Sample records for district meghalaya india

  1. Assessment of indoor radiation level in the environs of the uranium deposit area of West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya, India.

    PubMed

    War, S A; Nongkynrih, P; Khathing, D T; Iongwai, P S

    2009-11-01

    An estimation of the indoor background radiation dose distribution was carried out in dwellings of eleven villages located within and around the uranium mineralization area of Kylleng-Pyndensohiong, Mawthabah in West Khasi Hills District of Meghalaya, India. The ambient indoor gamma radiation level was monitored using Thermo Luminescence Dosimeters (TLDs) while the indoor radon and thoron concentration was measured using twin-cup dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs). Results obtained from the study reveals that the local inhabitants of villages located close to the mining site receive higher doses than those inhabitants of villages located at a much farther distance from the mining site. The average total annual effective dose was found to be varying from 1.2 mSv y(-1) in the village of Langpa to 3.4 mSv y(-1) in the village of Nongbah Jynrin. The data obtained will serve as a reference in documenting changes to environmental radioactivity if mining is to be carried out in the future. PMID:19713016

  2. Spatial distribution of natural radioactivity levels in topsoil around the high-uranium mineralization zone of Kylleng-Pyndensohiong (Mawthabah) areas, West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya, India.

    PubMed

    War, S A; Nongkynrih, P; Khathing, D T; Iongwai, P S; Jha, S K

    2008-10-01

    A study of background radiation and the distribution of radionuclides in the environment of the proposed uranium mining sites of Kylleng-Pyndensohiong (Mawthabah) areas, West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya, India, has been carried out with the objective of establishing a baseline radiation level of the region. Topsoil samples collected from the region are analysed for radioactivity measurements of primordial radionuclides by gamma-spectrometry technique. Direct dose measurement using a survey meter was also carried out simultaneously. Measurement carried out in the region shows that the activity concentration of 238U and 232Th in soil samples is found to be highest in Kylleng with respective median values of 335.3 Bq kg(-1) and 283.9 Bq kg(-1) followed by Syngkai with activity concentration of 285.3 Bq kg(-1) and 257.4 Bq kg(-1) for 238U and 232Th, respectively. The distribution of 40K concentration in the study area is found to be in the range of 173.1-359.0 Bq kg(-1) which is below the global and Indian average values of 420 Bq kg(-1) and 394 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The contribution of the primordial radionuclides to the total dose of the study area is found to be very high with a range of 136.8-334.5 nGy h(-1) in comparison to the global as well as Indian average values. PMID:18534723

  3. Developing a correlation index and U disequilibrium factor for the exploratory boreholes in Wahkut block of West Khasi Hills district, Meghalaya (India).

    PubMed

    Kukreti, B M; Kumar, Pramod

    2013-02-01

    With the objective to affirm the apparent uranium ore zone grade/thickness with good confidence for the non-cored as well as those boreholes with poor core recovery in the sedimentary environment of Wahkut block, West Khasi Hills district of Meghalaya, a systematic study between the in situ measured ?-ray logs under field conditions and laboratory analyzed core assay under controlled conditions has been carried out. The study area spans 2 sqkm having 33 cored and 39 non-cored boreholes with a cumulative drilled depth of about 11,000 m. On this available cored borehole database, simultaneous uranium ore zone continuity, both for in situ ?-ray logs and radiometric core assay, was evaluated with the experimental parameters of 1.0m ore zone thickness at 0.010% eU(3)O(8) cut off grade. A population of 18 such simultaneous qualifying zone (borehole log and core assay) across the 15 cored boreholes gave a grade thickness continuity index of 0.92 with a moderately strong relationship between the radiometric core assay and the in situ ?-ray logs. After validation of an in situ uranium ore zone, study boreholes were examined for their uranium disequilibrium status by fitting regression equations for the radiometric U(3)O(8)(?/?) and spectrometric radium measurements, done on the borehole core samples. A parent favoring uranium disequilibrium was observed in the sedimentary environment of Wahkut block, with a log normal distribution. An average uranium disequilibrium factor 1.46 ± 0.245 was estimated for the 19 study boreholes, across the block. PMID:23202436

  4. Ethnomedicinal plants used for diarrhea by tribals of Meghalaya, Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Laloo, Damiki; Hemalatha, Siva

    2011-01-01

    Environmental status and diarrhea is regarded as a complex and multidimensional topic. Diarrhea is one of the main water-borne diseases considered to be endemic in many regions of the world and brings the major health threats to the world populations, both in tropical and subtropical poor countries. The state Meghalaya situated in the North-Eastern India is an upland landmass bound by seven districts surrounded within by different tribes. The population is predominantly rural, with 81.41% of the population belongs merely to the scheduled tribes. The state offers a wide range of disease environments, dominated by communicable diseases (35.68%), and diarrhea is one of the water-borne diseases that alter the society of the state. Various factors like poor environmental sanitation, unavailability of safe drinking water, seasonal rainfall, infected foods, infection through fomites, flies, cockroaches, etc. are the main culprit that led to the cause of diarrhea in the state. The local people are very much closely associated with nature, and with their ethnobiological knowledge about the plants available around them, they can easily avert and cure themselves from several disease complications. In this review, the information regarding the traditional method of utilization of 58 plant species that are used to treat and cure diarrhea and dysentery are enlisted briefly. PMID:22279372

  5. Speleothems from Mawsmai and Krem Phyllut caves, Meghalaya, India: some evidences on biogenic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskar, Sushmitha; Baskar, R.; Lee, Natuschka; Theophilus, P. K.

    2009-05-01

    The Mawsmai cave and Krem Phyllut caves, East Khasi hills, Meghalaya, India has so far not yet attracted the attention of geomicrobiologists. Observations and hypotheses on the possible influence of identified microorganisms for speleothem formations in Meghalaya are reported for the first time. XRD studies identified calcite in speleothems and gypsum in cave wall deposits as the dominant minerals. SEM-EDAX showed interesting microfabric features showing strong resemblance with fossilised bacteria, calcified filaments, needle calcite and numerous nano scale calcite crystals, highly weathered and disintegrated crystals of calcite, that point towards a significant microbial influence in its genesis. Thin section petrography showed laminated stromatolitic features. The microorganisms identified by conventional isolation and further evaluation of isolates by molecular techniques include Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus licheniformis, Micrococcus luteus, and Actinomycetes. Microscopic observations also showed unidentifiable cocci and four unidentifiable strains of CaSO4 (gypsum) precipitating bacteria. Experimental studies confirmed that these bacteria are able to precipitate calcium minerals (calcite, gypsum, minor amounts of dolomite) in the laboratory. These results allow us to postulate that species like these may contribute to active biogenic influence in the cave formations at Meghalaya.

  6. Strain analysis and stratigraphic status of Nongkhya, Sumer and Mawmaram conglomerates of Shillong basin, Meghalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Niva Rani; Sarma, K. P.

    2010-04-01

    Shillong basin, one of the Purana basins of the Indian peninsula is situated in the central and eastern parts of the Shillong plateau of NE India. Metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of the basin are of Mesoproterozoic age and lithostratigraphically belong to Shillong Group (erstwhile Shillong series) comprising Lower Metapelitic Formation (LMF) and Upper Quartzitic Formation (UQF). A long, persistent, faulted and tectonically attenuated conglomerate known as Nongkhya-Sumer-Mawmaram-conglomerate separates these two formations. In the present work, quantitative strain analyses of the pebbles of Sumer, Nongkhya and Mawmaram conglomerates of Ri-Bhoi and West Khasi Hills districts of Meghalaya are carried out using manual and computerized programmes. Eight different techniques for intrapebble, interpebble and bulk rock strain estimation are applied and results are compared systematically. Sumer and Mawmaram conglomerates bear the testimony of broadly flattening type of deformation (0 < k < 1) while Nongkhya conglomerate shows constriction type (1 < k < ?). The change in strain ellipsoid shape from Nongkhya to Mawmaram area is accompanied by a change of fabric from S < L to L < S tectonites. Affinity of rotational strain is more in Nongkhya conglomerate as compared to Sumer and Mawmaram conglomerates. The compactness of pebbles is high in case of Nongkhya conglomerate and low to moderate in Sumer and Mawmaram conglomerates indicating high strain in Nongkhya conglomerate (northeastern part of Shillong basin) relative to Sumer and Mawmaram conglomerates (southwestern part of Shillong basin). Thus strain magnitude increases from SW to NE direction of the Shillong basin. The tectonostratigraphic status of these conglomerates suggest that the Sumer and Mawmaram conglomerates were initially a part of one conglomerate horizon of interformation type between LMF and UQF of the Shillong Group. With progressive deformation, the northeastern part of the Sumer conglomerate suffered tectonic attenuation and separation and eventually thrusted over the Basement Gneissic Group (BGG) as a tectonic mélange. This sector of the conglomerate is known as Nongkhya conglomerate. The tectonic configuration of the Nongkhya conglomerate is the effect of right and left lateral strike slip movement of Sumer conglomerate at Sumer and Adabasti points, respectively. This is a positive signature of post D 3 deformation on the Sumer conglomerate. The regional sigmoidal pattern of the interformational conglomerate broadly correlate with the Tyrsad-Barapani Shear Zone (TBSZ) of sinistral nature.

  7. Daughter Preference and Contraceptive-use in Matrilineal Tribal Societies in Meghalaya, India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpi Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Although son preference in patrilineal society is an established fact, daughter preference in matrilineal society is not thoroughly examined. Very few studies have been carried out on the issue. This paper attempts to explore the daughter preference and contraceptive-use in matrilineal tribal societies in Meghalaya, India. Data from the National Family Health Survey 1998-1999 have been used in this study because, among the large-scale surveys, only this dataset allows identification of matrilineal sample. Mean, percentage, and standard deviation are computed in the present study. Further, the data have been cross-tabulated, and logistic regression has been run through SPSS (version 15). Among the ever-married matrilineal women, 17% desired more sons than daughters but 18.2% desired more daughters than sons. About 11% of ever-married women could achieve their desired sex composition of children. However, a very striking finding suggests that, even after achieving desired sex composition of children, as high as 61.8% of women were still not using contraception mainly because of programme factors while one-fourth were still depending on temporary methods. The rest 13.2% adopted terminal method of contraception, which calls for immediate attention of planners. With the increase in the number of sons but without daughter, contraceptive-use drastically decreased. The most desired sex composition of children seems to be two daughters and a son. Absence of daughter with increase in the total number of sons increased the desire for additional children. Every woman with two or more sons but without daughter wanted the next child to be a daughter. Thus, there are ample evidences to draw the conclusion that there is, in fact, a daughter preference in the matrilineal tribal societies in Meghalaya, India. Policy-makers may, thus, target the women who have achieved fertility and should ensure that daughter preference does not lead to the negligence to sons. PMID:23930347

  8. Persistent transmission of malaria in Garo hills of Meghalaya bordering Bangladesh, north-east India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Malaria is endemic in Garo hills of Meghalaya, and death cases are reported annually. Plasmodium falciparum is the major parasite, and is solely responsible for each malaria-attributable death case. Garo hills are categorized high-risk for drug-resistant malaria; however, there exists no data on malaria transmitting mosquitoes prevalent in the region. Included in this report are entomological observations with particular reference to vector biology characteristics for devising situation specific intervention strategies for disease transmission reduction. Methods The epidemiological data of the West Garo hills have been reviewed retrospectively for 2001-2009 to ascertain the disease transmission profile given the existing interventions. Point prevalence study was conducted in Dalu Community Health Centre that lies in close proximity to international border with Bangladesh to ascertain the true prevalence of malaria, and parasite species. Mosquito collections were made in human dwellings of malaria endemic villages aiming at vector incrimination, and to study relative abundance, resting and feeding preferences, and their present susceptibility status to DDT. Results Investigations revealed that the West Garo hill district is co-endemic for Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, but P. falciparum was the predominant infection (> 82%). Malaria transmission was perennial and persistent with seasonal peak during May-July corresponding to months of high rainfall. Entomological collections revealed that Anopheles minimus was the predominant species that was incriminated by detection of sporozoites in salivary glands (infection rate 2.27%), and was ascertained to be fully susceptible to DDT. Conclusion For the control of malaria, improved diagnosis and sustained supply of drugs for artemisinin-based combination therapy are strongly advocated, which should be enforced for treatment of every single case of P. falciparum. Greater political commitment is called for organized vector control operations along border/high-risk areas to contain the spread of drug-resistant malaria, and averting impending disease outbreaks. PMID:20858290

  9. Micro structure analysis of the ovaries of common carp, Cyprinus carpio L. inhabiting a polluted reservoir, Umiam in Meghalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Massar, Bashida; Dey, Sudip; Dutta, Karabi

    2014-10-01

    The study uses microscopy to analyze damage caused to the ovaries of a fresh water fish, Cyprinus carpio L., owing to its exposure to municipal wastes in a polluted reservoir, Umiam in Meghalaya, India. Histological analysis of the ovary showed atretic oocytes, detached ovarian wall, detached follicular linings, and necrosis of nuclei. Scanning electron microscopy revealed deformed oocytes with a rough and distorted surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed a poorly developed chorion, presence of relatively less electron-dense materials as compared with control, multinucleation in some cells surrounding the oocytes, and distorted and condensed mitochondria. The importance of microscopy in its different forms in analyzing histological, surface microstructural and fine structural damage to fish ovaries in response to environmental pollution owing to municipal wastes and city garbage is discussed with the help of available literature. PMID:25089745

  10. Morphogroups and small sized tests in Pseudotextularia elegans (Rzehak) from the Late Maastrichtian succession of Meghalaya, India as indicators of biotic response to paleoenvironmental stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay K.

    2012-04-01

    Cretaceous-Paleocene shelf successions of Therriaghat and Mahadeo in Meghalaya, India preserve almost the whole of the Late Maastrichtian stage, in which the warm water Tethyan planktonic foraminifera Pseudotextularia elegans (Rzehak) occurs in the Racemiguembelina fructicosa Zone (=Zone CF4) and Pseudoguembelina palpebra Zone (=Zone CF2) as five distinct morphogroups (A-E). Morphogroups A-C commonly occur in rocks representing the transgressive regime of the R. fructicosa Zone at Therriaghat whereas that of P. palpebra Zone was conducive for morphogroup D in the deeper shelf around Therriaghat and morphogroup E in the near shore shelf around Mahadeo. The absence of P. elegans in the Pseudoguembelina hariaensis Zone (=Zone CF3) is postulated due to tectonic cause whereas its absence in the Plummeritahantkeninoides Zone (=Zone CF1) was due to regression. Analysis of growth parameters including length, width, thickness and angle of flaring of the tests of the species reveal that morphogroups B and C are generally larger in size than the other morphogroups and the test length of the Meghalaya specimens is smallest over its world occurrences. Diverse morphogroups and small tests are unique in the species of Meghalaya; however, the cause of such unusual growth is difficult to explain. Due to development close to the tectonically active Deccan volcanic Province and the Assam-Arakan and Himalayan mobile belts, the Meghalaya shelf had unusual biotic stress due to volcanic eruption, sea level fluctuations induced by plate collision and climate warming and retreat of the neo-Tethys. During the biozones CF4 and CF2 when vigorous Deccan outbursts occurred, P. elegans developed diverse morphogroups and acquired small size tests to cope with the changed environments and possibly to increase its chances of avoiding by microspherule missiles.

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of three indigenous strains of entomopathogenic nematodes from Meghalaya, India against mustard sawfly, Athalia lugens proxima Klug (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arun K; Lalramliana

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three indigenous strains of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) from Meghalaya, India, namely Heterorhabditis indica Poinar, Karunakar and David, Steinernema thermophilum Ganguly and Singh, and Steinernema glaseri (Steiner) against the last instar larva of mustard sawfly, Athalia lugens proxima Klug, a serious pest of mustard and radish in India. The larvae of A. lugens proxima were exposed to 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 infective juveniles (IJs) concentration of each nematode species in Petri dishes. Percentage larval mortality and nematode reproduction in insect larvae was studied. The sawfly larvae were found to be susceptible to all the three EPNs tested, but the degree of susceptibility to infection varied from among nematode species. Based on LC50 value, H. indica was the most pathogenic species. Nevertheless, S. thermophilum and S. glaseri also showed a high insect mortality. This study also revealed that all the three test nematodes are also able to propagate in the host cadaver and produce first generation infective juveniles. However, H. indica produced significantly more number of IJs per insect larva than the other two nematode species. The progeny production was recorded to be the least in case of S. glaseri. In conclusion, our findings suggest that of the three indigenous EPNs studied, H. indica and S. thermophilum have good potential as biological control agents against mustard sawfly, A. lugens proxima. PMID:24082523

  12. Ethno – veterinary Plants of Nadurbar district of Maharashtra, India

    PubMed Central

    Ramalah, P.V.; Patil, M B

    2005-01-01

    A survey of medicinal plants of Nandurbar district of Maharashtra, India in regard to their veterinary uses, has been done. While collecting the data, special emphasis is given to the foot and Mouth disease, Haemorrhagic Septicaemia, Maggotted Wounds, Retention of Placcenta, Timpany and Worms, which are the most common animal ailment in the district. After short listing, about 29 plant species are found to be in regular use by various tribal veterinary doctors in the district. PMID:22557165

  13. 210-Polonium studies in some environmental and biological matrices of Domiasiat uranium deposit area, West Khasi Hills, Meghalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Marbaniang, Deswyn G; Poddar, Raj K; Nongkynrih, Phlis; Khathing, Darlando T

    2010-03-01

    The study was performed using a silicon surface barrier alpha spectrometer at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Through the study, the observed (210)Po activity in water sample from different locations in the Domiasiat area ranges from 0.04 to 0.69 Bq/l. The daily and annual intake of (210)Po through water was also estimated and the mean value of 0.72 and 263.61 Bq, respectively, were observed. It is observed that the effective doses through water were higher than the World Health Organization recommended dose of 0.05 mSv/year. The total annual effective doses through terrestrial ingestion for all the locations was studied and the mean annual effective dose was observed to be 0.315 mSv, which, when compared to the worldwide and the Indian values, was observed to be slightly higher. The mean activity in soil is found to be 124.8 +/-5.7 Bq/kg and in meat the activity is 0.43 +/-0.05 Bq/kg. In fishes, an activity of 0.48 +/-0.07 Bq/kg in Garra lamta, 0.29 +/-0.02 Bq/kg in Neolissocheilus hexaganolepis, and 3.3 +/-0.1 Bq/kg in Macrobrachium sp. is observed. Activity concentration in plant samples was analyzed and the activity ranges from 0.020 +/-0.002 to 9.69 +/-0.35 Bq/kg. Committed effective dose by the adult population of the Domiasiat area through intake of (210)Po through these food items was also determined and compared with the Indian average value and the worldwide average value. PMID:19242810

  14. Cyanobacteria in wetlands of the industrialized Sambalpur District of India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are common components of phytoplankton communities in most freshwater ecosystems. Proliferations of cyanobacteria are often caused by high nutrient loading, and as such can serve as indicators of declining water quality. Massive industrialization in developing countries, like India, has polluted fresh water bodies, including wetlands. Many industries directly discard their effluents to nearby water sources without treatment. In the Sambalpur District of India effluents reach the reservoir of the worlds largest earthen dam i.e Hirakud Dam. This study examines cyanobacteria communities in the wetlands of Sambalpur District, Odisha, India, including areas subjected to industrial pollution. Result & Discussion The genera Anabaena, Oscillatoria, Chroococcus, Phormidium were dominant genera of polluted wetlands of Sambalpur districts. A positive correlation was found between total cyanobacterial species and dissolved oxygen levels, but cyanobacterial diversity was inversely related to BOD, COD, TSS, and TDS. High dissolved oxygen content was also associated with regions of lower cyanobacteria biomass. Conclusion Cyanobacterial abundance was positively correlated to content of oxidisable organic matter, but negatively correlated to species diversity. Lower dissolved oxygen was correlated to decreased diversity and increased dominance by Anabaena, Oscillatoria, Chroococcus, Phormidium species, observed in regions characterized by deteriorated water quality. PMID:23845058

  15. Outbreak of Chikungunya Fever, Dakshina Kannada District, South India, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Manimunda, Sathya P.; Sugunan, Attayur P.; Rai, Subhodh K.; Vijayachari, Paluru; Shriram, Ananganallur N.; Sharma, Sameer; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Chaitanya, Itta K.; Guruprasad, Dev R.; Sudeep, Anakkathil B.

    2010-01-01

    The outbreak of chikungunya fever that surfaced in India during late 2005 has affected more than 1.56 million people, spread to more than 17 states/union territories, and is still ongoing. Many of these areas are dengue- and leptospirosis-endemic settings. We carried out a cross-sectional survey in one such chikungunya-affected location in Dakshina Kannada District of Karnataka State to estimate the magnitude of the epidemic and the proportion of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections that remained clinically inapparent. The seropositivity for CHIKV infection was 62.2%, and the attack rate of confirmed CHIK fever was 58.3%. The proportion of inapparent CHIKV infection was 6.3%. The increasing trend in the seropositivity and attack rate of CHIKV infection with age group was statistically significant. The present study is an indicator of the magnitude of the ongoing outbreak of CHIKV infection in India that started during 2005–2006. PMID:20889860

  16. A synoptic account of flora of solapur district, maharashtra (India).

    PubMed

    Garad, Krushnadeoray U; Gore, Ramchandra D; Gaikwad, Sayajirao P

    2015-01-01

    The present paper provides the first systematic and comprehensive account of the flora of Solapur district of Maharashtra (India). The flora of this region demonstrates a wide range of species diversity and growth forms. The vegetation of the district mainly represents tropical dry deciduous forests, thorny open scrub and vast grasslands. During the present work, a total of 1441 taxa belonging to 699 genera and 125 families of flowering plants were recorded. A new species Crinumsolapurense Gaikwad et al. is described. Fabaceae is the dominant family with 210 taxa, followed by Poaceae (157 taxa), Asteraceae (85 taxa), Malvaceae (68 taxa) and Euphorbiaceae (48 taxa). Acacia is the largest genus with 25 taxa, followed by Euphorbia (23), Cyperus (22), Crotalaria (19) and Ipomoea (19). The herbaceous flora of the district is notable as it amounts to 56.21% of the whole of flora. The ratio of indigenous woody to herbaceous components is 1:1.28. The proportion of indigenous taxa (978) to the cultivated ones (460) is 1.35: 0.5 in the district. PMID:25632259

  17. Epidemiology of Malaria in Amritsar District of India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal; Mittal, Mridula; Sharma, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Objective Malaria is today one of the major causes of human suffering, both in terms of increasing morbidity/mortality and stunting intellectual/ economic growth. In a developing country like India, it has devastating socioeconomic consequences. The present study was therefore carried out to study the epidemiology of malaria in Amritsar district. Methods Diagnosed cases of Malaria reported from 1st January to 31st December 2009 in the erstwhile District of Amritsar were collected from the District Epidemiologist of Amritsar and Taran Taaran and studied. A total of 314 patients were studied. Data was assessed, systematically compiled and statistically analyzed. Results Most (84%) of the malaria patients in our study were less than 45 years of age. Male patients (57%) outnumbered females (43%). The majority of patients with malaria (98%) were from rural areas and 68.5% of the studied patients belonged to upper lower socioeconomical class according to Kuppuswamy socioeconomic status scale. The majority (83%) of patients took treatment from Registered Medical Practitioners/quacks. Out of the total patients, only 14% used mosquito nets, 13% used repellents, and 7% had wire gauze doors in their homes Conclusion The people living in rural areas were found to be more vulnerable to malaria. The disease was found to be more prevalent among the lower socio economic strata and young population leading to considerable adverse effect on health and economy. Our study aims to stress the estimation of the true burden of malaria. PMID:24715945

  18. Avifaunal diversity of Anekere wetland, Karkala, Udupi district, Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Bhat, P Ishwara; Cristopher, S S; Hosetti, B B

    2009-11-01

    The avifaunal diversity and density in Anekere wetland, Karkala, Udupi district, Karnataka, India, was studied for a period of three years. Anekere pond inhabits several local and migratory bird species. Reduction in water retention in this pond in summer, weed infestation, variations in food availability in different seasons and threat of predation on the breeding activity of birds affected the avifauna diversity in the study area. This habitat attracted 44 bird species, which are local and migratory including aquatic birds, waders and others. Highest population of tree ducks (lesser whistling teal) was recorded in all the three years of study. Other prominent residents were Moorhens, Jacanas, Herons and Cormorants. The visitors include ringed plovers, wagtails and storks. It was evident that purple moorhen and tree ducks have developed high tolerance to this highly fluctuating habitat and human activity. PMID:20329405

  19. Understanding unmet contraceptive needs among rural Khasi men and women in Meghalaya.

    PubMed

    Oosterhoff, Pauline; Dkhar, Badalam; Albert, Sandra

    2015-10-01

    There is a global push for increased access to contraception to respond to unmet contraceptive needs. Meghalaya state, with a majority of Indigenous people, has one of the highest unmet contraceptive needs and the lowest contraceptive prevalence rates in India. This qualitative study explores the reasons for the low uptake of contraceptives among Khasi people in a rural district. While policy makers assume that individuals may not be practising family planning because of religion and lack of education, couples actually do use a variety of 'natural' or 'traditional' contraceptive methods to obtain their desired family composition and size. Health providers focus on the provision of hormonal contraceptives, such as the pill, and on technologies such as IUDs and tubectomies that require regular follow-ups by trained medical staff. Health concerns, distrust of contraceptive technologies, the inadequate local health system and a desire to have more than two children are important factors in the low uptake of available contraceptive technologies. Contraceptive choices in rural areas are shaped by the historically problematic political engagement of Indigenous people with the central state, with policy implementation taking place on the basis of widespread assumptions rather than on evidence from contextually relevant behavioural sciences research. PMID:26109041

  20. Natural gamma radioactivity in the villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Padua, Jeni Chandar; Basil Rose, M R

    2013-01-01

    In situ radiometric survey carried out in 81 revenue villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India, using a portable radiation dosemeter/detector, revealed the existence of radiation hotspots along the coastal belt. A close observation of the coastal villages specifically revealed high background radioactivity in 14 coastal villages. A very high intrinsic anomalous radioactivity of 41.03 ?Sv h(-1) was observed, in a famous tourist spot in the coastal belt of Kanyakumari District. This is the highest level of radiation registered in South India, which is extremely higher than the permissible world average and is suggestive of causing severe clinical problems on continuous and prolonged exposure. PMID:23516264

  1. Chemical characteristics of groundwater in parts of the Gambhir River basin, Bharatpur District, Rajasthan, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Umar; A. Absar

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-nine dug well samples have been collected from the Gambhir River basin in the Bharatpur District of Rajasthan State in India for hydrogeochemical study to understand the sources of dissolved ions and assess the chemical quality of the water. Broadly speaking, the groundwaters have a chemical composition within the permissible limits suggested for drinking water. Nitrate is higher than the

  2. Ethnomedicine of Dharwad district in Karnataka, India—plants used in oral health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. S. Hebbar; V. H. Harsha; V. Shripathi; G. R. Hegde

    2004-01-01

    The present ethnomedicine survey covers the Dharwad district of Karnataka in southern India. It was revealed that 35 plants belonging to 26 families are being used to treat different types of oral ailments like toothache, plaque and caries, pyorrhea and aphthae. Sixteen of these plants were new claims for the treatment of oral ailments not previously reported in the ethnomedicinal

  3. Relationship between Household Literacy and Educational Engagement: Analysis of Data from Rajkot District, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudgar, Amita; Miller, Karyn; Kothari, Brij

    2012-01-01

    Household engagement in a child's education is a complex process; depending on the culture and the context, it may be revealed through a variety of behaviours. Using data from one district in rural Gujarat, India, four indicators of a household's educational engagement were employed to investigate the relationship between household literacy levels…

  4. Airborne fungal spores in a sawmill environment in Palakkad District, Kerala, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Padmanabhan S. Jothish; Themath Soman Nayar

    2004-01-01

    Concentration of airborne fungal spores inindoor and outdoor environments of a sawmill in Palakkad district of Kerala, India was studied with Burkard Personal Slide Sampler from January to December 1997. Total spore concentration in the indoor and outdoor showed a 3:2 ratio. Higher spore count was observed in indoor in January and in outdoor in October. Thirty three fungal spore

  5. Sergentomyia (Parrotomyia) jerighatiansis, a new species of sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) from Kandhamal district, Orissa, India.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, R; Jambulingam, P

    2013-12-01

    Sergentomyia (Parrotomyia) jerighatiansis a new species of sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) from the villages of Kandhamal district, Orissa, located on the east coast of India is described. Descriptive morphology, character measurements, and illustrations of males and females are provided and its taxonomic position within the genus is also defined. Voucher specimens of the new species have been deposited at the museum, Vector Control Research Centre (Indian Council of Medical Research), Puducherry, India and Zoological Survey of India, India. PMID:24076324

  6. Organochlorine pesticide residues in ground water of Thiruvallur district, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Jayashree; N. Vasudevan

    2007-01-01

    Modern agriculture practices reveal an increase in use of pesticides and fertilizers to meet the food demand of increasing\\u000a population which results in contamination of the environment. In India crop production increased to 100% but the cropping\\u000a area has increased marginally by 20%. Pesticides have played a major role in achieving the maximum crop production, but maximum\\u000a usage and accumulation

  7. Development of an agroforestry carbon sequestration project in Khammam district, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Sudha; V. Ramprasad; M. D. V. Nagendra; H. D. Kulkarni; N. H. Ravindranath

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses methodological issues in estimating carbon (C) sequestration potential, baseline determination, additionality\\u000a and leakage in Khammam district, Andhra Pradesh, southern part of India. Technical potential for afforestation on cultivable\\u000a wastelands, fallow, and marginal croplands was considered for Eucalyptus clonal plantations. Field studies for aboveground and belowground biomass, woody litter, and soil organic carbon for baseline\\u000a and project scenarios

  8. Geothermal studies at Tattapani Hot Spring area, Sarguja District, Central India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Shanker; J. L. Thussu; J. M. Prasad

    1987-01-01

    Tattapani area, Sarguja district, M.P. (Madhya Pradesh), is one of the strongest thermal manifestations in central India, comprising several hot springs (50-98°C) in marshy land with a cumulative discharge of about 60 1\\/min, and hydrothermal incrustations over an area 0.10 km². Thermal activity is controlled by the ENE-WSW Tattapani fault and NE-SW cross faults. Tattapani fault also forms the southern

  9. Seasonal variation of groundwater quality in a part of Guntur District, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Subba Rao

    2006-01-01

    The area in Guntur district, Andhra Pradesh, India, is selected to discuss the impact of seasonal variation of groundwater\\u000a quality on irrigation and human health, where the agriculture is the main livelihood of rural people and the groundwater is\\u000a the main source for irrigation and drinking. Granite gneisses associated with schists and charnockites of the Precambrian\\u000a Eastern Ghats underlie the

  10. Evaluation of malaria control programme in three selected districts of Assam, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hardev Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Background & objectives: To ensure that the activities of Malaria Control Programme were taking place in effective and judicious manner, an intensive monitoring and supervision of various activities of the programme were carried out in Karbi-Anglong, Cachar and Nagaon districts of Assam, India during July-October 2007. Methods: Questionnaire-based protocol prepared by the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme was used

  11. Burden, pattern and outcomes of road traffic injuries in a rural district of India.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Uthkarsh, Pallavi Sarji; Rao, Girish N; Jayaram, Ashok N; Panduranganath, Venkatesh

    2014-08-11

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a leading public health problem and the understanding of RTIs in rural India is limited. The present report documents the burden, pattern, characteristics and outcomes of RTIs in a rural district of India using combined data sources: police and hospital. RTIs contributed for 38% of fatal and 39% of non-fatal injuries with an annual mortality rate of 18.1/100,000 population/year. Young males were affected most and two-wheeler users and pedestrians were involved in 45% and 20% of fatal crashes, respectively. Nearly half (51%) of fatal RTIs occurred on national highways of the district; 46% died immediately at the site. Among those hospitalised, 20% were under the influence of alcohol while use of helmets and seat belts was <5%. Trauma care was deficient in the district leading to greater number of referrals. Road safety should be given high importance in rural India with a focus on safe roads, safe vehicles and safe people along with trauma care. PMID:25109622

  12. Matching services with local preferences: managing primary education services in a rural district of India.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanian, R

    1999-02-01

    India's poorest households have particularly little access to education. Urgent reforms are therefore needed to improve the universal availability of quality basic services and universal access to those services. At least 32 million children in India are estimated to not be enrolled and attending school. These children must be brought into schools in order to meet the goal of Universal Elementary Education (UEE). Widespread support exists for the decentralization of public services due to the equity and efficiency benefits associated with it. In particular, decentralization is seen to facilitate the matching of services with local preferences, increasing the chances of meeting policy goals. This approach is explored in the context of research conducted in a village of Raichur district, where poor households' preferences with regard to school timing are analyzed. Sections consider the equity and efficiency merits of decentralization, the agenda for improving education service delivery in India, users' relationship to the education system in Raichur district, how preferences are revealed, whose preferences are important in the conflict between local and policy perspectives, preference heterogeneity in the village context, and whether aspects of education services can be selectively decentralized. PMID:12349044

  13. Ethnomedicine of Dharwad district in Karnataka, India--plants used in oral health care.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, S S; Harsha, V H; Shripathi, V; Hegde, G R

    2004-10-01

    The present ethnomedicine survey covers the Dharwad district of Karnataka in southern India. It was revealed that 35 plants belonging to 26 families are being used to treat different types of oral ailments like toothache, plaque and caries, pyorrhea and aphthae. Sixteen of these plants were new claims for the treatment of oral ailments not previously reported in the ethnomedicinal literature of India. Basella alba, Blepharis repens, Capparis sepiaria, Oxalis corniculata and Ricinus communis are used for the treatment of aphthae; Azima tetracantha, Caesalpinia coriaria, Cleome gynandra, Gossypium herbacium, Leucas aspera, Merremia chryseides, Pergularia daemia, Prosopis juliflora and Solanum nigrum are used to treat tooth ache and Cassia hirsuta and Cassia tora are used in the treatment of plaque and caries. PMID:15325728

  14. Ethnobotanical investigations among tribes in Madurai District of Tamil Nadu (India)

    PubMed Central

    Ignacimuthu, S; Ayyanar, M; Sivaraman K, Sankara

    2006-01-01

    Background An ethnobotanical survey was carried out to collect information on the use of medicinal plants in Southern Western Ghats of India (Madurai district, Tamil Nadu). Information presented in this paper was gathered from the paliyar tribes using an integrated approach of botanical collections, group discussions and interviews with questionnaires in the years 1998 – 1999. The informants interviewed were 12 among whom 4 were tribal practitioners. Results A total of 60 ethnomedicinal plant species distributed in 32 families are documented in this study. The medicinal plants used by paliyars are listed with Latin name, family, local name, parts used, mode of preparation and medicinal uses. Generally, fresh part of the plant was used for the preparation of medicine. Conclusion We observed that the documented ethnomedicinal plants were mostly used to cure skin diseases, poison bites, stomachache and nervous disorders. The results of this study showed that these tribal people still depend on medicinal plants in Madurai district forest areas. PMID:16689985

  15. A study on traditional medicinal plants of Uthapuram, Madurai District, Tamilnadu, South India

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankari, Balayogan; Pitchaimani, Subburaj; Anandharaj, Marimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To record the medicinal plants of Uthapuram Village, Madurai district, Tamilnadu, South India for the first time and the usage of these medicinal plants to remediate the diseases among the peoples. Methods Explorative field trips were made to the village for about twelve months from April 2012 to May 2013 to survey the medicinal plants and collect the information from the villagers. Results From this study 52 species of valuable medicinal plants belonging to 36 families were recorded and their ethnomedicinal values were collected from the village peoples. Conclusion This study focuses the importance, utilization and conservation of the medicinal plants among the people. PMID:24093789

  16. Mapping private pharmacies and their characteristics in Ujjain district, Central India

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In India, private pharmacies are ubiquitous yet critical establishments that facilitate community access to medicines. These are often the first points of treatment seeking in parts of India and other low income settings around the world. The characteristics of these pharmacies including their location, drug availability, human resources and infrastructure have not been studied before. Given the ubiquity and popularity of private pharmacies in India, such information would be useful to harness the potential of these pharmacies to deliver desirable public health outcomes, to facilitate regulation and to involve in initiatives pertaining to rational drug use. This study was a cross sectional survey that mapped private pharmacies in one district on a geographic information system and described relevant characteristics of these units. Methods This study of pharmacies was a part of larger cross sectional survey carried out to map all the health care providers in Ujjain district (population 1.9 million), Central India, on a geographic information system. Their location vis-à-vis formal providers of health services were studied. Other characteristics like human resources, infrastructure, clients and availability of tracer drugs were also surveyed. Results A total 475 private pharmacies were identified in the district. Three-quarter were in urban areas, where they were concentrated around physician practices. In rural areas, pharmacies were located along the main roads. A majority of pharmacies simultaneously retailed medicines from multiple systems of medicine. Tracer parenteral antibiotics and injectable steroids were available in 83.7% and 88.7% pharmacies respectively. The proportion of clients without prescription was 39.04%. Only 11.58% of staff had formal pharmacist qualifications. Power outages were a significant challenge. Conclusion This is the first mapping of pharmacies & their characteristics in India. It provides evidence of the urban dominance and close relationship between healthcare provider location and pharmacy location. The implications of this relationship are discussed. The study reports a lack of qualified staff in the presence of a high proportion of clients attending without a prescription. The study highlights the need for the better implementation of regulation. Besides facilitating regulation & partnerships, the data also provides a sampling frame for future interventional studies on these pharmacies. PMID:22204447

  17. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis among children in Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lalitha Kabilan; Sudhansu Vrati; S. Ramesh; S. Srinivasan; Mohan Babu Appaiahgari; N. Arunachalam; V. Thenmozhi; S. Muthu Kumaravel; P. Philip Samuel; R. Rajendran

    2004-01-01

    Background: Japanese encephalitis (JE) is endemic in Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu (TN), Southern India. The reports of JE cases from the local hospitals did not reflect the actual disease burden. It is likely that these cases were attending the nearby referral hospitals, for want of better treatment facilities. Objectives: Between July 2002 and February 2003, a pilot study was undertaken

  18. Occurrence of thorite and radioactive zircon in syenite pegmatite, North of Ashwaraopet, Khammam district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Surya Prakash; Sastry, R. S. N.; Roy, Gautam

    1989-07-01

    This paper reports the occurrence of thorite and confirms the earlier find of radioactive zircon by Subbarao, Murali and others from syenite pegmatite in the Vinayakapuram-Kunavaram alkaline belt in the Khammam district of Andhra Pradesh, India. Thorite has also been found as residual concentrations in soil overlying the pegmatite.

  19. Malaria prevalence among pregnant women in two districts with differing endemicity in Chhattisgarh, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In India, malaria is not uniformly distributed. Chhattisgarh is a highly malarious state where both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are prevalent with a preponderance of P. falciparum. Malaria in pregnancy (MIP), especially when caused by P. falciparum, poses substantial risk to the mother and foetus by increasing the risk of foetal death, prematurity, low birth weight (LBW), and maternal anaemia. These risks vary between areas with stable and unstable transmission. The specific objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of malaria, its association with maternal and birth outcomes, and use of anti-malarial preventive measures for development of evidence based interventions to reduce the burden of MIP. Methods A cross-sectional study of pregnant women presenting to antenatal clinics (ANC) or delivery units (DU), or hospitalized for non-obstetric illness was conducted over 12?months in high (Bastar) and low (Rajnandgaon) transmission districts in Chhattisgarh state. Intensity of transmission was defined on the basis of slide positivity rates with a high proportion due to P. falciparum. In each district, a rural and an urban health facility was selected. Results Prevalence of peripheral parasitaemia was low: 1.3% (35/2696) among women at ANCs and 1.9% at DUs (19/1025). Peripheral parasitaemia was significantly more common in Bastar (2.8%) than in Rajnandgaon (0.1%) (p?district (stable malaria transmission) was strongly associated with peripheral parasitaemia (adjusted OR [aOR] 43.4; 95% CI, 5.6-335.2). Additional covariates associated with parasitaemia were moderate anaemia (aOR 3.7; 95% CI 1.8-7.7), fever within the past week (aOR 3.2; 95% CI 1.2-8.6), and lack of formal education (aOR 4.6; 95% CI 2.0-10.7). Similarly, analysis of DU participants revealed that moderate anaemia (aOR 2.5; 95% CI 1.1-5.4) and fever within the past week (aOR 5.8; 95% CI 2.4-13.9) were strongly associated with peripheral and/or placental parasitaemia. Malaria-related admissions were more frequent among pregnant women in Bastar, the district with greater malaria prevalence (51% vs. 11%, p?India. PMID:22882903

  20. Cattle mortality in the Thane district, India: a study of cause/effect relationships.

    PubMed

    Dogra, R K; Murthy, R C; Srivastava, A K; Gaur, J S; Shukla, L J; Varmani, B M

    1996-02-01

    An unexpected mortality of more than 300 cattle was investigated near a metal recovery factory located in a rural area of the Thane district of India. The factory was engaged in reclaiming lead, aluminum, tin, and zinc from discarded lead storage batteries and soft drink cans. The environmental samples (soil, leaves, grass, slag, water, and sediment), human blood and hair and animal samples (blood, urine, peritoneal fluid, liver, kidney, cow dung, ribs, and femur), collected for analysis revealed toxic levels of lead, cadmium, and chromium. Clinical examination of factory workers and school children revealed cough, fever, gastric problems, abdominal pain, skin lesions (scabies), and blue line on gums. Histopathological examination of animal tissues revealed chronic pathology with lead inclusion bodies in hepatocytes and renal tubules. Based on environmental, clinical, analytical, and histopathological observations, the mortality has been attributed to toxic levels of metals in the body and the malnourished status of the animals. PMID:8593087

  1. Dynamics of Forest Malaria Transmission in Balaghat District, Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neeru; Chand, Sunil K.; Bharti, Praveen K.; Singh, Mrigendra P.; Chand, Gyan; Mishra, Ashok K.; Shukla, Man M.; Mahulia, Man M.; Sharma, Ravendra K.

    2013-01-01

    Background An epidemiological and entomological study was carried out in Balaghat district, Madhya Pradesh, India to understand the dynamics of forest malaria transmission in a difficult and hard to reach area where indoor residual spray and insecticide treated nets were used for vector control. Methods This community based cross-sectional study was undertaken from January 2010 to December 2012 in Baihar and Birsa Community Health Centres of district Balaghat for screening malaria cases. Entomological surveillance included indoor resting collections, pyrethrum spray catches and light trap catches. Anophelines were assayed by ELISA for detection of Plasmodium circumsporozoite protein. Findings Plasmodium falciparum infection accounted for >80% of all infections. P. vivax 16.5%, P. malariae 0.75% and remaining were mixed infections of P. falciparum, P. vivax and P. malariae. More than, 30% infections were found in infants under 6 months of age. Overall, an increasing trend in malaria positivity was observed from 2010 to 2012 (chi-square for trend ?=? 663.55; P<0.0001). Twenty five Anopheles culicifacies (sibling species C, D and E) were positive for circumsporozoite protein of P. falciparum (44%) and P. vivax (56%). Additionally, 2 An. fluviatilis, were found positive for P. falciparum and 1 for P. vivax (sibling species S and T). An. fluviatilis sibling species T was found as vector in forest villages for the first time in India. Conclusion These results showed that the study villages are experiencing almost perennial malaria transmission inspite of indoor residual spray and insecticide treated nets. Therefore, there is a need for new indoor residual insecticides which has longer residual life or complete coverage of population with long lasting insecticide treated nets or both indoor residual spray and long lasting bed nets for effective vector control. There is a need to undertake a well designed case control study to evaluate the efficacy of these interventions. PMID:24023900

  2. Malaria transmission in the Tarai, Naini Tal District, Uttar Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Issaris, P. C.; Rastogi, S. N.; Ramakrishna, V.

    1953-01-01

    A study of the problems of malaria transmission in the Tarai of Naini Tal District, Uttar Pradesh, India, has been made by a WHO Malaria Control Demonstration Team operating in the area between 1949 and 1952. Earlier investigators of malaria transmission in the area had concluded that the fever season coincided with the pre-monsoon period; that Anopheles minimus was the chief vector; and that A. fluviatilis could be dismissed as a zoophilic non-vector. As a result of the team's malariometric and entomological surveys, the following conclusions have been reached: malaria transmission takes place throughout the year; A. minimus is virtually non-existent and plays no part in transmission; A. fluviatilis, the primary vector, is responsible for transmission in the pre- and post-monsoon periods; A. culicifacies, the secondary vector, is responsible for transmission in the monsoon period (July-September). The results of precipitin tests on A. fluviatilis—which gave a gross anthropophilic index of over 40%—indicate that the A. fluviatilis found in this region of India is a mixture of both anthropophilic and zoophilic races; further studies are required to substantiate this theory. PMID:13106698

  3. The Female Sex Work Industry in a District of India in the Context of HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Buzdugan, Raluca; Halli, Shiva S.; Hiremath, Jyoti M.; Jayanna, Krishnamurthy; Raghavendra, T.; Moses, Stephen; Blanchard, James; Scambler, Graham; Cowan, Frances

    2012-01-01

    HIV prevalence in India remains high among female sex workers. This paper presents the main findings of a qualitative study of the modes of operation of female sex work in Belgaum district, Karnataka, India, incorporating fifty interviews with sex workers. Thirteen sex work settings (distinguished by sex workers' main places of solicitation and sex) are identified. In addition to previously documented brothel, lodge, street, dhaba (highway restaurant), and highway-based sex workers, under-researched or newly emerging sex worker categories are identified, including phone-based sex workers, parlour girls, and agricultural workers. Women working in brothels, lodges, dhabas, and on highways describe factors that put them at high HIV risk. Of these, dhaba and highway-based sex workers are poorly covered by existing interventions. The paper examines the HIV-related vulnerability factors specific to each sex work setting. The modes of operation and HIV-vulnerabilities of sex work settings identified in this paper have important implications for the local programme. PMID:23346389

  4. Medicinal plants used by tribal population of Coochbehar district, West Bengal, India-an ethnobotanical survey

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Tanmay; Patra, Amal Kumar; Dastidar, Santanu Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore traditional ethnomedicinal knowledge of different tribes of Coochbehar district of West Bengal, India, and its present status. Methods With the help of standardized questionnaires, traditional healers and resource persons were interviewed on medicinal use of local flora in all the tribal villages of Coochbehar district during July, 2007 to December, 2009 and some of the places were revisited for this purpose again during July to December of 2012. Results A total of 46 plant species belonging to 42 genera and 27 families were reported to be used for treating 33 various physical ailments. In terms of the number of medicinal plant species, Fabaceae (5 species) and Euphorbiaceae (4 species) are dominant families. Among different plant parts used for the preparation of medicine, leaves were most frequently used for the treatment of diseases. Conclusions In all tribal villages we found the use of medicinal plants, particularly to treat common physical problems like smaller injuries, stomachache and abdominal disorder. However, non-availability of such plants in close vicinity is imposing restriction on using medicinal plants. Further research on these species may lead to the discovery of novel bioactive molecules in one hand and also it may open up a new horizon of sustainable development. PMID:25183132

  5. Indigenous knowledge of zootherapeutic use among the Biate tribe of Dima Hasao District, Assam, Northeastern India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study addresses the use of zootherapy in the traditional healthcare system of the Biate tribe of Dima Hasao district, Assam, India. It sought to identify the different species used for zootherapeutic use with the detailed methods of usages to create awareness and contribute to the conservation and sustainable utilization of the resources. Method 15 Biate villages within the district of Dima Hasao were surveyed through semi-structured questionnaires and informal interviews. Detailed information on the uses of each animal was recorded. Species were identified using standard literature. Fidelity level (FL) was calculated to demonstrate the percentage of respondents claiming the use of a certain animal for the same major purposes. Result The study documents 34 species for the treatment of about 34 different ailments. The largest number of species reported was mammals with17 species. Maximum number of species has been reported for the treatment of diabetes and its high fidelity levels warrants in-depth studies to establish its pharmacological activity. The usages documented herein are unique to the Biate tribe. Very often, these animals are hunted and sold openly at the local markets in the lure of quick money. A 300 gm live Gekko gecko may fetch a sum of 2,50,000 Indian Rupees (INR), and smoked meat of Hoolock hoolock cost approximately 250–300 INR per kg. Animals are also hunted for its hide. The unrestricted hunting of species like Capricornis sumatraensis has almost wiped out the population within the district. Some species are also reared as pets while some are used for display as a sign of expertise in hunting. The present study has documented the usage of at least 15 animals listed in the IUCN Red List. Conclusion The study illustrates the in-depth knowledge of the Biate tribe on zootherapy. Systematic investigation to identify the active ingredient may lead to the development of new drugs, which would prompt protection of these valuable resources. PMID:23938109

  6. Spatiotemporal distribution of dengue vectors & identification of high risk zones in district Sonitpur, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Momi; Gopalakrishnan, Reji; Kumar, Dharmendra; Gayan, Jyotsna; Baruah, Indra; Veer, Vijay; Dutta, Prafulla

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Dengue is an arboviral disease of public health importance in many parts of India and recently many cases have been reported from northeastern India. Aedes mosquitoes, which are the vectors of dengue, are widely prevalent in the region. A study was initiated in Sonitpur district of Assam to understand the spatiotemporal distribution and seasonal prevalence of dengue vectors and to identify the high risk zones. Methods: Ovitrap surveys were conducted in three randomly selected villages under each of the eight public health centres (PHC) in district Sonitpur of Assam, northeastern India during March 2011 - February 2012. Three risk zones (high, medium and low) were identified on the basis of per trap density of Aedes mosquitoes. Meteorological data were collected to study the temporal distribution of dengue vectors. Results: Aedes albopictus (99.3%) was the predominant dengue vector followed by Ae. aegypti (0.7%) recorded in the ovitraps. The highest vector density was observed during the post-monsoon (60.1 ± 18 per trap) while the lowest during the winter (7.6 ± 4.9 per trap) and the season-wise differences in the vector density were significant (P=0.005). Maximum temperature (correlation coefficient, r = 0.45) and minimum temperature (r = 0.408) showed the highest positive correlation with the vector density, whereas the number of rainy days showed high positive correlation (r = 0.185) than the total rainfall (r = 0.117). The high risk zone (Dekhiajuli, Behali, Bihaguri and Gohpur PHC) as indicated by the high larval densities of dengue vectors, 45.3 ± 18, 42.1 ± 22.3, 36.9 ± 29.1, 35.3 ± 22.6 per trap, respectively, was validated by dengue epidemiological data collected during 2012. Interpretation & conclusions: Yearlong monitoring of dengue vectors was done for the first time in this region. Monthly maximum temperature and the number of rainy days could be used for the prediction of larval density of Aedes mosquitoes. The identification high dengue risk zones would help in adopting targeted interventions for disease management in future. PMID:25297362

  7. Establishment of a Maternal Newborn Health Registry in the Belgaum District of Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnancy-related vital registration is important to inform policy to reduce maternal, fetal and newborn mortality, yet few systems for capturing accurate data are available in low-middle income countries where the majority of the mortality occurs. Furthermore, methods to effectively implement high-quality registration systems have not been described. The goal of creating the registry described in this paper was to inform public health policy makers about pregnancy outcomes in our district so that appropriate interventions to improve these outcomes could be undertaken and to position the district to be a leader in pregnancy-related public health research. Methods We created a prospective maternal and newborn health registry in Belgaum, Karnataka State, India. To initiate this registry, we worked with the Ministry of Health to first establish estimated birth rates and define the catchment areas of the clusters, working within the existing health system and primary health centers. We also undertook household surveys to identify women likely to become pregnant. We then implemented monitoring measures to ensure high quality and completeness of the maternal newborn health registry. All pregnant women in the catchment area were identified, consented and enrolled during pregnancy, with follow-up visits to ascertain pregnancy outcomes and mother/infant status at 42-days postpartum. Results From 2008 through 2014, we demonstrated continued improvements in both the coverage for enrollment and accuracy of reporting pregnancy outcomes within the defined catchment area in Belgaum, India. Nearly 100% of women enrolled had follow-up at birth and 99% had 42-day follow-up. Furthermore, we facilitated earlier enrollment of women during pregnancy while achieving more timely follow-up and decreased time of reporting from the date of the pregnancy event. Conclusions We created a pregnancy-related registry which includes demographic data, risk factors, and outcomes allowing for high rates of ascertainment and follow-up while working within the existing health system. Understanding the elements of the system used to create the registry is important to improve the quality of the results. Tracking of pregnancies and their outcomes is an important step toward reducing maternal and perinatal mortality. PMID:26062791

  8. Pesticide use pattern among farmers in a rural district of West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Indranil; Tripathi, S. K.; Roy, A. Sinha; Sengupta, Parama

    2014-01-01

    Background: A vast majority of Indian population are engaged in agriculture. While pesticides help in increasing crop production, inappropriate pesticide storage practice and inadequate protective measures frequently causes accidental poisoning among farmers. Objective: The present study was conducted to explore the pattern of pesticide use among farmers in a district of India with an attempt to identify the lacunae in their knowledge and awareness level on risks and hazards of pesticides use. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire based study was conducted in the district of Burdwan, West Bengal, to address the study objective. Data analysis was performed by using descriptive statistical methods: Frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation. Results: In the present study alpha-cypermethrin (46%) was the most commonly used pesticide followed by methyl parathion (25.6%), imidacloprid (16.4%), dichlorvos (7.8%) and phorate (4.2%). The farmers used to store pesticides mostly in cowshed (48.4%) followed by storeroom (29.6%). During spraying of pesticides, farmers experienced headache (29.8%) followed by nausea (26%), burning sensation in eyes (9.8%), cough (9.2%), muscle cramps (2%). Regarding the personal protective measures taken by the farmers for spraying, covering nose, mouth with cloth combined with bath after spraying was the most common practice (27%). When asked about suggested actions to be taken if anybody becomes sick following exposure to pesticides, 86% of farmers prefer consulting a doctor. Conclusion: The study suggested that farmers of Burdwan were exposed to highly hazardous, restricted and banned pesticides, with insufficient protection. In this situation, educational and training interventions on pesticide handling and safety precautions are urgently needed. PMID:25097405

  9. Assessment of internalized stigma among patients with mental disorders in thiruvananthapuram district, kerala, India.

    PubMed

    James, Tintu T; Kutty, V Raman

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to compare the prevalence of high internalized stigma of mental illness among patients attending community-based and psychiatric hospital-based care in Thiruvananthapuram district, Kerala, India and to examine the factors associated with high internalized stigma. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 290 patients, mean age 45 years, 38.2% and 61.8% female. A Malayalam version of the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness inventory was used for assessing internalized stigma. A multistage random sampling method was adopted. The prevalence of high internalized stigma was higher among patients from community-based care (44.7%) as compared with those from psychiatric hospital-based care (34.1%). Apart from treatment in community-based care, age ?45 years, unemployment, absence of long-term friendships, no hope of cure with medication, presence of other illnesses, and substance use were significantly associated with high internalized stigma. More than one third of the subjects had high internalized stigma. PMID:25122552

  10. Geochemistry of groundwater and groundwater prospects evaluation, Anekal Taluk, Bangalore Urban District, Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, P; Venkatesharaju, K; Prakash, K L; Somashekar, R K

    2011-08-01

    Anekal Taluk lies in the southern part of the of Bangalore urban district, known for Bannerghatta wildlife sanctuary, Jigani industrial estate, silk industry, and the electronics city, the pride of India and hub of Bangalore's information technology. In the present study, evaluation of geochemistry of 28 representative bore wells samples from Anekal Taluk was undertaken. It was found that most of the samples (92.9%) belong to Ca(2+?)-Mg(2+?)-Cl(?-?) -SO²??water type with Ca-Mg-Cl and Ca-Cl hydrochemical facies. The groundwater sources were further categorized as normal chloride (32.14%) and normal sulfate (100%) water types based on Cl and SO(4) concentrations. Majority of the samples (64.3%) belong to C3-S1 water class, indicating water with high salinity and low sodium. Positive index of base exchange indicates the chloro-alkaline equilibrium in the study area. Groundwater potential zonation map for Anekal Taluk was generated using multiparametric and weighted overlay method using the spatial analyst tool in ArcGIS v9.2. Accordingly, five distinct classes corresponding to good(high), moderate (medium), moderate to poor (low), poor (very low), and poor to nil (very low) groundwater potential zones were identified in the region. Of this, 85.27% of the study area belongs to good/high to moderate/medium groundwater potential and only 14.73% belonging to moderate/poor to nil groundwater potential zones. PMID:20936428

  11. Heavy metal contamination of drinking water in Kamrup district, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Sutapa; Sarma, Hari Prasad

    2011-08-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the heavy metal concentration of the drinking water with respect to zinc, copper, cadmium, manganese, lead and arsenic in Kamrup district of Assam, India. Ground water samples were collected from tube wells, deep tube wells and ring wells covering all the major hydrogeological environs. Heavy metals in groundwater are estimated by using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer, Perkin Elmer Analyst 200. Data were assessed statistically to find the distribution pattern and other related information for each metal. The study revealed that a good number of the drinking water sources were contaminated with cadmium, manganese and lead. Arsenic concentrations although did not exceeded WHO limits but was found to be slightly elevated. Copper and zinc concentrations were found to be within the prescribed WHO limits. An attempt has also been made to ascertain the possible source of origin of the metals. Positive and significant correlation existing between manganese with zinc and copper indicates towards their similar source of origin and mobility. In view of the present study and the level of heavy metal contamination, it could be suggested to test the potability of the water sources before using it for drinking purpose. PMID:20976545

  12. Seasonal variation of groundwater quality in a part of Guntur District, Andhra Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subba Rao, N.

    2006-01-01

    The area in Guntur district, Andhra Pradesh, India, is selected to discuss the impact of seasonal variation of groundwater quality on irrigation and human health, where the agriculture is the main livelihood of rural people and the groundwater is the main source for irrigation and drinking. Granite gneisses associated with schists and charnockites of the Precambrian Eastern Ghats underlie the area. Groundwater samples collected seasonally, pre- and post-monsoons, during three years from forty wells in the area were analyzed for pH, EC, TDS, TA, TH, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, CO{3/2-}, HCO{3/-}, Cl-, SO{4/2-}, NO{3/-}and F-. The chemical relationships in Piper’s diagram, Chebotarev’s genetic classification and Gibbs’s diagram suggest that the groundwaters mainly belong to non-carbonate alkali type and Cl- group, and are controlled by evaporation-dominance, respectively, due to the influence of semi-arid climate, gentle slope, sluggish drainage conditions, greater water rock interaction, and anthropogenic activities. A comparison of the groundwater quality in relation to drinking water quality standards proves that most of the water samples are not suitable for drinking, especially in post-monsoon period. US Salinity Laboratory’s and Wilcox’s diagrams, and %Na+ used for evaluating the water quality for irrigation suggest that the majority of the groundwater samples are not good for irrigation in post-monsoon compared to that in pre-monsoon. These conditions are caused due to leaching of salts from the overlying materials by infiltrating recharge waters. A management plan is suggested for sustainable development of the area.

  13. Potential and prospects of solar energy in Uttara Kannada, District of Karnataka State, India

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandra, T.V.; Subramanian, D.K. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Centre for Ecological Sciences

    1997-11-01

    Estimation of solar radiation for Uttara Kannada district is done on the basis of solar and other climatological data available at stations located at Karwar, Honnavar, Shirali, Mangalore, and Goa. The most commonly used empirical formula is the one that relates sunshine duration and global radiation, also referred to as Angstrom`s equation. The authors have used this relationship to estimate global radiation based on 20 years of data at Mangalore and 25 years of data at Goa provided by the India Meteorological Department. It is seen that computed and measured values (actual values) of global radiation (GR) agree within the range of 2--5% for most months. Data at Goa and Mangalore have been analyzed in order to improve accuracy and to establish the role of other climatological parameters, such as mean daily temperature, relative humidity, specific humidity, minimum and maximum temperature, and rainfall. The computed and estimated values are within the range {+-}5%. With this empirical relationship, GR is estimated (kWh/m{sup 2}) for Karwar (with 37 years of climatological data), Honnavar (with 50 years of climatological data), and Bhatkal (Shirali, with 15 years of climatological data). Karwar has a GR range of 5.5--6.5 for January--May and is in the range of 4--5 during the monsoon months, July--September, while at Honnovar the GR range during January--May is 5.47--6.5 and its minimum during the monsoon months. This study suggests that solar conversion technologies have considerable potential for application, provided that questions of storage and the monsoon season requirement can be adequately addressed through other options. The abundance of solar resources can be illustrated by comparing the land requirements of solar projects (thermal or photovoltaic) with those of hydro or energy plantation projects.

  14. Community Based Maternal Death Review: Lessons Learned from Ten Districts in Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Samiksha; Murthy, Gudlavalleti V S; Thippaiah, Anitha; Upadhyaya, Sanjeev; Krishna, Murali; Shukla, Rajan; Srikrishna, S R

    2015-07-01

    Maternal death is as much a social phenomenon as a medical event. Maternal death review (MDR), a strategy for monitoring maternal deaths, provides information on medical, social and health system factors that should be addressed to redress gaps in service provision or utilisation. To strengthen MDR implementation in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. The project involved development of state specific guidelines, technical assistance in operationalization and analysing processes and findings of MDR in ten districts. 284 deaths were recorded over 6 months (April-September 2012) of which 193 (75.4 %) could be reviewed. Post-partum haemorrhage (24 %) and hypertensive disorders (27.4 %) followed by puerperal sepsis in the post-partum period (16.8 %) were the leading causes of maternal deaths. 68.3 % deaths occurred at health facilities. 67 % of mothers dying during the natal or post-natal period, delivered at home, though the death occurred in a health facility. Type 1 delay (58.9 %) was the most common underlying cause of death, followed by type 3 delay (33.3 %). Under or nil reporting from the facilities was observed. Program staff could identify broad areas of intervention but lacked capacity to monitor, analyse, interpret and utilize the generated information to develop feasible actionable plans. Information gathered was incomplete and inaccurate in many cases. Challenges observed showed that it will require more time and continuous committed efforts of health staff for implementation of high quality MDR. Successful implementation will improve the response of the health system and contribute to improved maternal health. PMID:25636651

  15. Association of Climatic Variability, Vector Population and Malarial Disease in District of Visakhapatnam, India: A Modeling and Prediction Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Srimath-Tirumula-Peddinti, Ravi Chandra Pavan Kumar; Neelapu, Nageswara Rao Reddy; Sidagam, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Background Malarial incidence, severity, dynamics and distribution of malaria are strongly determined by climatic factors, i.e., temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. The objectives of the current study were to analyse and model the relationships among climate, vector and malaria disease in district of Visakhapatnam, India to understand malaria transmission mechanism (MTM). Methodology Epidemiological, vector and climate data were analysed for the years 2005 to 2011 in Visakhapatnam to understand the magnitude, trends and seasonal patterns of the malarial disease. Statistical software MINITAB ver. 14 was used for performing correlation, linear and multiple regression analysis. Results/Findings Perennial malaria disease incidence and mosquito population was observed in the district of Visakhapatnam with peaks in seasons. All the climatic variables have a significant influence on disease incidence as well as on mosquito populations. Correlation coefficient analysis, seasonal index and seasonal analysis demonstrated significant relationships among climatic factors, mosquito population and malaria disease incidence in the district of Visakhapatnam, India. Multiple regression and ARIMA (I) models are best suited models for modeling and prediction of disease incidences and mosquito population. Predicted values of average temperature, mosquito population and malarial cases increased along with the year. Developed MTM algorithm observed a major MTM cycle following the June to August rains and occurring between June to September and minor MTM cycles following March to April rains and occurring between March to April in the district of Visakhapatnam. Fluctuations in climatic factors favored an increase in mosquito populations and thereby increasing the number of malarial cases. Rainfall, temperatures (20°C to 33°C) and humidity (66% to 81%) maintained a warmer, wetter climate for mosquito growth, parasite development and malaria transmission. Conclusions/Significance Changes in climatic factors influence malaria directly by modifying the behaviour and geographical distribution of vectors and by changing the length of the life cycle of the parasite. PMID:26110279

  16. Diagnosis of Nutrient Constraints in Citrus Orchards of Humid Tropical India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Srivastava; Shyam Singh

    2006-01-01

    Citrus growing in humid, tropical India is concentrated in east to northeast India. The region is well known for large-scale commercial cultivation of Citrus reticulata Blanco, cultivar ‘Khasi,’ mandarin. Extensive surveys were conducted covering as many as 108 orchards from 52 locations representing eight states, namely West Bengal, Sikkim, Assam, Meghalaya, Tripura, Mizoram, Arunachal Pradesh, and Manipur. Expressed in milligrams

  17. Prevalence of peste des petits ruminants in goats in North-East India.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, V; Das, Sutopa; Raju, D S N; Chakravarty, Indirani; Nagalingam, M; Hemadri, D; Govindaraj, G; Ibotombi Singh, N; Ltu, Keduzol; Devi, Maitryee; Sharma, K; Gajendragad, M R; Rahman, H

    2014-12-01

    The present study describes prevalence of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) virus infection in goats in various parts of North-East (NE) India by screening of suspected serum samples collected during outbreak investigation and random samples during 2013-2014 survey. A total of 391 serum samples (318 random and 73 outbreak/suspected) were collected from 28 districts in 7 states (Meghalaya, Assam, Manipur, Nagaland, Arunachal Pradesh, Tripura and Mizoram) of NE India. Serum samples were screened for PPRV-specific antibodies by using PPR monoclonal-antibody based competitive ELISA. Analysis of 391 serum samples indicates that an overall seroprevalence of 17.90 % [CI 95 % 14.40-22.00] in goats {45.2 % in suspected [CI 95 % 34.32-56.58] and 11.63 % in random [CI 95 % 8.56-15.63] samples} in NE India. As expected prevalence was high in outbreaks vis-à-vis random samples. The random survey results (11.63 %) has specific implication in epidemiological perspectives, since it highlights the exact PPR prevalence under natural situations, where the subclinical, in apparent or nonlethal or recovery of infection was suspected in goats, as samples were collected from unvaccinated animals. It also warrants appropriate control measures against PPR in NE region to prevent spread of infection besides widespread presence of the disease in rest of India. PMID:25674627

  18. Visceral Leishmaniasis Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors in the Saran District of Bihar, India, from 2009 to July of 2011

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Diana; Dixon, Kandice; Garlapati, Rajesh; Gendernalik, Alex; Poché, David; Poché, Richard

    2013-01-01

    India is one of three countries that account for an estimated 300,000 of 500,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) occurring annually. Bihar State is the most affected area of India, with more than 90% of the cases. Surveys were conducted in two villages within the Saran district of Bihar, India, from 2009 to July of 2011 to assess risk factors associated with VL. Forty-five cases were identified, and individuals were given an oral survey. The results indicated that men contracted the disease more than women (58%), and cases over the age of 21 years accounted for 42% of the total VL cases. April to June showed the highest number of new cases. Of 135 households surveyed for sleeping conditions, 95% reported sleeping outside, and 98% slept in beds. Proximity to VL cases was the greatest risk factor (cluster 1 relative risk = 11.89 and cluster 2 relative risk = 138.34). The VL case clustering observed in this study can be incorporated in disease prevention strategies to more efficiently and effectively target VL control efforts. PMID:23382167

  19. Decadal changes in the land use/land cover and shoreline along the coastal districts of southern Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Misra, A; Balaji, R

    2015-07-01

    The coastal zone along the districts of Surat, Navsari, and Valsad in southern Gujarat, India, is reported to be facing serious environmental challenges in the form of shoreline erosion, wetland loss, and man-made encroachments. This study assesses the decadal land use/ land cover (LULC) changes in these three districts for the years 1990, 2001, and 2014 using satellite datasets of Landsat TM, ETM, and OLI. The LULC changes are identified by using band ratios as a pre-classification step, followed by implementation of hybrid classification (a combination of supervised and unsupervised classification). An accuracy assessment is carried out for each dataset, and the overall accuracy ranges from 90 to 95 %. It is observed that the spatial extents of aquaculture, urban built-up, and barren classes have appreciated over time, whereas the coverage of mudflats has depreciated due to rapid urbanization. The changes in the shoreline of these districts have also been analyzed for the same years, and significant changes are found in the form of shoreline erosion. The LULC maps prepared as well as the shoreline change analysis done for this study area will enable the local decision makers to adopt better land-use planning and shoreline protection measures, which will further aid in sustainable future developments in this region. PMID:26108747

  20. Teacher Education in Northeast India--Status, Weaknesses and Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Northeast India comprises of a cluster of eight states--Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Meghalaya, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura. The region is usually stereotyped as underdeveloped. Geographically, the region is surrounded by international border with part of Nepal, Bhutan, China, Myanmar and Bangladesh. Prevalence of insurgency and…

  1. Fluoride hazard and assessment of groundwater quality in the semi-arid Upper Panda River basin, Sonbhadra district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Janardhana Raju; Sangita Dey; Wolfgang Gossel; Peter Wycisk

    2012-01-01

    Around 9000 inhabitants in the Panda River basin, Sonbhadhra District, Uttar Pradesh, India, are vulnerable to a “silent” dental and skeletal fluorosis from groundwater consumption. The fluoride source and seasonal groundwater quality variation were studied by collecting 65 groundwater samples in the Upper Panda River basin. Major rock types are phyllites and granite gneissic rocks. Fluoride concentrations are in the

  2. Preventing the preventable through effective surveillance: the case of diphtheria in a rural district of Maharashtra, India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidemic diphtheria is still poorly understood and continues to challenge both developing and developed countries. In the backdrop of poor immunization coverage, non-existent adult boosters, weak case based surveillance and persistence of multiple foci, there is a heightened risk of re-emergence of the disease in epidemic forms in India. Investigating each outbreak to understand the epidemiology of the disease and its current status in the country is therefore necessary. Dhule a predominantly tribal and rural district in Northern Maharashtra has consistently recorded low vaccination coverages alongside sporaidic cases of diphtheria over the last years. Methods This study reports the findings of an onsite survey conducted to assess a recent outbreak of diphtheria in Dhule district and the response mounted to it. Secondary data regarding outbreak detection and response were obtained from the district surveillance office. Clinical data were extracted from hospital records of eleven lab confirmed cases including one death case. Frequency distributions were calculated for each identified clinical and non- clinical variable using Microsoft™ Excel® 2010. Results Our findings suggest a shift in the median age of disease to adolescents (10-15?years) without gender differences. Two cases (18%) reported disease despite immunization. Clinical symptoms included cough (82%), fever (73%), and throat congestion (64%). About 64% and 36% of the 11 confirmed cases presented with a well defined pseudomembrane and a tonsillar patch respectively. Drug resistance was observed in all three culture positive cases. One death occurred despite the administration of Anti-Diphtheric Serum in a partially immunized case (CFR 9%). Genotyping and toxigenicity of strain was not possible due to specimen contamination during transport as testing facilities were unavailable in the district. Conclusions The outbreak raises several concerns regarding the epidemiology of diphtheria in Dhule. The reason for shift in the median age despite consistently poor immunization coverage (below 50%) remains unclear. Concomitant efforts should now focus on improving and monitoring primary immunization and booster coverages across all age groups. Gradually introducing adult immunization at ten year intervals may become necessary to prevent future vulnerabilities. Laboratory networks for genotyping and toxigenicity testing are urgently mandated at district level given the endemicity of the disease in the surrounding region and its recent introduction in remote Dhule. Contingency funds with pre- agreements to obtain ADS and DT/Td vaccines at short notice and developing standard case management protocols at district level are necessary. Monitoring the disease, emerging strains and mutations, alongside drug resistance through robust and effective surveillance is a pragmatic way forward. PMID:23566309

  3. Diversity and seasonal densities of vector anophelines in relation to forest fringe malaria in district Sonitpur, Assam (India).

    PubMed

    Das, N G; Gopalakrishnan, Reji; Talukdar, P K; Baruah, Indra

    2011-10-01

    The prevalence and bionomics of known Indian malaria vector anophelines was studied in three forest fringe villages in Sonitpur district of Assam, India. Anopheles philippinensis/nivipes (36.8%) and An. annularis (25.6%) were the most abundant of the seven vector anopheline species recorded. Densities of vector anophelines in general were high during monsoon season and low during winter months. An. dirus s.l. was the most anthropophagic (91.6%) of all the species collected whereas, An. annularis, An. fluviatilis s.l. and An. varuna were predominantly zoophagic. The highest and the lowest slide positivity rates (SPR) was recorded during monsoon (36%) and winter (12.5%) seasons, respectively. SPR was positively correlated with vector anopheline densities (r = 0.902), which itself was found to be correlated with mean minimum temperature and relative humidity (RH). PMID:23024492

  4. On the relationship between bird and woody plant species diversity in the Uttara Kannada district of south India.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, R J; Joshi, N V; Gadgil, M

    1992-01-01

    Bird species richness is inversely related to woody plant species diversity and vertical stratification in the natural vegetation of Uttara Kannada, the district with the largest contiguous tract of humid tropical forest in peninsular India. This inverse relationship may be explained by the fact that although the peninsular Indian evergreen forests are rich in woody plant species when compared with the drier vegetation, they harbor an impoverished bird fauna due to their smaller overall extent and greater isolation. Much of this impoverishment is accounted for by the absence of many species of understory timaliids characteristic of the humid evergreen forests of the Eastern Himalayas and Southeast Asia. The plantations of Uttara Kannada largely derive their bird fauna from the drier vegetation and exhibit the commoner trend of a positive correlation between bird species richness and vertical stratification of the vegetation. PMID:11607298

  5. Lead, arsenic, fluoride, and iron contamination of drinking water in the tea garden belt of Darrang district, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Borah, Kamala Kanta; Bhuyan, Bhabajit; Sarma, Hari Prasad

    2010-10-01

    Drinking water quality with respect to lead, iron, fluoride, and arsenic has been carried out in and around tea gardens of Darrang district of Assam, India. The district lies between 26 degrees 25(') and 26 degrees 55(') northern latitude and 91 degrees 45(') and 91 degrees 20(') east longitude and covers an area of 3,465.30 km(2). Twenty-five different sampling stations were selected for the study. Iron, lead, and arsenic were analyzed by using an atomic absorption spectrometer, Perkin Elmer AA 200, while fluoride was measured by the SPADNS method using a UV-VIS spectrometer, Shimadzu 1240 model. The study revealed that the water sources in the area are heavily polluted with lead. Statistical analysis of the data is presented to determine the distribution pattern, localization of data, and other related information. Statistical observations imply non-uniform distribution of the studied parameters with a long asymmetric tail either on the right or left side of the median. PMID:19809882

  6. An ethnobotanical study of plants used for the treatment of livestock diseases in Tikamgarh District of Bundelkhand, Central India

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore and document the information regarding usage of ethnoveterinary medicinal plants utilized by rural farmers and traditional herbal healers for livestock healthcare in Tikamgarh District of Bundelkhnad, Central India. Methods The remote villages of Tikamgarh district were regularly visited from July 2011 to June 2012. Following the methods of Jain and Goel (1995) information regarding the usage of ethnoveterinary medicinal plants was collected. Results A total of 41 plant species in 39 genera and 25 families were used traditionally with various plant parts and their combinations for the treatment of more than 36 diseases in the studied area. Trees (17 species) were found to be the most used Ethnoveterinary medicinal plants followed by herbs (15 species), shrubs (6 species) and grasses (3) in descending order. The most common diseases cough, diarrhoea and fever were treated by 04 ethnoveterinary medicinal plant species. Conclusions The present study recommended that the crop and medicinal plant genetic resources cannot be conserved and protected without conserving/managing of the agro-ecosystem or natural habitat of medicinal plants and the socio-cultural organization of the local people. The same may be applied to protect indigenous knowledge, related to the use of medicinal and other wild plants. Introduction of medicinal plants in degraded government and common lands could be another option for promoting the rural economy together with environmental conservation, but has not received attention in the land rehabilitation programs in this region. PMID:25183130

  7. Prevalence of Environmental Smoke Exposure in Households with Children in Jodhpur District, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chopra, Anita; Dhawan, Anju; Sethi, Hem; Mohan, Devinder

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The present study assessed the prevalence of child exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) among families with smoking members. Methods: Secondary analysis was conducted on data from a survey done in Jodhpur district (Rajasthan) on substance use in 11459 households. Frequency of smoking by residents in households with children below 10…

  8. Potential and Prospects of Solar Energy in Uttara Kannada, District of Karnataka State, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. V. RAMACHANDRA; D. K. SUBRAMANIAN

    1997-01-01

    Solar energy can meet a large variety of the small-scale decentralized energy needs of a region. The design of solar devices depends on the global and diffuse solar radiation data. Estimation of solar radiation for Uttara Kannada district is done on the basis of solar and other climatological data available at stations located at Karwar, Honnavar, Shirali, Mangalore, and Goa.

  9. Some Less Known Ethnomedicinal uses from Mysore and coorg districts, Karnataka, Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, R. D.; Singh, N. P.

    2001-01-01

    Present communication deals with 51 less known uses belonging to 39 medicinal plants which are being used traditionally in Karnataka, and are not well known for its said efficacies for curing respective disorders. Each use has been given under correct botanical name, family, local name, locality in particular district and finally the collection number PMID:22557008

  10. India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaan, Leslie

    This text examines India's rich and long history, then uses this perspective to focus on present day problems and aspirations. It forces students to reevaluate their stereotyped images of India by presenting a nation that has striven to recover from a past of colonial domination, is presently faced with regional ethnic discord and disparity, and…

  11. India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaan, Leslie; Lightman, Kathleen

    Not only is India one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world, it has also become one of the greatest industrial nations. This package explores India's heritage, its people, and the traumatic changes of the 20th century. Contents include: Introduction, Climate, The Land, Cities, Agriculture, Rural Life, History, Religions, Dress, Food,…

  12. Insecticide Susceptibility of Phlebotomus argentipes in Visceral Leishmaniasis Endemic Districts in India and Nepal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diwakar Singh Dinesh; Murari Lal Das; Albert Picado; Lalita Roy; Suman Rijal; Shri Prakash Singh; Pradeep Das; Marleen Boelaert; Marc Coosemans

    2010-01-01

    ObjectivesTo investigate the DDT and deltamethrin susceptibility of Phlebotomus argentipes, the vector of Leishmania donovani, responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), in two countries (India and Nepal) with different histories of insecticide exposure.MethodsStandard WHO testing procedures were applied using 4% DDT and 0.05% deltamethrin impregnated papers. The effect of the physiological status (fed and unfed) of females on the outcome of

  13. Surface and groundwater quality characterization of Deoria District, Ganga Plain, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vikram Bhardwaj; Dhruv Sen Singh

    2011-01-01

    A water quality investigation was carried out in the Deoria district, Ganga plain, to assess the suitability of surface and\\u000a groundwaters for domestic, agricultural, and industrial purposes. As much as 50 representative samples from river and groundwater\\u000a were collected from various stations to monitor the water chemistry of various ions, comprising Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, HCO3\\u000a ?, SO4\\u000a 2?, NO3

  14. Medicinal Plant-Lore of Sugali Tribe of Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. Hamambara; Reddy, K. Eshwara; Venkataraju, R.R

    2000-01-01

    The preliminary investigations of crude during resources of sugali tribes of Anantapur district, Andhra Pradesh with their recipes, preparation of drugs, administration, usage form several centuries. Fifty plant crude drugs (species) belong to twenty nine families were collected based on folk-lore knowledge. Botanical name, family name, part used, mode of preparation and administration and purpose, for which it as been used were enumerated. PMID:22556937

  15. A study on hydrochemical characteristics of surface and sub-surface water in and around Perumal Lake, Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu, South India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. Prasanna; S. Chidambaram; T. V. Gireesh; T. V. Jabir Ali

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogeochemical investigations are carried out in and around Perumal Lake, Cuddalore district, South India in order to assess\\u000a its suitability in relation to domestic and agricultural uses. The water samples (surface water = 16; groundwater = 12) were\\u000a analyzed for various physicochemical attributes like pH, electrical conductivity (EC), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), chloride (Cl?), bicarbonate (HCO3\\u000a ?), sulfate (SO4\\u000a 2?),

  16. Changes in risk behaviours and prevalence of sexually transmitted infections following HIV preventive interventions among female sex workers in five districts in Karnataka state, south India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B M Ramesh; Tara S H Beattie; Isac Shajy; Reynold Washington; Latta Jagannathan; Sushena Reza-Paul; James F Blanchard; Stephen Moses

    2010-01-01

    ObjectivesTo examine the impact of a large-scale HIV prevention programme for female sex workers (FSW) in Karnataka state, south India, on the prevalence of HIV\\/sexually transmitted infections (STI), condom use and programme coverage.MethodsBaseline and follow-up integrated biological and behavioural surveys were conducted on random samples of FSW in five districts in Karnataka between 2004 and 2009.Results4712 FSW participated in the

  17. Cost & efficiency evaluation of a publicly financed & publicly delivered referral transport service model in three districts of Haryana State, India

    PubMed Central

    Prinja, Shankar; Manchanda, Neha; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kaur, Manmeet; Jeet, Gursimer; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Various models of referral transport services have been introduced in different States in India with an aim to reduce maternal and infant mortality. Most of the research on referral transport has focussed on coverage, quality and timeliness of the service with not much information on cost and efficiency. This study was undertaken to analyze the cost of a publicly financed and managed referral transport service model in three districts of Haryana State, and to assess its cost and technical efficiency. Methods: Data on all resources spent for delivering referral transport service, during 2010, were collected from three districts of Haryana State. Costs incurred at State level were apportioned using appropriate methods. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique was used to assess the technical efficiency of ambulances. To estimate the efficient scale of operation for ambulance service, the average cost was regressed on kilometres travelled for each ambulance station using a quadratic regression equation. Results: The cost of referral transport per year varied from ?5.2 million in Narnaul to ?9.8 million in Ambala. Salaries (36-50%) constituted the major cost. Referral transport was found to be operating at an average efficiency level of 76.8 per cent. Operating an ambulance with a patient load of 137 per month was found to reduce unit costs from an average ? 15.5 per km to ? 9.57 per km. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that the publicly delivered referral transport services in Haryana were operating at an efficient level. Increasing the demand for referral transport services among the target population represents an opportunity for further improving the efficiency of the underutilized ambulances. PMID:24521648

  18. Heavy metal accumulation by three species of mosses in Shillong, North-Eastern India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abhik Gupta

    1995-01-01

    Comparisons were made of the accumulation of cadmium, copper, manganese, lead, and zinc in Plagiothecium denticulatum, Bryum argenteum and Sphagnum sp. in Shillong, Meghalaya State, Northeastern India. Samples of P. denticulatum and B. argenteum were collected inside Shillong city (urban) and its immediately adjacent outskirts (suburban), while Sphagnum sp. was collected from a suburban site only. Lead and copper levels

  19. Pesticide residues in two frog species in a paddy agroecosystem in Palakkad district, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Kittusamy, Ganesan; Kandaswamy, Chandrasekar; Kandan, Nambirajan; Subramanian, Muralidharan

    2014-12-01

    Pesticides residues were quantified in 109 frogs comprising two species (Fejervarya limnocharis and Hoplobatrachus crassus) from organic and conventional paddy farms in Kerala, India. Seven frogs from conventional but none from the organic farms revealed deformities. Levels of total Organochlorines (OCs) (33.22 ng/g) and Synthetic Pyrethroid, Fenvalerate-II (26.91/42.15 ng/g) in deformed F. limnocharis and H. crassus were significantly greater than in healthy frogs. Among OCs in healthy frogs, traces of ? (gamma)-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) (2.12 ng/g) were found only in F. limnocharis from organic farm. Among Organophosphates, Phorate (1.02 ng/g) and Quinalphos (2.62 ng/g) were present in traces in deformed F. limnocharis, while Parathion ethyl (1.02 ng/g) was detected in deformed H. crassus. The data indicate that the high level of pesticides may have contributed to the deformity of frogs. Therefore, an elaborative study will be essential to conserve amphibians in India. PMID:25173364

  20. Geospatial Techniques for Efficient Conservation and Management of Surface Water for Irrigation in Joganbedi Village, Khargone District, Madhya Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. M.; Chauhan, A. S.; Aggarwal, D.

    2014-11-01

    The study aimed at developing improved methods based on remote sensing and GIS techniques to increase cultivated area under irrigation. Landuse / landcover mapping was considered as the key component to prioritize locations for constructing appropriate recharge structures. Joganbedi scheme was proposed for this study. Joganbedi is situated 13 km. from Khargone, district Khargone, Madhya Pradesh, India. Command area of the proposed scheme lies in Beda sub-basin which is a tributary of the Narmada River. This area is of hard rock terrain and is occupied by the Deccan basalt. The main objective of the study was surface water conservation and management via multi-spectral information resulting from remotely sensed data to increase irrigation. High resolution GeoEye1 stereo images were used for generation of DEM, contour, landuse/landcover mapping, lineaments and drainage mapping. DEM was used for canal alignment. and further, contours were used to determine catchment, submergence /FRL, and command areas. Landuse/landcover statistics of submergence area helped to identify different land classes within the study area. These parameters are required for scheme planning. Additionally, rainfall data, maximum drawdown level, and dam height were collected as supporting parameters. The study concludes that landuse/landcover mapping is useful in identification of surface water conservation and management plan for irrigation purpose. It also proves that implementation of Joganbedi scheme will increase the cultivated area under irrigation, facilitate the farmers for multi season cropping and help in improving their economic condition.

  1. Skill of frontline workers implementing integrated management of neonatal and childhood illness: experience from a district of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Akhil B; Mukhopadhyay, Dipta K; Mandal, Nirmal K; Panja, Tanamy K; Sinha, Nirmalya; Mitra, Kaninika

    2011-10-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Purulia district, West Bengal, India, to assess the skill of 155 frontline workers implementing Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI) and the logistic support thereof. The skills of counting respiratory rate, assessing immunization status in both age groups, assessment of breastfeeding in young infants and plotting of weight in a growth chart in case of children aged 2-59 months were acquired by majority of workers. Around two-thirds workers synthesized correct classification and nearly 60% gave appropriate management of at least one subgroup. In 30-40% cases, carers received feeding advices. Around 50% casesheets were complete and timely report submission rate was nearly 70%. Necessary equipments were available with majority of workers except the utensils for preparation of ORS. The supply of essential drugs varied from 33.5 to 71.6%. These findings suggest that IMNCI program offered a scope for capacity-building and infrastructure strengthening of the health system. PMID:21081541

  2. Integrated approach to aquifer delineation in hard rock terrains — A case study from the Banda District, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, D. C.; Niwas, Sri; Singhal, B. B. S.

    1988-03-01

    For obtaining a quick and stable solution of a groundwater problem in a hard rock area, totalling about 3000 km 2 in the southeastern parts of the Banda district of India, an integrated approach of photogeological, hydrogeological and geoelectrical studies was carried out with satisfactory results. The data of 160 vertical electrical soundings were interpreted using a computer oriented ridge-regression estimation technique, which provided a stable solution of the resistivity inverse problem even when the data are inaccurate and system parameters are linearly dependent. The integrated studies have indicated the existence of three aquifers in the subsurface: (a) a porous, sandy aquifer within the alluvium; (b) fractured (and weathered) aquifers in the sandstone bedrock in the eastern and southern parts, and in the granite bedrock in the northwestern parts of the area; and (c) a deeper aquifer in the cavernous dolomite, occurring below the compact sandstones, and expected to be highly productive at a number of localities. However, its southward extension beyond a lineament, designated as Manikpur Shear Zone, could not be established.

  3. Potential relationship between dengue fever and neural tube defects in a northern district of India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J B; Gulati, N

    1992-12-01

    A sudden increase in number of births of newborns with neural tube defects (NTD) was observed from June, 1989 to September, 1989 in Medical College and Hospital, Rohtak and various other government and private hospitals of the district of Rohtak. Out of a total 4785 deliveries whose records were collected, there were 87 newborns with NTD with an incidence of 18.18/1000 births which was three times higher than the previous incidence of 6.8/1000 births in the preceding 4 years. There was an epidemic of dengue fever in this area from September, 1988 to December, 1988 affecting almost one member from each family. This coincided with the period of their first trimester. Of these, 18 patients suffered clinically from dengue fever, 21 patients had positive dengue fever history in their family members, 21 patients had positive history in their neighbors. The cluster of NTD appears to be due to dengue virus infection. PMID:1361462

  4. Landscape Heterogeneity mapping for Access to Tribal health care in Nilgiris District of Tamil Nadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindha, B.; Prashanthi Devi, M.

    2014-11-01

    The Nilgiris district in Tamilnadu has a rich biodiversity in terms of flora, fauna and ethnic population. The district is basically a mountainous region, situated at an elevation of 2000 to 2,600 meters above MSL and constituting of several hill and Steep Mountain valleys. This region houses six tribes who are mainly forest dwellers and live in close settlements depending on the forest resources for their livelihood. The Tribes of Nilgiris have been diagnosed and monitored for Sickle cell Anemia which is a disease of major concern among these ethnic populations. This genetic disorder developed due to the sickling of Red Blood Cells has increased during the past few decades. The Tribes, as they live in close encounter with the forest regions and have strict social cultural barriers, face difficulty in availing treatment or counseling from the Sickle Cell Research Center (SCRC) and other NGOs like NAWA and AHWINI in the region. It was observed that many factors such as landscape terrain, climatic conditions and improper roads tend to hinder the access to appropriate health care. The SCRC in Gudalur region is a facility established to monitor the disease cases inspite of these influencing factors. On analyzing the year bound age wise classification among male and female patients, certain dropouts in cases were observed which may be due to inaccessible condition or migration of the patient. In our study, Landscape heterogeneity mapping for different climatic seasons was done in ArcGIS 10.1. For this, contour and terrain maps, road networks and villages were prepared and factors that determine Terrain Difficulty were assessed. Vegetation mapping using IRS satellite images for the study region was attempted and associated with the landscape map. A risk analysis was proposed based on terrain difficulty and access to the nearest Health care Center. Based on this, the above factors alternate routes were suggested to access the difficult areas.

  5. Geospatial modelling for groundwater quality mapping: a case study of Rupnagar district, Punjab, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Kaur, A.; Litoria, P.; Pateriya, B.

    2014-11-01

    Over period of time, the water usage and management is under stress for various reasons including pollution in both surface and subsurface. The groundwater quality decreases due to the solid waste from urban and industrial nodes, rapid use of insecticides and pesticides in agricultural practices. In this study, ground water quality maps for Rupnagar district of Punjab has been prepared using geospatial interpolation technique through Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) approach. IDW technique has been used for major ground water quality parameters observed from the field samples like Arsenic, Hardness, pH, Iron, Fluoride, TDS, and Sulphate. To assess the ground water quality of the Rupnagar district, total 280 numbers of samples from various sources of tubewells for both pre and post monsoon have collected. Out of which, 80 to 113 samples found Iron with non potable limits ranging 0.3-1.1mg/l and 0.3-1.02mg/l according to BIS standard for both the seasons respectively. Chamkaur Sahib, Rupnagar, Morinda blocks have been found non potable limit of iron in both pre & post-monsoon. 11 to 52 samples in this region have sulphate with permissible limits in both the season ranging 200-400mg/l and 201-400mg/l. But arsenic had acceptable limit in both the season. Various parameters-wise ground water quality map is generated using the range values of drinking water quality to know the distribution of different parameters and diversification in the concentration of different elements. These maps are very much needful for human being to expand awareness among the people to maintain the Cleanness of water at their highest quality and purity levels to achieve a healthy life.

  6. A spatial analysis to study access to emergency obstetric transport services under the public private “Janani Express Yojana” program in two districts of Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The government in Madhya Pradesh (MP), India in 2006, launched “Janani Express Yojana” (JE), a decentralized, 24X7, free emergency transport service for all pregnant women under a public-private partnership. JE supports India’s large conditional cash transfer program, the “Janani Suraksha Yojana” (JSY) in the province and transports on average 60,000 parturients to hospital every month. The model is a relatively low cost one that potentially could be adopted in other parts of India and South Asia. This paper describes the uptake, time taken and geographic equity in access to the service to transport women to a facility in two districts of MP. Methods This was a facility based cross sectional study. We interviewed parturients (n = 468) who delivered during a five day study period at facilities with >10 deliveries/month (n = 61) in two study districts. The women were asked details of transportation used to arrive at the facility, time taken and their residential addresses. These details were plotted onto a Geographic Information System (GIS) to estimate travelled distances and identify statistically significant clusters of mothers (hot spots) reporting delays >2 hours. Results JE vehicles were well dispersed across the districts and used by 236 (50.03%) mothers of which 111(47.03%) took >2 hours to reach a facility. Inability of JE vehicle to reach a mother in time was the main reason for delays. There was no correlation between the duration of delay and distance travelled. Maps of the travel paths and travel duration of the women are presented. The study identified hot spots of mothers with delays >2 hours and explored the possible reasons for longer delays. Conclusions The JE service was accessible in all parts of the districts. Relatively high utilization rates of JE indicate that it ably supported JSY program to draw more women for institutional deliveries. However, half of the JE users experienced long (>2 hour) delays. The delayed mothers clustered in difficult terrains of the districts. Additional support particularly for the identified hot spots, enhanced monitoring by state agencies and GIS tools can facilitate better effectiveness of the JE program. PMID:25048795

  7. Groundwater hydrochemistry of a sugarcane cultivation belt in parts of Muzaffarnagar district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, R.; Khan, M. Muqtada A.; Absar, A.

    2006-04-01

    The Kali-Hindon is a watershed in the most productive central Ganga plain of India. The whole area is a fertile track with sugarcane being the principal crop. Systematic sampling was carried out to assess the source of dissolved ions, impact of sugar factories and the quality of groundwater. Thirty-six samples were collected covering an area of 395 km2. The quality of groundwater is suitable for irrigational purposes but is rich in SO4 which is not best for human consumption. Graphical treatment of major ion chemistry helps identify six chemical types of groundwater. All possible species such as Na Cl, K Cl, Na HCO3, Na SO4, Ca HCO3, Mg HCO3, Ca SO4 and Mg SO4 are likely to occur in the groundwater system. The most conspicuous change in chemistry of groundwater is relative enrichment of SO4. The interpretation of data reveals that SO4 has not been acquired through water rock interaction. The source of SO4 is anthropogenic. Sugar factories alone are responsible for this potential environmental hazard.

  8. Preliminary study on avian fauna of the Krishna River basin Sangli District, Western Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Kumbar, Suresh M; Ghadage, Abhijit B

    2014-11-01

    The present study on avifaunal diversity carried out for three years at the Krishna River Basin, Sangli District revealed a total of 126 species of birds belonging to 30 families, of which 91 species were resident, 16 migratory, 12 resident and local migratory and 7 species were resident and migratory. Among the migrant birds, Rosy Starling Sturnus roseus was dominant in the study area. Commonly recorded resident bird species were, Red vented bulbul, Jungle crow, House sparrow, Common myna, Brahminy myna, Rock pigeon, Spotted dove, Rose ringed parakeet, Indian robin, White-browed fantail-flycatcher and Small sunbird. Most of the families had one or two species, whereas Muscicapidae family alone had 16 species. Forty one species of waterfowls were recorded in this small landscape. Out of 126 bird species, 38 were insectivorous, 28 piscivorous, 25 omnivorous, 19 carnivorous, 9 granivorous, 5 frugivorous and 2 species were nectar sucker and insectivorous. These results suggest that richness of avifauna in the Krishna River Basin, Western Maharashtra might be due to large aquatic ground, varied vegetations and favourable environmental conditions. PMID:25522499

  9. Insecticide Susceptibility of Phlebotomus argentipes in Visceral Leishmaniasis Endemic Districts in India and Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Picado, Albert; Roy, Lalita; Rijal, Suman; Singh, Shri Prakash; Das, Pradeep; Boelaert, Marleen; Coosemans, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the DDT and deltamethrin susceptibility of Phlebotomus argentipes, the vector of Leishmania donovani, responsible for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), in two countries (India and Nepal) with different histories of insecticide exposure. Methods Standard WHO testing procedures were applied using 4% DDT and 0.05% deltamethrin impregnated papers. The effect of the physiological status (fed and unfed) of females on the outcome of the bioassays was assessed and the optimal time of exposure for deltamethrin was evaluated on a colony population. Field populations from both countries were tested. Results Fed and unfed females responded in a similar way. For exposure time on field samples 60 min was adopted for both DDT and deltamethrin. In Bihar, knockdown and mortality with DDT was respectively 20 and 43%. In Nepal almost all sand flies were killed, except at the border with Bihar (mortality 62%). With 0.05% deltamethrin, between 96 and 100% of the sand flies were killed in both regions. Conclusions Based on literature and present data 4% DDT and 0.05% deltamethrin seem to be acceptable discriminating concentrations to separate resistant from susceptible populations. Resistance to DDT was confirmed in Bihar and in a border village of Nepal, but the sand flies were still susceptible in villages more inside Nepal where only synthetic pyrethroids are used for indoor spraying. The low effectiveness of indoor spraying with DDT in Bihar to control VL can be partially explained by this resistance hence other classes of insecticides should be tested. In both countries P. argentipes sand flies were susceptible to deltamethrin. PMID:21049013

  10. Study on Patient Satisfaction in the Government Allopathic Health Facilities of Lucknow District, India

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Ranjeeta; Idris, MZ; Bhushan, Vidya; Khanna, Anish; Agarwal, Monika; Singh, SK

    2009-01-01

    Background: The outcome of any disease is influenced by the decisions to seek care, timely arrival at appropriate diagnostic and treatment services and the receipt of adequate care from service providers. Satisfaction in service provision is increasingly being used as a measure of health system performance. Satisfaction manifests itself in the distribution, access and utilization of health services. Objectives: To determine the areas and causes of low satisfaction among the patients and suggest methods for improvement. Materials and Methods: Multistage stratified random sampling was used to select the government allopathic health facilities of Lucknow district and systematic random sampling for the selection of the patients for the interview. Results: The accessibility was difficult in 42% patients and waiting time more than 30 min for 62.5% of those attending the tertiary level health facility. The satisfaction with the duration of the outpatient department (OPD) (64.6%) and the presence of signboards (46.6%) was also found to be low. The overall satisfaction regarding the doctor-patient communication was more than 60% at all the levels of health care facilities but that with the examination and consultation was less than 60% at the primary level as compared to more than 80% elsewhere. The most important motivating factor for the visit to the tertiary (48.2%) and secondary level (71.9%, 67.1%) of health facilities was the faith on doctors or health facility. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction is severely deficient in several areas and needs improvement for the achievement of optimal health of the people. PMID:19876453

  11. What Are the Reasons for Poor Uptake of HIV Testing among Patients with TB in an Eastern India District?

    PubMed Central

    Bishnu, Bipra; Bhaduri, Sudipto; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Click, Eleanor S.; Chadha, Vineet Kumar; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Nair, Sreenivas Achutan; Gupta, Devesh; Ahmed, Quazi T.; Sarkar, Silajit; Paul, Durba; Dewan, Puneet

    2013-01-01

    Background National policy in India recommends HIV testing of all patients with TB. In West Bengal state, only 28% of patients with TB were tested for HIV between April-June, 2010. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to understand patient, provider and health system related factors associated with low uptake of HIV testing among patients with TB. Methods We reviewed TB and HIV program records to assess the HIV testing status of patients registered for anti-TB treatment from July-September 2010 in South-24-Parganas district, West Bengal, assessed availability of HIV testing kits and interviewed a random sample of patients with TB and providers. Results Among 1633 patients with TB with unknown HIV status at the time of diagnosis, 435 (26%) were tested for HIV within the intensive phase of TB treatment. Patients diagnosed with and treated for TB at facilities with co-located HIV testing services were more likely to get tested for HIV than at facilities without [RR?=?1.27, (95% CI 1.20–3.35)]. Among 169 patients interviewed, 67 reported they were referred for HIV testing, among whom 47 were tested. During interviews, providers attributed the low proportion of patients with TB being referred and tested for HIV to inadequate knowledge among providers about the national policy, belief that patients will not test for HIV even if they are referred, shortage of HIV testing kits, and inadequate supervision by both programs. Discussion In West Bengal, poor uptake of HIV testing among patients with TB was associated with absence of HIV testing services at sites providing TB care services and to poor referral practices among providers. Comprehensive strategies to change providers’ beliefs and practices, decentralization of HIV testing to all TB care centers, and improved HIV test kit supply chain management may increase the proportion of patients with TB who are tested for HIV. PMID:23469163

  12. Role of asymptomatic carriers and weather variables in persistent transmission of malaria in an endemic district of Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nani Gopal; Dhiman, Sunil; Talukdar, Pranab Kumar; Goswami, Diganta; Rabha, Bipul; Baruah, Indra; Veer, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission is perennial in the Assam–Arunachal Pradesh interstate border areas in the Sonitpur district of Assam, India. A yearlong study was carried out on the incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria and the role of asymptomatic malaria carriers in persistent transmission of the disease. The relationships between malaria incidence and weather parameters were also investigated. Methods Active and mass blood surveys were conducted on a monthly basis in Bengenajuli, Sapairaumari Pathar, and Nigam villages near the Assam–Arunachal Pradesh border. Epidemiological indices were estimated for malaria-positive cases. Multiple linear regression between monthly malaria incidence and monthly average temperature, and relative humidity along with monthly total rainfall was carried out. The known malaria vectors collected in CDC light traps were identified and recorded. Results Slide positivity rate (SPR) and Plasmodium falciparum percent (Pf%) for symptomatic malaria were 26.1 and 79.8, respectively. Prevalence of malaria vectors was observed throughout the year with varying density. Anopheles philippinensis/nivipes and A. annularis were predominant among the seven known vector species recorded currently. Asymptomatic parasitemia was detected throughout the year with SPR ranging from 4.8 to 5.3. Monthly rainfall with 1-month lag had the highest correlation (r=0.92) with SPR. The relationship between SPR and weather factors was established as SPR=?114.22+0.58 T min+1.38 RH+0.03 RF (R 2=0.89; p=0.00). Conclusion Low and relatively constant levels of asymptomatic parasitemia was present in the study area. High malaria vector density and presence of asymptomatic malaria parasite carriers were responsible for persistent malaria transmission in the region. This study concludes that passive detection and prompt treatment of asymptomatic carriers is essential for preventing persistent disease transmission. Rainfall along with some other weather variables may be used for predicting the malaria epidemics in the region. The predictive information could be useful to target resources more effectively. PMID:25595688

  13. Space Based Information Support for Decentralised Planning (SIS-DP)-A case study in Balangir District,Odisha, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Dash, S. K.; Thakur, R. R.; Jonna, S.; Tripathi, S.

    2014-11-01

    The state government is now focusing on decentralized planning and created administrative infrastructure for Gram Panchayat (Village Community) level planning in participatory way. The people are now opening up and started taking part in planning process at grass root level. In order to involve the people and make planning exercise more effective, National Remote Sensing Centre(ISRO), Dept. of Space(DOS) have begun activities using GIS and Communication Technology(Geo-Ict). Considering the potential of Geo-Ict a project titled "Space Based Information Support for Decentralized Planning (SIS-DP)" was launched by NRSC/ISRO under PC-NNRMS, DOS, Govt. of India. Odisha Space Applications Centre as a partner institution, have ful-filled the commitment of generating thematic information on 1 : 10 K from High resolution satellite data (Ortho-Rectified Cartosat-1 & LISS-IV data) for the state of Odisha. Thematic information on Land use, Settlements, Infrastructure and drainage have been generated and started dissemination to the users. The attribute information available from line department have also been linked to spatial framework of the SIS-DP layers. In the present study Bolangir, a drought prone and backward district is taken up. Total 285 thematic maps have been prepared at Gram Panchayat level keeping a buffer of 1.5 km to locally adjust any discrepancies in the boundary. User workshop and awareness campaigns were conducted and feed backs have been collected on Land Utilization Types (LUT). It is felt that extension of these services to the entire State have a strong bearing on improved strategy and planning process by the State.

  14. Predictors of HIV prevalence among street-based female sex workers in Andhra Pradesh state of India: a district-level analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A decline in HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSWs) has been reported from the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh between the two rounds of integrated biological and behavioural assessment (IBBA) surveys in 2005–06 and 2009, the first of these around the time of start of the Avahan HIV prevention intervention. In order to facilitate further planning of FSW interventions, we report the factors associated with HIV prevalence among street-based FSWs. Methods Behavioural data from the two rounds of IBBA surveys, district-level FSW HIV prevention program data, and urbanisation data from the Census of India were utilized. A multilevel logistic model was used to investigate factors associated with inter-district variations in HIV positivity among street-based FSWs in the districts by fitting a two-level model. Results The estimated HIV prevalence among street-based FSWs changed from 16% (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.2 – 17.7%) to 12.9% (95% CI 11.5 – 14.2%) from 2005–06 to 2009. HIV positivity was significantly higher in districts with a high proportion of FSWs registered with targeted interventions (odds ratio [OR] 2.02; 95% CI 1.18-3.45), and in districts with medium (OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.58-4.08) or high (OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.05-2.29) proportion of urban population. Districts which had met the condom requirement targets for FSWs had significantly lower HIV positivity (OR 0.50; 95% CI 0.26-0.97). In round 2 survey, the districts with medium level urbanisation had significantly higher proportion of FSWs registered with HIV intervention programmes and also reported higher consistent condom use with regular partner (p?district level in relation to HIV intervention programs and the degree of urbanization. These findings could be used to enhance program planning to further reduce HIV transmission in this population. PMID:24885786

  15. Severity of Malocclusion and Orthodontic Treatment Needs among 12- to 15-Year-Old School Children of Davangere District, Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Shivakumar, KM; Chandu, GN; Shafiulla, MD

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs among 12- to 15-year-old school children of Davangere District, India, by using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 1800 12- to 15-year-old school children of Davangere District, Karnataka, India. Talukas (administrative units in some states in India) were considered clusters. Schools were selected using simple random sampling procedures. The 300 study subjects were selected using systematic random sampling procedures. Data consisting of DAI components were recorded pro forma. The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis. The Chi-square test (?2) was used to compare malocclusion severity. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used to compare the changes in DAI scores and the mean DAI scores between age groups. The Z test was used to compare mean DAI scores between the 2 sexes and between children residing in urban and rural areas. Results: Of the 1800 school children examined, 899 (49.9%) were boys and 901 (50.1%) were girls. Most of the children (79.9%) had DAI scores ? 25 with no or minor malocclusion requiring no or little treatment, 15.4% had DAI scores of 26–30 with definite malocclusion requiring elective treatment, 4.2% had DAI scores of 31–35 with severe malocclusion requiring highly desirable treatment, and 0.5% had DAI scores ? 36 with handicapping malocclusion requiring mandatory treatment. Conclusions: The majority of the children in our study (79.9%) required no or little treatment; 20.1% had definite malocclusion requiring definite orthodontic treatment. PMID:20613919

  16. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure in Aromatic and Quality Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Landraces from North-Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Mawkhlieng, Bandapkuper; Misra, A. K.; Pattanayak, A.; Harish, G. D.; Singh, S. K.; Ngachan, S. V.; Bansal, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    The North-eastern (NE) India, comprising of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura, possess diverse array of locally adapted non-Basmati aromatic germplasm. The germplasm collections from this region could serve as valuable resources in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance, grain yield and cooking/eating quality. To utilize such collections, however, breeders need information about the extent and distribution of genetic diversity present within collections. In this study, we report the result of population genetic analysis of 107 aromatic and quality rice accessions collected from different parts of NE India, as well as classified these accessions in the context of a set of structured global rice cultivars. A total of 322 alleles were amplified by 40 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with an average of 8.03 alleles per locus. Average gene diversity was 0.67. Population structure analysis revealed that NE Indian aromatic rice can be subdivided into three genetically distinct population clusters: P1, joha rice accessions from Assam, tai rices from Mizoram and those from Sikkim; P2, chakhao rice germplasm from Manipur; and P3, aromatic rice accessions from Nagaland. Pair-wise FST between three groups varied from 0.223 (P1 vs P2) to 0.453 (P2 vs P3). With reference to the global classification of rice cultivars, two major groups (Indica and Japonica) were identified in NE Indian germplasm. The aromatic accessions from Assam, Manipur and Sikkim were assigned to the Indica group, while the accessions from Nagaland exhibited close association with Japonica. The tai accessions of Mizoram along with few chakhao accessions collected from the hill districts of Manipur were identified as admixed. The results highlight the importance of regional genetic studies for understanding diversification of aromatic rice in India. The data also suggest that there is scope for exploiting the genetic diversity of aromatic and quality rice germplasm of NE India for rice improvement. PMID:26067999

  17. Radiological assessment of surface water quality around proposed uranium mining site in India.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Lenka, P; Gothankar, S; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D; Khating, D T

    2009-06-01

    The gross alpha and gross beta activities were estimated for radiological assessment of surface water quality around the proposed uranium mining site Kylleng Pyndengsohiong Mawthabah (Domiasiat), West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya situated in a high rainfall area (12,000mm) in India. 189 Surface water samples were collected over different seasons of the year from nine different locations covering around 100km(2). Gross beta activities were found to vary from 144 to 361mBq/L which is much below the prescribed WHO limit of 1000mBq/L for drinking water. Gross alpha activities varied from 61 to 127mBq/L. These values are much below the reported gross alpha values by other countries. In about 7% of the samples the alpha activities remain exceeded the WHO guideline limit of 100mBq/L. Surface water samples collected during the summer season of the year show higher activity whereas low activity was found from samples collected during monsoon season. Results show that all water sources are acceptable as drinking water for human consumption from the radiological point of view, the higher gross alpha concentrations in a few locations remains so only for short duration during the summer season. PMID:19371984

  18. Double Outbreak of Measles in the Talaja Block of Bhavnagar District, Gujarat, India 2011: A Need for Improving the Vaccine Coverage and the Community Participation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankhuri P.; Chauhan, Naresh T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two outbreaks of measles were reported from an urban and a village area of Bhavnagar District, Gujarat, India in January and March 2011 respectively. Aim The present study was conducted to investigate and to assess various epidemiological features which were associated with the measles outbreak. Settings and Design The present study was designed as a cross sectional study, which was conducted in an urban and a rural area of the Talaja block of the Bhavnagar district of Gujarat, India from December 2010 to April 2011. Methods and Material The suspected cases were detected through an active case finding in the community. We defined a case clinically by the WHO criteria as the occurrence of a febrile rash with or without cough, coryza and conjunctivitis in a resident of the Talaja-urban and the Gorkhi village of the Talaja block, in the period from 1st December 2010 to 30th April 2011. Blood samples from 10 case patients were collected for the IgM antibody detection. A community based, retrospective, cohort design was carried out to find the vaccine efficacy in the Gorkhi village. Statistical Analysis We entered and analyzed the data by using an MS-Excel sheet. Results This study identified 27 confirmed cases of measles in the urban area of Talaja and 78 cases in Gorkhi village. All the 105 case patients belonged to the age group of 3 months-15 years. According to their mothers’ statements, out of the 105 measles cases in the two areas, 40 (38%) case patients were immunized. Ten sera from five case-patients each from both the areas were tested; all were found to be positive for the IgM/IgG antibodies by ELISA. Conclusions The outbreaks occurred due to a poor community participation and the poor vaccine coverage levels. PMID:23373035

  19. Study on the Prevalence of Leptospirosis among Fever Cases Reported from Private Clinics in the Urban areas of Villupuram District, Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Basker, Parasuraman; Kannan, Pichai; Kolandaswamy, Karumana Gounder

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To know the prevalence of leptospirosis cases reported in private clinics among fever cases in Villupuram District, Tamil Nadu, India to know its real magnitude of the problem and to diagnose Leptospirosis among fever cases from differential diagnosis. Methods 1502 Blood serum samples collected from three urban towns namely Kallakurichi (Latitude: 11° 73? N; Longitude: 78° 97? E), Villupuram (Latitude: 11° 75? N; Longitude: 79° 92? E) and Thindivanam (Latitude: 12° 25? N; Longitude: 79° 65? E) in fifteen clinics based on case definition of leptospirosis delineated by the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP), Government of India. Samples were tested in the laboratory of the Zonal Entomological Team (ZET), Cuddalore with Macroscopic Slide Agglutination Test (MSAT) and Ig-M ELISA. Result There were 65 positive cases detected from 1502 blood serum samples in both MSAT and Ig-M ELISA. It could be known that there was 4% cases contributed from private clinics among fever cases. From this study, further it was known that all age groups of people affected irrespective of sexes based on their living condition associated with the environment prevailed of the disease. Conclusion From this study, it was quantified that 4% of cases reported in private clinics among fever cases and its findings ascertained both the importance of differential diagnosis as well as reports that should be included to the Government for knowing its real magnitude for planning. PMID:24955313

  20. Cost-analysis of the WHO Essential Medicines List in A Resource-Limited Setting: Experience from A District Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dixon; Zachariah, Seeba; Byram, Rajarajeshwari; Kannan, Shanmugamari

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has been publishing the essential medicines list (EML) since 1977. The EML includes the most efficacious, safe and cost-effective drugs for the most relevant public health conditions worldwide. The WHO performs a cost-effectiveness analysis within each therapeutic group, but very little is known about which therapeutic groups are costliest for hospitals that adopt the WHO EML concept. In this study, we have described the annual consumption of medicines in a district hospital in India, that limited the list of available drugs according to the WHO EML concept. Only 21 drugs constituted 50% of the hospital spending. Anti-infective medicines accounted for 41% of drug spending, especially antiretrovirals which were used to treat HIV infection. Among other therapeutic groups, insulin had the highest impact on the hospital budget. We identified medicines used in perinatal care, which included anti-D immunoglobulin and lung surfactants, that were used rarely, but bore a relatively high cost burden. The results of this study indicate that, in district that adopt the WHO EML, antiretrovirals and antibiotics were the top therapeutic groups for the drug hospital budgets. PMID:24995196

  1. Cost-analysis of the WHO Essential Medicines List in A Resource-Limited Setting: Experience from A District Hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Uria, Gerardo; Thomas, Dixon; Zachariah, Seeba; Byram, Rajarajeshwari; Kannan, Shanmugamari

    2014-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has been publishing the essential medicines list (EML) since 1977. The EML includes the most efficacious, safe and cost-effective drugs for the most relevant public health conditions worldwide. The WHO performs a cost-effectiveness analysis within each therapeutic group, but very little is known about which therapeutic groups are costliest for hospitals that adopt the WHO EML concept. In this study, we have described the annual consumption of medicines in a district hospital in India, that limited the list of available drugs according to the WHO EML concept. Only 21 drugs constituted 50% of the hospital spending. Anti-infective medicines accounted for 41% of drug spending, especially antiretrovirals which were used to treat HIV infection. Among other therapeutic groups, insulin had the highest impact on the hospital budget. We identified medicines used in perinatal care, which included anti-D immunoglobulin and lung surfactants, that were used rarely, but bore a relatively high cost burden. The results of this study indicate that, in district that adopt the WHO EML, antiretrovirals and antibiotics were the top therapeutic groups for the drug hospital budgets. PMID:24995196

  2. Wheat Yield Prediction Using Remotely Sensed Agromet Trend-Based Models for Hoshiarpur District of Punjab, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazgeer, S.; Mahey, R. K.; Sidhu, S. S.; Sharma, P. K.; Sood, A.; Noorian, A. M.; Kamali, Gh.

    Estimation of crop production in advance of the harvest has been an intensively researched field in agriculture. The aim of present study was to predict wheat yield using different agrometeorological indices, spectral index (NDVI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and Trend Estimated Yield (TEY) in Hoshiarpur district of Punjab for the years 2001-02 and 2002-03. On the basis of examination of Correlation Coefficients (R), Standard Error of Estimate (SEOE) and Relative Deviation (RD) values resulted from different agromet models, the best agromet subset were selected as Minimum Temperature (Tmin), Maximum Temperature (Tmax) and Accumulated Heliothermal Units (HTU) for Hoshiarpur district. In order to improve model accuracy the above mentioned agrometeorological indices together with NDVI and TEY were used as independent variables for yield prediction at reproductive stage (2nd week of March) of wheat. It was found that Agromet-Spectral-Trend-Yield model could explain 96% (SEOE = 87 kg ha-1) of wheat yield variations for Hoshiarpur district.

  3. Are Banks Responsive to Exogenous Shocks to Credit Demand in Rural Economies? District level Evidence from India

    E-print Network

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    markets and, in the process, contribute to several existing literatures. Keywords: bank credit; credit Department for rainfall data, and Sanjay Bose (Statistics and Information Management, Reserve Bank of India), and seminars at the Institute for Financial Management and Research, Indian School of Business, Shiv Nadar

  4. Farmer's Incentives for Adoption of Recommended Farm Practices in Wheat Crop in Aligarh Intensive Agricultural District, India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidyarthy, Gopal Saran

    This study was undertaken to identify farmer incentives that led them to adopt wheat crop practices in Aligarh Intensive Agricultural District Program: the association between the farmer's characteristics and adoption groups; the incentives that lead the farmers to adopt recommended wheat crop practices; relationship between identified incentives…

  5. Hydrochemical appraisal of groundwater and its suitability in the intensive agricultural area of Muzaffarnagar district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Tyagi; P. S. Datta; N. K. Pruthi

    2009-01-01

    Muzaffarnagar is an economically rich district situated in the most fertile plains of two great rivers Ganga and Yamuna in the Indo-gangetic plains, with agricultural land irrigated by both surface water as well as groundwater. An investigation has been carried out to understand the hydrochemistry of the groundwater and its suitability for irrigation uses. Groundwater in the study area is

  6. Programmatic and beneficiary-related factors for low vaccination coverage in Papum Pare district, Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Takum, Tana; Padung, D; Joshua, Vasna; Manickam, P; Murhekar, Manoj V

    2011-08-01

    Vaccination coverage in Papum Pare district, Arunachal Pradesh was observed to be low. We evaluated the universal immunization programme (UIP) through survey of health facilities in the district and collected data about inputs and processes for childhood vaccination, cold-chain maintenance, supervision and monitoring. Using cluster sampling methodology, we selected 697 children aged 12-23 months from 41 clusters and interviewed their mothers to collect information about vaccination status, socio-demographic factors, knowledge, attitude and practices. Only 50% health facilities in the district were conducting fixed-day immunizations. Of the children surveyed, 55% were fully vaccinated. Mothers who were informed about next due date by health workers, possessed immunization card, attended antenatal clinics, or who delivered in hospital were likely to complete the vaccination schedule of their children. In order to increase the vaccination coverage, all health facilities in the district need to be made functional for conducting immunization. Educating health workers to remind mothers about due date of vaccination will also help increasing the vaccination coverage. PMID:20881003

  7. Emergency referral transport for maternal complication: lessons from the community based maternal death audits in Unnao district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sunil Saksena; Manthri, Suneedh; Sahoo, Pratap Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: An effective emergency referral transport system is the link between the home of the pregnant woman and a health facility providing basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care. This study attempts to explore the role of emergency transport associated with maternal deaths in Unnao district, Uttar Pradesh (UP). Methods: A descriptive study was carried out to assess the causes of and factors leading to maternal deaths in Unnao district, UP, through community based Maternal Death Review (MDR) using verbal autopsy, in a sample of 57 maternal deaths conducted between June 1, 2009, and May 31, 2010. A facility review was also conducted in 15 of the 16 block level and district health facilities to collect information on preparedness of the facilities for treating obstetric complications including referral transportation. A descriptive analysis was carried out using ratios and percentages to analyze the availability of basic facilities which may lead to maternal deaths. Results: It was found that there were only 10 ambulances available at 15 facilities against 19 required as per Indian Public Health Standards (IPHS). About 47% of the deaths took place in a facility, 30% enroute to a health facility and 23% at home. Twenty five percent of women were taken to one facility, 32% were taken to two facilities, and 25% were taken to three facilities while 19% were not taken to any facility before their death. Sixteen percent of the pregnant women could not arrange transportation to reach any facility. The mean time to make arrangements for travel from home to facility-1 and facility-2 to facility-3 was 3.1 hours; whereas from facility-1 to facility-2 was 9.9 hours. The mean travel time from home to facility-1 was 1 hour, from facility-1 to facility-2 was 1.4 hours and facility-2 to facility-3 was 1.6 hours. Conclusion: The public health facility review and MDR, clearly indicates that the inter-facility transfers appropriateness and timeliness of referral are major contributing factor for maternal deaths in Unnao district, UP. The UP Government, besides strengthening Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) and Basic Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (BEmONC) services in the district and state as a whole, also needs to focus on developing a functional and effective referral system on a priority basis to reduce the maternal deaths in Unnao district. PMID:25674573

  8. Nursing personnel planning for rural hospitals in Burdwan District, West Bengal, India, using workload indicators of staffing needs.

    PubMed

    Shivam, Swapnil; Roy, Rabindra Nath; Dasgupta, Samir; Das Bhattacharyya, Krishna; Misra, Raghu Nath; Roy, Sima; Indranil, Saha

    2014-12-01

    Lack of appropriate human resources planning is an important factor in the inefficient use of the public health facilities. Workforce projections can be improved by using objective methods of staffing needs based on the workload and actual work undertaken by workers, a guideline developed by Peter J. Shipp in collaboration with WHO-Workload Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN). A cross-sectional study was carried out to estimate the nursing stuff requirement for the rural hospitals and provide a quantitative description of imbalances, if there is any, in the allocation at the district level during 2011. The average WISN turns out to be 0.35 for entire district, which means only 35% of the required nurses is available or 65% understaffed. So, there is an urgent need for more allocations and deployment of staff so that workload can be tackled and evenly distributed among all nursing personnel. PMID:25895199

  9. Hydrochemical appraisal of groundwater and its suitability in the intensive agricultural area of Muzaffarnagar district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. K. Tyagi; P. S. Datta; N. K. Pruthi

    2009-01-01

    Muzaffarnagar is an economically rich district situated in the most fertile plains of two great rivers Ganga and Yamuna in\\u000a the Indo-gangetic plains, with agricultural land irrigated by both surface water as well as groundwater. An investigation\\u000a has been carried out to understand the hydrochemistry of the groundwater and its suitability for irrigation uses. Groundwater\\u000a in the study area is

  10. Ground Water Control Techniques for Safe Exploitation of the Neyveli Lignite Deposit, Cuddalore District, Tamil Nadu, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Anandan; S. N. Sahay; T. K. Ramabadran; S. Shiv Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Dewatering in deep opencast mines generally focuses on extraction of seepage water from the phreatic zones above the ore\\/mineral\\u000a deposits and storm water that collects in mine pits. But at the Neyveli lignite deposit in the Cuddalore District, there was\\u000a a danger of the mine floor bursting due to the hydrostatic head pressures in the underlying thick confined aquifers, a

  11. Impact of changed trophic status on the zooplankton composition in six water bodies of Dharwad district, Karnataka state (South India)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vijaykumar A. Kudari; Ravishankar D. Kanamadi

    2008-01-01

    The present paper cites results of zooplankton composition that carried out in the six water bodies of Dharwad district during\\u000a September–November 2004 (post monsoon) and February–April 2005 (pre monsoon). Comparison of the obtained results with those\\u000a of earlier investigations performed during 1978–1979 showed that changes have occurred in the interval. The total zooplankton\\u000a composition is significantly changed in all the

  12. Molecular evidence on the occurrence of co-infection with Pichia guilliermondii and Wuchereria bancrofti in two filarial endemic districts of India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF), a vector-borne parasitic disease, is endemic in several parts of India and mostly affects the poor or those with a low-income. The disease results in huge numbers of morbidities, disabilities, and deaths every year. Association of co-infection with other pathogens makes the condition more severe. Although co-infection is becoming a growing area of research, it is yet to emerge as a frontier research topic in filarial research specifically. This study reports the occurrence of a fungal infection in a large number of patients suffering from bancroftian filariasis in two districts of West Bengal, India. Methods Nocturnal blood samples from filarial patients containing parasites and fungus were initially co-cultured, and further the fungus was isolated and characterized. Molecular identification of the isolate was carried out by PCR-based selective amplification and sequencing of highly-conserved D1/D2 region of 26S rDNA, whereas pathogenicity was determined by amplification of the RPS0 gene. A phylogenetic tree was constructed to study the relationship between the isolate and common pathogenic yeasts. The isolate was studied for antibiotic sensitivity, whereas morphological characterization was performed by microscopic techniques. Results The isolate was identified as Pichia guilliermondii and this fungus was found to exist in co-infection with Wuchereria bancrofti in filarial patients. The fungus showed resistance to azole antifungals, griseofulvin, and, amphotericin B, whereas significant susceptibility was evident in cases of nystatin and cycloheximide. A total of 197 out of 222 patients showed this co-infection. Conclusion This study revealed, for the first time, that P. guilliermondii exists as a co-infection in microfilaraemic individuals living in a filarial endemic zone. The findings are important and have relevance to human health, especially for filarial patients. PMID:24708881

  13. Monitoring seasonal progress of rice stubble burning in major rice growing districts of Haryana, India, using multidate AWiFS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, M.; Prawasi, R.; Jangra, S.; Rana, P.; Kumari, K.; Lal, S.; Jakhar, K.; Sharma, S.; Hooda, R. S.

    2014-11-01

    The present paper describes the methodology and results of assessment of seasonal progress of rice stubble burning for 10 major rice growing districts of Haryana state in India. These 10 districts contribute about 84 per cent of total rice area of the state. As the rice fields are immediately required to be vacated for the sowing of next crop the farmers opt for mechanized harvesting and easy way out of burning the stubbles in the field. Such burning result in release of polluting gases and aerosols. Besides, the heating of the soil kills the useful micro-flora of the soil causing soil degradation. Multi-date AWiFS data from Resourcesat 1 and 2 satellites acquired between October 16, 2013 to November 26, 2013 were used for estimating paddy stubble burning areas at different intervals for the year 2013 crop growing season. In season collected ground truth data using hand held GPS along with field photographs were used to identify paddy stubble burning areas and other land features. Complete enumeration approach and Iterative Self-organizing Data Analysis Technique (ISODATA) unsupervised classifier was used for digital analysis. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of each date was also used with other spectral bands of temporal images. To improve the classification accuracy the non-agricultural areas were masked out. The area was estimated by computing pixels under the classified image mask. Progress of paddy stubble burning was estimated at different intervals for the year 2013 using available cloud free multi-date IRS-P6 AWiFS data to identify the crucial period when stubbles burning takes place in major area so that preventive measures can be taken to curb the menace.

  14. A pilot study on water pollution and characterization of multidrug-resistant superbugs from Byramangala tank, Ramanagara district, Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Lokesh, Priyanka; Rao, Reshma; Kumar, Arushi Umesh; Vasist, Kiran S; Narayanappa, Rajeswari

    2013-07-01

    Urbanization and industrialization has increased the strength and qualities of municipal sewage in Bangalore, India. The disposal of sewage into natural water bodies became a serious issue. Byramangala reservoir is one such habitat enormously polluted in South India. The water samples were collected from four hotspots of Byramangala tank in 3 months. The biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and bacterial counts were determined. The fecal coliforms were identified by morphological, physiological, and biochemical studies. The antibiotics sensitivity profiling of isolated bacteria were further carried out. We have noticed that a high content of BOD in the tank in all the 3 months. The total and fecal counts were found to be varied from 1.6?×?10(6) to 8.2?×?10(6)?colony forming unit/ml and >5,500/100 ml, respectively. The variations in BOD and total count were found to be statistically significant at p?>?0.05. Many pathogenic bacteria were characterized and most of them were found to be multidrug resistant. Salmonella showed resistance to cefoperazone, cefotaxime, cefixime, moxifloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, co-trimoxazole, levofloxacin, trimethoprim, and ceftazidime. Escherichia coli showed resistance to chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, co-trimoxazole, rifampicin, and nitrofurantoin while Enterobacter showed resistant to ampicillin, cefepime, ceftazidime, cefoperazone, and cefotaxime. Klebsiella and Shigella exhibited multiple drug resistance to conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus showed resistance to vancomycin, methicillin, oxacillin, and tetracycline. Furthermore, Salmonella and Klebsiella are on the verge of acquiring resistance to even the strongest carbapenems-imipenem and entrapenem. Present study revealed that Byramanagala tank has become a cesspool of multidrug-resistant "superbugs" and will be major health concern in South Bangalore, India. PMID:23114918

  15. Monitoring land use with reference to aquaculture in Chinna Cherukuru village of Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh, India - A Remote Sensing and GIS Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, M. R.; Ganguly, K.; Sunder, B. S.; Rani, G. P.; Rao, A.; Shankar, G. R.

    2014-11-01

    The present study focuses on the dynamics of conversion of agricultural land to aquaculture over a decade from 1995 to 2013 in Chinna Cherukuru Village (Thotapalligudur Mandal) in Nellore District of Andhra Pradesh State, India. Multi temporal satellite data from 1995's medium resolution to high resolution IRS LISS IV & Cartosat of 2013 time frame was analysed and mapped using RS & GIS techniques to monitor the dynamics of land transformation from agriculture to aquaculture (1995's) and conversion back to agriculture in 2013. It was observed that, in 1995 aquaculture was practiced to an extent of 62.35 hectares which accounts to 9.48 % of the Total Geographic Area (TGA) of the village (658.01 hectares), whereas in 2001 there is a major conversion from agricultural land to aquaculture accounting to an extent of 237.01 hectares or 36.01 % of total village area . However, thereafter there was a significant conversion back to agriculture accounting to an extent of 27.23 hectares or 4.13 % of TGA in 2013. The study tries to understand the underlying reasons for conversion back to agriculture which were due to several factors that include outbreak of diseases in aquatic fauna, natural calamities, variation in production cost / selling cost and non-availability of infrastructure facilities like cold storages etc. The present village level study on LUCC database provides an answer key question about socio-economic issues, land use and cropping pattern which form important input for environmental management.

  16. Metamorphic evolution of the contact aureole of the Jhirgadandi pluton, Sonbhadra district, Mahakoshal mobile belt, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Srivastava, Anand K.; Kumar, Gopendra; Dwivedi, S. B.

    2013-06-01

    The metamorphic evolution of the contact aureole around the Late Paleoproterozoic Jhirgadandi pluton in the eastern part of Parsoi Formation of Mahakoshal terrain, central India represents three distinct metamorphic zones, characterized by definite mineral assemblages. The contact-metamorphic event produced the peak-metamorphic mineral assemblages Bt + Qtz + Alb + Sil ± Cd ± Grt ± Mus ± Kfs in the metapelites of inner aureole, Bt + Qtz + And + Mus + Kfs + Plag ± Cd ± Chl in middle aureole and Chl + Mus + Bt ± And + Alb + Qtz ± Ep + Mt ± tourmaline in the outer aureole. The estimated P-T conditions based on detailed geothermobarometric calculations in the thermal metamorphosed rocks are 690°C/3.4 kbar, 580 ± 15°C and 487 ± 30°C in inner aureole, middle aureole and outer aureole, respectively. The variation in metamorphic condition suggests that the shallow crustal level emplacement of Jhirgadandi pluton is responsible for the overprinting of contact metamorphic assemblages (M2) in the low grade metapelites (regional metamorphism M1) of Mahakoshal Group.

  17. Ethnomedicinal plants used for the treatment of cuts and wounds by Kuruma tribes, Wayanadu districts of Kerala, India

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Binu; Arumugam, Rajendran; Veerasamy, Aravindhan; Ramamoorthy, Sivalingam

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the ethnomedicinal uses by the Kuruma tribals for discovering new drugs to cure cuts and wounds so as to provid the data scientifically evaluated. Methods A survey was conducted during May 2008–September 2009 to collect information on medicinal plants used by the Kuruma tribes and queries were made on the various species of plants used regularly and occasionally to cure cuts and wounds. Results The present study includes information on 34 plant species belonging to 32 genera and 25 families used by Kuruma tribe of Wayanad district of Kerala for the treatment of cuts and wounds. Conclusions The present study of the knowledge on the folklore uses of the medicinal plants used by Kuruma tribes leads to effective utilization of herbal medicines in the future. PMID:25183135

  18. Dental Caries and Their Treatment Needs in 3-5 Year Old Preschool Children in a Rural District of India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Momin, Rizwan K; Mathur, Ayush; Srinivas, Kavuri Teja; Jain, Ankita; Dommaraju, Neelima; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental problems in the preschool children are neglected by their parents as the deciduous teeth are going to shed off, and hence considered to be of no importance and more of economic burden if attended to them. Aims: This study was to determine the caries prevalence in preschool children (3-5-year-old) of rural Moradabad district, to analyze the specific pattern of dental caries experience in this population and to assess the treatment needs among them. Material and Methods: Children within the age group of 3-5 years attending Anganwadi centers of rural Moradabad district were included in the study. Caries diagnosis was based on decayed, extracted, filled surface (defs) and the treatment needs were recorded using World Health Organization (WHO) oral health assessment form 1997. Results: Out of 1,500 children examined, 48.7% males and 52.6% females did not require any treatment. The mean decayed, extracted, filled teeth (deft) value was found to be significantly high in 5-year-old participants when compared to 3-year-old participants (P < 0.01). Majority of the children required one surface filling followed by two surface fillings, caries arresting sealant care, extraction, crown bridge element, pulp care, and space maintainer. Conclusion: The most common pattern was pit and fissure, then maxillary anterior pattern, posterior proximal pattern, and posterior buccal lingual smooth surface pattern. The mean deft value was higher in males as compared to females. There is a greater need for oral health education among parents and teachers. PMID:25973401

  19. Traditional use of medicinal plants by the Jaintia tribes in North Cachar Hills district of Assam, northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Sajem, Albert L; Gosai, Kuldip

    2006-01-01

    The study of ethnobotany relating to any tribe is in itself a very intricate or convoluted process. This paper documents the traditional knowledge of medicinal plants that are in use by the indigenous Jaintia tribes residing in few isolated pockets of northeast India. The present study was done through structured questionnaires in consultations with the tribal practitioners and has resulted in the documentation of 39 medicinal plant species belonging to 27 families and 35 genera. For curing diverse form of ailments, the use of aboveground plant parts was higher (76.59%) than the underground plant parts (23.41%). Of the aboveground plant parts, leaf was used in the majority of cases (23 species), followed by fruit (4). Different underground plant forms such as root, tuber, rhizome, bulb and pseudo-bulb were also found to be in use by the Jaintia tribe as a medicine. Altogether, 30 types of ailments have been reported to be cured by using these 39 medicinal plant species. The study thus underlines the potentials of the ethnobotanical research and the need for the documentation of traditional ecological knowledge pertaining to the medicinal plant utilization for the greater benefit of mankind. PMID:16899114

  20. Groundwater quality and its suitability for drinking and irrigational use in the Southern Tiruchirappalli district, Tamil Nadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumar, S.; Ramkumar, K.; Chandrasekar, N.; Magesh, N. S.; Kaliraj, S.

    2014-12-01

    A total of 20 groundwater samples were collected from both dug and bore wells of southern Tiruchirappalli district and analyzed for various hydrogeochemical parameters. The analyzed physicochemical parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, bicarbonate, carbonate, sulfate, chloride, nitrate, and fluoride are used to characterize the groundwater quality and its suitability for drinking and irrigational uses. The results of the chemical analysis indicates that the groundwater in the study area is slightly alkaline and mainly contains Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ cations as well as HCO3 2-, Cl-, SO4 2-and NO3 - anions. The total dissolved solids mainly depend on the concentration of major ions such as Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, Cl, and SO4. Based on TDS, 55 % of the samples are suitable for drinking and rest of the samples are unsuitable for drinking. The total hardness indicates that majority of the groundwater samples are found within the permissible limit of WHO. The dominant hydrochemical facies for groundwater are Ca-Mg-Cl, Ca-HCO3, and Ca-Cl type. The USSL graphical geochemical representation of groundwater quality suggests that majority of the water samples belongs to high medium salinity with low alkali hazards. The Gibb's plot indicates that the groundwater chemistry of the study area is mainly controlled by evaporation and rock-water interaction. Spearman's correlation and factor analysis were used to distinguish the statistical relation between different ions and contamination source in the study area.

  1. Delineation of Deccan Trap outcrop extensions using satellite remote sensing techniques in Lalitpur district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, J.

    1990-02-01

    The visual interpretation and digital image analysis of remotely-sensed data of parts of the Lalitpur district of Uttar Pradesh have enabled the identification of an area having scattered remnants of Deccan Trap basic volcanic rocks occurring in the form of mesas associated with its weathered derivatives, laterite and typical black cotton soil. The lithology of the borehole data from the study area and the presence of characteristic black cotton soil cover marked by extensive gully development confirms the occurrence of volcanic 'traps' overlying the Pre Cambrian Bundelkhand Granite. This finding strengthens the earlier postulation by Vredenburg that the Deccan Trap extended far to the north in the Bundelkhand region. The interpretation of remotely-sensed data has also helped in delineating the boundary lineaments. Further, the present study has revealed that hitherto unknown bounding lineaments of the study area identified through satellite remote sensing and the abrupt termination of quartz reefs in the northern extremity of the area, suggest block faulting to the preservation of Deccan Trap rocks which might otherwise have remained exposed and been eroded.

  2. Hydrochemical appraisal of groundwater and its suitability in the intensive agricultural area of Muzaffarnagar district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, S. K.; Datta, P. S.; Pruthi, N. K.

    2009-01-01

    Muzaffarnagar is an economically rich district situated in the most fertile plains of two great rivers Ganga and Yamuna in the Indo-gangetic plains, with agricultural land irrigated by both surface water as well as groundwater. An investigation has been carried out to understand the hydrochemistry of the groundwater and its suitability for irrigation uses. Groundwater in the study area is neutral to moderately alkaline in nature. Chemistry of groundwater suggests that alkaline earths (Ca + Mg) significantly exceed the alkalis (Na + K) and weak acids exceed the strong acids (Cl + SO4), suggesting the dominance of carbonate weathering followed by silicate weathering. Majority of the groundwater samples (62%) posses Ca-Mg-HCO3 type of hydrochemical species, followed by Ca-Na-Mg-HCO3, Na-Ca-Mg-HCO3, Ca-Mg-Na-HCO3-Cl and Na-Ca-HCO3-SO4 types. A positive high correlation ( r 2 = 0.928) between Na and Cl suggests that the salinity of groundwater is due to intermixing of two or more groundwater bodies with different hydrochemical compositions. Barring a few locations, most of the groundwater samples are suitable for irrigation uses. Chemical fertilizers, sugar factories and anthropogenic activities are contributing to the sulphate and chloride concentrations in the groundwater of the study area. Overexploitation of aquifers induced multi componential mixing of groundwater with agricultural return flow waters is responsible for generating groundwater of various compositions in its lateral extent.

  3. Syndepositional and postdepositional features of the manganese ore deposits of the Proterozoic Penganga group, Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, P. C.

    1988-04-01

    The Proterozoic Penganga Group consisting of terrigenous and orthochemical sediments including a manganese orebody is well developed in the northwestern part of the Adilabad district, Andhra Pradesh. The manganese orebody of unmetamorphosed and undeformed, interbanded manganese oxide ore, chert, and minor calcareous shale has retained excellent syndepositional and postdepositional features both on the macro-and microscales. The primary depositional features include meso- and microbands of manganese oxide and silica of different descriptions, scour-and-fill structures, and Mn oxide micronodules. Spherical siliceous ?m-sized structures and other features of biogenic origin have been observed. Diagenetic features such as fabric changes, syneresis cracks, concretionary pods, and Mn oxide nodules have been recorded. They are accompanied by penecontemporaneous deformation structures such as pinch-and-swell structures, gravity-density features, brecciation, and folding and faulting of various kinds. All these features suggest that the manganese orebody was formed in a shallow-marine environment on a stable shelf possibly behind a barrier bar and subsequently underwent diagenetic reorganization and penecontemporaneous deformation when the sediments were still in a hydroplastic state.

  4. Strengthening of local vital events registration: lessons learnt from a voluntary sector initiative in a district in southern India

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Kiruba; Thomas, Tinku; Vaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem Birth and death registration rates are low in most parts of India. Poor registration rates are due to constraints in both the government system (supply-side) and the general population (demand-side). Approach We strengthened vital event registration at the local level within the existing legal framework by: (i) involving a non-profit organization as an interface between the government and the community; (ii) conducting supply-side interventions such as sensitization workshops for government officials, training for hospital staff and building data-sharing partnerships between stakeholders; (iii) monitoring for vital events by active surveillance through lay-informants; and (iv) conducting demand-side interventions such as publicity campaigns, education of families and assistance with registration. Local setting In the government sector, registration is given low priority and there is an attitude of blaming the victim, ascribing low levels of vital event registration to “cultural reasons/ignorance “. In the community, low registration was due to lack of awareness about the importance of and procedures for registration. Relevant changes This initiative helped improve registration of births and deaths at the subdistrict level. Vital event registration was significantly associated with local equity stratifiers such as gender, socioeconomic status and geography. Lessons learnt The voluntary sector can interface effectively between the government and the community to strengthen vital registration. With political support from the government, outreach activities can dramatically improve vital event registration rates, especially in disadvantaged populations. The potential relevance of the data and the data collection process to stakeholders at the local level is a critical factor for success. PMID:21556306

  5. Incidence of visceral leishmaniasis in the Vaishali district of Bihar, India: spatial patterns and role of inland water bodies.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Gouri Sankar; Kesari, Shreekant; Chatterjee, Nandini; Pal, Dilip Kumar; Kumar, Vijay; Ranjan, Alok; Das, Pradeep

    2011-05-01

    The role of the distribution of inland water bodies with respect to the transmission of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and its dominant vector, Phlebotomous argentipes, has been studied at the regional scale in Bihar, eastern India. The Landsat TM sensor multispectral scanning radiometer, with a spatial resolution of 30 m in the visible, reflective-infrared and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) bands, was used to identify water bodies using the normalized differential pond index (NDPI) calculated as follows: (Green - SWIR I)/(Green + SWIR I). Nearest neighbour and grid square statistics were used to delineate spatial patterns and distribution of the sandfly vector and the disease it transmits. The female P. argentipes sandfly was found to be associated with the distance from open water and particularly abundant near non-perennial river banks (68.4%; P <0.001), while its association with rivers was focused further away from the water source (?(2) = 26.3; P <0.001). The results also reveal that the distribution of VL is clustered around non-perennial riverbanks, while the pattern is slightly random around the perennial river banks. The grid square technique illustrate that the spatial distribution of the disease has a much stronger correlation with lower density of open waters surfaces as well as with sandfly densities (?(2) = 26.0; P <0.001). The results of our study suggest that inland water presence poses a risk for VL by offering suitable breeding sites for P. argentipes, a fact that should be taken into account when attempting to control disease transmission. PMID:21590671

  6. High prevalence of pfcrt K76T and mdr1 N86Y mutations in Sonitpur district of Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Diganta; Dhiman, Sunil; Rabha, Bipul; Kumar, Dinesh; Baruah, Indra; Veer, Vijay; Bhola, Rk; Sharma, Dk

    2014-09-01

    Present study reports the prevalence and distribution of pfcrt K76T and mdr1 N86Y mutations in malaria endemic areas of Sonitpur district of Assam. Out of 163 individuals tested for malaria, 67 (SPR = 41.1 %) were detected positive for malaria infection using rapid detection kit in the field and PCR assay in the laboratory. Nested PCR-RFLP assay was used to amplify pfcrt K76T and mdr1 N86Y genes flanking the K76T and N86Y mutations. P. falciparum was most abundant (91.04 %) among the three Plasmodium species reported and its prevalence was significantly higher as compared to P. vivax and P. malariae (?(2) = 150.76; p ? 0.0001; df = 2). Malaria was equally distributed among all the age groups and both the sexes. Hemoglobin contents in severe anaemic patients had a significant linear decreasing trend among patients with the increase in age (?(2) = 4.33; p = 0.03), whereas non severe anaemic patients exhibited significant linear increasing trend among the patients with the increase in age (?(2) = 18.38; p ? 0.0001). Pfcrt K76T mutation was recorded in 44 (72.13 %) isolates, whereas mdr1 N86Y mutation could be detected in 28 (41.79 %) isolates only. Only 32.7 % of the samples had both pfcrt K76T and mdr N86Y mutations. Number of pfcrt K76T mutant isolates was significantly higher than the wild type. However no significant difference was observed among the number of isolates with mdr1 N86Y mutant and wild isolates. PMID:25035579

  7. Risk factors of post-traumatic stress disorder in tsunami survivors of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Pyari, T. T.; Kutty, Raman V.; Sarma, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Context: In this study, we assessed the relation of possible risk factors with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the survivors of December 2004 tsunami in Kanyakumari district. Materials and Methods: We identified cases (n=158) and controls (n=141) by screening a random sample of 485 tsunami survivors from June 2005 to October 2005 using a validated tool, “Impact of events scale-revised (IES-R),” for symptoms suggestive of PTSD. Subjects whose score was equal to or above the 70th percentile (total score 48) were cases and those who had score below or equal to 30th percentile (total score 33) were controls. Analysis was done using statistical package for the social sciences to find the risk factors of PTSD among various pre-disaster, within-disaster and post-disaster factors. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that PTSD was related to female gender [odds ratio (OR) 6.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.26-12.39], age 40 years and above (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.23-4.63), injury to self (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.55-5.67), injury to family members (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.05-4.15), residence in urban area (area of maximum destruction) (OR 3.37, 95% CI 1.35-8.41) and death of close relatives (OR 3.83, 95% CI 1.91-7.68). Absence of fear of recurrence of tsunami (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.17-0.60), satisfaction of services received (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.92) and counseling services received more than three times (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.78) had protective effect against PTSD. Conclusions: There is an association of pre-disaster, within-disaster and post-disaster factors with PTSD, which demands specific interventions at all phases of disaster, with a special focus on vulnerable groups. PMID:22556437

  8. A Study on Ground Water Resource Management in Gondwana Formations in Western Part of West Godavari District Andhra Pradesh India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singara, S.

    2006-05-01

    Groundwater source forms nearly fifty percent of the total irrigation in the country. With green revolution, there has been an increasing demand for water for agricultural and this led to overexploitation of groundwater resources in many parts of the state and the study area is not an exception. With the success of groundwater exploration and development through deep tube wells in the study area, the farmers plunged into hectic activity of tapping groundwater. The present study was taken up to assess to groundwater recharge and draft in the area and to suggest remedial measures to redress overexploitation condition. The study area is underlain by a vide range of geological formations from Archean to Tertiary age. Crystallines consist of two-tier setting of aquifers with weathered and fracture zones. The Gondwana formations with Sandstone, shale and clay zones form unconfined to confined aquifer system. Deccan trap basalt occurs subsurface in some parts. Crystalline aquifers are exploited through borewells with a depth range of 29 to 101.5 m. Static water levels range in depth from 2.5 and 19.27 m bgl. Their yields range from 2.53 to 19.27 m3/hr. Sedimentary aquifers are exploited through tube wells with a depth range of 18 to 293 m and static water levels range from 2.1m agl to 48.0 m bgl. Yields of the wells vary form 1.3 to 67 m3 /hr. Groundwater is lifted by monoblock pumpsets of 5 HP in some places but mostly by submersible pumpsets with 5 to 12.5 HP. The tube wells are subjected to pumping from 5 to 18 hours per day depending on availability of electricity (power supply). They are operated form 90 days to throughout the year in different places. Groundwater development in the study area shows a steady increase since 1960 with number of tube wells uniformly increasing in each decade, from an initial figure of 592 wells in 1960 to 17,173 tube wells in 2002. Crop pattern was shifted from dry crops to paddy and sugar cane as major crops and irrigated dry crops like maize, tobacco, palm oil, garden crops in minor extent and coconut was planted in large extents. Piezometric surface shows uniform gradient over the entire area indicating hydraulic continuity between different geological formations. The water budgeting was computed by using norms recommended by GEC (Ground Water Estimation Committee) of CGWB 1997, Govt. of India. For the present study, June 2000 to May 2001 period is taken as groundwater year. Groundwater recharge is calculated (formation wise) by rainfall infiltration and water table fluctuation methods, and recharge from other sources reservoirs, tanks, canals, irrigation water returns etc. the total recharge comes to be 626 MCM. Groundwater draft for irrigation and domestic purposes is found to be 994.96 MCM. Groundwater balance shows overdraft by 364.15 MCM. Well density is increased from <1/Sq. km in 60s to >30/Sq.km in 2000. Piezometric surface profiles in N-S direction also show a drop from 1960 to 2000 year by 44m. Taking into consideration, the mined water during 1990-2000, the overdraft comes to 704 MCM i.e. 70.4 MCM/year. Groundwater draft in the study area is found to be 2.85 times more than the actual requirement (342 MCM) of the crops in the area due to highly permeable sandy soils. In view of the alarming imbalance in the groundwater recharge and draft, some management practices are suggested to restore the original groundwater condition which includes proper well spacing, artificial recharge, change of cropping pattern and irrigation methods to suit to the local conditions. Quality of groundwater is suitable for drinking and agricultural purposes.

  9. Study of the variation and the effect of geo-chemical composition on the external background radiation level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deswyn G. Marbaniang; Raj Kumar Poddar; P. Nongkynrih

    2009-01-01

    The study to generate the baseline of natural radiation and radioactivity in East and West Khasi Hills District of Meghalaya,\\u000a India was conducted to determine the different radiation dose in selected stations. Twenty stations were selected in both\\u000a the district, which include Shillong the capital of Meghalaya and the Domiasiat area, which has been identified as one with\\u000a a Uranium

  10. Arsenic Groundwater Contamination and Sufferings of People in North 24-Parganas, One of the Nine Arsenic Affected Districts of West Bengal, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman; Badal Kumar Mandal; Tarit Roy Chowdhury; Mrinal Kumar Sengupta; Uttam Kumar Chowdhury; Dilip Lodh; Chitta Ranjan Chanda; Gautam Kumar Basu; Subhash Chandra Mukherjee; Kshitish Chandra Saha; Dipankar Chakraborti

    2003-01-01

    To understand the magnitude of the arsenic calamity in West Bengal, a detailed study spanning 7 years was made in North 24-Parganas, one of the nine arsenic affected districts. Area and population of North 24-Parganas district are 4093.82 sq. km and 7.3 million, respectively. Fourty eight thousand and thirty water samples were analyzed from hand tubewells of North 24-Parganas in use for drinking,

  11. Census of India

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    India's richly diverse population of more than 975 million people, growing at a rate of over 43,000 persons per day, provides a wealth of fascinating data when its decennial census is taken by the Office of the Registrar General and Census Commissioner. Although the last Indian census was conducted in 1991, new data are still being released every month. This Website provides access to Census Publications; India and State Maps; State Publications; District Census Handbooks; Special Studies; India at a Glance; Key Population Statistics; Vital Statistics; State Census Directorates; and New Book Releases.

  12. Acceptability and feasibility of using non-specialist health workers to deliver mental health care: stakeholder perceptions from the PRIME district sites in Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa, and Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Emily; De Silva, Mary J; Hanlon, Charlotte; Petersen, Inge; Shidhaye, Rahul; Jordans, Mark; Luitel, Nagendra; Ssebunnya, Joshua; Fekadu, Abebaw; Patel, Vikram; Tomlinson, Mark; Lund, Crick

    2014-10-01

    Three-quarters of the global mental health burden exists in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet the lack of mental health services in resource-poor settings is striking. Task-sharing (also, task-shifting), where mental health care is provided by non-specialists, has been proposed to improve access to mental health care in LMICs. This multi-site qualitative study investigates the acceptability and feasibility of task-sharing mental health care in LMICs by examining perceptions of primary care service providers (physicians, nurses, and community health workers), community members, and service users in one district in each of the five countries participating in the PRogramme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME): Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa, and Uganda. Thirty-six focus group discussions and 164 in-depth interviews were conducted at the pre-implementation stage between February and October 2012 with the objective of developing district level plans to integrate mental health care into primary care. Perceptions of the acceptability and feasibility of task-sharing were evaluated first at the district level in each country through open-coding and then at the cross-country level through a secondary analysis of emergent themes. We found that task-sharing mental health services is perceived to be acceptable and feasible in these LMICs as long as key conditions are met: 1) increased numbers of human resources and better access to medications; 2) ongoing structured supportive supervision at the community and primary care-levels; and 3) adequate training and compensation for health workers involved in task-sharing. Taking into account the socio-cultural context is fundamental for identifying local personnel who can assist in detection of mental illness and facilitate treatment and care as well as training, supervision, and service delivery. By recognizing the systemic challenges and sociocultural nuances that may influence task-sharing mental health care, locally-situated interventions could be more easily planned to provide appropriate and acceptable mental health care in LMICs. PMID:25089962

  13. Acceptability and feasibility of using non-specialist health workers to deliver mental health care: Stakeholder perceptions from the PRIME district sites in Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa, and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Emily; De Silva, Mary J.; Hanlon, Charlotte; Petersen, Inge; Shidhaye, Rahul; Jordans, Mark; Luitel, Nagendra; Ssebunnya, Joshua; Fekadu, Abebaw; Patel, Vikram; Tomlinson, Mark; Lund, Crick

    2014-01-01

    Three-quarters of the global mental health burden exists in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), yet the lack of mental health services in resource-poor settings is striking. Task-sharing (also, task-shifting), where mental health care is provided by non-specialists, has been proposed to improve access to mental health care in LMICs. This multi-site qualitative study investigates the acceptability and feasibility of task-sharing mental health care in LMICs by examining perceptions of primary care service providers (physicians, nurses, and community health workers), community members, and service users in one district in each of the five countries participating in the PRogramme for Improving Mental health carE (PRIME): Ethiopia, India, Nepal, South Africa, and Uganda. Thirty-six focus group discussions and 164 in-depth interviews were conducted at the pre-implementation stage between February and October 2012 with the objective of developing district level plans to integrate mental health care into primary care. Perceptions of the acceptability and feasibility of task-sharing were evaluated first at the district level in each country through open-coding and then at the cross-country level through a secondary analysis of emergent themes. We found that task-sharing mental health services is perceived to be acceptable and feasible in these LMICs as long as key conditions are met: 1) increased numbers of human resources and better access to medications; 2) ongoing structured supportive supervision at the community and primary care-levels; and 3) adequate training and compensation for health workers involved in task-sharing. Taking into account the socio-cultural context is fundamental for identifying local personnel who can assist in detection of mental illness and facilitate treatment and care as well as training, supervision, and service delivery. By recognizing the systemic challenges and sociocultural nuances that may influence task-sharing mental health care, locally-situated interventions could be more easily planned to provide appropriate and acceptable mental health care in LMICs. PMID:25089962

  14. Social gradients in self-reported health and well-being among adults aged 50 and over in Pune District, India

    PubMed Central

    Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Juvekar, Sanjay; Lele, Pallavi; Agarwal, Dhiraj

    2010-01-01

    Background India's older population is projected to increase up to 96 million by 2011 with older people accounting for 18% of its population by 2051. The Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health aims to improve empirical understanding of health and well-being of older adults in developing countries. Objectives To examine age and socio-economic changes on a range of key domains in self-reported health and well-being amongst older adults. Design A cross-sectional survey of 5,430 adults aged 50 and over using a shortened version of the SAGE questionnaire to assess self-reported assessments (scales of 1–5) of performance, function, disability, quality of life and well-being. Self-reported responses were calibrated using anchoring vignettes in eight key domains of mobility, self-care, pain, cognition, interpersonal relationships, sleep/energy, affect, and vision. WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Index and WHO health scores were calculated to examine for associations with socio-demographic variables. Results Disability in all domains increased with increasing age and decreasing levels of education. Females and the oldest old without a living spouse reported poorer health status and greater disability across all domains. Performance and functionality self-reports were similar across all SES quintiles. Self-reports on quality of life were not significantly influenced by socio-demographic variables. Discussion The study provides standardised and comparable self-rated health data using anchoring vignettes in an older population. Though expectations of good health, function and performance decrease with age, self-reports of disability severity significantly increased with age, more so if female, if uneducated and living without a spouse. However, the presence or absence of spouse did not significantly alter quality of life self-reports, suggesting a possible protective effect provided by traditional joint family structures in India, where older people are social if not financial assets for their children. PMID:20975980

  15. Strategies for coping with the costs of inpatient care: a mixed methods study of urban and rural poor in Vadodara District, Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Michael Kent; Jayaswal, Rupal; Mills, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Background In India, coping mechanisms for inpatient care costs have been explored in rural areas, but seldom among urbanites. This study aims to explore and compare mechanisms employed by the urban and rural poor for coping with inpatient expenditures, in order to help identify formal mechanisms and policies to provide improved social protection for health care. Methods A three-step methodology was used: (1) six focus-group discussions; (2) 800 exit survey interviews with users of public and private facilities in both urban and rural areas; and (3) 18 in-depth interviews with poor (below 30th percentile of socio-economic status) hospital users, to explore coping mechanisms in greater depth. Results Users of public hospitals, in both urban and rural areas, were poor relative to users of private hospitals. Median expenditures per day were much higher at private than at public facilities. Most respondents using public facilities (in both urban and rural areas) were able to pay out of their savings or income; or by borrowing from friends, family or employer. Those using private facilities were more likely to report selling land or other assets as the primary source of coping (particularly in rural areas) and they were more likely to have to borrow money at interest (particularly in urban areas). Poor individuals who used private facilities cited as reasons their closer proximity and higher perceived quality of care. Conclusions In India, national and state governments should invest in improving the quality and access of public first-referral hospitals. This should be done selectively—with a focus, for example, on rural areas and urban slum areas—in order to promote a more equitable distribution of resources. Policy makers should continue to explore and support efforts to provide financial protection through insurance mechanisms. Past experience suggests that these efforts must be carefully monitored to ensure that the poorer among the insured are able to access scheme benefits, and the quality and quantity of health care provided must be monitored and regulated. PMID:21653545

  16. An epidemiological study of newly diagnosed sputum positive tuberculosis patients in Dhubri district, Assam, India and the factors influencing their compliance to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Forhad Akhtar; Sheikh, Samuel; Das, Kushal Chandra; Zaman, Gaffar Sarwar; Pal, Ranabir

    2014-01-01

    Context: Tuberculosis (TB) affects the economically productive age group and has emerged as a disease of significant socio-economic global burden. Aims: The aim of this study is to identify epidemiological factors responsible for TB and the clinico-social correlates influencing their compliance. Subjects and Methods: All new smear positive TB (NSP-TB) patients registered in Dhubri District Tuberculosis Center-Tuberculosis Unit during 2007 in Assam were included in this study. The study was performed by interview technique using a pre-tested questionnaire. Results: Nearly 90.76% of the participants were in the age group of 15-55 years and were predominantly unskilled workers and sole earning member of their family. 83.33% of the patients had symptoms of cough for more than 3 weeks and most of them (98.15%) lived in overcrowded houses. More than half of the patients had X-ray examination as their initial approach to diagnosis. More males (59.18%) than females (40.82%) reported to the health institution within first 6 weeks after the onset of symptom and among them 91.84% were declared cured after completion of therapy and while, only 40% of the patients initiating treatment after 6 weeks of the onset of symptoms were declared cured after completion of therapy. Conclusions: The prevalence of NSP-TB cases was more among the illiterate and underprivileged population who needs counseling and motivation for early intervention. PMID:25097426

  17. The crysophere as a resource and hazard - Integrated framework for the assessment of future water resource vulnerability and glacial hazard risk assessment in the Kullu district, Himachal Pradesh, India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Simon; Awasthi, Kirtiman; Ballesteros, Juan Antonio; Frey, Holger; Huggel, Christian; Kahn, Mustafa; Linsbauer, Andreas; Rohrer, Mario; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Salzmann, Nadine; Schauwecker, Simone; Stoffel, Markus

    2014-05-01

    High mountain environments are particularly susceptible to changes in atmospheric temperature and precipitation patterns, owing to the sensitivity of cryospheric components to melting conditions, and the importance of rainfall and river runoff for sustaining crops and livelihoods. The Himalayan state of Himachal Pradesh (population ca. 6 mil.) is the initial focus of a joint program between the governments of India and Switzerland aiming to build scientific capacity to understand the threat, and plan for adaptation to climate change in the Himalaya. Here we focus on the cryosphere, and provide an overview of the integrated framework we will follow to assess future water resource vulnerability from changes in runoff, and assess future disaster risk from mass movement and flood hazards. At this early stage of our project, we aim to identify key methodological steps, data requirements, and related challenges. The initial implementation of our framework will be centered on the Kullu district. Core and integrative components of both the traditional climate vulnerability framework (eg., IPCC AR4), and the vulnerability and risk concepts of the disaster risk management community (eg., IPCC SREX 2012) include the assessment of sensitivity, exposure, and adaptive capacity. Sensitivity to water vulnerability in the Kullu district requires the quantification of current and future water resource usage at the block or community level, using metrics such as total irrigated land area, total electricity usage, population density and birth rates. Within the disaster risk framework, sensitivity to mass movement and flood hazards will be determined based on factors such as population density and demographics (notably age and gender), strength of building materials etc. Projected temperature and precipitation data from regional climate model output will be used to model changes in melt water runoff and streamflow, determining the exposure of communities and natural systems to future changes in water quantity and quality. For disaster risk assessment, the goal is to identify the intersection of potential mass movement and flood hazards, with exposed people, resources, and assets. Base level information is required on glacier area and volume, mass balance, glacial lake distribution, surface topography, information on snow cover, duration, and snow water equivalent, and gauge measurements on river and stream flows. Where instrumental data is lacking, information of past hydrological regimes and evidence of mass movement can be derived from documentary records (archival reports), from geological indicators (i.e. palaeofloods: sedimentary and biological records over centennial to millennial scales), and from botanical sources (i.e. dendrogeomorphology). The adaptive capacity to face the challenges associated with a changing cryosphere in the Kullu district will require economic, political, and knowledge capacity to plan, prepare, and respond to issues of water quantity and quality, and disaster risk associated with mass movement and flood hazard. Socio-economic information to be assessed includes economic metrics, literacy rates, and population demographic factors such as gender, age, and religion. These same factors largely determine a communities capacity to anticipate, respond to, and recover from disasters.

  18. Innovation District

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Many cities are working to create innovation districts in the vein of the Silicon Valley and it can be an up-hill battle. Boston is currently working just such a district in its Seaport neighborhood and has been the recent subject of many articles, blog posts, and general discussion. As the city's official website for the district, visitors to this site can learn about physical headquarters in the District Hall building, along with details on long-term strategy, and upcoming events. Some recent posts deal with co-working spaces, networking, and more. In the Resources area visitors can learn about the various innovative businesses that are already in the neighborhood, along with others in and around Boston.

  19. HERBAL FOLK MEDICINES OF JALGAON DISTRICT (MAHARASHTRA)

    PubMed Central

    Fawar, Shubhangi; Patil, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Fifty plants belonging to 33 angiospermic families used by aborigines and rurals for different human ailments hitherto unreported from Jalgaon district. Maharashtra, India are communicated. Further scientific evaluation on pharmacological and clinical lines is needed for these widely employed herbal medicines. PMID:22557036

  20. Childlessness in Andhra Pradesh, India: Treatment-seeking and consequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sayeed Unisa

    1999-01-01

    Andhra Pradesh has a high incidence of childlessness, compared to the rest of India. This paper is based on a study that explored the psychosocial consequences of childlessness in Ranga Reddy district, Andhra Pradesh, India in 1998, and describes the extent and kinds of infertility treatment sought. Currently married women aged 20 years or more who had been married for

  1. Consumer Protection Act, 1986: Law and policy in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajendra Kumar Nayak

    1987-01-01

    India passed its new Consumer Protection Act in 1986. The author points out that the Act is a landmark in the history of the consumer protection movement in India. It concerns mainly the regulation of consumer disputes and creates specific redress agencies at district, state, and Union level. It also contains general provisions for consumer rights and for the organization

  2. Geothermal district heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budney, G. S.; Childs, F.

    1982-06-01

    Ten district heating demonstration projects and their present status are described. The projects are Klamath County YMCA, Susanville District Heating, Klamath Falls District Heating, Reno Salem Plaza Condominium, El Centro Community Center Heating/Cooling, Haakon School and Business District Heating, St. Mary's Hospital, Diamond Ring Ranch, Pagosa Springs District Heating, and Boise District Heating.

  3. Literature based species occurrence data of birds of northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Narwade, Sujit; Kalra, Mohit; Jagdish, Rajkumar; Varier, Divya; Satpute, Sagar; Khan, Noor; Talukdar, Gautam; Mathur, V. B.; Vasudevan, Karthikeyan; Pundir, Dinesh Singh; Chavan, Vishwas; Sood, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The northeast region of India is one of the world’s most significant biodiversity hotspots. One of the richest bird areas in India, it is an important route for migratory birds and home to many endemic bird species. This paper describes a literature-based dataset of species occurrences of birds of northeast India. The occurrence records documented in the dataset are distributed across eleven states of India, viz.: Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Bihar, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim, Tripura, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal. The geospatial scope of the dataset represents 24 to 29 degree North latitude and 78 to 94 degree East longitude, and it comprises over 2400 occurrence records. These records have been collated from scholarly literature published between1915 and 2008, especially from the Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society (JBNHS). The temporal scale of the dataset represents bird observations recorded between 1909 and 2007. The dataset has been developed by employing MS Excel. The key elements in the database are scientific name, taxonomic classification, temporal and geospatial details including geo-coordinate precision, data collector, basis of record and primary source of the data record. The temporal and geospatial quality of more than 50% of the data records has been enhanced retrospectively. Where possible, data records are annotated with geospatial coordinate precision to the nearest minute. This dataset is being constantly updated with the addition of new data records, and quality enhancement of documented occurrences. The dataset can be used in species distribution and niche modeling studies. It is planned to expand the scope of the dataset to collate bird species occurrences across the Indian peninsula. PMID:22207820

  4. Additions to the Encyrtidae and Mymaridae (Chalcidoidea) of India with new distribution and host records for some species

    PubMed Central

    Rameshkumar, A.; V, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Encyrtidae and Mymaridae of India have not been surveyed in depth and hosts are not known for most of the species as the methods of collections used are passive and do not yield firsthand information on the hosts. Based on our ongoing surveys on the Encyrtidae and Mymaridae of India, we report here new distribution and host records for some species. New information Acmopolynema campylurum Xu and Lin, Litus cynipseus Haliday, Omyomymar glabrum Lin and Chiappini and Platystethynium Ogloblin (Mymaridae), and Rhytidothorax purpureiscutellum (Girault) (Encyrtidae) are reported for the first time from India. Anagyrus aquilonaris (Noyes and Hayat) is recorded as new to Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya. Paraphaenodiscus indicus Singh and Agarwal and Paraphaenodiscus monawari Bhuiya are recorded from south India for the first time, the latter on a new host, Pulvinaria polygonata. Chorizococcus sorghi Williams (Pseudococcidae) is reported as a host for Cryptanusia ajmerensis (Fatma & Shafee), for which no hosts are hitherto known and the male of Cryptanusia is documented for the first time. Aclerda sp. is recorded as a new host for Neastymachus axillaris Singh, Agarwal and Basha. PMID:26069438

  5. India: Kachchh

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Liquefaction Effects from the Bhuj Earthquake     View Larger Image ... of western India. On January 26, 2001, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake devastated this area, killing 20,000 people and destroying ...

  6. India: Gujarat

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... title:  Dewatering Effects from the Gujarat Earthquake     View Larger Image ... India's Republic Day is normally celebrated, a devastating earthquake hit the state of Gujarat. About 20,000 people died and millions were ...

  7. Greater India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason R. Ali; Jonathan C. Aitchison

    2005-01-01

    “Greater India” is an 80-yr-old concept that has been used by geoscientists in plate tectonic models of the India–Asia collision system. Numerous authors working on the orogen and\\/or plate models of the broader region have added various sized chunks of continental lithosphere to the now northern edge of their reconstructed Indian plate. Prior to plate tectonic theory, Emile Argand (1924)

  8. Human consumption of rumen flukes of cattle in India.

    PubMed

    Sarmah, P C; Laha, R; Bhattacharjee, K; Goswami, A; Raquib, M; Kakati, P

    2014-01-01

    The practice of eating rumen flukes of cattle by a section of people living in Meghalaya, a north eastern State of India, is reported in this communication. Economically backward, some rural people belonging to Khasi, Jaintia, Garo, and Karbi tribes of Christian and Nepali communities who eat beef are accustomed to consuming cooked flukes during breakfast, meals, and also along with rice beer or alcohol. Inspection of the rumens of cattle during slaughter indicated a prevalence of flukes belonging to Cotylophoron, Paramphistomum, Calicophoron, Gastrothylax, and Fischoederius genera in 74% cases, and their collection from rumen ranged approximately from 50 g to 600 g. Biochemical analysis of flukes found 12.60% total protein, 0.78% fat, and 0.87% ash on fresh weight basis. High prevalence of flukes, easy visualization in rumen, their bulk collection, presence of nutritive value, absence of any ill effect, and lack of imminent danger of transmissibility are believed to be the rationales influencing their consumption by people. It is suggested that dietary benefits obtained from flukes might contribute to the energy transfer and inclusion in the food web. PMID:24964650

  9. Cancer notification in India.

    PubMed

    Lakshmaiah, K C; Guruprasad, B; Lokesh, K N; Veena, V S

    2014-01-01

    In many developed countries, notification of cancer cases is compulsory. Developing countries including India accounts for more than half of new cancer cases in the world, however notification of cancer is not yet mandatory. The primary purpose of notification is to effect prevention and control and better utilization of resources. It is also a valuable source for incidence, prevalence, mortality and morbidity of the disease. Notification of cancer will lead to improved awareness of common etiologic agents, better understanding of common preventable causes and better utilization of health resources with better monitoring and evaluation of the effectiveness of health programs such as cancer screening and cancer treatment programs, which ultimately might improve survival. Notification of cancer can be done by the doctor or the hospital. Akin to the integrated disease surveillance project where more than 90% of the districts report weekly data through E-mail/portal, notification of cancer can be implemented if it is incorporated into the National Program for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular diseases and Stroke scheme. The need of the hour is cancer notification in India. PMID:24665453

  10. "India Population Projects" in Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P H; Badari, V S

    1991-12-01

    An overview, objectives, implementation, and research and evaluation studies of 2 India Population Projects in Karnataka are presented. The India Population Project I (IPP-I) was conducted in Karnataka and Uttar Pradesh. India Population Project III (IPP-III) took place between 1984-92 in 6 districts of Karnataka: Belgaum, Bijapur, Dharwad, Bidar, Gulbarga, and Raichur, and 4 districts in Kerala. The 6 districts in Karnataka accounted for 36% (13.2 million) of the total national population. The project cost was Rs. 713.1 million which was shared by the World Bank, and the Indian national and regional government. Due to poor past performance, these projects were undertaken to improve health and family welfare status. Specific project objectives are outlined. IPP-I included an urban component, and optimal Government of India program, and an intensive rural initiative. The urban program aimed to improved pre- and postnatal services and facilities, and the family planning (FP) in Bangalore city. The rural program was primarily to provide auxiliary nurse-midwives and hospitals and clinics, and also supplemental feeding program for pregnant and nursing mothers and children up to 2 years. The government program provided FP staff and facilities. IPP-I had 3 units to oversee building construction, to recruit staff and provide supplies and equipment, and to establish a Population Center. IPP-III was concerned with service delivery; information, education, and communication efforts (IEC) and population education; research and evaluation; and project management. Both projects contributed significantly to improving the infrastructure. A brief account of the types and kinds of studies undertaken is given. Studies were grouped into longitudinal studies of fertility, mortality, and FP; management information and evaluation systems for health and family welfare programs; experimental strategies; and other studies. Research and evaluation studies in IPP-III encompassed studies in gaps in knowledge, skills, and practice of health and FP personnel; baseline and endline surveys; and operational evaluation of the management information and evaluation system; factors affecting primary health care in Gulbarga district; evaluation of radio health lessons and the impact of the Kalyana Matha Program; and studies of vaccination and child survival and maternal mortality. Training programs were also undertaken. PMID:12343763

  11. Essential Oil Composition of Valeriana Jatamansi Jones from Himalayan Regions of India

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Archana P.; Negi, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    Valeriana jatamansi Jones germplasm collected from sub-temperate Himalayan region of Uttarakhand and North-East state of Meghalaya, India was evaluated under identical conditions at National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, Bhowali, India, to study germplasm diversity based on essential oil composition. Twenty one compounds were identified in V. jatamansi root oil by GC and GC-MS. The major compounds identified were patchouli alcohol (0.4-63.7%), maaliol (2.9-53.8%), seychellene (4.1-27.4%), calarene/ß-gurjunene (3.0-20.8%), ?-santalene (0.6-12.0%). Other compounds present were bornyl acetate (0.6-1.5%), ?-guaiene (0.7-2.3%), ?-bulnesene/?-guaiene (0.7-6.3%), 7-epi-?-selinene (0.4-1.4%), kessane (2.1-3.3%), spathulenol (0.7-3.4%), viridiflorol (0.9-7.1%), ?-patchoulene (0.8-6.6%), ß-patchoulene (0.4-0.8%). Two superior chemotypes identified in V. jatamansi oil from Uttarakhand were: patchouli alcohol rich (IC573221, 63.7%) and maaliol rich (IC573222, 53.8%; IC589096, 51.7%), while accession from north-east was patchouli alcohol rich chemotype (IC574522, 57.2%). These superior chemotypes with higher amounts of patchouli alcohol and maaliol could be used for promoting cultivation as well as for meeting need of pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26009656

  12. Host preference of Phlebotomus argentipes and Phlebotomus papatasi in different biotopes of West Bengal, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Palit; S. K. Bhattacharya; S. N. Kundu

    2005-01-01

    Host preference Phlebotomus argentipes and Phlebotomus papatasi in different biotopes was investigated in two highly endemic Kala-azar districts of West Bengal, India for a better understanding of the transmission dynamics. Blood meals of 304 P. argentipes and 206 P. papatasi, collected from different biotopes from two Kala-azar affected districts in West Bengal, were tested against seven different antisera by modified

  13. Neuropathy in Arsenic Toxicity from Groundwater Arsenic Contamination in West Bengal, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Subhash Chandra Mukherjee; Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman; Uttam Kumar Chowdhury; Mrinal Kumar Sengupta; Dilip Lodh; Chitta Ranjan Chanda; Kshitish Chandra Saha; Dipankar Chakraborti

    2003-01-01

    Large number of people from 9 out of 18 districts of West Bengal, India are endemically exposed to arsenic contaminated groundwater due to drinking of tubewell water containing arsenic level above World Health Organization's maximum permissible limit of 50 µg\\/L. From our ongoing studies on neurological involvement in patients of arsenicosis from different districts of West Bengal, we report our findings

  14. Study of dung, urine, and milk of selected grazing animals as bioindicators in environmental geoscience--a case study from Mangampeta barite mining area, Kadapa District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Raghu, V

    2015-01-01

    The ancient scientific Sanskrit texts of Ayurveda (science of longevity) deal with waters, plants, and animals in relation to human health. Based on the studies mentioned in Ayurveda and modern literature, biological responses of grazing animals in Mangampeta barite mining area in Kadapa District, Andhra Pradesh, were studied. A non-mineralized Tirupati area in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, was selected for the purpose of comparison. In these areas, certain animal products of selected grazing animals were studied if they could be used as tools in mineral exploration. Samples of dung, urine, and milk from cow, bullock, she-buffalo, he-buffalo, sheep, and goat were collected from these two areas during winter and summer seasons. Goat dung was found to have lowest moisture content and highest organic matter while goat urine contained highest amounts of organic matter and ash content. All these animal products were analyzed for 11 trace elements. The concentration of trace elements released through dung, urine, and milk widely varied in different animal species with seasonal variations. The elemental concentration was higher in dung and lower in urine, when compared to that of milk. The concentration of all elements in dung, urine, and milk of all animals, in both the areas, was higher in winter than that in summer. Dung represents the metabolic process of the whole animal and reflects the dietary conditions whether fed on natural or inorganic supplement. It can be inferred that dung, urine, and milk of any animal can be used as tools in mineral exploration during winter, while during summer, only dung can be useful. The dung of goat when compared to that of the other cattle serves as a better tool in environmental studies as goat depends almost entirely on natural vegetation without human interference. PMID:25416966

  15. Greater India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Jason R.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.

    2005-10-01

    "Greater India" is an 80-yr-old concept that has been used by geoscientists in plate tectonic models of the India-Asia collision system. Numerous authors working on the orogen and/or plate models of the broader region have added various sized chunks of continental lithosphere to the now northern edge of their reconstructed Indian plate. Prior to plate tectonic theory, Emile Argand (1924) [Argand, E., 1924. La tectonique de l' Asie. Proc. 13th Int. Geol. Cong. 7 (1924), 171-372.] and Arthur Holmes (1965) [Holmes, A., 1965. Principles of Physical Geology, Second Edition. The Ronald Press Company, New York, 1128.] thought that the Himalayan Mountains and Tibetan Plateau had been raised due to the northern edge of the Indian craton under-thrusting the entire region. Since the advent of plate tectonic theory, Greater India proposals have been based principally on three lines of logic. One group of workers has added various amounts of continental lithosphere to India as part of their Mesozoic Gondwana models. A second form of reconstruction is based on Himalayan crustal-shortening estimates. A third body of researchers has used India continent extensions as means of allowing initial contact between the block and the Eurasian backstop plate in southern Tibet to take place at various times between the Late Cretaceous and late Eocene in what we call "fill-the-gap" solutions. The Indian craton and the southern edge of Eurasia were almost invariably some distance from one another when the collision was supposed to have started; extensions to the sub-continent were used to circumvent the problem. Occasionally, Greater India extensions have been based on a combination of fill-the-gap and shortening estimate arguments. In this paper, we exhume and re-examine the key Greater India proposals. From our analysis, it is clear that many proponents have ignored key information regarding the sub-continent's pre break-up position within Gondwana and the bathymetry of the Indian Ocean west of Australia, in particular the Wallaby-Zenith Plateau Ridge and the Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone. We suggest that the Indian continent probably extended no more than 950 km in the central portion of the Main Boundary Thrust, up to the Wallaby-Zenith Fracture Zone. At the Western Syntaxis, the extension was about 600 km. These estimates are broadly compatible with some of the geophysically-derived models depicting subducted Indian lithosphere beneath Tibet, as well as estimates of Himalayan shortening. Models requiring sub-continent extensions > 9° ahead of the craton are probably wrong. We also suggest that northern India did not have a thinned rifted passive margin due to the earlier rifting of blocks away from it when it formed part of Gondwana. Instead, the boundary developed as a transform fault and probably had a very narrow ocean-continent transition zone (5-10 km wide), similar to the Romanche Fracture Zone offshore of Ghana, West Africa.

  16. Genomic Diversity at Thirteen Short Tandem Repeat Loci in a Substructured Caste Population, Golla, of Southern Andhra Pradesh, India

    E-print Network

    Reddy, B Mohan; Sun, Guangyun; Luis, Javier Rodriguez; Crawford, Michael H; Hemam, Natabar Shyam; Deka, Ranjan

    2001-04-01

    Genomic diversity based on 13 short tandem repeat (STR) loci was studied in seven population groups of a substructured Golla caste from Chittoor district in southern Andhra Pradesh, India. These groups are traditionally pastoral, culturally...

  17. SOME RARE HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICINAL PLANTS OF SOUTH INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, S.

    1993-01-01

    This present study describes 11 species under 11 generate and 10 families of rare Homoeopathic Medicinal Plants introduced and cultivated in the Nilgiri district, Tamil Nadu, South India. The original citation, description, distribution and their medicinal uses are given. PMID:22556647

  18. Bombay, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Formerly known as Bombay, the city of Mumbai is situated on India's west coast, on the Arabian Sea, roughly 500 km (310 miles) south of the Tropic of Cancer. Its large harbor and ideal location facing Africa, Europe, and the Middle East make it an excellent city for trade. Sometimes referred to as the 'Gateway of India,' Mumbai handles more than one third of the country's foreign trade. The city supports a population of more than 12 million people in an area of roughly 619 square km (239 square miles). The port was acquired in 1534 by Portugal, which named it Bom Bahia, meaning 'beautiful bay.' Originally, the city rested upon seven small islands, mostly basaltic bedrock from earlier lava flows. These islands are now connected to one another by reclaimed land, but each island, or neighborhood, still retains a distinct identity within the city. (For more details, visit Welcome to Bombay: The Gateway of India.) The blue-grey pixels in this false-color image are urban areas. The dark green areas are heavily vegetated surfaces while the light brown regions are more sparsely vegetated. This image of Mumbai was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. July 23, 2002, marks the 30th anniversary of the Landsat program. (Click to read the press release-Celebrating 30 Years of Imaging the Earth.) The Landsat program has been particularly instrumental in tracking land use and land cover changes-such as increased urban growth-over the last three decades. Image courtesy Ron Beck, USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  19. Comparative efficacies of artemisinin combination therapies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria and polymorphism of pfATPase6, pfcrt, pfdhfr, and pfdhps genes in tea gardens of Jalpaiguri District, India.

    PubMed

    Saha, Pabitra; Guha, Subhasish K; Das, Sonali; Mullick, Shrabanee; Ganguly, Swagata; Biswas, Asit; Bera, Dilip K; Chattopadhyay, Gaurangadeb; Das, Madhusudan; Kundu, Pratip K; Ray, Krishnangshu; Maji, Ardhendu K

    2012-05-01

    In India, chloroquine has been replaced by a combination of artesunate and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (AS-SP) for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other available combinations, artemether-lumefantrine (AM-LF) and artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ), not included in the national program, are widely used by private practitioners. Little is known about the therapeutic efficacy of these artemisinin combinations and the prevalence of molecular markers associated with antimalarial drug resistance. A total of 157 patients with P. falciparum monoinfection were recruited and randomized into three study groups (AS-SP, AM-LF, and AS-MQ). All patients were followed up for 42 days to study the clinical and parasitological responses according to the WHO protocol (2009). We assessed the polymorphism of the pfATPase6, pfcrt, pfdhfr, and pfdhps genes by the DNA-sequencing method. The PCR-corrected therapeutic efficacies of AS-SP, AM-LF, and AS-MQ were 90.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.793 to 0.969), 95.9% (95% CI, 0.860 to 0.995), and 100% (95% CI, 0.927 to 1.00), respectively. No specific mutational pattern was observed in the pfATPase6 gene. All isolates had a K76T mutation in the pfcrt gene. In the pfdhfr-pfdhps genotype, quadruple mutation was frequent, and quintuple mutation was documented in 6.3% of P. falciparum isolates. The significant failure rate of AS-SP (9.5%), although within the limit (10%) for drug policy change, was due to SP failure because of prevailing mutations in pfdhfr, I(51)R(59)N(108), with pfdhps, G(437) and/or E(540). The efficacy of this ACT needs periodic monitoring. Artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-mefloquine are effective alternatives to the artesunate-sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine combination. PMID:22314538

  20. Evidence of Paternal N5, N10 - Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) C677T Gene Polymorphism in Couples with Recurrent Spontaneous Abortions (RSAs) in Kolar District- A South West of India

    PubMed Central

    Vanilla, Shiny; Kotur, Pushpa F; Kutty, Moideen A; Vegi, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is a multifactorial clinical obstetrics complication commonly occurring in pregnancy. Many research studies have noted the mutations such as C677T in N5, N10 - Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR)gene which is regarded as RSA risk factor. This study was carried out to determine the occurrence of frequency of C677T of the MTHFR gene mutations with RSA. Aim: The purpose of present study is to determine the frequency of MTHFR C677T polymorphisms in couples with recurrent pregnancy loss and the impact of paternal polymorphisms of MTHFR C677T in recurrent pregnancy loss in population of couples living in Kolar district of Karnataka with RSA. Design: A total of 15 couples with a history of two or more unexplained RSA were enrolled as subjects in the study and a total of 15 couples with normal reproductive history, having two or more children and no history of miscarriages were enrolled as controls. Materials and Methods: DNA extraction from samples case and control group couples and its quantification by Agarose gel electrophoresis, assessment of DNA purity, MTHFR C 677T gene mutation detection by PCR-RFLP method. Statistical analysis: Carried out by web based online SPSS tool. Results: The frequency of C677T genotype showed homozygous wild type CC (80%), heterozygous CT type (13.3%) and homozygous mutation TT type (6.67%) observed in males. Similarly from female’s homozygous wild type CC (86.6%), heterozygous type (13.3%), and homozygous type mutations TT (0%) was recorded. In couple control groups, we observed homozygous wild type CC (86.6%), heterozygous CT type (13.3%) and homozygous type mutations TT type (0%). Conclusion: We noticed a high frequency of MTHFR specifically T allele associated with paternal side.Therefore, the present study indicated the impact of paternal gene polymorphism of MTHFR C677T on screening in couples with recurrent pregnancy loss. PMID:25859445

  1. Delhi: India's urban example.

    PubMed

    Cutler, B

    1988-06-01

    Demography, migration, economy, employment, education, planning, housing and transportation in the Delhi Union Territory are described. The Territory is an administrative district that includes Old Delhi, the site of the ancient walled city, the New Delhi Municipal Corporation, the center of government, the Delhi Cantonment, a military center, and 27 smaller towns, many of which are rural in character. The Delhi Territory is notable for its relatively high per capita income ($321), high sex ratio (124), high proportion of recent migrants (over half), but also high employment rate and educational status of these migrants. Much of the economy is based on government service, retail trade and services. School enrollment is high, nearly 100% of primary school age children, 77% of middle school, and 50% of secondary school. Rapid growth has stressed the public health, sanitation, housing, electric power systems. Transportation is coping relatively well, considering that 20% of all motor vehicles in India are in Delhi. 50% of daily trips are made by bus, 22% by bicycle, 10% by motorcycles, and 4% by cars. Accommodations for tourists in Delhi's old center are good in both expensive and inexpensive hotels. PMID:12342348

  2. First report of Cobboldia elephantis (Cobbold, 1866) larvae in a free ranging wild elephant from Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Venu, R; Thoiba Singh, Th; Veeraharin, R; Rajesh, D; Srilatha, Ch

    2015-06-01

    Larvae of Cobboldia elephantis have been reported from the stomach of a free ranging wild elephant (Elephas maximus) while conducting post mortem examination at Palamner forest range, Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh state, India. This is the first report of C. elephantis in free ranging wild elephant in Andhra Pradesh state, India. PMID:26063993

  3. Mughal India

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As you enter a large room filled with various items, including a well-worn globe, a medium-sized file cabinet, and a wall of books, you wonder to yourself, Where am I?. It turns out that you have stumbled across the British Museum's fine interactive website on Mughal India. Designed for young people, the site is set up as an office where visitors may click on various items (such as a globe or a model of the Taj Mahal) in order to entire Flash-enabled learning environments that address various aspects of this most grand and productive period in India's history. While visitors will want to spend a good deal of time exploring the site, one particular representative area of the site is the coin cabinet. Clicking on the coin cabinet opens up a small chest that holds various pieces of currencies from the Mughal Empire. Visiting the different drawers in the chest allows users to learn what each type of coin can tell contemporary observers about the Empire's religious traditions, emperors, and politics. Thoroughly engaging and dynamic in its layout and content, this is a site that is worth a close look.

  4. Skewed Sex Ratios and Criminal Victimization in India

    PubMed Central

    South, Scott J.; Trent, Katherine; Bose, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Although substantial research has explored the causes of India’s excessively masculine population sex ratio, few studies have examined the consequences of this surplus of males. We merge individual-level data from the 2004–2005 India Human Development Survey with data from the 2001 India population census to examine the association between the district-level male-to-female sex ratio at ages 15 to 39 and self-reports of victimization by theft, breaking and entering, and assault. Multilevel logistic regression analyses reveal positive and statistically significant albeit substantively modest effects of the district-level sex ratio on all three victimization risks. We also find that higher male-to-female sex ratios are associated with the perception that young unmarried women in the local community are frequently harassed. Household-level indicators of family structure, socioeconomic status, and caste, as well as areal indicators of women’s empowerment and collective efficacy, also emerge as significant predictors of self-reported criminal victimization and the perceived harassment of young women. The implications of these findings for India’s growing sex ratio imbalance are discussed. PMID:24682921

  5. District, Know Thyself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupa, Megan; McFadden, Ledyard

    2009-01-01

    Finalists for the Broad Prize for Urban Education demonstrate that identifying strategies that fit the local context is essential in creating success for students. Long Beach Unified School District in California and Broward County Public Schools in Florida demonstrate how districts can use different strategies to achieve the same goals.

  6. Do School Districts Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehurst, Grover J.; Chingos, Matthew M.; Gallaher, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    School districts occupy center stage in education reform in the U.S. They manage nearly all public funding and are frequently the locus of federal and state reform initiatives, e.g., instituting meaningful teacher evaluation systems. Financial compensation for district leaders is high, with many being paid more than the chief state school officers…

  7. Chicago Park District

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-01-01

    The Chicago Park District is one of the largest municipal park systems in the United States, containing over 8,100 acres of green space. All told, the District has 580 parks, including two city conservatories, a number of historic lagoons, and the iconic Clarence Buckingham Memorial Fountain. This website allows visitors the opportunity to learn about the District's mission, history, and long-range planning for existing parks and potential new sites. On the homepage, visitors can use the Find a Park feature to learn about these diverse spaces. Additionally, they can use the I Want To area to learn about park permits, volunteering, and reporting problems within the park system. The Events area is quite a find, as visitors can learn about some of the hundreds of events sponsored each year by the District. Finally, visitors can also use the Doing Business area to learn about the various entrepreneurial activities which are possible via the District.

  8. What does it mean to empower informationally the local government!—designing an information system for a district level development administration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parthasarathi Banerjee

    2001-01-01

    An information system that empowers information agents having a stake in the development of a district government is discussed in this research. It analyses the case of a district administration in India who has implemented a browser based system. This system has information asymmetry and organisational capture as its goals; and it employs a few structural elements such as an

  9. Structured Inequalities: Factors Associated with Spatial Disparities in Maternity Care in India

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Sonalde; Wu, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Research on India documents considerable heterogeneity in health and health care across states. However, while regional differences are well established, factors underlying these differences have received little attention. This paper seeks to explain disparities in delivery care across districts by focusing on three factors: (1) Marriage and kinship patterns; (2) District wealth; (3) Governance and quality of services. Using data from nationally representative India Human Development Survey 2005 (IHDS) it examines the probability that the 11,905 women who had a child between 2000 and 2005 delivered in a hospital or received care from a doctor or a nurse while delivering at home. The results suggest that 47% of the variation in delivery care in India is between districts while 53% is between women within district. Although compositional differences in education and household wealth explain some of the variation between districts, marriage and kinship patterns, district wealth and governance each has a significant impact on shaping between-district variation in maternity care. PMID:24761090

  10. global warming's six indias

    E-print Network

    Haller, Gary L.

    global warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;Global Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about global warming varies widely by group

  11. Spatial and temporal patterns of air pollutants in rural and urban areas of India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Disha; Kulshrestha, U C

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we analysed spatial and temporal patterns of Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) concentrations across India. We have also assessed MODIS-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) variations to characterize the air quality and relate it to SPM, NO2 and SO2 in different areas. In addition, the pollutant concentrations have been mapped using geospatial techniques. The results indicated significant differences in air pollutant levels across rural and urban areas. In general, districts of central and northern India had relatively higher SPM concentrations compared to southern India. Out of the top ten SPM polluted districts in India, nine were located in the state of Uttar Pradesh (UP). We observed significant correlations between the SPM and AOD at different sites. Although spatial and temporal patterns of NO2 and SO2 matched AOD patterns, the correlation strength (r2) varied based on location. The causes and implications of these findings are presented. PMID:25244965

  12. Deccan Volcanism, Climate Change and the KT Mass Extinction across India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierry, A.; Gerta, K.; Silvia, G.; Annachiara, B.; Brian, G.; Sunil, B.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that the bulk (80%) of the Deccan Trap eruptions occurred over a relatively short time period coinciding with the KT mass extinction. Here we present results based multiproxies data from intertrappean sediments located at Anjar, Kutch, western India, Jhilmili, Madhya Pradesh, central India, and Rajahmundry, SE India. We compare these results with a KT sequence in Meghalya, NE India, about 800 km from the Deccan volcanic province. Intertrappean sediments at Anjar consist mainly of lacustrine sediments and exhibit at least three PGE anomalies with high Pd contents but only one with a significant Ir enrichment. The presence of dinosaurs eggshells and bone fragments above the Ir anomaly implies an upper Maastrichtian age for these sediments. Thus, the PGE anomalies do not coincide with the KT boundary, nor are they of cosmic origin because normalized PGE values suggest a flood basalt origin. Clay minerals consist mainly of smectite and palygorskite and reflect semi-arid conditions, probably linked to higher surface temperatures on a young volcanic landscape subjected to effusive volcanic activity. In the Rajhamundry area, two Deccan basalt flows, known as the Rajahmundry traps, mark the most extensive lava flows extending 1000 km across the Indian continent. The sediments directly overlying the lower trap contain the earliest Danian planktic foraminifera of zones P0-P1a and mark the initial evolution in the aftermath of the KT mass extinction. The upper trap was deposited during zone P1b corresponding to the lower part of magnetic polarity C29n. Sedimentological, mineralogical data reveal that deposition occurred in a shallow estuarine to inner neritic environment with periods of subaerial deposition marked by paleosoils. Clay minerals consist exclusively of smectite, typical of vertisoil developed under semi-arid conditions. Outcrop correlation reveals an incised valley estuarine system. At Jhilmili, multidisciplinary analyses reveal the KT boundary at or close to the lower trap basalt in C29R and the upper trap near the C29R/C29N transition. Intertrappean deposition occurred in predominantly terrestrial, semi-humid to arid environments. But a short aquatic interval (<60 ky) of fresh water ponds and lakes followed by shallow coastal marine conditions with brackish marine ostracods and early Danian zone P1a planktic foraminifera mark this interval close to the KT boundary. Similar to Rajahamundry, clays from paleosoils consist exclusively of smectite and indicate semi-arid conditions. In Meghalaya to the northeast, the K-T transition consists of Upper Cretaceous sediments dominated by sandstone, shale, sandy shale and rare coal layers, which indicate deposition in a shallow marine environment with high detrital influx from nearby continental reliefs. The KTB is characterized by major PGE anomalies in Ir (11.8 ppb), Ru (108 ppb), Rh (93 ppb) and Pd (75 pbb). Contrary to the sections located in the Deccan traps area, dominant kaolinite in clay mineral assemblages indicates high humidity and high runoff, which is likely linked with increased warming (greenhouse effect) due to Deccan activity on the mainland. The contemporaneous semi-arid climate conditions that are observed in the Deccan Traps province are not observed in Meghalaya and therefore appear to be restricted to areas of volcanic activity.

  13. It Takes a District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Karolee

    2003-01-01

    Describes Fontana (California) Unified School District's No Child Left Behind Act implementation plan, focusing on the use of project charts. Illustrates the project chart function with examples from Title I and Title X. (PKP)

  14. Geothermal district G1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    Geothermal District G1 includes 37 northeastern California counties and six geothermal fields: Lake City, Susanville, Litchfield, Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Electrical generation from geothermal resources occurs in three of the fields: Wendel, Amedee, and Casa Diablo. Low-temperature geothermal projects are underway throughout the district and are described in a road log format. The ten projects described are located at Big Bend, Glass Mountain, Bieber, Alturas, Cedarville, Lake City, Honey Lake Valley, Greenville, and in Sierra and Mono Counties.

  15. First Report of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus Infecting Gherkin (Cucumis anguira) in India.

    PubMed

    Anthony Johnson, A M; Vidya, T; Papaiah, S; Srinivasulu, M; Mandal, Bikash; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2013-09-01

    A field visit in September 2011 to the Cucumis anguira (Gherkin) growing regions of Kuppam, Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh, India revealed occurrence of mosaic, blistering and fruit malformation leading to the crop losses. Analysis of field samples revealed association of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) with the disease. This is the first confirmed report of natural occurrence of ZYMV on Gherkin in India. PMID:24426289

  16. Papillomavirus infection in rural women in southern India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Franceschi; R. Rajkumar; P. J. F. Snijders; A Arslan; C Mahe ´; M Plummer; R Sankaranarayanan; J. Cherian; C. J. L. M. Meijer; E Weiderpass

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, cervical infection with 44 types of human papillomavirus (HPV) in a rural area in the Dindigul District, Tamil Nadu, India, we interviewed and obtained cervical cell samples from 1891 married women aged 16–59 years. HPV prevalence was 16.9% overall and 14.0% among women without cervical abnormalities, or 17.7 and 15.2%,

  17. Government of India Geological Survey of India

    E-print Network

    Bilham, Roger

    that devastated the coastal regions of Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, India and Maldives and affected. The impact of the tsunami was quite severe in the coasts of Andaman and Nicobar group of Islands, Tamil Nadu

  18. 7 CFR 1210.401 - District conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false District conventions. 1210.401 Section 1210.401...Handler Members § 1210.401 District conventions. (a) Except for the initial district convention in each district, which will be...

  19. 7 CFR 1210.401 - District conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false District conventions. 1210.401 Section 1210.401...Handler Members § 1210.401 District conventions. (a) Except for the initial district convention in each district, which will be...

  20. Taxonomic notes and distribution extension of Durga Das’s leaf-nosed bat Hipposideros durgadasi Khajuria, 1970 (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae) from south India

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harpreet; Srinivasulu, Bhargavi; Shah, Tariq Ahmed; Devender, Gundena; Srinivasulu, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Durga Das’s leaf-nosed bat Hipposideros durgadasi Khajuria, 1970 is endemic to India, and was known only from Katanga, Katangi, and Richhai villages, in Jabalpur district, Madhya Pradesh. During surveys conducted in Kolar district, Karnataka, India, we successfully mist-netted a few individuals belonging to the bicolor species group which, upon detailed external, craniodental and bacular studies were identified as Durga Das’s leaf-nosed bat. This paper reports the presence of this species in southern India, extending its distribution range by almost 1300 km. We also provide a detailed morphological description for this species. PMID:25535483

  1. USACE DIVISION AND DISTRICT BOUNDARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USACE Division and District Boundary data contains the delination of Corps Division and District boundaries. District and Division Boundaries are based on the US political and watershed boundaries. In the mid 1990's, WES created the file by digitizing the 1984 Civil Wor...

  2. Problems of Affluent School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoone, Eugene P.

    All school districts are affected by the stagnant economy, the growing needs of the public sector, the increased burden of transfer payments, and the limited growth of public revenues. Retrenchment is common to all school districts, but it may be more severe in affluent districts. By 1969-70, suburban school systems were the clear-cut expenditure…

  3. The Socioeconomic and Institutional Determinants of Participation in India’s Health Insurance Scheme for the Poor

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Arindam; Ashok, Ashvin; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    The Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY), which was introduced in 2008 in India, is a social health insurance scheme that aims to improve healthcare access and provide financial risk protection to the poor. In this study, we analyse the determinants of participation and enrolment in the scheme at the level of districts. We used official data on RSBY enrolment, socioeconomic data from the District Level Household Survey 2007–2008, and additional state-level information on fiscal health, political affiliation, and quality of governance. Results from multivariate probit and OLS analyses suggest that political and institutional factors are among the strongest determinants explaining the variation in participation and enrolment in RSBY. In particular, districts in state governments that are politically affiliated with the opposition or neutral parties at the centre are more likely to participate in RSBY, and have higher levels of enrolment. Districts in states with a lower quality of governance, a pre-existing state-level health insurance scheme, or with a lower level of fiscal deficit as compared to GDP, are significantly less likely to participate, or have lower enrolment rates. Among socioeconomic factors, we find some evidence of weak or imprecise targeting. Districts with a higher share of socioeconomically backward castes are less likely to participate, and their enrolment rates are also lower. Finally, districts with more non-poor households may be more likely to participate, although with lower enrolment rates. PMID:23805211

  4. Districts Tackling Meal Debt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    School districts have resorted to hiring debt collectors, employing constables, and swapping out standard meals for scaled-back versions to try to coerce parents to pay off school lunch debt that, in recent years, appears to have surged as the result of a faltering economy and better record-keeping. While the average school lunch costs just about…

  5. School District Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Joseph L.

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" discusses the effective management of purchasing processes in a school district. These processes include obtaining materials, supplies, and equipment of maximum value for the least expense, and receiving, storing, and distributing the items obtained. The chapter opens with an overview of…

  6. Districts Shun Stimulus Bids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2010-01-01

    In the final sprint to polish Race to the Top applications, hundreds of school districts shunned a shot at a share of $4 billion in grants by refusing to sign on to their states' plans for the federal competition. California officials had secured the signatures of 790 local education agencies (leas) late last week, including most of the state's…

  7. Districts Delivering Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    The idea is not new: Offer courses remotely, build in variety and the students will come. This article discusses how public schools are investing in offering online courses, catering to students' specific learning needs and to remote locations. Several surveys conducted in recent years show that school districts nationwide are embracing this…

  8. Rightsizing a School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esselman, Mary; Lee-Gwin, Rebecca; Rounds, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The transformation of the Kansas City, Missouri Public Schools (KCMSD) has been long overdue. Multiple superintendents and administrations, using billions of dollars of desegregation funds ventured to transform the district by creating magnet schools, themed schools, and career-focused high schools. Missing from these initiatives, but included in…

  9. District-Level Downsizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Draconian cuts have become the order of business for many school districts since the economic recession hit in 2008. But for the coming school year, "draconian" has taken on an even harsher meaning, as states from California and Texas to Illinois and New York wrestle with deficits in the tens of billions of dollars and make multi-billion-dollar…

  10. Institutional responses to development pressures: Resilience of social-ecological systems in Himachal Pradesh, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristin Bingeman; Fikret Berkes; James S. Gardner

    2004-01-01

    In the Kullu District, Himachal Pradesh, India, economic and urban growth, and diversification have increased pressure on forests and forest-based social-ecological systems. As in many Himalayan regions, livelihood sustainability is linked to forest resources, products and services. Recent development in the region, to which these systems may be vulnerable, brings into question environmental and livelihood sustainability. This paper examines the

  11. Ethnomedicinal botany of the Apatani in the Eastern Himalayan region of India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chandra Prakash Kala

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the wealth of medicinal plants used by the Apatani tribe of Arunachal Pradesh. Apatani have traditionally settled in seven villages in the Ziro valley of Lower Subansiri district of Arunachal Pradesh in the Eastern Himalayan region of India. The present study has resulted in the documentation of 158 medicinal plant species used by the Apatani group of

  12. Labor Mobility, Market Integration, and Wage Convergence in Late 19th Century India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William J. Collins

    1999-01-01

    I use district-level wage and food price data for the period 1873 to 1906 to investigate the impact of improvements in transportation on the price of labor in late 19th century India. Falling transport costs could have promoted regional wage convergence by facilitating both labor mobility and interregional commodity trade. There is, however, only qualified evidence of wage convergence in

  13. Traditional knowledge on zootherapeutic uses by the Saharia tribe of Rajasthan, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madan Mohan Mahawar; DP Jaroli

    2007-01-01

    The present zootherapeutic study describes the traditional knowledge related to the use of different animals and animal-derived products as medicines by the Saharia tribe reside in the Shahabad and Kishanganj Panchayat Samiti's of Baran district of Rajasthan, India. A field survey was conducted from April to June 2006 by performing interview through structured questionnaire with 21 selected respondents, who provided

  14. Phytophagous mites – a potential threat to medicinal plants in Kerala, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kinathi Sheela; Niravath Ramani

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a brief survey of mites infesting medicinal plants in the Kannur district of Kerala state in south India. Six species, damaging five species of important medicinal plants, were found. These species included Tetranychus urticae Koch (Tetranychidae), Brevipalpus phoenicis Geij. 1939 (Tenuipalpidae) and four Eriophyid species, Paratetra murrayae ChannaBasavanna 1966, Anthocoptes vitexae Mohanasundaram 1981, Aceriasp.

  15. Medical Ethnobotany of Plants Used as Antidotes by Yanadi Tribes in South India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Sudarsanam; G. Siva Prasad

    1995-01-01

    A medical ethnobotanical survey of Yanadi tribes of the Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, India during 1990 to 1992, indicated 22 plant species commonly used as antidotes for poisonous bites. The methods of administration, techniques for confirming poisonous bites, and alternative uses od plants for protection against poisonous bites were recorded. This forms the first Medical ethnobotanical report on the Yanadi,

  16. Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India IBM Research India

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India Mohit Jain IBM Research India mohitjain@in.ibm.com Deepika@cs.cmu.edu Amarjeet Singh IIIT Delhi, India amarjeet@iiitd.ac.in Abstract-- Though rapid increase in energy factors affecting energy consumption in urban India. However, the small numbers of participants in those

  17. ADULT EDUCATION IN INDIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STYLER, W.E.

    AGAINST A BACKGROUND OF MASS ILLITERACY, POOR PAY AND STATUS OF TEACHERS, AND AN ALIEN EDUCATION PATTERN, THE STATE GOVERNMENTS OF INDIA HAVE PROVIDED SOCIAL EDUCATION FOR CITIZENSHIP AS WELL AS LITERACY. INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP METHODS HAVE BEEN USED, VIDYAPEETHS (RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES) AND EDUCATIONAL CENTERS HAVE BEEN SET UP, AND ALL INDIA RADIO…

  18. As India's Plates Collide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Rikesh, a 12 year old student from New York, reports on the causes of earthquakes, using India as a focal point. He discusses the earthquakes that have hit India from 1737 to 1991 and their effects, including tsunamis, and the work engineers are doing to reduce the damage from earthquakes.

  19. ETHNOMEDICINE OF BHIL TRIBE OF JHABUA DISTRICT, M. P.**

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, J. K.; Kalakoti, B. S.; Lal, Brij

    1986-01-01

    The Bhils are inhabitants of Dhar, Jhabua, Khargone and Ratlam distrcits of Madhya Pradesh. A large number of Bhils live in the neighbouring States of Maharashtra, Gujarat and Rajasthan. They constitute the third largest tribe of India; the first two being Gonds and Santhals. They utilize a large number of plant species occurring wild in the district as herbal remedies in various diseases and ailments. An ethno-medico-botanical survey was conducted in the tribal blocks. Viz. Kathiware, Alirajpur and Sodhwa blocks of Jhabua district, M. P. The authors have gathered first-hand information on seventy – five plant species and their mode of therapeutic uses from the tribal medicine men ‘Badwa’ and other experienced tribals. The present study has brought of light some interesting data on potential medicinal plants which will be screened for determining their therapeutic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:22557535

  20. ADDITIONS TO THE FLORA OF NILGIRIS DISTRICT, TAMIL NADU

    PubMed Central

    Baburaj, D. Suresh; Nain, S. S.; Rajan, S.

    1991-01-01

    Nilgiri District, Tamil Nadu is one of the most botanised areas of southern India. In spite of it a number of wild plants had been missed by previous collectors. In addition a number of exotics and ornamentals having importance in alternative systems of medicine like Homoeopathy and Unani have not been collected and preserved as herbarium records. The present paper lists 36 species of wild plants and 69 species of exotics. Their areas of occurrence, phonological data, accession numbers, and names of collectors have been given. PMID:22556568

  1. Four new vaccines for routine immunization in India: what about hemophilus influenza B and pneumococcal vaccine?

    PubMed

    Paul, Sourabh; Sahoo, Jyotiranjan

    2015-01-01

    Immunization is the process whereby a person is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically by the administration of a vaccine. The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) was flagged off in India in 1978. According to the recommendation of National technical advisory group of India (NATGI), Government of India is going to include four new vaccines in the UIP for whole India. The four new vaccines are Inactivated Poliomyelitis Vaccine (IPV) for polio, rota viral vaccine, vaccine against rubella, and Japanese encephalitis vaccine (179 districts in India). Here, authors have tried to show a comparative descriptive analysis of the hemophilus influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia with rota virus, so that in near future Government of India can also consider their inclusion in the national UIP. In India, 39.2% of all diarrheal death are due to rota virus, whereas 0.72 million deaths are due to hemophilus influenza B and 1.3 million are due to pneumococcal pneumonia in <5 years age-group. India's indigenous developed rota viral vaccine's (Rotavac) efficacy is 56% in 1(st) year compared to H influenza B (Hib) efficacy 95% and PCV13 vaccine "3 + 1" dose efficacy 100% (South Africa). Rotarix incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is US $21.4 to US $34 per disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) compared to Hib US $ 819 per DALYs in India. In case of pneumococcal vaccine, India needs more trails on the serotype specificity, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness but there is enough evidence that hemophilus influenza burden is high in India and the present Hib vaccine is safe and highly effective. In future with the help of donor agencies, India should include the hemophilus influenza B and pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine in national UIP which will save millions of poor children's life. PMID:25810981

  2. Reproductive pattern, perinatal mortality, and sex preference in rural Tamil Nadu, South India: community based, cross sectional study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Birgitte Bruun Nielsen; Jerker Liljestrand; Morten Hedegaard; Shakuntala Haraksingh Thilsted; Abraham Joseph

    1997-01-01

    AbstractObjectives: To study reproductive pattern and perinatal mortality in rural Tamil Nadu, South India.Design: Community based, cross sectional questionnaire study of 30 randomly selected areas served by health subcentres.Setting: Rural parts of Salem District, Tamil Nadu, South India.Subjects: 1321 women and their offspring delivered in the 6 months before the interview.Main outcome measures: Number of pregnancies, pregnancy outcome, spacing of

  3. Farmers' Training and Functional Literacy. A Pilot Evaluation Study of Functional Literacy Project in Lucknow District. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Social Welfare, New Delhi (India).

    The technical report of the Pilot Evaluation Study of Functional Literacy Project in Lucknow District, Uttar Pradesh, India presents the research procedures and statistical analysis for the previously published non-technical report of the study. The main study objectives were to obtain qualitative and quantitative measurements of attainment and…

  4. Telestroke a viable option to improve stroke care in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Padma V; Sudhan, Paulin; Khurana, Dheeraj; Bhatia, Rohit; Kaul, Subash; Sylaja, P N; Moonis, Majaz; Pandian, Jeyaraj Durai

    2014-10-01

    In India, stroke care services are not well developed. There is a need to explore alternative options to tackle the rising burden of stroke. Telemedicine has been used by the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) to meet the needs of remote hospitals in India. The telemedicine network implemented by ISRO in 2001 presently stretches to around 100 hospitals all over the country, with 78 remote/rural/district health centers connected to 22 specialty hospitals in major cities, thus providing treatment to more than 25?000 patients, which includes stroke patients. Telemedicine is currently used in India for diagnosing stroke patients, subtyping stroke as ischemic or hemorrhagic, and treating accordingly. However, a dedicated telestroke system for providing acute stroke care is needed. Keeping in mind India's flourishing technology sector and leading communication networks, the hub-and-spoke model could work out really well in the upcoming years. Until then, simpler alternatives like smartphones, online data transfer, and new mobile applications like WhatsApp could be used. Telestroke facilities could increase the pool of patients eligible for thrombolysis. But this primary aim of telestroke can be achieved in India only if thrombolysis and imaging techniques are made available at all levels of health care. PMID:25042038

  5. Opportunities and Challenges for Solar Minigrid Development in Rural India

    SciTech Connect

    Thirumurthy, N.; Harrington, L.; Martin, D.; Thomas, L.; Takpa, J.; Gergan, R.

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this report is to inform investors about the potential of solar minigrid technologies to serve India's rural market. Under the US-India Energy Dialogue, the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is supporting the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE)'s Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) in performing a business-case and policy-oriented analysis on the deployment of solar minigrids in India. The JNNSM scheme targets the development of 2GW of off-grid solar power by 2022 and provides large subsidies to meet this target. NREL worked with electricity capacity and demand data supplied by the Ladakh Renewable Energy Development Agency (LREDA) from Leh District, to develop a technical approach for solar minigrid development. Based on the NREL-developed, simulated solar insolation data for the city of Leh, a 250-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) system can produce 427,737 kWh over a 12-month period. The business case analysis, based on several different scenarios and JNNSM incentives shows the cost of power ranges from Rs. 6.3/kWh (US$0.126) to Rs. 9/kWh (US$0.18). At these rates, solar power is a cheaper alternative to diesel. An assessment of the macro-environment elements--including political, economic, environmental, social, and technological--was also performed to identify factors that may impact India?s energy development initiatives.

  6. Alabama district flood plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedgecock, T. Scott; Pearman, J. Leroy; Stricklin, Victor E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this flood plan is to outline and record advance planning for flood emergencies, so that all personnel will know the general plan and have a ready-reference for necessary information. This will ensure that during any flood event, regardless of the extent or magnitude, the resources of the District can be mobilized into a maximum data collection operation with a mimimum of effort.

  7. 75 FR 35778 - Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ...Commission [Project No. 12745-002] Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application...16, 2010. On February 1, 2010, Modesto Irrigation District and Turlock Irrigation District...

  8. 33 CFR 1.01-50 - Delegation to District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. 1.01-50 Section...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...District Commander, Seventeenth Coast Guard District. The Commandant...

  9. After the CTB... India`s intentions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bidwai; A. Vanaik

    1997-01-01

    More than six months after it was adopted in the U.N. General Assembly, the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTB) remains a victim of narrowly perceived national security interests. Three sour ironies marked the way agreement was reached. First, India, which pioneered the proposal in 1954, became its bitterest opponent, alone vetoing it at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, thus

  10. District Support of School Improvement: Highlights from Three Districts. Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This newsletter addresses various supports that districts are utilizing to help keep students in school and on the path to graduation. Described herein are three districts that have been particularly successful in raising student achievement--even though they differ in their specific strategies, fund allocation, and demographic composition. A…

  11. UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN

    E-print Network

    Shyy, Wei

    , contracting, and university admission decisions, violates the United States Constitution. On December 11, 2006UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN SOUTHERN DIVISION COALITION TO DEFEND 8, 2006 by several plaintiffs who claim that a recently-approved state constitutional amendment

  12. 7 CFR 953.29 - District committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating... § 953.29 District committees. Potato producers and handlers in each district...establish and organize a District Committee of potato producers and handlers within each...

  13. 7 CFR 953.29 - District committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating... § 953.29 District committees. Potato producers and handlers in each district...establish and organize a District Committee of potato producers and handlers within each...

  14. 7 CFR 946.31 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...districts of the production area are hereby established: (a) District No. 1—The counties of Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln, plus the East Irrigation District of the Columbia Basin Project, plus the area of Grant...

  15. 7 CFR 946.31 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...districts of the production area are hereby established: (a) District No. 1—The counties of Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln, plus the East Irrigation District of the Columbia Basin Project, plus the area of Grant...

  16. 7 CFR 946.31 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...districts of the production area are hereby established: (a) District No. 1—The counties of Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln, plus the East Irrigation District of the Columbia Basin Project, plus the area of Grant...

  17. 7 CFR 946.31 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...districts of the production area are hereby established: (a) District No. 1—The counties of Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln, plus the East Irrigation District of the Columbia Basin Project, plus the area of Grant...

  18. 7 CFR 946.31 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...districts of the production area are hereby established: (a) District No. 1—The counties of Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln, plus the East Irrigation District of the Columbia Basin Project, plus the area of Grant...

  19. Research District Seeing Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-05-13

    Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald (May 2012) - excerpt follows: It’s been a while since I’ve updated you on the Tri-Cities Research District, most certainly not for lack of new activity over the past several months. In fact, much has happened, and there’s more to come. I think many of us see new land development and construction as indicative of current or impending economic growth. So those of you who have ventured into North Richland either via Stevens Drive or George Washington Way lately have probably begun sensing and anticipating that such growth is afoot.

  20. Production potential of plateau agriculture and food sufficiency in the Kandhamal district of Orissa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pradeep Kumar Mohanty; Dwitikrishna Panigrahi; Milu Acharya

    2010-01-01

    The requirement for food grains in the rainfed hill plateaus of the Kandhamal district of the State of Orissa, India was calculated\\u000a according to accepted nutritional standards over 14 years from 1993 to 2006 and compared with actual production during this\\u000a time. Owing to the increase in population, the requirement increased from 120?×?103 MT in 1993 to 142?×?103 MT in 2006. Production, however,

  1. National Association of Conservation Districts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The idea of creating conservation districts through the support of private landowners was one that had gestated for decades before the National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) was formed in 1946. Currently, there are over 3000 conservation districts throughout the United States, and the NACD effectively acts as a unified voice that represents the interests of these districts and also helps develop national conservation policies and fruitful partnerships with other agencies and organizations. First-time visitors to the site will want to perhaps go to the directory section to learn more about the NACD and look through the site's interactive map to learn about where the various conservation districts are located. Students and practitioners may want to look through the electronic publications area, which includes such helpful materials as the organization's in-house weekly news briefs (called eNotes) and their publications produced through effective joint-partnerships, such as Forestry Notes and Conservation.

  2. Assessment of Implementation of Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness in India

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Baya; Singh, Sharad; Bahl, Rajiv; Puri, Anju; Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    At the current rate of decline in infant mortality, India is unlikely to achieve the Millennium Development Goal on child survival. Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI), adapted from the global Integrated Management of Childhood Illness to enhance the focus on newborns and on community health workers, is the central strategy within the National Reproductive and Child Health Programme to address high infant mortality. This paper assessed the progress of IMNCI in India, identified the programme bottlenecks, and also assessed the effect on coverage of key newborn and childcare practices. Programme data were analyzed to ascertain the implementation status; rapid programme assessment was conducted for identifying the programme bottlenecks; and results of analysis of two rounds of district-level household surveys were used for comparing the change in the coverage of child-health interventions in IMNCI and control districts. More than 200,000 community health workers and first-level healthcare providers were trained during 2005-2009 at a variable pace across 223 districts. Of the reported births (n=1,102,573), 65.5% were visited by a trained worker within 24 hours, and 63.1% were visited three times within 10 days. Poor supervision and inadequate essential supplies affected the performance of trained workers. During 2004-2008, 12 early-implementing districts had covered most key newborn and child practice indicators compared to the control districts; however, the difference was significant only for care-seeking for acute respiratory infection (net difference: 17.8%; 95% confidence interval 2.3-33.2, p<0.026). Based on the early experience of IMNCI implementation in different states of India, measures need to be taken to improve supportive supervision, availability of essential supplies, and monitoring of the programme if the strategy has to translate into improved child survival in India. PMID:22283037

  3. India. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1994 (India).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickler, Paul

    This curriculum packet on politics and international relations in India contains an essay, three lessons and a variety of charts, maps, and additional readings to support the unit. The essay is entitled "India 1994: The Peacock and the Vulture." The lessons include: (1) "The Kashmir Dispute"; (2) "India: Domestic Order and International Affairs, A…

  4. Genetic counselling in tribals in India

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Dipika; Das, Kishalaya

    2011-01-01

    Genetic counselling in tribals unlike general population residing in cities and near villages is a difficult task due of their lower literacy and poor socio-economic status. However, sustained effort is essential with a close interaction in the local language, certain misbeliefs need to be removed gradually taking into account their socio-cultural background. The present communication deals with our experience in counselling for haemoglobinopathies during Neonatal Screening Programme undertaken for sickle cell disease in Kalahandi district of Orissa and Community Screening Programmes in primitive tribes of India in four States viz. Orissa, Gujarat, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra. Counselling during neonatal screening programme was very well accepted demonstrating the benefit to the small babies as regards the morbidity. Premarital marriage counselling was also accepted by them. The success rate as followed up for 5 years is almost 50 per cent, the limitation being long follow up. Genetic counselling in these areas has to be continuous to achieve success and therefore the need for setting up of permanent centres in the tribal areas in India. PMID:22089621

  5. Chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in individuals exposed to arsenic through drinking water in West Bengal, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Mahata; A. Basu; S. Ghoshal; J. N. Sarkar; A. K. Roy; G. Poddar; A. K. Nandy; A. Banerjee; K. Ray; A. T. Natarajan; R. Nilsson; A. K. Giri

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater has become a worldwide problem. Currently an unprecedented number of people in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh are exposed to the ubiquitous toxicant via drinking water in exposure levels far exceeding the maximum recommended limit laid down by WHO. This arsenic epidemic has devastated nine districts of West Bengal encompassing an area of 38,865km2 leading to

  6. Problematic Worms and Priapulid-like Fossils from the Nagaur Group, the Marwar Supergroup, Western Rajasthan, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Purnima Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Worm-like problematic megafossils, comparable with priapulids, are reported from the Lower Cambrian Nagaur Formation of the Marwar Supergroup, Western Rajasthan, India. These fossils occur as positive epireliefs on the top surface of siliciclastic sandstone beds in the Dulmera area of Bikaner district, western Rajasthan. Occurrence of these structures is significant, as the fossil bearing strata also exhibit the preservation of

  7. Addressing the sluggish progress in reducing maternal mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Tulchinsky, Theodore Herzl

    2015-03-01

    Although some progress has been made in India, achievement of the Fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG5; ie, 75% reduction in maternal mortality ratio [MMR] from 1990 by 2015) target seems to be unattainable by 2015. Failure of the National Population Policy, 2000, and the National Health Policy, 2002, to reduce the MMR demanded a new direction, leading to the establishment of a National Rural Health Mission in 2005. This commentary addresses both the real achievements and the hurdles faced in India's stagnating progress in maternal health. Promotion of maternal nutrition and health education, with greater attention to emergency obstetrical care at the district subcenter and primary health care center levels, must be prioritized. These changes of focus are vital to make prenatal, delivery, and postnatal care safer with increased resources allotted to adolescents, the poor, and women living in rural areas in order to enhance maternal health and achieve the MDG target. PMID:22308538

  8. Economic development trends in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Hazaray

    1972-01-01

    On August 15, 1972, India celebrated the 25th anniversary of its independence. It is therefor appropriate to give on this\\u000a occasion an account of india’s past achievements and failures in view of its striving still more tenaciously towards a balanced\\u000a economic development in the years to come.

  9. Methane emissions in India: Sub-regional and sectoral trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Amit; Kankal, Bhushan; Shukla, P. R.

    2011-09-01

    This paper uses the 2006 IPCC Guidelines and latest country specific emission factors to estimate Indian methane emissions at sectoral and district level for the years 1990, 1995, 2005 and 2008. The estimates show that while methane emissions have increased steadily over past two decades, their share in India's aggregate GHG emissions has declined from 31% in 1985 to 27% in 2008 mainly due to relatively higher growth CO 2 emissions from the fossil fuels. The estimates for the year 2008 show that: i) agriculture sector, which employed two-thirds of India's population and contributed 17% of GDP, accounted for 23% of India's GHG emissions ii) 83% of country's methane emissions are contributed by enteric fermentation, manure use and rice production, and iii) methane emissions from urban solid waste are steadily rising over the past two decades; their share in aggregate methane emissions has reached 8%. Resting on the disaggregated emissions estimates, the paper argues for using geographical and sectoral flexibilities to develop a roadmap for mitigation of methane emissions for India.

  10. Climate drivers on malaria transmission in Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Upadhyayula, Suryanaryana Murty; Mutheneni, Srinivasa Rao; Chenna, Sumana; Parasaram, Vaideesh; Kadiri, Madhusudhan Rao

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted during the years 2006 to 2012 and provides information on prevalence of malaria and its regulation with effect to various climatic factors in East Siang district of Arunachal Pradesh, India. Correlation analysis, Principal Component Analysis and Hotelling's T² statistics models are adopted to understand the effect of weather variables on malaria transmission. The epidemiological study shows that the prevalence of malaria is mostly caused by the parasite Plasmodium vivax followed by Plasmodium falciparum. It is noted that, the intensity of malaria cases declined gradually from the year 2006 to 2012. The transmission of malaria observed was more during the rainy season, as compared to summer and winter seasons. Further, the data analysis study with Principal Component Analysis and Hotelling's T² statistic has revealed that the climatic variables such as temperature and rainfall are the most influencing factors for the high rate of malaria transmission in East Siang district of Arunachal Pradesh. PMID:25803481

  11. Acute malnutrition and under-5 mortality, northeastern part of India.

    PubMed

    Espié, Emmanuelle; Pujol, Carme Roure; Masferrer, Maria; Saint-Sauveur, Jean-François; Urrutia, Pedro Pablo Palma; Grais, Rebecca F

    2011-10-01

    We assessed the prevalence of childhood acute malnutrition and under-five mortality rate (U5MR) in Darbhanga district, India, using a two-stage 49-cluster household survey. A total of 1379 households comprising 8473 people were interviewed. During a 90-day recall period, U5MR was 0.5 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.2-1.4] per 10,000 per day. The prevalence of global acute malnutrition among 1405 children aged 6-59 months was 15.4% (NCHS) and 19.4% (2006 WHO references). This survey suggests that in Darbhanga district, the population is in a borderline food crisis with few food resources. Appropriate strategies should be developed to improve the overall nutritional and health status of children. PMID:21098554

  12. Improving health services in India: a different perspective.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Two papers in this volume focus on public finance and decentralization as central to resolving India's systemic public health crisis. However, some states and districts have achieved success despite serious financial and administrative deficits; this suggests that factors such as political commitment, community participation, human resource management, women's empowerment, and governance may be as or more important. The success of the National Rural Health Mission will depend on state and local institutional capacity, including strong partnerships with civil society organizations and private-sector actors. Increased resources and decentralization will not be sufficient by themselves. PMID:18607033

  13. India Through Literature: An Annotated Bibliography for Teaching India. Part I: India Through the Ancient Classics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald; Johnson, Jean

    The past and the present interweave in contemporary India. To understand India, one must know of the traditional stories. Two short pocket books make them accessible and acceptable to students: 1) The Dance of Shiva and Other Tales from India by Oroon Ghosh, published by the New American Library in New York; and, 2) Gods, Demons, and Others by R.…

  14. Urology in ancient India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sakti

    2007-01-01

    The practice of medical and surgical measures in the management of urological ailments prevailed in ancient India from the Vedic era around 3000 BC. Subsequently in the Samhita period, the two stalwarts - Charaka in medicine and Susruta in surgery elevated the art of medicine in India to unprecedented heights. Their elaboration of the etiopathological hypothesis and the medical and surgical treatments of various urological disorders of unparalleled ingenuity still remain valid to some extent in our contemporary understanding. The new generation of accomplished Indian urologists should humbly venerate the legacy of the illustrious pioneers in urology of our motherland. PMID:19675749

  15. Archaeological Survey of India

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Taj Mahal. Hawa Mahal. Mysore Palace. Sanchi Stupa. The historical monuments of India are some of the grandest and most beautiful in the world. The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), which oversees Indiaâ??s ancient monuments and archaeological sites, hosts a useful page for exploring Indiaâ??s methods of preserving its cultural heritage. After reading About Us, where you can learn about the organization itself, have a look at Monuments, Excavations, Conservation and Preservation, each of which provides important insights into the managing of essential subcontinental sites. Site visitors should also peruse the beautiful Photo Gallery, providing numerous images of both World Monuments and Excavations.

  16. Districts That School Year-Round.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlynn, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Describes four school districts that operate year-round schools: Socorro Independent School District, Texas; Valley View School District, Romeoville, Illinois; Murrieta Valley Unified School near San Diego, California; and Rock Island-Milan School District in northwestern Illinois. Briefly describes three tracks of year-round education:…

  17. District heating campaign in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Stalebrant, R.E. [Swedish District Heating Association, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-09-01

    During the fall of 1994 a district heating campaign was conducted in Sweden. The campaign was initiated because the Swedish district heating companies agreed that it was time to increase knowledge and awareness of district heating among the general public, especially among potential customers. The campaign involved many district heating companies and was organized as a special project. Advertising companies, media advisers, consultants and investigators were also engaged. The campaign was conducted in two stages, a national campaign followed by local campaign was conducted in two stages, a national campaign followed by local campaigns. The national campaign was conducted during two weeks of November 1994 and comprised advertising on commercial TV and in the press.

  18. Boise geothermal district heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.

    1985-10-01

    This document describes the Boise geothermal district heating project from preliminary feasibility studies completed in 1979 to a fully operational system by 1983. The report includes information about the two local governments that participated in the project - the City of Boise, Idaho and the Boise Warm Springs Water District. It also discusses the federal funding sources; the financial studies; the feasibility studies conducted; the general system planning and design; design of detailed system components; the legal issues involved in production; geological analysis of the resource area; distribution and disposal; the program to market system services; and the methods of retrofitting buildings to use geothermal hot water for space heating. Technically this report describes the Boise City district heating system based on 170/sup 0/F water, a 4000 gpm production system, a 41,000 foot pipeline system, and system economies. Comparable data are also provided for the Boise Warm Springs Water District. 62 figs., 31 tabs.

  19. The Impact of India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori, Mario M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the experiences of Maria Montessori and her son, Mario, during their internment in India during World War II. Discusses how their observations of communities of Buddhists, Christians, Hindus, Muslims, and Zoroastrians at the Theosophical Society contributed to ideas related to the absorbent mind, and enabled the extension of the…

  20. Asbestos problem in India.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, V; Madhavan, N

    2005-07-01

    Primary exposure to asbestos in India can be encountered in the form of asbestos mining, asbestos cement industries, asbestos processing unit and during renovation and demolition of old asbestos cemented roof or other structures as well as modern electrical as well as mechanical appliances in which asbestos is still found. Ultimately construction workers, electricians, vehicle mechanics and other workers in the building trades who are exposed to asbestos inhale hundreds and thousands of amphiboles, which causes lung damage. It is being mined in India at places such as Andhra Pradesh (Pulivendla), Jharkand (Roro), Rajasthan (Ajmer, Bhilwara, Udaipur, Rajsamand) and the common problem faced by the locals are asbestosis through air and fluorosis through drinking water. The problem continues to be in India as well as other developing countries. Also, India import and re-export asbestos to other countries and workers at shipyard, transport of the hazardous material on road and roadside residents all are vulnerable to this uncommon disease. The signs and symptoms generally found with the workers are shortness of breath, persistent and productive cough due to pulmonary fibrosis can show up many years after the asbestos exposure. PMID:15950810

  1. India's rocket propellant developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mama, Hormuz P.

    1995-01-01

    On 15 October 1994, the first successful launch took place of India's fourstage Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) from the Sriharikota launch base. Behind this success lies a long-standing and active program of Indian rocket propulsion development and propellant production. This paper provides an overview of this work, particularly in relation to the PSLV.

  2. Can India's "Literate" Read?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothari, Brij; Bandyopadhyay, Tathagata

    2010-01-01

    This paper takes a close look at India's literacy rate by exploring whether the officially "literate" can read and at what level. In a large sample, aged 7+, drawn from four Hindi-speaking states, two methods were used to measure literacy. One was the standard Census Method (CM) which relies on self-reporting and the other was a Reading Method…

  3. Active Fault Mapping of Naga-Disang Thrust (Belt of Schuppen) for Assessing Future Earthquake Hazards in NE India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.

    2014-12-01

    We observe the geodynamic appraisal of Naga-Disang Thrust North East India. The Disang thrust extends NE-SW over a length of 480 km and it defines the eastern margin of Neogene basin. It branches out from Haflong-Naga thrust and in the NE at Bulbulia in the right bank of Noa Dihing River, it is terminated by Mishmi thrust, which extends into Myanmar as 'Sagaing fault,which dip generally towards SE. It extends between Dauki fault in the SW and Mishmi thrust in the NE. When the SW end of 'Belt of Schuppen' moved upwards and towards east along the Dauki fault, the NE end moved downwards and towards west along the Mishmi thrust, causing its 'S' shaped bending. The SRTM generated DEM is used to map the topographic expression of the schuppen belt, where these thrusts are significantly marked by topographic break. Satellite imagery map also shows presence lineaments supporting the post tectonic activities along Naga-Disang Thrusts. The southern part of 'Belt of Schuppen' extends along the sheared western limb of southerly plunging Kohima synform, a part of Indo Burma Ranges (IBR) and it is seismically active.The crustal velocity at SE of Schuppen is 39.90 mm/yr with a azimuth of 70.780 at Lumami, 38.84 mm/yr (Azimuth 54.09) at Senapati and 36.85 mm/yr (Azimuth 54.09) at Imphal. The crustal velocity at NW of Schuppen belt is 52.67 mm/yr (Azimuth 57.66) near Dhauki Fault in Meghalaya. It becomes 43.60 mm/yr (Azimuth76.50) - 44.25 (Azimuth 73.27) at Tiding and Kamlang Nagar around Mishmi thrust. The presence of Schuppen is marked by a change in high crustal velocity from Indian plate to low crustal velocity in Mishmi Suture as well as Indo Burma Ranges. The difference in crustal velocities results in building up of strain along the Schuppen which may trigger a large earthquake in the NE India in future. The belt of schuppean seems to be seismically active, however, the enough number of large earthquakes are not recorded. These observations are significant on Naga-Disang Thrusts to reveal a possible seismic gap in NE India observed from two great earthquakes in the region viz. 1897 (Shillong 8.7M) and 1950 (Arunachal-China 8.7M), which is required to be investigated.

  4. Education And Gender Bias in the Sex Ratio At Birth: Evidence From India

    PubMed Central

    ECHÁVARRI, REBECA A.; EZCURRA, ROBERTO

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the possible existence of a nonlinear link between female disadvantage in natality and education. To this end, we devise a theoretical model based on the key role of social interaction in explaining people’s acquisition of preferences, which justifies the existence of a nonmonotonic relationship between female disadvantage in natality and education. The empirical validity of the proposed model is examined for the case of India, using district-level data. In this context, our econometric analysis pays particular attention to the role of spatial dependence to avoid any potential problems of misspecification. The results confirm that the relationship between the sex ratio at birth and education in India follows an inverted U-shape. This finding is robust to the inclusion of additional explanatory variables in the analysis, and to the choice of the spatial weight matrix used to quantify the spatial interdependence between the sample districts. PMID:20355693

  5. Subclinical arsenicosis in cattle in arsenic endemic area of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Rana, Tanmoy; Bera, Asit Kumar; Das, Subhashree; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Pan, Diganta; Das, Subrata Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitously found metalloid that commonly contaminates drinking water and agricultural food. To minimise the ecotoxicological effect of arsenic in the environment, it is important to ameliorate the deleterious effects on human and animal health. We investigated the effects of arsenic on cattle by estimating arsenic concentration in biological samples of cattle that consumed contaminated drinking water and feedstuffs directly or indirectly. We have selected arsenic prone village that is Ghentugachi, Nadia district, West Bengal, India, along with arsenic safe control village, Akna in Hoogli district, West Bengal, India. It is found that arsenic is deposited highly in blood, urine and faeces. Agricultural field is contaminated through cattle urine, hair, faeces, cow dung cakes and farmyard manure. Bioconcentration factor and biotransfer factor are two important biomarkers to assess the subclinical toxicity in cattle, as they do not exhibit clinical manifestation like human beings. PMID:22903174

  6. 78 FR 3892 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ...No. UL11-1-000; Project No. 2299-078] Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice Clarifying Party Status On January 9, 2013, the Modesto Irrigation District (Modesto) filed a motion for clarification...

  7. 77 FR 16828 - Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Dispute Resolution Process...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ...Hydroelectric Project Project No. 2299-075] Turlock Irrigation District, & Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Dispute Resolution Process...Hydroelectric Project No. 2299-075.\\1\\ Turlock Irrigation District and the Modesto Irrigation...

  8. 77 FR 5507 - Turlock Irrigation District, Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ...Commission [Project No. 2299-075] Turlock Irrigation District, Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...into any Order issuing a license. Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation...

  9. 75 FR 43958 - Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Application for Amendment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ...Commission [Project No. 2299-074] Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Application for Amendment...Filed: May 24, 2010. d. Applicant: Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation...

  10. 77 FR 4291 - Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ...Commission [ Project No. 2299-075] Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service...into any Order issuing a license. Turlock Irrigation District and Modesto Irrigation...

  11. 46 CFR 42.05-25 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District...Section 42.05-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...This Subchapter § 42.05-25 Coast Guard District Commander or...

  12. 46 CFR 50.10-5 - Coast Guard District Commander or District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander or District...Section 50.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...This Subchapter § 50.10-5 Coast Guard District Commander or...

  13. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability in Mettur region, Tamilnadu, India using drastic and GIS techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Srinivasamoorthy; K. Vijayaraghavan; M. Vasanthavigar; V. S. Sarma; R. Rajivgandhi; S. Chidambaram; P. Anandhan; R. Manivannan

    A study was carried in Mettur taluk, Salem district of Tamilnadu, India to develop a DRASTIC vulnerability index in GIS environment\\u000a owing to groundwater pollution with increasing population, industries, and agricultural activities. Seven DRASTIC layers were\\u000a created from available data (depth to water table, net recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topography, impact of vadose zone,\\u000a and hydraulic conductivity) and incorporated

  14. Eradicating successfully yaws from India: The strategy & global lessons.

    PubMed

    Narain, Jai P; Jain, S K; Bora, D; Venkatesh, S

    2015-05-01

    Yaws, a non-venereal treponematosis, affecting primarily the tribal populations, has been considered historically as one of the most neglected tropical diseases in the world. In 1996, India piloted an initiative to eradicate yaws based on a strategy consisting of active case finding through house-to-house search and treatment of cases and their contacts with long acting penicillin. Thereafter, the campaign implemented in all 51 endemic districts in 10 s0 tates of the country led to the achievement of a yaws-free status in 2004. In the post-elimination phase, surveillance activities accompanied by serological surveys were continued in the erstwhile endemic districts. These surveys carried out among children between the age of 1-5 yr, further confirmed the absence of community transmission in the country. The experience of India demonstrates that yaws can be eradicated in all endemic countries of Africa and Asia, provided that political commitment can be mobilized and community level activities sustained until the goal is achieved. PMID:26139778

  15. The Socioeconomic and Institutional Determinants of Participation in India's Health Insurance Scheme for the Poor.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Arindam; Ashok, Ashvin; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    The Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY), which was introduced in 2008 in India, is a social health insurance scheme that aims to improve healthcare access and provide financial risk protection to the poor. In this study, we analyse the determinants of participation and enrolment in the scheme at the level of districts. We used official data on RSBY enrolment, socioeconomic data from the District Level Household Survey 2007-2008, and additional state-level information on fiscal health, political affiliation, and quality of governance. Results from multivariate probit and OLS analyses suggest that political and institutional factors are among the strongest determinants explaining the variation in participation and enrolment in RSBY. In particular, districts in state governments that are politically affiliated with the opposition or neutral parties at the centre are more likely to participate in RSBY, and have higher levels of enrolment. Districts in states with a lower quality of governance, a pre-existing state-level health insurance scheme, or with a lower level of fiscal deficit as compared to GDP, are significantly less likely to participate, or have lower enrolment rates. Among socioeconomic factors, we find some evidence of weak or imprecise targeting. Districts with a higher share of socioeconomically backward castes are less likely to participate, and their enrolment rates are also lower. Finally, districts with more non-poor households may be more likely to participate, although with lower enrolment rates. PMID:23805211

  16. Hemovigilance program-India.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Akanksha; Singh, Surinder; Marwaha, Neelam

    2013-01-01

    A centralized hemovigilance program to assure patient safety and to promote public health has been launched for the first time in India on Dec 10, 2012 in 60 medical colleges in the first phase along with a well-structured program for monitoring adverse reactions associated with blood transfusion and blood product administration. National Institute of Biologicals (NIB) will be the National Coordinating Centre for Hemovigilance. This program will be implemented under overall ambit of Pharmacovigilance Program of India (PvPI), which is being coordinated by Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission (IPC). All medical colleges of the country will be enrolled in this program by the year 2016 in order to have a National Centre of Excellence for Hemovigilance at NIB, which will act as a global knowledge platform. PMID:23559771

  17. Severe Flooding in India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Floods devestated parts of eastern India along the Brahmaputra River in June 2000. In some tributaries of the Brahmaputra, the water reached more than 5 meters (16.5 feet) above flood stage. At least 40 residents died, and the flood waters destroyed a bridge linking the region to the rest of India. High water also threatened endangered Rhinos in Kaziranga National Park. Flooded areas are shown in red in the above image. The map was derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data taken on June 15, 2000. For more information on observing floods with satellites, see: Using Satellites to Keep our Head above Water and the Dartmouth Flood Observatory Image by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory

  18. Distribution of Anopheles culicifacies and Detection of its Sibling Species E from Madhya Pradesh: Central India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay Kumar; Tyagi, Varun; Singh, Sompal; Veer, Vijay; Agrawal, Om Prakash; Sukumaran, Devanathan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anopheles culicifacies is an important vector of malaria in Southeast Asia, contributing to almost 70% of malaria cases in India. It exists as a complex of five morphologically indistinguishable species A, B, C, D and E with varied geographical distribution patterns. In India, 8% of the total population of Madhya Pradesh (Central India) contributes about 30% of total malaria cases, 60% of total falciparum cases and 50% of malaria deaths. An. culicifacies is the major malaria vector in this state. Vector control mainly relies on the proper identification and distribution of vector species exists in a particular area. The present study was carried out to identify the distribution of An. culicifacies sibling species in certain endemic district of Central India, Madhya Pradesh. Methods: The An. culicifacies mosquitoes collected from the study districts were identified morphologically. The genomic DNA was isolated from the mosquitoes and subjected to Allele specific PCR targeting D3 domain of 28S ribosomal DNA. Results: The mean prevalence of An. culicifacies during the study period was in the range of 8–120 per man per hour (PMH). From the study areas species B was identified from Jabalpur, Chindwara and Hoshangabad, Species C from Hoshangabad only, Species D from Narsinghpur and Khandwa and sibling species E from Mandla, Chindwara and Hoshangabad respectively. Conclusion: This is the first report to detect species E from Madhya Pradesh region which necessitate for reconsideration of species distribution of each An. culicifacies sibling species that would enable to develop required vector control strategies. PMID:26114132

  19. Potential for early warning of maalria in India using NOAA-AVHRR based vegetation health indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiman, R. C.; Kogan, Felix; Singh, Neeru; Singh, R. P.; Dash, A. P.

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in India with about 1 82 million cases annually and 1000 deaths As per World Health Organization WHO estimates about 1 3 million Disability Adjusted Life Years DALYs are lost annually due to malaria in India Central peninsular region of India is prone to malaria outbreaks Meteorological parameters changes in ecological conditions development of resistance in mosquito vectors development of resistance in Plasmodium falciparum parasite and lack of surveillance are the likely reasons of outbreaks Based on satellite data and climatic factors efforts have been made to develop Early Warning System EWS in Africa but there is no headway in this regard in India In order to find out the potential of NOAA satellite AVHRR derived Vegetation Condition Index VCI Temperature Condition Index TCI and a cumulative indicator Vegetation Health Index VHI were attempted to find out their potential for development of EWS Studies were initiated by analysing epidemiological data of malaria vis-a-vis VCI TCI and VHI from Bikaner and Jaisalmer districts of Rajasthan and Tumkur and Raichur districts of Karnataka Correlation coefficients between VCI and monthly malaria cases for epidemic years were computed Positive correlation 0 67 has been found with one-month lag between VCI and malaria incidence in respect of Tumkur while a negative correlation with TCI -0 45 is observed In Bikaner VCI is found to be negatively related -0 71 with malaria cases in epidemic year of 1994 Weekly

  20. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  1. Stroke program for India

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nishant K.; Khadilkar, Satish V.

    2010-01-01

    India is silently witnessing a stroke epidemic. There is an urgent need to develop a national program towards “Fighting Stroke”. This program should be specific to our national needs. In order to recommend on who should lead an Indian fight-stroke program, we examined the published opinions of stroke clinicians and the official documents on stroke care training abroad. We identified the resources that already exist in India and can be utilized to develop a national fight-stroke program. Through a review of published literature, we noted different opinions that exist on who would best manage stroke. We found that because stroke is a cardiovascular disorder of the central nervous system, its management requires a multi-disciplinary approach involving clinicians with background not limited to neurology. India has very few neurologists trained in stroke medicine and they cannot care for all stroke patients of the country. We propose a mechanism that would quickly put in place a stroke care model relevant in Indian context. We recommend for tapping the clinical expertise available from existing pool of non-neurologist physicians who can be trained and certified in stroke medicine (Strokology). We have discussed an approach towards developing a national network for training and research in Strokology hoping that our recommendations would initiate discussion amongst stroke academicians and motivate the national policy makers to quickly develop an “Indian Fight Stroke Program.” PMID:20436743

  2. Medicine in South India

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, Malcolm M.

    1978-01-01

    A three-month sabbatical allowed a superficial overview of Indian medical history and practice. As in Western nations, cost is a major determinant of health care delivery in India; poverty and fiscal shortages, however, deny care to many. The education of Indian physicians is similar to that in Western nations and a high level of clinical competence is seen. However, physician compensation is woefully low by Western standards. India possesses its own indigenous medical systems, purported to be the oldest in the world and predating Hippocrates by several millenia. Most Indians are cared for by native practitioners whose medical techniques are intricately related to the Hindu and Islamic religions. Many of their herbal medicines have been assimilated into contemporary Western practice. Diseases unknown to us except by textbooks are commonly seen and effectively treated. On the other hand, Western diseases such as coronary arteriosclerosis are not uncommon in a land of massive overpopulation and malnutrition. The humbling aspect of this experience is the realization that medical practice dating back several millenia can be made more modern and carried out competently by contemporary physicians. A Western physician working in India finds an unparalleled variety of disease in a totally different medical-religious environment allowing him to reorganize his priorities and to rediscover himself in the world within which he lives. PMID:716392

  3. Tobacco control in India.

    PubMed Central

    Shimkhada, Riti; Peabody, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Legislation to control tobacco use in developing countries has lagged behind the dramatic rise in tobacco consumption. India, the third largest grower of tobacco in the world, amassed 1.7 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 1990 due to disease and injury attributable to tobacco use in a population where 65% of the men and 38% of the women consume tobacco. India's anti-tobacco legislation, first passed at the national level in 1975, was largely limited to health warnings and proved to be insufficient. In the last decade state legislation has increasingly been used but has lacked uniformity and the multipronged strategies necessary to control demand. A new piece of national legislation, proposed in 2001, represents an advance. It includes the following key demand reduction measures: outlawing smoking in public places; forbidding sale of tobacco to minors; requiring more prominent health warning labels; and banning advertising at sports and cultural events. Despite these measures, the new legislation will not be enough to control the demand for tobacco products in India. The Indian Government must also introduce policies to raise taxes, control smuggling, close advertising loopholes, and create adequate provisions for the enforcement of tobacco control laws. PMID:12640476

  4. Child maltreatment in India.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Malhi, Prabhjot

    2013-11-01

    Child maltreatment is a global problem but is more difficult to assess and manage in developing countries such as India where one-fifth of the world's total child population resides. Certain forms of maltreatment such as feticide, infanticide, abandonment, child labour, street-begging, corporal punishment and battered babies are particularly prevalent in India. Most physicians still need to be sensitized in order to suspect child abuse on the basis of unexplained trauma, multiple fractures, parental conflict and other corroborative evidence. This article summarizes the various aspects of this major problem in resource-poor settings in the hope that it will assist in the planning of services addressing child physical and sexual abuse and neglect in India and in other developing countries. A culture of non-violence towards children needs to be built into communities in order to provide an environment conducive to the overall development of the child. Rehabilitation of abused children and their families requires a multi-disciplinary service including paediatricians, child psychologists and social workers, and the training of police forces in how to tackle the problem. PMID:24070123

  5. A new species of Tangius from north India (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zi-Wei; Li, Li-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Tangius indicus sp. n. (Batrisitae: Batrisini) is described and illustrated from the Indian States of Meghalaya (Khasi Hills, type locality) and West Bengal (Darjeeling). Specimens of the new species are similar to those of the recently described T. glabellus Yin & Li from Tibet, Southwest China, and can be separated only by minor differences of the male features. PMID:24223485

  6. A new species of Tangius from north India (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae).

    PubMed

    Yin, Zi-Wei; Li, Li-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Tangius indicus sp. n. (Batrisitae: Batrisini) is described and illustrated from the Indian States of Meghalaya (Khasi Hills, type locality) and West Bengal (Darjeeling). Specimens of the new species are similar to those of the recently described T. glabellus Yin & Li from Tibet, Southwest China, and can be separated only by minor differences of the male features. PMID:24223485

  7. Smoking, physical activity and healthy aging in India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To identify levels of physical inactivity and smoking and examine their relationships to health among older people in India. Methods In 2010, Longitudinal Aging Study in India researchers interviewed 1,683 older adults in randomly sampled households with members aged???45 years in eight stratified districts in four states (90.9% response rate). We first used descriptive analyses to characterize older people in poor and good health. Differences between groups were established using chi-squared and t-tests. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were then performed to determine whether physical inactivity and smoking led to poor health while controlling for district of residence, caste, age, gender, marital status, and educational level. Regression analyses were also used to identify significant relationships between socio-demographic characteristics and health behaviors. Results Larger proportions of older people in poor health were smokers (26.1% vs. 16.9%; p???0.001) and physically inactive (vigorous activities: 88.7% vs. 70.7%, p???0.001; moderate activities: 67.1% vs. 57.1%, p???0.01). Smoking (p???0.05) and lack of vigorous physical activity (p???0.001) increased the likelihood of poor health. Low educational level was significantly related to smoking and the lack of moderate physical activity (both p???0.001). Female gender decreased the likelihood of smoking. Male gender increased the likelihood of vigorous physical activity but decreased the likelihood of moderate physical activity. Conclusions Smoking and physical inactivity have important impacts on the health of older people in India. Policy attention is needed to improve these modifiable health behaviors. PMID:24884852

  8. Continuing challenge of infectious diseases in India.

    PubMed

    John, T Jacob; Dandona, Lalit; Sharma, Vinod P; Kakkar, Manish

    2011-01-15

    In India, the range and burden of infectious diseases are enormous. The administrative responsibilities of the health system are shared between the central (federal) and state governments. Control of diseases and outbreaks is the responsibility of the central Ministry of Health, which lacks a formal public health department for this purpose. Tuberculosis, malaria, filariasis, visceral leishmaniasis, leprosy, HIV infection, and childhood cluster of vaccine-preventable diseases are given priority for control through centrally managed vertical programmes. Control of HIV infection and leprosy, but not of tuberculosis, seems to be on track. Early success of malaria control was not sustained, and visceral leishmaniasis prevalence has increased. Inadequate containment of the vector has resulted in recurrent outbreaks of dengue fever and re-emergence of Chikungunya virus disease and typhus fever. Other infectious diseases caused by faecally transmitted pathogens (enteric fevers, cholera, hepatitis A and E viruses) and zoonoses (rabies, leptospirosis, anthrax) are not in the process of being systematically controlled. Big gaps in the surveillance and response system for infectious diseases need to be addressed. Replication of the model of vertical single-disease control for all infectious diseases will not be efficient or viable. India needs to rethink and revise its health policy to broaden the agenda of disease control. A comprehensive review and redesign of the health system is needed urgently to ensure equity and quality in health care. We recommend the creation of a functional public health infrastructure that is shared between central and state governments, with professional leadership and a formally trained public health cadre of personnel who manage an integrated control mechanism of diseases in districts that includes infectious and non-infectious diseases, and injuries. PMID:21227500

  9. India Co2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, S.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    Is there a way to find a balance between improving living conditions for the people on the margins and also reducing emissions while limiting our negative impacts on the climate? This is a critical question today because there are many arguments between developed and developing countries about who is responsible for global warming. Developed countries believe that it is the poor countries because they are not educated enough to know about how they are affecting the climate. While the developing countries hold wealthy nations responsible because they are using the most resources. However it is important to acknowledge the fact that if there was no gap in between the developed and developing countries our emissions total would be much higher. This “gap” has been a natural controlling factor in climate change. This is why I wanted to see if I could plot what it would look like if a developing country such as India were to produce emissions that the US or Switzerland or Norway are producing as developed countries. India has a population total of 1.1 billion compared to the US with only 298 million, Switzerland with 7.5 million, and Norway with 4.6 million people. When the population is compared to the emissions output in metric tons, per capita, India produced the least emissions out of these countries, 1.4 tons per person while having the second largest population in the world, while the US produced 19 tons per capita, Switzerland produced 5.6 and Norway produced 8.7 tons per capita in 2006. The emissions rate is growing every year and increases widely and globally. If India was producing emissions that equal Norway, Switzerland and the US the total emissions it would be producing annually would be 9 billion for Norway, 6 billion for Switzerland and 20 billion emissions for the US, all in the year 2006 alone. This shows how the balance between countries with huge populations and very little emission output and average population and high emission out put has created a balance in between the “developed” and developing countries. If India was producing the same amounts of emissions per capita as the it would have a total of 20 billion metric tons of CO2 emissions annually.

  10. 7 CFR 983.11 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, and Imperial Counties of California. (2) District 2 consists of Kings, Fresno, Madera, and Merced Counties of California. (3) District 3 consists of all counties in California where pistachios are...

  11. 7 CFR 923.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...pursuant to § 923.31(m): (a) District 1 shall include the Counties of Chelan, Okanogan, Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, Spokane, Pend Oreille, Stevens, and Ferry. (b) District 2 shall include the counties of Kittitas, Yakima,...

  12. 7 CFR 923.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...pursuant to § 923.31(m): (a) District 1 shall include the Counties of Chelan, Okanogan, Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, Spokane, Pend Oreille, Stevens, and Ferry. (b) District 2 shall include the counties of Kittitas, Yakima,...

  13. 7 CFR 923.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...pursuant to § 923.31(m): (a) District 1 shall include the Counties of Chelan, Okanogan, Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, Spokane, Pend Oreille, Stevens, and Ferry. (b) District 2 shall include the counties of Kittitas, Yakima,...

  14. 7 CFR 923.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...pursuant to § 923.31(m): (a) District 1 shall include the Counties of Chelan, Okanogan, Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, Spokane, Pend Oreille, Stevens, and Ferry. (b) District 2 shall include the counties of Kittitas, Yakima,...

  15. 7 CFR 923.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...pursuant to § 923.31(m): (a) District 1 shall include the Counties of Chelan, Okanogan, Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, Spokane, Pend Oreille, Stevens, and Ferry. (b) District 2 shall include the counties of Kittitas, Yakima,...

  16. 7 CFR 924.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PRUNES GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.14 District. District means the...

  17. 7 CFR 915.11 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...described subdivisions of the production area: (a) District 1 shall include Miami-Dade County. (b) District 2 shall include all of the production area except Miami-Dade County. [19 FR 3439, June 11, 1954, unless otherwise...

  18. 7 CFR 915.11 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...described subdivisions of the production area: (a) District 1 shall include Miami-Dade County. (b) District 2 shall include all of the production area except Miami-Dade County. [19 FR 3439, June 11, 1954, unless otherwise...

  19. 7 CFR 915.11 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...described subdivisions of the production area: (a) District 1 shall include Miami-Dade County. (b) District 2 shall include all of the production area except Miami-Dade County. [19 FR 3439, June 11, 1954, unless otherwise...

  20. 7 CFR 915.11 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...described subdivisions of the production area: (a) District 1 shall include Miami-Dade County. (b) District 2 shall include all of the production area except Miami-Dade County. [19 FR 3439, June 11, 1954. Redesignated at 26 FR...

  1. 7 CFR 915.11 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...described subdivisions of the production area: (a) District 1 shall include Miami-Dade County. (b) District 2 shall include all of the production area except Miami-Dade County. [19 FR 3439, June 11, 1954, unless otherwise...

  2. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...and Jefferson in the State of Oregon; District...counties of Klamath, Lake, Jackson, and Josephine in the State of Oregon; District...Yamhill, Tillamook, Washington, Clatsop, Columbia...Hood River in the State of Oregon;...

  3. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...and Jefferson in the State of Oregon; District...counties of Klamath, Lake, Jackson, and Josephine in the State of Oregon; District...Yamhill, Tillamook, Washington, Clatsop, Columbia...Hood River in the State of Oregon;...

  4. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...and Jefferson in the State of Oregon; District...counties of Klamath, Lake, Jackson, and Josephine in the State of Oregon; District...Yamhill, Tillamook, Washington, Clatsop, Columbia...Hood River in the State of Oregon;...

  5. 7 CFR 947.32 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...and Jefferson in the State of Oregon; District...counties of Klamath, Lake, Jackson, and Josephine in the State of Oregon; District...Yamhill, Tillamook, Washington, Clatsop, Columbia...Hood River in the State of Oregon;...

  6. 7 CFR 959.24 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...following districts of the production area are hereby initially established: District No. 1: (Coastal Bend) The Counties of Victoria, Calhoun, Goliad, Refugio, Bee, Live Oak, San Patricio, Aransas, Jim Wells, Nueces, Kleberg, Brooks,...

  7. Southwest Florida Water Management District

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The mission of the Southwest Florida Water Management District is to manage the water and water-related resources within its boundaries. Central to the mission is maintaining the balance between the water needs of current and future users while protecting and maintaining the natural systems that provide the District with its existing and future water supply. The website includes an Information and Education page, which offers activities, newsletters, virtual field trips, and other resources for K-12 students and teachers. Also provided on the site are various datasets, brochures, publications, reports, textual references and links.

  8. Assessment and management of coastal multi-hazard vulnerability along the Cuddalore–Villupuram, east coast of India using geospatial techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Mahendra; P. C. Mohanty; H. Bisoyi; T. Srinivasa Kumar; S. Nayak

    2011-01-01

    The current study area is coastal zone of Cuddalore, Pondicherry and Villupuram districts of the Tamil Nadu along the southeast coast of India. This area is experiencing threat from many disasters such as storm, cyclone, flood, tsunami and erosion. This was one of the worst affected area during 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and during 2008 Nisha cyclone. The multi-hazard vulnerability

  9. Eriospermocormus indicus gen. et sp. nov. (Liliales: Eriospermaceae): first record of a monocotyledonous corm from the Deccan Intertrappean beds of India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. D. Bonde

    2005-01-01

    Eriospermocormus indicus gen. et sp. nov. is a permineralized monocotyledonous corm resembling Eriospermum Jacq. (Order Liliales, Family Eriospermaceae), described from the Deccan Intertrappean beds at Nawargaon, Wardha District, Maharashtra, India. It is a vertically and laterally compressed rhizomatous tuber exhibiting seven nodes within a height of 4.0cm. Fibrous roots emerge in rings from the internodes. The axis has a thin

  10. India`s first solar chicken brooder

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, P.; Naryanaswamy, T.S.; Kumar, A.; Choudhary, U. [Indian Association for the Advancement of Science, New Delhi (India); Sharma, S.K. [Panjab Univ., Chandigarh (India). Energy Research Centre

    1995-12-31

    A 1,200 bird solar chicken brooder was indigenously designed and operated by the Indian scientists for the first time in the country as a Project under funding by the Ministry of Non Conventional Energy Sources to the All India Women`s Conference. This multi disciplinary project was taken up on the International Sun Day, May 3, 1993 and completed on May, 1994. Data has been collected for the first nine months of operation. Its successful operation has justified multi disciplinary approach. The solar chicken brooder incorporates modern poultry concepts of breeding under controlled temperatures. In view of the mixed climate of Delhi, provision was made for heating and cooling both to take care of the 24 hour cycle. Comfort conditions have been identified and maintained (as is done in the their genetic characteristics) at different temperatures for a period of 8--10 weeks to grow them to a uniform weight of 2.0 kg. Growing them under controlled temperature for the first 4 weeks and then at room temperature was another new concept to grow hard stock. This development has opened avenues for new food industry based on processing of chicken utilizing internationally available technologies.

  11. 7 CFR 916.12 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...area or such other subdivision as may be prescribed pursuant to § 916.31: (a) District 1 shall include the counties of Madera and Fresno. (b) District 2 shall include the counties of Kings and Tulare. (c) District 3 shall include...

  12. District Learning Tied to Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Ledyard

    2009-01-01

    Winners and finalists for the annual Broad Prize for Urban Education have consistently outperformed peer districts serving similar student populations. What makes the difference? These districts consistently demonstrate a learning loop that influences the district's ability to learn, which ultimately influences student opportunities to learn.…

  13. Status of CFD in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Prahlad

    This paper gives an overview of the status of CFD activity that is being carried out in a number of organisations in India. It discusses the drive for CFD in India and its relevance, the general pattern of growth for CFD in the country, the present CFD scenario, some applications and directions for the future. The emphasis is mainly on

  14. Status of CFD in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. S. Prahlad

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the status of CFD activity that is being carried out in a number of organisations in India. It discusses the drive for CFD in India and its relevance, the general pattern of growth for CFD in the country, the present CFD scenario, some applications and directions for the future. The emphasis is mainly on

  15. Indigenisation of Psychology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalal, Ajit K.

    2011-01-01

    Academic psychology which made a new beginning in India in the early part of 20th century was modelled on the Western scientific tradition. The teaching of psychology was very much on the British pattern since the colonial rule, whereas the research was mostly an extension of the Western work in India. Psychology went through massive expansion…

  16. Optimizing biodiesel production in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvain Leduc; Karthikeyan Natarajan; Erik Dotzauer; Ian McCallum; Michael Obersteiner

    2009-01-01

    India is expected to at least double its fuel consumption in the transportation sector by 2030. To contribute to the fuel supply, renewable energies such as jatropha appear to be an attractive resource for biodiesel production in India as it can be grown on waste land and does not need intensive water supply. In order to produce biodiesel at a

  17. E-Learning in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sanjaya

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the e-learning in India. It describes the historical developments of e-learning and identifies major stakeholders and institutions that have initiated e-learning programs after the creation of the National Task Force on Information Technology and Software Development constituted by the Prime Minister of India

  18. Occupational Health Research in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Habibullah N SAIYED; Rajnarayan R TIWARI

    2004-01-01

    India being a developing nation is faced with traditional public health problems like communicable diseases, malnutrition, poor environmental sanitation and inadequate medical care. However, globalization and rapid industrial growth in the last few years has resulted in emergence of occupational health related issues. Agriculture (cultivators i.e. land owners+ agriculture labourers) is the main occupation in India giving employment to about

  19. Passages From India, Vol. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geils, Kenneth, Ed.

    This collection of articles from Indian newspapers is designed for use in the secondary classroom to assist with the study of India. There are 12 categories of articles: (1) Women: Like Avis, #2 But Trying Harder; (2) Calcutta: City of Joy; (3) India: Feeling Its Curry; (4) Us & Them: Misunderstandings; (5) Those Monsoon Showers May Come Your Way;…

  20. Passages from India, Vol. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geils, Kenneth, Ed.

    This is compendium of readings designed for use in the secondary classroom to assist with the study of India. There are seventeen categories of readings: (1) introduction to the subcontinent; (2) description of society; (3) caste and its continuing impact; (4) leadership roles; (5) women in India; (6) role playing in society; (7) marriage; (8)…

  1. Environment and Culture in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuthold, David

    India suffers from severe environmental problems with respect to deforestation, flooding, and pollution. These problems are associated with industrialization, lack of money to enforce anti-pollution practices, climatic and population pressures, and cultural factors. Half of India's forests have been cut in the last 40 years. Deforestation is the…

  2. The Relationship between Student Achievement, School District Economies of Scale, School District Size, and Student Socioeconomic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trani, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between student achievement, school district economies of scale, school district size and student socioeconomic status were measured for 131 school districts in the state of Oregon. Data for school districts ranging in size from districts with around 300 students to districts with more than 40,000 students were collected for…

  3. Districts Neglecting Programs for ELLs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on state and independent reviews that cite shortcomings in four urban systems. According to the reviews of those school systems over the past two years, four urban districts--in Boston, Massachusetts; Buffalo, New York; Portland, Oregon; and Seattle, Washington--did not provide special help to learn English to all students…

  4. Districts Created to Steer "Turnarounds"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    If the job of a traditional superintendent is hard, imagine the complexities involved in building a school system from scratch--especially one composed of schools with some of the most intractable educational challenges. That's the task facing education leaders in Michigan and Tennessee, which are building special districts to take over…

  5. Competition with Charters Motivates Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Marc J.; Lueken, Martin F.; Egalite, Anna J.

    2013-01-01

    Proponents of market-based education reform often argue that introducing charter schools and other school choice policies creates a competitive dynamic that will prompt low-performing districts to improve their practice. Rather than simply providing an alternative to neighborhood public schools for a handful of students, the theory says, school…

  6. North Residential District University Stakeholders

    E-print Network

    Towers (Drackett, Jones and Taylor) · 1.12 M gross square feet · Major new campus green spaces forming a pedestrian district Design Build #12;#12;#12;LANE AND HIGH #12;OAK WALK #12;"TOWN" SQUARE #12;COLLEGE GREEN #12;Where we are today... #12;Today · Completed the Criteria Design · Program Verification · Schedule/logistics

  7. Astronomical Instruments in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Sreeramula Rajeswara

    The earliest astronomical instruments used in India were the gnomon and the water clock. In the early seventh century, Brahmagupta described ten types of instruments, which were adopted by all subsequent writers with minor modifications. Contact with Islamic astronomy in the second millennium AD led to a radical change. Sanskrit texts began to lay emphasis on the importance of observational instruments. Exclusive texts on instruments were composed. Islamic instruments like the astrolabe were adopted and some new types of instruments were developed. Production and use of these traditional instruments continued, along with the cultivation of traditional astronomy, up to the end of the nineteenth century.

  8. Prospects for better nutrition in India.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Rajan; van den Briel, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Being home to 31% of the world's children who are stunted and 42% of those who are underweight, and with many children and adults affected by micronutrient deficiencies, India is facing huge challenges in the field of nutrition. Even though the Indian Government is investing vast amounts of money into programs that aim to enhance food security, health and nutrition (the Integrated Child Development Services program alone costs 3 billion USD per year), overall impact has been rather disappointing. However, there are some bright spots on the horizon. The recent District Level Health Surveys (DLHS-4) do show significant progress, ie a reduction in stunting of around 15% over the past 6 years in a few states for which preliminary results are available. The reasons for this reduction are not unambiguous and appear to include state government commitment, focus on the 'window of opportunity', improved status and education of women, a lowered fertility rate, and combinations of nutrition- specific and nutrition-sensitive interventions. Apart from the government many other agencies play a role in driving improvements in nutrition. Since 2006 the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) has worked with a range of partners to improve access to nutritious foods for large parts of the population, through public and private delivery channels. This supplement presents a selection of these activities, ranging from a capacityassessment of frontline workers in the ICDS system, large scale staple food fortification, salt iodization, fortification of mid-day meals for school children and decentralized complementary food production. PMID:25384721

  9. HIV-1 discordant couples in Karnataka, South India: is the sex ratio of index cases changing?

    PubMed

    Shastri, S; Shet, A; Rewari, B; De Costa, A

    2012-07-01

    India has an estimated 2.5 million HIV infections, most of which are heterosexually transmitted. Women comprise 40% of infected adults. In India, 90% of women between the ages of 15 and 45 years are married. Previous literature has suggested that sexual intercourse with an HIV-infected husband represents a married woman's greatest risk for being infected. However, a recent meta-analysis of discordant couples from sub-Saharan Africa reported that women were the index case in half of all couples. Similar data are not available from India. This cross-sectional study describes the epidemiology of 925 discordant couples from five districts in Karnataka province, one of the high HIV prevalence provinces in India. Men were the index case in 74% of couples. However, in young couples (where the index case was aged <30 years), women were more likely to be the infected partner (64% of couples). Condom use was reported by 46% of these discordant couples. These results suggest an emerging predominance of female index case infections among younger discordant couples in India, and point to the need for focusing HIV preventive messages on youth and couples before marriage. PMID:22844005

  10. Holocene aridification of India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponton, C.; Giosan, L.; Eglinton, T.I.; Fuller, D.Q.; Johnson, J.E.; Kumar, P.; Collett, T.S.

    2012-01-01

    Spanning a latitudinal range typical for deserts, the Indian peninsula is fertile instead and sustains over a billion people through monsoonal rains. Despite the strong link between climate and society, our knowledge of the long-term monsoon variability is incomplete over the Indian subcontinent. Here we reconstruct the Holocene paleoclimate in the core monsoon zone (CMZ) of the Indian peninsula using a sediment core recovered offshore from the mouth of Godavari River. Carbon isotopes of sedimentary leaf waxes provide an integrated and regionally extensive record of the flora in the CMZ and document a gradual increase in aridity-adapted vegetation from ???4,000 until 1,700 years ago followed by the persistence of aridity-adapted plants after that. The oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber detects unprecedented high salinity events in the Bay of Bengal over the last 3,000 years, and especially after 1,700 years ago, which suggest that the CMZ aridification intensified in the late Holocene through a series of sub-millennial dry episodes. Cultural changes occurred across the Indian subcontinent as the climate became more arid after ???4,000 years. Sedentary agriculture took hold in the drying central and south India, while the urban Harappan civilization collapsed in the already arid Indus basin. The establishment of a more variable hydroclimate over the last ca. 1,700 years may have led to the rapid proliferation of water-conservation technology in south India. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. India Habitat Centre

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The India Habitat Centre(IHC) was created in New Delhi, India, to "provide a physical environment [to] serve as a catalyst for a synergetic relationship between individuals and institutions working in diverse habitat related areas." Their website gives visitors a generous glimpse into what it is like to enjoy such features as the "Habitat Film Club", "Habitat Learning Centre", and the "IHC Visual Arts Gallery". Like a multi-faceted community center, the IHC houses a "Habitat Library & Resource Centre" and offers a monthly "Habitat Walk", among other activities. The "Habitat Walk" gives community members the opportunity to visit various natural and historical sites, and provides several pages of background on the sites that visitors can download or print from the "Habitat Walk" link on the website. The center also reaches out and empowers the community by encouraging students and non-students to participate in their annual contest for the Habitat Young Visionary Award, a photography fellowship, and in the recent past, internships in a non-governmental organization.

  12. Nano-mineralogical investigation of coal and fly ashes from coal-based captive power plant (India): an introduction of occupational health hazards.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos L S; Marostega, Fabiane; Taffarel, Silvio R; Saikia, Binoy K; Waanders, Frans B; DaBoit, Kátia; Baruah, Bimala P; Silva, Luis F O

    2014-01-15

    Coal derived nano-particles has been received much concern recently around the world for their adverse effects on human health and the environment during their utilization. In this investigation the mineral matter present in some industrially important Indian coals and their ash samples are addressed. Coal and fly ash samples from the coal-based captive power plant in Meghalaya (India) were collected for different characterization and nano-mineralogy studies. An integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to know their extent of risks to the human health when present in coal and fly ash. The study has revealed that the coals contain mainly clay minerals, whilst glass fragments, spinel, quartz, and other minerals in lesser quantities were found to be present in the coal fly ash. Fly ash carbons were present as chars. Indian coal fly ash also found to contain nanominerals and ultrafine particles. The coal-fired power plants are observed to be the largest anthropogenic source of Hg emitted to the atmosphere and expected to increase its production in near future years. The Multi Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes (MWCNTs) are detected in our fly ashes, which contains residual carbonaceous matter responsible for the Hg capture/encapsulation. This detailed investigation on the inter-relationship between the minerals present in the samples and their ash components will also be useful for fulfilling the clean coal technology principles. PMID:24121564

  13. Understanding School District Budgets: A Guide For Local Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mary

    2005-01-01

    A school district budget is more than numbers. It is a record of a district?s past decisions and a spending plan for its future. It shows a district?s priorities whether they have been clearly articulated or simply occurred by default. And it is a communications document that can tell constituents a lot about the district?s priorities and goals. A…

  14. Identification of vulnerable areas to soil erosion risk in India using GIS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, H.; Raizada, A.; Mandal, D.; Kumar, S.; Srinivas, S.; Mishra, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    This paper attempts to provide information for policy makers and soil conservation planners in the form of district-wise soil erosion risk (SER) maps prepared for the state of Telengana, India. The SER values for each district were computed by extracting the information on grid-wise soil erosion and soil loss tolerance limit values existing on the country-scale in a GIS environment. The objectives of the study were to (i) identify the areas of the state with high erosion risk, and (ii) identify areas with urgent needs of conservation measures. The results reveal that around 69% of the state has negligible risk of soil erosion above the tolerance limits, and does not call for immediate soil conservation measures. The remaining area (2.17M ha) requires conservation planning. Four districts, viz. Adilabad, Warangal, Khammam and Karimnagar are the most risk prone with more than one-fourth of their total geographical areas showing net positive SER values. In order to obtain a clearer picture and categorize the districts based on their extent of vulnerability, the Weighted Erosion Risk values were computed. Adilabad, Warangal and Khammam were identified as the worst-affected districts in terms of soil erosion and therefore need immediate attention for natural resource conservation.

  15. Anthropological studies among Pangwalas and Gaddis of Himachal Pradesh, North India.

    PubMed

    Singh, I P; Bhasin, M K

    1983-06-01

    The present paper is based on the Research Project entitled "Impact of Technological and Economic Development Programme on Bio-Cultural Heritage of Gaddis and Pangwalas Population Groups of Himachal Pradesh". The project was framed after UNESCO/MAB Project Nos. 6 and 12 under UNESCO Programme on Man Biosphere (MAB) and supported by the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. The population groups under investigation are: 1. Transhumant Gaddis of Bharmour Sub-Tehsil, Chamba District; 2. Settled Gaddis of Kangra District; and 3. Pangwalas of Pangi Tehsil, Chamba District, Himachal Pradesh. The carrying capacity has been calculated for Pangi and Bharmour Sub-Tehsil and it has been observed that in both the places the size of population is beyond the capacity of the land. The pattern of body growth and respiratory functions among Transhumant Gaddis of Bharmour Sub-Tehsil, Chamba District and Settled Gaddis of Kangra District have been studied. Statistically non-significant differences in most of the biological variables have been observed among these groups. PMID:6881942

  16. Arecanut: India’s popular masticatory — history, chemistry and utilization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Raghavan; H. K. Baruah

    1958-01-01

    To the Indians, Malayans, or the Indonesians, betel-nut chewing is as familiar as chewing gum to the Americans. In India the\\u000a use of arecanut and its cultivation constitute a distinct agricultural practice scarcely less important than that of other\\u000a economic crops, but little attention has been given to a proper assessment of the fruit either in India or elsewhere.

  17. Updated January 2014 District Coordinators

    E-print Network

    -3464 x25437 johns290@msu.edu E9526 Prospect St., Ste. 1, Munising MI 49862 Toll Free: (877) 643-9881 Doug@msu.edu Mary Ellen Pond: (888) 678-3464 x25437 johns290@msu.edu E9526 Prospect St., Ste. 1, Munising MI 49862 not currently covered). Kelley Hiemstra MSU Extension District 4, Ogemaw County Bldg, 205 S. Eighth St, West

  18. FOLK HERBAL MEDICINE: A SURVEY ON THE PANIYA TRIBES OF MUNDAKUNNU VILLAGE OF THE NILGIRI HILLS, SOUTH INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, P. N. Arul

    2005-01-01

    The present paper represents the results of an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Mundakunnu village of Gudalur taluk, Nilgiri district of Tamil Nadu, India. It has been observed that the plant species are used to various ailments of analgesic, antidiarrhoeal, piles, antidiabetic, gynecological problems, vermifuge, antidandruff, venereal diseases, bone fracture and as vegetables. A total of 52 plants species belonging to 51 genera (33 dicot & 6 monocot) have been discussed. PMID:22557184

  19. Operational experience on a grid connected 100 kWe biomass gasification power plant in Karnataka, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Dasappa; D. N. Subbukrishna; K. C. Suresh; P. J. Paul; G. S. Prabhu

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the operational experience from a 100kWe gasification power plant connected to the grid in Karnataka. Biomass Energy for Rural India (BERI) is a program that implemented gasification based power generation with an installed capacity of 0.88MWe distributed over three locations to meet the electrical energy needs in the district of Tumkur. The operation of one 100kWe power

  20. Central Utah Water Conservancy District

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Central Utah Water Conservancy District (CUWCD) is a political subdivision of the State of Utah. It was formally established in 1964 to act as the local entity to contract with the United States of America in connection with the construction, operation, and financing of the Central Utah Project (CUP). The purpose of the CUP is to enable the State of Utah to beneficially use a substantial portion of its allotted share of the Colorado River water under the Colorado River Compact. The District sponsors the CUP which includes five specific units. Each unit consists of a series of dams, pipelines, reservoirs, tunnels, and aqueducts designed to assist in meeting the water needs of all ten counties through approximately the year 2020. The District, primarily a wholesaler of water to other cities and agencies, has the responsibility to plan, design, construct, operate and maintain project facilities, administer the sale and delivery of project water, and repay the federal government the reimbursable costs of the CUP.

  1. (Coal utilization in India)

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, R.P.

    1991-01-15

    Under the Phase II, Alternative Energy Resources Development (AERD) project of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Government of India (GOI), five collaborative coal projects have been initiated in the areas of: (1) NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} control from coal-fired power plants, (2) slagging combustor development for high-ash Indian coals, (3) characterization of Indian coals for combustion and gasification, (4) diagnostic studies for prediction of power plant life expectancy, and (5) environmental and natural resource analysis of coal cycle. The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) has the implementation responsibility for these projects. The Indian collaborative institutions identified for these projects are the Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd. (BHEL), Trichy, (Projects 1--4), and the Tata Energy Research Institute (TERI) for Project 5. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is providing cross-cut technical coordination and support for these five projects.

  2. Tackling antibiotic resistance in India.

    PubMed

    Wattal, Chand; Goel, Neeraj

    2014-12-01

    Infectious diseases are major causes of mortality in India. This is aggravated by the increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) both in the community and in hospitals. Due to the emergence of resistance to all effective antibiotics in nosocomial pathogens, the situation calls for emergency measures to tackle AMR in India. India has huge challenges in tackling AMR, ranging from lack of surveillance mechanisms for monitoring AMR and use; effective hospital control policies; sanitation and non-human use of antimicrobial. The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Govt. of India has taken initiatives to tackle AMR. Extensive guidelines have been drafted and a model worksheet has been developed as a roadmap to tackle AMR. PMID:25353717

  3. Availability and distribution of safe abortion services in rural areas: a facility assessment study in Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Sarika; Ali, Sayyed; Randive, Bharat; Sabde, Yogesh; Diwan, Vishal; De Costa, Ayesha

    2015-01-01

    Background Unsafe abortion contributes to a significant portion of maternal mortality in India. Access to safe abortion care is known to reduce maternal mortality. Availability and distribution of abortion care facilities can influence women's access to these services, especially in rural areas. Objectives To assess the availability and distribution of abortion care at facilities providing childbirth care in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) province of India. Design Three socio demographically heterogeneous districts of MP were selected for this study. Facilities conducting at least 10 deliveries a month were surveyed to assess availability and provision of abortion services using UN signal functions for emergency obstetric care. Geographical Information System was used for visualisation of the distribution of facilities. Results The three districts had 99 facilities that conducted >10 deliveries a month: 74 in public and 25 in private sector. Overall, 48% of facilities reported an ability to provide safe surgical abortion service. Of public centres, 32% reported the ability compared to 100% among private centres while 18% of public centres and 77% of private centres had performed an abortion in the last 3 months. The availability of abortion services was higher at higher facility levels with better equipped and skilled personnel availability, in urban areas and in private sector facilities. Conclusions Findings showed that availability of safe abortion care is limited especially in rural areas. More emphasis on providing safe abortion services, particularly at primary care level, is important to more significantly dent maternal mortality in India. PMID:25797220

  4. 77 FR 21556 - Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project: Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ...Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2299-075] Don Pedro Hydroelectric Project: Turlock Irrigation District; Modesto Irrigation District; Supplement to Notice of Study Dispute Resolution Technical Conference On March 16,...

  5. Need for neonatal screening program in India: A national priority.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Pradhan, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    In India, out of 342 districts surveyed, 286 have been identified as endemic to iodine deficiency (ID). Research studies conducted in school age children (SAC), Adolescent girls, Pregnant Mothers (PMs) and Neonates have documented poor iodine nutritional status. As observed by total goiter rate of more than 5% and median urinary iodine concentration level of <100 ?g/l in SAC and <150 ?g/l in PMs as prescribed cutoff of World Health Organization. And higher thyroid stimulating hormone levels among neonates. ID leads to compromised mental development and hence which remain hidden and not visible to family, program managers and administrator. The present review describes the current status of ID in different parts of the country. With a view to strongly recommend the implementation of Neonatal screening program for ID so that the optimal mental development of children can be achieved. PMID:25729682

  6. Got Web? Investing in a District Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    School and school district websites began to mushroom in the mid-1990s in what looked like a rush to stake a cyber-claim in a new frontier. As a byproduct, these early experiments also seemed like a good place to let parents know what is going on in the local school district. Today, it is all too easy to find district websites that are little more…

  7. 7 CFR 922.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.14 District....

  8. 7 CFR 922.14 - District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.14 District....

  9. Study of the variation and the effect of geo-chemical composition on the external background radiation level.

    PubMed

    Marbaniang, Deswyn G; Poddar, Raj Kumar; Nongkynrih, P

    2009-05-01

    The study to generate the baseline of natural radiation and radioactivity in East and West Khasi Hills District of Meghalaya, India was conducted to determine the different radiation dose in selected stations. Twenty stations were selected in both the district, which include Shillong the capital of Meghalaya and the Domiasiat area, which has been identified as one with a Uranium ore deposit. The dose was measured using a Micro-R-Survey meter and from the measurement it was found out that the absorbed dose in both the districts ranges from 0.04 to 1.66 microGy h(-1). The maximum dose was observed in Kylleng (0.72 microGy h(-1)) and the minimum in Mawphlang (0.06 microGy h(-1)). Average absorbed dose and equivalent dose were found to be higher than the Indian and world average values by several orders. The radiation levels distribution was found to be non-uniform through out the selected study area. PMID:18496759

  10. Severe Neurotoxic Envenoming and Cardiac Complications after the Bite of a ‘Sind Krait’ (Bungarus cf. sindanus) in Maharashtra, India

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Lalitha V.; Ambike, Dhananjay; Husainy, Saifuddin; Khaire, Anil; Captain, Ashok; Kuch, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of severe envenoming with unusual complications and two anecdotal cases of fatalities following proven 17-scale-row ‘Sind krait’ (Bungarus cf. sindanus) bites on people sleeping in temporary huts at construction sites in Pune District, Maharashtra, India. A 25-yr-old male developed progressive neuromuscular paralysis, abdominal pain and autonomic disturbances complicated by four prolonged episodes of pulseless ventricular tachycardia requiring defibrillation, and followed by pulmonary edema secondary to impaired left ventricular systolic function and hyperfusion. There was no response to antivenom; mechanical ventilation was required for six days. Only one other case of fatal envenoming likely caused by this species had been reported previously in India. The distribution of B. sindanus sensu lato from eastern Afghanistan to India overlaps with that of the superficially very similar common krait (Bungarus caeruleus). Thus, B. cf. sindanus envenoming may be common but routinely overlooked or misdiagnosed. PMID:23264729

  11. Headline: Portland District partner named best in nation Author: Scott Clemans, Portland District Public Affairs

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Headline: Portland District partner named best in nation Author: Scott Clemans, Portland District Public Affairs A key Portland District recreation partner has been named best in the nation by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Senior members of the Corps' National Resources Management community

  12. Vietnam, March 2010 1 The districting problem:The districting problem

    E-print Network

    Ferland, Jacques A.

    Vietnam, March 2010 1 The districting problem:The districting problem: applicationsTrois--RiviRivièèresres #12;Vietnam, March 2010 2 IntroductionIntroduction The districting problem consists in partitioning a considering different criteria or constraints.criteria or constraints. #12;Vietnam, March 2010 3 Main criteria

  13. How Subjects Matter in District Office Practice: Instructionally Relevant Policy in Urban School District Redesign

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Burch; James P. Spillane

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a virtual explosion of research interest in the role of school districts in instructional change (Hightower, Knapp, Marsh & McLaughlin, 2002). The consensus building within the research is that district action is pivotal to whether and how reforms reach classrooms. While drawing attention to how districts mediate instructional practice, most of the research to

  14. A Report and Estimating Tool for K-12 School Districts. Missouri District Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consortium for School Networking, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Missouri district is a small rural school district with 450 students and 51 staff with a total of 210 client computers. The district consists of two schools (K-6 and 7-12) housed in a single building. This document contains the results of the four 2004 Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) case studies: (1) Software costs; (2) Hardware costs; (3)…

  15. Cultural Districts, A New Strategy for Regional Development? The South-East Cultural District in Sicily

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antoine Le Blanc

    2010-01-01

    Le Blanc A. Cultural districts, a new strategy for regional development? The South-East Cultural District in Sicily, Regional Studies. The industrialization of cultural production and a strong trend for the development of regional networks have recently led to the creation of new spatial and economic forms called ‘cultural districts’. However, these new economic systems rely on very different geographical bases,

  16. India Culture Trunk. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1997 (India).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeksen, Peggy

    This unit is intended to provide students with a general knowledge of the history and culture of India. Activities include: (1) "What Do You Know about India?"; (2) "What Is All This Stuff For?"; (3) "Name That Spice and Why It's Nice"; (4) "Where and How Are These Elephants Marching?"; (5) "Why Is India What It Is?"; (6) "Why is India the Cover…

  17. Government of India Department of Science & Technology

    E-print Network

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    Government of India Department of Science & Technology Department of Biotechnology Australian for bilateral collaboration in science Jointly managed by Australian and Indian governments Supports & Technology (DST), Government of India & Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary

  18. Economic and Disease Burden of Dengue Illness in India

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Donald S.; Halasa, Yara A.; Tyagi, Brij Kishore; Adhish, S. Vivek; Nandan, Deoki; Karthiga, K. S.; Chellaswamy, Vidya; Gaba, Mukul; Arora, Narendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2012 India reported an annual average of 20,474 dengue cases. Although dengue has been notifiable since 1996, regional comparisons suggest that reported numbers substantially underrepresent the full impact of the disease. Adjustment for underreporting from a case study in Madurai district and an expert Delphi panel yielded an annual average of 5,778,406 clinically diagnosed dengue cases between 2006 and 2012, or 282 times the reported number per year. The total direct annual medical cost was US$548 million. Ambulatory settings treated 67% of cases representing 18% of costs, whereas 33% of cases were hospitalized, comprising 82% of costs. Eighty percent of expenditures went to private facilities. Including non-medical and indirect costs based on other dengue-endemic countries raises the economic cost to $1.11 billion, or $0.88 per capita. The economic and disease burden of dengue in India is substantially more than captured by officially reported cases, and increased control measures merit serious consideration. PMID:25294616

  19. Prevalence and clinical manifestations of malaria in Aligarh, India.

    PubMed

    Asma, Umm-e; Taufiq, Farha; Khan, Wajihullah

    2014-12-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of tropical countries with an estimated 207 million cases globally. In India, there are endemic pockets of this disease, including Aligarh. Hundreds of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax cases with severe pathological conditions are recorded every year in this district. The aim of this study is to find out changes in liver enzymes and kidney markers. Specific diagnosis for P. falciparum and P. vivax was made by microscopic examination of Giemsa stained slides. Clinical symptoms were observed in both of these infections. Liver enzymes, such as AST, ALT, and ALP, and kidney function markers, such as creatinine and urea, were estimated by standard biochemical techniques. In Aligarh district, P. vivax, P. falciparum, and mixed infections were 64%, 34%, and 2%, respectively. In case of P. falciparum infection, the incidences of anemia, splenomegaly, renal failure, jaundice, and neurological sequelae were higher compared to those in P. vivax infection. Recrudescence and relapse rates were 18% and 20% in P. falciparum and P. vivax infections, respectively. Liver dysfunctions and renal failures were more common in P. falciparum patients, particularly in elderly patients. Artesunate derivatives must, therefore, be introduced for the treatment of P. falciparum as they resist to chloroquine as well as sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine combinations. PMID:25548413

  20. Integrating socio-economic and infrastructural dimension to reveal hazard vulnerability of coastal districts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Jublee; Paul, Saikat

    2015-04-01

    Losses of life and property due to natural hazards have intensified in the past decade, motivating an alteration of disaster management away from simple post event resettlement and rehabilitation. The degree of exposure to hazard for a homogeneous population is not entirely reliant upon nearness to the source of hazard event. Socio-economic factors and infrastructural capability play an important role in determining the vulnerability of a place. This study investigates the vulnerability of eastern coastal states of India from tropical cyclones. The record of past hundred years shows that the physical vulnerability of eastern coastal states is four times as compared to the western coastal states in terms of frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones. Nevertheless, these physical factors played an imperative role in determining the vulnerability of eastern coast. However, the socio-economic and infrastructural factors influence the risk of exposure exponentially. Inclusion of these indicators would provide better insight regarding the preparedness and resilience of settlements to hazard events. In this regard, the present study is an effort to develop an Integrated Vulnerability Model (IVM) based on socio-economic and infrastructural factors for the districts of eastern coastal states of India. A method is proposed for quantifying the socio-economic and infrastructural vulnerability to tropical cyclone in these districts. The variables included in the study are extracted from Census of India, 2011 at district level administrative unit. In the analysis, a large number of variables are reduced to a smaller number of factors by using principal component analysis that represents the socio-economic and infrastructure vulnerability to tropical cyclone. Subsequently, the factor scores in socio-economic Vulnerability Index (SeVI) and Infrastructure Vulnerability Index (InVI) are standardized from 0 to 1, indicating the range from low to high vulnerability. The factor scores are then mapped for spatial analysis. Utilizing SeVI and InVI, the highly vulnerable districts are demonstrated that are likely to face significant challenges in coping with tropical cyclone and require strategies to address the various aspects of socio-economic and infrastructural vulnerability. Moreover, this model can be incorporated not only for multi-level governance but also to integrate it with the real-time weather forecasts to identify the predictive areas of vulnerability.

  1. Regional case studies--India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Srinath

    2009-01-01

    As a proportion of all deaths in India, cardiovascular disease (CVD) will be the largest cause of disability and death, by the year 2020. At the present stage of India's health transition, an estimated 53% of deaths and 44% of disability-adjusted life-years lost are contributed to chronic diseases. India also has the largest number of people with diabetes in the world, with an estimated 19.3 million in 1995 and projected 57.2 million in 2025. The prevalence of hypertension has been reported to range from 20 to 40% in urban adults and 12-17% among rural adults. The number of people with hypertension is expected to increase from 118.2 million in 2000 to 213.5 million in 2025, with nearly equal numbers of men and women. Over the coming decade, until 2015, CVD and diabetes will contribute to a cumulative loss of USD237 billion for the Indian economy. Much of this enormous burden is already evident in urban as well as semi-urban and slum dwellings across India, where increasing lifespan and rapid acquisition of adverse lifestyles related to the demographic transition contribute to the rising prevalence of CVDs and its risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. The underlying determinants are sociobehavioral factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, improper diet and stress. The changes in diet and physical activity have resulted largely from the epidemiological transition that is underway in most low income countries including India. The main driving forces of these epidemiological shifts are the globalized world, rapid and uneven urbanization, demographic shifts and inter- and intra-country migrations--all of which result in alterations in dietary practices and decreased physical activity. While these changes are global, India has several unique features. The transitions in India are uneven with several states in India still battling the ill effects of undernutrition and infectious diseases, while in other states with better indices of development, chronic diseases including diabetes are emerging as a major area of concern. Regional and urban-rural differences in the occurrence of CVD are the hallmark. All these differences result in a differing prevalence of CVD and its risk factors. Therefore while studying nutrition and physical activity shifts in India, the marked heterogeneity and secular changes in dietary and physical activity practices should be taken into account. This principle should also apply to strategies, policies and nutrition and physical activity guidelines so that they take the regional differences into account. PMID:19346764

  2. Caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda) from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-García, J. M.; Ganesh, T.; Jaikumar, M.; Raman, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    The caprellid fauna of India is investigated. A total of 538 samples (including algae, seagrasses, sponges, hydroids, ascidians, bryozoans, encrusted dead corals, coral rubble, fine and coarse sediments) were collected from 39 stations along the coast of India, covering a wide diversity of habitats from intertidal to 12 m water depth. A new species ( Jigurru longimanus n.sp.) is described, and figures of the 11 valid species reported so far from India are given together with a key for their identification. No caprellids were found in sediments from the northeast (16-20ºN) coast of India while they were abundant in the southeast and west coast. Decreases in salinity due to river discharges associated with lower values of oxygen, higher water temperatures and lower nutrient inputs along the east coast could explain these differences in caprellid composition between the two coastlines. Significantly, lower abundance of caprellids in India, as in other tropical ecosystems, is probably related to the lack of species belonging to the genus Caprella, which reach very high abundances in temperate waters.

  3. Salaryfax for Nine Districts 1972-73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albuquerque Public Schools, NM.

    This study compares salaries as well as benefits of school district personnel in the nine metropolitan school districts that include Albuquerque, New Mexico; Denver, Colorado; El Paso, Texas; Memphis, Tennessee; Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona; Wichita, Kansas; and Mobile, Alabama. The tables aggregate all the elements in the total compensation…

  4. School Districts Try a New Tack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitz, James A., Jr., Battaglia, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Politicians are increasingly pressuring school districts to improve instruction while holding down costs. To achieve this aim, western New York school districts are experimenting with mutual gains bargaining, an alternative negotiation process based on Roger Fisher and William Ury's 1991 book "Getting to Yes." Instead of bargaining from stated set…

  5. School Attendance and District and School Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John T.; Toma, Eugenia F.; Zimmer, Ron W.

    2008-01-01

    The size of schools and districts in which they are located has become a salient policy issue in recent years. While consolidation of school districts and expanding high school size were in vogue from the 1960s until recently, funding agencies are now sponsoring projects to reduce school size under the assumption that smaller schools will lead to…

  6. Procedures for Projecting School District Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Information Center on Education.

    The cohort survival model for projecting school district enrollments is presented for use in local district short-term planning. The basic model, modifications, and sample worksheets are presented. To assist in the calculations of local enrollment projections, step-by-step procedures frequently refer to the sample worksheets. Local administrators…

  7. District Awards for Teacher Excellence: Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Since 2008 Texas's District Awards for Teacher Excellence (D.A.T.E.) program has provided grants to districts for the implementation of locally designed incentive pay plans. The 2010-11 school year is the third year of the D.A.T.E. incentive pay plans with approximately $197 million in annual state funding. This research brief summarizes the key…

  8. Grantmaking to School Districts: Lessons for Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Julia; Weiss, Heather; Harris, Erin; Little, Priscilla M. D.

    2010-01-01

    This brief offers lessons and best practices from foundations across the country on grantmaking to school districts. It offers advice to foundations that are considering school district investments for the first time. It also offers a useful "check" to more experienced foundations that want to examine their thinking and approaches against the…

  9. School Dropouts in Rural Colorado School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tombari, Martin; Andrews, Alex; Gallinati, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Dropouts from rural school districts have not received the same scrutiny as given to those from urban ones. The reasons behind this lack of knowledge about the experience of rural school districts with dropouts are unclear. The purpose of the present study was to begin to close this knowledge gap. A first major study of rural dropouts in the…

  10. Corps of Engineers St. Louis District

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    US Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis District Gateway to ExcellenceFUSRAP 1 St. Louis Oversight Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) · Corps "inherited" equipment, documents, and data from Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis District Gateway to Excellence Brief History 4 Oct 1997 ­ FUSRAP

  11. Districts Create Community Connections with Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2012-01-01

    More districts realize that communicating in a clear and engaging way with stakeholders about everything from the district's overall education vision to scholastic and extracurricular success stories can go a long way toward enlisting broad community support. And although face-to-face communications are still important, technology provides a…

  12. Making Use of District and School Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parke, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how districts can better use their extensive student databases and other existing data to explore questions of interest. School districts are required to maintain a wealth of student information in electronic data systems and other formats. The meaningfulness of the data depends to a large degree on whether they can understand…

  13. The New American Urban School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    The Education Commission of the States has found that urban school districts face enormous problems. This document looks at a variety of ideas about how to re-engineer the urban school district. These essays encourage educators and the public to think about the nation's urban school systems and how they might better meet the needs of children. The…

  14. Re-regulating district heating in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Westin; Fredrik Lagergren

    2002-01-01

    The electricity market reform in Sweden has had great, but little discussed, consequences for the district heating industry. Formerly regulated municipal district heating companies are now obliged to operate in a commercial manner and pricing, previously regulated by the Local Authority Act, is now free. The Swedish Competition Authority has on several occasions mentioned to the Government that a price

  15. Mapping the District: An Accreditation Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Rios Community Coll. District, Sacramento, CA. Office of Institutional Research.

    This document is a survey designed to assess the opinions of campus and district office employees in the Los Rios Community College District, California, about where the responsibility for different functions lies and how well the functions are being performed. Respondents are asked to identify the area performing each function, and then rate how…

  16. River Hills Economic Development District Jill Saegesser

    E-print Network

    development Historic preservation Tourism, Park and Recreational Facilities Economic Dislocation AdjustmentRiver Hills Economic Development District Jill Saegesser 300 Spring Street, Suite 2A Jeffersonville://www.riverhills.cc/ The River Hills Economic Development District (RHEDD) serves a five-county region in southeast Indiana which

  17. > BUREAU HOME > AUSTRALIA > QUEENSLAND > FORECASTS DISTRICT FORECASTS

    E-print Network

    Greenslade, Diana

    > BUREAU HOME > AUSTRALIA > QUEENSLAND > FORECASTS DISTRICT FORECASTS IMPROVEMENTS FOR QUEENSLAND across Australia From October 2013, new and improved district forecasts will be introduced in Queensland Protection times FURTHER INFORMATION : www.bom.gov.au/NexGenFWS © Commonwealth of Australia, 2013 PTO> Wind

  18. A Handbook for School District Financial Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembowski, Frederick L.

    Designed for school business officials, this handbook provides research information and guidelines on school district banking and cash management systems. Section 1 gives an overview of district financial management operations, discussing the administrative framework, cash budgeting, information and control systems, collection and disbursement…

  19. 1 District, 1 Set of Math Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanold, Timothy; Ebert, Jhone

    2010-01-01

    In March 2008, teachers and leaders of the mathematics programs grades 6-12 in the Clark County School District (Las Vegas, Nevada) found themselves under the urgent spotlight of failed expectations. District leaders and teachers had been bold enough to create highstakes, districtwide common assessment semester exams in five subject areas of…

  20. Districts Abandon Grants Targeting Teacher Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2012-01-01

    Three big-city districts--Chicago, Milwaukee, and New York--have terminated federal grants aimed at promoting performance-based compensation plans and professional development for teachers and principals. Overall, the 2010 Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) grants to the three districts would have provided an $88 million payout over five years--nearly 7…

  1. Wireless Wide Area Networks for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nair, Prakash

    This paper considers a basic question that many schools districts face in attempting to develop affordable, expandable district-wide computer networks that are resistant to obsolescence: Should these wide area networks (WANs) employ wireless technology, stick to venerable hard-wired solutions, or combine both. This publication explores the…

  2. AASA Cites Five Districts for Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Administrator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The AASA Instructional Leadership and Technology Committee this year honored five school districts with Outstanding Achievement in Professional Development awards. Honored were Deer Valley Unified School District (Arizona), South Windsor Public Schools (Connecticut), Fort Knox Community Schools (Kentucky), West Orange Public Schools (New Jersey),…

  3. District of Columbia v. Heller and Originalism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence B. Solum

    2009-01-01

    On June 26, 2008, the United States Supreme Court handed down its 5-4 decision in District of Columbia v. Heller, striking a District of Columbia statute that prohibits the possession of useable handguns in the home on the ground that it violated the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution. Justice Scalia's majority opinion drew dissents from Justice Stevens and

  4. School District Size and Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Donna; Halcoussis, Dennis; Svorny, Shirley

    2003-01-01

    Examines impact of school district size on academic achievement of California students. After controlling for certain student characteristics and environmental factors, including class and school size, finds that district size appears to retard academic achievement, especially the performance of middle-school students. (Contains 25 references.)…

  5. Collaborative Strategic Decision Making in School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazer, S. David; Rich, William; Ross, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The dual purpose of this paper is to determine how superintendents in US school districts work with stakeholders in the decision-making process and to learn how different choices superintendents make affect decision outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: This multiple case study of three school districts employs qualitative methodology to…

  6. SOME ETHNOMEDICINAL PLANTS OF KORAPUT DISTRICT ORISSA

    PubMed Central

    Das, P.K.; Misra, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the ethnomedicinal use of 35 plants by the tribals of Koraput district to cure 25 diseases they suffer from. Apart from this, a note on the vegetation pattern, tribal population and geography of the district is given here. PMID:22557632

  7. Sex inequalities in cataract blindness burden and surgical services in south India

    PubMed Central

    Nirmalan, P K; Padmavathi, A; Thulasiraj, R D

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To determine sex inequalities in cataract blindness and surgical services in south India Methods: Details of lens status and cataract surgery were recorded for subjects aged 50 years and older identified through cluster sampling as part of population based cross sectional assessments of cataract blindness and surgical outcomes in three districts of south India. Results: Females were less likely to be operated on for cataract (adjusted OR 0.71, 95% CI: 0.57 to 0.87) although the cataract blindness burden was higher for females (p<0.001). Literacy of the subject was a major predictor for being operated on for cataract. Achieving equal surgical coverage between sexes will have resulted in an additional 25.3% reduction of cataract blindness. Conclusions: Eye care programmes in this population need to be sensitised to the substantial reduction in blindness possible by achieving equal surgical coverage between sexes. PMID:12812882

  8. ENGINEERING EDUCATION IN INDIA Draft Final report

    E-print Network

    Banerjee, Rangan

    ENGINEERING EDUCATION IN INDIA Draft Final report Rangan Banerjee Vinayak P. Muley Sponsored by the Observer Research Foundation to examine engineering education in India, we felt that this may have built up data from primary and secondary sources for engineering education in India and have

  9. Food Insecurity in India: Causes and Dimensions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dand Sejal A; Chakravarty Sujoy

    In this study we explore causes of the widespread food insecurity that prevails in India. It has been observed that even though the proportion of the malnourished fell by about 1 percent (FAO, 2002) through the nineties in India, their absolute number increased by about 18 million. Thus the problem of food insecurity in India is not of general systemic

  10. India's Energy Future and Carbon Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Kumar; Devleena Mani

    The energy scenario in India is driven by coal, oil & gas, hydroelectric, nuclear and renew- able resources. Coal is the most important & abundant fossil fuel in India and accounts for 51% of India's energy need. 45% of energy requirements are met by petroleum products, 2% by hydroelectric and the remainder by nuclear and other resources. The energy requirements

  11. First Record of the Carmine Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae, Infesting Withania somnifera in India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kumar Pati, Pratap

    2012-01-01

    During April–June 2010, red two—spotted carmine spider mites Tetranychus urticae Koch (Trombidiformes: Tetranychidae) were found on aerial apical parts of Ashwagandha Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Solanales: Solanaceae) plants in the Amritsar District of Punjab Province in the North Indian plains. The mites fed on the leaves, making them shiny white in color, which gradually dried off and were later shed. The pest was identified as T. urticae. To best of our knowledge, this is the first record of this pest infesting W. somnifera in India. PMID:22970740

  12. Chikungunya virus infection amongst the acute encephalitis syndrome cases in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Taraphdar, D; Roy, B K; Chatterjee, S

    2015-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection from the acute encephalitis syndrome cases is an uncommon form and has been observed in the year 2010-11 from West Bengal, India. The case-1 and case-2 had the acute encephalitis syndrome; case-3 was of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis whereas the case-4 had the symptoms of meningo-encephalopathy with bulbar involvement. We are reporting four cases with neurological complications involving central nervous system (CNS) due to CHIKV infection from this state for the first time. The virus has spread almost every districts of this state rapidly. At this stage, these cases are public health threat. PMID:25657139

  13. Clinical Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of Expanded Voluntary HIV Testing in India

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Nakamura, Yoriko M.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Losina, Elena; Swaminathan, Soumya; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), most of the estimated 2.3 to 2.5 million HIV-infected individuals in India remain undiagnosed. The questions of whom to test for HIV and at what frequency remain unclear. Methods We used a simulation model of HIV testing and treatment to examine alternative HIV screening strategies: 1) current practice, 2) one-time, 3) every five years, and 4) annually; and we applied these strategies to three population scenarios: 1) the general Indian population (“national population”), i.e. base case (HIV prevalence 0.29%; incidence 0.032/100 person-years [PY]); 2) high-prevalence districts (HIV prevalence 0.8%; incidence 0.088/100 PY), and 3) high-risk groups (HIV prevalence 5.0%; incidence 0.552/100 PY). Cohort characteristics reflected Indians reporting for HIV testing, with a median age of 35 years, 66% men, and a mean CD4 count of 305 cells/µl. The cost of a rapid HIV test was $3.33. Outcomes included life expectancy, HIV-related direct medical costs, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs), and secondary transmission benefits. The threshold for “cost-effective” was defined as 3x the annual per capita GDP of India ($3,900/year of life saved [YLS]), or for “very cost-effective” was <1x the annual per capita GDP ($1,300/YLS). Results Compared to current practice, one-time screening was very cost-effective in the national population (ICER: $1,100/YLS), high-prevalence districts (ICER: $800/YLS), and high-risk groups (ICER: $800/YLS). Screening every five years in the national population (ICER: $1,900/YLS) and annual screening in high-prevalence districts (ICER: $1,900/YLS) and high-risk groups (ICER: $1,800/YLS) were also cost-effective. Results were most sensitive to costs of care and linkage-to-care. Conclusions In India, voluntary HIV screening of the national population every five years offers substantial clinical benefit and is cost-effective. Annual screening is cost-effective among high-risk groups and in high-prevalence districts nationally. Routine HIV screening in India should be implemented. PMID:23741348

  14. Biogeochemical study of termite mounds: a case study from Tummalapalle area of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Arveti, Nagaraju; Reginald, S; Kumar, K Sunil; Harinath, V; Sreedhar, Y

    2012-04-01

    Termite mounds are abundant components of Tummalapalle area of uranium mineralization of Cuddapah District of Andhra Pradesh, India. The systematic research has been carried out on the application of termite mound sampling to mineral exploration in this region. The distribution of chemical elements Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, Li, Rb, Sr, Ba, and U were studied both in termite soils and adjacent surface soils. Uranium accumulations were noticed in seven termite mounds ranging from 10 to 36 ppm. A biogeochemical parameter called "Biological Absorption Coefficient" of the termite mounds indicated the termite affected soils contained huge amounts of chemical elements than the adjacent soils. PMID:21594643

  15. Carbonaceous aerosol emissions from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, D. C.; Gadi, Ranu; Mandal, T. K.; Mitra, A. P.

    Budget estimate for carbonaceous aerosols including black carbon (BC) and organic carbon, emitted from the combustion of various fuels, is very important for regional climate studies. Emission factors for carbonaceous aerosols from bio-fuels and soft coke were determined in a controlled combustion study. The emission factors thus obtained along with those available for other fossil fuels consumed in different sectors have been applied to assess the budget for carbonaceous aerosols from India. Preliminary calculations give a range of 1.6-1.8 Tg of carbonaceous aerosols that include 0.4-1.4 Tg of BC. A major (˜80%) portion of carbonaceous aerosols emitted from India is found to originate from the use of biomass for energy as 70-80% of energy requirement in rural India is met by combustion of traditional bio-fuels.

  16. Status of CFD in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahlad, T. S.

    This paper gives an overview of the status of CFD activity that is being carried out in a number of organisations in India. It discusses the drive for CFD in India and its relevance, the general pattern of growth for CFD in the country, the present CFD scenario, some applications and directions for the future. The emphasis is mainly on aerospace related CFD, eventhough other applications are briefly mentioned. The paper indicates how the problem of computational capability is being tackled through the development of parallel computing platforms.

  17. Human Milk Fortification in India.

    PubMed

    Kler, Neelam; Thakur, Anup; Modi, Manoj; Kaur, Avneet; Garg, Pankaj; Soni, Arun; Saluja, Satish

    2015-01-01

    Human milk fortification in preterm babies has become a standard of care in developed countries. Use of human milk fortifier (HMF) in very-low-birthweight infants is not a routine practice in India. There are concerns about high osmolality, feed intolerance, necrotizing enterocolitis, risk of contamination and added cost associated with use of HMF. There are limited data from India which address the issue of safety and short-term benefits of human milk fortification. This chapter highlights the issues related to human milk fortification in our country. © 2015 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:26111571

  18. Mucormycosis in India: unique features.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Singh, Rachna

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis remains a devastating invasive fungal infection, with high mortality rates even after active management. The disease is being reported at an alarming frequency over the past decades from India. Indian mucormycosis has certain unique features. Rhino-orbito-cerebral presentation associated with uncontrolled diabetes is the predominant characteristic. Isolated renal mucormycosis has emerged as a new clinical entity. Apophysomyces elegans and Rhizopus homothallicus are emerging species in this region and uncommon agents such as Mucor irregularis and Thamnostylum lucknowense are also being reported. This review focuses on these distinct features of mucormycosis observed in India. PMID:25187095

  19. Surveillance of Drinking Water Quality for Safe Water Supply—A Case Study from Shillong, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gajanan Kisan Khadse; Moromi D. Kalita; S. N. Pimpalkar; Pawan K. Labhasetwar

    To ascertain the quality of drinking water being supplied and maintained, it is necessary to conduct water quality surveillance\\u000a for evolving suitable strategy for future planning. In the present investigation, water quality was monitored in treatment\\u000a plants, service reservoirs, and at consumer ends in three seasons to assess the baseline water quality status at Shillong\\u000a in Meghalaya. There are three

  20. Ecosystem function in a Khasi village of the desertified Cherrapunji area in northeast India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A K Gangwar; P S Ramakrishnan

    1989-01-01

    Village ecosystem function of the Khasis in Meghalaya was studied. The land has been desertified around Cherrapunji as the\\u000a traditional slash and burn agriculture (jhum) has been replaced by plantation systems. Apart from mixed plantations with areca\\u000a nut, orange, jackfruit, bay leaf, black pepper and betel leaf, broom grass, thatch grass and bamboo are also raised in the\\u000a village. All

  1. Smuggling India: Deconstructing Western India’s Illicit Export Trade, 1818-1870

    E-print Network

    Boehme, Kate

    2015-02-16

                                                                                                                             5 E. Eastwick. Murray’s Hand-Book for India; being an account of The Three Presidencies, and of The Overland Route; intended as A Guide for Travellers, Officers, and Civilians; with vocabularies and dialogues of the spoken language of India, Part II... the Persian Gulf and Red Sea regions. Through the employment of Bania agents the Portuguese were able to gain access to a greater number of markets, including those such as Aden – which at the time was administered by Ottoman Turkey – where they themselves...

  2. History of Cardiology in India.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. PMID:26071301

  3. Epidemiology of filariasis in India

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, N. G. S.

    1957-01-01

    The author reviews the history of filarial infections in India and discusses factors affecting the filariae, their vectors, and the human reservoir of infection. A detailed description is given of techniques for determining the degree of infection, disease and endemicity of filariasis in a community, and aspects which require further study are indicated. PMID:13472411

  4. India: From SITE to INSAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhri, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies core of India's illiteracy problem and describes use of educational technology to educate rural children. Highlights include descriptions of the Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) project; motivation behind low-cost educational aids development in rural areas; an educational radio pilot project; and development and…

  5. Radiochemistry in India : An Overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. B. Manohar; B. S. Tomar; V. K. Manchanda

    2000-01-01

    A major expansion in the experimental programme of Atomic Energy occurred with the establishment of Atomic Energy Establishment at Trombay (AEET). Along with the setting up of the India's first reactor APSARA, a prototype radiochemistry laboratory was set up at the Trombay site. This laboratory was to serve as a training ground for a team of chemists, chemical engineers and

  6. India and Fast Breeder Reactors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. V. RAMANA

    2009-01-01

    India has long pursued a fast breeder program, motivated in part by the availability of only poor quality uranium resources within the country. But progress so far has been disappointing, with only one test reactor having been constructed and having a chequered operating history. The larger Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor that is being constructed has a design that compromises safety

  7. Corruption in India Andrew Sanchez

    E-print Network

    50 Corruption in India Andrew Sanchez The momentum of last year's hunger strike by the anti-corruption corruption ombudsman. Hazare's campaign rests upon the proposition that the democratic ideals with which. Hazare's supporters argue that this process has two primary effects. First, corruption allows wealthier

  8. Poverty among Elderly in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Akanksha; Mohanty, Sanjay K.

    2012-01-01

    Using consumption expenditure data of the National Sample Survey 2004-2005, this paper estimates the size of elderly poor and tests the hypotheses that elderly households are not economically better-off compared to non-elderly households in India. Poverty estimates are derived under three scenarios--by applying the official cut-off point of the…

  9. Understanding Child Rights in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grewal, Imandeep Kaur; Singh, Nandita Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: This article traces the status of child rights in India, with special attention to traditional beliefs that have shaped and sustain gender discrimination. The article examines the possibilities and limitations of the newly implemented Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act of 2009 for operating as an equalizing…

  10. School District Employment Reductions Slow. Get the Facts. #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Kansas school districts reduced employment by 327 full-time equivalent positions this school year, the smallest reduction in three years of cuts to district operating budgets. Districts reduced positions by 561 in FY 2010 and 1,626 in FY 2011. Districts eliminated nearly 400 "regular" teaching positions this year, but added 114 special education…

  11. An Analysis of a High Performing School District's Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corum, Kenneth D.; Schuetz, Todd B.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a problem based learning project focusing on the cultural elements of a high performing school district. Current literature on school district culture provides numerous cultural elements that are present in high performing school districts. With the current climate in education placing pressure on school districts to perform…

  12. NEZ PERCE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT CULDESAC, IDAHO 83524

    E-print Network

    NEZ PERCE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT PO BOX 131 CULDESAC, IDAHO 83524 208-843-2931 PHONE AVENUE, SUITE 1100 PORTLAND, OREGON 97204-1348 FROM: NEZ PERCE SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT PROJECTS DATE: 10/4/06 Dear Council Members: The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District

  13. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY NEW YORK DISTRICT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY NEW YORK DISTRICT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS JACOB K. JAVITS FEDERAL BUILDING NEW.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District (District) announces the availability of the Draft contact: Jenifer Thalhauser Project Manager New York District Corps of Engineers (917) 790-8632 jenifer

  14. District heating and cooling for efficient energy supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alojz Poredos; Andrej Kitanovski

    2011-01-01

    Supplying customers with heating and cooling energy from district energy systems essentially contributes to the rational use of energy and to environmental protection. In the past few years, the use of district cooling has been significantly increased in some countries. The energy supply of cooling and heating for urban districts is usually separated. While a part of a district is

  15. Understanding epidemiological transition in India

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Suryakant; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam

    2014-01-01

    Background Omran's theory explains changing disease patterns over time predominantly from infectious to chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). India's epidemiological transition is characterized by dual burden of diseases. Kumar addressed low mortality and high morbidity in Kerala, which seems also to be true for India as a country in the current demographic scenario. Methods NSS data (1986–1987, 1995–1996, 2004) and aggregated data on causes of death provided by Registrar General India (RGI) were used to examine the structural changes in morbidity and causes of death. A zero-inflated poisson (ZIP) regression model and a beta-binomial model were used to corroborate the mounting age pattern of morbidity. Measures, namely the 25th and 75th percentiles of age-at-death and modal age-at-death, were used to examine the advances in mortality transition. Objective This study addressed the advances in epidemiological transition via exploring the structural changes in pattern of diseases and progress in mortality transition. Results The burden of NCDs has been increasing in old age without replacing the burden of communicable diseases. The manifold rise of chronic diseases in recent decades justifies the death toll and is responsible for transformation in the age pattern of morbidity. Over time, deaths have been concentrated near the modal age-at-death. Modal age-at-death increased linearly by 5 years for females (r2=0.9515) and males (r2=0.9020). Significant increase in modal age-at-death ascertained the dominance of old age mortality over the childhood/adult age mortality. Conclusions India experiences a dual burden of diseases associated with a remarkable transformation in the age pattern of morbidity and mortality, contemporaneous with structural changes in disease patterns. Continued progress in the pattern of diseases and mortality transition, accompanied by a linear rise in ex, unravels a compelling variation in advances found so far in epidemiological transition witnessed by the developed nations, with similar matrices for India. PMID:24848651

  16. A Research Report of Small/Rural School Districts in New Mexico Compared to School Districts of Similiar Size Nationwide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.; Muse, Ivan D.

    A 1982-83 survey produced data used to compare 17 small/rural K-12 New Mexico school districts (900 students or fewer) with 642 similar districts nationwide. Of New Mexico's 88 school districts, 43 were identified as qualifying (48.9%, enrolling 16,648 students), for comparison to 4,125 similar districts nationwide. A questionnaire mailed to…

  17. About East Bay Regional Park District The East Bay Regional Park District spans Alameda and Contra Costa

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Kathleen

    and conducts nightly backups directly in District facilities. IT management needed to assure that certain dataAbout East Bay Regional Park District The East Bay Regional Park District spans Alameda and Contra,200 miles of trails for hiking, biking, horseback riding and nature study. The Park District is responsible

  18. Rb-Sr Isotope Dating of Neoproterozoic (Malani Group) Magmatism from Southwest Rajasthan, India: Evidence of Younger Pan-African Thermal Event by 40Ar 39Ar Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. S. Rathore; T. R. Venkatesan; R. K. Srivastava

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports Rb-Sr isotope ages of the Neoproterozoic volcanics, and associated granitoids of the trans-Aravalli belt of northwestern India. All these rocks along with the earlier reported 779±10 Ma old felsic volcanics from Diri, and Gurapratap Singh of Pali district, Rajasthan, constitute the Malani Group. The study indicates that different rock suites belonging to the Malani Group represent a

  19. Arsenic groundwater contamination and its health effects in the state of Uttar Pradesh (UP) in upper and middle Ganga plain, India: A severe danger

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sad Ahamed; Mrinal Kumar Sengupta; Amitava Mukherjee; M. Amir Hossain; Bhaskar Das; Bishwajit Nayak; Arup Pal; Subhas Chandra Mukherjee; Shyamapada Pati; Rathindra Nath Dutta; Garga Chatterjee; Adreesh Mukherjee; Rishiji Srivastava; Dipankar Chakraborti

    2006-01-01

    This communication presents results of our 2-year survey on groundwater arsenic contamination in three districts Ballia, Varanasi and Gazipur of Uttar Pradesh (UP) in the upper and middle Ganga plain, India. Analyses of 4780 tubewell water samples revealed that arsenic concentrations in 46.5% exceeded 10 ?g\\/L, in 26.7%, 50 ?g\\/L and in 10% 300 ?g\\/L limits. Arsenic concentrations up to 3192 ?g\\/\\/L were observed.

  20. Fostering Maternal and Newborn Care in India the Yashoda Way: Does This Improve Maternal and Newborn Care Practices during Institutional Delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Beena; Roy, Reetabrata; Saha, Somen; Roalkvam, Sidsel

    2014-01-01

    Background The Yashoda program, named after a legendary foster-mother in Indian mythology, under the Norway-India Partnership Initiative was launched as a pilot program in 2008 to improve the quality of maternal and neonatal care at facilities in select districts of India. Yashodas were placed mainly at district hospitals, which are high delivery load facilities, to provide support and care to mothers and newborns during their stay at these facilities. This study presents the results from the evaluation of this intervention in two states in India. Methods Data collection methods included in-depth interviews with healthcare providers and mothers and a survey of mothers who had recently delivered within a quasi-experimental design. Fifty IDIs were done and 1,652 mothers who had delivered in the past three months were surveyed during 2010 and 2011. Results A significantly higher proportion of mothers at facilities with Yashodas (55 percent to 97 percent) received counseling on immunization, breastfeeding, family planning, danger signs, and nutrition compared to those in control districts (34 percent to 66 percent). Mothers in intervention facilities were four to five times more likely to receive postnatal checks than mothers in control facilities. Among mothers who underwent cesarean sections, initiation of breastfeeding within five hours was 50 percent higher in intervention facilities. Mothers and families also reported increased support, care and respect at intervention facilities. Conclusion Yashoda as mothers' aide thus seems to be an effective intervention to improve quality of maternal and newborn care in India. Scaling up of this intervention is recommended in district hospitals and other facilities with high volume of deliveries. PMID:24454718

  1. 7 CFR 958.27 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...territory within a boundary following the Snake River northwesterly from its junction...Malheur River to the junction with the Snake River, the point of beginning. District...junction of the Malheur River with the Snake River and extending southwestward...

  2. 7 CFR 958.27 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...territory within a boundary following the Snake River northwesterly from its junction...Malheur River to the junction with the Snake River, the point of beginning. District...junction of the Malheur River with the Snake River and extending southwestward...

  3. 7 CFR 958.27 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...territory within a boundary following the Snake River northwesterly from its junction...Malheur River to the junction with the Snake River, the point of beginning. District...junction of the Malheur River with the Snake River and extending southwestward...

  4. 7 CFR 958.27 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...territory within a boundary following the Snake River northwesterly from its junction...Malheur River to the junction with the Snake River, the point of beginning. District...junction of the Malheur River with the Snake River and extending southwestward...

  5. 7 CFR 958.27 - Districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...territory within a boundary following the Snake River northwesterly from its junction...Malheur River to the junction with the Snake River, the point of beginning. District...junction of the Malheur River with the Snake River and extending southwestward...

  6. Rochester City School District Peer Assistance Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chierichella, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the author evaluates the Peer Assistance and Review (PAR) program in the Rochester City School District, Rochester, NY. The author evaluates the system's strengths and weaknesses and discusses the program's alignment with New York State requirements.

  7. Inequalities in Advice Provided by Public Health Workers to Women during Antenatal Sessions in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhishek; Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Ram, Faujdar; Ogollah, Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Studies have widely documented the socioeconomic inequalities in maternal and child health related outcomes in developing countries including India. However, there is limited research on the inequalities in advice provided by public health workers on maternal and child health during antenatal visits. This paper investigates the inequalities in advice provided by public health workers to women during antenatal visits in rural India. Methods and Findings The District Level Household Survey (2007–08) was used to compute rich-poor ratios and concentration indices. Binary logistic regressions were used to investigate inequalities in advice provided by public health workers. The dependent variables comprised the advice provided on seven essential components of maternal and child health care. A significant proportion of pregnant women who attended at least four ANC sessions were not advised on these components during their antenatal sessions. Only 51%–72% of the pregnant women were advised on at least one of the components. Moreover, socioeconomic inequalities in providing advice were significant and the provision of advice concentrated disproportionately among the rich. Inequalities were highest in the case of advice on family planning methods. Advice on breastfeeding was least unequal. Public health workers working in lower level health facilities were significantly less likely than their counterparts in the higher level health facilities to provide specific advice. Conclusion A significant proportion of women were not advised on recommended components of maternal and child health in rural India. Moreover, there were enormous socioeconomic inequalities. The findings of this study raise questions about the capacity of the public health care system in providing equitable services in India. The Government of India must focus on training and capacity building of the public health workers in communication skills so that they can deliver appropriate and recommended advice to all clients, irrespective of their socioeconomic status. PMID:23028688

  8. Dual energy use systems: District heating survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    The current status of and problems facing district heating systems operated by electric utilities were identified. The technical and economic factors which can affect the present and future success of district heating systems in the United States were evaluated. A survey of 59 district heating electric utilities was conducted to determine the current status of the industry. Questions developed to obtain data on technical, economic, regulator, and marketing factors were included in the survey. Literature on district heating in the U.S. and abroad was collected from governments, industry and foreign sources and reviewed to aid in evaluating the current and future potential of the industry. Interviews were held with executives of 16 utilities that operate district heating systems in order to determine corporate attitudes. A summary of the literature obtained is provided. Survey results are tabulated and described. The interviews and survey data were used to compile 10 case studies of utilities operating district heating systems under a braod range of circumstances.

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle assessment of India: a technical study for U.S.-India cooperation 

    E-print Network

    Woddi, Taraknath Venkat Krishna

    2009-05-15

    assessment of India emphasizes the entwinment of the military and civilian facilities and would aid in moving forward with the separation plan. To estimate the existing uranium reserves in India, a complete historical assessment of ore production, conversion...

  10. Nuclear fuel cycle assessment of India: a technical study for U.S.-India cooperation 

    E-print Network

    Woddi, Taraknath Venkat Krishna

    2008-10-10

    assessment of India emphasizes the entwinment of the military and civilian facilities and would aid in moving forward with the separation plan. To estimate the existing uranium reserves in India, a complete historical assessment of ore production, conversion...

  11. Assessing chronic and climate-induced water risk through spatially distributed cumulative deficit measures: A new picture of water sustainability in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devineni, Naresh; Perveen, Shama; Lall, Upmanu

    2013-04-01

    India is a poster child for groundwater depletion and chronic water stress. Often, water sustainability is measured through an estimate of the difference between the average supply and demand in a region. However, water supply and demand are highly variable in time and space. Hence, measures of scarcity need to reflect temporal imbalances even for a fixed location. We introduce spatially distributed indices of water stress that integrate over time variations in water supply and demand. The indices reflect the maximum cumulative deficit in a regional water balance within year and across years. This can be interpreted as the amount that needs to be drawn from external storage (either aquifers or surface reservoirs or interarea transfers) to meet the current demand pattern given a variable climate and renewable water supply. A simulation over a long period of record (historical or projected) provides the ability to quantify risk. We present an application at a district level in India considering more than a 100 year data set of rainfall as the renewable supply, and the recent water use pattern for each district. Consumption data are available through surveys at the district level, and consequently, we use this rather than river basins as the unit of analysis. The rainfall endogenous to each district is used as a potentially renewable water supply to reflect the supply-demand imbalances directly at the district level, independent of potential transfers due to upstream-induced runoff or canals. The index is useful for indicating whether small or large surface storage will suffice, or whether the extent of groundwater storage or external transfers, or changes in demand are needed to achieve a sustainable solution. Implications of the analysis for India and for other applications are discussed.

  12. Urbanization and agricultural land loss in India: comparing satellite estimates with census data.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Bhartendu; Seto, Karen C

    2015-01-15

    We examine the impacts of urbanization on agricultural land loss in India from 2001 to 2010. We combined a hierarchical classification approach with econometric time series analysis to reconstruct land-cover change histories using time series MODIS 250 m VI images composited at 16-day intervals and night time lights (NTL) data. We compared estimates of agricultural land loss using satellite data with agricultural census data. Our analysis highlights six key results. First, agricultural land loss is occurring around smaller cities more than around bigger cities. Second, from 2001 to 2010, each state lost less than 1% of its total geographical area due to agriculture to urban expansion. Third, the northeastern states experienced the least amount of agricultural land loss. Fourth, agricultural land loss is largely in states and districts which have a larger number of operational or approved SEZs. Fifth, urban conversion of agricultural land is concentrated in a few districts and states with high rates of economic growth. Sixth, agricultural land loss is predominantly in states with higher agricultural land suitability compared to other states. Although the total area of agricultural land lost to urban expansion has been relatively low, our results show that since 2006, the amount of agricultural land converted has been increasing steadily. Given that the preponderance of India's urban population growth has yet to occur, the results suggest an increase in the conversion of agricultural land going into the future. PMID:24958549

  13. Thalassemia major and intermedia in jammu and kashmir, India: a regional transfusion centre experience.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay

    2014-12-01

    Data on status of thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies from the extreme northern part of India is scarce. We investigated socio-demographic characteristics and management issues related to ?-thalassemia in Jammu and Kashmir, India. Data from 96 thalassemia major and intermedia patients visiting the department of transfusion medicine for their transfusion needs was collected. Parameters recorded included age group, age at diagnosis, gender, religion, districts of the state they belonged to, family history of thalassemia, blood group, type of thalassemia (major/intermedia), total number of transfusions received and chelation therapy status. Thalassemia major patients comprised 92 (95.8 %) and intermedia 4 (4.2 %) of the cohort. Most cases were diagnosed in infancy or early childhood. The districts of Jammu and Rajouri together contributed 53 % of the cases. Most patients were Hindu (76/96, 79.2 %). A positive family history was most often obtained from Muslim patients (8/18, 44.4 %). Only 50 % cases were on iron chelation therapy. There is a need to come up with a national/local policy to manage disease in endemic areas and a policy formulated to help families and patients. Data such as ours may help in health management planning for thalassemic patients in this region. PMID:25435731

  14. 76 FR 62843 - Sulfanilic Acid From China and India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ...Third Review)] Sulfanilic Acid From China and India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed...countervailing duty order on sulfanilic acid from India and antidumping duty orders on sulfanilic acid from China and India would...

  15. Assessment of organochlorine pesticides in human milk and risk exposure to infants from North-East India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, K; Sharma, Ramesh C

    2011-11-01

    Despite the worldwide ban on use of persistent organochlorine pesticides, their usage continued until recently in India, for vector-borne disease eradication programs and agricultural purposes. The concentrations of organochlorine contaminants, DDT and HCH, have been determined in human breast milk from Dibrugarh and Nagaon districts of Assam state, North-East India. The results demonstrated that the mean levels of total DDT were 3210 ng/g lipid wt. and 2870 ng/g lipid wt. and total HCH were 2720 ng/g lipid wt. and 2330 ng/g lipid wt. in Nagaon and Dibrugarh respectively. There was no significant difference in the levels of investigated pollutants between the two districts. Significant differences in ADI (Average daily intake) for total DDT were found between the two districts. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between OCP levels in breast milk and age of mothers. Based on OCP levels in human breast milk, the ADI by the infants has been estimated. It has been found that high daily intake of DDTs and HCHs by the infants exceeded the TDI (Tolerable daily intake) which implied that infants of the region are potentially at high risk by these contaminants. PMID:21917296

  16. Molecular biology research in neuropsychiatry: India’s contribution

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Ramesh, B. N.; Vasudevaraju, P.; Rao, K. S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders represent the second largest cause of morbidity worldwide. These disorders have complex etiology and patho-physiology. The major lacunae in the biology of the psychiatric disorders include genomics, biomarkers and drug discovery, for the early detection of the disease, and have great application in the clinical management of disease. Indian psychiatrists and scientists played a significant role in filling the gaps. The present annotation provides in depth information related to research contributions on the molecular biology research in neuropsychiatric disorders in India. There is a great need for further research in this direction as to understand the genetic association of the neuropsychiatric disorders; molecular biology has a tremendous role to play. The alterations in gene expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction and depression. The development of transgenic neuropsychiatric animal models is of great thrust areas. No studies from India in this direction. Biomarkers in neuropsychiatric disorders are of great help to the clinicians for the early diagnosis of the disorders. The studies related to gene-environment interactions, DNA instability, oxidative stress are less studied in neuropsychiatric disorders and making efforts in this direction will lead to pioneers in these areas of research in India. In conclusion, we provided an insight for future research direction in molecular understanding of neuropsychiatry disorders. PMID:21836667

  17. POTA: Lessons Learned From India’s Anti-Terror Act

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Gagné

    2005-01-01

    Shortly after the September 11 terrorist attacks in the United States, India passed its own anti-terrorism ordinance, the Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA), following a terrorist attack on India’s Parliament building in December 2001. As with the USA PATRIOT Act, Indian legislators acted quickly, declaring the Act to be a necessary weapon against terrorism. But POTA, like the USA PATRIOT

  18. India: A Performance Based Unit. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1998 (India).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Sharon L.

    This unit of study aims to help students in grades 9-12 experience the history, culture, religion, and literature of India by emphasizing active participation in the diverse art forms indigenous to India and those that are shared by India and the United States. Components of study in the unit are: The "Ramayana"; Indian Classical Dance; The…

  19. India at 50. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad, 1997 (India).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, John

    This unit is intended to provide students with an understanding of India in 1997 by drawing on some of the major cultural, political, intellectual, and economic themes of its recent history. This snapshot of India uses the 50th anniversary as the occasion to evaluate the path modern India has taken. The unit examines the country's reactions to…

  20. The motion and active deformation of India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Paul; R. Bürgmann; V. K. Gaur; R. Bilham; K. M. Larson; M. B. Ananda; S. Jade; M. Mukal; T. S. Anupama; G. Satyal; D. Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of surface displacements using GPS constrain the motion and deformation of India and India-Eurasia plate boundary deformation along the Himalaya. The GPS velocities of plate-interior sites constrain the pole of the angular velocity vector of India with respect to Eurasia to lie at 25.6+\\/-1.0°N11.1+\\/-9.0°E, approximately 6° west of the NUVEL-1A pole of <3 Ma plate motion. The angular rotation

  1. India going nuclear: A bomb against China?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weixing Hu

    1998-01-01

    As China and India were gradually repairing their relations since the late 1980s, India’s nuclear tests in May 1998 caused\\u000a a major setback for the improvement of the bilateral relationship. By discussing the question whether New Delhi is developing\\u000a the bomb against China or not, this article attempts to shed some light on the strategic fallouts of the Indian nuclear

  2. Nehruvian science and postcolonial India.

    PubMed

    Arnold, David

    2013-06-01

    This essay uses the seminal figure of Jawaharlal Nehru to interrogate the nature and representation of science in modern India. The problem posed by Nehruvian science--the conflict between (yet simultaneity of) science as both universal phenomenon and local effect--lies at the heart of current debates about what science means for the non-West. The problematic of Nehruvian science can be accessed through Nehru's own speeches and writings, but also through the wider project of science with which he identified--critiquing colonialism, forging India's place in the modern world, marrying intellectual endeavor with practical nation building. The essay makes a case for looking at Nehruvian science as a way of structuring the problem of postcolonial science, particularly in relation to understanding the authority of science and its evaluation in terms of its capacity to deliver socioeconomic change. PMID:23961694

  3. The Little District that Could: Literacy Reform Leads to Higher Achievement in California District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Patricia R.; Budicin-Senters, Antoinette; King, L. McLean

    2005-01-01

    This article describes educational reform developed over a 10-year period in California's Lemon Grove School District, which resulted in a steady and remarkable upward shift in achievement for the students of this multicultural district just outside San Diego. Six elements of literacy reform emerged as the most significant factors affecting…

  4. IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE MIDDLE DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA

    E-print Network

    Ray, David

    an establishment of religion prohibited by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, which is made1 IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE MIDDLE DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA TAMMY KITZMILLER, et applicable to the states by the Fourteenth Amendment, as well as the Constitution of the Commonwealth

  5. Charleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    Requested School 8.1 7 West Ashley Middle Sangaree Middle #12;Charleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board AGENDA Special: Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 2 of 2 VII. DISCIPLINE: Expulsion Hearing Student Infraction School 7.1 Non

  6. Charleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    : Student Gr Home School Requested School 8.1 5 Burke Middle St. Andrews Middle 8.2 PreK Minnie HughesCharleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board AGENDA Meeting, 2012 Page 2 of 2 EXECUTIVE SESSION VII. DISCIPLINE: Expulsion Hearing Student Infraction School 7

  7. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    /INTER STUDENT TRANSFER REQUESTS: Student Gr Home School Requested School 8.1 6 West Ashley Middle St. AndrewsCharleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board MINUTES Middle (D) 8.2 1 Goodwin Elem Springfield Elem (A) 8.3 4K Mt. Zion Elem Oakland Elem (A) 8.4 4K Mt. Zion

  8. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    Home School Requested School 8.1 K4 E.B. Ellington Oakland Elem (A) 8.2 5 St. Andrews Middle CCharleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board MINUTES.E. Williams (tabled) 8.3 6 West Ashley Middle St. Andrews Middle (D) 8.4 8 Baptist Hill High West Ashley High

  9. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    Morningside Middle West Ashley Middle (A) 8.11 5 Oakland Elem Moultrie Middle (A) 8.12 K -not in school- StonoCharleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board MINUTES/INTER STUDENT TRANSFER REQUESTS: Student Gr Home School Requested School 8.1 8 Stall High School West Ashley

  10. Charleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    School 7.1 Bomb Threat West Ashley Middle 7.2 Habitual Infractions CCSMS VIII. INTRA/INTER STUDENTCharleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board AGENDA Meeting TRANSFER REQUESTS: Student Gr Home School Requested School 8.1 10 St. Johns High West Ashley High (EMP) 8

  11. Charleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    TRANSFER REQUESTS: Student Gr Home School Requested School 8.1 7 West Ashley Middle St. Andrews Middle #12;Charleston County School District St. Andrew's Constituent District #10 School Board AGENDA Meeting 4, 2012 Page 2 of 2 EXECUTIVE SESSION VII. DISCIPLINE: Expulsion Hearing Student Infraction School 7

  12. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    Home School Requested School 8.1 7 West Ashley Middle Sangaree Middle (A) #12;Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board MINUTES on long-term removal from WAHS/CCSD for the remainder of the school year. The student will return before

  13. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    /INTER STUDENT TRANSFER REQUESTS: Student Gr Home School Requested School 8.1 5 C.E. Williams Fort Johnson MiddleCharleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board MINUTES (A) 8.2 5 C.E. Williams Fort Johnson Middle (A) 8.3 6 Baptist Hill Middle St. Andrews Middle (A) 8

  14. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    Home School Requested School 8.1 5 Baptist Hill Middle St. Andrews Middle (A) 8.2 8 Baptist Hill HighCharleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board MINUTES West Ashley High (A) 8.3 8 St. John's High West Ashley High (A) 8.4 5 C.E. Williams Fort Johnson Middle

  15. Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board

    E-print Network

    Dillon, Robert T.

    TRANSFER REQUESTS: Student Gr Home School Requested School 8.1 5 Burke Middle St. Andrews Middle (A) 8Charleston County School District St. Andrews Constituent District # 10 School Board MINUTES.1 be expelled from CCSD/Daniel Jenkins Creative Learning Center for the remainder of the 2011-2012 school year

  16. How Does District Principal Evaluation Affect Learning-Centered Principal Leadership? Evidence From Michigan School Districts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min Sun; Peter Youngs

    2009-01-01

    This study used Hierarchical Multivariate Linear models to investigate relationships between principals' behaviors and district principal evaluation purpose, focus, and assessed leadership activities in 13 school districts in Michigan. The study found that principals were more likely to engage in learning-centered leadership behaviors when the purposes of evaluation included principal professional development, school restructuring, and accountability; when the focus of

  17. Managing School Districts with Declining Enrollment. Case Study Number 2: School District B. A Small City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Bureau of Field Studies and Surveys.

    This case study of the effects of declining enrollment on the school district in one small Minnesota city is published in conjuction with a planning assistance manual. In its attempt to balance the budget, the district was forced to make many staff reductions, including cuts in administrative staff. In addition to the problems in force and…

  18. Exploring Superintendent Leadership in Smaller Urban Districts: Does District Size Influence Superintendent Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentschke, Guilbert C.; Nayfack, Michelle B.; Wohlstetter, Priscilla

    2009-01-01

    Much of the existing literature on urban school reform focuses on how the relatively small number of our nation's largest urban districts are approaching school reform with these objectives in mind. However, does smaller district size have any bearing, direct or indirect, on the nature of superintendent leadership? The authors' exploratory…

  19. Malaria in Wanokaka and Loli sub-districts, West Sumba District, East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Syafruddin; P. B. Asih; F. N. Coutrier; L. Trianty; R. Noviyanti; Y. Luase; W. Sumarto; M. Caley; A. J. A. M. van der Ven; R. W. Sauerwein

    2006-01-01

    Malaria has long been known as one of the major public health problems in West Sumba District, East Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia. To obtain baseline data for establishment of a suitable malaria control program in the area, malariometric surveys were conducted in two sub-districts, Wanokaka and Loli, during the periods of January, May, and August 2005. The survey included three

  20. IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF ALASKA

    E-print Network

    Plaintiff is The Boat Company, which is a non-profit corporation which operates multi-day tours in southeastIN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF ALASKA THE BOAT COMPANY, ) ) Plaintiff. ) __________________________________________) O R D E R Cross-Motions for Summary Judgment re The Boat Company's Claims Plaintiff moves

  1. Healthcare waste management in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Patil; A. V. Shekdar

    2001-01-01

    Health-care waste management in India is receiving greater attention due to recent regulations (the Biomedical Wastes (Management & Handling) Rules, 1998). The prevailing situation is analysed covering various issues like quantities and proportion of different constituents of wastes, handling, treatment and disposal methods in various health-care units (HCUs). The waste generation rate ranges between 0·5 and 2·0kg bed?1day?1. It is

  2. Psychiatric thoughts in ancient India.

    PubMed

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry. PMID:25838724

  3. Environmental impact of mine tailings in Redi mines, Sindhudurg District, Maharashtra (India).

    PubMed

    Sawant, Arun D; Thakur, Vikas A

    2011-07-01

    Redi mine contains Fe, Mn as major elements, Al, Si as minor elements and also contains traces of Cr, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu and P. The toxic trace elements present in the ore have also contributed to the contamination of the environment. Various operations of mining, the machinery used, transportation, the metallurgy and kind of waste management practices used are the significant factors of contributing to the nature of tailings of mine. The studies of tailings have revealed that, in addition to elemental contaminations, the operations create acidic environment around the area (pH-6.2 to 6.3 ), as water samples around showed acidic to slightly basic (pH 5.1 to 7.3) nature while soil samples were found acidic to the slightly basic (pH 6.1 to 7.4). In the samples of ore, tailings and soil, the most abundant elements found are Fe, Mn, Si and Al. In water samples, in addition to presence of Fe, Mn, Si, Al, P, significant quantities of Ni, Zn are also found. Ore, tailings and soil samples were analysed by X-Ray Diffraction technique and have shown the presence of goethite, gibbsite, kaolinite, quartz and mica alongwith haematite in the overall composition of ore. PMID:23029934

  4. Study on Bioaccumulation of Lindane in Various Tissues of Channa gachua from Aurangabad District (MS) India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Shingare; M. V. Gaikwad; T. S. Pathan; P. B. Thete; Y. K. Khillare

    To study bioaccumulation level of lindane in various tissues of Channa gachua, been studied for the present study, fishes were collected from nearby agricultural area, has. Tissues like muscle, kidney and liver are used for quantification of bioaccumulati on level of lindane. The tissues are blended with n-Hexane for extraction of pesticides and then were analyzed on Gas Chromatograph (GC,

  5. Geospatial tools for assessing land degradation in Budgam district, Kashmir Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Mehnaz; Lone, Mahjoor Ahmad; Romshoo, Shakil Ahmad

    2011-06-01

    Land degradation reduces the ability of the land to perform many biophysical and chemical functions. The main aim of this study was to determine the status of land degradation in the Budgam area of Kashmir Himalaya using remote sensing and geographic information system. The satellite data together with other geospatial datasets were used to quantify different categories of land degradation. The results were validated in the field and an accuracy of 85% was observed. Land use/land cover of the study area was determined in order to know the effect of land use on the rate of land degradation. Normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI) and slope of the area were determined using LANDSAT-enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) data, advanced space borne thermal emission and reflection radiometer, and digital elevation model along with other secondary data were analysed to create various thematic maps, viz., land use/land cover, geology, NDVI and slopes used in modelling land degradation in the Kashmir Himalayan region. The vegetation condition, elevation and land use/land cover information of the area were integrated to assess the land degradation scenario in the area using the ArcGIS `Spatial Analyst Module'. The results reveal that about 13.19% of the study area has undergone moderate to high degradation, whereas about 44.12% of the area has undergone slight degradation.

  6. Decentralisation to Improve Teacher Quality? District Institutes of Education and Training in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    Decentralisation is often expected to improve democratic participation and empowerment, and improve government responsiveness to local needs. International experience demonstrates that striking the right balance between centralisation and decentralisation remains highly challenging, and that developing appropriate institutional capacity to…

  7. Multilevel Analysis of the Predictors of HIV Prevalence among Pregnant Women Enrolled in Annual HIV Sentinel Surveillance in Four States in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Thamattoor, Usha; Thomas, Tinku; Banandur, Pradeep; S, Rajaram; Duchesne, Thierry; Abdous, Belkacem; Washington, Reynold; B M, Ramesh; Moses, Stephen; Alary, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneity of the HIV epidemic across districts of south India is reflected in HIV positivity among antenatal clinic (ANC) attendees. Along with individual factors, contextual factors also need consideration for effective HIV interventions. Thus, identifying district and individual level factors that influence ANC HIV positivity assumes importance to intervene effectively. Methods Data on HIV sentinel surveillance among the ANC population were obtained from the National AIDS Control Organization (NACO) between years 2004 and 2007. Data from serial cross-sectional studies among female sex workers (FSWs) conducted during this time period in 24 districts were used to generate district level variables corresponding to parameters concerning this high risk population. Other district level data were obtained from various official/governmental agencies. Multilevel logistic regression was used to identify individual and district level factors associated with ANC-HIV positivity. Results The average ANC-HIV prevalence from 2004 to 2007 in the 24 integrated biological and behavioural assessments (IBBA) districts ranged from 0.25 to 3.25%. HIV positivity was significantly higher among ANC women with age?25 years [adjusted odds ratio (AOR):1.49; 95% confidence interval (95%CI):1.27 to 1.76] compared to those with age<25 years; illiterate (AOR:1.62; 95%CI:1.03 to 2.54) compared to literate; employed in agriculture (AOR:1.34; 95%CI:1.11 to 1.62) or with occupations like driver/helper/industry/factory workers/hotel staff (AOR:1.59; 95%CI:1.26 to 2.01) compared to unemployed. District level HIV prevalence among FSWs (AOR:1.03; 95%CI:1.0 to 1.05) and percentage women marrying under 18 years were significantly associated with ANC-HIV positivity (AOR:1.02; 95%CI:1.00 to 1.04). Conclusion Illiteracy of the woman, higher HIV prevalence among FSWs and early marriage were associated with HIV positivity among pregnant women in southern India. In addition to targeted HIV preventive interventions among FSWs, studying and changing the behavior of FSW clients and addressing structural drivers of the epidemic might indirectly help reduce HIV infection among women in southern India. PMID:26147208

  8. District heating strategy model: community manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hrabak, R. A.; Kron, Jr., N. F.; Pferdehirt, W. P.

    1981-10-01

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) cosponsor a program aimed at increasing the number of district heating and cooling systems. Twenty-eight communities have received HUD cooperative agreements to aid in a national feasibility assessment of district heating and cooling systems. The HUD/DOE program includes technical assistance provided by Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Part of this assistance is a computer program, called the district heating strategy model, that performs preliminary calculations to analyze potential district heating and cooling systems. The model uses information about a community's physical characteristics, current electricity-supply systems, and local economic conditions to calculate heat demands, heat supplies from existing power plants and a new boiler, system construction costs, basic financial forecasts, and changes in air-pollutant emissions resulting from installation of a district heating and cooling system. This report explains the operation of the district heating strategy model, provides simplified forms for organizing the input data required, and describes and illustrates the model's output data. The report is written for three groups of people: (1) those in the HUD/DOE-sponsored communities who will be collecting input data, and studying output data, to assess the potential for district heating and cooling applications in their communiites; (2) those in any other communities who may wish to use the model for the same purpose; and (3) technical-support people assigned by the national laboratories to explain to community personnel how the model is used.

  9. Paleoenvironmental Changes linked to Deccan Volcanism and the K-T Mass Extinction across India and their Correlations with more distant Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adatte, T.; Keller, G.; Gerstch, B.; Gardin, S.; Bartolini, A.; Bajpai, S.

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that the bulk (80%) of the Deccan Trap eruptions occurred over a relatively short time period coinciding with the KT mass extinction. Here we present results based on multiproxy data from intertrappean sediments located at Anjar, Kutch, western India, Jhilmili, Madhya Pradesh, central India, and Rajahmundry, SE India. We compare these results with a KT sequence in Meghalya, NE India, about 800 km from the Deccan volcanic province and more distant areas (e.g. South Atlantic, Tunisia, Kazakhstan) . Intertrappean sediments at Anjar consist mainly of lacustrine sediments and paleosoils, which exhibit at least three PGE anomalies with high Pd contents but only one with a significant Ir enrichment. The presence of dinosaur eggshells and bone fragments above the Ir anomaly implies an upper Maastrichtian age for these sediments. Thus, the PGE anomalies do not coincide with the KT boundary, nor are they of cosmic origin because normalized PGE values suggest a flood basalt origin. Clay minerals consist mainly of smectite and palygorskite and reflect arid conditions, probably linked to higher surface temperatures on a young volcanic landscape subjected to effusive volcanic activity. In the Rajhamundry area, two Deccan basalt flows, known as the Rajahmundry traps, mark the most extensive lava flows extending 1000 km across the Indian continent. The sediments directly overlying the lower trap contain the earliest Danian planktic foraminifera of zones P0-P1a and mark the initial evolution in the aftermath of the KT mass extinction. The upper trap was deposited during zone P1b corresponding to the lower part of magnetic polarity C29n. Sedimentological, mineralogical data reveal that deposition occurred in a shallow estuarine to inner neritic environment with periods of subaerial deposition marked by paleosoils. Clay minerals consist exclusively of smectite, typical of vertisol developed under semi-arid conditions. Outcrop correlation reveals an incised valley estuarine system. At Jhilmili, multidisciplinary analyses reveal the KT boundary at or close to the lower trap basalt in C29R and the upper trap near the C29R/C29N transition. Intertrappean deposition occurred in predominantly terrestrial environments. But a short aquatic interval of fresh water ponds and lakes followed by shallow estuarine marine conditions with brackish ostracods and early Danian zone P1a planktic foraminifera mark this interval close to the K-T boundary. Clays from paleosoils and sediments consist of smectite and palygorskyte and indicate sub-humid to semi-arid conditions. In Meghalaya to the northeast, the KT transition consists of Upper Cretaceous sediments dominated by sandstone, shale, sandy shale and rare coal layers, which indicate deposition in a shallow marine environment with high detrital influx from nearby continental areas. The KTB is characterized by major PGE anomalies in Ir (11.8 ppb), Ru (108 ppb), Rh (93 ppb) and Pd (75 pbb). Contrary to the sections located in the Deccan traps, dominant kaolinite in clay mineral assemblages indicates high humidity and high runoff, which is likely linked with increased warming (greenhouse effect) due to Deccan activity on the mainland. Such climatic conditions have been observed worldwide (e.g. Tunisia, Kazakhstan, South Atlantic). The contemporaneous semi-arid climate conditions that are observed in the Deccan Traps province are not observed elsewhere and therefore appear to be restricted to areas of volcanic activity.

  10. Equity in maternal, newborn, and child health care coverage in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Rai, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    Background Addressing inequitable coverage of maternal and child health care services among different socioeconomic strata of population and across states is an important part of India's contemporary health program. This has wide implications for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal targets. Objective This paper assesses the inequity in coverage of maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) care services across household wealth quintiles in India and its states. Design Utilizing the District Level Household and Facility Survey conducted during 2007–08, this paper has constructed a Composite Coverage Index (CCI) in MNCH care. Results The mean overall coverage of 45% was estimated at the national level, ranging from 31% for the poorest to 60% for the wealthiest quintile. Moreover, a massive state-wise difference across wealth quintiles was observed in the mean overall CCI. Almost half of the Indian states and union territories recorded a ?50% coverage in MNCH care services, which demands special attention. Conclusion India needs focused efforts to address the inequity in coverage of health care services by recognising or defining underserved people and pursuing well-planned time-oriented health programs committed to ameliorate the present state of MNCH care. PMID:24119659

  11. Psychosocial Determinants of Tobacco Use among School Going Adolescents in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Varun; Talwar, Richa; Roy, Neelam; Raut, Deepak; Singh, Saudan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tobacco use is one of the major preventable causes of premature death and disease in the world. Many psychosocial factors were found to influence tobacco use. Therefore the present study was designed to determine the role of psychosocial factors associated with tobacco use among school going adolescents in Delhi, India. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted from February 2013 to September 2013 in four government schools in South district of Delhi, India. The questionnaire contains questions adapted from GYTS (Global Youth Tobacco Survey) to find the prevalence and pattern of tobacco use among adolescents. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Results. The prevalence of ever and current tobacco use was found in 16.4% and 13.1%. Current smoking and current tobacco chewing were found in 10.2% and 9.4% students, respectively. The risk of current tobacco use was found to be higher among males (P value = 0.000) and in those who got higher pocket money (P value = 0.000). Psychosocial factors like lower general self-efficacy and maladjustments with peers, teachers, and schools were also found to be significant predictors of current tobacco use. Conclusion. The study has revealed higher prevalence of ever and current tobacco use among adolescent students in Delhi, India. PMID:25431738

  12. Information and communication technology in disease surveillance, India: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    India has made appreciable progress and continues to demonstrate a strong commitment for establishing and operating a disease surveillance programme responsive to the requirements of the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]). Within five years of its launch, India has effectively used modern information and communication technology for collection, storage, transmission and management of data related to disease surveillance and effective response. Terrestrial and/or satellite based linkages are being established within all states, districts, state-run medical colleges, infectious disease hospitals, and public health laboratories. This network enables speedy data transfer, video conferencing, training and e-learning for outbreaks and programme monitoring. A 24x7 call centre is in operation to receive disease alerts. To complement these efforts, a media scanning and verification cell functions to receive reports of early warning signals. During the 2009 H1N1 outbreak, the usefulness of the information and communication technology (ICT) network was well appreciated. India is using ICT as part of its Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP) to help overcome the challenges in further expansion in hard-to-reach populations, to increase the involvement of the private sector, and to increase the use of other modes of communication like e-mail and voicemail. PMID:21143821

  13. Willingness to pay for cattle and buffalo insurance: an analysis of dairy farmers in central India.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Ameer; Chander, Mahesh; Bardhan, Dwaipayan

    2013-02-01

    In India, insurance market especially in agricultural sector is usually underdeveloped. The idea of livestock insurance emerged in India before three decades, yet, it has not operated in a significant way till date. It is well noted that livestock insurance scheme is the relevant strategy in managing different risks related to livestock farming but very little attention has been paid to address the livestock insurance needs of the dairy farmers. This study, therefore, addresses the basic question that how many people and to what extent they are willing to pay for livestock insurance and determine the main factors which influence insurance participation of dairy farmers. The data was collected from Gorakhpur district of Uttar Pradesh in India with a sample survey of 120 cattle and buffalo farmers. For eliciting willingness to pay, a contingent valuation scenario was presented to dairy animal owners in the group of five to six. A logit discrete binary regression model was used to know the factors influencing adoption of livestock insurance. The results suggest that most of the farmers were willing to participate in cattle and buffalo insurance. The amount of premium varies across different breeds of dairy animals. The low level of education of many dairy farmers have negatively influenced the decision to purchase livestock insurance. Farmers having more experience in rearing dairy animals are more likely to be willing to pay for cattle and buffalo insurance. PMID:22843215

  14. Long-term implications of low fertility in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Rajan, S I; Zachariah, K C

    1998-09-01

    This study reviewed patterns of low fertility in Kerala state, India, and the implications for employment, the elderly, the marriage squeeze, and education. The total fertility rate (TFR) in Kerala declined from 5.6 to 1.7 children/woman during 1951-93. In 1993, infant mortality was 13/1000 live births. The demographic transition was enhanced by high population density and state policies and programs. Economic conditions are poor. Unemployment in 1997-98 was 10% of total Indian unemployment, despite Kerala's having only 3.4% of total population. Unemployment is high among the educated and those aged 15-29 years. Kerala has a high level of migrant population. Health conditions are good in Kerala. Mortality is low; life expectancy at birth is high, especially among females. The TFR varied from 1.6 in Emakulam to 3.4 in Malappuram districts during 1984-90. Only 5 districts in 1990 had above-replacement fertility. Continued patterns of fertility decline suggest that zero population growth may occur in 25-30 years. The implications of the age distribution are that the school-age population will decline, as will the need for youth products and services. The demographic pressure on unemployment will not decline until after 2021. The proportion in the labor force will begin to decline after 2000. The proportion aged 50-64 years out of total population will increase to 35.5% by 2021. By 2001, the number of females aged 20-24 years will almost equal the number of males aged 25-29 years. In 2021, if old-age benefits are extended to all elderly, the cost will rise to Rs. 138 million. Elderly voters will be 1 in 5 in 2021. PMID:12321907

  15. India has done it: demographic transition already underway in India.

    PubMed

    Gowarikar, V

    1995-10-01

    The author posits that a classical demographic transition in India in underway. Birth and death rates are declining in both rural and urban areas of all states. Specifically, the following four stages were completed. 1) During 1941-71, the death rate declined sharply and the birth rate declined somewhat. 2) The natural growth rate increased dramatically from 8.7 to 22.2. 3) After 1971, the birth rate began to decline dramatically over a 10-year period and the natural growth rate stabilized at 22.2. 4) During 1981-91, the magnitude of the birth rate decline was greater than the death rate decline. The natural growth rate declined to 19.7. The final stage of transition is the current one. The natural growth rate is expected to decline at a faster rate until it reaches zero. The birth rate ranges from 18.1 in Kerala to 35.8 in Madhya Pradesh. It is expected in the final stage of India's demographic transition that the crude birth rate will decline to 21 in 2003 and the crude death rate will decline to 8. The natural growth rate under such a scenario would be 13. The estimation of the decline in the crude birth rate is based on present determinant factors, such as literacy, wealth generation, energy consumption, and food availability. Future strategies should continue with the improvement in the role of the Family Welfare Department and with continued strengthening of existing programs. The rise in population size should be understood as a natural historical demographic process and not a reason to dismantle and destabilize a program going back to 1951. Rajasthan and Haryana have legislation that bars people from holding office, if their family size is greater than two children. This action is commended. India has a need for government to demystify contraception as was accomplished in Thailand and to create awareness of modern methods and the potential for side effects without discouraging use. PMID:12291348

  16. Koponenius gen. nov., a new genus of the millipede family Haplodesmidae from the Himalayas of India and Nepal (Diplopoda: Polydesmida).

    PubMed

    Golovatch, Sergei I; Vandenspiegel, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The first, apparently westernmost indigenous representatives of Haplodesmidae are reported, from the Himalayas of Nepal and India. Both new species belong to a new genus, Koponenius gen. nov., with K. unicornis sp. nov., the type species from Darjeeling District, NE India, and K. biramus sp. nov., from Nepal. The new genus is superficially very similar to Prosopodesmus Silvestri, 1910, most species of which seem to be native to tropical Australia, partly also to southern Japan. However, Koponenius gen. nov. is easily distinguished in showing only 19 body segments, a special ozopore formula (5, 7-18), 4 transverse rows of setigerous isostictic tubercles per postcollum metatergum, and a clearly helicoid, twisted prefemoral portion of the gonopod so that the seminal groove runs mostly laterally, not mesally.  PMID:25544626

  17. Coalbed methane could cut India`s energy deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Kelafant, J. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Stern, M. [MathTech International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1998-05-25

    Foreign interest in upcoming Indian coalbed methane (CBM) concession rounds will depend on prospect quality, fiscal regime attractiveness, and perceptions interested parties will have concerning the government`s willingness to promote development. The more liberal tax and royalty provisions for foreign producers announced by the ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas indicate that India is interested in attracting international CBM investments. This article examines the potential for developing the country`s large CBM resource base, estimated between 30 tcf (250 billion cu m) and 144 tcf (4 trillion cu m) of gas. It also provides an overview of the current contractual and regulatory framework governing CBM development.

  18. Regional disparities, targeting, and poverty in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gaurav Datt; Martin Ravallion

    1990-01-01

    How much can India reduce poverty nationwide by manipulating the distribution of income between regions or sectors? What is the overall effect on the poor of targeting resources toward the poorer states of India - or toward the generally poorer rural sector. Given real constraints on policy changes, it can be argued that the costs and the benefits of regional

  19. India's Higher Education Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    India, with the world's second largest higher education system and a rapidly growing economy as one of the BRIC nations, faces significant challenges in building both capacity and excellence in higher education. India's higher education system is characterized by "islands of excellence in a sea of mediocrity." The mainstream…

  20. Development of Public Libraries in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zahid Ashraf Wani

    2008-01-01

    India is no exception. Libraries were established in ancient India mainly by the patronage extended by emperors, major capitalists, and scholars. Indian emperors and kings were supported scholars and scholarship. There is evidence of well-developed libraries even in the sixth century A.D. The famous Nalanda University in Bihar had its own magnificent library with a massive collection of manuscripts covering

  1. Food Insecurity in India: Natural or Manmade?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vijay Kumbhar

    2010-01-01

    The issue of food security, especially in a developing nation like India, raises the twin problems of uncertain food production and unequal food distribution. The impact of unequal food distribution can have adverse effects on the rural and urban population living below the poverty line. Food insecurity is not only economic problem but also problem of non-humanity approach in India.

  2. Travel to India (A Culture Project).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornhill, Harold R., Jr.

    An activity designed to introduce secondary students to the history, culture, and geography of India is presented. Students are asked to complete a four-page project, consisting of questions on travel to India. Students look at general and specific information about the country. (DB)

  3. Current genetic research in cotton in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Basu

    1996-01-01

    Genetic research on cotton in India in recent times is reviewed. Establishment of a gene bank with global accessions of the four cultivated species, as well as wild relatives, has facilitated genetic improvement of cotton in India. Genetic control of the economic traits has been studied by biometrical approaches, particularly the line x tester analysis, diallel cross and generation mean

  4. India: Economic Development and Social Opportunity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean Dreze; Amartya Sen

    1995-01-01

    This book presents analysis of endemic deprivation in India and the role of public action in addressing the problem. The analysis is based on a broad view of economic development, focusing on human well-being and 'social opportunity' rather than the standard indicators of economic growth. India's success in reducing deprivation since Independence has been limited. Recent diagnoses of this failure

  5. Some new and noteworthy plants from India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. N. Naik

    1970-01-01

    The paper deals with three species of flowering plants of whichIndigofera duthiei Drum. ex Naik is new to Science.Amaranthus dubius Mart. ex Thell. is a new record for India.Biophytum helenae Busc.et Musch. is the correct name of the plant widely occurring in India and recorded asB. sensitivum DC.

  6. Putin's India Policy: Mutual Gains for Future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Biju Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The importance of India in the foreign policy of Russia increased after Putin became the president. Despite Putin's westward orientation much of the contradictions remain. In the east, the improvement of relations with China is accompanied by views of China's possible geopolitical domination in Far East and Central Asia. Putin's policy is to retain India as a major strategic partner

  7. Pharmacovigilance practices for better healthcare delivery: knowledge and attitude study in the national malaria control programme of India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pooja; Anvikar, Anupkumar R; Valecha, Neena; Gupta, Yogendra K

    2014-01-01

    Objective. With large scale rollout of artemisinin based therapy in the National Malaria Control Programme of India, a risk management plan is needed. This depends on adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting by the healthcare professionals (HCPs). For the programme to be successful, an understanding of the mindset of HCPs is critical. Hence, the present study was designed to assess and compare the ADR reporting beliefs of HCPs involved in the National Malaria Control Programme of India. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst the HCPs who manage malaria up to the district level in India. A 5-point Likert scale-based questionnaire was developed as a study tool. Results. A total of 154 HCPs participated in the study (age: 42.4 ± 10.1 years with 33.8% being females). About 61% felt that only medically qualified HCPs are responsible for ADR reporting. Likeliness to report in future was mentioned by 45% HCPs. The knowledge score was relatively lower for life science graduates (P = 0.09). Knowledge correlated positively with attitude (r (2) = 0.114; P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Based on the caveats identified, a specific and targeted in-service education with hands-on training on ADR monitoring and reporting needs to be designed to boost real time pharmacovigilance in India. PMID:25302133

  8. Diagnosis of Chikungunya dominated co-infection with dengue during an outbreak in south India (2010 and 2012).

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramani, K; Paramasivan, R; Thenmozhi, V; Dhananjeyan, K J; Balaji, T; Leo, S Victor Jerald

    2015-07-01

    Following a report of dengue outbreak from January 2010 to 2012 in the Tirunelveli, Theni, Dharmapuri and Thiruvallur districts of Tamil Nadu state, India, an investigation was carried out. The study was to demonstrate the probable presence of Chikungunya viral antibodies in patients clinically suspected of dengue fever. Out of 331 samples analysed, dengue viral antibodies were observed in 14.8% (n?=?49) of patients, while 16.6% (n?=?55) were positive for Chikungunya viral specific IgM antibodies. In the four districts surveyed, patients found positive for Chikungunya were found to be higher than dengue. The clinician should consider Chikungunya in the differential diagnosis of dengue-like infection appearing in the community. PMID:25990548

  9. Burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand State, India

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Davidson H; Singh, Mrigendra P; Wylie, Blair J; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Tuchman, Jordan; Desai, Meghna; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Gupta, Priti; Brooks, Mohamad I; Shukla, Manmohan M; Awasthy, Kiran; Sabin, Lora; MacLeod, William B; Dash, Aditya P; Singh, Neeru

    2009-01-01

    Background Past studies in India included only symptomatic pregnant women and thus may have overestimated the proportion of women with malaria. Given the large population at risk, a cross sectional study was conducted in order to better define the burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand, a malaria-endemic state in central-east India. Methods Cross-sectional surveys at antenatal clinics and delivery units were performed over a 12-month period at two district hospitals in urban and semi-urban areas, and a rural mission hospital. Malaria was diagnosed by Giemsa-stained blood smear and/or rapid diagnostic test using peripheral or placental blood. Results 2,386 pregnant women were enrolled at the antenatal clinics and 718 at the delivery units. 1.8% (43/2382) of the antenatal clinic cohort had a positive diagnostic test for malaria (53.5% Plasmodium falciparum, 37.2% Plasmodium vivax, and 9.3% mixed infections). Peripheral parasitaemia was more common in pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in rural sites (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 4.31, 95%CI 1.84-10.11) and in those who were younger than 20 years (aRR 2.68, 95%CI 1.03-6.98). Among delivery unit participants, 1.7% (12/717) had peripheral parasitaemia and 2.4% (17/712) had placental parasitaemia. Women attending delivery units were more likely to be parasitaemic if they were in their first or second pregnancy (aRR 3.17, 95%CI 1.32-7.61), had fever in the last week (aRR 5.34, 95%CI 2.89-9.90), or had rural residence (aRR 3.10, 95%CI 1.66-5.79). Malaria control measures including indoor residual spraying (IRS) and untreated bed nets were common, whereas insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) and malaria chemoprophylaxis were rarely used. Conclusion The prevalence of malaria among pregnant women was relatively low. However, given the large at-risk population in this malaria-endemic region of India, there is a need to enhance ITN availability and use for prevention of malaria in pregnancy, and to improve case management of symptomatic pregnant women. PMID:19728882

  10. Arsenic Contamination in Rice, Wheat, Pulses, and Vegetables: A Study in an Arsenic Affected Area of West Bengal, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Bhattacharya; A. C. Samal; J. Majumdar; S. C. Santra

    2010-01-01

    Ganga-Meghna-Bramhaputra basin is one of the major arsenic-contaminated hotspot in the world. To assess the level of severity\\u000a of arsenic contamination, concentrations of arsenic in irrigation water, soil, rice, wheat, common vegetables, and pulses,\\u000a intensively cultivated and consumed by the people of highly arsenic affected Nadia district, West Bengal, India, were investigated.\\u000a Results revealed that the arsenic-contaminated irrigation water (0.318–0.643 mg l-1)

  11. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 11. Photocopy of blueprint (on file at La Grande District ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of blueprint (on file at La Grande District Office, La Grande, Oregon) USDA Forest Service, 1939 - Union Ranger District Compound, Guard Residence, Fronting State Highway 203, at West edge of Union, Union, Union County, OR

  13. 69. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: REINFORCEMENT SHEET, SHEET 5; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 66. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSION SHEET, SECTION THROUGH CROWN, SHEET 6, APRIL, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 65. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: UPSTREAM ELEVATION, SHEET 3; APRIL, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 67. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: OUTLET GATES, CROWN SECTION, UPSTREAM ELEVATION AND DOWNSTREAM ELEVATION SHEET, SHEET 7; APRIL, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 64. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: PLAN VIEW, SHEET 2; APRIL, 1918. Palmdale Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION OF INTAKE ON EAST SIDE OF DAM - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  19. 7 CFR 946.103 - Reestablishment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (a) District No. 1—the counties of Douglas, Chelan, Okanogan, Grant, Adams, Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln. (b) District No. 2—the counties of Kittitas, Yakima, Klickitat, Benton, Franklin,...

  20. 7 CFR 946.103 - Reestablishment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (a) District No. 1—the counties of Douglas, Chelan, Okanogan, Grant, Adams, Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln. (b) District No. 2—the counties of Kittitas, Yakima, Klickitat, Benton, Franklin,...

  1. 7 CFR 946.103 - Reestablishment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (a) District No. 1—the counties of Douglas, Chelan, Okanogan, Grant, Adams, Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln. (b) District No. 2—the counties of Kittitas, Yakima, Klickitat, Benton, Franklin,...

  2. 7 CFR 946.103 - Reestablishment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (a) District No. 1—the counties of Douglas, Chelan, Okanogan, Grant, Adams, Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln. (b) District No. 2—the counties of Kittitas, Yakima, Klickitat, Benton, Franklin,...

  3. 7 CFR 946.103 - Reestablishment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (a) District No. 1—the counties of Douglas, Chelan, Okanogan, Grant, Adams, Ferry, Stevens, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Whitman, and Lincoln. (b) District No. 2—the counties of Kittitas, Yakima, Klickitat, Benton, Franklin,...

  4. Managing Texas Groundwater Resources through Groundwater Conservation Districts 

    E-print Network

    Fipps, Guy

    2002-03-01

    This publication gives an overview of Texas water law and the regulations governing groundwater conservation districts. The powers and responsibilities of districts are summarized. Color maps show the coverage of existing conservation and special...

  5. 46 CFR 188.10-13 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 188.10-13...Section 188.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Subchapter § 188.10-13 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  6. 46 CFR 167.05-15 - Coast Guard District Commander.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coast Guard District Commander. 167.05-15...Section 167.05-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...Definitions § 167.05-15 Coast Guard District Commander. This...

  7. EPA - NEW ENGLAND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS - 108TH CONGRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set portrays the Congressional Districts of the United States for the 108th Congress. Lines coincident with Congressional District boundaries were extracted from the existing National Atlas County Boundaries layer. In areas lacking coincident geometry, lines from State ...

  8. 13 CFR 305.5 - Project administration by District Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 false Project administration by District Organization... ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLIC WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT...Projects § 305.5 Project administration by District...

  9. 13 CFR 305.5 - Project administration by District Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 false Project administration by District Organization... ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLIC WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT...Projects § 305.5 Project administration by District...

  10. 13 CFR 305.5 - Project administration by District Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 false Project administration by District Organization... ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLIC WORKS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT...Projects § 305.5 Project administration by District...

  11. 7 CFR 1210.501 - Realignment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Indian River, Lake, Lee...Walton, and Washington, and the States of North Carolina...Virginia, and Washington, DC. ...District 5 —The State of California...District 7 —The States of Alaska...Dakota, Utah, Washington, and...

  12. 7 CFR 1210.501 - Realignment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Indian River, Lake, Lee...Walton, and Washington, and the States of North Carolina...Virginia, and Washington, DC. ...District 5 —The State of California...District 7 —The States of Alaska...Dakota, Utah, Washington, and...

  13. 7 CFR 959.110 - Reestablishment of districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...959.25, the following districts are reestablished: (a) District 1 (Coastal Bend-Lower Valley): The counties of Victoria, Calhoun, Goliad, Refugio, Bee, Live Oak, San Patricio, Aransas, Jim Wells, Nueces, Kleberg, Brooks,...

  14. General topographic view of Lakeview Historic District, view looking south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General topographic view of Lakeview Historic District, view looking south on G Street toward intersection of G and Center Streets - Lakeview Downtown Historic District, E, F & G Streets between Second Street North & First Street South, Lakeview, Lake County, OR

  15. Collective private urban renewal in New Bedford's historic district

    E-print Network

    Bullard, John K. (John Kilburn)

    1974-01-01

    This thesis examines the waterfront historic district in New Bedford, Massachusetts. It is, hopefully, the beginning of a process of collective private renewal that may lead the revival of the district as a vital element ...

  16. 13 CFR 305.5 - Project administration by District Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Project administration by District Organization. 305...Assistance ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PUBLIC...Approved Projects § 305.5 Project administration by District Organization....

  17. 20 CFR 704.401 - Administration; compensation districts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administration; compensation districts. 704...Benefits EMPLOYMENT STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LONGSHOREMEN'S...Instrumentalities Act § 704.401 Administration; compensation districts. For...

  18. 13 CFR 305.5 - Project administration by District Organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project administration by District Organization. 305...DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS Requirements for Approved Projects § 305.5 Project administration by District Organization....

  19. NONMELANOMA SKIN CANCER IN INDIA: CURRENT SCENARIO

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Saumya

    2010-01-01

    Incidence of skin cancers has been increasing since the last few decades worldwide. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the commonest variety of cutaneous malignancy. Conventional wisdom has it that the incidence of all varieties of skin cancers is lower among Indians due to the protective effects of melanin. Though national surveys and cross-country data in India are unavailable, there are indirect indications from several smaller reports that NMSCs may be on the rise in India. Reports of quite a few atypical cases lead us to hypothesize that factors other than ultraviolet radiation may be important in the occurrences of these cancers, particularly in the skin types prevalent in India. The descriptive epidemiology and clinical characteristics of squamous and basal cell carcinoma in India, including their variants, are discussed here along with hypotheses on their etiopathogenesis. Novel management techniques currently available in India are also highlighted. PMID:21430894

  20. Present and Future Energy Scenario in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Gupta, V. K.

    2014-09-01

    India's energy sector is one of the most critical components of an infrastructure that affects India's economic growth and therefore is also one of the largest industries in India. India has the 5th largest electricity generating capacity and is the 6th largest energy consumer amounting for around 3.4 % of global energy consumption. India's energy demand has grown at 3.6 % pa over the past 30 years. The consumption of the energy is directly proportional to the progress of manpower with ever growing population, improvement in the living standard of the humanity and industrialization of the developing countries. Very recently smart grid technology can attribute important role in energy scenario. Smart grid refers to electric power system that enhances grid reliability and efficiency by automatically responding to system disturbances. This paper discusses the new communication infrastructure and scheme designed to integrate data.