than or equal to current costs. The DHC assessment area included the following: the Downtown Business District; the newly-designated Heritage Business Park; and the Joliet Correctional Center. The Heritage Business Park is the site of a former steel wire and rod mill. Approximately one-third of the site is currently occupied by a rod mill operated by American Steel and Wire while the rest of the Park is essentially undeveloped. In late 1985, plans were formulated to redevelop the site into an industrial park for light industry, offices and research and development facilities. The installation of a DHC system over the next five to ten years would not only complement the redevelopment of the Downtown Business District that was recently begun, but would help to encourage the eventual development of the Heritage Business Park as well.

  6. Phase 1 feasibility study: district heating and cooling using wastewater effluent and sea water in Olympia, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of district heating and cooling (DHC) using low-temperature hydrothermal sources in conjunction with heat pumps has been assessed on a preliminary basis for downtown Olympia and the Capitol Campus. The conclusion is that DHC can provide thermal energy at approximately 75 to 85% of the lowest competing fuel cost in the community. Three potential hydrothermal sources for DHC were evaluated: treated wastewater effluent from the LOTT plant; surface water from Capitol Lake or Budd Inlet; and waste process water from the Olympia Brewery. LOTT effluent and Budd Inlet sea water were both found to be favorable sources, possessing heat pump output potentials far in excess of the service area's heating or cooling demands. Capitol Lake was found to be an unfavorable source because its maximum potential as a heat pump source falls below the service area's thermal demands. The Olympia Brewery was also eliminated because its waste heat was likewise insufficient to meet winter demands, and it requires a costly transmission pipeline to the service area. However, it should be noted that at some point in the future the Brewery could become a DHC customer if its large demand for conventionally-fueled process heat becomes too costly.

  7. District cooling in Stockholm using sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Fermbaeck, G.

    1995-12-31

    In May this year Stockholm Energi started supplying properties in central Stockholm with cooling for comfort and for various processes from its new district cooling system. The project is unique in that most of the cooling energy is produced using cold water from the Baltic Sea. The following article describes the system and provides a summary of the considerations that resulted in venturing to invest in sea-water cooling for such a large project. There is also a description of the hydrological conditions that made the system feasible in Stockholm and some speculations about the possibilities to use cooled sea water elsewhere in the world.

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell application in district cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qattan, Ayman; ElSherbini, Abdelrahman; Al-Ajmi, Kholoud

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents analysis of the performance of a combined cooling and power (CCP) system for district cooling. The cogeneration system is designed to provide cooling for a low-rise residential district of 27,300 RT (96 MWc). A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generates electric power to operate chillers, and the exhaust fuel and heat from the SOFC run gas turbines and absorption chillers. Thermal energy storage is utilized to reduce system capacity. Part-load operation strategies target maximizing energy efficiency. The operation of the system is compared through an hourly simulation to that of packaged air-conditioning units typically used to cool homes. The CCP system with the district cooling arrangement improves the cooling-to-fuel efficiency by 346%. The peak power requirement is reduced by 57% (24 MW) and the total fuel energy is reduced by 54% (750 TJ y-1). The system cuts annual carbon dioxide emissions to less than half and reduces other harmful emissions. A cost analysis of the system components and operation resulted in a 53% reduction in the cost per ton-hour of cooling over traditional systems.

  9. Impact of advanced fluids on costs of district cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S. ); France, D.M.; Knodel, B.D. Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Three alternate fluids, ice-water slurry, friction reduction additive and the combination of them, have been compared for use in District Cooling Systems (DCS). The effect of the fluids on cost and cooling capacities were considered for the two cases of new and existing DCS separately. Two criteria were used in comparisons among fluids in each case: constant pumping power which allows for the most benefit, and constant velocity which is more practical consideration. An economic assessment for a 500 ton system shows a potential cost difference in the total pipe cost for a new system of 70% when a 30% ice slurry is used in place of chilled water. The pipe diameter is reduced to 40% using the slurry. These results apply to the constant comparison and are independent of the use of additive. Friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure drop. The ice-water slurry also has a significant impact on existing district cooling systems. It can potentially expand the cooling capacity by 500% without new piping being installed while maintaining the same pumping power, velocity and pressure-drop as the chilled water system. Again, friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure-drop. They do not influence cooling capacity. The cost for expanding the piping to increase the cooling capacity by the same amount by the use of conventional district cooling technology has been shown to be extremely high compared to the ice-water slurry system.

  10. Impact of advanced fluids on costs of district cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, U.S.; France, D.M.; Knodel, B.D. |

    1992-07-01

    Three alternate fluids, ice-water slurry, friction reduction additive and the combination of them, have been compared for use in District Cooling Systems (DCS). The effect of the fluids on cost and cooling capacities were considered for the two cases of new and existing DCS separately. Two criteria were used in comparisons among fluids in each case: constant pumping power which allows for the most benefit, and constant velocity which is more practical consideration. An economic assessment for a 500 ton system shows a potential cost difference in the total pipe cost for a new system of 70% when a 30% ice slurry is used in place of chilled water. The pipe diameter is reduced to 40% using the slurry. These results apply to the constant comparison and are independent of the use of additive. Friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure drop. The ice-water slurry also has a significant impact on existing district cooling systems. It can potentially expand the cooling capacity by 500% without new piping being installed while maintaining the same pumping power, velocity and pressure-drop as the chilled water system. Again, friction reduction additives serve to reduce pumping power and pressure-drop. They do not influence cooling capacity. The cost for expanding the piping to increase the cooling capacity by the same amount by the use of conventional district cooling technology has been shown to be extremely high compared to the ice-water slurry system.

  11. District cooling and heating development in Stamford, CT. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes the development options for introducing district cooling and heating in downtown Stamford, Connecticut. A district energy system as defined for the Stamford project is the production of chilled and hot water at a central energy plant, and its distribution underground to participating building in the vicinity. The objective of the study was to investigate implementation of a district energy system in conjunction with cogeneration as a means to encourage energy conservation and provide the city with an economic development tool. Analysis of the system configuration focused on selecting an arrangement which offered a realistic opportunity for implementation. Three main alternatives were investigated: (1) construction of an 82 MW cogeneration plant and a district heating and cooling system to serve downtown buildings, (2) construction of a small (4 MW) in-fence cogeneration plant combined with cooling and heating, and (3) construction of a district cooling and heating plant to supply selected buildings. Option (1) was determined to be unfeasible at this time due to low electricity prices. The analysis demonstrated that alternatives (2) and (3) were feasible. A number of recommendations are made for detailed cost estimates and ownership, leasing, and financial issues. 12 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. 1992 National census for district heating, cooling and cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    District energy systems are a major part of the energy use and delivery infrastructure of the United States. With nearly 6,000 operating systems currently in place, district energy represents approximately 800 billion BTU per hour of installed thermal production capacity, and provides over 1.1 quadrillion BTU of energy annually -- about 1.3% of all energy used in the US each year. Delivered through more that 20,000 miles of pipe, this energy is used to heat and cool almost 12 billion square feet of enclosed space in buildings that serve a diverse range of office, education, health care, military, industrial and residential needs. This Census is intended to provide a better understanding of the character and extent of district heating, cooling and cogeneration in the United States. It defines a district energy system as: Any system that provides thermal energy (steam, hot water, or chilled water) for space heating, space cooling, or process uses from a central plant, and that distributes the energy to two or more buildings through a network of pipes. If electricity is produced, the system is a cogenerating facility. The Census was conducted through surveys administered to the memberships of eleven national associations and agencies that collectively represent the great majority of the nation`s district energy system operators. Responses received from these surveys account for about 11% of all district systems in the United States. Data in this report is organized and presented within six user sectors selected to illustrate the significance of district energy in institutional, community and utility settings. Projections estimate the full extent of district energy systems in each sector.

  13. Application of solar ponds to district heating and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, C. M.

    1981-04-01

    A preliminary investigation is reported of the feasibility of incorporating solar ponds into subdivisions to provide district heating, domestic hot water (DHW), and district cooling. Two locations were chosen for analysis: Fort Worth, Texas and Washington, D.C. Solar ponds were sized to meet space heating, cooling, and DHW loads in each location for differing community sizes. Parameters such as storage layer temperature, pond geometry, and storage depth vs surface area were varied to determine the most effective approach to solar pond utilization. A distribution system for the district heating system was designed, including sizing of heat exchangers, piping, and pumps. Cost estimates for the pond and distribution system were formulated by using data generated in pond sizing, as well as associated system costs (e.g., salt costs and distribution system costs). Finally, solar ponds were found to be competitive with residential flat plate collector systems, with delivered energy costs as low as $16.00/GJ.

  14. Modular cogeneration in district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Aalto, P.; Gleason, T.C.J.; Skalafuris, A.J.

    1987-12-01

    The use of prepackaged cogeneration systems of modular size (100 kWe - 10 MWe) in conjunction with district heating and cooling is proposed as a way to enhance the energy conservation potential of both cogeneration and district energy systems. This report examines the technical and institutional aspects of this marriage of technologies, and develops a research agenda whose goal is to define this potential use of cogeneration more accurately and to develop the generic technology base needed to bring it to actuality. 11 refs.

  15. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network, Phase 2. Final report, March 1, 1980-January 31, 1984. Volume 5, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-31

    This volume contains the backup data for the portion of the load and service assessment in Section 2, Volume II of this report. This includes: locations of industrial and commercial establishments, locations of high rise buildings, data from the Newark (Essex County) Directory of Business, data from the Hudson County Industrial Directory, data from the N. J. Department of Energy Inventory of Public Buildings, data on commercial and industrial establishments and new developments in the Hackensack Meadowlands, data on urban redevelopment and Operation Breakthrough, and list of streets in the potential district heating areas of Newark/Harrison and Jersey City/Hoboken.

  16. Steamtown District Heating and Cooling Project, Scranton, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of a study intended to examine the feasibility of a district heating and cooling alternative for the Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, PA. The objective of the study was to investigate the import of steam from the existing district heating system in Scranton which is operated by the Community Central Energy Corporation and through the use of modern technology provide hot and chilled water to Steamtown for its internal heating and cooling requirements. Such a project would benefit Steamtown by introducing a clean technology, eliminating on-site fuel use, avoiding first costs for central heating and cooling plants and reducing operation and maintenance expenditures. For operators of the existing district heating system, this project represents an opportunity to expand their customer base and demonstrate new technologies. The study was conducted by Joseph Technology Corporation, Inc. and performed for the Community Central Energy Corporation through a grant by the US Department of Energy. Steamtown was represented by the National Park Service, the developers of the site.

  17. District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network, Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-31

    This volume begins with an Introduction summarizing the history, methodology and scope of the study, the project team members and the private and public groups consulted in the course of the study. The Load and Service Area Assessment follows, including: a compilation and analysis of existing statistical thermal load data from census data, industrial directories, PSE and G records and other sources; an analysis of responses to a detailed, 4-page thermal load questionnaire; data on public buildings and fuel and energy use provided by the New Jersey Dept. of Energy; and results of other customer surveys conducted by PSE and G. A discussion of institutional questions follows. The general topic of rates is then discussed, including a draft hypothetical Tariff for Thermal Services. Financial considerations are discussed including a report identifying alternative ownership/financing options for district heating systems and the tax implications of these options. Four of these options were then selected by PSE and G and a financial (cash-flow) analysis done (by the PSE and G System Planning Dept.) in comparison with a conventional heating alternative. Year-by-year cost of heat ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) was calculated and tabulated, and the various options compared.

  18. Moorhead district heating, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a demonstration cogeneration hot water district heating system was studied. The district heating system would use coal and cogenerated heat from the Moorhead power plant to heat the water that would be distributed through underground pipes to customers or their space and domestic water heating needs, serving a substantial portion of the commercial and institutional loads as well as single and multiple family residences near the distribution lines. The technical feasibility effort considered the distribution network, retrofit of the power plant, and conversion of heating systems in customers' buildings to use hot water from the system. The system would be developed over six years. The economic analysis consisted of a market assessment and development of business plans for construction and operation of the system. Rate design methodology, institutional issues, development risk, and the proposal for implementation are discussed.

  19. Downtown district cooling: A 21st century approach

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    On December 1, 1992, the Board of Directors of the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority (MPEA) met on Chicago`s historic Navy Pier and ushered in a new era of competition for energy supply in Chicago. The MPEA, a state agency created for the purposes of promoting and operating fair and exposition facilities within the Chicago area (including the McCormick Place exposition center and Navy Pier), voted to accept a third-party proposal to provide district heating and cooling services to the existing McCormick Place facilities and a million square feet of new exposition space. The winning bidder was a joint venture between Trigen Energy, the nation`s largest provider of district energy services, and Peoples Gas, the gas distribution company which serves Chicago. This vote culminated two years of effort by the Energy Division of Chicago`s Department of Environment to analyze the feasibility and promote the implementation of a district energy system to serve the expanded McCormick Place and its environs in the South Loop neighborhood. Initial services began in November, 1993, with a new hot and cold water piping system interconnecting the three existing exhibition facilities. The final buildout of the system, with a combined peak demand predicted at 160 MMBtu of heating and 15,920 tons of and cooling, is scheduled for completion in the summer of 1997.

  20. Maryvale Terrace: Geothermal residential district space heating and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. H.; Goldstone, L. A.

    1982-08-01

    A preliminary study of the technical and economic feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating and cooling system is analyzed for the Maryvale Terrace residential subdevelopment in Phoenix, Arizona, consisting of 557 residential houses. The design heating load was estimated to be 16.77 million Btu/h and the design cooling load was estimated to be 14.65 million Btu/h. Average annual energy use for the development was estimated to be 5870 million Btu/y and 14,650 million Btu/y for heating and cooling, respectively. Competing fuels are natural gas for heating and electricity for cooling. A geothermal resource is assumed to exist beneath the site at a depth of 6000 feet. Five production wells producing 1000 qpm each of 2200 F geothermal fluid are required. Total estimated cost for installing the system is $5,079,300. First year system operations cost (including debt service) is $974,361. The average annual geothermal heating and cooling cost per home is estimated to be $1750 as compared to a conventional system annual cost of $1145.

  1. Innovations in district heating and cooling 1984--1994 and their economic impact

    SciTech Connect

    Mornhed, G.; Casten, T.R.

    1995-08-01

    The period from 1984 to 1994 saw the concept of district heating and cooling revived. Many new district energy systems were established and existing systems expanded. The expansion can be attributed to technical innovations as well as institutional, environmental, and economic changes; no one event can be singled out as a main reason for the improved climate. The district cooling industry in particular, fueled by growing demand and technical innovation, experienced a period of unprecedented expansion. On the surface, the concept of district cooling would appear to be uneconomical. Although economic benefits can be achieved using traditional district cooling technology over individual building systems, the benefits from technical innovations during the last 10 years, such as low-temperature chilled-water storage, trigeneration, variable-speed-drive technology, and automation, have made district cooling more competitive and have contributed to industry growth. On the district heating side, innovations such as low-cost distribution technology and cost-effective cogeneration helped create a renaissance. The improved competitiveness of district heating and cooling has made the combined service attractive for users who now do not need to rely on either in-house heating or cooling plants. Ongoing innovations in the industry set the stage for continued expansion as district heating and cooling--district energy--move into the next century and help improve their urban environment more than ever.

  2. Desiccant-based, heat-actuated cooling assessment for DHC (District Heating and Cooling) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; DiBella, F.A.; Becker, F.E.

    1990-07-01

    An assessment has been completed of the use of desiccant-based, heat-actuated cooling for District Heating and Cooling (DHC) systems, showing that such desiccant-based cooling (DBC) systems are generally applicable to District Heating (DH) systems. Since the DH system only has to supply hot water (or steam) to its customers, systems that were designed as conventional two-pipe DH systems can now be operated as DHC systems without major additional capital expense. Desiccant-based DHC systems can be operated with low-grade DH-supplied heat, at temperatures below 180{degree}F, without significant loss in operating capacity, relative to absorption chillers. During this assessment, a systems analysis was performed, an experimental investigation was conducted, developmental requirements for commercializing DBC systems were examined, and two case studies were conducted. As a result of the case studies, it was found that the operating cost of a DBC system was competitive with or lower than the cost of purchasing DHC-supplied chilled water. However, because of the limited production volume and the current high capital costs of desiccant systems, the payback period is relatively long. In this regard, through the substitution of low-cost components specifically engineered for low-temperature DHC systems, the capital costs should be significantly reduced and overall economics made attractive to future users. 17 figs.

  3. A novel concept for heat transfer fluids used in district cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-01-04

    Low-temperature phase-change materials (PCMS) were mixed with water to enhance the performance of heat transfer fluid. Several PCMs were tested in a laboratory-scale test loop to check their suitability to district cooling applications. The phase-change temperatures and latent heats of fusion of tetradecane, pentadecane, and hexadecane paraffin waxes were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter. The heat of fusion of these materials is approximately 60% of that of ice. They exhibit no supercooling and are stable under repeated thermal cycling. For 10% and 25% PCM-water slurries, the heat transfer enhancement was found to be approximately 18 and 30 percent over the value of water, respectively. It was also found that, in the turbulent region, there is only a minor pumping penalty from the addition of up to 25% PCM to the water. It was demonstrated that pentadecane does not clog in a glass-tube chiller, and continuous pumping below its freezing, point (9.9[degrees]C):was successfully carried out in a bench-scale flow loop. Adding PCM to water increases the thermal capacity of the heat transfer fluid and therefore decreases the volume that needs to be pumped in a district cooling system. It also increases the heat transfer rate, resulting in smaller heat exchangers. Research is continuing on these fluids in order to determine their behavior in large-size loops and to arrive at optimum formulations.

  4. Characterization of selected application of biomass energy technologies and a solar district heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Robert P.

    1980-09-01

    The following systems are discussed: energy self-sufficient farms, wood gasification, energy from high-yield silviculture farms, and solar district heating and cooling. System descriptions and environmental data are included for each one. (MHR)

  5. Development of advanced low-temperature heat transfer fluids for district heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The feasibility of adding phase change materials (PCMs) and surfactants to the heat transfer fluids in district cooling systems was investigated. It increases the thermal capacity of the heat transfer fluid and therefore decreases the volume that needs to be pumped. It also increases the heat transfer rate, resulting in smaller heat exchangers. The thermal behavior of two potential PCMs, hexadecane and tetradecane paraffin wax, was experimentally evaluated. The heat of fusion of these materials is approximately 60% of that of ice. They exhibit no supercooling and are stable under repeated thermal cycling. While test results for laboratory grade materials showed good agreement with data in the literature, both melting point and heat of fusion for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower than literaturevalues. PCM/water mixtures were tested in a laboratory-scale test loop to determine heat transfer and flow resistance properties. When using PCMs in district cooling systems, clogging of frozen PCM particles isone of the major problems to be overcome. In the present project it is proposed to minimize or prevent clogging by the addition of an emulsifier. Effects of the emulsifier on the mixture of water and hexadecane(a PCM) were studied. As the amount of the emulsifier was increased, the size of the solid PCM particles became smaller. When the size of the particles was small enough, they did not stick together or stick to the cold surface of a heat exchanger. The amount of emulsifier to produce this condition was determined.

  6. District heating and cooling systems of the future: Strategies for global change

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    The future of district heating and cooling, also known as district energy, will be a function of economic and regulatory forces in the US. Typically a district energy system provides thermal energy in the form of steam, hot water, or chilled water from a central plant, and distributes the energy through pipes to two or more buildings. At the present time, district energy is under-utilized and serves only 1.3 percent of US energy needs, providing a total of 1.1 quadrillion Btu of energy annually. A brief review of the historical development of district energy, the status of the technology in the US, and a few basics on world energy consumption lead in to the economic and environmental advantages of district energy. District energy systems have been retrofitted to comply wit h the regulations of the Clean Air Act (CAA); presently emissions of greenhouse gases, such as CO{sub 2}, are not regulated by the CAA. If the results of ongoing investigation on global climate change determine that regulation is warranted, several strategies exist for district energy systems to offer significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Projections of district energy`s reaction to the ongoing forces are possible with the use of energy consumption forecasts through the year 2015, and a discussion of trend setting concepts being applied involving: gas turbines, cogeneration, fuel cells, chillers, advanced transmission fluids, renewable energies, and CO{sub 2} capture. District energy has potential to be an important part of the evolving strategies for global climate change. For this reason, combined with technology advancements and a supportive economic climate, a new era in district energy has begun. Growth and development of district energy into the foreseeable future is expected to be strong.

  7. Geothermal district heating and cooling system for the city of Calistoga, California

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.

    1982-01-01

    Calistoga has long been known for having moderate (270/sup 0/F maximum) hydrothermal deposits. The economic feasibility of a geothermal heating and cooling district for a portion of the downtown commercial area and city-owned building was studied. Descriptions of existing and proposed systems for each building in the block are presented. Heating and cooling loads for each building, retrofit costs, detailed cost estimates, system schematics, and energy consumption data for each building are included. (MHR)

  8. ADMX Phase II : Relocation and Millikelvin Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Heilman, Jesse; Tracy, Kyle

    2010-08-30

    Low mass axions are an attractive candidate for making up dark matter. While there are several models for how the Axion couples with other matter, were they to be the majority of the local galactic dark matter halo, they would have a number density on the order of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) is a microwave cavity experiment searching for axion Dark Matter via the axion's electromagnetic coupling. While the original ADMX did not see evidence of axions, the experiment is planned to go through two phases of upgrades to expand its sensitivity and provide a definitive search for axion dark matter. The first phase established the use of a SQUID amplifier which can reduce the amplifier noise temperature to the 100 mK range. In the second phase we will first move the experiment from LLNL to CENPA at the University of Washington. Once the experiment has been moved successfully we will install a dilution refrigerator to cool the cavity to the 100 mK range thus increasing the sensititivity to the level required to scan the remainder of the allowed model space.

  9. Advanced heat pump cycle for district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Radermacher, R.

    1991-07-01

    A bread board heat pump was designed and built to test the performance of a vapor compression heat pump with two stage ammonia-water solution circuits. The design was updated based on the experience gained with the single stage version of this heat pump. A major improvement was obtained by eliminating the rectifier. The new scheme was first investigated by computer simulation and then incorporated in the experimental setup. Water balance in the high and low temperature circuits is now maintained by bleeding up to 2.5% of the weak solution flow from one solution circuit to the other. The advantages of this scheme are reduced first cost, simplified design and control, 20--30% improvement in cooling coefficient of performance and 10--15% increase in cooling capacity as compared to the cycle with a rectifier. Coefficients of performance in the range of 0.84 to 1.03 were obtained experimentally for a temperature lift of 100-K. The pressure ratios encountered were in the range of 7.6 to 9.9, which are 35 to 50% of the pressure ratio expected for a conventional heat pump. Thus the results demonstrate that high temperature lifts can be achieved at pressure ratios which are less than half as large as for conventional systems. The cooling capacities were in the range of 2.79 to 4.21 kW. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Development of advanced low-temperature heat transfer fluids for district heating and cooling, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.I.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    The feasibility of adding phase change materials (PCMS) and surfactants to the heat transfer fluids in district cooling systems was investigated. It increases the thermal capacity of the heat transfer fluid and therefore decreases the volume that needs to be pumped. It also increases the heat transfer rate, resulting in smaller heat exchangers. The thermal behavior of two potential PCMS, hexadecane and tetradecane paraffin wax, was experimentally evaluated. The heat of fusion of these materials is approximately 60% of that of ice. They exhibit no supercooling and are stable under repeated thermal cycling. While test results for laboratory grade materials showed good agreement with data in the literature, both melting point and heat of fusion for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower than literature values. PCM/water mixtures were tested in a laboratory-scale test loop to determine heat transfer and flow resistance properties. For 10% and 25% PCM/water slurries, the heat transfer enhancement was found to be approximately 18 and 30 percent above the value for water, respectively. Within the turbulent region, there is only a minor pumping penalty from the addition of up to 25% PCM to the water. Research is continuing on these fluids in order to determine their behavior in large-size loops and to arrive at optimum formulations.

  11. A novel concept for heat transfer fluids used in district cooling systems. Progress report, September 25, 1990--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-01-04

    Low-temperature phase-change materials (PCMS) were mixed with water to enhance the performance of heat transfer fluid. Several PCMs were tested in a laboratory-scale test loop to check their suitability to district cooling applications. The phase-change temperatures and latent heats of fusion of tetradecane, pentadecane, and hexadecane paraffin waxes were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter. The heat of fusion of these materials is approximately 60% of that of ice. They exhibit no supercooling and are stable under repeated thermal cycling. For 10% and 25% PCM-water slurries, the heat transfer enhancement was found to be approximately 18 and 30 percent over the value of water, respectively. It was also found that, in the turbulent region, there is only a minor pumping penalty from the addition of up to 25% PCM to the water. It was demonstrated that pentadecane does not clog in a glass-tube chiller, and continuous pumping below its freezing, point (9.9{degrees}C):was successfully carried out in a bench-scale flow loop. Adding PCM to water increases the thermal capacity of the heat transfer fluid and therefore decreases the volume that needs to be pumped in a district cooling system. It also increases the heat transfer rate, resulting in smaller heat exchangers. Research is continuing on these fluids in order to determine their behavior in large-size loops and to arrive at optimum formulations.

  12. District cooling engineering & design program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Phoenix, Arizona is located in the Sonoran desert. Daytime temperatures typically rise to over 100 F during the three summer months. Average and peak temperatures have tended to rise over recent decades. This is generally attributed to what is known as the heat island effect, due to an increase in heat absorbing concrete and a decrease in irrigated farmland in the area. Phoenix is the eighth largest city in the US with a population of just over one million (1,000,000). The metropolitan area is one of the fastest growing in the nation. Over the last ten years its population has increased by over 40%. It is not an exaggeration to say the general availability of refrigerated air conditioning, both for buildings and automobiles has been an important factor enabling growth. The cost of operating public buildings has risen significantly in the last decade. In fiscal year 92/93 the City of Phoenix had energy expenses of over thirty four million dollars ($34,000,000). Because the City was planning a major new construction project, a new high-rise City Hall, it was decided to study and then optimize the design and selection of building systems to minimize long term owning and operating costs. The City Hall was to be constructed in downtown Phoenix. Phoenix presently owns other buildings in the area. A number of large cooling systems serving groups of buildings are currently operating in the Phoenix area. The City requested that the design consultants analyze the available options and present recommendations to the City`s engineering staff.

  13. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge

  14. Microwave link phase compensation for longitudinal stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mernick, K.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Johnson, B.; Severino, F.

    2010-05-02

    A new microwave link has been developed for the longitudinal stochastic cooling system, replacing the fiberoptic link used for the transmission of the beam signal from the pickup to the kicker. This new link reduces the pickup to kicker delay from 2/3 of a turn to 1/6 of a turn, which greatly improves the phase margin of the system and allows operation at higher frequencies. The microwave link also introduces phase modulation on the transmitted signal due to variations in the local oscillators and time of flight. A phase locked loop tracks a pilot tone generated at a frequency outside the bandwidth of the cooling system. Information from the PLL is used to calculate real-time corrections to the cooling system at a 10 kHz rate. The design of the pilot tone system is discussed and results from commissioning are described.

  15. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  16. Cooling of Electronics with Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S. K.; Dutta, P.

    2010-10-01

    This paper deals with phase change materials (PCMs), used in conjunction with thermal conductivity enhancer (TCE), as means of thermal management of electronic systems. This work was motivated by the need for short term thermal management of high packing density equipments (such as in avionics). Eicosane is used as PCM, while aluminium pin or plate fins are used as TCE. The test section considered in all cases is 42×42 mm square base with TCE height of 25 mm. An electronic heater producing 4, 6 and 8 W was used to simulate the heat generation of electronic chips. Various volumetric percentages of TCE in the conglomerate of PCM and TCE were considered, namely, 0, 2, 8, 18 and 27%. The case with 8% volumetric percentage of TCE was found to have the best thermal performance. A numerical model was developed to enable interpretation of experimental results and to perform parametric studies.

  17. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  18. Cooling compact stars and phase transitions in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    We report new simulations of cooling of compact stars containing quark cores and updated fits to the Cas A fast cooling data. Our model is built on the assumption that the transient behaviour of the star in Cas A is due to a phase transition within the dense QCD matter in the core of the star. Specifically, the fast cooling is attributed to an enhancement in the neutrino emission triggered by a transition from a fully gapped, two-flavor, red-green color-superconducting quark condensate to a superconducting crystalline or an alternative gapless, color-superconducting phase. The blue-colored condensate is modeled as a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type color superconductor with spin-one pairing order parameter. We study the sensitivity of the fits to the phase transition temperature, the pairing gap of blue quarks and the timescale characterizing the phase transition (the latter modelled in terms of a width parameter). Relative variations in these parameter around their best-fit values larger than 10-3 spoil the fit to the data. We confirm the previous finding that the cooling curves show significant variations as a function of compact star mass, which allows one to account for dispersion in the data on the surface temperatures of thermally emitting neutron stars.

  19. Macroeconomic effects under the proposed District Heating and Cooling Tax Incentives Act of 1982. Technology-related policy evaluation using a market penetration model and a macromodel

    SciTech Connect

    Teotia, A.P.S.; Poyer, D.A.

    1983-08-01

    In its energy conservation programs, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has supported research into and development of district heating and cooling systems to meet energy demands in the residential and commercial sectors. Toward this goal, DOE requested Argonne National Laboratory to estimate the macroeconomic effects of the Senate bill known as the ''District Heating and Cooling Tax Incentives Act of 1982.'' The first step was to estimate market penetration of district heating and cooling cogeneration energy systems under the provisions of the proposed act, using Argonne's district heating and cooling market penetration model. This model provided annual estimates of district heating and cooling investment and energy savings. In the second step, macroeconomic effects of district heating and cooling under the Act's provisions were estimated using the annual model of the US economy developed by Data Resources, Inc. The conclusion is that district heating and cooling penetration under the Act could have significant favorable effects on gross national product, US employment, fuel import costs, and similar factors. The analysis assumes that district heating and cooling can overcome the institutional and environmental barriers that have impeded it in the past. 16 references, 17 figures, 13 tables.

  20. Feasibility and Supply Analysis of U.S. Geothermal District Heating and Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoning

    Geothermal energy is a globally distributed sustainable energy with the advantages of a stable base load energy production with a high capacity factor and zero SOx, CO, and particulates emissions. It can provide a potential solution to the depletion of fossil fuels and air pollution problems. The geothermal district heating and cooling system is one of the most common applications of geothermal energy, and consists of geothermal wells to provide hot water from a fractured geothermal reservoir, a surface energy distribution system for hot water transmission, and heating/cooling facilities to provide water and space heating as well as air conditioning for residential and commercial buildings. To gain wider recognition for the geothermal district heating and cooling (GDHC) system, the potential to develop such a system was evaluated in the western United States, and in the state of West Virginia. The geothermal resources were categorized into identified hydrothermal resources, undiscovered hydrothermal resources, near hydrothermal enhanced geothermal system (EGS), and deep EGS. Reservoir characteristics of the first three categories were estimated individually, and their thermal potential calculated. A cost model for such a system was developed for technical performance and economic analysis at each geothermally active location. A supply curve for the system was then developed, establishing the quantity and the cost of potential geothermal energy which can be used for the GDHC system. A West Virginia University (WVU) case study was performed to compare the competiveness of a geothermal energy system to the current steam based system. An Aspen Plus model was created to simulate the year-round campus heating and cooling scenario. Five cases of varying water flow rates and temperatures were simulated to find the lowest levelized cost of heat (LCOH) for the WVU case study. The model was then used to derive a levelized cost of heat as a function of the population density

  1. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  2. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Kirk T; Tolbert, Leon M; Ayers, Curtis William; Ozpineci, Burak; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given. This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device

  3. Thermal performance of phase change wallboard for residential cooling application

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.; Stetiu, C.

    1997-04-01

    Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand mainly due to very poor load factors in milder climates. Thermal mass can be utilized to reduce the peak-power demand, downsize the cooling systems, and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices have been used in the past to overcome the shortcomings of alternative cooling sources, or to avoid high demand charges. The manufacturing of phase change material (PCM) implemented in gypsum board, plaster or other wall-covering material, would permit the thermal storage to become part of the building structure. PCMs have two important advantages as storage media: they can offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity, and their discharge is almost isothermal. This allows the storage of high amounts of energy without significantly changing the temperature of the room envelope. As heat storage takes place inside the building, where the loads occur, rather than externally, additional transport energy is not required. RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation program based on the finite difference approach, was used to numerically evaluate the latent storage performance of treated wallboard. Extended storage capacity obtained by using double PCM-wallboard is able to keep the room temperatures close to the upper comfort limits without using mechanical cooling. Simulation results for a living room with high internal loads and weather data for Sunnyvale, California, show significant reduction of room air temperature when heat can be stored in PCM-treated wallboards.

  4. Optimization of the engineering design for the Lansing District Cooling System by comparative analysis of the impact of advanced technologies on a conventional design approach. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Lansing Board of Water and Light (LBWL) began investigating development of a cooling district in the Lansing Downtown in 1989 in order to retain and build summer load for its steam utility. A feasibility study was conducted in conjunction with SFT, Inc. and ZBA, Inc. which addressed many factors such as marketability of the product, impact on the summer steam load, distribution system development, system design, probable capital and operating costs, reliability and environmental and other regulatory impacts on a preliminary feasibility basis. The Phase I study completed in September of 1989 provided highly promising results for establishing a District Cooling System (DCS). An existing chilled water production facility owned by the State of Michigan was identified as a potential location for a DCS plant. With these changes a review of the feasibility with a new set of alternatives and sensitivities was evaluated. This enhancement to the Phase I Study was nearing completion when the LBWL in conjunction with Energy, Mines and Resources Canada proposed to conduct the Phase II project in conjunction with DOE. The project was structured to proceed along a dual track to demonstrate the impact of the application of various innovative technologies.

  5. The Analysis of A Hybrid Cooling System - Phase 2,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kuan-Hsiung

    During the first phase of study, the mathematical modelling and the performance of the hybrid cooling system using solid desiccants were analyzed numerically. During this phase of study, the experimental investigation was conducted which yielded successful results with 5 % deviation as compared with the operational data of available commerical dehumidifiers. Furthmore, a prototype hybrid cooling system was actually constructed in the Refrigeration & Air-Conditioning Lab of National Sun Yat-Sen University (NSYSU), which generated good correlations with 7% deviation only, as compared with the analytical results. In other words, the good correlations obtained among the math modeling, the commercial unit operational data, and the NSYSU prototype system warrant the potential applications of this system for many industrial dehumidification and drying processes.

  6. COOLING OF COMPACT STARS WITH COLOR SUPERCONDUCTING PHASE IN QUARK-HADRON MIXED PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Tsuneo; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Fujimoto, Masayuki E-mail: hashimoto@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2013-03-01

    We present a new scenario for the cooling of compact stars considering the central source of Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The Cas A observation shows that the central source is a compact star that has high effective temperature, and it is consistent with the cooling without exotic phases. The observation also gives the mass range of M {>=} 1.5 M {sub Sun }, which may conflict with the current plausible cooling scenario of compact stars. There are some cooled compact stars such as Vela or 3C58, which can barely be explained by the minimal cooling scenario, which includes the neutrino emission by nucleon superfluidity (PBF). Therefore, we invoke the exotic cooling processes, where a heavier star cools faster than lighter one. However, the scenario seems to be inconsistent with the observation of Cas A. Therefore, we present a new cooling scenario to explain the observation of Cas A by constructing models that include a quark color superconducting (CSC) phase with a large energy gap; this phase appears at ultrahigh density regions and reduces neutrino emissivity. In our model, a compact star has a CSC quark core with a low neutrino emissivity surrounded by high emissivity region made by normal quarks. We present cooling curves obtained from the evolutionary calculations of compact stars: while heavier stars cool slowly, and lighter ones indicate the opposite tendency without considering nucleon superfluidity. Furthermore, we show that our scenario is consistent with the recent observations of the effective temperature of Cas A during the last 10 years, including nucleon superfluidity.

  7. Optics for Phase Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Johnson; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-06-26

    The realization of a muon collider requires a reduction of the 6D normalized emittance of an initially generated muon beam by a factor of more than 106. Analytical and simulation studies of 6D muon beam ionization cooling in a helical channel filled with pressurized gas or liquid hydrogen absorber indicate that a factor of 106 is possible. Further reduction of the normalized 4D transverse emittance by an additional two orders of magnitude is envisioned using Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC). To realize the phase shrinkage effect in the parametric resonance method, one needs to design a focusing channel free of chromatic and spherical aberrations. We report results of our study of a concept of an aberration-free wiggler transport line with an alternating dispersion function. Resonant beam focusing at thin beryllium wedge absorber plates positioned near zero dispersion points then provides the predicted PIC effect.

  8. Reduction in air emissions attainable through implementation of district heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomquist, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    District heating and cooling (DHC) can provide multiple opportunities to reduce air emissions associated with space conditioning and electricity generation, which contribute 30% to 50% of all such emissions. When DHC is combined with cogeneration (CHP), maximum reductions in sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), particulates, and ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants can most effectively be achieved. Although significant improvements in air quality have been documented in Europe and Scandinavia due to DHC and CHP implementation, accurately predicting such improvements has been difficult. Without acceptable quantification methods, regulatory bodies are reluctant to grant air emissions credits, and local community leaders are unwilling to invest in DHC and CHP as preferred methods of providing energy or strategies for air quality improvement. The recent development and release of a number of computer models designed specifically to provide quantification of air emissions that can result from DHC and CHP implementation should help provide local, state, and national policymakers with information vital to increasing support and investment in DHC development.

  9. The CERES S'COOL Project: Development and Operational Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Lin H.; Young, David F.; Racel, Anne M.

    1998-01-01

    As part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, the first Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument will be launched on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft from the Tanegashima launch site in Japan in November 1997. The instrument will measure the radiation budget incoming and outgoing radiant energy - of the Earth. The major feature of interest is clouds, which play a very strong role in regulating our climate. CERES will identify clear and cloudy regions and determine cloud physical and microphysical properties using imager data from a companion instrument. Validation efforts for the remote sensing algorithms will be intensive. As one component of the validation, the S'COOL (Students' Cloud Observations On-Line) project will involve school children around the globe in making ground truth measurements at the time of a CERES overpass. They will report cloud type, height, fraction, and opacity, as well as the local surface conditions. Their observations will be collected at the NASA Langley Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and made available over the Internet for educational purposes as well as for use by the CERES Science Team in validation efforts. Pilot testing of the S'COOL project began in January 1997 with two local schools in Southeastern Virginia and one remote site in Montana. National testing in April 1997 involved 8 schools (grades 3 to high school) across the United States. Global testing will be carried out in October 1997. Details of the S'COOL project, which is mainly Internet-based, are being developed in each of these phases according to feedback received from participants. In 1998, when the CERES instrument is operational, a global observer network should be in place providing useful information to the scientists and learning opportunities to the students. Broad participation in the S'COOL project is planned, both to obtain data from a wide range of geographic areas, and to involve as many students as

  10. Development of advanced low-temperature heat transfer fluids for district heating and cooling. Final report, September 25, 1990--September 24, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The feasibility of adding phase change materials (PCMs) and surfactants to the heat transfer fluids in district cooling systems was investigated. It increases the thermal capacity of the heat transfer fluid and therefore decreases the volume that needs to be pumped. It also increases the heat transfer rate, resulting in smaller heat exchangers. The thermal behavior of two potential PCMs, hexadecane and tetradecane paraffin wax, was experimentally evaluated. The heat of fusion of these materials is approximately 60% of that of ice. They exhibit no supercooling and are stable under repeated thermal cycling. While test results for laboratory grade materials showed good agreement with data in the literature, both melting point and heat of fusion for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower than literaturevalues. PCM/water mixtures were tested in a laboratory-scale test loop to determine heat transfer and flow resistance properties. When using PCMs in district cooling systems, clogging of frozen PCM particles isone of the major problems to be overcome. In the present project it is proposed to minimize or prevent clogging by the addition of an emulsifier. Effects of the emulsifier on the mixture of water and hexadecane(a PCM) were studied. As the amount of the emulsifier was increased, the size of the solid PCM particles became smaller. When the size of the particles was small enough, they did not stick together or stick to the cold surface of a heat exchanger. The amount of emulsifier to produce this condition was determined.

  11. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  12. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  13. Legionnaires' disease bacteria in power plant cooling systems: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Christensen, S.W.; Solomon, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    Legionnaires' Disease Bacteria (Legionella) are a normal component of the aquatic community. The study investigated various environmental factors that affect Legionella profiles in power plant cooling waters. The results indicate that each of the four factors investigated (incubation temperature, water quality, the presence and type of associated biota, and the nature of the indigenous Legionella population) is important in determining the Legionella profile of these waters. Simple predictive relationships were not found. At incubation temperatures of 32/sup 0/ and 37/sup 0/C, waters from a power plant where infectious Legionella were not observed stimulated the growth of stock Legionella cultures more than did waters from plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent. This observation is consistent with Phase I results, which showed that densities of Legionella were frequently reduced in closed-cycle cooling systems despite the often higher infectivity of Legionella in closed-cycle waters. In contrast, water from power plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent supported the growth of indigenous Legionella pneumophila at 42/sup 0/C, while water from a power plant where infectious Legionella were absent did not support growth of indigenous Legionella. Some Legionella are able to withstand a water temperature of 85/sup 0/C for several hours, thus proving more tolerant than was previously realized. Finally, the observation that water from two power plants where infectious Legionella were prevalent usually supported the growth of Group A Legionella at 45/sup 0/C indicates the presence, of soluble Legionella growth promoters in these waters. This test system could allow for future identification and control of these growth promoters and, hence, of Legionella. 25 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Cooling of Sr to high phase-space density by laser and sympathetic cooling in isotopic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, G.; Drullinger, R. E.; Poli, N.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2006-02-15

    Based on an experimental study of two-body and three-body collisions in ultracold strontium samples, a novel optical-sympathetic cooling method in isotopic mixtures is demonstrated. Without evaporative cooling, a phase-space density of 6x10{sup -2} is obtained with a high spatial density that should allow us to overcome the difficulties encountered so far to reach quantum degeneracy for Sr atoms.

  15. Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, T.; Buhagiar, D.; Farrugia, R. N.

    2014-06-01

    A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

  16. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  17. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  18. Geothermal district heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budney, G. S.; Childs, F.

    1982-06-01

    Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

  19. User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

  20. User manual for GEOCITY: A computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, H. D.; Fassbender, L. L.; Bloomster, C. H.

    1982-09-01

    A model to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir is discussed. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factor or commercial building. All the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output are included. The indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual are given.

  1. Feasibility of cogenerated district heating and cooling for North Loop project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-03-01

    A thermal-economic analysis was performed in order to determine feasibility of cogeneration with central heating and cooling for Chicago's North Loop Development Project. Heating, cooling and electrical loads were predicted by using energy data according to use and floor area, representative of downtown Chicago. The central facility proposed would supply cogenerated heating for a part of the development's demand and about one half of the cooling demand by means of combined conventional and cogeneration equipment together on the 4-pipe distribution system. Electricity would also be distributed and used to substantially displace purchases. Additional options are also discussed and, if economical, could make implementation more attractive. Four alternatives involving gas turbines and diesels were selected for study and are reported. Energy savings extend over the assumed 25 years of the project and are indexed to inflation and fuel-cost escalation. It would appear that cogeneration could assist economic development of the North Loop Project.

  2. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Phase Space Cooling Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, T. L.

    2010-03-30

    MICE is an experimental demonstration of muon ionization cooling using a section of an ionization cooling channel and a muon beam. The muons are produced by the decay of pions from a target dipping into the ISIS proton beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The channel includes liquid-hydrogen absorbers providing transverse and longitudinal momentum loss and high-gradient radiofrequency (RF) cavities for longitudinal reacceleration, all packed into a solenoidal magnetic channel. MICE will reduce the beam transverse emittance by about 10% for muon momenta between 140 and 240 MeV/c. Time-of-flight (TOF) counters, threshold Cherenkov counters, and a calorimeter will identify background electrons and pions. Spectrometers before and after the cooling section will measure the beam transmission and input and output emittances with an absolute precision of 0.1%.

  3. Effect of Continuous Cooling on Secondary Phase Precipitation in the Super Duplex Stainless Steel ZERON-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calliari, Irene; Bassani, Paola; Brunelli, Katya; Breda, Marco; Ramous, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    The precipitation of secondary phases in super duplex stainless steels (SDSS) is a subject of great relevance owing to their dangerous effects on both mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. This paper examines the effect of continuous cooling after solution annealing treatment on secondary phase precipitation in the ZERON-100 SDSS. It considers the influence of cooling rate on volume fraction, morphology and chemical composition. It has been found that the formation of sigma and chi phases can be avoided only at cooling rates higher than 0.7 °C/s. In addition, at the lowest cooling rate the sigma phase amount approaches the equilibrium value, but the chi phase amount remains significantly low.

  4. Proposed renovation of a district cooling plant to optimize the existing distribution system and increase production capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Tredinnick, S.M.

    1998-12-31

    The phaseout of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) production in January 1996 is making district cooling (DC) an increasingly popular alternative to chiller retrofits and replacements. By connecting to a DC system, building owners and managers can focus on issues other than chilled-water production, thus liberating personnel, space, and financial resources for other important functions. A San Diego company has been serving the downtown business district of San Diego with reliable DC service since 1971. The existing system presently serves nine customers and, based on the current system plant pumping configuration, requires modifications in order to handle additional capacity. They are interested in signing on additional customers in the near future but cannot due to the limitations of the existing distribution system. This paper addresses modifications recommended to the company based on a hydraulic analysis and conceptual design completed in June 1995. The results of the analysis increased system distribution capacity from 5,245 tons (19.9 MW{sub th}) to almost 18,000 tons (62.9 MW{sub th}), while maintaining the present pipe system sizes. Investigations to increase plant capacity was not part of the scope of this paper since the focus was on the distribution system.

  5. Towards high phase space density of alkali atoms by simple optical cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiazhong; Vendeiro, Zachary; Chen, Wenlan; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple optical cooling method, which can cool down the temperature of rubidium 87 to the ground state of the vibrational levels. We only use one far-detuned laser performing both cooling and optical repumping. By tuning the laser frequency, we verify the dependence of the two-body collision loss versus the laser detuning. Combining with the retrap of the atoms in the optical dipole trap, we can make the phase space density approaching to unity.

  6. Light-Weight, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  7. Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation, 'Light-Weight, Low-Cost, Single-Phase Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate,' directly addresses program goals of increased power density, specific power, and lower cost of power electronics components through improved thermal management.

  8. Gasifier waste water treatment: Phase I cooling tower assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Winton, S.L.

    1985-02-01

    Details of an advanced study of the treatability of waste waters from the fixed-bed gasification of lignite describe the test equipment and results at a pilot plant in North Dakota using stripped-gas liquor (SGL) as cooling tower makeup. Ammonia, alkalinity, phenol, and other non-hydantoin organics were removed from the cooling water by stripping and/or biological degradation, with the phenol concentration in the exhaust air exceeding the odor threshold. It will be necessary to control foaming of the circulating water, but both glycol and silicon based agents performed well during the test. It will also be necessary to reduce the high level of biofouling on heat transfer surfaces, although stainless steel fouling was not a major problem. The conclusion is that SGL is limited by potentially serious operating problems without additional treatment. 5 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

  9. Computer cooling using a two phase minichannel thermosyphon loop heated from horizontal and vertical sides and cooled from vertical side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieliński, Henryk; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2010-10-01

    In the present paper it is proposed to consider the computer cooling capacity using the thermosyphon loop. A closed thermosyphon loop consists of combined two heaters and a cooler connected to each other by tubes. The first heater may be a CPU processor located on the motherboard of the personal computer. The second heater may be a chip of a graphic card placed perpendicular to the motherboard of personal computer. The cooler can be placed above the heaters on the computer chassis. The thermosyphon cooling system on the use of computer can be modeled using the rectangular thermosyphon loop with minichannels heated at the bottom horizontal side and the bottom vertical side and cooled at the upper vertical side. The riser and a downcomer connect these parts. A one-dimensional model of two-phase flow and heat transfer in a closed thermosyphon loop is based on mass, momentum, and energy balances in the evaporators, rising tube, condenser and the falling tube. The separate two-phase flow model is used in calculations. A numerical investigation for the analysis of the mass flux rate and heat transfer coefficient in the steady state has been accomplished.

  10. Abnormal correlation between phase transformation and cooling rate for pure metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. J.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, X. J.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z.-K.; Zhang, T.-Y.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This work aims to achieve deep insight into the phenomenon of phase transformation upon rapid cooling in metal systems and reveal the physical meaning of scatter in the time taken to reach crystallization. The total number of pure metals considered in this work accounts for 14. Taking pure copper as an example, the correlation between phase selection of crystal or glass and cooling rate was investigated using molecular dynamic simulations. The obtained results demonstrate that there exists a cooling rate region of 6.3 × 1011–16.6 × 1011 K/s, in which crystalline fractions largely fluctuate along with cooling rates. Glass transformation in this cooling rate region is determined by atomic structure fluctuation, which is controlled by thermodynamic factors. According to the feature of bond-orientation order at different cooling rates, we propose two mechanisms of glass formation: (i) kinetic retardation of atom rearrangement or structural relaxation at a high cooling rate; and (ii) competition of icosahedral order against crystal order near the critical cooling rate.

  11. Abnormal correlation between phase transformation and cooling rate for pure metals.

    PubMed

    Han, J J; Wang, C P; Liu, X J; Wang, Y; Liu, Z-K; Zhang, T-Y; Jiang, J Z

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to achieve deep insight into the phenomenon of phase transformation upon rapid cooling in metal systems and reveal the physical meaning of scatter in the time taken to reach crystallization. The total number of pure metals considered in this work accounts for 14. Taking pure copper as an example, the correlation between phase selection of crystal or glass and cooling rate was investigated using molecular dynamic simulations. The obtained results demonstrate that there exists a cooling rate region of 6.3 × 10(11)-16.6 × 10(11) K/s, in which crystalline fractions largely fluctuate along with cooling rates. Glass transformation in this cooling rate region is determined by atomic structure fluctuation, which is controlled by thermodynamic factors. According to the feature of bond-orientation order at different cooling rates, we propose two mechanisms of glass formation: (i) kinetic retardation of atom rearrangement or structural relaxation at a high cooling rate; and (ii) competition of icosahedral order against crystal order near the critical cooling rate. PMID:26939584

  12. Cooling vests with phase change material packs: the effects of temperature gradient, mass and covering area.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmer, Ingvar

    2010-05-01

    Phase change material (PCM) absorbs or releases latent heat when it changes phases, making thermal-regulated clothing possible. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationships between PCM cooling rate and temperature gradient, mass and covering area on a thermal manikin in a climatic chamber. Three melting temperatures (24, 28, 32 degrees C) of the PCMs, different mass, covering areas and two manikin temperatures (34 and 38 degrees C) were used. The results showed that the cooling rate of the PCM vests tested is positively correlated with the temperature gradient between the thermal manikin and the melting temperature of the PCMs. The required temperature gradient is suggested to be greater than 6 degrees C when PCM vests are used in hot climates. With the same temperature gradient, the cooling rate is mainly determined by the covering area. The duration of the cooling effect is dependent on PCM mass and the latent heat. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The study of factors affecting the cooling rate of personal cooling equipment incorporated with PCM helps to understand cooling mechanisms. The results suggest climatic conditions, the required temperature gradient, PCM mass and covering area should be taken into account when choosing personal PCM cooling equipment. PMID:20432090

  13. Abnormal correlation between phase transformation and cooling rate for pure metals

    PubMed Central

    Han, J. J.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, X. J.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z.-K.; Zhang, T.-Y.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to achieve deep insight into the phenomenon of phase transformation upon rapid cooling in metal systems and reveal the physical meaning of scatter in the time taken to reach crystallization. The total number of pure metals considered in this work accounts for 14. Taking pure copper as an example, the correlation between phase selection of crystal or glass and cooling rate was investigated using molecular dynamic simulations. The obtained results demonstrate that there exists a cooling rate region of 6.3 × 1011–16.6 × 1011 K/s, in which crystalline fractions largely fluctuate along with cooling rates. Glass transformation in this cooling rate region is determined by atomic structure fluctuation, which is controlled by thermodynamic factors. According to the feature of bond-orientation order at different cooling rates, we propose two mechanisms of glass formation: (i) kinetic retardation of atom rearrangement or structural relaxation at a high cooling rate; and (ii) competition of icosahedral order against crystal order near the critical cooling rate. PMID:26939584

  14. CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS PHASE 2 FULL SCALE COOLING COILS GROUT FILL DEMONSTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E; Alex Cozzi, A

    2008-06-19

    This report documents the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) support for the Tank Closure and Technology Development (TCTD) group's strategy for closing high level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Specifically, this task addresses the ability to successfully fill intact cooling coils, presently within the HLW tanks, with grout that satisfies the fresh and cured grout requirements [1] under simulated field conditions. The overall task was divided into two phases. The first phase was the development of a grout formulation that satisfies the processing requirements for filling the HLW tank cooling coils [5]. The second phase of the task, which is documented in this report, was the filling of full scale cooling coils under simulated field conditions using the grout formulation developed in the first phase. SRS Type I tank cooling coil assembly design drawings and pressure drop calculations were provided by the Liquid Waste (LW) customer to be used as the basis for configuring the test assemblies. The current concept for closing tanks equipped with internal cooling coils is to pump grout into the coils to inhibit pathways for infiltrating water. Access to the cooling coil assemblies is through the existing supply/return manifold headers located on top of the Type I tanks. The objectives for the second phase of the testing, as stated in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance plan (TTQAP) [2], were to: (1) Perform a demonstration test to assess cooling coil grout performance in simulated field conditions, and (2) Measure relevant properties of samples prepared under simulated field conditions. SRNL led the actual work of designing, fabricating and filling two full-scale cooling coil assemblies which were performed at Clemson Engineering Technologies Laboratory (CETL) using the South Carolina University Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program. A statement of work (SOW) was issued to CETL [6] to perform this work.

  15. A pumped two-phase cooling system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.; Costello, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    A pumped, two-phase heat-transport system is being developed for possible use for temperature control of scientific instruments on future NASA missions. As compared to a single-phase system, this two-phase system can maintain tighter temperature control with less pumping power. A laboratory model of the system has been built and tested. The measured heat transfer coefficients were approximately the same as in heat pipes, 220 Btu/hr-sq ft-F, as compared to 25 Btu/hr-sq ft-F for single-phase liquid flow. Heat shearing between experiments has been demonstrated wherein vapor generated in the cold plate of an active experiment was condensed in a cold, unheated experiment. System stability has been observed. However, additional development is needed. The use of non-azeotropic mixtures of coolants appears especially promising as a simple way to determine exit quality and thus control the flow rates to prevent dryout.

  16. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, B; Mills, Michael J.; Specht, Eliot D; Santella, Michael L; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  17. Crystallization history of lunar picritic basalt sample 12002 - Phase-equilibria and cooling-rate studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Longhi, J.; Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental crystallization of a lunar picrite composition (sample 12002) at controlled linear cooling rates produces systematic changes in the temperature at which crystalline phases appear, in the texture, and in crystal morphology as a function of cooling rate. Phases crystallize in the order olivine, chromium spinel, pyroxene, plagioclase, and ilmenite during equilibrium crystallization, but ilmenite and plagioclase reverse their order of appearance and silica crystallizes in the groundmass during controlled cooling experiments. The partition of iron and magnesium between olivine and liquid is independent of cooling rate, temperature, and pressure. Comparison of the olivine nucleation densities in the lunar sample and in the experiments indicates that the sample began cooling at about 1 deg C/hr. Pyroxene size, chemistry, and growth instability spacings, as well as groundmass coarseness, all suggest that the cooling rate subsequently decreased by as much as a factor of 10 or more. The porphyritic texture of this sample, then, is produced at a decreasing, rather than a discontinuously increasing, cooling rate.

  18. Forced two-phase helium cooling scheme for the Mu2e transport solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatkowski, G.; Cheban, S.; Dhanaraj, N.; Evbota, D.; Lopes, M.; Nicol, T.; Sanders, R.; Schmitt, R.; Voirin, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids.

  19. Forced Two-Phase Helium Cooling Scheme for the Mu2e Transport Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Tatkowski, G.; Cheban, S.; Dhanaraj, N.; Evbota, D.; Lopes, M.; Nicol, T.; Sanders, R.; Schmitt, R.; Voirin, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids

  20. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  1. Optimal design variable considerations in the use of phase change materials in indirect evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilakapaty, Ankit Paul

    The demand for sustainable, energy efficient and cost effective heating and cooling solutions is exponentially increasing with the rapid advancement of computation and information technology. Use of latent heat storage materials also known as phase change materials (PCMs) for load leveling is an innovative solution to the data center cooling demands. These materials are commercially available in the form of microcapsules dispersed in water, referred to as the microencapsulated phase change slurries and have higher heat capacity than water. The composition and physical properties of phase change slurries play significant role in energy efficiency of the cooling systems designed implementing these PCM slurries. Objective of this project is to study the effect of PCM particle size, shape and volumetric concentration on overall heat transfer potential of the cooling systems designed with PCM slurries as the heat transfer fluid (HTF). In this study uniform volume heat source model is developed for the simulation of heat transfer potential using phase change materials in the form of bulk temperature difference in a fully developed flow through a circular duct. Results indicate the heat transfer potential increases with PCM volumetric concentration with gradually diminishing returns. Also, spherical PCM particles offer greater heat transfer potential when compared to cylindrical particles. Results of this project will aid in efficient design of cooling systems based on PCM slurries.

  2. Study of a splat cooled Cu-Zr-noncrystalline phase.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revcolevschi, A.; Grant, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    By rapid quenching from the melt, using the splat forming gun technique, a noncrystalline phase has been obtained in a Cu-Zr alloy containing 60 at. % Cu. Upon heating, rapid crystallization of the samples takes place at 477 C with a heat release of about 700 cal per mol. The variation of the electrical resistivity of the samples with temperature confirms the transformation. Very high resolution electron microscopy studies of the structural changes of the samples upon heating are presented and show the gradual crystallization of the amorphous structure.

  3. Phase change based cooling for high burst mode heat loads with temperature regulation above the phase change temperature

    SciTech Connect

    The United States of America as represented by the United States Department of Energy

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for transferring thermal energy from a heat load is disclosed. In particular, use of a phase change material and specific flow designs enables cooling with temperature regulation well above the fusion temperature of the phase change material for medium and high heat loads from devices operated intermittently (in burst mode). Exemplary heat loads include burst mode lasers and laser diodes, flight avionics, and high power space instruments. Thermal energy is transferred from the heat load to liquid phase change material from a phase change material reservoir. The liquid phase change material is split into two flows. Thermal energy is transferred from the first flow via a phase change material heat sink. The second flow bypasses the phase change material heat sink and joins with liquid phase change material exiting from the phase change material heat sink. The combined liquid phase change material is returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. The ratio of bypass flow to flow into the phase change material heat sink can be varied to adjust the temperature of the liquid phase change material returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. Varying the flowrate and temperature of the liquid phase change material presented to the heat load determines the magnitude of thermal energy transferred from the heat load.

  4. Decay-phase cooling and inferred heating of M- and X-class solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Milligan, Ryan O.

    2013-11-20

    In this paper, the cooling of 72 M- and X-class flares is examined using GOES/XRS and SDO/EVE. The observed cooling rates are quantified and the observed total cooling times are compared with the predictions of an analytical zero-dimensional hydrodynamic model. We find that the model does not fit the observations well, but does provide a well-defined lower limit on a flare's total cooling time. The discrepancy between observations and the model is then assumed to be primarily due to heating during the decay phase. The decay-phase heating necessary to account for the discrepancy is quantified and found be ∼50% of the total thermally radiated energy, as calculated with GOES. This decay-phase heating is found to scale with the observed peak thermal energy. It is predicted that approximating the total thermal energy from the peak is minimally affected by the decay-phase heating in small flares. However, in the most energetic flares the decay-phase heating inferred from the model can be several times greater than the peak thermal energy.

  5. Effect of spray cooling on heat transfer in a two-phase helium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perraud, S.; Puech, L.; Thibault, P.; Rousset, B.; Wolf, P. E.

    2013-10-01

    We describe an experimental study of the phenomenon of spray cooling in the case of liquid helium, either normal or superfluid, and its relationship to the heat transfer between an atomized two-phase flow contained in a long pipe, and the pipe walls. This situation is discussed in the context of the cooling of the superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Experiments were conducted in a test loop reproducing the LHC cooling system, in which the vapor velocity and temperature could be varied in a large range. Shear induced atomization results in the generation of a droplet mist which was characterized by optical means. The thickness of the thin liquid film deposited on the walls by the mist was measured using interdigitated capacitors. The cooling power of the mist was measured using thermal probes, and correlated to the local mist density. Analysis of the results shows that superfluidity has only a limited influence on both the film thickness and the mist cooling power. Using a simple model, we show that the phenomenon of spray cooling accounts for the measured non-linearity of the global heat transfer. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results for cooling the final focus magnets in an upgraded version of the LHC.

  6. Photoreversible micellar solution as a smart drag-reducing fluid for use in district heating/cooling systems.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haifeng; Ge, Wu; Oh, Hyuntaek; Pattison, Sean M; Huggins, Jacob T; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Hart, David J; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Zakin, Jacques L

    2013-01-01

    A photoresponsive micellar solution is developed as a promising working fluid for district heating/cooling systems (DHCs). It can be reversibly switched between a drag reduction (DR) mode and an efficient heat transfer (EHT) mode by light irradiation. The DR mode is advantageous during fluid transport, and the EHT mode is favored when the fluid passes through heat exchangers. This smart fluid is an aqueous solution of cationic surfactant oleyl bis(2-hydroxyethyl)methyl ammonium chloride (OHAC, 3.4 mM) and the sodium salt of 4-phenylazo benzoic acid (ACA, 2 mM). Initially, ACA is in a trans configuration and the OHAC/ACA solution is viscoelastic and exhibits DR (of up to 80% relative to pure water). At the same time, this solution is not effective for heat transfer. Upon UV irradiation, trans-ACA is converted to cis-ACA, and in turn, the solution is converted to its EHT mode (i.e., it loses its viscoelasticity and DR) but it now has a heat-transfer capability comparable to that of water. Subsequent irradiation with visible light reverts the fluid to its viscoelastic DR mode. The above property changes are connected to photoinduced changes in the nanostructure of the fluid. In the DR mode, the OHAC/trans-ACA molecules assemble into long threadlike micelles that impart viscoelasticity and DR capability to the fluid. Conversely, in the EHT mode the mixture of OHAC and cis-ACA forms much shorter cylindrical micelles that contribute to negligible viscoelasticity and effective heat transfer. These nanostructural changes are confirmed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and the photoisomerization of trans-ACA and cis-ACA is verified by (1)H NMR. PMID:23210742

  7. Phase transformation upon cooling path in Ca2SiO4: Possible geological implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yun-Ting; Kung, Jennifer; Hsu, Han

    2016-04-01

    At the contact metamorphism zone two different Ca2SiO4 phases can be found; calcio-olivine (γ phase) and larnite (β phase). In-situ experiments illustrated the existence of five various polymorphs in Ca2SiO4, i.e., α, α'H, α'L, β and γ. The path of phase transformation and the transformation temperatures are shown as follows. γ → α'L(700° C) → α'H(1100° C) → α (1450° C) α'L → β (680° C) → γ (500° C) Experiments showed that the phase transitions at lower temperature is not reversible and seemed to be complicated; β phase is only stable from 500° C to 680° C upon cooling. To understand the possible mechanism of the β phase being metastable at room temperature, atmosphere condition, we were motivated to investigate the route of phase transition in Ca2SiO4 in different thermal process. Powder samples were synthesized by the solid-state reaction. Pure reagent oxides CaCO3 and SiO2 were mixed in 2:1 stoichiometric mole. Two control factors were designated in the experiments; the sintering temperature of starting materials and the cooling path. The sintering temperature was set within the range of stable phase field of α'L phase (˜900° C) and α'H phase (1300° C). The cooling process was designed in three different routes: 1) the quenched procedure from sintering temperature with rate of 900° C/min and 1300° C/min, 2) the furnace cooling procedure, 3) set a slow cooling rate (0.265 ° C/min). The products were examined for the crystal structure by X-ray powder diffraction. First-principle calculation was also applied to investigate the thermodynamic properties of α'H, β and γ phases. A major finding in this study showed that the γ phase presented in the final product when the sintering temperature was set at the stable field of α'H phase; on the other hand, the β phase would present when the sintering temperature was set within the field of α'L phase. It was noted that the existing phase in the product would be modified by the

  8. Development of a prototype thermoelectric space cooling system using phase change material to improve the performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongliang

    The thermoelectric cooling system has advantages over conventional vapor compression cooling devices, including compact in size, light in weight, high reliability, no mechanical moving parts, no refrigerant, being powered by direct current, and easily switching between cooling and heating modes. However, it has been long suffering from its relatively high cost and low energy efficiency, which has restricted its usage to niche applications, such as space missions, portable cooling devices, scientific and medical equipment, where coefficient of performance (COP) is not as important as reliability, energy availability, and quiet operation environment. Enhancement of thermoelectric cooling system performance generally relies on two methods: improving thermoelectric material efficiency and through thermoelectric cooling system thermal design. This research has been focused on the latter one. A prototype thermoelectric cooling system integrated with phase change material (PCM) thermal energy storage unit for space cooling has been developed. The PCM thermal storage unit used for cold storage at night, functions as the thermoelectric cooling system's heat sink during daytime's cooling period and provides relatively lower hot side temperature for the thermoelectric cooling system. The experimental test of the prototype system in a reduced-scale chamber has realized an average cooling COP of 0.87, with the maximum value of 1.22. Another comparison test for efficacy of PCM thermal storage unit shows that 35.3% electrical energy has been saved from using PCM for the thermoelectric cooling system. In general, PCM faces difficulty of poor thermal conductivity at both solid and liquid phases. This system implemented a finned inner tube to increase heat transfer during PCM charging (melting) process that directly impacts thermoelectric system's performance. A simulation tool for the entire system has been developed including mathematical models for a single thermoelectric module

  9. Optoacoustic detection of a kinetic-cooling effect in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung Min; Shin, Keon Bae

    1995-11-01

    A kinetic-cooling effect in the liquid phase has been observed by the use of pulsed optoacoustic spectroscopy. The magnitude of the optoacoustic signal in an aqueous Eu^3+ solution, as measured from the absorption of pulsed light, was found to decrease when the excitation-laser wavelength was tuned to the transition from the thermally excited ^7F1 state to the upper electronic ^5D0 state of Eu^3+ ion. This anomalous optoacoustic phenomenon is attributed to the kinetic-cooling effect.

  10. Two-phase flow in the cooling circuit of a cryogenic rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preclik, D.

    1992-07-01

    Transient two-phase flow was investigated for the hydrogen cooling circuit of the HM7 rocket engine. The nuclear reactor code ATHLET/THESEUS was adapted to cryogenics and applied to both principal and prototype experiments for validation and simulation purposes. The cooling circuit two-phase flow simulation focused on the hydrogen prechilling and pump transient phase prior to ignition. Both a single- and a multichannel model were designed and employed for a valve leakage flow, a nominal prechilling flow, and a prechilling with a subsequent pump-transient flow. The latter case was performed in order to evaluate the difference between a nominal and a delayed turbo-pump start-up. It was found that an extension of the nominal prechilling sequence in the order of 1 second is sufficient to finally provide for liquid injection conditions of hydrogen which, as commonly known, is undesirable for smooth ignition and engine starting transients.

  11. Gray-molasses cooling of 39K to a high phase-space density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, G.; Fouché, L.; Wang, P.; Aspect, A.; Bouyer, P.; Bourdel, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present new techniques in cooling 39K atoms using laser light close to the D1 transition. First, a new compressed-MOT configuration is taking advantage of gray-molasses-type cooling induced by blue-detuned D1 light. It yields an optimized density of atoms. Then, we use pure D1 gray molasses to further cool the atoms to an ultra-low temperature of 6\\ \\mu\\text{K} . The resulting phase-space density is 2\\times 10^{-4} and will ease future experiments with ultracold potassium. As an example, we use it to directly load up to 3\\times 10^7 atoms in a far detuned optical trap, a result that opens the way to the all-optical production of potassium degenerate gases.

  12. Ejector gas cooling. Phase 1. Final report, 1 April 1987-30 April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D.; Silvetti, B.M.; Hrbek, R.

    1988-11-01

    Closed-circuit ejector cooling systems have never in the past achieved acceptable operating efficiencies in their vapor-compression cycle using standard refrigerants. Despite their long history, relative simplicity, quietness, rugged design, low maintenance and low cost, they could not compete with electric-motor-driven compressors. Phase I is an assessment of two immiscible fluids in an ejector cooling system with different latent heat capacity and molecular weights intended to require less heat in the boiler producing the propellant and taking more heat out in the evaporator cooling fluid. Actual tests corrected to standard conditions and neglecting thermal losses showed 0.5 closed-cycle thermal COP (excluding stack losses), higher than ever previously achieved but below original expectations. Computer programs developed indicate higher COP values are attainable along with competitive first costs.

  13. Phase coexistence and transformations in field-cooled ternary piezoelectric single crystals near the morphotropic phase boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengtao; Wang, Yaojin; Wang, Zhiguang; Ge, Wenwei; Li, Jiefang; Luo, Haosu; Viehland, D.

    2014-12-01

    Structural phase transformations in (100)-oriented Pb(In1/2Nb1/2)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 single crystals have been investigated by X-ray diffraction. A cubic (C) → tetragonal (T) → monoclinic-C (MC) transformation sequence was observed in the field-cooled condition. Two phase coexistence regions of C + T and T + MC were found. In addition to an increase in the C → T phase transition temperature and a decrease of the T → MC one, a broadening of the coexistence regions was also found with increasing field. This broadening can be explained by the presence of polar nano regions within the C, T, and MC phase regions.

  14. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  15. A SINDA modeling technique for pumped two-phase spacecraft cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollendorf, S.; Costello, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a modeling technique that has proven successful in simulating pumped, two-phase cooling systems. The technique uses the standard SINDA thermal-analysis program and thereby extends the capabilities of SINDA to complex, active spacecraft thermal-control systems. This paper provides sufficient detail that a current SINDA user will be able to apply the technique by reference to this paper alone.

  16. User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. The reservoir and fluid transmission submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the reservoir and fluid transmission system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is assumed to be provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, fan-coil units, or other in-house heating systems. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. Geothermal space or process cooling is simulated by circulating hot water through lithium bromide/water absorption chillers located at each building. Retrofit costs for both heating and cooling applications can be input by the user. The life-cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end-users are calculated using discounted cash flow analysis.

  17. Cooling/heating-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Pirdadeh-Beiranvand, Masoumeh

    2015-11-01

    A simple, low-cost, and effective cooling/heating-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (CHA-HS-SPME) device, capable of direct cooling the fiber to low temperatures and simultaneous heating the sample matrix to high temperatures, was fabricated and evaluated. It was able to cool down the commercial and handmade fibers for the effective tapping of volatile and semi-volatile species in the headspace of complex solid matrices, with minimal manipulation compared with conventional SPME. The CHA-HS-SPME system can create large temperature gaps (up to 200 °C) between the fiber and the sample matrix, because the cooling process is directly applied onto the fiber. Different effective experimental parameters for the fabrication of the CHA-HS-SPME device as well as for the extraction and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from solid samples were evaluated and optimized. The proposed device coupled to GC-FID was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of PAHs in contaminated soils without any sample pretreatment step. Good agreement was observed between the results obtained by the proposed CHA-HS-SPME-GC-FID method and those achieved by validated method. PMID:26572839

  18. Use of volatile organic solvents in headspace liquid-phase microextraction by direct cooling of the organic drop using a simple cooling capsule.

    PubMed

    Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh; Hajipour, Somayeh

    2016-08-01

    A low-cost and simple cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device for the extraction and determination of 2,6,6-trimethyl-1,3 cyclohexadiene-1-carboxaldehyde (safranal) in Saffron samples, using volatile organic solvents, was fabricated and evaluated. The main part of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction system was a cooling capsule, with a Teflon microcup to hold the extracting organic solvent, which is able to directly cool down the extraction phase while the sample matrix is simultaneously heated. Different experimental factors such as type of organic extraction solvent, sample temperature, extraction solvent temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The optimal conditions were obtained as: extraction solvent, methanol (10 μL); extraction temperature, 60°C; extraction solvent temperature, 0°C; and extraction time, 20 min. Good linearity of the calibration curve (R(2) = 0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.01-50.0 μg/mL. The limit of detection was 0.001 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation for 1.0 μg/mL of safranal was 10.7% (n = 6). The proposed cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction device was coupled (off-line) to high-performance liquid chromatography and used for the determination of safranal in Saffron samples. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results of the cooling-assisted headspace liquid-phase microextraction high-performance liquid chromatography method and those obtained by a validated ultrasound-assisted solvent extraction procedure. PMID:27311349

  19. Effect of Cooling Rate on Phase Transformations in a High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Studied from the Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorin, Thomas; Stanford, Nicole; Taylor, Adam; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phase transformation and precipitation in a high-strength low-alloy steel have been studied over a large range of cooling rates, and a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram has been produced. These experiments are unique because the measurements were made from samples cooled directly from the melt, rather than in homogenized and re-heated billets. The purpose of this experimental design was to examine conditions pertinent to direct strip casting. At the highest cooling rates which simulate strip casting, the microstructure was fully bainitic with small regions of pearlite. At lower cooling rates, the fraction of polygonal ferrite increased and the pearlite regions became larger. The CCT diagram and the microstructural analysis showed that the precipitation of NbC is suppressed at high cooling rates, and is likely to be incomplete at intermediate cooling rates.

  20. Planning for Quality Schools: Meeting the Needs of District Families. Phase One: Understanding Current School Supply and Student Enrollment Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, David; Allen, Marni; Turner, Margery; Comey, Jennifer; Williams, Barika; Guernsey, Elizabeth; Filardo, Mary; Huvendick, Nancy; Sung, Ping

    2008-01-01

    This report is the first phase of a three-part Quality Schools Project to help the District of Columbia create a firm analytical basis for planning for quality schools to meet the needs of the city's families. The Quality School Project is a joint effort of the DC Office of the State Superintendent of Education, the 21st Century School Fund, the…

  1. Heat-Transfer Measurements in the Primary Cooling Phase of the Direct-Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Baserinia, Amir R.; Ng, Harry; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal modeling of the direct-chill casting process requires accurate knowledge of (1) the different boundary conditions in the primary mold and secondary direct water-spray cooling regimes and (2) their variability with respect to process parameters. In this study, heat transfer in the primary cooling zone was investigated by using temperature measurements made with subsurface thermocouples in the mold as input to an inverse heat conduction algorithm. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to investigate the primary cooling of AA3003 and AA4045 aluminum alloy ingots cast at speeds ranging between 1.58 and 2.10 mm/s. The average heat flux values were calculated for the steady-state phase of the casting process, and an effective heat-transfer coefficient for the global primary cooling process was derived that included convection at the mold surfaces and conduction through the mold wall. Effective heat-transfer coefficients were evaluated at different points along the mold height and compared with values from a previously derived computational fluid dynamics model of the direct-chill casting process that were based on predictions of the air gap thickness between the mold and ingot. The current experimental results closely matched the values previously predicted by the air gap models. The effective heat-transfer coefficient for primary cooling was also found to increase slightly with the casting speed and was higher near the mold top (up to 824 W/m2·K) where the molten aluminum first comes in contact with the mold than near the bottom (as low as 242 W/m2·K) where an air gap forms between the ingot and mold because of thermal contraction of the ingot. These results are consistent with previous studies.

  2. Dynamic evolution of liquid-liquid phase separation during continuous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, S. D.; Gibbs, P. J.; Katz, M. R.; Ott, T. J.; Patterson, B. M.; Lee, W. -K.; Fezzaa, K.; Cooley, J. C.; Clarke, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Solidification from a multiphase fluid involves many unknown quantities due to the difficulty of predicting the impact of fluid flow on chemical partitioning. Real-time x-ray radiography has been used to observe liquideliquid phase separation in Al90In10 prior to solidification. Quantitative image analysis has been used to measure the motion and population characteristics of the dispersed indium-rich liquid phase during cooling. Here we determine that the droplet growth characteristics resemble well known steady-state coarsening laws with likely enhancement by concurrent growth due to supersaturation. Simplistic views of droplet motion are found to be insufficient until late in the reaction due to a hydrodynamic instability caused by the large density difference between the dispersed and matrix liquid phases.

  3. Dynamic evolution of liquid–liquid phase separation during continuous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Katz, Martha R.; Ott, Thomas J.; Patterson, Brian M.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Clarke, Amy J.

    2015-01-06

    Solidification from a multiphase fluid involves many unknown quantities due to the difficulty of predicting the impact of fluid flow on chemical partitioning. Real-time x-ray radiography was used to observe liquid-liquid phase separation in Al90In10 prior to solidification. Quantitative image analysis was used to measure the motion and population characteristics of the dispersed indium-rich liquid phase during cooling. Here we determine that the droplet growth characteristics resemble well known steady-state coarsening laws with likely enhancement by concurrent growth due to supersaturation. Simplistic views of droplet motion are found to be insufficient until late in the reaction due to a hydrodynamic instability caused by the large density difference between the dispersed and matrix liquid phases.

  4. Dynamic evolution of liquid–liquid phase separation during continuous cooling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Katz, Martha R.; Ott, Thomas J.; Patterson, Brian M.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Clarke, Amy J.

    2015-01-06

    Solidification from a multiphase fluid involves many unknown quantities due to the difficulty of predicting the impact of fluid flow on chemical partitioning. Real-time x-ray radiography was used to observe liquid-liquid phase separation in Al90In10 prior to solidification. Quantitative image analysis was used to measure the motion and population characteristics of the dispersed indium-rich liquid phase during cooling. Here we determine that the droplet growth characteristics resemble well known steady-state coarsening laws with likely enhancement by concurrent growth due to supersaturation. Simplistic views of droplet motion are found to be insufficient until late in the reaction due to a hydrodynamicmore » instability caused by the large density difference between the dispersed and matrix liquid phases.« less

  5. Carbon-based nanostructured surfaces for enhanced phase-change cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj Kousalya, Arun

    To maintain acceptable device temperatures in the new generation of electronic devices under development for high-power applications, conventional liquid cooling schemes will likely be superseded by multi-phase cooling solutions to provide substantial enhancement to the cooling capability. The central theme of the current work is to investigate the two-phase thermal performance of carbon-based nanostructured coatings in passive and pumped liquid-vapor phase-change cooling schemes. Quantification of the critical parameters that influence thermal performance of the carbon nanostructured boiling surfaces presented herein will lead to improved understanding of the underlying evaporative and boiling mechanisms in such surfaces. A flow boiling experimental facility is developed to generate consistent and accurate heat transfer performance curves with degassed and deionized water as the working fluid. New means of boiling heat transfer enhancement by altering surface characteristics such as surface energy and wettability through light-surface interactions is explored in this work. In this regard, carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings are exposed to low-intensity irradiation emitted from a light emitting diode and the subcooled flow boiling performance is compared against a non-irradiated CNT-coated copper surface. A considerable reduction in surface superheat and enhancement in average heat transfer coefficient is observed. In another work involving CNTs, the thermal performance of CNT-integrated sintered wick structures is evaluated in a passively cooled vapor chamber. A physical vapor deposition process is used to coat the CNTs with varying thicknesses of copper to promote surface wetting with the working fluid, water. Thermal performance of the bare sintered copper powder sample and the copper-functionalized CNT-coated sintered copper powder wick samples is compared using an experimental facility that simulates the capillary fluid feeding conditions of a vapor chamber

  6. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  7. Self-shaping of oil droplets via the formation of intermediate rotator phases upon cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denkov, Nikolai; Tcholakova, Slavka; Lesov, Ivan; Cholakova, Diana; Smoukov, Stoyan K.

    2015-12-01

    Revealing the chemical and physical mechanisms underlying symmetry breaking and shape transformations is key to understanding morphogenesis. If we are to synthesize artificial structures with similar control and complexity to biological systems, we need energy- and material-efficient bottom-up processes to create building blocks of various shapes that can further assemble into hierarchical structures. Lithographic top-down processing allows a high level of structural control in microparticle production but at the expense of limited productivity. Conversely, bottom-up particle syntheses have higher material and energy efficiency, but are more limited in the shapes achievable. Linear hydrocarbons are known to pass through a series of metastable plastic rotator phases before freezing. Here we show that by using appropriate cooling protocols, we can harness these phase transitions to control the deformation of liquid hydrocarbon droplets and then freeze them into solid particles, permanently preserving their shape. Upon cooling, the droplets spontaneously break their shape symmetry several times, morphing through a series of complex regular shapes owing to the internal phase-transition processes. In this way we produce particles including micrometre-sized octahedra, various polygonal platelets, O-shapes, and fibres of submicrometre diameter, which can be selectively frozen into the corresponding solid particles. This mechanism offers insights into achieving complex morphogenesis from a system with a minimal number of molecular components.

  8. Self-shaping of oil droplets via the formation of intermediate rotator phases upon cooling.

    PubMed

    Denkov, Nikolai; Tcholakova, Slavka; Lesov, Ivan; Cholakova, Diana; Smoukov, Stoyan K

    2015-12-17

    Revealing the chemical and physical mechanisms underlying symmetry breaking and shape transformations is key to understanding morphogenesis. If we are to synthesize artificial structures with similar control and complexity to biological systems, we need energy- and material-efficient bottom-up processes to create building blocks of various shapes that can further assemble into hierarchical structures. Lithographic top-down processing allows a high level of structural control in microparticle production but at the expense of limited productivity. Conversely, bottom-up particle syntheses have higher material and energy efficiency, but are more limited in the shapes achievable. Linear hydrocarbons are known to pass through a series of metastable plastic rotator phases before freezing. Here we show that by using appropriate cooling protocols, we can harness these phase transitions to control the deformation of liquid hydrocarbon droplets and then freeze them into solid particles, permanently preserving their shape. Upon cooling, the droplets spontaneously break their shape symmetry several times, morphing through a series of complex regular shapes owing to the internal phase-transition processes. In this way we produce particles including micrometre-sized octahedra, various polygonal platelets, O-shapes, and fibres of submicrometre diameter, which can be selectively frozen into the corresponding solid particles. This mechanism offers insights into achieving complex morphogenesis from a system with a minimal number of molecular components. PMID:26649824

  9. Effect of cooling-heating rate on sol-gel transformation of fish gelatin-gum arabic complex coacervate phase.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Mohammad; Chung, Donghwa

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize influence of different cooling and heating rates on gelation of fish gelatin (FG)-gum arabic (GA) complex coacervate phase using rheological measurements. For the coacervate phase prepared at 10°C, the gelling temperature, melting temperature, gel strength, and stress relaxation decreased with increasing cooling or heating rate, however, no gelation was observed at the highest cooling rate of 0.05°C/min. Similar trends were obtained for the coacervates phase prepared at 30°C, but the gelation did not occur at a cooling rate of 0.033 or 0.05°C/min. The results indicated that rheological properties of FG-GA coacervate gels were highly dependent to the cooling process, where more thermos-stable and stronger gels formed at slower cooling. This was probably because of higher degree of molecular rearrangements, more hydrogen bindings, and formation of greater junction zones into the gel network at slower cooling rates. However, all of the FG-GA coacervate gels obtained at different cooling rates were classified as a weak physical gel. PMID:27246375

  10. The impact of a phase-change cooling vest on heat strain and the effect of different cooling pack melting temperatures.

    PubMed

    House, James R; Lunt, Heather C; Taylor, Rowan; Milligan, Gemma; Lyons, Jason A; House, Carol M

    2013-05-01

    Cooling vests (CV) are often used to reduce heat strain. CVs have traditionally used ice as the coolant, although other phase-change materials (PCM) that melt at warmer temperatures have been used in an attempt to enhance cooling by avoiding vasoconstriction, which supposedly occurs when ice CVs are used. This study assessed the effectiveness of four CVs that melted at 0, 10, 20 and 30 °C (CV₀, CV₁₀, CV₂₀, and CV₃₀) when worn by 10 male volunteers exercising and then recovering in 40 °C air whilst wearing fire-fighting clothing. When compared with a non-cooling control condition (CON), only the CV₀ and CV₁₀ vests provided cooling during exercise (40 and 29 W, respectively), whereas all CVs provided cooling during resting recovery (CV₀ 69 W, CV₁₀ 66 W, CV₂₀ 55 W and CV₃₀ 29 W) (P < 0.05). In all conditions, skin blood flow increased when exercising and reduced during recovery, but was lower in the CV₀ and CV₁₀ conditions compared with control during exercise (observed power 0.709) (P < 0.05), but not during resting recovery (observed power only 0.55). The participants preferred the CV₁₀ to the CV₀, which caused temporary erythema to underlying skin, although this resolved overnight after each occurrence. Consequently, a cooling vest melting at 10 °C would seem to be the most appropriate choice for cooling during combined work and rest periods, although possibly an ice-vest (CV₀) may also be appropriate if more insulation was worn between the cooling packs and the skin than used in this study. PMID:23160652

  11. Phase coexistence and transformations in field-cooled ternary piezoelectric single crystals near the morphotropic phase boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chengtao; Wang, Yaojin Wang, Zhiguang; Ge, Wenwei; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, D.; Luo, Haosu

    2014-12-08

    Structural phase transformations in (100)-oriented Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} single crystals have been investigated by X-ray diffraction. A cubic (C) → tetragonal (T) → monoclinic-C (M{sub C}) transformation sequence was observed in the field-cooled condition. Two phase coexistence regions of C + T and T + M{sub C} were found. In addition to an increase in the C → T phase transition temperature and a decrease of the T → M{sub C} one, a broadening of the coexistence regions was also found with increasing field. This broadening can be explained by the presence of polar nano regions within the C, T, and M{sub C} phase regions.

  12. Mpemba effect and phase transitions in the adiabatic cooling of water before freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.; De Risi, R.; Somma, L.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, an accurate experimental investigation of the Mpemba effect (that is, of the fact that initially hot water freezes before the colder one) is carried out, showing that, in the adiabatic cooling of water, relevant roles are played by supercooling, and by phase transitions which take place at 6±1 ∘C,3.5±0.5 ∘C and 1.3±0.6 ∘C. The last transition, which occurs with the non-negligible probability of 0.21 with respect to the total number of runs performed, has not been detected earlier. On the basis of our experimental results, we can present a thorough theoretical analysis of supercooling and of such phase transitions, which are interpreted in terms of the different ordering of molecule clusters in water.

  13. Cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device based on thermoelectric cooling of metal fiber.

    PubMed

    Haddadi, Shokouh Hosseinzadeh; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2009-04-01

    A new cold fiber solid-phase microextraction device was designed and constructed based on thermoelectric cooling. A three-stage thermoelectric cooler (TEC) was used for cooling a copper rod coated with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) hollow fiber, which served as the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The copper rod was mounted on a commercial SPME plunger and exposed to the cold surface of the TEC, which was enclosed in a small aluminum box. A heat sink and a fan were used to dissipate the generated heat at the hot side of the TEC. By applying an appropriate dc voltage to the TEC, the upper part of the copper rod, which was in contact to the cold side of the TEC, was cooled and the hollow fiber reached a lower temperature through heat transfer. A thermocouple was embedded in the cold side of the TEC for indirect measurement of the fiber temperature. The device was applied in quantitative analysis of off-flavors in a rice sample. Hexanal, nonanal, and undecanal were chosen as three off-flavors in rice. They were identified according to their retention times and analyzed by GC-flame ionization detection instrument. Headspace extraction conditions (i.e., temperature and time) were optimized. Standard addition calibration graphs were obtained at the optimized conditions and the concentrations of the three analytes were calculated. The concentration of hexanal was also measured using a conventional solvent extraction method (697+/-143ng/g) which was comparable to that obtained from the cold fiber SPME method (644+/-8). Moreover, the cold fiber SPME resulted in better reproducibility and shorter analysis time. Cold fiber SPME with TEC device can also be used as a portable device for field sampling. PMID:18814881

  14. Beyond optical molasses: 3D raman sideband cooling of atomic cesium to high phase-space density

    PubMed

    Kerman; Vuletic; Chin; Chu

    2000-01-17

    We demonstrate a simple, general purpose method to cool neutral atoms. A sample containing 3x10(8) cesium atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap is cooled and simultaneously spin polarized in 10 ms at a density of 1.1x10(11) cm (-3) to a phase space density nlambda(3)(dB) = 1/500, which is almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than attainable in free space with optical molasses. The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even at densities where the mean lattice site occupation is close to unity. PMID:11015933

  15. A novel personal cooling system (PCS) incorporated with phase change materials (PCMs) and ventilation fans: An investigation on its cooling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wei, Fanru; Lai, Dandan; Shi, Wen; Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Song, Guowen

    2015-08-01

    Personal cooling systems (PCS) have been developed to mitigate the impact of severe heat stress for humans working in hot environments. It is still a great challenge to develop PCSs that are portable, inexpensive, and effective. We studied the performance of a new hybrid PCS incorporating both ventilation fans and phase change materials (PCMs). The cooling efficiency of the newly developed PCS was investigated on a sweating manikin in two hot conditions: hot humid (HH, 34°C, 75% RH) and hot dry (HD, 34°C, 28% RH). Four test scenarios were selected: fans off with no PCMs (i.e., Fan-off, the CONTROL), fans on with no PCMs (i.e., Fan-on), fans off with fully solidified PCMs (i.e., PCM+Fan-off), and fans on with fully solidified PCMs (i.e., PCM+Fan-on). It was found that the addition of PCMs provided a 54∼78min cooling in HH condition. In contrast, the PCMs only offered a 19-39min cooling in HD condition. In both conditions, the ventilation fans greatly enhanced the evaporative heat loss compared with Fan-off. The hybrid PCS (i.e., PCM+Fan-on) provided a continuous cooling effect during the three-hour test and the average cooling rate for the whole body was around 111 and 315W in HH and HD conditions, respectively. Overall, the new hybrid PCS may be an effective means of ameliorating symptoms of heat stress in both hot-humid and hot-dry environments. PMID:26267508

  16. Influence of Cooling Rate on Phase Formationin Spray-Formed H13 Tool Steel

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. Mchugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia

    2006-04-01

    Spray forming is an effective way to process many tool steels into near-net-shape molds, dies and related tooling. The general approach involves depositing atomized droplets onto a refractory pattern in order to image the pattern’s features. The pattern is removed and the die is fitted into a standard holding fixture. This approach results in significant cost and lead-time savings compared to conventional machining, Spray-formed dies perform well in many industrial forming operations, oftentimes exhibiting extended die life over conventional dies. Care must be exercised when spray forming tool steel dies to minimize porosity and control the nature and distribution of phases and residual stresses. Selection of post-deposition heat treatment is important to tailor the die’s properties (hardness, strength, impact energy, etc.) for a particular application. This paper examines how the cooling rate and other processing parameters during spray processing and heat treatment of H13 tool steel influence phase formation. Results of case studies on spray-formed die performance in forging, extrusion and die casting, conducted by industry during production runs, will be described.

  17. A multiscale thermo-fluid computational model for a two-phase cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacco, Riccardo; Carichino, Lucia; de Falco, Carlo; Verri, Maurizio; Agostini, Francesco; Gradinger, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a mathematical model and a numerical simulation method for the condenser component of a novel two-phase thermosyphon cooling system for power electronics applications. The condenser consists of a set of roll-bonded vertically mounted fins among which air flows by either natural or forced convection. In order to deepen the understanding of the mechanisms that determine the performance of the condenser and to facilitate the further optimization of its industrial design, a multiscale approach is developed to reduce as much as possible the complexity of the simulation code while maintaining reasonable predictive accuracy. To this end, heat diffusion in the fins and its convective transport in air are modeled as 2D processes while the flow of the two-phase coolant within the fins is modeled as a 1D network of pipes. For the numerical solution of the resulting equations, a Dual Mixed-Finite Volume scheme with Exponential Fitting stabilization is used for 2D heat diffusion and convection while a Primal Mixed Finite Element discretization method with upwind stabilization is used for the 1D coolant flow. The mathematical model and the numerical method are validated through extensive simulations of realistic device structures which prove to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  18. Arsenic speciation in pyrite and secondary weathering phases, Mother Lode gold district, Tuolumne County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, K.S.; Tingle, Tracy N.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Bird, Dennis K.

    2004-10-27

    Arsenian pyrite, formed during Cretaceous gold mineralization, is the primary source of As along the Melones fault zone in the southern Mother Lode Gold District of California. Mine tailings and associated weathering products from partially submerged inactive gold mines at Don Pedro Reservoir, on the Tuolumne River, contain approx. 20-1300 ppm As. The highest concentrations are in weathering crusts from the Clio mine and nearby outcrops which contain goethite or jarosite. As is concentrated up to 2150 ppm in the fine-grained (<63 mu-m) fraction of these Fe-rich weathering products. Individual pyrite grains in albite-chlorite schists of the Clio mine tailings contain an average of 1.2 wt. percent As. Pyrite grains are coarsely zoned, with local As concentrations ranging from approx. 0 to 5 wt. percent. Electron microprobe, transmission electron microscope, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) analyses indicate that As substitutes for S in pyrite and is not present as inclusions of arsenopyrite or other As-bearing phases. Comparison with simulated EXAFS spectra demonstrates that As atoms are locally clustered in the pyrite lattice and that the unit cell of arsenian pyrite is expanded by approx. 2.6 percent relative to pure pyrite. During weathering, clustered substitution of As into pyrite may be responsible for accelerating oxidation, hydrolysis, and dissolution of arsenian pyrite relative to pure pyrite in weathered tailings. Arsenic K-edge EXAFS analysis of the fine-grained Fe-rich weathering products are consistent with corner-sharing between As(V) tetrahedra and Fe(III)-octahedra. Determinations of nearest-neighbor distances and atomic identities, generated from least-squares fitting algorithms to spectral data, indicate that arsenate tetrahedra are sorbed on goethite mineral surfaces but substitute for SO4 in jarosite. Erosional transport of As-bearing goethite and jarosite to Don Pedro Reservoir increases the potential for As

  19. Arsenic speciation in pyrite and secondary weathering phases, Mother Lode gold district, Tuolumne County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, K.S.; Tingle, Tracy N.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Bird, Dennis K.

    2004-10-27

    Arsenian pyrite, formed during Cretaceous gold mineralization, is the primary source of As along the Melones fault zone in the southern Mother Lode Gold District of California. Mine tailings and associated weathering products from partially submerged inactive gold mines at Don Pedro Reservoir, on the Tuolumne River, contain approx. 20-1300 ppm As. The highest concentrations are in weathering crusts from the Clio mine and nearby outcrops which contain goethite or jarosite. As is concentrated up to 2150 ppm in the fine-grained (<63 mu-m) fraction of these Fe-rich weathering products. Individual pyrite grains in albite-chlorite schists of the Clio mine tailings contain an average of 1.2 wt. percent As. Pyrite grains are coarsely zoned, with local As concentrations ranging from approx. 0 to 5 wt. percent. Electron microprobe, transmission electron microscope, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) analyses indicate that As substitutes for S in pyrite and is not p resent as inclusions of arsenopyrite or other As-bearing phases. Comparison with simulated EXAFS spectra demonstrates that As atoms are locally clustered in the pyrite lattice and that the unit cell of arsenian pyrite is expanded by approx. 2.6 percent relative to pure pyrite. During weathering, clustered substitution of As into pyrite may be responsible for accelerating oxidation, hydrolysis, and dissolution of arsenian pyrite relative to pure pyrite in weathered tailings. Arsenic K-edge EXAFS analysis of the fine-grained Fe-rich weathering products are consistent with corner-sharing between As(V) tetrahedra and Fe(III)-octahedra. Determinations of nearest-neighbor distances and atomic identities, generated from least-squares fitting algorithms to spectral data, indicate that arsenate tetrahedra are sorbed on goethite mineral surfaces but substitute for SO4 in jarosite. Erosional transport of As-bearing goethite and jarosite to Don Pedro Reservoir increases the potential for As

  20. Urban thermal environment measurements and numerical simulation for an actual complex urban area covering a large district heating and cooling system in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong; Ooka, Ryozo; Kato, Shinsuke

    Urban thermal situation is thought to have a great influence on the air quality in urban areas. In recent years, the urban thermal environment has become worse, such as the days on which the temperature goes above 30 °C, the sultry nights and heat stroke increase due to changes in terrestrial cover and increased anthropogenic heat emission accompanied by urbanization. Therefore, the urban thermal environment should be carefully investigated and accurately analyzed for a better study of the air quality. Here, in order to study the urban thermal environment in summer, (1) the actual status of an urban thermal environment in a complex urban area covering a large district heating and cooling (DHC) system in Tokyo is investigated using field measurements, and (2) a numerical simulation program which can be adapted to complex urban areas coupled with convection, radiation and conduction is developed and used to predict the urban thermal environment. Wind velocity, temperature and humidity are obtained from the simulation, which shows good agreement with results of the field measurement. The spatial distribution of the standard effective temperature (SET *), the comprehensive index of human thermal comfort, is also calculated using the above results, to estimate the thermal comfort at the pedestrian level. This urban thermal numerical simulation can be coupled with air pollution dispersion and chemical processes to provide a more precise air quality prediction in complex urban areas.

  1. Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Tsang, Y.W.; Min, K.B.; Elsworth, D.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability had decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain.

  2. The study of a reactor cooling pump under two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Yuan, S. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Zhang, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the steady pressure field has been investigated numerically by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in a nuclear reactor cooling pump. As a multiphase approach the Eulerian-Eulerian two fluid model has been applied to calculated five computational models with different kinds of blades. The analysis of inner flow field of the five model pumps shows that the pressure in the impeller increases with the increase of the gas contents and the pressure distributions are irregular at the inlet of different blades when the gas contents less than 20%. With the increase of the number of blades, the vortexes at the outlet of impeller decrease whereas the vortexes in the deep of the volute markedly increases and high velocity of the fluid huddle is generated gradually at the outlet pipes. Under the action of centrifugal force and Coriolis force, gas phase mainly concentrated at the lower velocity and lower pressure area. The radial force on the impeller gradually increases with the increase of the gas contents.

  3. Effect of the rate of cooling on the phase composition of rare-earth titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Azimov, S.A.; Gulamova, D.D.; Suleimanov, S.Kh.

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of different regimes of quenching with cooling rates of approx. 10/sup 2/ and 10/sup 5/ K/sec on the phase composition of rare-earth mono- and dititanates, as well as the possibility of formation of glasses at the nonvariant points (eutectic and peritectic) of the binary systems TiO/sub 2/-Ln/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (Ln-La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Y, and Sc). For compounds of the types Ln/sub 2/TiO/sub 5/ and Ln/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/ (Ln-La...Lu, Y, Sc) there is a tendency for a structure with a higher symmetry to form as the ionic radius of the lanthanide decreases and the rate of quenching increases. The use of ultrarapid quenching expanded the region of existence of the cubic structure of the fluorite type to Tb/sub 2/TiO/sub 5/ and the structure of the pyrochlore type up to Sm/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/. Ultrarapid quenching of compounds with the composition Ln/sub 4/Ti/sub 9/O/sub 24/ led to a transition into the amorphous state.

  4. Demonstration of Super Cooled Ice as a Phase Change Material Heat Sink for Portable Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Bue, Grant C.

    2009-01-01

    A phase change material (PCM) heat sink using super cooled ice as a nontoxic, nonflammable PCM is being developed. The latent heat of fusion for water is approximately 70% larger than most paraffin waxes, which can provide significant mass savings. Further mass reduction is accomplished by super cooling the ice significantly below its freezing temperature for additional sensible heat storage. Expansion and contraction of the water as it freezes and melts is accommodated with the use of flexible bag and foam materials. A demonstrator unit has been designed, built, and tested to demonstrate proof of concept. Both testing and modeling results are presented along with recommendations for further development of this technology.

  5. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (Phase O). Volume 1: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRW Systems Group, Redondo Beach, CA.

    The purpose of this study was to establish the technical and economic feasibility of using solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings. Five selected building types in 14 selected cities were used to determine loads for space heating, space cooling and dehumidification, and domestic service hot water heating. Relying on existing and…

  6. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Phase 0. Executive Summary. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    After the Westinghouse Electric Corporation made a comprehensive analysis of the technical, economic, social, environmental, and institutional factors affecting the feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, it determined that solar heating and cooling systems can become competitive in most regions of the country in…

  7. District cooling re-invented

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, D.P. )

    1994-05-01

    This article describes the modernization of a chilled water storage system. The topics of the article include a description of the existing installation, a performance analysis, an evaluation of the alternatives for modernizing the system, a description of the upgraded system, construction of the retrofit and operation of the modernized system.

  8. Use of treated gasification wastewater in a pilot cooling tower. Phase I. Final report for the period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, W.G.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Mann, M.D.; Galegher, S.J.; Gallagher, J.R.; Mayer, G.G.; Thomas, W.C.; Winton, S.L.; Nelson, D.F.

    1984-05-16

    During the UNDERC cooling tower tests, data were colleced and evaluated in five major areas: characterization of cooling tower streams, process performance, biofouling, corrosion, and inorganic/organic fouling. A summary of the results and conclusions for each area is presented. Recommendations are provided for research and development programs to further define the pretreatment and operating requirements for the use of wastewater as cooling tower makeup. The results of the Phase I-Pilot Cooling Tower test have revealed several potential problems that may arise from the use of a relatively high organic content gas liquor as cooling tower makeup. Most of the problems identified are related to the presence of organics in the wastewater which promote biofouling/fouling, corrosion, and emissions from the cooling tower. The Phase II-Pilot Cooling Tower Test will address this issue by identifying the advantages of further treatment of stripped gas liquor to reduce the organic content to a lower level before use in the cooling tower. This test will parallel the Phase I test using the same system and monitoring procedures. Comparison of the results of Phase I and Phase II tests will provide an indication of how well problem areas can be avoided with additional makeup water pretreatment. 39 references, 34 tables, and 25 figures.

  9. Three phases of cooling and unroofing in the Appalachian Basin, Pennsylvania: Implications for flexural control

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmer, G.C.; Gold, D.P. . Dept. of Geosciences); Omar, G.I. . Geology Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission-track ages of 111--184 Ma and mean lengths of 10.7--13.1 [mu]m with unimodal, negatively skewed length distributions indicate slow cooling of Ordovician through Permian rocks in an area extending from the Anthracite Basin to the western Appalachian Plateau. Cooling histories modeled from fission-track data show that cooling began immediately following the Alleghanian Orogeny at 250--240 Ma. Ordovician rocks in the Juniata Culmination began to cool slightly earlier at 265 Ma, probably reflecting synorogenic unroofing of this area during formation of the Valley and Ridge duplex. Unroofing histories were modeled from cooling histories using the one-dimensional heat flow equation. Cooling and unroofing histories can be divided into three periods. The initial period of relatively rapid cooling and unroofing extended from the end of the Alleghanian Orogeny into the Jurassic and represents post-orogenic unroofing due to flexural rebound as orogenic load was removed through erosion. Initial unroofing rates are higher in eater Pennsylvania than in the west, consistent with a flexural model. A period of little to no unroofing from the Jurassic into the Miocene began contemporaneously with the inception of drift at the Atlantic continental margin. As the new continental margin subsided, the remaining load dropped below sea level and was no longer subject to removal, resulting in the cessation of flexural rebound and suppression of unroofing in the foreland. The most rapid unroofing occurred from the Miocene to the present. The nature of this event is unknown; however, it is also observed in increased sedimentation rates in the middle Atlantic offshore basins.

  10. Streamflow changes in Alaska between the cool phase (1947-1976) and the warm phase (1977-2006) of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation: The influence of glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.

    2009-01-01

    Streamflow data from 35 stations in and near Alaska were analyzed for changes between the cool phase (1947-1976) and the warm phase (1977-2006) of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Winter, spring, and summer flow changes and maximum annual flow changes were different for glaciated basins (more than 10% glacier-covered area) than for nonglaciated basins, showing the influence of glaciers on historical streamflowchanges. Mean February flows, for example, increased for the median of available stations by 45% for glaciated basins and by 17% for nonglaciated ones.

  11. The partitioning of copper among selected phases of geologic media of two porphyry copper districts, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Learned, R.E.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    In experiments designed to determine the manner in which copper is partitioned among selected phases that constitute geologic media, we have applied the five-step sequential extraction procedure of Chao and Theobald to the analysis of drill core, soils, and stream sediments of the Rio Vivi and Rio Tanama porphyry copper districts of Puerto Rico. The extraction procedure affords a convenient means of determining the trace-metal content of the following fractions: (1) Mn oxides and "reactive" Fe oxides; (2) "amorphous" Fe oxides; (3) "crystalline" Fe oxides; (4) sulfides and magnetite; and (5) silicates. An additional extraction between steps (1) and (2) was performed to determine organic-related copper in stream sediments. The experimental results indicate that apportionment of copper among phases constituting geologic media is a function of geochemical environment. Distinctive partitioning patterns were derived from the analysis of drill core from each of three geochemical zones: (a) the supergene zone of oxidation; (b) the supergene zone of enrichment; and (c) the hypogene zone; and similarly, from the analysis of; (d) soils on a weakly leached capping; (e) soils on a strongly leached capping; and (f) active stream sediment. The experimental results also show that geochemical contrasts (anomaly-to-background ratios) vary widely among the five fractions of each sampling medium investigated, and that at least one fraction of each medium provides substantially stronger contrast than does the bulk medium. Fraction (1) provides optimal contrast for stream sediments of the district; fraction (2) provides optimal contrast for soils on a weakly leached capping; fraction (3) provides optimal contrast for soils on a strongly leached capping. Selective extraction procedures appear to have important applications to the orientation and interpretive stages of geochemical exploration. Further investigation and testing of a similar nature are recommended. ?? 1981.

  12. Optimized He 2 cooling systems for space application. Behavior and handling of superfluid helium at G = 0, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, H. D.; Klipping, G.; Lueders, K.; Schotte, K. D.; Schotte, U.; Szuecs, Z.; Ruppert, U.

    1983-06-01

    Increased reliability of He2 cooling systems for space applications is considered. An active phase separator (APS) with annular flow gap of variable length which allows variation of the cooling capacity over a wide range, developed for zero-g tests is described. Helium-tight electrical leadthroughs, a displacement transducer for low temperature application, a ball closure for use in combination with the APS, and gas/liquid detectors were developed. For temperature and liquid level measurement in narrow slits in laboratory as well as flight experiments, temperature sensors were developed. Three thickness measurement methods for He2 films are proposed: optical (1/10 000 to 1/100 mm), crystal (1/10 to the 7th power to 1/10 mm) and capacitive (1/10 to the 6th power to some mm).

  13. Collaborating To Serve Arizona Students & Families More Effectively: Phase 1 Report. Evaluation of Murphy School District-Department of Economic Security Collaborative Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izu, Jo Ann; Carreon, Tori

    This report presents the results of Phase I of an evaluation of the Murphy School District (MSD)-Department of Economic Security (DES) collaborative effort, one of the first interagency partnerships in the state of Arizona that attempts to address the needs of students and their families more effectively. The primary purposes of the evaluation are…

  14. A Study of Discrepant Reading Achievement of Minority and White Students in a Desegregating School District: Phase One, Two and Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zafirau, James; Fleming, Margaret

    This study investigated disparities in reading performance among minority and white students in an urban school district undergoing desegregation in 1980-81. Phase one compared minority and white students on reading comprehension test performance. It was found that white students performed significantly higher on the test than minority students,…

  15. Variable Gravity Effects on the Cooling Performance of a Single Phase Confined Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalak, Travis; Yerkes, Kirk; Baysinger, Karri; McQuillen, John

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the testing of a spray cooling experiment designed to be flown on NASA's KC-135 Reduced Gravity Testing Platform. Spray cooling is an example of a thermal management technique that may be utilized in high flux heat acquisition and high thermal energy transport concepts. Many researchers have investigated the utility of spray cooling for the thermal management of devices generating high heat fluxes. However, there has been little research addressing the physics and ultimate performance of spray cooling in a variable gravity environment. An experimental package, consisting of a spray chamber coupled to a fluid delivery loop system, was fabricated for variable gravity flight tests. The spray chamber contains two opposing nozzles spraying on target Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) heaters. These heaters are mounted on glass pedestals, which are part of a sump system to remove unconstrained liquid from the test chamber. Liquid is collected in the sumps and returned to the fluid delivery loop. Thermocouples mounted in and around the pedestals are used to determine both the heat loss through the underside of the IT0 heater and the heat extracted by the spray. A series of flight tests were carried out aboard the KC-135, utilizing the ability of the aircraft to produce various gravity conditions. During the flight tests, for a fixed flow rate, heat input was varied at 20, 30, 50, and 80W with variable gravities of 0.01, 0.16, 0.36, and 1.8g. Flight test data was compared to terrestrial baseline data in addition to analytical and numerical solutions to evaluate the heat transfer in the heater and support structure . There were significant differences observed in the spray cooling performance as a result of variable gravity conditions and heat inputs. In general, the Nussult number at the heater surface was found to increase with decreasing gravity conditions for heat loads greater than 30W.

  16. Mathematical Model of Two Phase Flow in Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Including Flue Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The previously developed model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer is extended to be able to take into account the flow of supersaturated moist air. The two phase flow model is based on void fraction of gas phase which is included in the governing equations. Homogeneous equilibrium model, where the two phases are well mixed and have the same velocity, is used. The effect of flue gas injection is included into the developed mathematical model by using source terms in governing equations and by using momentum flux coefficient and kinetic energy flux coefficient. Heat and mass transfer in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations, where the mass transfer is represented by measured fill Merkel number and heat transfer is calculated using prescribed Lewis factor.

  17. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition and Its Phase Diagram in Deeply-Cooled Heavy Water Confined in a Nanoporous Silica Matrix.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Ito, Kanae; Leão, Juscelino B; Harriger, Leland; Liu, Yun; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-01

    Using neutron diffraction technique, we measure the average density of the heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix, MCM-41, over the pressure-temperature plane. The result suggests the existence of a line of liquid-liquid phase transition with its end point at 1.29 ± 0.34 kbar and 213 ± 3 K in a fully hydrated sample. This point would be the liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) according to the "liquid-liquid critical point" scenario. The phase diagram of the deeply cooled confined heavy water is then discussed. Moreover, in a partially hydrated sample, the phase transition completely disappears. This result shows that it is the free water part, rather than the bound water part, of the confined water that undergoes a liquid-liquid transition. PMID:26266493

  18. Ice pack heat sink subsystem, phase 2. [astronaut life support cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.; Kellner, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes the design, development, fabrication, and test at one gravity of a prototype ice pack heat sink subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions; the investigation of thermal storage material with the objective of uncovering materials with heats of fusion and/or solution in the range of 300 Btu/lb (700 kilojoules/kilogram); and the planned procedure for implementing an ice pack heat sink subsystem flight experiment. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  19. Ice Pack Heat Sink Subsystem - Phase I. [astronaut liquid cooling garment design and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roebelen, G. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes the design and test at one-g of a functional laboratory model (non-flight) Ice Pack Heat Sink Subsystem to be used eventually for astronaut cooling during manned space missions. In normal use, excess heat in the liquid cooling garment (LCG) coolant is transferred to a reusable/regenerable ice pack heat sink. For emergency operation, or for extension of extravehicular activity mission time after all the ice has melted, water from the ice pack is boiled to vacuum, thereby continuing to remove heat from the LCG coolant. This subsystem incorporates a quick connect/disconnect thermal interface between the ice pack heat sink and the subsystem heat exchanger.

  20. Heavy-tailed phase-space distributions beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs: Confined laser-cooled atoms in a nonthermal state.

    PubMed

    Dechant, Andreas; Shafier, Shalom Tzvi; Kessler, David A; Barkai, Eli

    2016-08-01

    The Boltzmann-Gibbs density, a central result of equilibrium statistical mechanics, relates the energy of a system in contact with a thermal bath to its equilibrium statistics. This relation is lost for nonthermal systems such as cold atoms in optical lattices, where the heat bath is replaced with the laser beams of the lattice. We investigate in detail the stationary phase-space probability for Sisyphus cooling under harmonic confinement. In particular, we elucidate whether the total energy of the system still describes its stationary state statistics. We find that this is true for the center part of the phase-space density for deep lattices, where the Boltzmann-Gibbs density provides an approximate description. The relation between energy and statistics also persists for strong confinement and in the limit of high energies, where the system becomes underdamped. However, the phase-space density now exhibits heavy power-law tails. In all three cases we find expressions for the leading-order phase-space density and corrections which break the equivalence of probability and energy and violate energy equipartition. The nonequilibrium nature of the steady state is corroborated by explicit violations of detailed balance. We complement these analytical results with numerical simulations to map out the intricate structure of the phase-space density. PMID:27627290

  1. Computation of Phase Fractions in Austenite Transformation with the Dilation Curve for Various Cooling Regimens in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihua; Chen, Dengfu; Long, Mujun; Li, Wei; Chen, Huabiao; Vitos, Levente

    2016-03-01

    A concise model is applied to compute the microstructure evolution of austenite transformation by using the dilation curve of continuously cast steels. The model is verified by thermodynamic calculations and microstructure examinations. When applying the model, the phase fractions and the corresponding transforming rates during austenite transformation are investigated at various cooling rates and chemical compositions. In addition, ab initio calculations are performed for paramagnetic body-centered-cubic Fe to understand the thermal expansion behavior of steels at an atomic scale. Results indicate that by increasing the cooling rate, the final volume fraction of ferrite/pearlite will gradually increase/decrease with a greater transforming rate of ferrite. The ferrite fraction increases after austenite transformation with lowering of the carbon content and increasing of the substitutional alloying fractions. In the austenite transformation, the thermal expansion coefficient is sequentially determined by the forming rate of ferrite and pearlite. According to the ab initio theoretical calculations for the single phase of ferrite, thermal expansion emerges from magnetic evolution and lattice vibration, the latter playing the dominant role. The theoretical predictions for volume and thermal expansion coefficient are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Screening of tropical fruit volatile compounds using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers and internally cooled SPME fiber.

    PubMed

    Carasek, Eduardo; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2006-11-15

    In this study, the optimization and comparison of an internally cooled fiber [cold fiber with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) loading] and several commercial solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers for the extraction of volatile compounds from tropical fruits were performed. Automated headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) using commercial fibers and an internally cooled SPME fiber device coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify the volatile compounds of five tropical fruits. Pulps of yellow passion fruit (Passiflora edulis), cashew (Anacardium occidentale), tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.), acerola (Malphigia glabra L.), and guava (Psidium guajava L.) were sampled. The extraction conditions were optimized using two experimental designs (full factorial design and Doehlert matrix) to analyze the main and secondary effects. The volatile compounds tentatively identified included alcohols, esters, carbonyl compounds, and terpernes. It was found that the cold fiber was the most appropriate fiber for the purpose of extracting volatile compounds from the five fruit pulps studied. PMID:17090108

  3. Computation of Phase Fractions in Austenite Transformation with the Dilation Curve for Various Cooling Regimens in Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhihua; Chen, Dengfu; Long, Mujun; Li, Wei; Chen, Huabiao; Vitos, Levente

    2016-06-01

    A concise model is applied to compute the microstructure evolution of austenite transformation by using the dilation curve of continuously cast steels. The model is verified by thermodynamic calculations and microstructure examinations. When applying the model, the phase fractions and the corresponding transforming rates during austenite transformation are investigated at various cooling rates and chemical compositions. In addition, ab initio calculations are performed for paramagnetic body-centered-cubic Fe to understand the thermal expansion behavior of steels at an atomic scale. Results indicate that by increasing the cooling rate, the final volume fraction of ferrite/pearlite will gradually increase/decrease with a greater transforming rate of ferrite. The ferrite fraction increases after austenite transformation with lowering of the carbon content and increasing of the substitutional alloying fractions. In the austenite transformation, the thermal expansion coefficient is sequentially determined by the forming rate of ferrite and pearlite. According to the ab initio theoretical calculations for the single phase of ferrite, thermal expansion emerges from magnetic evolution and lattice vibration, the latter playing the dominant role. The theoretical predictions for volume and thermal expansion coefficient are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Gas-phase measurements of combustion interaction with materials for radiation-cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, R. S.; Lucht, R. P.; Jassowski, D. M.; Rosenberg, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Foil samples of Ir and Pt are exposed to combustion products in a controlled premixed environment at atmospheric pressure. Electrical heating of the foil samples is used to control the surface temperature and to elevate it above the radiative equilibrium temperature within the test apparatus. Profiles of temperature and OH concentration in the boundary layer adjacent to the specimen surface are measured by laser-induced fluorescence. Measured OH concentrations are significantly higher than equilibrium concentrations calculated for the known mixture ratio and the measured temperature profiles. This result indicates that superequilibrium concentrations of H-atoms and O-atoms are also present in the boundary layer, due to partial equilibrium of the rapid binary reactions of the H2/O2 chemical kinetic system. These experiments are conducted as part of a research program to investigate fundamental aspects of the interaction of combustion gases with advanced high-temperature materials for radiation-cooled thrusters.

  5. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experiments were performed to investigate feasibility of using organic materials as a PCM for a latent heat storage unit of a natural circulation cooling/latent heat storage system. This system was designed to cool a shelter accommodating telecommunication equipment located in subtropical deserts or similar regions without using a power source. Taking into account practical considerations and the results of various experiments regarding the thermodynamic properties, thermal degradation, and corrosiveness to metals, lauric acid and iron was selected for the PCM and the latent heat storage unit material, respectively. Cyclic heating and cooling of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change was repeated for more than 430 days. The results showed that the heating-cooling curve was almost unchanged between the early stage and the 1,870th cycle. It was concluded that the latent heat storage unit could be used safely for more than ten years as a component of the cooling system.

  6. Volume-Of-Fluid Simulation for Predicting Two-Phase Cooling in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorle, Catherine; Parida, Pritish; Houshmand, Farzad; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    Two-phase flow in microfluidic geometries has applications of increasing interest for next generation electronic and optoelectronic systems, telecommunications devices, and vehicle electronics. While there has been progress on comprehensive simulation of two-phase flows in compact geometries, validation of the results in different flow regimes should be considered to determine the predictive capabilities. In the present study we use the volume-of-fluid method to model the flow through a single micro channel with cross section 100 × 100 μm and length 10 mm. The channel inlet mass flux and the heat flux at the lower wall result in a subcooled boiling regime in the first 2.5 mm of the channel and a saturated flow regime further downstream. A conservation equation for the vapor volume fraction, and a single set of momentum and energy equations with volume-averaged fluid properties are solved. A reduced-physics phase change model represents the evaporation of the liquid and the corresponding heat loss, and the surface tension is accounted for by a source term in the momentum equation. The phase change model used requires the definition of a time relaxation parameter, which can significantly affect the solution since it determines the rate of evaporation. The results are compared to experimental data available from literature, focusing on the capability of the reduced-physics phase change model to predict the correct flow pattern, temperature profile and pressure drop.

  7. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  8. Phase modulation for reduced vibration sensitivity in laser-cooled clocks in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W.; Dick, G.; Jefferts, S.; Walls, F.

    2001-01-01

    The standard interrogation technique in atomic beam clocks is square-wave frequency modulation (SWFM), which suffers a first order sensitivity to vibrations as changes in the transit time of the atoms translates to perceived frequency errors. Square-wave phase modulation (SWPM) interrogation eliminates sensitivity to this noise.

  9. Phase II Testing of Liquid Cooling Garments Using a Sweating Manikin, Controlled by a Human Physiological Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Trevino, Luis; Bue,Grant; Rugh, John

    2006-01-01

    An Advanced Automotive Manikin (ADAM) developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is used to evaluate NASA's liquid cooling garments (LCGs) used in advanced space suits for extravehicular applications. The manikin has 120 separate heated/sweating zones and is controlled by a finite element physiological model of the human thermoregulatory system. Previous testing showed the thermal sensation and comfort followed the expected trends as the LCG inlet fluid temperature was changed. The Phase II test data demonstrates the repeatability of ADAM by retesting the baseline LCG. Skin and core temperature predictions using ADAM in an LCG/Arctic suit combination are compared to NASA physiological data to validate the manikin/model. Additional LCG configurations are assessed using the manikin and compared to the baseline LCG. Results can extend to other personal protective clothing, including HAZMAT suits, nuclear/biological/chemical protective suits, and fire protection suits.

  10. User manual for GEOCITY: A computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume 1: Main text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, H. D.; Fassbender, L. L.; Bloomster, C. H.

    1982-09-01

    The cost of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir was calculated. The GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, and fan-coil units. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. The life cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end users are calculated by discounted cash flow analysis.

  11. Fate of arsenic-bearing phases during the suspended transport in a gold mining district (Isle river Basin, France).

    PubMed

    Grosbois, C; Courtin-Nomade, A; Robin, E; Bril, H; Tamura, N; Schäfer, J; Blanc, G

    2011-11-01

    Arsenic-rich (~140-1520 mg x kg(-1)) suspended particulate matter (SPM) was collected daily with an automatic sampler in the Upper Isle River (France) draining a former gold mining district in order to better understand the fate of arsenic during the suspended transport (particles smaller than 50 μm). Various techniques at a micrometric scale (EPMA, quantitative SEM-EDS with an automated particle counting including classification system and μXRD) were used to directly characterize As-bearing phases. The most frequent ones were aggregates of fine clay particles. Their mineralogy varied with particle sources involved. These aggregates were formed by chlorite-phlogopite-kaolinite assemblages during the high flow and chlorite-illite-montmorillonite during the low flow. Among all the observed As-carriers in SPM, these clay assemblages were the least As-rich (0.10 up to 1.58 wt.% As) and their median As concentrations suggested that they were less concentrated during the high flow than during the low flow. Iron oxyhydroxides were evidenced by μXRD in these clay aggregates, either as micro- to nano-sized particles and/or as coating. (Mn, Fe)oxyhydroxides were also present as discrete particles. Manganese oxides (0.14-1.26 wt.% As) transport significantly more arsenic during the low flow than during the high flow (0.16-0.79 wt.% As). The occurrence of Fe oxyhydroxide particles appeared more complex. During the low flow, observations on banks and in wetlands of freshly precipitated Fe hydroxides (ferrihydrite-type) presented the highest As concentrations (up to 6.5 wt.% As) but they were barely detected in SPM at a microscale. During the high flow, As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides (0.10-2.80 wt.% As) were more frequent, reflecting mechanical erosion and transport when the surface water level increased. Arsenic transfers from SPM to corresponding aqueous fraction mostly depend on As-carrier stability. This study shows the temporal occurrence of each type of As-bearing phases in

  12. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H.; Bos, W.

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  13. Thermal and economic assessment of hot side sensible heat and cold side phase change storage combination fo absorption solar cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. K.; Morehouse, J. H.

    An analysis of a solar assisted absorption cooling system which employs a combination of phase change on the cold side and sensible heat storage on the hot side of the cooling machine for small commercial buildings is given. The year-round thermal performance of this system for space cooling were determined by simulation and compared against conventional cooling systems in three geographic locations: Phoenix, Arizona; Miami, Florida and Washington, D.C. The results indicate that the hot-cold storage combination has a considerable amount of energy and economical savings over hot side sensible heat storage. Using the hot-cold storage combination, the optimum collector areas for Washington, D.C., Phoenix and Miami are 355 m squared, 250 m squared and 495 m squared, respectively. Compared against conventional vapor compression chiller, the net solar fractions are 61, 67 and 69 percent, respectively.

  14. Stability and Phase Noise Tests of Two Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi T.

    1998-01-01

    A cryocooled Compensated Sapphire Oscillator (CSO), developed for the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment, and operating in the 8K - 10K temperature range was previously demonstrated to show ultra-high stability of sigma(sub y) = 2.5 x 10 (exp -15) for measuring times 200 seconds less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 600 seconds using a hydrogen maser as reference. We present here test results for a second unit which allows CSO short-term stability and phase noise to be measured for the first time. Also included are design details of a new RF receiver and an intercomparison with the first CSO unit. Cryogenic oscillators operating below about 10K offer the highest possible short term stability of any frequency sources. However, their use has so far been restricted to research environments due to the limited operating periods associated with liquid helium consumption. The cryocooled CSO is being built in support of the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment and is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3-4 x 10 (exp -15) (1 second less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 100 seconds) and phase noise of -73dB/Hz @ 1Hz measured at 34 GHz. Installation in 5 stations of NASA's deep space network (DSN) is planned in the years 2000 - 2002. In the previous tests, actual stability of the CSO for measuring times tau less than or equal to 200 seconds could not be directly measured, being masked by short-term fluctuations of the H-maser reference. Excellent short-term performance, however, could be inferred by the success of an application of the CSO as local oscillator (L.O.) to the JPL LITS passive atomic standard, where medium-term stability showed no degradation due to L.O. instabilities at a level of (sigma)y = 3 x 10 (exp -14)/square root of tau. A second CSO has now been constructed, and all cryogenic aspects have been verified, including a resonator turn-over temperature of 7.907 K

  15. Emerging cool white light emission from Dy(3+) doped single phase alkaline earth niobate phosphors for indoor lighting applications.

    PubMed

    Vishwakarma, Amit K; Jha, Kaushal; Jayasimhadri, M; Sivaiah, B; Gahtori, Bhasker; Haranath, D

    2015-10-21

    Single-phase cool white-light emitting BaNb2O6:Dy(3+) phosphors have been synthesized via a conventional solid-state reaction method and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and spectrofluorophotometric measurements. XRD and Rietveld structural refinement studies confirm that all the samples exhibit pure orthorhombic structure [space group -C2221(20)]. SEM observations reveal the dense particle packaging with irregular morphology in a micron range. The as-prepared phosphors exhibit blue (482 nm) and yellow (574 nm) emissions under 349, 364, 386 and 399 nm excitations corresponding to (4)F9/2→(6)HJ (J = 15/2, 13/2) transitions of Dy(3+) ions. The energy transfer mechanism between Dy(3+) ions has been studied in detail and the luminescence decay lifetime for the (4)F9/2 level was found to be around 146.07 μs for the optimized phosphor composition. The calculated Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates for the optimized phosphor are (x = 0.322, y = 0.339), which are close to the National Television Standard Committee (NTSC) (x = 0.310, y = 0.316) coordinates. The values of CIE chromaticity coordinates and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5907 K endorse cool white-light emission from the phosphor. The study reveals that BaNb2O6:Dy(3+) phosphor could be a potential candidate for near ultra-violet (NUV) excited white-LED applications. PMID:26374377

  16. Measurement and simulation of two-phase CO2 cooling in Micromegas modules for a Large Prototype of Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. S.; Attié, D.; Colas, P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sarkar, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ganjour, S.

    2015-08-01

    The readout electronics of a Micromegas (MM) module consume nearly 26 W of electric power, which causes the temperature of electronic board to increase upto 70 oC. Increase in temperature results in damage of electronics. Development of temperature gradient in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) may affect precise measurement as well. Two-phase CO2 cooling has been applied to remove heat from the MM modules during two test beam experiments at DESY, Hamburg. Following the experimental procedure, a comprehensive study of the cooling technique has been accomplished for a single MM module by means of numerical simulation. This paper is focused to discuss the application of two-phase CO2 cooling to keep the temperature below 30 oC and stabilized within 0.2 oC.

  17. Determination of organochlorine pesticides in water using solvent cooling assisted dynamic hollow-fiber-supported headspace liquid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Pin; Huang, Shang-Da

    2007-12-28

    The organic solvent film formed within a hollow fiber was used as an extraction interface in the headspace liquid-phase microextraction (HS-LPME) of organochlorine pesticides. Some common organic solvents with different vapor pressures (9.33-12,918.9 Pa) were studied as extractants. The results indicated that even the solvent with the highest vapor pressure (cyclohexane) can be used to carry out the extraction successfully. However, those compounds (analytes) with low vapor pressures could not be extracted successfully. In general, the large surface area of the hollow fiber can hasten the extraction speed, but it can increase the risk of solvent loss. Lowering the temperature of the extraction solvent could not only reduce solvent loss (by lowering its vapor pressure) but also extend the feasible extraction time to improve extraction efficiency. In this work, a solvent cooling assisted dynamic hollow-fiber-supported headspace liquid-phase microextraction (SC-DHF-HS-LPME) approach was developed. By lowering the temperature of the solvent, the evaporation can be decreased, the extraction time can be lengthened, and, on the contrary, the equilibrium constant between headspace phase and extraction solvent can be increased. In dynamic LPME, the extracting solvent is held within a hollow fiber, affixed to a syringe needle and placed in the headspace of the sample container. The extracting solvent within the fiber is moved to-and-fro by using a programmable syringe pump. The movement facilitates mass transfer of analyte(s) from the sample to the solvent. Analysis of the extract was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of identity of extraction solvent, extraction temperature, sample agitation, extraction time, and salt concentration on extraction performance were also investigated. Good enrichments were achieved (65-211-fold) with this method. Good repeatabilities of extraction were obtained, with RSD values below 15.2%. Detection

  18. Giant zero field cooled spontaneous exchange bias effect in phase separated La1.5Sr0.5CoMnO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Venimadhav, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report a giant zero field cooled exchange bias (ZEB) effect (˜0.65 T) in La1.5Sr0.5CoMnO6 sample. Magnetic study has revealed a reentrant spin glass ˜90 K, phase separation to spin glass and ferromagnetic phases below 50 K and canted antiferromagnetic transition ˜10 K. A small conventional exchange bias (CEB) is established with the advent of spontaneous phase separation down to 10 K. Giant ZEB and enhanced CEB effects are found only below 10 K and are attributed to the large unidirectional anisotropy at the interface of isothermally field induced ferromagnetic phase and canted antiferromagnetic background.

  19. The influence of cooling conditions on grain size, secondary phase precipitates and mechanical properties of biomedical alloy specimens produced by investment casting.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, R; Williamson, K; O'Brien, C; Ramirez-Garcia, S; Browne, D J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate and evaluate the effect of the cooling environment on the microstructure, secondary phase precipitates and mechanical properties of an as-cast cobalt alloy. The microstructure of castings has a large bearing on the mechanical properties, grain size, porosity and the morphology of carbide precipitates are thought to influence hardness, tensile strength and ductility. It is postulated that a greater understanding of microstructure and secondary phase precipitate response to casting parameters could lead to the optimisation of casting parameters and serve to reduce the requirement of thermo-mechanical treatments currently applied to refine as-cast structures and achieve adequate mechanical properties. Thermal analysis was performed to determine the critical stages of cooling. Ten millimetre diameter cylindrical specimens which could be machined into tension test specimens were cast and cooled under different conditions to impose different cooling rates. Analytical techniques such as optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), tensile testing and micro-hardness testing were used to study the specimens. Parameters studied include grain size, secondary dendrite arm spacing, secondary phase precipitates, porosity, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength and elongation. The microstructure of as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo was found to consist of a dendritic matrix with secondary phases precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These secondary phase precipitates consist of carbides, rich in chromium and molybdenum. The size and area fraction of carbides was found to decrease significantly with increasing cooling rate while the micro-porosity was only marginally affected. The as-cast grains are illustrated for the first time showing a significant difference in size between insulated and naturally cooled specimens. The secondary dendrite arm spacing was

  20. Active (air-cooled) vs. passive (phase change material) thermal management of high power lithium-ion packs: Limitation of temperature rise and uniformity of temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, Rami; Kizilel, R.; Selman, J. R.; Al-Hallaj, S.

    The effectiveness of passive cooling by phase change materials (PCM) is compared with that of active (forced air) cooling. Numerical simulations were performed at different discharge rates, operating temperatures and ambient temperatures of a compact Li-ion battery pack suitable for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) propulsion. The results were also compared with experimental results. The PCM cooling mode uses a micro-composite graphite-PCM matrix surrounding the array of cells, while the active cooling mode uses air blown through the gaps between the cells in the same array. The results show that at stressful conditions, i.e. at high discharge rates and at high operating or ambient temperatures (for example 40-45 °C), air-cooling is not a proper thermal management system to keep the temperature of the cell in the desirable operating range without expending significant fan power. On the other hand, the passive cooling system is able to meet the operating range requirements under these same stressful conditions without the need for additional fan power.

  1. Advanced composite materials and subcooled liquid change-of-phase (COP) cooling for thermal management in advanced electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.E.; Ehlers, S.L.; Mudawar, I.

    1996-12-31

    High performance, high density airborne and spaceborne electronic systems (both DoD and commercial) are performance and reliability limited by materials and thermal management. There is a continual need to improve performance and reliability in high density systems and to reduce adverse effects induced by excessive weight, dissipated heat, and related environmental incompatibilities. The penalties effected by these limitations prevail from cradle-to-grave in the life of high performance airborne systems, beginning at the development stage, continuing through manufacturing and procurement, and throughout system life, ultimately raising the cost of ownership. The objective of this effort is to investigate the use of selected high specific property composites and change-of-phase (COP) (i.e., liquid to vapor) cooling (using non-CFC, perfluorohexane fluids) to combat these limitations. High density (e.g., 2 kw SEM-E configuration), miniaturized avionics are assumed. Material systems for enclosure and module packaging as well as COP mechanisms will be discussed at this time relative to a retrofit scenario, interfacing with existing aircraft environmental control systems (ECS) for coolant reconditioning.

  2. Charter Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Anne Turnbaugh

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with superintendents of eight charter-school districts in four states: California, Florida, Georgia, and New Mexico. Describes advantages and disadvantages. Includes a list (with website addresses) of all current charter-school districts. (PKP)

  3. Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project. Phase 2: coal, hydroelectric and energy alternatives. Volume I. Beluga Coal District Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, G.; Lane, D.; Edblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    This volume deals with the problems and procedures inherent in the development of the Beluga Coal District. Socio-economic implications of the development and management alternatives are discussed. A review of permits and approvals necessary for the initial development of Beluga Coal Field is presented. Major land tenure issues in the Beluga Coal District as well as existing transportation routes and proposed routes and sites are discussed. The various coal technologies which might be employed at Beluga are described. Transportation options and associated costs of transporting coal from the mine site area to a connecting point with a major, longer distance transportation made and of transporting coal both within and outside (exportation) the state are discussed. Some environmental issues involved in the development of the Beluga Coal Field are presented. (DMC)

  4. Studies of Phase Change Materials and a Latent Heat Storage Unit Used for a Natural Circulation Cooling/Latent Heat Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakitani, Katsumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    Experimental and theoretical studies were made of the heat transfer characteristics of a latent heat storage unit used for a natural circulation cooling /latent heat storage system. Heating and cooling curves of the latent heat storage unit undergoing solid-liquid phase change of a PCM (lauric acid) was obtained by using anatural circulation loop of R22 which consisted of an electrically heated evaporater, a water cooled condenser and the latent heat storage unit. The latent heat storage unit showed a heat transfer performance which was high enough for practical use. An approximate theoretical analysis was conducted to investigate transient behavior of the latent heat storage unit. Predictions of the refrigerant and outer surface temperatures during the melting process were in fair agreement with the experimental data, whereas that of the refrigerant temperature during the solidification process was considerably lower than the measurement.

  5. Stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron.

  6. Thermal hydraulic analysis of two-phase closed thermosyphon cooling system for new cold neutron source moderator of Breazeale research reactor at Penn State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habte, Melaku

    A cold neutron source cooling system is required for the Penn State's next generation cold neutron source facility that can accommodate a variable heat load up to about ˜10W with operating temperature of about 28K. An existing cold neutron source cooling system operating at the University of Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) facility failed to accommodate heat loads upwards of 4W with the moderator temperature reaching a maximum of 44K, which is the critical temperature for the operating fluid neon. The cooling system that was used in the TCNS cooling system was a two-phase closed thermosyphon with a reservoir (TPCTR). The reservoir containing neon gas is kept at room temperature. In this study a detailed thermal analysis of the fundamental operating principles of a TPCTR were carried out. A detailed parametric study of the various geometric and thermo-physical factors that affect the limits of the operational capacity of the TPCTR investigated. A CFD analysis is carried out in order to further refine the heat transfer analysis and understand the flow structure inside the thermosyphon and the two-phase nucleate boiling in the evaporator section of the thermosyphon. In order to help the new design, a variety of ways of increasing the operating range and heat removal capacity of the TPCTR cooling system were analyzed so that it can accommodate the anticipated heat load of 10W or more. It is found, for example, that doubling the pressure of the system will increase the capacity index zeta by 50% for a system with an initial fill ratio FR of 1. A decrease in cryorefrigeration performance angle increases the capacity index. For example taking the current condition of the TCNS system and reducing the angle from the current value of ˜700 by half (˜350) will increase the cooling power 300%. Finally based on detailed analytic and CFD analysis the best operating condition were proposed.

  7. Abundances of volatile-bearing phases in carbonaceous chondrites and cooling rates of meteorites based on cation ordering of orthopyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra

    1989-01-01

    Results of preliminary calculations of volatile abundances in carbonaceous chondrites are discussed. The method (Ganguly 1982) was refined for the calculation of cooling rate on the basis of cation ordering in orthopyroxenes, and it was applied to the derivation of cooling rates of some stony meteorites. Evaluation of cooling rate is important to the analysis of condensation, accretion, and post-accretionary metamorphic histories of meteorites. The method of orthopyroxene speedometry is widely applicable to meteorites and would be very useful in the understanding of the evolutionary histories of carbonaceous chondrites, especially since the conventional metallographic and fission track methods yield widely different results in many cases. Abstracts are given which summarize the major conclusions of the volatile abundance and cooling rate calculations.

  8. Development of Continuous Cooling Transformation Diagrams of Zirconium-Niobium Alloy Phase Transformations within the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, Elizabeth J.

    Microstructure and chemistry of zirconium alloys have a major influence on material performance, including mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Therefore, it is essential to thoroughly understand processing required to obtain desired microstructures for application in commercial nuclear reactors. Zirconium-niobium alloys are of particular interest for commercial nuclear applications (e.g., in boiling water reactors, pressurized water reactors, Canadian deuterium uranium reactors) due to increased corrosion resistance in aqueous environments over other zirconium alloys. Heat treatments of zirconium-niobium alloys affect overall microstructure, precipitate distributions and size, and ultimately determine material performance. Phase transformations in zirconium-niobium alloys were modeled for a range of niobium concentrations and heat treatment conditions, by conducting controlled experiments. Heat-flux differential scanning calorimetry was performed and data was collected and analyzed for zirconium-niobium alloys with niobium content ranging from 0.6-3.0 weight percent. Continuous cooling transformation diagrams were constructed for slow cooling rate conditions (9-34°C/minute) based on calorimetry test results. A standard operating procedure for performing these calorimetry tests and corresponding data analysis technique was developed specifically to study the zirconium-niobium material system. A mathematical model was developed utilizing the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami theory that accurately describes phase transformations upon continuous cooling in zirconium-niobium binary alloys. This model relates fraction of phase transformed to kinetic parameters that were calculated from experimental test results in order to model the phase transformation for various cooling rates from 10-40°C/minute.

  9. Co-sponsored second quarter progress review conference on district heating

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the progress review conference on district heating and cooling systems is presented. The agenda and lists of speakers and attendees are presented. A history of district heating and some present needs and future policies are given and an excerpt from the National District Heating Program Strategy (DOE, March 1980) is included. Following the presentation, District Heating and Cooling Systems Program, by Alan M. Rubin, a fact sheet on DOE's Integrated Community Energy Systems Program and information from an oral presentation, District Heating and Cooling Systems for Communities Through Power Plant Retrofit Distribution Network, are given. The Second Quarterly Oral Report to the US DOE on the District Heating and Cooling Project in Detroit; the executive summary of the Piqua, Ohio District Heating and Cooling Demonstration Project; the Second Quarterly Report of the Moorehead, Minnesota District Heating Project; and the report from the Moorehead, Minnesota mayor on the Hot Water District Heating Project are presented.

  10. Exchange bias in phase-segregated Nd2/3Ca1/3MnO3 as a function of temperature and cooling magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertman, Elena; Dolya, Sergiy; Desnenko, Vladimir; Pozhar, L. A.; KajÅaková, Marcela; Feher, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Exchange bias (EB) phenomena have been observed in Nd2/3Ca1/3MnO3 colossal magnetoresistance perovskite below the Curie temperature TC ˜ 70 K and attributed to an antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic (FM) spontaneous phase segregated state of this compound. Field cooled magnetic hysteresis loops exhibit shifts toward negative direction of the magnetic field axis. The values of exchange field HEB and coercivity HC are found to be strongly dependent of temperature and strength of the cooling magnetic field Hcool. These effects are attributed to evolution of the FM phase content and a size of FM clusters. A contribution to the total magnetization of the system due to the FM phase has been evaluated. The exchange bias effect decreases with increasing temperature up to TC and vanishes above this temperature with disappearance of FM phase. Relaxation of a non-equilibrium magnetic state of the compound manifests itself through a training effect also observed while studying EB in Nd2/3Ca1/3MnO3.

  11. Thermohydraulics in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor primary loop during early phases of unrestricted core-heatup accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.; Colman, J.; Hsu, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    In High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) siting considerations, the Unrestricted Core Heatup Accidents (UCHA) are considered as accidents of highest consequence, corresponding to core meltdown accidents in light water reactors. Initiation of such accidents can be, for instance, due to station blackout, resulting in scram and loss of all main loop forced circulation, with none of the core auxiliary cooling system loops being started. The result is a slow but continuing core heatup, extending over days. During the initial phases of such UCHA scenarios, the primary loop remains pressurized, with the system pressure slowly increasing until the relief valve setpoint is reached. The major objectives of the work described here were to determine times to depressurization as well as approximate loop component temperatures up to depressurization.

  12. Phase 1 archaeological investigation, cultural resources survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana districts, south shore of Maui, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Erkelens, C.

    1995-04-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. The survey team documented a total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features. Archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Maonakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. Twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bones from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area.

  13. Phase I Archaeological Investigation Cultural Resources Survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana Districts, South Shore of Maui, Hawaii (DRAFT )

    SciTech Connect

    Erkelens, Conrad

    1994-03-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. A total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features were documented. A GPS receiver was used to accurately and precisely plot locations for each of the documented sites. Analysis of the locational information suggests that archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Moanakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. A total of twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bone from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area. A small test unit was excavated at one habitation site

  14. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  15. Silico-ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (SFCA) Iron Ore Sinter Bonding Phases: New Insights into Their Formation During Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter phases during heating and cooling of synthetic iron ore sinter mixtures in the range 298 K to 1623 K (25 °C to 1350 °C) and at oxygen partial pressure of 5 × 10-3 atm has been characterized using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. SFCA and SFCA-I are the key bonding phases in iron ore sinter, and an improved understanding of their formation mechanisms may lead to improved efficiency of industrial sintering processes. During heating, SFCA-I formation at 1327 K to 1392 K (1054 °C to 1119 °C) (depending on composition) was associated with the reaction of Fe2O3, 2CaO·Fe2O3, and SiO2. SFCA formation (1380 K to 1437 K [1107 °C to 1164 °C]) was associated with the reaction of CaO·Fe2O3, SiO2, and a phase with average composition 49.60, 9.09, 0.14, 7.93, and 32.15 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. Increasing Al2O3 concentration in the starting sinter mixture increased the temperature range over which SFCA-I was stable before the formation of SFCA, and it stabilized SFCA to a higher temperature before it melted to form a Fe3O4 + melt phase assemblage (1486 K to 1581 K [1213 °C to 1308 °C]). During cooling, the first phase to crystallize from the melt (1452 K to 1561 K [1179 °C to 1288 °C]) was an Fe-rich phase, similar in composition to SFCA-I, and it had an average composition 58.88, 6.89, 0.82, 3.00, and 31.68 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. At lower temperatures (1418 K to 1543 K [1145 °C to 1270 °C]), this phase reacted with melt to form SFCA. Increasing Al2O3 increased the temperature at which crystallization of the Fe-rich phase occurred, increased the temperature at which crystallization of SFCA occurred, and suppressed the formation of Fe2O3 (1358 K to 1418 K [1085 °C to 1145 °C]) to lower temperatures.

  16. Method and apparatus for maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Farthing, William Earl [Pinson, AL; Felix, Larry Gordon [Pelham, AL; Snyder, Todd Robert [Birmingham, AL

    2008-02-12

    An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

  17. Method and apparatus maintaining multi-component sample gas constituents in vapor phase during sample extraction and cooling

    DOEpatents

    Farthing, William Earl; Felix, Larry Gordon; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for diluting and cooling that is extracted from high temperature and/or high pressure industrial processes. Through a feedback process, a specialized, CFD-modeled dilution cooler is employed along with real-time estimations of the point at which condensation will occur within the dilution cooler to define a level of dilution and diluted gas temperature that results in a gas that can be conveyed to standard gas analyzers that contains no condensed hydrocarbon compounds or condensed moisture.

  18. Microseismic monitoring for evidence of geothermal heat in the capital district of New York. Final report, Phases I-III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The seismic monitoring work of the geothermal project was initiated for the purpose of determining more exactly the relationship between seismicity and the postulated geothermal and related activity in the Albany-Saratoga Springs area in upstate New York. The seismic monitoring aspect of this work consisted of setting up and operating a network of seven seismograph stations within and around the study area capable of detecting and locating small earthquakes. To supplement the evidence from present day seismic activity, a list of all known historical and early instrumental earthquakes was compiled and improved from original sources for a larger region centered on the study area. Additional field work was done to determine seismic velocities of P and S phases by special recording of quarry blasts. The velocity results were used both as an aid to improve earthquake locations based on computer programs and to make inferences about the existence of temperature anomalies, and hence geothermal potential, at depths beneath the study area. Finally, the level in the continuous background earth vibration, microseisms, was measured throughout the study area to test a possibility that a relationship may exist at the surface between the level in microseisms and the geothermal or related activity. The observed seismic activity within the study area, although considerably higher (two to three times) than inferred from the historical and early instrumental data, is still not only low for a potential geothermal area but appears to be related to coherent regional tectonic stresses and not to the proposed more localized geothermal activity reflected in the mineralized, CO/sub 2/ rich spring discharge.

  19. Charter School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul T.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the difference between charter schools and charter districts (all schools in the district are chartered), why charter school districts are spreading, and how local school districts can become charter districts. Current laws in Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, New Mexico, Oregon, and Texas allow charter districts. (PKP)

  20. Benchmarking of thermal hydraulic loop models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES), phase-I: Isothermal steady state forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Batta, A.; Casamassima, V.; Cheng, X.; Choi, Yong Joon; Hwang, Il Soon; Lim, Jun; Meloni, P.; Nitti, F. S.; Dedul, V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Komlev, O.; Jaeger, W.; Sedov, A.; Kim, Ji Hak; Puspitarini, D.

    2011-08-01

    As highly promising coolant for new generation nuclear reactors, liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic has been extensively worldwide investigated. With high expectation about this advanced coolant, a multi-national systematic study on LBE was proposed in 2007, which covers benchmarking of thermal hydraulic prediction models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES). This international collaboration has been organized by OECD/NEA, and nine organizations - ENEA, ERSE, GIDROPRESS, IAEA, IPPE, KIT/IKET, KIT/INR, NUTRECK, and RRC KI - contribute their efforts to LACANES benchmarking. To produce experimental data for LACANES benchmarking, thermal-hydraulic tests were conducted by using a 12-m tall LBE integral test facility, named as Heavy Eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of Operability and Safety of PEACER (HELIOS) which has been constructed in 2005 at the Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. LACANES benchmark campaigns consist of a forced convection (phase-I) and a natural circulation (phase-II). In the forced convection case, the predictions of pressure losses based on handbook correlations and that obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics code simulation were compared with the measured data for various components of the HELIOS test facility. Based on comparative analyses of the predictions and the measured data, recommendations for the prediction methods of a pressure loss in LACANES were obtained. In this paper, results for the forced convection case (phase-I) of LACANES benchmarking are described.

  1. District heating strategy model: community manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hrabak, R. A.; Kron, Jr., N. F.; Pferdehirt, W. P.

    1981-10-01

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) cosponsor a program aimed at increasing the number of district heating and cooling systems. Twenty-eight communities have received HUD cooperative agreements to aid in a national feasibility assessment of district heating and cooling systems. The HUD/DOE program includes technical assistance provided by Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Part of this assistance is a computer program, called the district heating strategy model, that performs preliminary calculations to analyze potential district heating and cooling systems. The model uses information about a community's physical characteristics, current electricity-supply systems, and local economic conditions to calculate heat demands, heat supplies from existing power plants and a new boiler, system construction costs, basic financial forecasts, and changes in air-pollutant emissions resulting from installation of a district heating and cooling system. This report explains the operation of the district heating strategy model, provides simplified forms for organizing the input data required, and describes and illustrates the model's output data. The report is written for three groups of people: (1) those in the HUD/DOE-sponsored communities who will be collecting input data, and studying output data, to assess the potential for district heating and cooling applications in their communiites; (2) those in any other communities who may wish to use the model for the same purpose; and (3) technical-support people assigned by the national laboratories to explain to community personnel how the model is used.

  2. Optimization of evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.; Bradley, C. C.; Hulet, R. G.

    1997-05-01

    Recent experiments have used forced evaporative cooling to produce Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute gases. The evaporative cooling process can be optimized to provide the maximum phase-space density with a specified number of atoms remaining. We show that this global optimization is approximately achieved by locally optimizing the cooling efficiency at each instant. We discuss how this method can be implemented, and present the results for our 7Li trap. The predicted behavior of the gas is found to agree well with experiment.

  3. New petrological constraints on the last eruptive phase of the Sabatini Volcanic District (central Italy): Clues from mineralogy, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Mollo, Silvio; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; von Quadt, Albrecht; Forni, Francesca; Bachmann, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    We report results from mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic analyses of the three youngest pyroclastic products (ca. 86 ky) belonging to the Sabatini Volcanic District (Roman Province, central Italy). By means of thermometers, hygrometers and oxygen barometers, we have estimated that the crystallization temperature of magma progressively decreases over time (910-740 °C), whereas the amount of water dissolved in the melt and fO2 progressively increases as compositions of magmas become more differentiated (4.5-6.4 wt.% H2O and 0.4-2.6 ΔQFM buffer, respectively). Thermodynamic simulations of phase equilibria indicate that geochemical trends in mafic magmas (MgO > 4 wt.%) can be reproduced by abundant fractionation of olivine and clinopyroxene (~ 50 wt.% crystallization), while the trends of more evolved magmas (MgO ≤ 4 wt.%) originated by fractional crystallization of plagioclase and sanidine (~ 45 wt.% crystallization). The behavior of trace elements highlights that magmatic differentiation is controlled by polybaric differentiation that includes: (1) prolonged fractionation of mafic, anhydrous minerals from a primitive, H2O-poor magma at depth and (2) extraction of a more evolved, H2O-rich magma that crystallizes abundant felsic and subordinated hydrous minerals at shallow crustal levels. Assimilation and fractional crystallization modeling also reveal that magmas interacted with the carbonate rocks of the subvolcanic basement. The effect of carbonate assimilation accounts for both trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic variations in magmas, suggesting a maximum degree of carbonate assimilation of less than 5 wt.%.

  4. Cooling field tuned magnetic phase transition and exchange bias-like effect in Y{sub 0.9}Pr{sub 0.1}CrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Dongmei E-mail: dyu@ansto.gov.au Feng, Zhenjie; Jing, Chao; Ren, Wei; Cao, Shixun; Zhang, Jincang E-mail: dyu@ansto.gov.au; Zheng, Jiashun; Yu, Dehong E-mail: dyu@ansto.gov.au Sun, Dehui; Avdeev, Maxim; Wang, Baomin; Lu, Bo

    2015-09-07

    Cooling magnetic field dependence of magnetic phase transition has been observed in Y{sub 0.9}Pr{sub 0.1}CrO{sub 3}. G{sub z}F{sub x} order (spin structure of PrCrO{sub 3}) is dominant after zero field cooling (ZFC), whereas G{sub x}F{sub z} order (spin structure of YCrO{sub 3}) is dominant after cooling under a field higher than 100 Oe. Positive/negative exchange bias-like effect, with large vertical shift and small horizontal shift, has been observed after FC/ZFC process. The vertical shift can be attributed to the frozen ordered Pr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} spins in magnetic domains, because of the strong coupling between Pr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} sublattices; while the horizontal shift is a result of the pinning of spins at the interfaces. The frozen structure is generated by the field used for the measurement of the initial magnetization curve of M(H) for the ZFC cooled sample, while it is generated by the cooling field for the sample cooled under a cooling field higher than 100 Oe.

  5. Direct visualization and measurement of the extrapolation length on cooling toward the nematic-smectic-A phase transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoonseuk; Rosenblatt, Charles

    2010-05-01

    A herringbone "easy axis" pattern is scribed into a polyimide alignment layer for liquid-crystal orientation using the stylus of an atomic force microscope. Owing to the liquid crystal's bend elasticity K33 , the nematic director is unable to follow the sharp turn in the scribed easy axis, but instead relaxes over an extrapolation length L=K33/W2φ, where W2φ is the quadratic azimuthal anchoring strength coefficient. By immersing a tapered optical fiber into the liquid crystal, illuminating the fiber with polarized light, and scanning the fiber close to the substrate, a visualization and direct measurement of L are obtained on approaching the nematic-smectic- A phase transition temperature T NA from above. L is found to exhibit a sharp pretransitional increase near T NA, consistent with a diverging bend elastic constant. PMID:20866248

  6. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  7. Search for cool giant exoplanets around young and nearby stars. VLT/NaCo near-infrared phase-coronagraphic and differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, A.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Rameau, J.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Bonnefoy, M.; Desidera, S.; Sylvestre, M.; Baudoz, P.; Galicher, R.; Mouillet, D.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Spectral differential imaging (SDI) is part of the observing strategy of current and future high-contrast imaging instruments. It aims to reduce the stellar speckles that prevent the detection of cool planets by using in/out methane-band images. It attenuates the signature of off-axis companions to the star, such as angular differential imaging (ADI). However, this attenuation depends on the spectral properties of the low-mass companions we are searching for. The implications of this particularity on estimating the detection limits have been poorly explored so far. Aims: We perform an imaging survey to search for cool (Teff< 1000-1300 K) giant planets at separations as close as 5-10 AU. We also aim to assess the sensitivity limits in SDI data taking the photometric bias into account. This will lead to a better view of the SDI performance. Methods: We observed a selected sample of 16 stars (age <200 Myr, distance <25 pc) with the phase-mask coronagraph, SDI, and ADI modes of VLT/NaCo. Results: We do not detect any companions. As for the estimation of the sensitivity limits, we argue that the SDI residual noise cannot be converted into mass limits because it represents a differential flux, unlike what is done for single-band images, in which fluxes are measured. This results in degeneracies for the mass limits, which may be removed with the use of single-band constraints. We instead employ a method of directly determining the mass limits and compare the results from a combined processing SDI-ADI (ASDI) and ADI. The SDI flux ratio of a planet is the critical parameter for the ASDI performance at close-in separations (≲1''). The survey is sensitive to cool giant planets beyond 10 AU for 65% and 30 AU for 100% of the sample. Conclusions: For close-in separations, the optimal regime for SDI corresponds to SDI flux ratios higher than ~2. According to the BT-Settl model, this translates into Teff ≲ 800 K, which is significantly lower than the methane

  8. A Non-Heating Experimental Study on the Two-Phase Natural Circulation through the Annular Gap between Reactor Vessel and Insulation under External Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, K.S.; Park, R.J.; Cho, Y.R.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, H.D.; Kim, H.M.; Kim, K.Y.

    2004-07-01

    To improve the margin for IVR in high-power reactors, some design improvements of the vessel/insulation configuration to increase the heat removal rate by two-phase natural circulation have been proposed. To observe and evaluate the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation in the APR1400 under external reactor vessel cooling, the T-HERMES program has been performed, that is, the THERMES- SCALE, T-HERMES-SMALL, HERMES-HALF, and T-HERMES-CFD studies. In this paper, the HERMES-HALF study, which is one of the T-HERMES programs, is introduced. The HERMES-HALF is a non-heating experimental study on the two-phase natural circulation through the annular gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation. The objectives of this HERMES-HALF study are to observe and evaluate the two-phase natural circulation phenomena through the gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation in the APR1400. For these purposes, a half-scaled experimental facility is prepared utilizing the results of a scaling analysis to simulate the APR1400 reactor and insulation system. The behaviors of the boiling-induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the insulation gap are observed, and the liquid mass flow rates driven by the natural circulation loop and void fraction distribution are measured. And numerical analyses of the HERMES-HALF experiments using CFX-5.6 code have also been performed by solving unsteady, three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for multiphase flows with the zero equation turbulence model. By the experimental flow observation and numerical predictions, weak recirculation flows in the near region of the shear key are observed. The void fraction monotonically increases from the water inlet to the shear key region. There exists a short decrease of the void fraction after passing through the shear key due to geometrical expansion and the recirculation flow caused by the shear key. The variation of

  9. Conceptual design study of geothermal district heating of a thirty-house subdivision in Elko, Nevada, using existing water-distribution systems, Phase III. Final technical report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, D.R.

    1980-09-30

    A conceptual design study for district heating of a 30-home subdivision located near the southeast extremity of the city of Elko, Nevada is presented. While a specific residential community was used in the study, the overall approach and methodologies are believed to be generally applicable for a large number of communities where low temperature geothermal fluid is available. The proposed district heating system utilizes moderate temperature, clean domestic water and existing community culinary water supply lines. The culinary water supply is heated by a moderate temperature geothermal source using a single heat exchanger at entry to the subdivision. The heated culinary water is then pumped to the houses in the community where energy is extracted by means of a water supplied heat pump. The use of heat pumps at the individual houses allows economic heating to result from supply of relatively cool water to the community, and this precludes the necessity of supplying objectionably hot water for normal household consumption use. Each heat pump unit is isolated from the consumptive water flow such that contamination of the water supply is avoided. The community water delivery system is modified to allow recirculation within the community, and very little rework of existing water lines is required. The entire system coefficient of performance (COP) for a typical year of heating is 3.36, exclusive of well pumping energy.

  10. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  11. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  12. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  13. School District Mergers: What One District Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the planning process for a school district merger in a northwestern Pennsylvania school district, effective communication proved to be a challenge. Formed in 1932, this school district of approximately 1400 students was part of a utopian community; one established by a transportation system's corporation that was a major industrial…

  14. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  15. Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system. Phase III, final report. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1984-10-01

    The appendices provide supporting information on: properties of a chemical system for solar fired, air-cooled absorption equipment, air-side performance of a one-inch tube, absorber plate-fin coil, listings of the programs used for simulation and data reduction, and evaluation of the Carrier 3-ton chiller in an integrated heating and cooling system. (LEW)

  16. Development of a single-family absorption chiller for use in a solar heating and cooling system, phase 3, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, R. C.; Biermann, W. J.

    1984-10-01

    Supporting information is presented on: properties of a chemical system for solar fired, air-cooled absorption equipment, air-side performance of a one-inch tube, absorber plate-fin coil, listings of the programs used for simulation and data reduction, and evaluation of the Carrier three-tone chiller in an integrated heating and cooling system.

  17. 36 CFR 28.3 - Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District. 28.3 Section 28.3 Parks, Forests, and Public... General Provisions § 28.3 Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore... Community Development District, the Seashore District, and the Dune District. (b) The Community...

  18. 36 CFR 28.3 - Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District. 28.3 Section 28.3 Parks, Forests, and Public... General Provisions § 28.3 Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore... Community Development District, the Seashore District, and the Dune District. (b) The Community...

  19. 36 CFR 28.3 - Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District. 28.3 Section 28.3 Parks, Forests, and Public... General Provisions § 28.3 Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore... Community Development District, the Seashore District, and the Dune District. (b) The Community...

  20. 36 CFR 28.3 - Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District. 28.3 Section 28.3 Parks, Forests, and Public... General Provisions § 28.3 Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore... Community Development District, the Seashore District, and the Dune District. (b) The Community...

  1. 36 CFR 28.3 - Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore District. 28.3 Section 28.3 Parks, Forests, and Public... General Provisions § 28.3 Boundaries: The Community Development District; The Dune District; The Seashore... Community Development District, the Seashore District, and the Dune District. (b) The Community...

  2. Methods and guidelines for assessing customer district energy needs. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, I.; Taranov, D.

    1998-12-01

    District heating systems have been in service in cities, universities, and industrial facilities for more than 100 years. In recent years there has also been a rapid increase in the number of district cooling systems constructed as well as being studied for possible implementation. Ever increasing building construction and electricity costs (particularly demand charges), continued emphasis on energy conservation, new and improved equipment and piping technologies, and revived technologies such as thermal storage, have all contributed to the need and benefits of larger more efficient district energy (heating and cooling) plans and distribution systems. District energy (DE) may be generated in an existing conventional power plant (converted to cogeneration), a new gas-fired combined cycle plant or by electrical and gas fired chillers and boilers. The district energy system permits substantial energy savings over individual building cooling and heating systems. Further, such systems provide conditions for added economic development and environment improvement in the cities. District energy systems (particularly cooling systems) become more important in the US with the introduction of retail wheeling of electricity. Connecting a customer to a district cooling system (as opposed to individual electric chillers) implies a long-term customer for this service. Therefore the major motivation for district cooling development is to retain electric customers who otherwise may switch to alternative generators. The purpose of this project is to develop a methodology for evaluation of customer`s peak hourly, and annual load profiles in terms of useful energy to be supplied by a district system.

  3. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  4. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  5. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  6. A broad spectral feature detected during the cooling phase of a thermonuclear X-ray burst from GRS 1747-312 with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Masachika; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ozaki, Masanobu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Mori, Hideyuki; Saji, Shigetaka

    2015-08-01

    Precise measurement of the mass-radius relation of a Neutron Star (NS) is crucial to determine the equation of state of the ultra dense matter. Instead of directly measuring the mass and radius, it is often measured the mass-radius ratio, i.e. gravitational redshift at the NS surface, as it is free from the uncertainty to the source distance. If we can detect spectral features in the emission from the NS photosphere, which may be observable during the thermonuclear X-ray bursts, we can directly measure the gravitational redshift. Thus, we are systematically analyzing the Suzaku archival data looking for the thermonuclear X-ray bursts.GRS 1747-312 is a type I X-ray burst source located in the globular cluster Terzan 6. It was observed with Suzaku as a part of Galactic bulge mapping observations in September, 2009, for a total exposure of 45.3 ks. An exceptionally large X-ray burst with photospheric radius expansion was detected during the observation. The burst duration exceeded an hour. Unfortunately, most of the decay of the burst was not observed due to the satellite passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly.We detected a broad feature in the energy spectrum of the burst above 7 keV in its cooling phase. The feature resembled that of an absorption edge, but was significantly smeared. We found that it was best reproduced by a rotation-broadened absorption edge, where the photo-electric absorption edge was smeared by the rapid spin of the NS. The smeared edge may be produced by the dominant products of the X-ray burst, i.e. hydrogen-like Fe (9.28 keV) or Ni (10.78 keV). If this identification is correct, the gravitational red shift would be 1.30+-0.02 or 1.51+-0.02, respectively, corresponding to the NS radius of 10.1+-0.3 or 7.4+-0.1 km, for an assumed NS mass of 1.4 solar mass. Because the absorption edge is not completely smeared out even with the rapid spin of the NS, this can be a powerful tool to measure the gravitational redshift of the NSs.

  7. An Alternative to Laser Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Laser cooling has been the standard approach for over thirty years for cooling the translational motion of atoms. While laser cooling is an extremely successful method, it has been limited to a small set of elements in the periodic table. The performance of laser cooling for those elements has saturated in terms of flux of ultra-cold atoms, density, and phase-space density. I report our progress towards the development of an alternative to laser cooling. Our approach relies on magnetic stopping of supersonic beams, an atomic coilgun. A recent advance is the experimental realization of an adiabatic coilgun which preserves phase-space density. Further cooling was demonstrated with a one-way wall, realizing the historic thought experiment of Maxwell's Demon. More recently, we showed how to apply this method to compress atomic phase space with almost no loss of atom number. Our approach is fundamentally different than laser cooling as it does not rely on the momentum of the photon, but rather the photon entropy. I will report on our experimental progress towards this goal, and describe future experiments that will be enabled by this work.

  8. Giant zero field cooled spontaneous exchange bias effect in phase separated La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna Murthy, J.; Venimadhav, A.

    2013-12-16

    We report a giant zero field cooled exchange bias (ZEB) effect (∼0.65 T) in La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6} sample. Magnetic study has revealed a reentrant spin glass ∼90 K, phase separation to spin glass and ferromagnetic phases below 50 K and canted antiferromagnetic transition ∼10 K. A small conventional exchange bias (CEB) is established with the advent of spontaneous phase separation down to 10 K. Giant ZEB and enhanced CEB effects are found only below 10 K and are attributed to the large unidirectional anisotropy at the interface of isothermally field induced ferromagnetic phase and canted antiferromagnetic background.

  9. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  10. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  11. Implementation of the superfluid helium phase transition using finite element modeling: Simulation of transient heat transfer and He-I/He-II phase front movement in cooling channels of superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielert, E. R.; Verweij, A. P.; Ten Kate, H. H. J.

    2013-01-01

    In the thermal design of high magnetic field superconducting accelerator magnets, the emphasis is on the use of superfluid helium as a coolant and stabilizing medium. The very high effective thermal conductivity of helium below the lambda transition temperature significantly helps to extract heat from the coil windings during steady state and transient heat deposition. The layout and size of the helium channels have a strong effect on the maximum amount of heat that can be extracted from the porously insulated superconducting cables. To better understand the behavior of superfluid helium penetrating the magnet structure and coil windings, simulation based on a three dimensional finite element model can give valuable insight. The 3D geometries of interest can be regarded as a complex network of coupled 1D geometries. The governing physics is thus similar for both geometries and therefore validation of several and different 1D models is performed. Numerically obtained results and published experimental data are compared. Once the viability of the applied methods is proven, they can be incorporated into the 3D geometries. Not only the transport properties in the bulk of the helium are of interest, but also the strong non-linear behavior at the interfaces between solids and superfluid helium (Kapitza conductance) is important from an engineering point of view, since relatively large temperature jumps may occur here. In this work it is shown how He-II behavior in magnet windings can be simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics. 1D models are validated by experimental results taken from literature in order to improve existing 2D and 3D models with more complete physics. The examples discussed include transient heat transfer in 1D channels, Kapitza conductance and sub-cooling of normal liquid helium to temperatures below the lambda transition in long channels (phase front movement).

  12. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Phase 0. Feasibility and Planning Study. Volume 1: Executive Summary. Document No. 74SD419. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co., Philadelphia, PA. Space Div.

    The purpose of this study was to establish the technical and economic feasibility of using solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings and to provide baseline information for the widespread application of solar energy. The initial step in this program was a study of the technical, economic, societal, legal, and environmental factors…

  13. Mergers, cooling flows, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    Mergers (the capture of cold gas, especially) can have a profound influence on the hot coronal gas of early-type galaxies and clusters, potentially inducing symptoms hitherto attributed to a cooling flow, if thermal conduction is operative in the coronal plasma. Heat can be conducted from the hot phase into the cold phase, simultaneously ionizing the cold gas to make optical filaments, while locally cooling the coronal gas to mimic a cooling-flow. If there is heat conduction, though, there is no standard cooling-flow since radiative losses are balanced by conduction and not mass deposition. Amongst the strongest observational support for the existence of cooling-flows is the presence of intermediate temperature gas with x-ray emission-line strengths in agreement with cooling-flow models. Here, x-ray line strengths are calculated for this alternative model, in which mergers are responsible for the observed optical and x-ray properties. Since gas around 10(exp 4) K is thermally stable, the cold cloud need not necessarily evaporate and hydrostatic solutions exist. Good agreement with the x-ray data is obtained. The relative strengths of intermediate temperature x-ray emission lines are in significantly better agreement with a simple conduction model than with published cooling-flow models. The good agreement of the conduction model with optical, infrared and x-ray data indicates that significantly more theoretical effort into this type of solution would be profitable.

  14. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  15. Laser Cooling of Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti.

    An experiment on the laser cooling of a metastable helium beam has been carried out. This experiment is appropriate to be described theoretically under a semiclassical framework. The experiment is the first phase of a large experimental project, whose ultimate goal is to investigate the behavior of laser -cooled metastable helium atoms in the quantum mechanical domain. This first phase is to provide the foundation for the second phase, which will be described in a full quantum mechanical framework. To reach this goal, an atomic beam source and a detection and data acquisition system were designed and constructed to be used in both phases. A laser system that is necessary for the first phase was also designed and constructed. This experiment was designed so that the studies of the atomic behavior, both in the semiclassical and quantum mechanical regions, can be investigated almost simultaneously. This experiment mainly consists of a one-dimensional transverse Doppler cooling of a metastable helium beam. The theory of Doppler cooling, based upon previous work of others, is discussed in this thesis as well. A final velocity width (HWHM) of ~0.62 m/s has been achieved, which is about 2.5 times larger than the Doppler velocity predicted by the theory. The two most likely reasons for not obtaining the Doppler velocity have been carefully examined. Sub-Doppler cooling of the helium beam was also tried, but was unsuccessful. It is our belief that the very same reasons prevent us from achieving sub -Doppler cooling as well.

  16. Effect of the cooling rate on the mechanism and the kinetics of the phase transformations in solidification of W-Mo high-speed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nizhnikovskaya, P.F.; Kalinushkin, E.P.; Arshava, E.V.; Yakushev, O.S.

    1988-03-01

    The stop-quenching solidification of steel R6M5, R6M5F3, R6M5K5 was studied. The furnace was a horizontal-type vacuum with a quenching tank provided with a thyristor system. The specimens were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and also by electron microprobe. The method of stop-quenching was found to increase the cooling rate for a fuller completion of the peritectic reaction, establish a connection between the peritectic and the eutectic reaction in high speed steels, and broaden the temperature range of peritic transformation under conditions of accelerated heat removal.

  17. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  18. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  19. Leaner Class Sizes Add Fiscal Stress to Florida Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    With a total price tag pushing $10 billion, Florida's "class-size-reduction mandate"--the nation's toughest--is under fire, as school districts call on lawmakers to weaken the 2002 constitutional requirement before it is fully phased in later this year. Starting with the 2008-09 school year, individual districts must meet new size caps in each…

  20. School District Energy Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    This manual serves as an energy conservation reference and management guide for school districts. The School District Energy Program (SDEP) is designed to provide information and/or assistance to school administrators planning to implement a comprehensive energy management program. The manual consists of 15 parts. Part 1 describes the SDEP; Parts…

  1. District, Know Thyself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupa, Megan; McFadden, Ledyard

    2009-01-01

    Finalists for the Broad Prize for Urban Education demonstrate that identifying strategies that fit the local context is essential in creating success for students. Long Beach Unified School District in California and Broward County Public Schools in Florida demonstrate how districts can use different strategies to achieve the same goals.

  2. Do School Districts Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehurst, Grover J.; Chingos, Matthew M.; Gallaher, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    School districts occupy center stage in education reform in the U.S. They manage nearly all public funding and are frequently the locus of federal and state reform initiatives, e.g., instituting meaningful teacher evaluation systems. Financial compensation for district leaders is high, with many being paid more than the chief state school officers…

  3. Dynamics of RF captured cooled proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kells, W.; Mills, F.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of electron cooling experiments at the Electron Cooling Ring (ECR) at Fermilab, several peculiar features of the longitudinal phase space of cold protons (200 MeV) captured in RF buckets were observed. Here we present the experimental facts, present a simple theory, and summarize computer simulation results which support the theory and facts.

  4. Rectlinear cooling scheme for bright muon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-05-03

    A fast cooling technique is described that simultaneously reduces all six phase-space dimensions of a charged particle beam. In this process, cooling is accomplished by reducing the beam momentum through ionization energy loss in absorbers and replenishing the momentum loss only in the longitudinal direction rf cavities. In this work we review its main features and describe the main results.

  5. Mars Pathfinder mechanically pumped cooling loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, G. C.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanically pumped single-phase cooling loop was successfully flown on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Spacecraft which safely landed on the Martian surface on July 4, 1997. One of the key technologies that enabled the mission to succeed was an active heat rejection system (HRS) used to cool the electronics on the spacecraft during its seven-month cruise from Earth to Mars.

  6. Building a Construction Curriculum for Your School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruder, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Embracing the notion of going green, an affluent school district in Pennsylvania spent $83 million as part of the high school's renovation and expansion project. The three-level addition is now equipped with self-dimming lights, energy-efficient windows, a rooftop solar water heater, and a geothermal cooling and heating system. As a bonus for…

  7. Alfvén wave phase-mixing in flows. Why over-dense, solar coronal, open magnetic field structures are cool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The motivation for this study is to include the effect of plasma flow in Alfvén wave (AW) damping via phase mixing and to explore the observational implications. Methods: Our magnetohydrodynamic simulations and analytical calculations show that, when a background flow is present, mathematical expressions for the AW damping via phase mixing are modified by the following substitution: CA' (x) → CA' (x) + V0' (x), where CA and V0 are AW phase and the flow speeds, and the prime denotes a derivative in the direction across the background magnetic field. Results: In uniform magnetic fields and over-dense plasma structures, where CA is smaller than in the surrounding plasma, the flow, which is confined to the structure and going in the same direction as the AW, reduces the effect of phase-mixing, because on the edges of the structure CA' and V0' have opposite signs. Thus, the wave damps by means of slower phase-mixing compared to the case without the flow. This is the result of the co-directional flow that reduces the wave front stretching in the transverse direction. Conversely, the counter-directional flow increases the wave front stretching in the transverse direction, therefore making the phase-mixing-induced heating more effective. Although the result is generic and is applicable to different laboratory or astrophysical plasma systems, we apply our findings to addressing the question why over-dense solar coronal open magnetic field structures (OMFS) are cooler than the background plasma. Observations show that the over-dense OMFS (e.g. solar coronal polar plumes) are cooler than surrounding plasma and that, in these structures, Doppler line-broadening is consistent with bulk plasma motions, such as AW. Conclusions: If over-dense solar coronal OMFS are heated by AW damping via phase-mixing, we show that, co-directional with AW, plasma flow in them reduces the phase-mixing induced-heating, thus providing an explanation of why they appear cooler than the

  8. Microseismic monitoring for evidence of geothermal heat in the capital district of New York. Volume 5. Phases I-III. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The seismic monitoring aspect of this work consisted of setting up and operating a network of seven seismograph stations within and around the study area capable of detecting and locating small earthquakes. To supplement the evidence from present day seismic activity, a list of all known historical and early instrumental earthquakes was compiled and improved from original sources for a larger region centered on the study area. Additional field work was done to determine seismic velocities of P and S phases by special recording of quarry blasts. The velocity results were used both as an aid to improve earthquake locations based on computer programs and to make inferences about the existence of temperature anomalies, and hence geothermal potential, at depths beneath the study area. Finally, the level in the continuous background earth vibration, microseisms, was measured throughout the study area to test a possibility that a relationship may exist at the surface between the level in microseisms and the geothermal or related activity. The observed seismic activity within the study area, although considerably higher (two to three times) than inferred from the historical and early instrumental data, is still not only low for a potential geothermal area but appears to be related to coherent regional tectonic stresses and not to the proposed more localized geothermal activity reflected in the mineralized, CO/sub 2/ rich spring discharge.

  9. Sea breeze analysis based on LES simulations and the particle trace calculations in MM21 district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Toru; Soga, Yuta; Goto, Koji; Sadohara, Satoru; Takahashi, Keiko

    2016-04-01

    We have performed thermal and wind environment LES simulations in MM21 district in Yokohama. The used simulation model is MSSG (Multi-Scale Simulator for the Geo-environment). The spatial resolution is about 5[m] in horizontal and vertical axis. We have also performed the particle trace calculations in order to investigate the route of the sea-breeze. We have found the cool wind is gradually warmed/heated up as flowing into the district, then it blows up and is diffused. We will also discuss the contributions of the DHC (District Heating & Cooling) system in the area.

  10. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  11. Magneto-optical cooling of atoms.

    PubMed

    Raizen, Mark G; Budker, Dmitry; Rochester, Simon M; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2014-08-01

    We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces, can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultracold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power. PMID:25078213

  12. Cooling of Kilauea Iki lava lake

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, R.G.

    1982-02-01

    In 1959 Kilauea Iki erupted leaving a 110 to 120 m lake of molten lava in its crater. The resulting lava lake has provided a unique opportunity to study the cooling dynamics of a molten body and its associated hydrothermal system. Field measurements taken at Kilauea Iki indicate that the hydrothermal system above the cooling magma body goes through several stages, some of which are well modeled analytically. Field measurements also indicate that during most of the solidification period of the lake, cooling from above is controlled by 2-phase convection while conduction dominates the cooling of the lake from below. A summary of the field work related to the study of the cooling dynamics of Kilauea Iki is presented. Quantitative and qualitative cooling models for the lake are discussed.

  13. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  14. Geothermal District Heating Economics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-12

    GEOCITY is a large-scale simulation model which combines both engineering and economic submodels to systematically calculate the cost of geothermal district heating systems for space heating, hot-water heating, and process heating based upon hydrothermal geothermal resources. The GEOCITY program simulates the entire production, distribution, and waste disposal process for geothermal district heating systems, but does not include the cost of radiators, convectors, or other in-house heating systems. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating basedmore » on the climate, population, and heat demand of the district; characteristics of the geothermal resource and distance from the distribution center; well-drilling costs; design of the distribution system; tax rates; and financial conditions.« less

  15. ASTROMAG coil cooling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG is a planned particle astrophysics magnetic facility. Basically it is a large magnetic spectrometer outside the Earth's atmosphere for an extended period of time in orbit on a space station. A definition team summarized its scientific objectives assumably related to fundamental questions of astrophysics, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. Since magnetic induction of about 7 Tesla is desired, it is planned to be a superconducting magnet cooled to liquid helium 2 temperatures. The general structure of ASTROMAG is based on: (1) two superconducting magnetic coils, (2) dewar of liquid helium 2 to provide cooling capability for the magnets; (3) instrumentation, matter-anti matter spectrometer (MAS) and cosmic ray isotope spectrometer (CRIS); and (4) interfaces to the shuttle and space station. Many configurations of the superconducting magnets and the dewar were proposed and evaluated, since those are the heart of the ASTROMAG. Baseline of the magnet configuration and cryostat as presented in the phase A study and the one kept in mind while doing the present study are presented. ASTROMAG's development schedule reflects the plan of launching to the space station in 1995.

  16. Geothermal district G1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Geothermal District G1 includes 37 northeastern California counties and six geothermal fields: Lake City, Susanville, Litchfield, Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Electrical generation from geothermal resources occurs in three of the fields: Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Low-temperature geothermal projects are underway throughout the district and are described in a road log format. The ten projects described are located at Big Bend, Glass Mountain, Bieber, Alturas, Cedarville, Lake City, Honey Lake Valley, Greenville, and in Sierra and Mono Counties.

  17. Apatite Chemistry in a Felsic Magmatic System From the El Teniente District (Chile) as Monitor of an Early, Single-phase, Cl and S-rich Magmatic Volatile Phase Evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, L. B.; Rabbia, O. M.

    2009-05-01

    Apatite (Ap) is a ubiquitous accessory mineral phase in igneous rocks, that can incorporate several geochemically important elements among which are volatiles as Cl, H2O, S, As, F. Furthermore, as Ap starts to crystallize early in felsic magmas, and continue through a wide temperature range, it can potentially be used to monitor the evolution of magmatic volatiles in porphyry copper systems. In this work, we have studied magmatic Ap from Late Miocene dacitic porphyries spatially and temporally associated to the Cu-(Mo) La Huifa- La Negra prospect (4 km NE from the giant El Teniente porphyry copper deposit, Chile). These felsic rocks formed from hydrous magmas as indicated by early crystallized Hb (before Bt). Al-Hb geobarometer indicates that phenocrysts formed at ˜2 Kb, while fine grained groundmass suggests a depressurization. Ap is present as small (˜10-50 microns) subhedral to euhedral prisms included in Fe-Ti oxides, plagioclase, amphibole and biotite phenocrysts (IAp), and as bigger (up to ˜300 microns) isolated microphenocrysts (MAp), indicating crystallization throughout magmatic evolution. About 300 EPM analyses of Cl, F and SO3 have been performed on Ap in different textural positions. Only Ap included in anhydrous phases (mostly Pl and oxides) and unaltered grains from the groundmass were used to evaluate volatile evolution. Calculated apatite saturation temperature following Piccoli and Candela (1994) indicates that they started to crystallize ˜900°C. The most outstanding chemical feature of the studied Ap is their high Cl (up to 4.52 wt%) and SO3 (up to 0.98 wt%) contents, being highest in IAp. Cl/F and Cl/OH strongly decrease from ApI to MAp within all studied samples varying in SiO2 content from 66.3 to 69.7 wt%. They display a continuous and well defined trend. This variation is controlled mainly by Cl decrease and F increase, meanwhile OH remains roughly constant. SO3 in Ap varies from 0.98wt% in IAp to below detection limit (0.02 wt% SO3) in

  18. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures. Progress report, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  19. Evidence of the existence of the high-density and low-density phases in deeply-cooled confined heavy water under high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Harriger, Leland; Leão, Juscelino B.

    2014-07-07

    The average density of D{sub 2}O confined in a nanoporous silica matrix (MCM-41-S) is studied with neutron scattering. We find that below ∼210 K, the pressure-temperature plane of the system can be divided into two regions. The average density of the confined D{sub 2}O in the higher-pressure region is about 16% larger than that in the lower-pressure region. These two regions could represent the so-called “low-density liquid” and “high-density liquid” phases. The dividing line of these two regions, which could represent the associated 1st order liquid-liquid transition line, is also determined.

  20. Plugging of cooling holes in film-cooled turbine vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    The plugging of vane cooling holes by impurities in a marine gas turbine was closely simulated in burner rig tests where dopants were added to the combustion products of a clean fuel (Jet-A). Hole plugging occurred when liquid phases, resulting from the dopants, were present in the combustion products. Increasing flame temperature and dopant concentration resulted in an increased rate of deposition and hole plugging.

  1. Adiabatic cooling of antiprotons.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Kalra, R; Novitski, E; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Müllers, A; Walz, J

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3×10(6) p are cooled to 3.5 K-10(3) times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e(-) (with many fewer e(-) than p in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process-a significant advantage for rare particles. PMID:21405511

  2. Adiabatic Cooling of Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; McConnell, R.; Richerme, P.; Kalra, R.; Novitski, E.; Oelert, W.; Grzonka, D.; Sefzick, T.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; Muellers, A.; Walz, J.

    2011-02-18

    Adiabatic cooling is shown to be a simple and effective method to cool many charged particles in a trap to very low temperatures. Up to 3x10{sup 6} p are cooled to 3.5 K--10{sup 3} times more cold p and a 3 times lower p temperature than previously reported. A second cooling method cools p plasmas via the synchrotron radiation of embedded e{sup -} (with many fewer e{sup -} than p) in preparation for adiabatic cooling. No p are lost during either process--a significant advantage for rare particles.

  3. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  4. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  5. Cooling Force Measurements at CELSIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Ga ring lnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  6. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  7. Debuncher cooling performance

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Vander Meulen, David; Werkema, Steven; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We present measurements of the Fermilab Debuncher momentum and transverse cooling systems. These systems use liquid helium cooled waveguide pickups and slotted waveguide kickers covering the frequency range 4-8 GHz.

  8. Debuncher Cooling Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P. F.; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Vander Meulen, David; Werkema, Steven

    2006-03-20

    We present measurements of the Fermilab Debuncher momentum and transverse cooling systems. These systems use liquid helium cooled waveguide pickups and slotted waveguide kickers covering the frequency range 4-8 GHz.

  9. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  10. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  11. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  12. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  13. Controlled Rate Cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled-rate cooling is one of several techniques available for the long-term storage of plants in liquid nitrogen. In this technique samples are slowly cooled to an intermediate temperature and then plunged in liquid nitrogen. Controlled rate cooling is based on osmotic regulation of cell conte...

  14. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  15. The Cool Flames Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Sheredy, William; Wu, Ming-Shin; Tornabene, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A space-based experiment is currently under development to study diffusion-controlled, gas-phase, low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignition in an unstirred, static reactor. At Earth's gravity (1g), natural convection due to self-heating during the course of slow reaction dominates diffusive transport and produces spatio-temporal variations in the thermal and thus species concentration profiles via the Arrhenius temperature dependence of the reaction rates. Natural convection is important in all terrestrial cool flame and auto-ignition studies, except for select low pressure, highly dilute (small temperature excess) studies in small vessels (i.e., small Rayleigh number). On Earth, natural convection occurs when the Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds a critical value of approximately 600. Typical values of the Ra, associated with cool flames and auto-ignitions, range from 104-105 (or larger), a regime where both natural convection and conduction heat transport are important. When natural convection occurs, it alters the temperature, hydrodynamic, and species concentration fields, thus generating a multi-dimensional field that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to be modeled analytically. This point has been emphasized recently by Kagan and co-workers who have shown that explosion limits can shift depending on the characteristic length scale associated with the natural convection. Moreover, natural convection in unstirred reactors is never "sufficiently strong to generate a spatially uniform temperature distribution throughout the reacting gas." Thus, an unstirred, nonisothermal reaction on Earth does not reduce to that generated in a mechanically, well-stirred system. Interestingly, however, thermal ignition theories and thermokinetic models neglect natural convection and assume a heat transfer correlation of the form: q=h(S/V)(T(bar) - Tw) where q is the heat loss per unit volume, h is the heat transfer coefficient, S/V is the surface to

  16. Cooling apparatus for water-cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikawa, T.; Tamba, S.

    1986-05-20

    A cooling apparatus is described for a water-cooled internal combustion engine including a shaft that rotates when the engine is running, the apparatus comprising a centrifugal fan adapted to be connected to and rotated by the shaft, the fan having an intake air port and a discharge air opening, a rotary screen adapted to be operatively connected to and rotated by the shaft, the screen being disposed in the intake air port, a cooling radiator, a spiral-shaped duct connecting the radiator with the discharge air opening, and separating means on the duct, the separating means comprising an opening formed in the outer wall of the duct.

  17. Elastic Metal Alloy Refrigerants: Thermoelastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UMD is developing an energy-efficient cooling system that eliminates the need for synthetic refrigerants that harm the environment. More than 90% of the cooling and refrigeration systems in the U.S. today use vapor compression systems which rely on liquid to vapor phase transformation of synthetic refrigerants to absorb or release heat. Thermoelastic cooling systems, however, use a solid-state material—an elastic shape memory metal alloy—as a refrigerant and a solid to solid phase transformation to absorb or release heat. UMD is developing and testing shape memory alloys and a cooling device that alternately absorbs or creates heat in much the same way as a vapor compression system, but with significantly less energy and a smaller operational footprint.

  18. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  19. Heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Imig, L.A.; Gardner, M.R.

    1982-08-01

    A heating and cooling apparatus capable of cyclic heating and cooling of a test specimen undergoing fatigue testing is discussed. Cryogenic fluid is passed through a block clamped to the speciment to cool the block and the specimen. Heating cartridges penetrate the block to heat the block and the specimen to very hot temperaures. Control apparatus is provided to alternatively activate the cooling and heating modes to effect cyclic heating and cooling between very hot and very cold temperatures. The block is constructed of minimal mass to facilitate the rapid temperature changes. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  20. Competency: District Views from Southern California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyo, John

    1979-01-01

    Educators from Fullerton Union High School District, Newport-Mesa Unified School District, Capistrano Unified School District, and Huntington Beach Union High School District describe their efforts toward developing competency-based curriculum to meet state mandates. (SJL)

  1. Status of the MANX muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Hu, M.; Jansson, A.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Shiltsev, V.; Yarba, V.; Yu, M.; /Fermilab /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2008-06-01

    A demonstration experiment of six-dimensional (6D) phase space muon beam cooling is a key milestone on the roadmap toward to a real muon collider. In order to achieve this goal, they have designed the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory Experiment (MANX) channel, which consists of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC). They discuss the status of the simulation study of the MANX in this document.

  2. Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, M.R.

    2005-10-24

    In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

  3. Evaporative cooling of the dipolar hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Hummon, Matthew T; Yeo, Mark; Quéméner, Goulven; Bohn, John L; Ye, Jun

    2012-12-20

    Atomic physics was revolutionized by the development of forced evaporative cooling, which led directly to the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum-degenerate Fermi gases and ultracold optical lattice simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. More recently, substantial progress has been made in the production of cold molecular gases. Their permanent electric dipole moment is expected to generate systems with varied and controllable phases, dynamics and chemistry. However, although advances have been made in both direct cooling and cold-association techniques, evaporative cooling has not been achieved so far. This is due to unfavourable ratios of elastic to inelastic scattering and impractically slow thermalization rates in the available trapped species. Here we report the observation of microwave-forced evaporative cooling of neutral hydroxyl (OH(•)) molecules loaded from a Stark-decelerated beam into an extremely high-gradient magnetic quadrupole trap. We demonstrate cooling by at least one order of magnitude in temperature, and a corresponding increase in phase-space density by three orders of magnitude, limited only by the low-temperature sensitivity of our spectroscopic thermometry technique. With evaporative cooling and a sufficiently large initial population, much colder temperatures are possible; even a quantum-degenerate gas of this dipolar radical (or anything else it can sympathetically cool) may be within reach. PMID:23257881

  4. Cooling Scenario for the HESR Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Stockhorst, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Maier, R.; Lorentz, B.

    2006-03-20

    The High-Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the future International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt is planned as an anti-proton cooler ring in the momentum range from 1.5 to 15 GeV/c. An important and challenging feature of the new facility is the combination of phase space cooled beams with internal targets. The required beam parameters and intensities are prepared in two operation modes: the high luminosity mode with beam intensities up to 1011 anti-protons, and the high resolution mode with 1010 anti-protons cooled down to a relative momentum spread of only a few 10-5. Consequently, powerful phase space cooling is needed, taking advantage of high-energy electron cooling and high-bandwidth stochastic cooling. Both cooling techniques are envisaged here theoretically, including the effect of beam-target interaction and intra-beam scattering to find especially for stochastic cooling the best system parameters.

  5. The MANX Muon Cooling Experiment Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S. A.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Robertsa, T. J.; Yoneharab, K.

    2010-03-30

    The MANX experiment is being proposed to demonstrate the reduction of 6D muon phase space emittance, using a continuous liquid absorber to provide ionization cooling in a helical solenoid magnetic channel. The experiment involves the construction of a two-period-long helical cooling channel (HCC) to reduce the muon invariant emittance by a factor of two. The HCC would replace the current cooling section of the MICE experiment now being set up at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The MANX experiment would use the existing MICE spectrometers and muon beam line. We discuss the placement of detection planes to optimize the muon track resolution.

  6. Districts Tackling Meal Debt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    School districts have resorted to hiring debt collectors, employing constables, and swapping out standard meals for scaled-back versions to try to coerce parents to pay off school lunch debt that, in recent years, appears to have surged as the result of a faltering economy and better record-keeping. While the average school lunch costs just about…

  7. The Importance of Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tymms, Peter; Merrell, Christine; Heron, Tara; Jones, Paul; Albone, Stephen; Henderson, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Effectiveness studies have largely concentrated on the school as the unit of analysis, although an increasing number have directed their attention to the teacher as the main unit of interest. But policy is often directed through organisations at the district level or what is sometimes known as the Education Authority (EA). Few studies have…

  8. District-Level Downsizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Draconian cuts have become the order of business for many school districts since the economic recession hit in 2008. But for the coming school year, "draconian" has taken on an even harsher meaning, as states from California and Texas to Illinois and New York wrestle with deficits in the tens of billions of dollars and make multi-billion-dollar…

  9. Districts Weigh Obesity Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Parents of children in most elementary grades in Minnesota's Independent School District 191 receive an annual notice with potentially life-altering data for their children--and they are not state test scores, attendance rates, or grades. The notice contains the child's body mass index (BMI) score, which estimates whether the student has excess…

  10. School District Spending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul. Program Evaluation Div.

    Minnesota spends more for education than most states and has increased its financial commitment steadily over the past 15 years. Because of the state's dominant role in education funding, legislators have enacted measures requiring all local school districts to follow uniform financial accounting and reporting standards (UFARS). Since 1980, the…

  11. Modelling district nurse expertise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    As changes in society and health provision mean that one in four people over the age of 75 will require nursing care at home, pre-registration adult nurse education increasingly prepares student nurses for a future career within the community. District nurses undertake complex, multidimensional health and social assessments and care in a non-clinical setting and work in partnership with patients and their significant others to promote practical and psychological coping mechanisms and self-care. The district nurse's first assessment visit is key to developing a therapeutic partnership and it is often during this visit that expertise in district nursing practice emerges. The holistic, contextual and dynamic aspects of nursing in the home setting can make district nursing expertise difficult to illustrate and demonstrate within the classroom setting. This article explores the ways in which an understanding of expertise development theory can enable the tacit expertise that occurs within the first assessment visit to be made visible to student nurses, using simulation and expert narrative as a pedagogical strategy. PMID:25475676

  12. Rightsizing a School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esselman, Mary; Lee-Gwin, Rebecca; Rounds, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of the Kansas City, Missouri Public Schools (KCMSD) has been long overdue. Multiple superintendents and administrations, using billions of dollars of desegregation funds ventured to transform the district by creating magnet schools, themed schools, and career-focused high schools. Missing from these initiatives, but included in…

  13. District Leadership Conference Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    This manual provides usable guidelines and planning forms and materials for planning district leadership conferences, which were designed and initiated in Washington State to meet the problems in student enrollment and, consequently, Distributive Education Clubs of America membership. The conferences have become a useful means to increase…

  14. A District Level Planning Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHenry, W. E.; Achilles, C. M.

    This report examines school district planning models in South Carolina. It focuses on three questions: (1) Of those school districts conducting some type of systematic planning, how many are producing strategic plans? Long-range plans? Accountability reports? (2) In those same districts, how many are preparing adequate program-management…

  15. District Consolidation: Rivals Coming Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mart, Dan

    2011-01-01

    District consolidation is a highly emotional process. One key to success is sticking to the facts. In Iowa, school districts facing financial difficulties or enrollment concerns do not have to move directly to consolidation. In many cases, districts begin by developing sharing agreements. These sharing agreements may start with simple sharing of…

  16. Problems of Affluent School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoone, Eugene P.

    All school districts are affected by the stagnant economy, the growing needs of the public sector, the increased burden of transfer payments, and the limited growth of public revenues. Retrenchment is common to all school districts, but it may be more severe in affluent districts. By 1969-70, suburban school systems were the clear-cut expenditure…

  17. USACE DIVISION AND DISTRICT BOUNDARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USACE Division and District Boundary data contains the delination of Corps Division and District boundaries. District and Division Boundaries are based on the US political and watershed boundaries. In the mid 1990's, WES created the file by digitizing the 1984 Civil Wor...

  18. FACTORS IN FUTURE DISTRICT ORGANIZATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrus Junior Coll., Azusa, CA.

    CALIFORNIA HAS ACCEPTED THE CONCEPT THAT ALL SCHOOL DISTRICTS ARE TO BE INCLUDED IN JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICTS. THIS STUDY DETERMINED WHAT EFFECT ANY CHANGE IN THE TERRITORY NOW INCLUDED IN THE CITRUS JUNIOR COLLEGE DISTRICT WOULD HAVE UPON THE SCHOOL'S ENROLLMENTS, BUILDING PROGRAM, AND FINANCIAL STRUCTURE. TOTAL ENROLLMENT IN THE COLLEGE, 1963-64,…

  19. A District's Journey to Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Students learn best from well-designed instruction. To what extent can a school district design a curriculum that supports inquiry learning? How can a district implement consistent inquiry practices in forty schools? In this article, the author discusses Newport News Public School District's journey to inquiry which began in 2004 with a…

  20. Helium cooling systems for large superconducting physics detector magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.

    The large superconducting detector magnets used for high energy physics experiments are virtually all indirectly cooled. In general, these detector magnets are not cryogenically stabilized. Therefore, there are a number of choices for cooling large indirectly cooled detector magnets. These choices include; 1) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by the helium refrigerator J-T circuit, 2) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by a helium pump, and 3) a peculation gravity feed cooling system which uses liquid helium from a large storage dewar. The choices for the cooling of a large detector magnet are illustrated by applying these concepts to a 4.2 meter diameter 0.5 tesla thin superconducting solenoid for an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  1. Decentralization: The Administrator's Guidebook to School District Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel J.

    The school district decentralization process is described in this guidebook, which focuses on the administrator's role in implementation. Three chapters are organized around the three phases of decentralization--exploration, trial, and commitment. Each phase is examined in terms of the real-life experiences of administrators and other…

  2. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  3. RF Integration into Helical Magnet for Muon 6-Dimensional Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Lee, A.; Lopes, M.; Zlobin, A.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; Neubauer, M.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    The helical cooling channel is proposed to make a quick muon beam phase space cooling in a short channel length. The challenging part of the helical cooling channel magnet design is how to integrate the RF cavity into the compact helical cooling magnet. This report shows the possibility of the integration of the system.

  4. HPASS: a computer program for evaluation of district heating with heat pumps. Users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, G.R.; Calm, J.M.

    1981-03-01

    HPASS (Heat Pump district heating ASSessment) is a computer program for assessment of district heating and cooling with heat pumps. The software facilitates comparison of site- and source-energy use, discounted payback, and life-cycle costs of these systems with alternative systems providing similar services. The program also performs parametric studies of these analyses. This report explains the use of HPASS; the input requirements, available outputs, and program options are described.

  5. Axion cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    Cooling simulations of neutron stars and their comparison with the data from thermally emitting x-ray sources put constraints on the properties of axions, and by extension, of any light pseudoscalar dark matter particles, whose existence has been postulated to solve the strong-C P problem of QCD. We incorporate the axion emission by pair-breaking and formation processes by S - and P -wave nucleonic condensates in a benchmark code for cooling simulations, as well as provide fit formulas for the rates of these processes. Axion cooling of neutron stars has been simulated for 24 models covering the mass range 1 to 1.8 solar masses, featuring nonaccreted iron and accreted light-element envelopes, and a range of nucleon-axion couplings. The models are based on an equation state predicting conservative physics of superdense nuclear matter that does not allow for the onset of fast cooling processes induced by phase transitions to non-nucleonic forms of matter or high proton concentration. The cooling tracks in the temperature vs age plane were confronted with the (time-averaged) measured surface temperature of the central compact object in the Cas A supernova remnant as well as surface temperatures of three nearby middle-aged thermally emitting pulsars. We find that the axion coupling is limited to fa/107 GeV ≥(5 - 10 ) , which translates into an upper bound on axion mass ma≤(0.06 - 0.12 ) eV for Peccei-Quinn charges of the neutron |Cn|˜0.04 and proton |Cp|˜0.4 characteristic for hadronic models of axions.

  6. NASA Microclimate Cooling Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this outline form presentation is to present NASA's challenges in microclimate cooling as related to the spacesuit. An overview of spacesuit flight-rated personal cooling systems is presented, which includes a brief history of cooling systems from Gemini through Space Station missions. The roles of the liquid cooling garment, thermal environment extremes, the sublimator, multi-layer insulation, and helmet visor UV and solar coatings are reviewed. A second section is presented on advanced personal cooling systems studies, which include heat acquisition studies on cooling garments, heat rejection studies on water boiler & radiators, thermal storage studies, and insulation studies. Past and present research and development and challenges are summarized for the advanced studies.

  7. Solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartera, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    To emphasize energy conservation and low cost energy, the systems of solar heating and cooling are analyzed and compared with fossil fuel systems. The application of solar heating and cooling systems for industrial and domestic use are discussed. Topics of discussion include: solar collectors; space heating; pools and spas; domestic hot water; industrial heat less than 200 F; space cooling; industrial steam; and initial systems cost. A question and answer period is generated which closes out the discussion.

  8. Semioptimal practicable algorithmic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2011-04-15

    Algorithmic cooling (AC) of spins applies entropy manipulation algorithms in open spin systems in order to cool spins far beyond Shannon's entropy bound. Algorithmic cooling of nuclear spins was demonstrated experimentally and may contribute to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Several cooling algorithms were suggested in recent years, including practicable algorithmic cooling (PAC) and exhaustive AC. Practicable algorithms have simple implementations, yet their level of cooling is far from optimal; exhaustive algorithms, on the other hand, cool much better, and some even reach (asymptotically) an optimal level of cooling, but they are not practicable. We introduce here semioptimal practicable AC (SOPAC), wherein a few cycles (typically two to six) are performed at each recursive level. Two classes of SOPAC algorithms are proposed and analyzed. Both attain cooling levels significantly better than PAC and are much more efficient than the exhaustive algorithms. These algorithms are shown to bridge the gap between PAC and exhaustive AC. In addition, we calculated the number of spins required by SOPAC in order to purify qubits for quantum computation. As few as 12 and 7 spins are required (in an ideal scenario) to yield a mildly pure spin (60% polarized) from initial polarizations of 1% and 10%, respectively. In the latter case, about five more spins are sufficient to produce a highly pure spin (99.99% polarized), which could be relevant for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  9. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  10. Hydrogen film cooling investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of flow turning, flow acceleration, and supersonic flow on film cooling were determined experimentally and correlated in terms of an entrainment film cooling model. Experiments were conducted using thin walled metal test sections, hot nitrogen mainstream gas, and ambient hydrogen or nitrogen as film coolants. The entrainment film cooling model relates film cooling effectiveness to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. The experimental apparatus and the analytical model used are described in detail and correlations for the entrainment fraction and film coolant-to-wall heat transfer coefficient are presented.

  11. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  12. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  13. Impact of Cooling Rate on the Durability of PHA Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.B.

    2001-06-04

    This study was conducted to determine the effect, if any, on the PCT responses of glasses cooled at different rates. Two bounding cooling profiles were used in this study: rapidly quenched and a canister centerline cooling curve. Glasses were selected based on a number of criteria, but mainly to challenge the regions where amorphous phase separation is expected based upon current model predictions. The current DWPF homogeneity constraint, imposed to preclude regions of phase separation, predicted that most of the glasses selected would be phase separated. It was, therefore, important to ensure that deleterious phase separation does not occur at either cooling profile. In this case, deleterious phase separation is defined as the formation of an amorphous phase in the glass that significantly decreases the glass durability as measured by the PCT response.

  14. Alabama district flood plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedgecock, T. Scott; Pearman, J. Leroy; Stricklin, Victor E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this flood plan is to outline and record advance planning for flood emergencies, so that all personnel will know the general plan and have a ready-reference for necessary information. This will ensure that during any flood event, regardless of the extent or magnitude, the resources of the District can be mobilized into a maximum data collection operation with a mimimum of effort.

  15. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

    2004-10-01

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 105 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

  16. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  17. DOAS, Radiant Cooling Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The article discusses dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) and radiant cooling technologies. Both of these topics were covered in previous ASHRAE Journal columns. This article reviews the technologies and their increasing acceptance. The two steps that ASHRAE is taking to disseminate DOAS information to the design community, available energy savings and the market potential of radiant cooling systems are addressed as well.

  18. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  19. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  20. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  1. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  2. Coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  3. Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Astronauts working on the surface of the moon had to wear liquid-cooled garments under their space suits as protection from lunar temperatures which sometimes reach 250 degrees Fahrenheit. In community service projects conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center, the technology developed for astronaut needs has been adapted to portable cooling systems which will permit two youngsters to lead more normal lives.

  4. Why Cool Roofs?

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  5. S'COOL Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one fifth grade's participation in in NASA's S'COOL (Students' Cloud Observations On-Line) Project, making cloud observations, reporting them online, exploring weather concepts, and gleaning some of the things involved in authentic scientific research. S?COOL is part of a real scientific study of the effect of clouds on…

  6. Prospects of laser cooling in atomic thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Isaac; Chen, Tzu-Ling; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Lien, Yu-Hung; Liu, Yi-Wei; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2011-10-15

    One of the most precisely determined upper limits for the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) is set by the thallium (Tl) atomic beam experiment. One way to enhance the sensitivity of the atomic beam setup is to laser cool the Tl atoms to reduce the EDM-like phase caused by the Exv effect. In this report, a cooling scheme based on the 6P{sub 3/2}(F=2){r_reversible}6D{sub 5/2}(F{sup '}=3) transition in Tl is proposed. The absolute frequency measurement of this nearly closed-cycle transition was performed in an atomic beam apparatus. Two Ti:sapphire lasers were frequency-doubled using enhancement cavities in X-type configurations to provide the needed 377- and 352-nm light sources for the optical pumping and cooling transitions, respectively. The absolute frequency of this cooling transition is determined to be 851 634 646(56) MHz.

  7. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  8. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  9. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Berman, Mark J.

    2008-01-29

    A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

  10. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  11. Turbine blade cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  12. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  13. RHIC stochastic cooling motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, D.; DeSanto, L.; Olsen, R.H.; Fu, W.; Brennan, J.M.; Liaw, CJ; Bellavia, S.; Brodowski, J.

    2011-03-28

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beams are subject to Intra-Beam Scattering (IBS) that causes an emittance growth in all three-phase space planes. The only way to increase integrated luminosity is to counteract IBS with cooling during RHIC stores. A stochastic cooling system for this purpose has been developed, it includes moveable pick-ups and kickers in the collider that require precise motion control mechanics, drives and controllers. Since these moving parts can limit the beam path aperture, accuracy and reliability is important. Servo, stepper, and DC motors are used to provide actuation solutions for position control. The choice of motion stage, drive motor type, and controls are based on needs defined by the variety of mechanical specifications, the unique performance requirements, and the special needs required for remote operations in an accelerator environment. In this report we will describe the remote motion control related beam line hardware, position transducers, rack electronics, and software developed for the RHIC stochastic cooling pick-ups and kickers.

  14. Subcontracted activities related to TES for building heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.

    1980-01-01

    The subcontract program elements related to thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling systems are outlined. The following factors are included: subcontracts in the utility load management application area; life and stability testing of packaged low cost energy storage materials; and development of thermal energy storage systems for residential space cooling. Resistance storage heater component development, demonstration of storage heater systems for residential applications, and simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage (heat pump systems) are also discussed. Application of thermal energy storage for solar application and twin cities district heating are covered including an application analysis and technology assessment of thermal energy storage.

  15. Saint Paul Energy Park: the potential for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Kron, R.; Davis, H.

    1980-03-01

    The results of ANL's study of the energy and economic aspects of using district heating in the St. Paul Energy Park are summarized. The Energy Park is a 6 million ft/sup 2/ residential, commercial office, and light industrial complex to be built in the midway area of St. Paul, Minnesota. Space heating and cooling design loads for the park were calculated assuming that the ASHRAE's 90-75 energy-conserving construction standards would be used in constructing the park's buildings. Based in part on this assumption, ANL estimated the costs and energy use characteristics of six possible energy system options for supplying Energy Park's space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating needs. The results indicate that in today's economy, a central heating and cooling plant with natural gas boilers and electrically driven centrifugal chillers with thermal storage has good potential for energy and economic savings and clearly merits further consideration.

  16. Minneapolis district-heating options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, T. K.; Borkowski, R. J.; Karnitz, M. A.; Strom, S.; Linwick, K.

    1981-10-01

    The feasibility of a large-scale district heating system for the Minneapolis central city area was investigated. The analysis was based on a previous city of St. Paul Hot-water district heating study and other studies done by a Swedish engineering firm. Capital costs such as building and heat source conversion, pipeline construction, and equipment were used in comparing the projected expenses of various district heating scenarios. Options such as coal, refuse-derived fuel burning, and cogeneration at the Riverside Power Station were discussed as energy supplies for a cost-effective district heating system.

  17. Analysis of County School Districts in Arkansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Karol B.; Charlton, J.L.

    The 1948, Arkansas School District Reorganization Act was passed in an effort to reduce the 1589 small school districts to a smaller number. Those districts not consolidated would form county districts. As of the 1967-68 school year, 26 of these county districts remained. The purpose of this study was to provide information drawing attention to…

  18. Suburban District Leaders' Perception of Their Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia France, Roxanne

    2013-01-01

    In the field of district leadership, most studies focus only on the context and conditions existing in large urban districts in need of reform. This study examined whether district leadership practices have applicability to district leaders working within the suburban context. In addition, it determined whether district conditions (i.e., district…

  19. Optoelectrical Cooling of Polar Molecules to Submillikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prehn, Alexander; Ibrügger, Martin; Glöckner, Rosa; Rempe, Gerhard; Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate direct cooling of gaseous formaldehyde (H2 CO ) to the microkelvin regime. Our approach, optoelectrical Sisyphus cooling, provides a simple dissipative cooling method applicable to electrically trapped dipolar molecules. By reducing the temperature by 3 orders of magnitude and increasing the phase-space density by a factor of ˜104, we generate an ensemble of 3 ×105 molecules with a temperature of about 420 μ K , populating a single rotational state with more than 80% purity.

  20. Analytical investigation of chord size and cooling methods on turbine blade cooling requirements. Book 1: Sections 1 through 8 and appendixes A through I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of chord size on air cooled turbine blades. In the preliminary design phase, eight turbine blade cooling configurations in 0.75-in., 1.0-in., and 1.5-in. chord sizes were analyzed to determine the maximum turbine inlet temperature capabilities. A pin fin convection cooled configuration and a film-impingement cooled configuration were selected for a final design analysis in which the maximum turbine inlet temperature was determined as a function of the cooling air inlet temperature and the turbine inlet total pressure for each of the three chord sizes. The cooling air flow requirements were also determined for a varying cooling air inlet temperature with a constant turbine inlet temperature. It was determined that allowable turbine inlet temperature increases with increasing chord for the convection cooled and transpiration cooled designs, however, the film-convection cooled designs did not have a significant change in turbine inlet temperature with chord.

  1. Research District Seeing Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-05-13

    Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald (May 2012) - excerpt follows: It’s been a while since I’ve updated you on the Tri-Cities Research District, most certainly not for lack of new activity over the past several months. In fact, much has happened, and there’s more to come. I think many of us see new land development and construction as indicative of current or impending economic growth. So those of you who have ventured into North Richland either via Stevens Drive or George Washington Way lately have probably begun sensing and anticipating that such growth is afoot.

  2. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  3. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  4. Fermilab Recycler Stochastic Cooling for Luminosity Production

    SciTech Connect

    Broemmelsiek, D.; Gattuso, C.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Recycler began regularly delivering antiprotons for Tevatron luminosity operations in 2005. Methods for tuning the Recycler stochastic cooling system are presented. The unique conditions and resulting procedures for minimizing the longitudinal phase space density of the Recycler antiproton beam are outlined.

  5. District Support of School Improvement: Highlights from Three Districts. Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter addresses various supports that districts are utilizing to help keep students in school and on the path to graduation. Described herein are three districts that have been particularly successful in raising student achievement--even though they differ in their specific strategies, fund allocation, and demographic composition. A…

  6. Personal Cooling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Cool Head, a personal cooling system for use in heat stress occupations, is a spinoff of a channeled cooling garment for space wear. It is portable and includes a heat exchanger, control display unit, liquid reservoir and temperature control unit. The user can eliminate 40 to 60 percent of his body's heat storage and lower heart rate by 50 to 80 beats a minute. The system is used by the Army, Navy, crop dusting pilots, heavy equipment operators and auto racing drivers and is marketed by Life Enhancement Technologies, LLC. Further applications are under consideration.

  7. Feedback cooling of currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Sean

    1989-02-01

    Just as feedback can be used to correct errors in the output voltages of amplifiers, it can also be used to remove noise from the current through a resistor. Such a feedback amplifier behaves as a refrigerator cooling the electrons in a resistor connnected to it. This principle has been recognized since the 1940s but has been largely ignored because the cooling power available from such refrigerators is miniscule. It is pointed out here that the method might be practical for cooling the currents in the microscopic circuits that are typical of modern electrical engineering and recent studies in transport physics.

  8. Cooling of solar flares plasmas. 1: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.; Mariska, John T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the cooling of flare plasma are reexamined. By assuming that the cooling occurs in two separate phase where conduction and radiation, respectively, dominate, a simple analytic formula for the cooling time of a flare plasma is derived. Unlike earlier order-of-magnitude scalings, this result accounts for the effect of the evolution of the loop plasma parameters on the cooling time. When the conductive cooling leads to an 'evaporation' of chromospheric material, the cooling time scales L(exp 5/6)/p(exp 1/6), where the coronal phase (defined as the time maximum temperature). When the conductive cooling is static, the cooling time scales as L(exp 3/4)n(exp 1/4). In deriving these results, use was made of an important scaling law (T proportional to n(exp 2)) during the radiative cooling phase that was forst noted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations (Serio et al. 1991; Jakimiec et al. 1992). Our own simulations show that this result is restricted to approximately the radiative loss function of Rosner, Tucker, & Vaiana (1978). for different radiative loss functions, other scaling result, with T and n scaling almost linearly when the radiative loss falls off as T(exp -2). It is shown that these scaling laws are part of a class of analytic solutions developed by Antiocos (1980).

  9. Multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A multilayer composite material and method for evaporative cooling of a person employs an evaporative cooling liquid that changes phase from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The evaporative cooling liquid is absorbed into a superabsorbent material enclosed within the multilayer composite material. The multilayer composite material has a high percentage of the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix. The cooling effect can be sustained for an extended period of time because of the high percentage of phase change liquid that can be absorbed into the superabsorbent. Such a composite can be used for cooling febrile patients by evaporative cooling as the evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix changes from a liquid to a gaseous state to absorb thermal energy. The composite can be made with a perforated barrier material around the outside to regulate the evaporation rate of the phase change liquid. Alternatively, the composite can be made with an imperveous barrier material or semipermeable membrane on one side to prevent the liquid from contacting the person's skin. The evaporative cooling liquid in the matrix can be recharged by soaking the material in the liquid. The multilayer composite material can be fashioned into blankets, garments and other articles.

  10. A Demographic Analysis of the Impact of Property Tax Caps on Indiana School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirth, Marilyn A.; Lagoni, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana legislature passed and the governor signed into law House Enrolled Act No. 1001, now referred to as Public Law 146-2008, which capped Indiana school districts' ability to raise revenues from the local property tax without local voter approval. To phase in the impact of the law, the state provided school districts with…

  11. Directions for the '80s: Educational Master Plan. San Francisco Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan-Hall, Tyra L., Ed.

    Designed to assist staff in the San Francisco Community College District (SFCCD) in synthesizing the trends, events and issues that are likely to influence educational programs and services, this master plan assesses the district's internal and external environments and describes the SFCCD's two-phase planning process. Chapter 1 discusses the…

  12. The Development and Implementation of a District Computer Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzl, F. Neil

    The Development and Implementation of a District Computer Education Program conducted at Glasgow High School, Newark, Delaware, was designed to model full utilization of computer services in a public high school. The phases of the project included: (1) development of goals and objectives at the district level; (2) workshops for teacher training;…

  13. Progress Report: The Development of a School District Budget Planning System (SPLAN). A Technical Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratten, J. E.; And Others

    The design and initial trial phase of a project to develop a computer-based budget planning system for school districts are reported in this document. From a teletype at the district office linked to a computer at System Development Corporation, a user (administrator) can retrieve specific portions or summaries of a prestored description of his…

  14. A Model At-Risk Program for Large School Districts: A Two Year Collaborative Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkees-Wircenski, Michelle; Wircenski, Jerry L.

    1991-01-01

    A two-year collaborative effort between the Texas Education Agency, the University of North Texas, and the Garland Independent School District developed a model at-risk program for large school districts. The program's two phases were developing a core group of personnel and conducting train the trainer activities. (JOW)

  15. Computer Applications Planning. A Guide to Planning and Implementing a District-Wide Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mojkowski, Charles

    Designed to help school districts move from exploring the use of computers in the classroom to the comprehensive planning and development of computer education programs, this guide is organized around five steps essential to the process of developing a district program. Phase 1 includes the following preliminary activities involved in planning for…

  16. Implementation of Stochastic Cooling Hardware at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The invention of Stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer made possible the increase in phase space density of charged particle beams. In particular, this feedback technique allowed the development of proton antiproton colliders at both CERN and Fermilab. This paper describes the development of hardware systems necessary to cool antiprotons at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider complex.

  17. Implementation of stochastic cooling hardware at Fermilab's Tevatron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2011-08-01

    The invention of Stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer made possible the increase in phase space density of charged particle beams. In particular, this feedback technique allowed the development of proton antiproton colliders at both CERN and Fermilab. This paper describes the development of hardware systems necessary to cool antiprotons at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider complex.

  18. Stimulated radiative laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muys, P.

    2008-04-01

    Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to the radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

  19. Sisyphus cooling of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul; Kim, Geena; Joshi, Trinity; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Tiarks, Daniel; Müller, Holger

    2014-02-01

    Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a wide range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 μK, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single-photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency-locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali-metal species.

  20. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  1. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  2. Too cool to work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, Xavier; Defay, Emmanuel; Heine, Volker; Mathur, Neil D.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetocaloric and electrocaloric effects are driven by doing work, but this work has barely been explored, even though these caloric effects are being exploited in a growing number of prototype cooling devices.

  3. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  4. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  5. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  6. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  7. Liquid cooled helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, William (Inventor); Williams, Bill A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Liquid cooled helmet comprising a cap of flexible material adapted to fit the head of a person, cooling panels mounted inside the cap forming passageways for carrying a liquid coolant, the panels being positioned to engage the cranium and neck of a person wearing the helmet, inlet and outlet lines communicating with the passageways, and releasable straps for securing the helmet about the neck of the wearer.

  8. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  9. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Seiber, Larry E.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  10. Suburban District Leadership Does Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Eustace; France, Roxanne Garcia

    2015-01-01

    The increased demand for educational reform and accountability has resulted in a renewed focus on the relationship between building leaders and district leaders, particularly on how district leaders can support principals to ensure the academic success of students. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and Race to the Top (RttT) legislations…

  11. Internal Auditing for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles

    This book provides guidelines for conducting internal audits of school districts. The first five chapters provide an overview of internal auditing and describe techniques that can be used to improve or implement internal audits in school districts. They offer information on the definition and benefits of internal auditing, the role of internal…

  12. Districts' Efficiency Evaluated in Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    A report from a progressive think tank measuring the "educational productivity" of more than 9,000 school districts around the country says that districts getting the most for their money tend to spend more on teachers and less on administration, partner with their communities to save money, and have school boards willing to make potentially…

  13. Presumptions against School District Secession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Dale

    2009-01-01

    While political philosophers have paid a great deal of attention to providing a theory of secession for cases of nations breaking away from nation-states, little has been said about perhaps the most common type of secession--school district secession. I argue that while there is no principled prohibition against school district secession, there…

  14. Characteristics of District Evaluation Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGranahan, Pamela

    This study provides information about the actual functions and activities of school district evaluation units by examining an integral product of the units. This product, an evaluation report, was examined from a nationwide sample of district evaluation organizations (N=116). Reports were checked for the presence of particular evaluation report…

  15. Redesigning the District Operating System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodas, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we look at the inner workings of a school district through the lens of the "district operating system (DOS)," a set of interlocking mutually-reinforcing modules that includes functions like procurement, contracting, data and IT policy, the general counsel's office, human resources, and the systems for employee and family…

  16. Electoral Competition in Heterogeneous Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callander, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers a model of elections in which parties compete simultaneously for multiple districts. I show that if districts are heterogeneous, then a unique two-party equilibrium exists under plurality rule in which further entry is deterred. The equilibrium requires that parties choose noncentrist policy platforms and not converge to the…

  17. Metallographic Cooling Rate of IVA Irons Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.

    2005-01-01

    There is long standing problem reconciling the chemical evidence that the IVA iron meteorites formed in a core with the diverse cooling rates reported by several researchers. This large inferred range of cooling rates suggests that the IVA irons were distributed at different depths in a parent body with a complex structure when the Widmanstatten pattern formed. On the other hand, some researchers argued that the diverse cooling rates in group IVA result from inaccurate model parameters such as phase diagram, interdiffusion coefficients, and kamacite nucleation and growth mechanisms. In addition, the measured cooling rates may not apply for the same cooling temperature ranges, and the variation in the crystallographic orientations of the Widmanstatten plates on the analysis surface may result in inaccurate measurements of widths needed for the computer simulation models. We have revaluated the major parameters in computer model developed by Hopfe and Goldstein and measured cooling rates for the IVA irons. Such data are useful in evaluating whether these meteorites were part of a single core of a parent body during the formation of the Widmanstatten pattern.

  18. SUMMARY OF BEAM COOLING AND INTRABEAM SCATTERING.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; MESHKOV, I.N.; WEI, J.

    2006-05-26

    For heavy-particle beams in storage rings where there is no significant synchrotron radiation damping, beam cooling is an essential tool in obtaining high phase-space density high brightness beams. Advances in various types of cooling such as electron, stochastic, laser and muon cooling are covered in dedicated Conferences. In this series of Workshops (HB2002-06), discussions are aimed only at a few specific subjects which are crucial for future projects. The discussion topics in our session closely followed those discussed during the HB2004 workshop [1]. Specifically, we concentrated on the topics of electron cooling and intrabeam scattering, motivated by the design of the future high-energy coolers [2,3,4]. These cooling projects at high-energy require accurate numerical modeling and experimental verification. A variety of tasks were put together at HB2004 [1]. In our working group we discussed a progress in addressing these tasks. We had 10 presentations [5]-[14] (with additional presentations in the joint sessions) which followed by dedicated discussions. Our main topics of discussions: intrabeam scattering (IBS), electron cooling, and beam stability are summarized.

  19. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  20. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  1. Cool Flame Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  2. New Jersey's Plan to Intervene in Deficient School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of County and Regional Services.

    Implemented in January 1984, the two-part New Jersey local assistance plan calls for state intervention and possible takeover in districts that are unable, after going through the Level I and Level II monitoring and correction processes, to meet state certification standards. The first phase of the intervention plan, a Level III monitoring…

  3. Dilemmas Presented by State Agency Takeovers of Local School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffy, Betty E.

    During the 1988-89 school year, two local school districts were placed into "Phase III" of the Kentucky Educational Improvement Act (1978), a category of state receivership in which much local decision-making power was transferred to Kentucky Department of Education officials. When state education department intervention occurs, major issues arise…

  4. Small School District Saves Money with Energy Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kussmaul, Donald L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes how the small Tiskilwa (Illinois) school district used a United States Department of Energy grant to replace and block windows and insulate the attic in the elementary school. Describes savings in dollars and energy resulting from the energy audit and technical assistance phases of the project. (SB)

  5. District Computer Concerns: Checklist for Monitoring Instructional Use of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Merilyn

    Designed to assist those involved with planning, organizing, and implementing computer use in schools, this checklist can be applied to: (1) assess the present state of instructional computer use in the district; (2) assist with the development of plans or guidelines for computer use; (3) support a start-up phase; and (4) monitor the…

  6. Solar heating and cooling of buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, R. D.; Davis, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Solar energy has been used for space heating and water heating for many years. A less common application, although technically feasible, is solar cooling. This paper describes the techniques employed in the heating and cooling of buildings, and in water heating. The potential for solar energy to displace conventional energy sources is discussed. Water heating for new apartments appears to have some features which could make it a place to begin the resurgence of solar energy applications in the United States. A project to investigate apartment solar water heating, currently in the pilot plant construction phase, is described.

  7. Electron cooling rates characterization at Fermilab's Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A 0.1 A, 4.3 MeV DC electron beam is routinely used to cool 8 GeV antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler storage ring [1]. The primary function of the electron cooler is to increase the longitudinal phase-space density of the antiprotons for storing and preparing high-density bunches for injection into the Tevatron. The longitudinal cooling rate is found to significantly depend on the transverse emittance of the antiproton beam. The paper presents the measured rates and compares them with calculations based on drag force data.

  8. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  9. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

    2009-02-10

    Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has cross-flow and counter-current MDCT's consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to simulate the cooling tower performance for the counter-current cooling tower and to conduct a parametric study under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and performed the benchmarking analysis against the integral measurement results to accomplish the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of parametric calculations was performed to investigate the impact of wind speeds and ambient conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was also benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS integral test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be published here.

  10. Turbine modifications for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Sawhney, H.S.; Oliker, I.; Silaghy, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the technical and economic feasibilities of retrofitting existing turbine-generators and replacing existing turbine-generators with specially designed district heating units. Topics considered include turbine retrofit options (approach and design criteria, district heating equipment), new district heating turbines (approach and design criteria, turbine selection), and heat generation costs. The conclusions of the analysis include: no technical barrier was discovered for converting the Potomac River Power Plant to a cogeneration facility, additional equipment required for the district heating operation is of conventional design, the existing steam turbines and associated system components can be retrofitted for district heating operation, the modified units retain the flexibility of producing 100% electric power output when the district heating load is disconnected, the district heating system uses indirect heating of water by extraction steam (the purity of which is not degraded), about three and a half times more heat can be extracted from units designed specifically for cogeneration than from modified units, and the described methodology can be used for the assessment of retrofitting existing units to cogeneration operation for power plants located close to heat load centers.

  11. Research Proposal for the Design and Engineering Phase of a Solar Heating and Cooling System Experiment at the Warner Robins Public Library, Warner Robins, Georgia. Submitted to the United States Energy Research and Development Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Warren H.; And Others

    A number of reasons are advanced to include a solar heating and cooling experiment in a library building. The unique aspects of the experiment are to be a seasonally adjustable collector tilt and testing of a new generation of absorption air conditioners. After a brief description of the proposed experiment, the proposal contains forms filed by…

  12. Design and development of LH2 cooled rolling element radial bearings for the NERVA engine turbopump. Volume 3: Phase 2: Tests on build-ups 16, 17, and 18 at NRDS, Jackass Flats, Nevada, December 1971 - March 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accinelli, J. B.; Koch, D. A.; Reuter, F.

    1972-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrogen to cool the rolling element radial bearings in the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles is discussed. The fifteen hour service life goal was obtained during the tests. The increase in bearing life was also considered to be produced by: (1) improvements in bearing material, (2) bearing retainer configuration and manufacturing changes, and (3) better control of operating parameters.

  13. Spray Cooling Modeling: Droplet Sub-Cooling Effect on Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Joseph E.; Selvam, R. P.; Silk, Eric A.

    2008-01-21

    Spray cooling has become increasingly popular as a thermal management solution for high-heat flux (>100 W/cm{sup 2}) applications such as laser diodes and radars. Research has shown that using sub-cooled liquid can increase the heat flux from the hot surface. The objective of this study was to use a multi-phase numerical model to simulate the effect of a sub-cooled droplet impacting a growing vapor bubble in a thin (<100 {mu}m) liquid film. The two-phase model captured the liquid-vapor interface using the level set method. The effects of surface tension, viscosity, gravity and phase change were accounted for by using a modification to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, which were solved using the finite difference method. The computed liquid-vapor interface and temperature distributions were visualized for better understanding of the heat removal process. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms of sub-cooled droplet impact on a growing vapor bubble, various initial droplet temperatures were modeled (from 20 deg. C below saturation temperature to saturation temperature). This may provide insights into how to improve the heat transfer in future spray cooling systems.

  14. Projection of school district enrollments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dillen, S. L.; Friedman, L. D.; Cheng, W. K.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives were to provide a better statistical basis for enrollment projections, to attempt to model the school district's enrollment, and to produce a single estimate of enrollment for each grade, grade group, and ethnic group, and for the total by year. Efforts were also made to provide error estimates for the projections, to design a simple, user-oriented computer program for use by school district administrators, and to work with real data from local school districts and aid them in making projections on an experimental basis. The study at Jet Propulsion Laboratory was concerned with projection methodology and production of a generally usable computer program.

  15. Cool-Water Coal Gasification Program: Environmental Monitoring Plan Commissioning Phase, final report. Volume 1. Technical report. Volume 2. Appendix A - HRSG (heat recovery steam generator) stack-testing results. Volume 3. Appendix B - analytical results. Appendix C - sampling analytical methods. Appendix D - ambient air monitoring data. Volume 4. Appendix E - quality assurance/quality control. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-11

    The Cool Water Coal Gasification Program (CWCGP) began electrical production under the terms of the Price Guarantee Commitment with the U.S. Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) on June 24, 1984. An Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) approved by the SFC was initiated at that time. The Commissioning Phase, the first of four phases of the EMP, was conducted from June 24 through December 31, 1984. Sampling and analysis of compliance and supplemental parameters produced over 1100 samples and 8500 data points from 17 aqueous, ten gaseous, and four solid sampling streams. The technical report includes a description of the CWCGP process as it was operated during the Commissioning Phase, a summary of process changes that occurred during the period, their effect on the environmental monitoring effort, and details of pollution-control testing (Appendix A), data calculations (Appendix B), analytical methods and results (Appendix C), ambient-air-monitoring data (Appendix D), and quality-assurance/quality-control program results (Appendix E).

  16. Cooling in a compound bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Hu, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Electron cooling in the Fermilab Recycler ring is found to create correlation between longitudinal and transverse tails of the antiproton distribution. By separating the core of the beam from the tail and cooling the tail using 'gated' stochastic cooling while applying electron cooling on the entire beam, one may be able to significantly increase the overall cooling rate. In this paper, we describe the procedure and first experimental results.

  17. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  18. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.CAMERON,P.WEI,J.

    2003-05-12

    Emittance growth due to Intra-Beam Scattering significantly reduces the heavy ion luminosity lifetime in RHIC. Stochastic cooling of the stored beam could improve things considerably by counteracting IBS and preventing particles from escaping the rf bucket [1]. High frequency bunched-beam stochastic cooling is especially challenging but observations of Schottky signals in the 4-8 GHz band indicate that conditions are favorable in RHIC [2]. We report here on measurements of the longitudinal beam transfer function carried out with a pickup kicker pair on loan from FNAL TEVATRON. Results imply that for ions a coasting beam description is applicable and we outline some general features of a viable momentum cooling system for RHIC.

  19. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  20. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  1. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  2. Mechano-caloric cooling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Luna, Jack; Abbassi, P.; Carandang, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The mechano-caloric effect is potentially useful in the He II temperature range. Aside from demonstration work, little quantification effort appears to have been known since other refrigeration possibilities have been available for some time. Successful He II use-related system examples are as follows: in space, the utilization of the latent heat of vaporization has been quite successful in vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) in conjunction with thermomechanical force application in plugs. In magnet cooling systems, the possibility of using the mechano-caloric cooling effect in conjunction with thermo-mechanical circulation pump schemes, has been assessed (but not quantified yet to the extent desirable). A third example is quoted in conjunction with superfluid wind tunnel studies and liquid helium tow tank for surface vessels respectively. In all of these (partially future) R and D areas, the question of refrigerator effectiveness using the mechano-caloric effect appears to be relevant, possibly in conjunction with questions of reliability and simplicity. The present work is concerned with quantification of phenomena including simplified thermodynamic cycle calculations.

  3. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-10-01

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and an uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  4. Simulation of Bichromatic Force Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Xiang; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2016-05-01

    Laser cooling without spontaneous emission as implemented by the bichromatic force (BF) remains a controversial topic. We have done a numerical simulation of the BF on He using the 23 S <--> 33 P transition at λ = 389 nm in order to support the interpretation of previously reported measurements. Our experiments and the simulation reported here use a time scale comparable to the excited state lifetime so that spontaneous emission cannot contribute significantly. The average velocity change is 30 - 40 times larger than the recoil velocity but the measurements of both phase space and velocity space compression are limited by the longitudinal velocity spread of the atomic beam to ~ 2. The simulation clearly shows this spreading. The code passed several preliminary tests using single-frequency traveling and standing waves, and then it was run with the appropriate bichromatic light fields. Its output agrees very well with the measurements and, most importantly, shows that significant laser cooling is indeed possible on a time scale comparable to that of a single absorption-spontaneous cycle. Supported by ONR.

  5. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A.

    1995-12-31

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  6. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2004-01-01

    Many papers have been published that further elucidate the structure of coronas in cool stars as determined from EUVE, HST, FUSE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations. In addition we are exploring the effects of coronas on the He I 1083081 transition that is observed in the infrared. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Ground-based magnetic Doppler imaging of cool stars suggests that active stars have active regions located at high latitudes on their surface. We have performed similar imaging in X-ray to locate the sites of enhanced activity using Chandra spectra. Chandra HETG observations of the bright eclipsing contact binary 44i Boo and Chandra LETG observations for the eclipsing binary VW Cep show X-ray line profiles that are Doppler-shifted by orbital motion. After careful analysis of the spectrum of each binary, a composite line-profile is constructed by adding the individual spectral lines. This high signal-to-noise ratio composite line-profile yields orbital velocities for these binaries that are accurate to 30 km/sec and allows their orbital motion to be studied at higher time resolutions. In conjunction with X-ray lightcurves, the phase-binned composite line-profiles constrain coronal structures to be small and located at high latitudes. These observations and techniques show the power of the Doppler Imaging Technique applied to X-ray line emission.

  7. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  8. Cyclic cooling algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Florian; Mahler, Guenter; Michel, Mathias

    2007-09-15

    We introduce a scheme to perform the cooling algorithm, first presented by Boykin et al. in 2002, for an arbitrary number of times on the same set of qbits. We achieve this goal by adding an additional SWAP gate and a bath contact to the algorithm. This way one qbit may repeatedly be cooled without adding additional qbits to the system. By using a product Liouville space to model the bath contact we calculate the density matrix of the system after a given number of applications of the algorithm.

  9. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  10. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  11. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  12. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  13. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  14. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  15. 7 CFR 906.20 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.20 Districts. For the purpose of... are hereby initially established: District No. 1: The county of Cameron in the State of Texas; District No. 2: The county of Hidalgo in the State of Texas; and District No. 3 The county of Willacy...

  16. 7 CFR 906.20 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Committee § 906.20 Districts. For the purpose of... are hereby initially established: District No. 1: The county of Cameron in the State of Texas; District No. 2: The county of Hidalgo in the State of Texas; and District No. 3 The county of Willacy...

  17. High power density spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Donald E.; Pais, Martin R.; Chow, Louis C.

    1989-07-01

    The research reported describes experimental and theoretical investigations of high power density evaporative spray cooling. Preliminary experiments demonstrating heat fluxes greater than 1,000 W/sq cm were conducted. Extensive laser phase Doppler measurements of spray characteristics were also taken. These measurements provided valuable insight into the heat transfer process. An in-depth analysis was conducted to determine the mechanisms responsible for critical heat flux. Theoretical modeling was also conducted to determine the most desirable heat transfer conditions. After analysis of these results, an improved experimental apparatus was designed and fabricated. The new apparatus provided greater experimental control and improve accuracy. New tests were conducted in which the critical heat flux was increased, and the heat transfer efficiency was greatly improved. These results are compared to those of previous researchers, and indicated substantial improvement.

  18. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valéry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2015-12-01

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust.

  19. Cooling Atomic Gases With Disorder.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Yang, Shuxiang; Rousseau, Valéry; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Hulet, Randall G; Scalettar, Richard T

    2015-12-11

    Cold atomic gases have proven capable of emulating a number of fundamental condensed matter phenomena including Bose-Einstein condensation, the Mott transition, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov pairing, and the quantum Hall effect. Cooling to a low enough temperature to explore magnetism and exotic superconductivity in lattices of fermionic atoms remains a challenge. We propose a method to produce a low temperature gas by preparing it in a disordered potential and following a constant entropy trajectory to deliver the gas into a nondisordered state which exhibits these incompletely understood phases. We show, using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, that we can approach the Néel temperature of the three-dimensional Hubbard model for experimentally achievable parameters. Recent experimental estimates suggest the randomness required lies in a regime where atom transport and equilibration are still robust. PMID:26705614

  20. Solar-powered cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2015-07-28

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system that uses nanostructural materials such as aerogels, zeolites, and sol gels as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material while the material is at a relatively low temperature, perhaps at night. During daylight hours, when the nanostructural materials is heated by the sun, the refrigerant are thermally desorbed from the surface of the aerogel, thereby creating a pressurized gas phase in the vessel that contains the aerogel. This solar-driven pressurization forces the heated gaseous refrigerant through a condenser, followed by an expansion valve. In the condenser, heat is removed from the refrigerant, first by circulating air or water. Eventually, the cooled gaseous refrigerant expands isenthalpically through a throttle valve into an evaporator, in a fashion similar to that in more conventional vapor recompression systems.

  1. Boise geothermal district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the Boise geothermal district heating project from preliminary feasibility studies completed in 1979 to a fully operational system by 1983. The report includes information about the two local governments that participated in the project - the City of Boise, Idaho and the Boise Warm Springs Water District. It also discusses the federal funding sources; the financial studies; the feasibility studies conducted; the general system planning and design; design of detailed system components; the legal issues involved in production; geological analysis of the resource area; distribution and disposal; the program to market system services; and the methods of retrofitting buildings to use geothermal hot water for space heating. Technically this report describes the Boise City district heating system based on 170/sup 0/F water, a 4000 gpm production system, a 41,000 foot pipeline system, and system economies. Comparable data are also provided for the Boise Warm Springs Water District. 62 figs., 31 tabs.

  2. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section 1.01-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant redelegates to the District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District, the authority in 46 U.S.C. 3302(i)(1) to issue permits to certain...

  3. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section 1.01-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant redelegates to the District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District, the authority in 46 U.S.C. 3302(i)(1) to issue permits to certain...

  4. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section 1.01-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant redelegates to the District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District, the authority in 46 U.S.C. 3302(i)(1) to issue permits to certain...

  5. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section 1.01-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant redelegates to the District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District, the authority in 46 U.S.C. 3302(i)(1) to issue permits to certain...

  6. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section 1.01-50 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant redelegates to the District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District, the authority in 46 U.S.C. 3302(i)(1) to issue permits to certain...

  7. 77 FR 16828 - Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Dispute Resolution Process...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of... relicensing proceeding for the Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project No. 2299-075.\\1\\ Turlock Irrigation District and the Modesto Irrigation District (collectively, the Districts), are co-licensees for the Don...

  8. 76 FR 20971 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Intent To File License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of..., 2011. d. Submitted By: Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District. e. Name of Project... Regulatory Affairs, Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, California 95381, 209-883-8241...

  9. 77 FR 4291 - Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed... any Order issuing a license. Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District, as the..., Turlock Irrigation District, P.O. Box 949, Turlock, CA 95381. Greg Dias or Representative,...

  10. Comment on the Word 'Cooling' as it is Used in Beam Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2006-03-20

    Beam physicists use the word 'cooling' differently than it is used by the general public or even by other physicists. It is recommended that we no longer use this term, but replace it with some other term such as: 'Phase Density Cooling' (PDF) or 'damping', or alternatively 'Liouville Cooling', which would make our field more easily understood by outsiders.

  11. Interaction-induced adiabatic cooling for antiferromagnetism in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dare, A.-M.; Raymond, L.; Albinet, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2007-08-01

    In the experimental context of cold-fermion optical lattices, we discuss the possibilities to approach the pseudogap or ordered phases by manipulating the scattering length or the strength of the laser-induced lattice potential. Using the two-particle self-consistent approach, as well as quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we provide isentropic curves for the two- and three-dimensional Hubbard models at half-filling. These quantitative results are important for practical attempts to reach the ordered antiferromagnetic phase in experiments on optical lattices of two-component fermions. We find that adiabatically turning on the interaction in two dimensions to cool the system is not very effective. In three dimensions, adiabatic cooling to the antiferromagnetic phase can be achieved in such a manner, although the cooling efficiency is not as high as initially suggested by dynamical mean-field theory. Adiabatic cooling by turning off the repulsion beginning at strong coupling is possible in certain cases.

  12. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  13. Emergency cooling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Cheung, Y.K.

    1994-01-04

    An improved emergency cooling system and method are disclosed that may be adapted for incorporation into or use with a nuclear BWR wherein a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) containing a nuclear core and a heat transfer fluid for circulation in a heat transfer relationship with the core is housed within an annular sealed drywell and is fluid communicable therewith for passage thereto in an emergency situation the heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and any noncondensibles present in the RPV, an annular sealed wetwell houses the drywell, and a pressure suppression pool of liquid is disposed in the wetwell and is connected to the drywell by submerged vents. The improved emergency cooling system and method has a containment condenser for receiving condensible heat transfer fluid in a gaseous phase and noncondensibles for condensing at least a portion of the heat transfer fluid. The containment condenser has an inlet in fluid communication with the drywell for receiving heat transfer fluid and noncondensibles, a first outlet in fluid communication with the RPV for the return to the RPV of the condensed portion of the heat transfer fluid and a second outlet in fluid communication with the drywell for passage of the noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles. The noncondensed balance of the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles passed to the drywell from the containment condenser are mixed with the heat transfer fluid and the noncondensibles from the RPV for passage into the containment condenser. A water pool is provided in heat transfer relationship with the containment condenser and is thermally communicable in an emergency situation with an environment outside of the drywell and the wetwell for conducting heat transferred from the containment condenser away from the wetwell and the drywell. 5 figs.

  14. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  15. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, Kent Goran; McLaurin, Leroy Dixon; Bertsch, Oran Leroy; Lowe, Perry Eugene

    1998-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  16. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  17. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; Yu.I. Eidelman; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; D.M. Gassner; H. Hahn; M. Harrison; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; A.K. Jain; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; N. Malitsky; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; K.A.M. Mirabella; C. Montag; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; G. Parzen; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; D. Trbojevic; G. Wang; J. Wei; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; D.T. Abell; D.L. Bruhwiler; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; A.V. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; J.R. Delayen; Y.S. Derbenev; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; L. Merminga; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; J.S. Sekutowicz

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/.

  18. Guide to Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb sunlight, making them warm in the sun and increasing the need for air conditioning. White or special "cool color" roofs absorb less sunlight, stay cooler in the sun and transmit less heat into the building.

  19. Deep mine cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Conan, J.

    1984-11-06

    A deep mine cooling system comprising a compressor supplied with air and rotatively driven by a motor and an expansion turbine supplied with compressed air from said compressor and driving an actuating unit, wherein the compressed air, after leaving the compressor but prior to reaching the expansion turbine, passes through a steam generator whose output provides the energy required to operate an absorption refrigeration machine used to cool utility water for mining, said compressed air on leaving the steam generator going to a first heat exchanger in which it yields calories to a water circuit comprising a second heat exchanger, said second heat exchanger giving off the calories absorbed by the water in the first heat exchanger to the air fed by the second heat exchanger to a drying cell that is regenerated by said air from the second heat exchanger, said drying cell being part of a set of two cells working in alternation, the other cell in the set receiving the compressed air from the first heat exchanger, such that the compressed air is fed to said expansion turbine after leaving said drying unit, and wherein the air exhausted from said expansion turbine is sent to a third heat exchanger after which it is distributed according to the needs of the mine, said third exchanger being traversed by the water collected in the mine, cooled in said exchanger and circulated upon leaving said exchanger to meet the cool water requirements of the mine.

  20. Elementary stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  1. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  2. COOLING TOWER PLUME MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of recently reported cooling tower plume models yields none that is universally accepted. The entrainment and drag mechanisms and the effect of moisture on the plume trajectory are phenomena which are treated differently by various investigators. In order to better under...

  3. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  4. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  5. Laser cooling of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2010-08-01

    Laser cooling of solids, sometimes also known as optical refrigeration, is a fast developing area of optical science, investigating the interaction of light with condensed matter. Apart from being of fundamental scientific interest, this topic addresses a very important practical issue: design and construction of laser pumped solid-state cryocoolers, which are compact, free from mechanical vibrations, moving parts, fluids and can cause only low electromagnetic interference in the cooled area. The optical cryocooler has a broad area of applications such as in the development of magnetometers for geophysical sensors, in biomedical sensing and can be beneficial for satellite instrumentations and small sensors, where compactness and the lack of vibrations are very important. Simply, a laser cooler works on the conversion of low energy pump photons into high-energy anti-Stokes fluorescence photons by extracting some of the phonons (heat energy) in a material. That is, the process of laser cooling of solids is based on anti-Stokes fluorescence also known as luminescence upconversion, when light quanta in the red tail of the absorption spectrum are absorbed from a pump laser, and blue-shifted photons are spontaneously emitted. The extra energy extracted from the solid-state lattice in the form of the phonons is the quanta of vibrational energy which generates heat. The idea to cool solids with anti-Stokes fluorescence was proposed in 1929 by Peter Pringsheim and first demonstrated experimentally by Epstein's research team in 1995. In 1999, Steven Bowman proposed to use the optical refrigeration by anti-Stokes fluorescence within the laser medium to balance the heat generated by the Stokes shifted stimulated emission in a high-power solid-state bulk laser. Such a laser without internal heating named radiation-balanced or athermal laser was experimentally demonstrated for the first time in 2002. At the present time laser cooling of solids can be largely divided into three

  6. Electron Cooling Study for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhang; Douglas, David R.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  7. Absorption heat pump in heating and cooling systems of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, I.

    This report focuses on the operation and applicability of absorption heat pumps (AHP) in building heating and cooling systems. Examples are presented on heating systems of residential buildings and a heating/cooling system of an office building. Despite the limitations of present AHP technology the examples assume AHPs which produce heat at an appropriate temperature level for each application. According to the calculations the primary energy saving potential of AHPs in building specific heat production is 20 to 40 percent. For AHPs coupled with district heating systems the primary energy saving potential can not be unambiguously defined because it is influenced by the production form of district heat, the influence of district heat demand on power generation etc. For the time being economical aspects limit the application potential of AHPs. The profitability of AHP investments is quite poor because of present energy prices, the price ratio of different energy forms and the high investment cost of AHP-systems. The environmental impact of AHPs depend on the fuel used in the generator. Using fuel oil or gas will decrease sulphur and particle emissions but might increase the emissions of NO(x) and hydrocarbons because of the smaller size of combustion units. CFC-emissions will be decreased because AHPs apply alternative refrigerants.

  8. Laser-Cooling-Assisted Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, cotrapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular-dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. This technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  9. Sympathetic cooling of {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect

    van Abeelen, F.A.; Verhaar, B.J.; Moerdijk, A.J.

    1997-06-01

    We use recently measured cold photoassociation and two-photon data to extract the singlet and triplet accumulated radial phases of interacting ground-state lithium atoms. Using the resulting values we predict scattering lengths, Feshbach resonances, and exchange decay rates for cold collisions between {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li atoms that are of interest for the possibility of sympathetic cooling of {sup 6}Li and for the coexistence of the bosonic and fermionic quantum-degenerate phases of {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li. In addition, we calculate scattering lengths and exchange decay rates for cold collisions between identical lithium isotopes in different hyperfine states. These quantities are used to examine the possibilities of coexisting {sup 7}Li Bose condensates and of evaporatively cooling coexisting {sup 6}Li subsystems. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Physiologic and Functional Responses of MS Patients to Body Cooling Using Commercially Available Cooling Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Lee, Hank C.; Luna, Bernadette; Webbon, Bruce W.; Mead, Susan C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Personal cooling systems are widely used in industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. Increasingly they are also used by heat sensitive multiple sclerosis (HSMS) patients to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life. There are a variety of cooling systems commercially available to the MS community. However, little information is available regarding the comparative physiological changes produced by routine operation of these various systems. The objective of this study was to document and compare the patient response to two passive cooling vests and one active cooling garment. The Life Enhancement Technology, Inc. (LET) lightweight active cooling vest with cap, the MicroClimate Systems (MCS) Change of Phase garment, and the Steele Vest were each used to cool 13 male and 13 female MS subjects (31 to 67 yr.) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approximately 22 C), were tested with one of the cooling garments. Oral, fight and left ear temperatures were logged manually every 5 min. An-n, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; and respiration were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. Each subject was given a series of subjective and objective evaluation tests before and after cooling. The LET and Steele vests test groups had similar, significant (P less than 0.01) cooling effects on oral and ear canal temperature, which decreased approximately 0.4 C, and 0.3 C, respectively. Core temperature increased (N.S.) with all three vests during cooling. The LET vest produced the coldest (P less than 0.01) skin temperature. Overall, the LET vest provided the most improvement on subjective and objective performance measures. These results show that the garment configurations tested do not elicit a similar thermal response in all MS patients. Cooling with the LET active garment configuration resulted in the lowest body temperatures for the MS subjects; cooling with

  11. 78 FR 3892 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status On January 9, 2013, the Modesto Irrigation District (Modesto) filed a motion...

  12. Development of Technologies on Innovative Simplified Nuclear Power Plant Using High-Efficiency Steam Injectors (10) Application to a Small District-Heating Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tadashi Narabayashi; Yoichiro Shimadu; Toshiiro Murase; Masatoshi Nagai; Michitsugu Mori; Shuichi Ohmori

    2006-07-01

    A steam injector (SI) is a simple, compact and passive pump and also acts as a high-performance direct-contact compact heater. This provides SI with capability to use as a passive ECCS pump and also as a direct-contact feedwater heater that heats up feedwater by using extracted steam from the turbine. In order to develop a high reliability passive ECCS pump and a compact feedwater heater, it is necessary to quantify the characteristics between physical properties of the flow field. We carried out experiments to observe the internal behavior of the water jet as well as measure the velocity of steam jet using a laser Doppler velocimetry. Its performance depends on the phenomena of steam condensation onto the water jet surface and heat transfer in the water jet due to turbulence on to the phase-interface. The analysis was also conducted by using a CFD code with the separate two-phase flow models. With regard to the simplified feed-water system, size of four-stage SI system is almost the same as the model SI that had done the steam and water test that pressures were same as that of current ABWR. The authors also conducted the hot water supply system test in the snow for a district heating. With regard to the SI core cooling system, the performance tests results showed that the low-pressure SI core cooling system will decrease the PCT to almost the same as the saturation temperature of the steam pressure in a pressure vessel. As it is compact equipment, SI is expected to bring about great simplification and materials-saving effects, while its simple structure ensures high reliability of its operation, thereby greatly contributing to the simplification of the power plant for not only an ABWR power plant but also a small PWR/ BWR for district heating system. (authors)

  13. Cooling System Using Natural Circulation for Air Conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Takashi; Seshimo, Yu

    In this paper, Cooling systems with natural circulation loop of refrigerants are reviewed. The cooling system can largely reduce energy consumption of a cooling system for the telecommunication base site. The cooling system consists of two refrigeration units; vapor compression refrigeration unit and sub-cooling unit with a natural-circulation loop. The experiments and calculations were carried out to evaluate the cycle performance of natural circulation loop with HFCs and CO2. The experimental results showed that the cooling capacity of R410A is approximately 30% larger than that of R407C at the temperature difference of 20K and the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately 4-13% larger than that of R410A under the two-phase condition. On the other hand, the cooling capacity of CO2 was approximately 11% smaller than that of R410A under the supercritical condition. The cooling capacity took a maximum value at an amount of refrigerant and lineally increased as the temperature difference increases and the slightly increased as the height difference. The air intake temperature profile in the inlet of the heat exchangers makes the reverse circulation under the supercritical state and the driving head difference for the reverse circulation depends on the density change to temperature under the supercritical state. Also, a new fan control method to convert the reverse circulation into the normal circulation was reviewed.

  14. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2005-05-16

    Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

  15. Electron Cooling of Bunched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uesugi, T.; Noda, K.; Syresin, E.; Meshkov, I.; Shibuya, S.

    2006-03-20

    Experiments of electron cooling have been done with the HIMAC synchrotron in NIRS. Limitation on cooled beam-sizes in longitudianl and transverse spaces were measured. The effect of space-charge field and intra-beam scattering are investigated.

  16. Maintaining gas cooling equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, J.D.

    1997-05-01

    An often overlooked key to satisfactory operation and longevity of any mechanical device is proper operation and maintenance in accordance with the manufacturer`s written instructions. Absorption chillers, although they use a different technology than the more familiar vapor compression cycle to produce chilled water, operate successfully in a variety of applications if operated and maintained properly. Maintenance procedures may be more frequent than those required for vapor compression chillers, but they are also typically less complex. The goal of this article is to describe the basic operation of an absorption chiller to provide an understanding of the relatively simple tasks required to keep the machine operating at maximum efficiency for its design life and beyond. A good starting point is definitions. Gas cooling equipment is generally defined as alternative energy, non-electric cooling products. This includes absorption chillers, engine-drive chillers and packaged desiccant units, among others. Natural gas combustion drives the equipment.

  17. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  18. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  19. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  20. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  1. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  2. Stochastic cooling of bunched beams from fluctuation and kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical formalism for stochastic phase-space cooling of bunched beams in storage rings is developed on the dual basis of classical fluctuation theory and kinetic theory of many-body systems in phase-space. The physics is that of a collection of three-dimensional oscillators coupled via retarded nonconservative interactions determined by an electronic feedback loop. At the heart of the formulation is the existence of several disparate time-scales characterizing the cooling process. Both theoretical approaches describe the cooling process in the form of a Fokker-Planck transport equation in phase-space valid up to second order in the strength and first order in the auto-correlation of the cooling signal. With neglect of the collective correlations induced by the feedback loop, identical expressions are obtained in both cases for the coherent damping and Schottky noise diffusion coefficients. These are expressed in terms of Fourier coefficients in a harmonic decomposition in angle of the generalized nonconservative cooling force written in canonical action-angle variables of the particles in six-dimensional phase-space. Comparison of analytic results to a numerical simulation study with 90 pseudo-particles in a model cooling system is presented.

  3. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  4. Computing Cooling Flows in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J.

    1986-01-01

    Algorithm developed for calculating both quantity of compressor bleed flow required to cool turbine and resulting decrease in efficiency due to cooling air injected into gas stream. Program intended for use with axial-flow, air-breathing, jet-propulsion engines with variety of airfoil-cooling configurations. Algorithm results compared extremely well with figures given by major engine manufacturers for given bulk-metal temperatures and cooling configurations. Program written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  5. Cooled thin metal liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, George P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A first metal sheet (34) has openings (46) in registration with depressions (40) in a second contacting metal sheet (36). Each depression has a downstream wall (42) at an angle of 24.degree. from the plane of the sheets. A metering hole (56) in the depression amidst cooling air in a direction to first impinge against an overlaying portion (48) of the first plate, before it diffuses along the downstream wall.

  6. Cooling your home naturally

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

  7. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  8. Analysis of optical stochastic cooling including transverse effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Zege, A.V.

    1995-05-01

    The phase space area plays an important role in determining the performance of optical stochastic cooling. Specifically, the number of samples in the beam consists of three factors corresponding to three dimensions, the factor in each dimension being given by the ratio of the total phase space area in that dimension to the radiation wavelength.

  9. Project S'COOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Carolyn J.; Chambers, Lin H.

    1998-01-01

    The Students Clouds Observations On-Line or S'COOL project was piloted in 1997. It was created with the idea of using students to serve as one component of the validation for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument which was launched with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November, 1997. As part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise CERES is interested in the role clouds play in regulating our climate. Over thirty schools became involved in the initial thrust of the project. The CERES instrument detects the location of clouds and identifies their physical properties. S'COOL students coordinate their ground truth observations with the exact overpass of the satellite at their location. Their findings regarding cloud type, height, fraction and opacity as well as surface conditions are then reported to the NASA Langley Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data is then accessible to both the CERES team for validation and to schools for educational application via the Internet. By March of 1998 ninety-three schools, in nine countries had enrolled in the S'COOL project. Joining the United States participants were from schools in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The project is gradually becoming the global project envisioned by the project s creators. As students obtain the requested data useful for the scientists, it was hoped that students with guidance from their instructors would have opportunity and motivation to learn more about clouds and atmospheric science as well.

  10. Water-Cooled Optical Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menna, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    Water-cooled optical probe measures temperature of nearby radiating object. Intended primarily for use in silicon-growing furnace for measuring and controlling temperatures of silicon ribbon, meniscus, cartridge surfaces, heaters, or other parts. Cooling water and flushing gas cool fiber-optic probe and keep it clean. Fiber passes thermal radiation from observed surface to measuring instrument.

  11. Liquid metal cooling of synchrotron optics

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    The installation of insertion devices at existing synchrotron facilities around the world has stimulated the development of new ways to cool the optical elements in the associated x-ray beamlines. Argonne has been a leader in the development of liquid metal cooling for high heat load x-ray optics for the next generation of synchrotron facilities. The high thermal conductivity, high volume specific heat, low kinematic viscosity, and large working temperature range make liquid metals a very efficient heat transfer fluid. A wide range of liquid metals were considered in the initial phase of this work. The most promising liquid metal cooling fluid identified to date is liquid gallium, which appears to have all the desired properties and the fewest number of undesired features of the liquid metals examined. Besides the special features of liquid metals that make them good heat transfer fluids, the very low vapor pressure over a large working temperature range make liquid gallium an ideal cooling fluid for use in a high vacuum environment. A leak of the liquid gallium into the high vacuum and even into very high vacuum areas will not result in any detectable vapor pressure and may even improve the vacuum environment as the liquid gallium combines with any water vapor or oxygen present in the system. The practical use of a liquid metal for cooling silicon crystals and other high heat load applications depends on having a convenient and efficient delivery system. The requirements for a typical cooling system for a silicon crystal used in a monochromator are pumping speeds of 2 to 5 gpm (120 cc per sec to 600 cc per sec) at pressures up to 100 psi.

  12. Energy Sources and Systems Analysis: 40 South Lincoln Redevelopment District (Full Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the results of a case study to analyze district energy systems for their potential use in a project that involves redeveloping 270 units of existing public housing, along with other nearby sites. When complete, the redevelopment project will encompass more than 900 mixed-income residential units, commercial and retail properties, and open space. The analysis estimated the hourly heating, cooling, domestic hot water, and electric loads required by the community; investigated potential district system technologies to meet those needs; and researched available fuel sources to power such systems.

  13. Energy Sources and Systems Analysis: 40 South Lincoln Redevelopment District (Short Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the a brief overview of the results of a case study to analyze district energy systems for their potential use in a project that involves redeveloping 270 units of existing public housing, along with other nearby sites. When complete, the redevelopment project will encompass more than 900 mixed-income residential units, commercial and retail properties, and open space. The analysis estimated the hourly heating, cooling, domestic hot water, and electric loads required by the community; investigated potential district system technologies to meet those needs; and researched available fuel sources to power such systems. A full report of this case study is also available.

  14. Local cooling despite global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girihagama, Lakshika Nilmini Kumari

    How much warmer is the ocean surface than the atmosphere directly above it? Part 1 of the present study offers a means to quantify this temperature difference using a nonlinear one-dimensional global energy balance coupled ocean--atmosphere model ("Aqua Planet"). The significance of our model, which is of intermediate complexity, is its ability to obtain an analytical solution for the global average temperatures. Preliminary results show that, for the present climate, global mean ocean temperature is 291.1 K whereas surface atmospheric temperature is 287.4 K. Thus, the surface ocean is 3.7 K warmer than the atmosphere above it. Temporal perturbation of the global mean solution obtained for "Aqua Planet" showed a stable system. Oscillation amplitude of the atmospheric temperature anomaly is greater in magnitude to those found in the ocean. There is a phase shift (a lag in the ocean), which is caused by oceanic thermal inertia. Climate feedbacks due to selected climate parameters such as incoming radiation, cloud cover, and CO2 are discussed. Warming obtained with our model compares with Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) estimations. Application of our model to local regions illuminates the importance of evaporative cooling in determining derived air-sea temperature offsets, where an increase in the latter increases the systems overall sensitivity to evaporative cooling. In part 2, we wish to answer the fairly complicated question of whether global warming and an increased freshwater flux cause Northern Hemispheric warming or cooling. Starting from the assumption of the ocean as the primary source of variability in the Northern hemispheric ocean--atmosphere coupled system, we employed a simple non--linear one--dimensional coupled ocean--atmosphere model similar to the "Aqua Planet" model but with additional advective heat transports. The simplicity of this model allows us to analytically predict the evolution of many dynamical variables of interest

  15. Evaluation of thermal-storage concepts for solar cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Morehouse, J. H.; Choi, M. K.; White, N. M.; Scholten, W. B.

    1981-10-01

    Various configuration concepts for utilizing thermal energy storage to improve the thermal and economic performance of solar cooling systems for buildings were analyzed. The storge concepts evaluated provide short-term thermal storge via the bulk containment of water or salt hydrates. The evaluations were made for both residential-size cooling systems (3-ton) and small commercial-size cooling systems (25-ton). The residential analysis considers energy requirements for space heating, space cooling and water heating, while the commercial building analysis is based only on energy requirements for space cooling. The commercial building analysis considered a total of 10 different thermal storage/solar systems, 5 each for absorption and Rankine chiller concepts. The residential analysis considered 4 thermal storage/solar systems, all utilizing an absorption chiller. The trade-offs considered include: cold-side versus hot-side storage, single vs multiple stage storage, and phase-change vs sensible heat storage.

  16. Two outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in Bolton Health District

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, E.; O'Mahony, M.; Watson, J. M.; Lynch, D.; Joseph, C.; Quigley, C.; Aston, R.; Constable, G. N.; Farrand, R. J.; Maxwell, S.; Hutchinson, D. N.; Craske, J.; Lee, J. V.

    1990-01-01

    In 1988, there were two outbreaks of legionellosis in Bolton Health District. Altogether 37 cases of Legionnaires' disease and 23 cases of non-pneumonic legionellosis were identified. Twenty-five patients with Legionnaires' disease were associated with an engineering plant, 4 with Bolton town centre, and 8 with both the plant and town centre. Twenty-two people with non-pneumonic legionellosis were linked with the engineering plant and one with the plant and the town centre. A case-control study carried out among 37 employees with legionellosis and 109 control subjects at the plant showed that infection was associated with one of the 15 cooling towers on the site. Legionella pneumophila indistinguishable by serological and genetic typing methods was isolated from this cooling tower and from sputum samples from two patients. In the town centre, no one tower was linked with infection and L. pneumophila was not cultured from any of the nine towers identified. Control measures were implemented and to date there have been no further cases of legionellosis associated with Bolton Health District. PMID:2323354

  17. Congressional District Visits in August

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Fushcia

    2014-08-01

    In preparation for the U.S. congressional recess, AGU Public Affairs hosted an instructional webinar about meeting with legislators and their staff at their district offices. Congress is on recess, with most members back in their districts to reconnect with their constituents. The August recess is a great opportunity for AGU members to schedule meetings with their legislators to talk about the importance of their research and the value of science funding. In these meetings, members can initiate a connection with their senator or representative that will allow them to build a relationship as a valuable resource.

  18. State of the District [Los Angeles Community College District].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltai, Leslie

    Accomplishments made by the Los Angeles Community College District during its fifth year of independent operation are noted, and 10 projects to receive attention during the coming year are listed. The accomplishments are: (1) increasing and diversifying enrollment, (2) stabilizing and improving the college environment, (3) developing fiscal…

  19. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1999-04-14

    Radiative cooling is a natural and effective method of phase-space cooling for stored electron beams. In electron storage rings the average effects of synchrotron radiation from the bending magnets cause the beam emittances in all three degrees of freedom to damp towards equilibria, determined by the fluctuating nature of quantum emissions. In this paper, they show that the radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. In addition, they investigate methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. They propose a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to fast cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space-charge effects encountered in a medium-energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of ultra-low-emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  20. System and method for cooling a combustion gas charge

    DOEpatents

    Massey, Mary Cecelia; Boberg, Thomas Earl

    2010-05-25

    The present invention relates to a system and method for cooling a combustion gas charge prior. The combustion gas charge may include compressed intake air, exhaust gas, or a mixture thereof. An evaporator is provided that may then receive a relatively high temperature combustion gas charge and discharge at a relatively lower temperature. The evaporator may be configured to operate with refrigeration cycle components and/or to receive a fluid below atmospheric pressure as the phase-change cooling medium.

  1. RF system concepts for a muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Corlett, J.N.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1998-06-01

    The feasibility of muon colliders for high energy physics experiments has been under intensive study for the past few years and recent activity has focused on defining an R and D program that would answer the critical issues. An especially critical issue is developing practical means of cooling the phase space of the muons once they have been produced and captured in a solenoidal magnetic transport channel. Concepts for the rf accelerating cavities of a muon cooling experiment are discussed.

  2. Solar residential heating and cooling system development test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Melton, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system is described, which was installed in a simulated home at Marshall Space Flight Center. Performance data are provided for the checkout and initial operational phase for key subsystems and for the total system. Valuable information was obtained with regard to operation of a solar cooling system during the first summer of operation. Areas where improvements and modifications are required to optimize such a system are discussed.

  3. The cooling and condensation of flare coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    A model is investigated for the decay of flare heated coronal loops in which rapid radiative cooling at the loop base creates strong pressure gradients which, in turn, generate large (supersonic) downward flows. The coronal material cools and 'condenses' onto the flare chromosphere. The features which distinguish this model from previous models of flare cooling are: (1) most of the thermal energy of the coronal plasma may be lost by mass motion rather than by conduction or coronal radiation; (2) flare loops are not isobaric during their decay phase, and large downward velocities are present near the footpoints; (3) the differential emission measure q has a strong temperature dependence.

  4. Legionella in cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Witherell, L E; Novick, L F; Stone, K M; Duncan, R W; Orciari, L A; Kappel, S J; Jillson, D A

    1986-01-01

    Legionellosis (Legionnaires' disease and Pontiac fever) outbreaks have been associated with aerosols ejected from contaminated cooling towers--wet-type heat rejection units (WTHRUs) used to dissipate unwanted heat into the atmosphere. The Vermont Department of Health undertook a program to inventory, inspect, and sample all WTHRUs in Vermont from April 1981 to April 1982. All WTHRUs were sampled for Legionella pneumophila and data were obtained for location, design, construction, and operating characteristics. Of the 184 WTHRUs operating, statistical analyses were performed on those 130 which were sampled for L. pneumophila only once during the study period. Of these, 11 (8.5%) were positive for L. pneumophila. Sources of makeup water and period of operation had significant association with the recovery of L. pneumophila. Five out of 92 towers (5.4%) utilizing surface water sources for cooling were positive for L. pneumophila, in contrast to 6 positive towers of the 38 units (15.8%) which obtained makeup water from ground water sources (p = .054 by chi-square test). Nearly 15% of the 54 units which operated throughout the year were positive, compared to less than 4% of the 76 towers operating seasonally (p = .03 by chi-square test). The mean pH of the cooling water in units where L. pneumophila was recovered (8.3) was significantly higher than the mean pH of 7.9 in units testing negative (p less than .05 by t-test). In addition, the mean log-transformed turbidity of positive towers, 0.03 nephelometric units (ntu), was significantly lower than the mean of log turbidity of negative towers, 0.69 ntu (p less than .02 by t-test). PMID:10281778

  5. Your District Deserves an Audit Committee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaupp, Frederick W.; Maust, Robert S.

    1974-01-01

    A school district audit committee has the capacity to unearth pertinent information about the operating efficiency and effectiveness of a school district, as well as providing a more professional audit. (Author/WM)

  6. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SISKIYOU COUNTIES, CALIF., AND IN ALL COUNTIES IN OREGON, EXCEPT MALHEUR COUNTY Order Regulating Handling...; District No. 2: The counties of Klamath, Lake, Jackson, and Josephine in the State of Oregon; District...

  7. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SISKIYOU COUNTIES, CALIF., AND IN ALL COUNTIES IN OREGON, EXCEPT MALHEUR COUNTY Order Regulating Handling...; District No. 4: The counties of Modoc and Siskiyou in the State of California; District No. 5: The...

  8. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SISKIYOU COUNTIES, CALIF., AND IN ALL COUNTIES IN OREGON, EXCEPT MALHEUR COUNTY Order Regulating Handling...; District No. 4: The counties of Modoc and Siskiyou in the State of California; District No. 5: The...

  9. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SISKIYOU COUNTIES, CALIF., AND IN ALL COUNTIES IN OREGON, EXCEPT MALHEUR COUNTY Order Regulating Handling...; District No. 4: The counties of Modoc and Siskiyou in the State of California; District No. 5: The...

  10. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SISKIYOU COUNTIES, CALIF., AND IN ALL COUNTIES IN OREGON, EXCEPT MALHEUR COUNTY Order Regulating Handling...; District No. 4: The counties of Modoc and Siskiyou in the State of California; District No. 5: The...

  11. 7 CFR 983.11 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.11 Districts. (a) Districts shall consist of the following: (1... States of Arizona and New Mexico. (b) With the approval of the Secretary, the boundaries of any...

  12. 7 CFR 983.11 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.11 Districts. (a) Districts shall consist of the following: (1... States of Arizona and New Mexico. (b) With the approval of the Secretary, the boundaries of any...

  13. 7 CFR 983.11 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.11 Districts. (a) Districts shall consist of the following: (1... States of Arizona and New Mexico. (b) With the approval of the Secretary, the boundaries of any...

  14. 7 CFR 983.11 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.11 Districts. (a) Districts shall consist of the following: (1... States of Arizona and New Mexico. (b) With the approval of the Secretary, the boundaries of any...

  15. 7 CFR 983.11 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.11 Districts. (a) Districts shall consist of the following: (1... States of Arizona and New Mexico. (b) With the approval of the Secretary, the boundaries of any...

  16. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  17. Heat pipe cooled probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J. (Inventor); Couch, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    The basic heat pipe principle is employed to provide a self-contained passively cooled probe that may be placed into a high temperature environment. The probe consists of an evaporator region of a heat pipe and a sensing instrument. Heat is absorbed as the working fluid evaporates in the probe. The vapor is transported to the vapor space of the condenser region. Heat is dissipated from the condenser region and fins causing condensation of the working fluid, which returns to the probe by gravity and the capillary action of the wick. Working fluid, wick and condenser configurations and structure materials can be selected to maintain the probe within an acceptable temperature range.

  18. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  19. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-10-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  20. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  1. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  2. Rotary engine cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Charles (Inventor); Gigon, Richard M. (Inventor); Blum, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rotary engine has a substantially trochoidal-shaped housing cavity in which a rotor planetates. A cooling system for the engine directs coolant along a single series path consisting of series connected groups of passages. Coolant enters near the intake port, passes downwardly and axially through the cooler regions of the engine, then passes upwardly and axially through the hotter regions. By first flowing through the coolest regions, coolant pressure is reduced, thus reducing the saturation temperature of the coolant and thereby enhancing the nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanism which predominates in the high heat flux region of the engine during high power level operation.

  3. Cooling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Mayes, James C.

    2009-05-05

    A device and method provide for cooling of a system having an energy source, one or more devices that actively consume energy, and one or more devices that generate heat. The device may include one or more thermoelectric coolers ("TECs") in conductive engagement with at least one of the heat-generating devices, and an energy diverter for diverting at least a portion of the energy from the energy source that is not consumed by the active energy-consuming devices to the TECs.

  4. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. The term...

  5. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast Guard District Commander or District...

  6. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 50.10-5 Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. The term...

  7. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander. 42.05-25 Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN VOYAGES BY SEA Definition of Terms Used in This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast Guard District Commander or District...

  8. 75 FR 43958 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Application for Amendment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of...: May 24, 2010. d. Applicant: Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District. e. Name of.... g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 USC 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Turlock...

  9. 75 FR 35778 - Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of... Competing Applications June 16, 2010. On February 1, 2010, Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the...

  10. Variability in the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act in Wisconsin school districts and science departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher L.

    In the United States of America, the public education system is comprised of over 14,000 school districts. Each of these unique districts is being affected by the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. In turn, this diverse population of school districts is determining the impact on education of this sweeping federal education policy. This study examines eight of those school districts to determine their actions related to the early phase of the implementation of one portion of NCLB, the accountability provisions prescribing standardized assessment for the determination of Adequate Yearly Progress. Specifically, this study examines what these eight Wisconsin school districts, serving from 1,000 to over 5,000 students, did with the student achievement data resulting from their state assessment, the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examinations (WKCE). A wide variety of responses were found in how school districts used the WKCE data. The eight school districts were examined to determine what features of their organizations were responsible for how they responded to the enactment of the AYP provisions, specifically how they used the WCKE data. District responses were found to be determined by district size, governance structures, personnel, and dispositions. The interactions of these characteristics were considered in light of organizational studies using conceptualizations borrowed from ecology and the theory of evolution and by studies of school districts.

  11. Districts Created to Steer "Turnarounds"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    If the job of a traditional superintendent is hard, imagine the complexities involved in building a school system from scratch--especially one composed of schools with some of the most intractable educational challenges. That's the task facing education leaders in Michigan and Tennessee, which are building special districts to take over…

  12. Accounting Systems for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, E. Barrett, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Advises careful analysis and improvement of existing school district accounting systems prior to investment in new ones. Emphasizes the importance of attracting and maintaining quality financial staffs, developing an accounting policies and procedures manual, and designing a good core accounting system before purchasing computer hardware and…

  13. Strategies of School District Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Jean B.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on conflict seen as the result of attempts to achieve desired outcomes in organizational "games." Conflict arises when conflictual behaviors are viewed as appropriate strategies to achieve goals. Data from two school districts are analyzed to examine the sources of conflict and to suggest means of conflict management. (Author/CS)

  14. Districts Neglecting Programs for ELLs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on state and independent reviews that cite shortcomings in four urban systems. According to the reviews of those school systems over the past two years, four urban districts--in Boston, Massachusetts; Buffalo, New York; Portland, Oregon; and Seattle, Washington--did not provide special help to learn English to all students…

  15. Marketing Techniques for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, John J., Ed.

    Development of marketing plans can assist not only public school districts in meeting recent competition but will also improve educational processes, increase revenue, and restore confidence in schools. This collection of articles describes a new role for school administrators--particulary for business managers: administrators as "entrepreneurs."…

  16. Equalization among Florida School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern; Shiver, Lee

    1983-01-01

    This statistical analysis of funding equalization from 1970 to 1981 evaluates the distributional equity achieved by Florida's school finance plan and examines the relationship between selected per pupil revenue measures and variables thought to influence school district spending, concluding that greater equity has not been attained. (MJL)

  17. School Districts and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.; Whitehurst, Grover J.; Gallaher, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    School districts are a focus of education reform efforts in the United States, but there is very little existing research about how important they are to student achievement. We fill this gap in the literature using 10 years of student-level, statewide data on fourth- and fifth-grade students in Florida and North Carolina. A variance decomposition…

  18. Competition with Charters Motivates Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Marc J.; Lueken, Martin F.; Egalite, Anna J.

    2013-01-01

    Proponents of market-based education reform often argue that introducing charter schools and other school choice policies creates a competitive dynamic that will prompt low-performing districts to improve their practice. Rather than simply providing an alternative to neighborhood public schools for a handful of students, the theory says, school…

  19. Forecasting School District Fiscal Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Curtis A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper's goal is to redefine fiscal health by broadening its predictive function and to determine which fiscal indicators are useful for forecasting fiscal health for one, two, and three years. Results indicate that school district fiscal health forecasts are potentially great planning tools for local for local decision makers. Includes 11…

  20. Nation, Districts Step up Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2013-01-01

    President Barack Obama's announcement last week of a wide-ranging anti-violence plan in response to the Newtown, Connecticut, school shootings comes as many districts are adopting new and sometimes dramatic measures--including arming teachers and volunteers--intended to prevent similar tragedies in their own schools. School safety experts warn…