Science.gov

Sample records for diverse delayed effects

  1. Local Effects of Delayed Food

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M

    2007-01-01

    Five pigeons were trained on a procedure in which seven concurrent variable-interval schedules arranged seven different food–rate ratios in random sequence in each session. Each of these components lasted for 10 response-produced food deliveries, and components were separated by 10-s blackouts. We varied delays to food (signaled by blackout) between the two response alternatives in an experiment with three phases: In Phase 1, the delay on one alternative was 0 s, and the other was varied between 0 and 8 s; in Phase 2, both delays were equal and were varied from 0 to 4 s; in Phase 3, the two delays summed to 8 s, and each was varied from 1 to 7 s. The results showed that increasing delay affected local choice, measured by a pulse in preference, in the same way as decreasing magnitude, but we found also that increasing the delay at the other alternative increased local preference. This result casts doubt on the traditional view that a reinforcer strengthens a response depending only on the reinforcer's value discounted by any response–reinforcer delay. The results suggest that food guides, rather than strengthens, behavior. PMID:17465314

  2. Local Effects of Delayed Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Five pigeons were trained on a procedure in which seven concurrent variable-interval schedules arranged seven different food-rate ratios in random sequence in each session. Each of these components lasted for 10 response-produced food deliveries, and components were separated by 10-s blackouts. We varied delays to food (signaled by blackout)…

  3. Diversity and time delays induce resonance in a modular neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. B.; Yang, X. L.; Kurths, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper focuses on the resonance dynamics of a modular neuronal network consisting of several small-world subnetworks. The considered network is composed of delay-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons, whose characteristic parameters present diversity in the form of quenched noise. Our numerical results indicate that when such a network is subjected to an external subthreshold periodic signal, its collective response is optimized for an intermediate level of diversity, namely, a resonant behavior can be induced by an appropriate level of diversity. How the probabilities of intramodule and intermodule connections, as well as the number of subnetworks influence the diversity-induced resonance are also discussed. Further, conclusive evidences demonstrate the nontrivial role of time-delayed coupling on the diversity-induced resonance properties. Especially, multiple resonance is obviously detected when time delays are located at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the signal. Moreover, the phenomenon of fine-tuned delays in inducing multiple resonance remains when diversity is within an intermediate range. Our findings have implications that neural systems may profit from their generic diversity and delayed coupling to optimize the response to external stimulus.

  4. Effects of elongation delay in transcription dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Jin, Huiqin; Yang, Zhuoqin; Lei, Jinzhi

    2014-12-01

    In the transcription process, elongation delay is induced by the movement of RNA polymerases (RNAP) along the DNA sequence, and can result in changes in the transcription dynamics. This paper studies the transcription dynamics that involved the elongation delay and effects of cell division and DNA replication. The stochastic process of gene expression is modeled with delay chemical master equation with periodic coefficients, and is studied numerically through the stochastic simulation algorithm with delay. We show that the average transcription level approaches to a periodic dynamics over cell cycles at homeostasis, and the elongation delay can reduce the transcription level and increase the transcription noise. Moreover, the transcription elongation can induce bimodal distribution of mRNA levels that can be measured by the techniques of flow cytometry. PMID:25365608

  5. Delayed Ischemic Stroke after Flow Diversion of Large Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si On; Chung, Yeon Gu; Won, Yu Sam; Rho, Myung Ho

    2016-03-01

    For securing large, giant, and wide-neck aneurysms, conventional coil embolization has substantial limitations, such as incomplete occlusion, recanalization, and a high recurrence rate. To overcome these limitations, a novel paradigm was suggested and, as a result, flow-diverting device was developed. The flow-diverting device is an innovative and effective technique to allow securing of large, giant, and wide-neck aneurysms. In numerous studies, the flow-diverting device has shown better outcomes than coil embolization. However, the flow-diverting device has also some risks, including rupture of aneurysm, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. In addition, with more experience, unexpected complications are also reported.5)7) In the present case, we experienced a delayed ischemic stroke at 27 days after endovascular treatment. The patient had multiple aneurysms and, among them, we treated a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm using Pipeline™ Embolization Device. The patient was tolerable for 25 days, but then suddenly presented intermittent right hemiparesis. In the initial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there was no acute lesion; however, in the follow-up MRI, an acute ischemic stroke was found in the territory of anterior choroidal artery which was covered by Pipeline Embolization Device. We suspect that neo-intimal overgrowth or a tiny thrombus have led to this delayed complication. Through our case, we learned that the neurosurgeon should be aware of the possibility of delayed ischemic stroke after flow diversion, as well as, long-term close observation and follow-up angiography are necessary even in the event of no acute complications. PMID:27114962

  6. Delayed Ischemic Stroke after Flow Diversion of Large Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si On; Chung, Yeon Gu; Won, Yu Sam

    2016-01-01

    For securing large, giant, and wide-neck aneurysms, conventional coil embolization has substantial limitations, such as incomplete occlusion, recanalization, and a high recurrence rate. To overcome these limitations, a novel paradigm was suggested and, as a result, flow-diverting device was developed. The flow-diverting device is an innovative and effective technique to allow securing of large, giant, and wide-neck aneurysms. In numerous studies, the flow-diverting device has shown better outcomes than coil embolization. However, the flow-diverting device has also some risks, including rupture of aneurysm, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. In addition, with more experience, unexpected complications are also reported.5)7) In the present case, we experienced a delayed ischemic stroke at 27 days after endovascular treatment. The patient had multiple aneurysms and, among them, we treated a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm using Pipeline™ Embolization Device. The patient was tolerable for 25 days, but then suddenly presented intermittent right hemiparesis. In the initial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there was no acute lesion; however, in the follow-up MRI, an acute ischemic stroke was found in the territory of anterior choroidal artery which was covered by Pipeline Embolization Device. We suspect that neo-intimal overgrowth or a tiny thrombus have led to this delayed complication. Through our case, we learned that the neurosurgeon should be aware of the possibility of delayed ischemic stroke after flow diversion, as well as, long-term close observation and follow-up angiography are necessary even in the event of no acute complications. PMID:27114962

  7. Delayed hemorrhagic complications after flow diversion for intracranial aneurysms: a literature overview

    PubMed Central

    Rouchaud, Aymeric; Brinjikji, Waleed; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Cloft, Harry J.; Kadirvel, Ramanthan; Kallmes, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Delayed aneurysm rupture and delayed intraparenchymal hemorrhages (DIPH) are poorly understood and often fatal complications of flow diversion (FD) for intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for these complications. Materials and Methods We performed a systematic review on post-FD delayed aneurysm rupture and DIPH. For each reported case we collected the following information: aneurysm location, size and rupture status, type of flow-diverter used, timing of the hemorrhage, and neurological outcome. We reported descriptive statistics of patients suffering DIPH and delayed aneurysm rupture to determine if there were any characteristics consistently present among patients with these complications. Results We identified 81 delayed aneurysms ruptures and 101 DIPH. 76.6% (45/58) of the delayed ruptures occurred within one month. The prognosis of delayed ruptures was poor, with 81.3% (61/75) experiencing death or poor neurological outcome. Giant aneurysms accounted for 46.3% of ruptures (31/67). 80.9% (55/68) of these aneurysms were initially unruptured. 17.8% (13/73) of the delayed ruptured aneurysms had prior or concomitant coiling. DIPHs were ipsilateral to the treated aneurysm in 82.2% (60/73) of cases. 86.0% (43/50) of the DIPH occurred within one month after FDS. Combined morbidity/mortality rate was 68.5% (50/73 following DIPH. 23.0% of DIPHs (14/61) occurred in patients with giant aneurysms. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that giant aneurysms represent almost 50% of delayed aneurysm ruptures in the flow-diverter literature. About 20% of delayed ruptures occurred despite associated coiling. A substantial proportion of DIPHs occur early following FDS treatment of giant aneurysms. PMID:26553302

  8. Delayed onset muscle soreness: is massage effective?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Despite the widespread occurrence of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), there is little consensus as to the exact cause or which treatments may be most effective at alleviating symptoms. Greater understanding of DOMS can give sports medicine and fitness professionals an opportunity to help prevent or speed recovery of this performance limiting condition. This article will review the DOMS literature, including the potential role of psychosocial factors and explore studies which involve massage therapy as a treatment modality. Articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and references from articles are included in this review. Search words and phrases included delayed onset muscle soreness, repeated bout effect, massage effectiveness, exercise induced muscle damage, and eccentric exercise. PMID:24139006

  9. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  10. The Effects of Delay of Feedback on a Delayed Concept Formation Transfer Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroth, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    Delay and completeness of verbal information feedback were investigated within a transfer of learning paradigm involving concept formation. An experiment with 192 undergraduates indicates that, although delay of feedback (up to 30 seconds) slows speed of learning on the initial task, it has positive effects on the transfer task. (SLD)

  11. Delay time and Hartman effect in strain engineered graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi Deng, Zhi-Yong; Ban, Yue

    2014-05-07

    Tunneling times, including group delay and dwell time, are studied for massless Dirac electrons transmitting through a one-dimensional barrier in strain-engineered graphene. The Hartman effect, the independence of group delay on barrier length, is induced by the strain effect, and associated with the transmission gap and the evanescent mode. The influence of barrier height/length and strain modulus/direction on the group delay is also discussed, which provides the flexibility to control the group delay with applications in graphene-based devices. The relationship between group delay and dwell time is finally derived to clarify the nature of the Hartman effect.

  12. Diversity of copper(I) complexes showing thermally activated delayed fluorescence: basic photophysical analysis.

    PubMed

    Czerwieniec, Rafał; Yersin, Hartmut

    2015-05-01

    A comparison of three copper(I) compounds [1, Cu(dppb)(pz2Bph2); 2, Cu(pop)(pz2Bph2); 3, Cu(dmp)(phanephos)(+)] that show pronounced thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) at ambient temperature demonstrates a wide diversity of emission behavior. In this study, we focus on compound 1. A computational density functional theory (DFT)/time-dependent DFT approach allows us to predict detailed photophysical properties, while experimental emission studies over a wide temperature range down to T = 1.5 K lead to better insight into the electronic structures even with respect to spin-orbit coupling efficiencies, radiative rates, and zero-field splitting of the triplet state. All three compounds, with emission quantum yields higher than ϕPL = 70%, are potentially well suited as emitters for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on the singlet-harvesting mechanism. Interestingly, compound 1 is by far the most attractive one because of a very small energy separation between the lowest excited singlet S1 and triplet T1 state of ΔE(S1-T1) = 370 cm(-1) (46 meV). Such a small value has not been reported so far. It is responsible for the very short decay time of τ(TADF, 300 K) = 3.3 μs. Hence, if focused on the requirements of a short TADF decay time for reduction of the saturation effects in OLEDs, copper(I) complexes are well comparable or even slightly better than the best purely organic TADF emitters. PMID:25894718

  13. Effects of signaled versus unsignaled delay of reinforcement on choice.

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, M A; Williams, B A

    2001-01-01

    Pigeons chose between 5-s and 15-s delay-of-reinforcement alternatives. The first key peck to satisfy the choice schedule began a delay timer, and food was delivered at the end of the interval. Key pecks during the delay interval were measured, but had no scheduled effect. In Experiment 1, signal conditions and choice schedules were varied across conditions. During unsignaled conditions, no stimulus change signaled the beginning of a delay interval. During differential and nondifferential signal conditions, offset of the choice stimuli and onset of a delay stimulus signaled the beginning of a delay interval. During differential signal conditions, different stimuli were correlated with the 5-s and 15-s delays, whereas the same stimulus appeared during both delay durations during nondifferential signal conditions. Pigeons showed similar, extreme levels of preference for the 5-s delay alternative during unsignaled and differentially signaled conditions. Preference levels were reliably lower with nondifferential signals. Experiment 2 assessed preference with two pairs of unsignaled delays in which the ratio of delays was held constant but the absolute duration was increased fourfold. No effect of absolute duration was found. The results highlight the importance of delayed primary reinforcement effects and challenge models of choice that focus solely on conditioned reinforcement. PMID:11394485

  14. Resonance Effects in Photoemission Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Sabbar, M; Heuser, S; Boge, R; Lucchini, M; Carette, T; Lindroth, E; Gallmann, L; Cirelli, C; Keller, U

    2015-09-25

    We present measurements of single-photon ionization time delays between the outermost valence electrons of argon and neon using a coincidence detection technique that allows for the simultaneous measurement of both species under identical conditions. The analysis of the measured traces reveals energy-dependent time delays of a few tens of attoseconds with high energy resolution. In contrast to photoelectrons ejected through tunneling, single-photon ionization can be well described in the framework of Wigner time delays. Accordingly, the overall trend of our data is reproduced by recent Wigner time delay calculations. However, besides the general trend we observe resonance features occurring at specific photon energies. These features have been qualitatively reproduced and identified by a calculation using the multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock method, including the influence of doubly excited states and ionization thresholds. PMID:26451550

  15. Why Do Rereading Lag Effects Depend on Test Delay?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    In previous research, rereading after a long lag versus a short lag led to greater performance on delayed tests but not on immediate tests. The current study tested two accounts of why the effects of rereading lag depend on test delay. The "levels of representation" ("LOR") "hypothesis" states that the effects reflect differential emphasis on…

  16. Components of Effective Diversity Training Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 12 diversity experts uncovered components of effective diversity training programs: management commitment and support, inclusion in strategic planning, attention to specific organizational needs, qualified trainers, mandatory attendance, inclusiveness, trust and confidentiality, accountability, and clearly focused evaluation. (SK)

  17. The effect of delayed death in HIV/AIDS models.

    PubMed

    Lutambi, Angelina Mageni

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients who receive treatment survive for some years after they have acquired the disease. The received treatment causes sustained reduction of viral reproduction by improving the immune function, leading to prolonged progression period to AIDS development. This prolonged progression period has created variability in survival times that affects estimates produced using mathematical models that do not include delay in disease related mortality. This paper investigates the effect of including delay in AIDS death occurrence in HIV/AIDS transmission models. A simple mathematical model with two stages of HIV progression is developed and extended to include time delay in the occurrence of AIDS deaths. Numerical simulations indicate that time delay changes the mortality curves considerably but has less effect on the proportion of infectives. The study highlights the importance of incorporating delay in models of HIV/AIDS for the production of accurate HIV/AIDS estimates. PMID:27141921

  18. Reversing the Signaled Magnitude Effect in Delayed Matching to Sample: Delay-Specific Remembering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, K. Geoffrey; Brown, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Pigeons performed a delayed matching-to-sample task in which large or small reinforcers for correct remembering were signaled during the retention interval. Accuracy was low when small reinforcers were signaled, and high when large reinforcers were signaled (the signaled magnitude effect). When the reinforcer-size cue was switched from small to…

  19. Effects of amphetamine on delay discounting in rats depend upon the manner in which delay is varied.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; Henson, Cedric; France, Charles P

    2014-12-01

    Whether stimulant drugs like amphetamine increase or decrease choice of larger delayed reinforcers over smaller immediately available reinforcers under delay discounting procedures can depend on several factors, including the order in which delay is presented. This study examined whether the order of delay presentation impacts drug effects on discounting in rats (n = 8) trained and tested under an ascending order, a descending order, as well as under a fixed delay condition. Responses on one lever delivered 1 food pellet immediately and responses on the other lever delivered 3 food pellets immediately or after a delay (4-32 s). In Experiment 1, the delay to the larger reinforcer varied within session and the order of delay presentation (ascending or descending) varied across conditions. In Experiment 2, the same delay value was presented in all blocks of the session (i.e., delay was fixed), and delay varied across conditions. Under the ascending order of delay, amphetamine (0.32-1.78 mg/kg) increased choice of the larger reinforcer in some rats and decreased choice in others. In the same rats responding under the descending and fixed delay conditions, amphetamine markedly decreased choice of the larger reinforcer even in the component associated with no delay. In some subjects, the effects of amphetamine differed depending on the manner in which delay was presented, indicating that drug-induced changes in performance were due, in part, to mechanisms other than altered sensitivity to reinforcer delay. These results also suggest that a history of responding under both orders of delay presentation can modulate drug effects. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:24780379

  20. Symptomatic Very Delayed Parent Artery Occlusion After Flow Diversion Stent Embolization

    PubMed Central

    OISHI, Hidenori; TERANISHI, Kosuke; NONAKA, Senshu; YAMAMOTO, Munetaka; ARAI, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Flow diversion stents (FDSs) are constructed from high-density braided mesh, which alters intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics and leads to aneurysm occlusion by inducing thrombus formation. Although there are potential complications associated with FDS embolization, one of the serious complications is the parent artery occlusion due to the in-stent thrombosis. A 72-year-old woman with a symptomatic giant fusiform aneurysm in the cavernous segment of ICA underwent single-layer pipeline embolization device (PED) embolization. Six-month and 1-year follow-up conventional angiographies showed the residual blood flow in the aneurysm. Two-year follow-up MRI showed the aneurysm sac shrinkage and the antiplatelet therapy was discontinued. The patient suffered from symptomatic parent artery occlusion due to the in-stent thrombosis, 4 months after antiplatelet therapy discontinuation. The patient with the incompletely occluded aneurysm after PED embolization should be given long-term antiplatelet therapy because of the risk of delayed parent artery occlusion. PMID:27169622

  1. Symptomatic Very Delayed Parent Artery Occlusion After Flow Diversion Stent Embolization.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hidenori; Teranishi, Kosuke; Nonaka, Senshu; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-15

    Flow diversion stents (FDSs) are constructed from high-density braided mesh, which alters intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics and leads to aneurysm occlusion by inducing thrombus formation. Although there are potential complications associated with FDS embolization, one of the serious complications is the parent artery occlusion due to the in-stent thrombosis. A 72-year-old woman with a symptomatic giant fusiform aneurysm in the cavernous segment of ICA underwent single-layer pipeline embolization device (PED) embolization. Six-month and 1-year follow-up conventional angiographies showed the residual blood flow in the aneurysm. Two-year follow-up MRI showed the aneurysm sac shrinkage and the antiplatelet therapy was discontinued. The patient suffered from symptomatic parent artery occlusion due to the in-stent thrombosis, 4 months after antiplatelet therapy discontinuation. The patient with the incompletely occluded aneurysm after PED embolization should be given long-term antiplatelet therapy because of the risk of delayed parent artery occlusion. PMID:27169622

  2. Child, family, and childcare predictors of delayed school entry and kindergarten retention among linguistically and ethnically diverse children.

    PubMed

    Winsler, Adam; Hutchison, Lindsey A; De Feyter, Jessica J; Manfra, Louis; Bleiker, Charles; Hartman, Suzanne C; Levitt, Jerome

    2012-09-01

    Concern about kindergarten retention is on the rise within the current climate of high-stakes testing and escalating kindergarten expectations. Kindergarten retention has been linked in previous research to various risk factors such as poverty, low maternal education, single parent status, minority status, English language learner (ELL) status, and male gender. However, these factors are also associated with poor school readiness and low kindergarten performance--the very reasons children are retained in the 1st place. This study teases apart unique and combined predictors of delayed entry into kindergarten and kindergarten retention with a large (n = 13,191) ethnically diverse, at-risk sample of children. Delayed kindergarten entry was rare for this sample but more likely among boys, native English speakers, those with poorer school readiness, less maternal education, and greater resources, and those who attended childcare rather than public school prekindergarten (pre-K) at age 4 years. Boys were more likely to be retained in kindergarten, but only because of their poorer school readiness. After strong effects for age 4 school readiness were controlled, only poverty, ELL status, and preschool program attendance predicted retention. ELL students were less likely to be retained than were native speakers, and those who attended public school pre-K programs were less likely to be retained, compared with those in childcare at age 4 years. After controlling for children's actual performance in kindergarten their 1st time, Caucasian children and children with lower language and social skills at age 4 years were more likely to repeat kindergarten. PMID:22288368

  3. The effects of delays in radiotherapy treatment on tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, R. M.; Beddoe, A. H.; Dale, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    There is often a considerable delay from initial tumour diagnosis to the start of radiotherapy treatment, which may be due to factors such as waiting lists and referral delays. This paper uses widely published models and clinical parameters to calculate the effect of delays in treatment on local tumour control for four different types of tumour - squamous cell carcinoma (head and neck), breast, cervix and prostate. The Poisson model for tumour control probability (TCP), an exponential function for tumour growth and the linear quadratic model of cell kill are used to calculate the change in TCP for delays between diagnosis and treatment of up to 100 days. Typical values of the clinical parameters have been taken from the literature; these include α and β, σα, tumour size at diagnosis, pre-treatment doubling time, delay in onset of accelerated repopulation and doubling time during treatment. It is acknowledged that there are limitations in the reliability of these data for predicting absolute values of tumour control, but models are still useful for predicting how changes in treatment parameters are likely to affect the outcome. It is shown that for fast-growing tumours a delay of 1-2 months can have a significant adverse effect on the outcome, whereas for slow-growing tumours such as Ca prostate a delay of a few months does not significantly reduce the probability of tumour control. These calculations show the importance of ensuring that delays from diagnosis through to treatment are minimized, especially for patients with rapidly proliferating tumours.

  4. The Effects of Attending a Diverse College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichs, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether there are benefits to be obtained from having a diverse student body is a key issue in the debate over affirmative action. This paper estimates the effects of college racial diversity on post-college earnings, civic behavior, and satisfaction with the college attended. I use the Beginning Postsecondary Students survey,…

  5. Delayed population models with Allee effects and exploitation.

    PubMed

    Liz, Eduardo; Ruiz-Herrera, Alfonso

    2015-02-01

    Allee effects make populations more vulnerable to extinction, especially under severe harvesting or predation. Using a delay-differential equation modeling the evolution of a single-species population subject to constant effort harvesting, we show that the interplay between harvest strength and Allee effects leads not only to collapses due to overexploitation; large delays can interact with Allee effects to produce extinction at population densities that would survive for smaller time delays. In case of bistability, our estimations on the basins of attraction of the two coexisting attractors improve some recent results in this direction. Moreover, we show that the persistent attractor can exhibit bubbling: a stable equilibrium loses its stability as harvesting effort increases, giving rise to sustained oscillations, but higher mortality rates stabilize the equilibrium again. PMID:25811339

  6. Effect of exposure delay of concrete into aggressive environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abimouloud, Youcef; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2016-07-01

    Some regions in the world suffered since several years from environmental problems such as underground level water rising. Water table effects durability of concrete implantation in the underground by the ease of luckless chemical elements ingress mainly through concrete the foundations of structures such as sulfate, chloride, and acids. For that reason a lot of foundations structures were made with SRPC (sulfate resisting Portland cement). This study is a contribution to assess the effect of exposure delay of concrete into aggressive fields, as a kind of cure which protects concrete from aggressive factors and allows it to acquire the needed strength. The study has shown that concrete exposure delay into aggressive environment is not a kind of cure mainly for concrete made with SRPC. Concrete with SRPC immediately exposed to aggressive environment shows a better mechanical resistance than concrete that has known exposure delay.

  7. Effects of Acute and Chronic Cocaine Administration on Titrating-Delay Matching-to-Sample Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Branch, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of cocaine were examined under a titrating-delay matching-to-sample procedure. In this procedure, the delay between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, matches increase the delay and mismatches decrease the delay. Titrated delay values served as the…

  8. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  9. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  10. The Delay Hypothesis: The Manifestation of Media Effects over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Bernat, Jennifer K.; Wilson, Kari M.; Goonewardene, Julie

    2011-01-01

    A between-participants experiment (N = 147) tested for the presence of a delayed effect following exposure to an episode of a legal drama that contained false information. Participants were more likely to endorse false beliefs if they were queried two weeks after watching the program rather than immediately following exposure. The relationship…

  11. Control of epidemics on complex networks: Effectiveness of delayed isolation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago; Young, Lai-Sang

    2015-08-01

    We study isolation as a means to control epidemic outbreaks in complex networks, focusing on the consequences of delays in isolating infected nodes. Our analysis uncovers a tipping point: if infected nodes are isolated before a critical day dc, the disease is effectively controlled, whereas for longer delays the number of infected nodes climbs steeply. We show that dc can be estimated explicitly in terms of network properties and disease parameters, connecting lowered values of dc explicitly to heterogeneity in degree distribution. Our results reveal also that initial delays in the implementation of isolation protocols can have catastrophic consequences in heterogeneous networks. As our study is carried out in a general framework, it has the potential to offer insight and suggest proactive strategies for containing outbreaks of a range of serious infectious diseases. PMID:26382469

  12. Control of epidemics on complex networks: Effectiveness of delayed isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tiago; Young, Lai-Sang

    2015-08-01

    We study isolation as a means to control epidemic outbreaks in complex networks, focusing on the consequences of delays in isolating infected nodes. Our analysis uncovers a tipping point: if infected nodes are isolated before a critical day dc, the disease is effectively controlled, whereas for longer delays the number of infected nodes climbs steeply. We show that dc can be estimated explicitly in terms of network properties and disease parameters, connecting lowered values of dc explicitly to heterogeneity in degree distribution. Our results reveal also that initial delays in the implementation of isolation protocols can have catastrophic consequences in heterogeneous networks. As our study is carried out in a general framework, it has the potential to offer insight and suggest proactive strategies for containing outbreaks of a range of serious infectious diseases.

  13. Learning from feedback: Spacing and the delay-retention effect.

    PubMed

    Smith, Troy A; Kimball, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of feedback-timing effects and also examined the effects of restudy and retest trials following immediate and delayed feedback. Results were not consistent with theories assuming that the only function of feedback is to correct initial errors but instead supported a theoretical account assuming that delaying feedback strengthens initially correct responses due to the spacing of encoding opportunities: Delaying feedback increased the probability of correct response perseveration on the final retention test but had minimal effects on error correction or error perseveration probabilities. In a 2nd experiment, the effects of varying the lags between study, test, and feedback trials during learning provided further support for the spacing hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:20053046

  14. Breaking down the silos to decrease internal diversions and patient flow delays.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Molly; Tobis, Kristen; Gurka, David; Serafin, Frederick; Carlson, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals strive to admit patients to the units where caregiver competencies align with the patient's condition. When the hospital's census peaks, internal diversions and the associated risks increase, which are intensified when silos exist, as segregated care negatively impacts collaboration and patient safety. In this study, a 600+-bed academic, tertiary care specialty hospital experienced an increase in internal diversions. Within the neuroscience service line, emergent neuroscience transfers from outside hospitals had been declined or internally diverted because of capacity limitations. Formalized processes for improving collaboration between health care providers related to capacity issues were required to decrease internal diversions and improve patient flow and patient safety. A pilot project was conducted on neuroscience units during a process improvement initiative. A hospital-wide internal diversion plan was developed, identifying primary and secondary placement options for all patients requiring hospitalization to support patient flow and patient safety. Forecasting tools were developed to provide units' leadership with current information on expected admissions. Daily capacity huddles were instituted to increase collaboration between patient care units. The interventions trialed during the pilot decreased internal diversions and improved patient flow. The improved collaboration resulted in an 80% decrease in declinations of emergent intensive care unit transfers from outside hospitals due to capacity limitations and a 50% decrease in the number of these patients being internally diverted to alternate intensive care units. The interventions implemented minimized internal diversions and improved patient flow. The transparency of the patient placement process led to an increased collaboration between all participants. PMID:25474675

  15. An Investigation of Variables Influencing the Delay Retention Effect. The Effect of Form of Information Feedback on Test Conditions on the Delay Retention Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Persis T.

    The purpose of this study is twofold: (1) to separate variables combined in the forms of Information Feedback (IF); and (2) to identify additional variables in the effect upon retention of 24 hour delay of feedback. In two of the experiments, the effect of IF delay, immediate test conditions, and different forms of IF upon seven day retention,…

  16. Neuromodulation of delay discounting, the reflection effect, and cigarette consumption

    PubMed Central

    Sheffer, Christine E; Mennemeier, Mark; Landes, Reid D; Bickel, Warren K; Brackman, Sharon; Dornhoffer, John; Kimbrell, Timothy; Brown, Ginger

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smokers and substance users discount the value of delayed outcomes more steeply than non-users. Higher discounting rates are associated with relapse and poorer treatment outcomes. The left dorsolateral prefontal cortex (DLPFC) exerts an inhibitory influence on impulsive or seductive choices and greater activity in the prefrontal cortex is associated with lower discounting rates. We hypothesized that increasing activity in the left DLPFC with high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF rTMS) would decrease delay discounting and decrease impulsive decision-making in a gambling task as well as decrease cigarette consumption, similar to other studies. In this single-blind, within-subjects design, smokers with no intention to quit (n=47) and nonsmokers (n=19) underwent three counterbalanced sessions of HF rTMS (20Hz, 10Hz, sham) delivered over the left DLPFC. Tasks were administered at baseline and after each stimulation session. Stimulation decreased discounting of monetary gains (F[3,250]=4.46, p<.01), but increased discounting of monetary losses (F[3,246]=4.30, p<.01), producing a reflection effect, normally absent in delay discounting. Stimulation had no effect on cigarette consumption. These findings provide new insights into cognitive processes involved with decision-making and cigarette consumption and suggest that like all medications for substance dependence, HF rTMS is likely to be most effective when paired with cognitive-behavioral interventions. PMID:23518286

  17. Effect of Delay on Children's Delay-Execute Prospective Memory Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendell, Peter G.; Vella, Melissa J.; Kliegel, Matthias; Terrett, Gill

    2009-01-01

    To date, little work has been done investigating prospective memory in children, particularly using a delay-execute paradigm. Two experiments were conducted to investigate this issue with children aged 5-11 years. While playing a computer driving game, children's ability to carry out a delayed intention either immediately a target cue appeared or…

  18. Overt Verbalization and Delay Behavior in Children: The Effects of Evaluative Statements and Freedom of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toner, Ignatius J.

    The maintenance of self-imposed delay of gratification by preschool children was briefly examined in two studies. One study investigated the effects of overt verbalization on the delay behavior of 75 preschool children. Children who periodically spoke of the delayed reward during the delay task, regardless of whether they spoke positively or…

  19. Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1989-06-01

    With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Examining the Effects of a Highly Rated Science Curriculum Unit on Diverse Students: Results from a Planning Grant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Sharon; Kuipers, Joel; Pyke, Curtis; Szesze, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a planning grant studying the effects of a highly rated curriculum unit on a diverse student population. The treatment was introduced to 1500 eighth grade students in five middle schools selected for their ethnic, linguistic, and socioeconomic diversity. Students were given pre-, post-, and delayed posttests…

  1. Probability distributed time delays: integrating spatial effects into temporal models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to provide insights into the complex biochemical processes inside a cell, modelling approaches must find a balance between achieving an adequate representation of the physical phenomena and keeping the associated computational cost within reasonable limits. This issue is particularly stressed when spatial inhomogeneities have a significant effect on system's behaviour. In such cases, a spatially-resolved stochastic method can better portray the biological reality, but the corresponding computer simulations can in turn be prohibitively expensive. Results We present a method that incorporates spatial information by means of tailored, probability distributed time-delays. These distributions can be directly obtained by single in silico or a suitable set of in vitro experiments and are subsequently fed into a delay stochastic simulation algorithm (DSSA), achieving a good compromise between computational costs and a much more accurate representation of spatial processes such as molecular diffusion and translocation between cell compartments. Additionally, we present a novel alternative approach based on delay differential equations (DDE) that can be used in scenarios of high molecular concentrations and low noise propagation. Conclusions Our proposed methodologies accurately capture and incorporate certain spatial processes into temporal stochastic and deterministic simulations, increasing their accuracy at low computational costs. This is of particular importance given that time spans of cellular processes are generally larger (possibly by several orders of magnitude) than those achievable by current spatially-resolved stochastic simulators. Hence, our methodology allows users to explore cellular scenarios under the effects of diffusion and stochasticity in time spans that were, until now, simply unfeasible. Our methodologies are supported by theoretical considerations on the different modelling regimes, i.e. spatial vs. delay-temporal, as indicated

  2. Communicative Interactions of Mildly Delayed and Normally Developing Preschool Children: Effects of Listener's Developmental Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Michael J.; Paul-Brown, Diane

    1986-01-01

    The communicative interactions of 32 mildly delayed and normally developing preschoolers were recorded during free play in a mainstreamed program. Analyses of syntactic complexity, semantic diversity, functional aspects of speech, and the use of selected discourse devices indicated that mildly delayed children adjusted important characteristics of…

  3. Effect of Departure Delays on Manned Mars Mission Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1995-01-01

    This study determines the effect on the initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) of delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep-space maneuver (DSM) is considered in order to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed, using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction-class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 and 1977.3 metric tons (mt), respectively. Conjunction-class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays, having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties than chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM does not significantly reduce the penalties. The results of this study can enable mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  4. Effect of departure delays on manned Mars mission selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1995-03-01

    This study determines the effect on the initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) of delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep-space maneuver (DSM) is considered in order to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed, using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction-class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 and 1977.3 metric tons (mt), respectively. Conjunction-class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays, having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties than chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM does not significantly reduce the penalties. The results of this study can enable mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  5. How effective delays shape oscillatory dynamics in neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxin, Alex; Montbrió, Ernest

    2011-02-01

    Synaptic, dendritic and single-cell kinetics generate significant time delays that shape the dynamics of large networks of spiking neurons. Previous work has shown that such effective delays can be taken into account with a rate model through the addition of an explicit, fixed delay (Roxin et al. (2005,2006) [29,30]). Here we extend this work to account for arbitrary symmetric patterns of synaptic connectivity and generic nonlinear transfer functions. Specifically, we conduct a weakly nonlinear analysis of the dynamical states arising via primary instabilities of the asynchronous state. In this way we determine analytically how the nature and stability of these states depend on the choice of transfer function and connectivity. We arrive at two general observations of physiological relevance that could not be explained in previous work. These are: 1 - fast oscillations are always supercritical for realistic transfer functions and 2 - traveling waves are preferred over standing waves given plausible patterns of local connectivity. We finally demonstrate that these results show good agreement with those obtained performing numerical simulations of a network of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

  6. Region effects influence local tree species diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ricklefs, Robert E.; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  7. Region effects influence local tree species diversity.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-19

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  8. The effects of thiopentone and propofol on delayed hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Devlin, E G; Clarke, R S; Mirakhur, R K; McNeill, T A

    1995-06-01

    The effects of thiopentone and propofol on delayed hypersensitivity reactions and T lymphocyte proliferation were studied in nine healthy volunteers (five women and four men). Thiopentone 5 mg.kg-1 and propofol 2.5 mg kg-1 were given as a 10 min infusion on two separate occasions. The volunteers were exposed to a skin multitest antigen before and after administration of the two agents and their skin reactions assessed. T lymphocyte responses were studied using phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferation. Results showed that both drugs caused a significant depression of skin reactions in vivo but no depression in the T lymphocyte proliferation. PMID:7618660

  9. Effects of delaying puberty on bone mineralization in female rats.

    PubMed

    Rakover, Y; Lu, P; Briody, J N; Tao, C; Weiner, E; Ederveen, A G; Cowell, C T; Ben-Shlomo, I

    2000-07-01

    The effect of delaying puberty on bone mineralization was studied using female rats as a model. Repeated injections of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRHa) were used to suppress the onset of puberty from the age of 6-10 weeks. A group of control female rats was given aqueous solution injections at the same age and for the same duration. The effect of delaying puberty on bone mineralization was examined using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (QCT), both methods being adapted for small animals. Bone mineral parameters were measured at baseline and at the ages of 10, 17 and 24 weeks in total body, femur and spine. Compared to controls, bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD), as measured by DXA, were significantly decreased in GnRHa-treated rats in total body and femur at 10 and 24 weeks of age (P < 0.05). The results were even more significant after adjusting for weight. After this adjustment, spine BMC and BMD at 10, 17 and 24 weeks were significantly lower in the treatment group (P < 0.05). Trabecular BMD at the distal femur in the GnRHa treated group as measured by peripheral QCT was significantly lower (P < 0.05). However, cortical bone in the mid-femur had higher BMD, concurrent with lower cortical thickness in the treatment group. In conclusion, a delay in the onset of sexual maturation may cause prolonged, possibly irreversible defect in bone mineralization. PMID:10875850

  10. EFFECTS OF SELECTION DELAYS ON RADIAL MAZE PERFORMANCE: ACQUISITION AND EFFECTS OF SCOPOLAMINE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of post-selection confinement (delays) on both the acquisition of performance and the response to the muscarinic blocker scopolamine were examined in an automated version of the eight arm radial maze. Long-Evans rats exposed to post-selection delays of 0.5 sec (n=4) o...

  11. Multitrophic diversity effects of network degradation.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Peres, Carlos A; Hawes, Joseph E; Naeem, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    Predicting the functional consequences of biodiversity loss in realistic, multitrophic communities remains a challenge. No existing biodiversity-ecosystem function study to date has simultaneously incorporated information on species traits, network topology, and extinction across multiple trophic levels, while all three factors are independently understood as critical drivers of post-extinction network structure and function. We fill this gap by comparing the functional consequences of simulated species loss both within (monotrophic) and across (bitrophic) trophic levels, in an ecological interaction network estimated from spatially explicit field data on tropical fecal detritus producer and consumers (mammals and dung beetles). We simulated trait-ordered beetle and mammal extinction separately (monotrophic extinction) and the coextinction of beetles following mammal loss (bitrophic extinction), according to network structure. We also compared the diversity effects of bitrophic extinction models using a standard monotrophic function (the daily production or consumption of fecal detritus) and a unique bitrophic functional metric (the proportion of daily detritus production that is consumed). We found similar mono- and bitrophic diversity effects, regardless of which species traits were used to drive extinctions, yet divergent predictions when different measures of function were used. The inclusion of information on network structure had little apparent effect on the qualitative relationship between diversity and function. These results contribute to our growing understanding of the functional consequences of biodiversity from real systems and underscore the importance of species traits and realistic functional metrics to assessments of the ecosystem impacts of network degradation through species loss. PMID:27547324

  12. Effect of trimetazidine on early and delayed doxorubicin myocardial toxicity.

    PubMed

    Perletti, G; Monti, E; Paracchini, L; Piccinini, F

    1989-01-01

    The influence of the administration of trimetazidine on the myocardial toxicity induced by doxorubicin was studied on an in vivo model in the rat. Trimetazidine was chosen due to its ability to act as a scavenger of oxygen-derived free radicals, which have been implicated in both early and delayed cardiotoxic manifestations after doxorubicin treatment. In the present study, doxorubicin was administered as 4 weekly i.v. injections of 3 mg/kg. The cardiotoxic effects were evaluated by measuring predictive ECG parameters (QT and ST intervals) as well as the contractile performance of atria isolated from treated animals. Heart preparations were also examined by light microscopy. Trimetazidine, 2.5 mg/kg/day i.p. for 3 days before doxorubicin administration plus 2.5 mg/kg/day p.o. for 10 weeks, was unable to prevent the development of doxorubicin-induced long-term cardiotoxicity. However, a significant improvement of the early cardiotoxic signs was observed in trimetazidine-treated rats, as reported in previous investigations. The present findings suggest that different target structures may be involved in the early and delayed free radical-mediated effects of doxorubicin. PMID:2636823

  13. The Effect of Delayed Feedback on Infant Learning Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, W. Stuart; Watson, John S.

    1979-01-01

    Findings confirmed that whereas six- to eight-month-old infants revealed reliable acquisition under immediate reinforcement, a three-second delay precluded response acquisition, as did six-second and ten-second delay of reinforcement. A modified delayed-reinforcement scheduling procedure enabled a previous methodological criticism to be…

  14. Isolating Behavioral Mechanisms of Inter-Temporal Choice: Nicotine Effects on Delay Discounting and Amount Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locey, Matthew L.; Dallery, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    Many drugs of abuse produce changes in impulsive choice, that is, choice for a smaller-sooner reinforcer over a larger-later reinforcer. Because the alternatives differ in both delay and amount, it is not clear whether these drug effects are due to the differences in reinforcer delay or amount. To isolate the effects of delay, we used a titrating…

  15. Effects of alveolar ridge preservation on delayed implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan; Li, Bin; Xue, Hui-Min; Huang, Hai-Yun; Liu, Gang-Li

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma) on delayed implant osseointegration. The 3rd and 4th left and right mandibular premolars were extracted from four adult healthy male and female dogs. For the experimental group, we randomly selected two extraction sockets in each dog to be filled with Bio-Oss bone substitute (Geistlich Pharma). The two remaining extraction sockets remained untreated and served as the control group. Three months after Bio-Oss placement, dental implants were inserted into the alveolar bone of the experimental group and the control group. The osteogenic activity of the bone around the implants was assessed by evaluating the histological morphology and by estimating histomorphometric parameters at 3 and 6 months after delayed implantation. At 3 months, Goldner’s trichrome staining analysis showed that the bone-implant contact rate and mineralised bone area around the implant were significantly higher in the experimental group (75.98% ± 8.97% and 69.52% ± 9.63%, respectively) than in the control group (56.13% ± 8.18% and 52.82% ± 7.25%, respectively; P < 0.05). However, at 6 months, the two groups showed no significant difference. Fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed that the average mineralisation apposition rate of the bone tissue around the dental implant in the experimental group at 3 and 6 months was 6.80 ± 0.43 μm and 8.38 ± 0.84 μm, respectively, which was significantly higher than the rate in the control group (P < 0.05). These data indicated that alveolar ridge preservation by using Bio-Oss placement can promote osseointegration of delayed implantation. This may be a promising option for clinical use. PMID:26379871

  16. A study of the effect of group delay distortion on an SMSK satellite communications channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of group delay distortion on an SMSK satellite communications channel have been investigated. Software and hardware simulations have been used to determine the effects of channel group delay variations with frequency on the bit error rate for a 220 Mbps SMSK channel. These simulations indicate that group delay distortions can significantly degrade the bit error rate performance. The severity of the degradation is dependent on the amount, type, and spectral location of the group delay distortion.

  17. On the form of the forgetting function: the effects of arithmetic and logarithmic distributions of delays.

    PubMed Central

    Sargisson, Rebecca J; White, K Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    Forgetting functions with 18 delay intervals were generated for delayed matching-to-sample performance in pigeons. Delay interval variation was achieved by arranging five different sets of five delays across daily sessions. In different conditions, the delays were distributed in arithmetic or logarithmic series. There was no convincing evidence for different effects on discriminability of the distributions of different delays. The mean data were better fitted by some mathematical functions than by others, but the best-fitting functions depended on the distribution of delays. In further conditions with a fixed set of five delays, discriminability was higher with a logarithmic distribution of delays than with an arithmetic distribution. This result is consistent with the treatment of the forgetting function in terms of generalization decrement. PMID:14964709

  18. Delayed effects of ionizing radiation on the ear

    SciTech Connect

    Bohne, B.A.; Marks, J.E.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1985-07-01

    The question of damage to the ear from exposure to ionizing radiation was addressed by exposing groups of chinchillas to fractioned doses of radiation (2 Gy per day) for total doses ranging from 40 to 90 Gy. In order to allow any delayed effects of radiation to become manifest, the animals were sacrificed two years after completion of treatment and their temporal bones were prepared for microscopic examination. The most pronounced effect of treatment was degeneration of sensory and supporting cells and loss of eighth nerve fibers in the organ of Corti. Damage increased with increasing dose of radiation. The degree of damage found in many of these ears was of sufficient magnitude to produce a permanent sensorineural hearing loss.

  19. Effects of restraint on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzabata, Hassina; Multon, Stephane; Sellier, Alain; Houari, Hacene

    2012-07-15

    Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) is a chemical reaction that causes expansion in civil engineering structures. The safety level of such damaged structures has to be reassessed. To do this, the mechanical conditions acting on DEF expansions have to be analysed and, in particular, the variation of strength with expansion and the effect of restraint on the DEF expansion. This paper highlights several points: DEF expansion is isotropic in stress-free conditions, compressive stresses decrease DEF expansion in the direction subjected to restraint and lead to cracks parallel to the restraint, and expansion measured in the stress-free direction of restrained specimens is not modified. Thus restraint causes a decrease of the volumetric expansion and DEF expansion under restraint is anisotropic. Moreover, the paper examines the correlation between DEF expansion and concrete damage, providing data that can be used for the quantification of the effect of stresses on DEF induced expansion.

  20. Effects of postmortem delays on protein composition and oxidation.

    PubMed

    ElHajj, Zeinab; Cachot, Amélie; Müller, Terry; Riederer, Irène M; Riederer, Beat M

    2016-03-01

    Human autopsy brain tissue is widely used to study neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other diseases. However, when it comes to an evaluation of data obtained from such tissue, it is essential to consider potential postmortem effects on protein composition, posttranslational modification and proteolysis with increasing postmortem delays. In this study, we analyzed mouse brain tissues with different postmortem delays (pmd) of 0 h, 6h and 24h, for changes in protein composition, proteolysis and modifications such as S-nitrosylation, carbonylation and ubiquitination. Proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) were of special interest, including cytoskeletal and synaptic proteins or proteins involved in inflammation. Several proteins were fairly resistant to degradation during the first 6h but started to degrade thereafter. S-nitrosylation and carbonylation showed not much variation, except for those proteins that were susceptible to degradation. Brain spectrin was S-nitrosylated at death, and S-nitrosylated degradation fragments were measured at a pmd of 24h, indicating a susceptibility of brain spectrin to degradation. Furthermore, the physiological role of S-nitrosylation remains to be investigated. When studying human brain tissue, some proteins are more susceptible to degradation than others, while ubiquitination and carbonylation were little affected during the first 24h after death. PMID:26791740

  1. Effect of Small Transmission Delay on Human Behavior in Audio Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Kaname

    Transmission delay in audio communications is a well-known obstacle to achieving smooth communication. However, it is not known what kinds of effects are caused by small delays. We hypothesized that the small delay in the listener's responses disturbs the speaker's “verbal conditioning, ” where the verbal behavior of the speaker varies in accordance with the listener's responses. We examined whether the small delays in the listener's responses disturb the speaker's verbal conditioning using an artificial-grammar learning task. The results suggested that a 300-ms delay disturbed the participants' verbal conditioning although they were not adequately aware of the delay.

  2. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced mitotic delay: delayed expression of G/sub 2/ arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.; Zorch, M.; Leeper, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the presence of 5 mM caffeine, irradiated (1.5 Gy) S and G/sub 2/ cells progressed to mitosis in register and without arrest in G/sub 2/. Caffeine (5 mM) markedly reduced mitotic delay even after radiation doses up to 20 Gy. When caffeine was removed from irradiated (1.5 Gy) and caffeine-treated cells, a period of G/sub 2/ arrest followed, similar in length to that produced by radiation alone. The arrest expressed was independent of the duration of the caffeine treatment for exposures up to 3 hr. The similarity of the response to the cited effects of caffeine on S-phase delay suggests a common basis for delay induction in S and G/sub 2/ phases.

  3. Effects of Child Age and Level of Developmental Delay on Family Practice Physicians' Diagnostic Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epps, Susan; Kroeker, Rose

    1995-01-01

    This study of the effects of child age (20 and 40 months) and level of developmental delay (mild and severe) on identification of developmental disorders by 155 family practice physicians provided evidence that identification of developmental delay was generally high across conditions, with mild delay being less likely to be detected. (Author/JDD)

  4. Effect of Pressure on Piloted Ignition Delay of PMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Sara; Lai, Janice; Scott, Sarah; Ramirez-Correa, Amelia; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Urban, David; Ruff, Gary

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce the risk of decompression sickness associated with spacewalks, NASA is considering designing the next generation of exploration vehicles and habitats with a different cabin environment than used previously. The proposed environment uses a total cabin pressure of 52.7 to 58.6 kPa with an oxygen concentration of 30 to 34% by volume and was chosen with material flammability in mind. Because materials may burn differently under these conditions and there is little information on how this new environment affects the flammability of the materials onboard, it is important to conduct material flammability experiments at the intended exploration atmosphere. One method to evaluate material flammability is by its ease of ignition. To this end, piloted ignition delay tests were conducted in the Forced Ignition and Spread Test (FIST) apparatus subject to this new environment. In these tests, polymethylmethacylate (PMMA) was exposed to a range of oxidizer flow velocities and externally applied heat fluxes. The ultimate goal is to determine the individual effect of pressure and the combined effect of pressure and oxygen concentration on the ignition delay. Tests were conducted for a baseline case of normal pressure and oxygen concentration, low pressure (58.6 kPa) with normal oxygen (21%). Future work will focus on low pressure with 32% oxygen concentration (space exploration atmosphere - SEA) conditions. It was found that reducing the pressure while keeping the oxygen concentration at 21% reduced the ignition time by 17% on average. It was also noted that the critical heat flux for ignition decreases in low-pressure conditions. Because tests conducted in standard atmospheric conditions will underpredict the flammability of materials intended for use on spacecraft, fire safety onboard at exploration atmospheres may be compromised.

  5. Effects of Time Delay on Three Interacting Species System with Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Jian; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2008-09-01

    We study the effects of time delay in three interacting species system with noise. The time evolution and spatiotemporal pattern in the Lotka-Volterra model of three interacting species with noise and time delay were investigated by means of stochastic simulation. Our results indicate that: (i) Time delay induces the synchronously periodic oscillations of the three species densities; (ii) Time delay cause the spatiotemporal pattern to be concentrated.

  6. The effects of delayed auditory and visual feedback on speech production.

    PubMed

    Chesters, Jennifer; Baghai-Ravary, Ladan; Möttönen, Riikka

    2015-02-01

    Monitoring the sensory consequences of articulatory movements supports speaking. For example, delaying auditory feedback of a speaker's voice disrupts speech production. Also, there is evidence that this disruption may be decreased by immediate visual feedback, i.e., seeing one's own articulatory movements. It is, however, unknown whether delayed visual feedback affects speech production in fluent speakers. Here, the effects of delayed auditory and visual feedback on speech fluency (i.e., speech rate and errors), vocal control (i.e., intensity and pitch), and speech rhythm were investigated. Participants received delayed (by 200 ms) or immediate auditory feedback, while repeating sentences. Moreover, they received either no visual feedback, immediate visual feedback, or delayed visual feedback (by 200, 400, and 600 ms). Delayed auditory feedback affected fluency, vocal control, and rhythm. Immediate visual feedback had no effect on any of the speech measures when it was combined with delayed auditory feedback. Delayed visual feedback did, however, affect speech fluency when it was combined with delayed auditory feedback. In sum, the findings show that delayed auditory feedback disrupts fluency, vocal control, and rhythm and that delayed visual feedback can strengthen the disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback on fluency. PMID:25698020

  7. On the delay effects of different channels in Internet-based networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun-Bo; Kim, Jongrae; Sun, Xi-Ming; Liu, Guo-Ping

    2013-11-01

    The sensor-to-controller and the controller-to-actuator delays in networked control systems (NCSs) are investigated for the first time with respect to their different effects on the system performance. This study starts with identifying the delay-independent and delay-dependent control laws in NCSs, and confirms that only two delay-dependent control laws can cause different delay effects in different channels. The conditions under which the different delays in different channels can cause different effects are then given for both delay-dependent control laws. The results are verified by numerical examples. Potentially, these results can be regarded as important design principles in the practical implementation of NCSs.

  8. The Effect of Cognitive Restructuring on Delay of Gratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisan, Mordecai; Koriat, Asher

    1984-01-01

    Two experiments evaluated predictions derived from a cognitive-developmental approach to delay of gratification. In the first, kindergarten children were asked to make a choice between a small immediate and a large delayed reward. In the second, children were presented with either an objective-rational or a subjective-emotional argument…

  9. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen`s discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F{sub 1} mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen's discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts (1949), leukemia (1952) and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intrauterine exposure (1952). No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements (1956), the F1 mortality (1981), cytogenetic studies (1987) or biochemical genetic studies (1988). Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes (1968), and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes (1992). Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia (1995), a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. Also, obligate heterozygote female relatives can be studied for increased susceptibility to radiation-induced breast cancer, as suggested by clinical studies. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others (1994). The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased

  11. Effects of Acute and Chronic Morphine on Delay Discounting in Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Eppolito, Amy K.; France, Charles P.; Gerak, Lisa R.

    2015-01-01

    When reinforcers of different magnitudes are concurrently available, choice is greater for a large reinforcer; that choice can be reduced by delaying its delivery, a phenomenon called delay discounting and represented graphically by a delay curve in which choice is plotted as a function of delay to the large reinforcer. Morphine, administered acutely, can alter responding for large, delayed reinforcers. In this study, the impact of morphine tolerance, dependence and withdrawal on choice of delayed reinforcers was examined in 6 pigeons responding to receive a small amount of food delivered immediately or a larger amount delivered immediately or after delays that increased within sessions. Acutely, morphine decreased responding for the large reinforcer, and the effect was greater when morphine was administered immediately, rather than 6 hr, before sessions. During 8 weeks of daily administration, morphine produced differential effects across pigeons, shifting the delay curve downward in some and upward in others. In all pigeons, tolerance developed to the response rate-decreasing effects of morphine but not to its effects on delay discounting. When chronic morphine treatment was discontinued, rate of responding decreased in 4 pigeons, indicating the emergence of withdrawal; choice of the large reinforcer increased, regardless of delay, in all pigeons, an effect that persisted for weeks. These data suggest that chronic morphine administration has long-lasting effects on choice behavior, which might impact vulnerability to relapse in opioid abusers. PMID:23553726

  12. Experiments and analysis for a controlled mechanical absorber considering delay effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yixia; Xu, Jian

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that a traditional passive absorber is highly effective within a narrow frequency band. To solve this problem, a time-delayed absorber is utilized to suppress the vibration of the primary system when the passive absorber loses efficiency. A controllable mechanical device is designed and constructed to implement the time-delayed feedback control. The time delay mainly comes from signal acquiring and processing, computing and applying the control force. Such delay is inherent and non-ignorable. To begin with, a mathematical model with the inherent delay is proposed to provide an analytical fundamental. Then, the value of the inherent time delay is identified by the hammer test. Experimental and numerical results show that reasonable feedback gains can significantly improve the absorber's effectiveness when the excitation frequency is close to the second resonant frequency of the new coupled system. This research provides instructive ideas to the application of the time-delayed absorber in practical engineering.

  13. Effect of delayed aging on mechanical properties of an Al-Cu-Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindranathan, S.P.; Kashyap, K.T.; Kumar, S.R.; Ramachandra, C.; Chatterji, B.

    2000-02-01

    The effect of delayed aging on mechanical properties is characteristically found in Al-Mg-Si alloys. Delayed aging refers to the time elapsed between solutionizing and artificial aging. Delayed aging leads to inferior properties. This effect was investigated in an Al-Cu-Mg alloy (AU2GN) of nominal composition Al-2Cu-1.5Mg-1Fe-1Ni as a function of delay. This alloy also showed a drop in mechanical properties with delay. The results are explained on the basis of Pashley's kinetic model to qualitatively explain the evolution of a coarse precipitate structure with delay. It is found that all the results of delayed aging in the Al-Cu-Mg alloys are similar to those found in Al-Mg-Si alloys.

  14. Time-Delayed Subsidies: Interspecies Population Effects in Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle C.; Reynolds, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Cross-boundary nutrient inputs can enhance and sustain populations of organisms in nutrient-poor recipient ecosystems. For example, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) can deliver large amounts of marine-derived nutrients to freshwater ecosystems through their eggs, excretion, or carcasses. This has led to the question of whether nutrients from one generation of salmon can benefit juvenile salmon from subsequent generations. In a study of 12 streams on the central coast of British Columbia, we found that the abundance of juvenile coho salmon was most closely correlated with the abundance of adult pink salmon from previous years. There was a secondary role for adult chum salmon and watershed size, followed by other physical characteristics of streams. Most of the coho sampled emerged in the spring, and had little to no direct contact with spawning salmon nutrients at the time of sampling in the summer and fall. A combination of techniques suggest that subsidies from spawning salmon can have a strong, positive, time-delayed influence on the productivity of salmon-bearing streams through indirect effects from previous spawning events. This is the first study on the impacts of nutrients from naturally-occurring spawning salmon on juvenile population abundance of other salmon species. PMID:24911974

  15. Predicting Hunger: The Effects of Appetite and Delay on Choice.

    PubMed

    Read; van Leeuwen B

    1998-11-01

    Preferences often fluctuate as a result of transient changes in hunger and other visceral states. When current decisions have delayed consequences, the preferences that should be relevant are those that will prevail when the consequences occur. However, consistent with the notion of an intrapersonal empathy gap (Loewenstein, 1996) we find that an individual's current state of appetite has a significant effect on choices that apply to the future. Participants in our study made advance choices between healthy and unhealthy snacks (i.e., fruit and junk food) that they would receive in 1 week when they were either hungry (late in the afternoon) or satisfied (immediately after lunch). In 1 week, at the appointed time, they made an immediate choice, an opportunity to change their advance choice. Our main predictions were strongly confirmed. First, advance choices were influenced by current hunger as well as future hunger: hungry participants chose more unhealthy snacks than did satisfied ones. Second, participants were dynamically inconsistent: they chose far more unhealthy snacks for immediate choice than for advance choice. An additional hypothesis related to gender differences was also confirmed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9831521

  16. A theoretical account of cognitive effects in delay discounting

    PubMed Central

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Bickel, Warren; Redish, A. David

    2012-01-01

    Although delay discounting, the attenuation of the value of future rewards, is a robust finding, the mechanism of discounting is not known. We propose a potential mechanism for delay discounting such that discounting emerges from a search process trying to determine what rewards will be available in the future. In this theory, the delay dependence of the discounting of future expected rewards arises from three assumptions. First, that evaluation of outcomes involves a search process. Second, that value is assigned to an outcome proportionally to how easy it is to find. Third, that outcomes that are less delayed are typically easier for the search process to find. By relaxing this third assumption (for example, by assuming that episodically cued outcomes are easier to find), our model suggests that it is possible to dissociate discounting from delay. Our theory thereby explains the empirical result that discounting is slower to episodically-imagined outcomes, because these outcomes are easier for the search process to find. Additionally, the theory explains why improving cognitive resources such as working memory slows discounting, by improving searches and thereby making rewards easier to find. The three assumptions outlined here are likely to be instantiated during deliberative decision-making, but unlikely in habitual decision-making. We model two simple implementations of this theory and show that they unify empirical results about the role of cognitive function in delay discounting, and make new neural, behavioral, and pharmacological predictions. PMID:22487035

  17. A theoretical account of cognitive effects in delay discounting.

    PubMed

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Bickel, Warren; Redish, A David

    2012-04-01

    Although delay discounting, the attenuation of the value of future rewards, is a robust finding, the mechanism of discounting is not known. We propose a potential mechanism for delay discounting such that discounting emerges from a search process that is trying to determine what rewards will be available in the future. In this theory, the delay dependence of the discounting of future expected rewards arises from three assumptions. First, that the evaluation of outcomes involves a search process. Second, that the value is assigned to an outcome proportionally to how easy it is to find. Third, that outcomes that are less delayed are typically easier for the search process to find. By relaxing this third assumption (e.g. by assuming that episodically-cued outcomes are easier to find), our model suggests that it is possible to dissociate discounting from delay. Our theory thereby explains the empirical result that discounting is slower to episodically-imagined outcomes, because these outcomes are easier for the search process to find. Additionally, the theory explains why improving cognitive resources such as working memory slows discounting, by improving searches and thereby making rewards easier to find. The three assumptions outlined here are likely to be instantiated during deliberative decision-making, but are unlikely in habitual decision-making. We model two simple implementations of this theory and show that they unify empirical results about the role of cognitive function in delay discounting, and make new neural, behavioral, and pharmacological predictions. PMID:22487035

  18. Confounding Effects of Phase Delays on Causality Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Vakorin, Vasily A.; Mišić, Bratislav; Krakovska, Olga; Bezgin, Gleb; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Linear and non-linear techniques for inferring causal relations between the brain signals representing the underlying neuronal systems have become a powerful tool to extract the connectivity patterns in the brain. Typically these tools employ the idea of Granger causality, which is ultimately based on the temporal precedence between the signals. At the same time, phase synchronization between coupled neural ensembles is considered a mechanism implemented in the brain to integrate relevant neuronal ensembles to perform a cognitive or perceptual task. Phase synchronization can be studied by analyzing the effects of phase-locking between the brain signals. However, we should expect that there is no one-to-one mapping between the observed phase lag and the time precedence as specified by physically interacting systems. Specifically, phase lag observed between two signals may interfere with inferring causal relations. This could be of critical importance for the coupled non-linear oscillating systems, with possible time delays in coupling, when classical linear cross-spectrum strategies for solving phase ambiguity are not efficient. To demonstrate this, we used a prototypical model of coupled non-linear systems, and compared three typical pipelines of inferring Granger causality, as established in the literature. Specifically, we compared the performance of the spectral and information-theoretic Granger pipelines as well as standard Granger causality in their relations to the observed phase differences for frequencies at which the signals become synchronized to each other. We found that an information-theoretic approach, which takes into account different time lags between the past of one signal and the future of another signal, was the most robust to phase effects. PMID:23349720

  19. Decomposer diversity and identity influence plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Reich, Peter B; Isbell, Forest

    2012-10-01

    Plant productivity and other ecosystem functions often increase with plant diversity at a local scale. Alongside various plant-centered explanations for this pattern, there is accumulating evidence that multi-trophic interactions shape this relationship. Here, we investigated for the first time if plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning are mediated or driven by decomposer animal diversity and identity using a double-diversity microcosm experiment. We show that many ecosystem processes and ecosystem multifunctionality (herbaceous shoot biomass production, litter removal, and N uptake) were affected by both plant and decomposer diversity, with ecosystem process rates often being maximal at intermediate to high plant and decomposer diversity and minimal at both low plant and decomposer diversity. Decomposers relaxed interspecific plant competition by enlarging chemical (increased N uptake and surface-litter decomposition) and spatial (increasing deep-root biomass) habitat space and by promoting plant complementarity. Anecic earthworms and isopods functioned as key decomposers; although decomposer diversity effects did not solely rely on these two decomposer species, positive plant net biodiversity and complementarity effects only occurred in the absence of isopods and the presence of anecic earthworms. Using a structural equation model, we explained 76% of the variance in plant complementarity, identified direct and indirect effect paths, and showed that the presence of key decomposers accounted for approximately three-quarters of the explained variance. We conclude that decomposer animals have been underappreciated as contributing agents of plant diversity-ecosystem functioning relationships. Elevated decomposer performance at high plant diversity found in previous experiments likely positively feeds back to plant performance, thus contributing to the positive relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning. PMID:23185884

  20. Impacts of Wake Effect and Time Delay on the Dynamic Analysis of Wind Farms Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Fouly, Tarek H. M.; El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the impacts of proper modeling of the wake effects and wind speed delays, between different wind turbines' rows, on the dynamic performance accuracy of the wind farms models. Three different modeling scenarios were compared to highlight the impacts of wake effects and wind speed time-delay models. In the first scenario,…

  1. Delayed childbearing: effects on fertility and the outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balasch, Juan; Gratacós, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    In modern societies, the proportion of women who delay childbearing beyond the age of 35 years has greatly increased in recent decades. They are falsely reassured by popular beliefs that advances in new reproductive technologies can compensate for the age-related decline in fertility. Yet age remains the single most important determinant of male and female fertility, either natural or treated. The consequences of advancing maternal age are not only relevant for the risk of natural and assisted conception, but also for the outcome of pregnancy. Although the absolute rate of poor pregnancy outcomes may be low from an individual standpoint, the impact of delaying childbearing from a public health perspective cannot be overestimated and should be in the agenda of public health policies for the years to come. This review summarizes available evidence regarding the impact of delaying childbearing on fertility and pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21228557

  2. Effect of delayed auditory feedback on normal speakers at two speech rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Andrew; Kalinowski, Joseph; Rastatter, Michael P.; Lynch, Kerry

    2002-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of short and long auditory feedback delays at two speech rates with normal speakers. Seventeen participants spoke under delayed auditory feedback (DAF) at 0, 25, 50, and 200 ms at normal and fast rates of speech. Significantly two to three times more dysfluencies were displayed at 200 ms (p<0.05) relative to no delay or the shorter delays. There were significantly more dysfluencies observed at the fast rate of speech (p=0.028). These findings implicate the peripheral feedback system(s) of fluent speakers for the disruptive effects of DAF on normal speech production at long auditory feedback delays. Considering the contrast in fluency/dysfluency exhibited between normal speakers and those who stutter at short and long delays, it appears that speech disruption of normal speakers under DAF is a poor analog of stuttering.

  3. Delayed tillage and cover crop effects in potato systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delayed tillage and the inclusion of cover crops can substantially reduce erosion in intensively tilled potato systems. Both of these practices can potentially impact potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)yield and quality via changes in soil temperature and soil water status, and suppression or enhancement...

  4. Diversity or reconcentration : Competition's latent effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gillan, J.; Rohrbach, P.

    1994-06-15

    Competitive diversity has long been valued in American culture and telecommunications policy. Certainty, encouraging diversity and competition has been the central theme of government policy for the past decade. Now, spurred by the momentum of the [open quotes]information superhighway[close quotes] and the perceived convergence of cable and telephone technologies, attention has turned to whether the last bastion of monopoly - the local exchange - may soon be added to the list of competitive telecommunications markets.

  5. The Effect of D-Cycloserine on Immediate vs. Delayed Extinction of Learned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Julia M.; Richardson, Rick

    2010-01-01

    We compared the effect of D-cycloserine (DCS) on immediate (10 min after conditioning) and delayed (24 h after conditioning) extinction of learned fear in rats. DCS facilitated both immediate and delayed extinction when the drug was administered after extinction training. However, DCS did not facilitate immediate extinction when administered prior…

  6. Stability and bifurcation in a reaction-diffusion model with nonlocal delay effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shangjiang

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the existence, stability, and multiplicity of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution and periodic solutions for a reaction-diffusion model with nonlocal delay effect and Dirichlet boundary condition are investigated by using Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction. Moreover, we illustrate our general results by applications to models with a single delay and one-dimensional spatial domain.

  7. Interactive Effects of Graphic Organizers and Delayed Review on Concept Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel H.; Katayama, Andrew D.; Dubois, Nelson F.; Devaney, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Investigated the effects of immediate and delayed review occasion and study materials (text, text plus outlines, and text plus graphic organizers) in two experiments involving 198 undergraduates. Delayed review facilitated performance for students who viewed text plus graphic organizers but not for those who viewed only text or text plus outlines.…

  8. The Effects of Inflation and Interest Rates on Delay Discounting in Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashima, Kentaro

    2006-01-01

    Interest and inflation rates may be major determinants of delay discounting, but these variables have not been controlled in past experiments because they depend on macroeconomic conditions. This study uses a computer game-like task to investigate the effects of inflation rates on people's subjective valuation of delayed rewards. During the task,…

  9. Effects of Delayed Constructed-Response Identity Matching on Spelling of Dictated Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Elenice S.; de Souza, Deisy G.; de Rose, Julio C.; Fonseca, Monica

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effects of delayed constructed-response identity marching on spelling with 6 first graders with histories of school failure. After training, the children learned to spell words to dictation and their cursive writing improved. These results replicate studies showing that delayed constructed-response matching establishes spelling. For…

  10. Effects of acute and chronic flunitrazepam on delay discounting in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Eppolito, Amy K; France, Charles P; Gerak, Lisa R

    2011-03-01

    Delay to delivery of a reinforcer can decrease responding for that reinforcer and increase responding for smaller reinforcers that are available concurrently and delivered without delay; acute administration of drugs can alter responding for large, delayed reinforcers, although the impact of chronic treatment on delay discounting is not well understood. In this experiment, the effects of repeated administration of the benzodiazepine flunitrazepam were studied in 6 pigeons responding on one key to receive food that was delivered immediately and on a second key to receive a larger amount of food that was delivered following delays which increased across a single session. Pigeons responded predominantly for the large reinforcer when there were no delays and when delays were short; however, as delays increased, responding for the large reinforcer decreased. Acutely, flunitrazepam (0.32, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased responding for the large reinforcer, shifting the discounting curve rightward and upward. Repeated administration of flunitrazepam (0.32, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/kg, each for six sessions, separated by one session during which vehicle was administered) did not markedly alter its effects on responding for the large reinforcer, indicating that the development of tolerance to this effect of flunitrazepam is modest under these conditions. PMID:21541119

  11. Hopf bifurcations in a reaction-diffusion population model with delay effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ying; Wei, Junjie; Shi, Junping

    A reaction-diffusion population model with a general time-delayed growth rate per capita is considered. The growth rate per capita can be logistic or weak Allee effect type. From a careful analysis of the characteristic equation, the stability of the positive steady state solution and the existence of forward Hopf bifurcation from the positive steady state solution are obtained via the implicit function theorem, where the time delay is used as the bifurcation parameter. The general results are applied to a "food-limited" population model with diffusion and delay effects as well as a weak Allee effect population model.

  12. Delays in Human-Computer Interaction and Their Effects on Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Kohrs, Christin; Angenstein, Nicole; Brechmann, André

    2016-01-01

    The temporal contingency of feedback is an essential requirement of successful human-computer interactions. The timing of feedback not only affects the behavior of a user but is also accompanied by changes in psychophysiology and neural activity. In three fMRI experiments we systematically studied the impact of delayed feedback on brain activity while subjects performed an auditory categorization task. In the first fMRI experiment, we analyzed the effects of rare and thus unexpected delays of different delay duration on brain activity. In the second experiment, we investigated if users can adapt to frequent delays. Therefore, delays were presented as often as immediate feedback. In a third experiment, the influence of interaction outage was analyzed by measuring the effect of infrequent omissions of feedback on brain activity. The results show that unexpected delays in feedback presentation compared to immediate feedback stronger activate inter alia bilateral the anterior insular cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex, the left inferior parietal lobule and the right inferior frontal junction. The strength of this activation increases with the duration of the delay. Thus, delays interrupt the course of an interaction and trigger an orienting response that in turn activates brain regions of action control. If delays occur frequently, users can adapt, delays become expectable, and the brain activity in the observed network diminishes over the course of the interaction. However, introducing rare omissions of expected feedback reduces the system's trustworthiness which leads to an increase in brain activity not only in response to such omissions but also following frequently occurring and thus expected delays. PMID:26745874

  13. Delays in Human-Computer Interaction and Their Effects on Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kohrs, Christin; Angenstein, Nicole; Brechmann, André

    2016-01-01

    The temporal contingency of feedback is an essential requirement of successful human-computer interactions. The timing of feedback not only affects the behavior of a user but is also accompanied by changes in psychophysiology and neural activity. In three fMRI experiments we systematically studied the impact of delayed feedback on brain activity while subjects performed an auditory categorization task. In the first fMRI experiment, we analyzed the effects of rare and thus unexpected delays of different delay duration on brain activity. In the second experiment, we investigated if users can adapt to frequent delays. Therefore, delays were presented as often as immediate feedback. In a third experiment, the influence of interaction outage was analyzed by measuring the effect of infrequent omissions of feedback on brain activity. The results show that unexpected delays in feedback presentation compared to immediate feedback stronger activate inter alia bilateral the anterior insular cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex, the left inferior parietal lobule and the right inferior frontal junction. The strength of this activation increases with the duration of the delay. Thus, delays interrupt the course of an interaction and trigger an orienting response that in turn activates brain regions of action control. If delays occur frequently, users can adapt, delays become expectable, and the brain activity in the observed network diminishes over the course of the interaction. However, introducing rare omissions of expected feedback reduces the system’s trustworthiness which leads to an increase in brain activity not only in response to such omissions but also following frequently occurring and thus expected delays. PMID:26745874

  14. Effects of Crop Diversity on Agroecosystem Productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the role of diversity in the functioning of ecosystems has important implications for agriculture. Previous agricultural research has shown that crop rotation and the use of cover crops can lead to increases in yield relative to monoculture; however, few studies have been performed wi...

  15. The Effects of Methylphenidate on Discounting of Delayed Rewards in ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Keri; Hawk, Larry W.; Reynolds, Brady; Mazzullo, Rebecca; Rhodes, Jessica; Pelham, William E.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Gangloff, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    Impulsivity is a central component of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Delay discounting, or a preference for smaller, immediate rewards over larger, delayed rewards is considered an important aspect of impulsivity, and delay-related impulsivity has been emphasized in etiological models of ADHD. The current study examined whether stimulant medication, an effective treatment for ADHD, reduces discounting of delayed experiential and hypothetical rewards among 49 children (age 9–12 years) with ADHD. Following a practice day, participants completed a 3-day double-blind placebo-controlled acute medication assessment. Active doses were long-acting methylphenidate (Concerta), with the nearest equivalents of 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg TID immediate-release methylphenidate. On each testing day, participants completed experiential (real-world money in real time) and hypothetical discounting tasks. Relative to placebo, methylphenidate reduced discounting of delayed experiential rewards, but not hypothetical rewards. Broadly consistent with etiological models that emphasize delay-related impulsivity among children with ADHD, these findings provide initial evidence that stimulant medication reduces delay discounting among those with the disorder. The present results also draw attention to task parameters that may influence the sensitivity of various delay discounting measures to medication effects. PMID:19803628

  16. Diversity begets diversity? The effects of board composition on the appointment and success of women CEOs.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alison; Glass, Christy

    2015-09-01

    Previous research on the effects of leadership diversity on firm outcomes has produced inconsistent and inconclusive findings. While some scholars argue that diversity increases organizational equity and enhances performance, others argue that diversity increases conflict, reduces cooperation and harms performance. This study tests the impact of a variety of compositional factors on firm outcomes. Specifically, we analyze whether and how board composition affects the advancement and mobility of women CEOs and firm performance. Our analysis relies on a unique data set of all Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) and Board of Directors (BODs) in Fortune 500 companies over a ten-year period. We find a marginally significant positive relationship between board diversity and the likelihood of a woman being appointed CEO. We further find that board diversity significantly and positively influences the post-promotion success of women CEOs. Our findings suggest that board composition is critical for the appointment and success of women CEOs, and increasing board diversity should be central to any organizational diversity efforts. PMID:26188443

  17. Time-delay effects on dynamics of a two-actor conflict model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Pacheco, A.; Obregón-Quintana, B.; Liebovitch, L. S.; Guzmán-Vargas, L.

    2013-02-01

    We present a study of time-delay effects on a two-actor conflict model based on nonlinear differential equations. The state of each actor depends on its own state in isolation, its previous state, its inertia to change, the positive or negative feedback and a time delay in the state of the other actor. We use both theoretical and numerical approaches to characterize the evolution of the system for several values of time delays. We find that, under particular conditions, a time delay leads to the appearance of oscillations in the states of the actors. Besides, phase portraits for the trajectories are presented to illustrate the evolution of the system for different time delays. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of social conflict models.

  18. Effects of diversity on multiagent systems: Minority games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. Y. Michael; Lim, S. W.; Gao, Zhuo

    2005-06-01

    We consider a version of large population games whose agents compete for resources using strategies with adaptable preferences. The games can be used to model economic markets, ecosystems, or distributed control. Diversity of initial preferences of strategies is introduced by randomly assigning biases to the strategies of different agents. We find that diversity among the agents reduces their maladaptive behavior. We find interesting scaling relations with diversity for the variance and other parameters such as the convergence time, the fraction of fickle agents, and the variance of wealth, illustrating their dynamical origin. When diversity increases, the scaling dynamics is modified by kinetic sampling and waiting effects. Analyses yield excellent agreement with simulations.

  19. Plant diversity effects on root decomposition in grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongmei; Mommer, Liesje; van Ruijven, Jasper; de Kroon, Hans; Gessler, Arthur; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Wirth, Christian; Weigelt, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Loss of plant diversity impairs ecosystem functioning. Compared to other well-studied processes, we know little about whether and how plant diversity affects root decomposition, which is limiting our knowledge on biodiversity-carbon cycling relationships in the soil. Plant diversity potentially affects root decomposition via two non-exclusive mechanisms: by providing roots of different substrate quality and/or by altering the soil decomposition environment. To disentangle these two mechanisms, three decomposition experiments using a litter-bag approach were conducted on experimental grassland plots differing in plant species richness, functional group richness and functional group composition (e.g. presence/absence of grasses, legumes, small herbs and tall herbs, the Jena Experiment). We studied: 1) root substrate quality effects by decomposing roots collected from the different experimental plant communities in one common plot; 2) soil decomposition environment effects by decomposing standard roots in all experimental plots; and 3) the overall plant diversity effects by decomposing community roots in their 'home' plots. Litter bags were installed in April 2014 and retrieved after 1, 2 and 4 months to determine the mass loss. We found that mass loss decreased with increasing plant species richness, but not with functional group richness in the three experiments. However, functional group presence significantly affected mass loss with primarily negative effects of the presence of grasses and positive effects of the presence of legumes and small herbs. Our results thus provide clear evidence that species richness has a strong negative effect on root decomposition via effects on both root substrate quality and soil decomposition environment. This negative plant diversity-root decomposition relationship may partly account for the positive effect of plant diversity on soil C stocks by reducing C loss in addition to increasing primary root productivity. However, to fully

  20. Design and analysis of clinical trials in the presence of delayed treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Sit, Tony; Liu, Mengling; Shnaidman, Michael; Ying, Zhiliang

    2016-05-20

    In clinical trials with survival endpoint, it is common to observe an overlap between two Kaplan-Meier curves of treatment and control groups during the early stage of the trials, indicating a potential delayed treatment effect. Formulas have been derived for the asymptotic power of the log-rank test in the presence of delayed treatment effect and its accompanying sample size calculation. In this paper, we first reformulate the alternative hypothesis with the delayed treatment effect in a rescaled time domain, which can yield a simplified sample size formula for the log-rank test in this context. We further propose an intersection-union test to examine the efficacy of treatment with delayed effect and show it to be more powerful than the log-rank test. Simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate the proposed methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26833957

  1. Existence and global attractivity of periodic solution for an impulsive delay differential equation with Allee effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jurang; Zhao, Aimin; Yan, Weiping

    2005-09-01

    Sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence and global attractivity of positive periodic solution of an impulsive delay differential equation with Allee effect. The results of this paper improve and generalize noticeably the known theorems in the literature.

  2. The Effect of Diagnostic Delays on the Drop-Out Rate and the Total Delay to Diagnosis of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Stephen J.; Uys, Pieter W.; Hargrove, John; van Helden, Paul D.; Williams, Brian G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Numerous patient and healthcare system-related delays contribute to the overall delay experienced by patients from onset of TB symptoms to diagnosis and treatment. Such delays are critical as infected individuals remain untreated in the community, providing more opportunities for transmission of the disease and adversely affecting the epidemic. Methodology/Principal Findings We present an analysis of the factors that contribute to the overall delay in TB diagnosis and treatment, in a resource-poor setting. Impact on the distribution of diagnostic delay times was assessed for various factors, the sensitivity of the diagnostic method being found to be the most significant. A linear relationship was found between the sensitivity of the test and the predicted mean delay time, with an increase in test sensitivity resulting in a reduced mean delay time and a reduction in the drop-out rate. Conclusions/Significance The results show that in a developing country a number of delay factors, particularly the low sensitivity of the initial sputum smear microscopy test, potentially increase total diagnostic delay times experienced by TB patients significantly. The results reinforce the urgent need for novel diagnostic methods, both for smear positive and negative TB, that are highly sensitive, accessible and point of care, in order to reduce mean delay times. PMID:18398459

  3. Effects of Diversity Experiences on Critical Thinking Skills: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loes, Chad; Pascarella, Ernest; Umbach, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education to estimate the unique effects of exposure to classroom diversity and involvement in interactional diversity on growth in critical thinking skills during the first year of college. Net of important confounding influences, neither classroom nor interactional diversity…

  4. Adapting Strategies of Effective Instruction for Culturally Diverse Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamauchi, Lois A.; Im, Seongah; Schonleber, Nanette S.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes collaboration between preschool and university educators focused on adapting the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and Excellence (CREDE) standards for Effective Pedagogy for use in early childhood (EC) settings. The CREDE standards are strategies of best practices for culturally diverse K-12 students. Teachers…

  5. Are Tree Species Diversity and Genotypic Diversity Effects on Insect Herbivores Mediated by Ants?

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Navarrete, María José; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A.; Parra-Tabla, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity can influence predators and omnivores and such effects may in turn influence herbivores and plants. However, evidence for these ecological feedbacks is rare. We evaluated if the effects of tree species (SD) and genotypic diversity (GD) on the abundance of different guilds of insect herbivores associated with big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) were contingent upon the protective effects of ants tending extra-floral nectaries of this species. This study was conducted within a larger experiment consisting of mahogany monocultures and species polycultures of four species and –within each of these two plot types– mahogany was represented by either one or four maternal families. We selected 24 plots spanning these treatment combinations, 10 mahogany plants/plot, and within each plot experimentally reduced ant abundance on half of the selected plants, and surveyed ant and herbivore abundance. There were positive effects of SD on generalist leaf-chewers and sap-feeders, but for the latter group this effect depended on the ant reduction treatment: SD positively influenced sap-feeders under ambient ant abundance but had no effect when ant abundance was reduced; at the same time, ants had negative effects on sap feeders in monoculture but no effect in polyculture. In contrast, SD did not influence specialist stem-borers or leaf-miners and this effect was not contingent upon ant reduction. Finally, GD did not influence any of the herbivore guilds studied, and such effects did not depend on the ant treatment. Overall, we show that tree species diversity influenced interactions between a focal plant species (mahogany) and ants, and that such effects in turn mediated plant diversity effects on some (sap-feeders) but not all the herbivores guilds studied. Our results suggest that the observed patterns are dependent on the combined effects of herbivore identity, diet breadth, and the source of plant diversity. PMID:26241962

  6. Are Tree Species Diversity and Genotypic Diversity Effects on Insect Herbivores Mediated by Ants?

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarrete, María José; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A; Parra-Tabla, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity can influence predators and omnivores and such effects may in turn influence herbivores and plants. However, evidence for these ecological feedbacks is rare. We evaluated if the effects of tree species (SD) and genotypic diversity (GD) on the abundance of different guilds of insect herbivores associated with big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) were contingent upon the protective effects of ants tending extra-floral nectaries of this species. This study was conducted within a larger experiment consisting of mahogany monocultures and species polycultures of four species and -within each of these two plot types- mahogany was represented by either one or four maternal families. We selected 24 plots spanning these treatment combinations, 10 mahogany plants/plot, and within each plot experimentally reduced ant abundance on half of the selected plants, and surveyed ant and herbivore abundance. There were positive effects of SD on generalist leaf-chewers and sap-feeders, but for the latter group this effect depended on the ant reduction treatment: SD positively influenced sap-feeders under ambient ant abundance but had no effect when ant abundance was reduced; at the same time, ants had negative effects on sap feeders in monoculture but no effect in polyculture. In contrast, SD did not influence specialist stem-borers or leaf-miners and this effect was not contingent upon ant reduction. Finally, GD did not influence any of the herbivore guilds studied, and such effects did not depend on the ant treatment. Overall, we show that tree species diversity influenced interactions between a focal plant species (mahogany) and ants, and that such effects in turn mediated plant diversity effects on some (sap-feeders) but not all the herbivores guilds studied. Our results suggest that the observed patterns are dependent on the combined effects of herbivore identity, diet breadth, and the source of plant diversity. PMID:26241962

  7. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    PubMed

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  8. Effects of acute and chronic cocaine administration on titrating-delay matching-to-sample performance.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Branch, Marc N

    2012-03-01

    The effects of cocaine were examined under a titrating-delay matching-to-sample procedure. In this procedure, the delay between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, matches increase the delay and mismatches decrease the delay. Titrated delay values served as the primary dependent measure. After establishing stable performance in pigeons, several behaviorally-effective doses of cocaine were administered acutely. Dose-related within-session decreases in titrated delay values were observed. Following acute determinations, the dose of cocaine that produced the most rapid decline without eliminating performance was administered prior to each daily session. Chronic administration resulted in performance trending toward control levels. A redetermination of the dose-response function following chronic exposure revealed reduced potency (i.e., tolerance) under cocaine on titrated delay matching-to-sample performance. Supplemental analyses suggest that cocaine may serve as a disruptor of the stimulus conditions in which the performance was established. PMID:22389523

  9. Self-regulation strategies may enhance the acute effect of exercise on smoking delay.

    PubMed

    Hatzigeorgiadis, Antonis; Pappa, Vassiliki; Tsiami, Anastasia; Tzatzaki, Theodora; Georgakouli, Kalliopi; Zourbanos, Nikos; Goudas, Marios; Chatzisarantis, Nikos; Theodorakis, Yannis

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined the acute effect of a moderate intensity aerobic exercise session combined with self-regulation on smoking delay in physically inactive smokers. Participants were 11 adults (5 males and 6 females) that completed three experimental conditions: control, exercise, and exercise using self-regulation strategies (SR). Following the experimental treatment smoking for the two exercise conditions delayed significantly more than for the control condition; in addition exercise SR delayed smoking marginally more that the plain exercise condition. Findings supported previous research that acute exercise reduces cravings to smoke, and suggests that the use of self-regulation strategies may strengthen exercise for smoking cessation interventions. PMID:26851493

  10. Energy-delay performance of giant spin Hall effect switching for dense magnetic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Young, Ian A.

    2014-10-01

    We show that the giant spin Hall effect (GSHE) magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) can enable better energy delay and voltage performance than MTJ spin torque devices at 10-30 nm scaled nanomagnet dimensions. We propose a dense bit cell composed of a folded electrode to enable scaling to sub-10 nm CMOS. We derive the energy-delay trajectory and energy-delay product of GSHE and MTJ devices with an energy minimum at the magnetic characteristic time. Optimized GSHE devices with PMA can enable low voltage (<0.1 V), scaled dimensions, and fast switching time (100 ps) at an average switching energy approaching 100 aJ/bit.

  11. An Explanation of Persistence and Sleeper Effects: An Empirical Test of the Delayed Opinion Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Steve; Hylton, Cal

    A theoretical model was tested for its ability to explain persistence and delayed credibility (or "sleeper") effects in attitude change via persuasive variables. The model predicted opinion effects from two major components: a multiplicative effect of message repetition and credibility, and a simple effect of time since receipt of message. The…

  12. Effect of phase response curve skew on synchronization with and without conduction delays.

    PubMed

    Canavier, Carmen C; Wang, Shuoguo; Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    A central problem in cortical processing including sensory binding and attentional gating is how neurons can synchronize their responses with zero or near-zero time lag. For a spontaneously firing neuron, an input from another neuron can delay or advance the next spike by different amounts depending upon the timing of the input relative to the previous spike. This information constitutes the phase response curve (PRC). We present a simple graphical method for determining the effect of PRC shape on synchronization tendencies and illustrate it using type 1 PRCs, which consist entirely of advances (delays) in response to excitation (inhibition). We obtained the following generic solutions for type 1 PRCs, which include the pulse-coupled leaky integrate and fire model. For pairs with mutual excitation, exact synchrony can be stable for strong coupling because of the stabilizing effect of the causal limit region of the PRC in which an input triggers a spike immediately upon arrival. However, synchrony is unstable for short delays, because delayed inputs arrive during a refractory period and cannot trigger an immediate spike. Right skew destabilizes antiphase and enables modes with time lags that grow as the conduction delay is increased. Therefore, right skew favors near synchrony at short conduction delays and a gradual transition between synchrony and antiphase for pairs coupled by mutual excitation. For pairs with mutual inhibition, zero time lag synchrony is stable for conduction delays ranging from zero to a substantial fraction of the period for pairs. However, for right skew there is a preferred antiphase mode at short delays. In contrast to mutual excitation, left skew destabilizes antiphase for mutual inhibition so that synchrony dominates at short delays as well. These pairwise synchronization tendencies constrain the synchronization properties of neurons embedded in larger networks. PMID:24376399

  13. Effect of Time Delay on Binary Signal Detection via a Bistable System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ling-Zao; Liu, Bing-Yang; Xu, Yi-Da; Li, Jian-Long

    2014-02-01

    The effect of time delay on binary signal detection via a bistable system in the presence of white or colored Gaussian noise is investigated. By defining the bit error rate based on the solution of the approximated Fokker—Planck equation, the detector performance is investigated theoretically and is verified by Monte Carlo simulation. It is shown that, when the system parameter or noise intensity is optimally chosen, the increasing time delay generally improves the system performance. It is also shown that it is more difficult to accurately predict the system performance with a larger time delay and correlation time. This may inspire more thorough investigations in cooperative effects of a nonlinear system and time delay on signal processing.

  14. Effects of time delay and pitch control sensitivity in the flared landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthe, C. J.; Chalk, C. R.; Wingarten, N. C.; Grantham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Between December 1985 and January 1986, a flared landing program was conducted, using the USAF Total In-Flight simulator airplane, to examine time delay effects in a formal manner. Results show that as pitch sensitivity is increased, tolerance to time delay decreases. With the proper selection of pitch sensitivity, Level I performance was maintained with time delays ranging from 150 milliseconds to greater than 300 milliseconds. With higher sensitivity, configurations with Level I performance at 150 milliseconds degraded to level 2 at 200 milliseconds. When metrics of time delay and pitch sensitivity effects are applied to enhance previously developed predictive criteria, the result is an improved prediction technique which accounts for significant closed loop items.

  15. Effects of delayed auditory feedback on speech kinematics in fluent speakers

    PubMed Central

    Sasisekaran, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The effects of delayed auditory feedback on behavioral responses and speech kinematics were investigated. Participants were 10 males (M age = 22.2, SD = 3.7) and 10 females (M age = 20.5, SD = 2.2). Participants were required to repeat short (six-syllable) and longer (11-syllable) non-words in a reading task. Speech errors, lip movement variability, and movement duration of labial trajectories under delayed feedback were compared to effects under gated speech feedback and a control or synchronous auditory feedback condition. Repeated measures analysis indicated lower percent of correct productions, higher variability and slower duration of lip movements in the delayed feedback condition compared to the gated feedback and control conditions. Implications for auditory feedback of movement control in continuous speech and for theories of delayed auditory feedback that attribute a role to movements are discussed. PMID:23409597

  16. Network-scale effect on synchronizability of fully coupled network with connection delay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y G; Wang, Z H

    2016-04-01

    Network-scale effect on synchronizability of fully coupled network with connection delay is investigated in this paper. The master stability function, which governs the stability of synchronization manifold, is first obtained by separating the synchronization manifold direction from other transverse directions. Then, by introducing a new time variable in the master stability function, it is shown the effect of connection delay can be weakened with the increase of network scale, and thus, in contrast to the situation without connection delay, large network scale is more positive to the synchronizability of fully coupled network with connection delay. Those findings are confirmed by the studies on two specific networks with nodes of typical nonlinear dynamical systems. PMID:27131482

  17. Effects of Grammatical and Associative Structure, Delay Interval, and Activity During Delay on Memory Span of Educable Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmel, Melvyn I.; Bennett, Stanley W.

    Four types of sentences differing in grammaticalness and amount of association between component words were presented to 80 educable mentally retarded children for recall after varying delay intervals. The children (all male and between the ages of nine and 14) sat quietly during the delay intervals of named numbers from a memory drum. The results…

  18. Institutions and Cultural Diversity: Effects of Democratic and Propaganda Processes on Local Convergence and Global Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Roberto; Kacperski, Celina; Sancho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a connected world where people influence each other, what can cause a globalized monoculture, and which measures help to preserve the coexistence of cultures? Previous research has shown that factors such as homophily, population size, geography, mass media, and type of social influence play important roles. In the present paper, we investigate for the first time the impact that institutions have on cultural diversity. In our first three studies, we extend existing agent-based models and explore the effects of institutional influence and agent loyalty. We find that higher institutional influence increases cultural diversity, while individuals' loyalty to their institutions has a small, preserving effect. In three further studies, we test how bottom-up and top-down processes of institutional influence impact our model. We find that bottom-up democratic practices, such as referenda, tend to produce convergence towards homogeneity, while top-down information dissemination practices, such as propaganda, further increase diversity. In our last model--an integration of bottom-up and top-down processes into a feedback loop of information--we find that when democratic processes are rare, the effects of propaganda are amplified, i.e., more diversity emerges; however, when democratic processes are common, they are able to neutralize or reverse this propaganda effect. Importantly, our models allow for control over the full spectrum of diversity, so that a manipulation of our parameters can result in preferred levels of diversity, which will be useful for the study of other factors in the future. We discuss possible mechanisms behind our results, applications, and implications for political and social sciences. PMID:27058247

  19. Institutions and Cultural Diversity: Effects of Democratic and Propaganda Processes on Local Convergence and Global Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Roberto; Kacperski, Celina; Sancho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a connected world where people influence each other, what can cause a globalized monoculture, and which measures help to preserve the coexistence of cultures? Previous research has shown that factors such as homophily, population size, geography, mass media, and type of social influence play important roles. In the present paper, we investigate for the first time the impact that institutions have on cultural diversity. In our first three studies, we extend existing agent-based models and explore the effects of institutional influence and agent loyalty. We find that higher institutional influence increases cultural diversity, while individuals' loyalty to their institutions has a small, preserving effect. In three further studies, we test how bottom-up and top-down processes of institutional influence impact our model. We find that bottom-up democratic practices, such as referenda, tend to produce convergence towards homogeneity, while top-down information dissemination practices, such as propaganda, further increase diversity. In our last model—an integration of bottom-up and top-down processes into a feedback loop of information—we find that when democratic processes are rare, the effects of propaganda are amplified, i.e., more diversity emerges; however, when democratic processes are common, they are able to neutralize or reverse this propaganda effect. Importantly, our models allow for control over the full spectrum of diversity, so that a manipulation of our parameters can result in preferred levels of diversity, which will be useful for the study of other factors in the future. We discuss possible mechanisms behind our results, applications, and implications for political and social sciences. PMID:27058247

  20. Effects of the gaseous and liquid water content of the atmosphere on range delay and Doppler frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flock, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    When high precision is required for range measurement on Earth space paths, it is necessary to correct as accurately as possible for excess range delays due to the dry air, water vapor, and liquid water content of the atmosphere. Calculations based on representative values of atmospheric parameters are useful for illustrating the order of magnitude of the expected delays. Range delay, time delay, and phase delay are simply and directly related. Doppler frequency variations or noise are proportional to the time rate of change of excess range delay. Tropospheric effects were examined as part of an overall consideration of the capability of precision two way ranging and Doppler systems.

  1. The effects of practice and delay on motor skill learning and retention.

    PubMed

    Savion-Lemieux, Tal; Penhune, Virginia B

    2005-03-01

    The present study assessed the effects of amount of practice and length of delay on the learning and retention of a timed motor sequence task. Participants learned to reproduce ten-element visual sequences by tapping in synchrony with the stimulus. Participants were randomly assigned to a varied-practice condition or a varied-delay condition. In the varied-practice condition, participants received either one, three, or six blocks of practice followed by a fixed 4-week delayed-recall. In the varied-delay condition, participants received three blocks of practice followed by a varied delay of either 3 days, or 2, 4, or 8 weeks. Learning was assessed by changes in accuracy, response variance, and percent response asynchrony. Our results showed that amount of practice per se did not affect learning and retention of the task. Rather, distribution of practice over several days was the most important factor affecting learning and retention. We hypothesize that passage of time is essential for a maximum benefit of practice to be gained, as the time delay may allow for consolidation of learning, possibly reflecting plastic changes in motor cortical representations of the skill. With regards to delay, our findings suggest that explicit and motoric components of a motor sequence are likely to be learned and maintained in separate but interacting systems. First, only the longest delay group showed decrements in percent correct, indicating that longer lengths of delay might hinder retrieval of explicit aspects of the task. Second, all groups showed a decrement in percent response asynchrony, suggesting that synchronization may be a more difficult parameter to maintain because it relies heavily on sensorimotor integration. PMID:15551084

  2. The effects of the delays on systems subject to manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental study to determine the effects of time delays in manual control systems. A simple, fixed-base laboratory simulation facility is used for determining pilot dynamics and tracking performance in a series of single-axis, compensatory tracking tasks. In these tasks, three time-delay values and three controlled-element dynamics are used. The delays are chosen to encompass values encountered in experimental and operational aircraft. It is noted that the controlled-element dynamics replicate those found in many previous manual control studies, that is, the classical displacement, rate, and acceleration control systems. The experimental effort is complemented with an analytical pilot modeling study where the parameters of a structural model of the human pilot are adjusted so as to provide excellent matches to the experimentally determined pilot dynamics. The experimental and analytical studies both indicate that time delays cause significant changes in pilot equalization requirements.

  3. Simulation evaluation of the effects of time delay and motion on rotorcraft handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David G.; Hoh, Roger H.; Atencio, Adolph, Jr.; Key, David L.

    1991-01-01

    A study aimed at determining the effects of simulator characteristics on perceived handling qualities is discussed. Evaluations were conducted with a baseline set of rotorcraft dynamics, using a simple transfer-function model of an uncoupled helicopter, under different conditions of visual and overall time delays. As the visual and motion parameters were changed, differences in pilot opinion were found reflecting a change in the pilots' perceptions of handling qualities, rather than changes in the aircraft model itself. It is concluded that it is necessary to tailor the motion washout dynamics to suit the task, with reduced washouts for precision maneuvering as compared to aggressive maneuvering. Visual-delay data suggest that it may be better to allow some time delay in the visual path to minimize the mismatch between visual and motion, rather than eliminate the visual delay entirely through lead compensation.

  4. Effectiveness of brief time-out with and without contingent delay: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mace, F C; Page, T J; Ivancic, M T; O'Brien, S

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated a commonly used component of brief time-out, in which release from time-out is delayed contingent on the occurrence of disruption. Data were collected for one normal and two mentally retarded children on time-out-producing behaviors (aggression and disruption) as well as delay-producing behaviors during time-out (loud vocalizations, out-of-chair, aggression, and disruption). The results of a combination ABAC reversal and multiple-baseline design indicated that, under the conditions used in this investigation, both delay and no delay variations were effective in reducing the frequency of the target behaviors. Implications for the use of time-out to reduce aberrant behaviors are discussed. PMID:3710950

  5. Effect of daily morphine administration and its discontinuation on delay discounting of food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2016-04-01

    Opioid abusers discount delayed reinforcers more rapidly than nonusers; however, it is unclear whether chronic drug administration or its discontinuation impacts discounting. This study examined the impact of daily morphine administration and its discontinuation on delay discounting of food in rhesus monkeys. Responding on one lever delivered one food pellet immediately; responding on another lever delivered two food pellets either immediately or after a delay (30-120 s) that increased within the session. Monkeys (n=3) responded for the large reinforcer when both reinforcers were delivered immediately and more for the smaller, immediately available reinforcer as the delay to delivery of the large reinforcer increased. When administered acutely, morphine (0.032-5.6 mg/kg) increased trial omissions and had variable effects on choice, with small doses decreasing and large doses increasing choice of the large delayed reinforcer. Chronic morphine administration (0.1 mg/kg/day to 3.2 mg/kg twice daily) reduced choice of the large delayed reinforcer in two monkeys, while increasing choice in a third monkey. Despite the development of tolerance to some effects (i.e. rightward shifts in dose-effect curves for the number of trials omitted) and evidence of mild opioid dependence (e.g. decrease in the number of trials completed, as well as body weight), discontinuation of treatment did not appear to systematically impact discounting. Overall, these results suggest that repeated opioid administration causes persistent effects on choice under a delay discounting procedure; however, differences in the direction of effect among individuals suggest that factors other than, or in addition to, changes in discounting might play a role. PMID:26397762

  6. Effect of the Colorado River Diversion on Matagorda Bay Epifauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilber, D. H.; Bass, R.

    1998-09-01

    The effect on epifauna of the Colorado River diversion, which restored river flow to Matagorda Bay, Texas, U.S.A. was assessed using three independent data sets and analytical approaches. A monitoring study conducted by the Galveston District, U.S. Corps of Engineers, revealed lower croaker and brown shrimp abundances for 3 years following the diversion compared to their abundances during 3 pre-diversion years. No changes in the abundances of white shrimp, blue crabs and spot were evident in this monitoring study. The relative distributions of these common epifaunal organisms within the eastern arm of the bay, where the redirected river-mouth empties, did not change following the diversion. Analyses of data (1982-1995) from a long-term trawl-survey programme conducted by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) indicated that the catches of common epibenthic organisms in the eastern arm of the bay following the diversion were also within the range of historic variation. Species richness decreased significantly at the eastern stations where salinities were lower following the diversion. Commercial fishery landings of most species in the post-diversion period were within the range of historic variation. Oyster landings, however, were consistently low for the 4 years for which post-diversion data were available, probably because previously harvestable reefs were lost to sedimentation and burial close to the redirected river mouth. Prior to the diversion (1970-1991), oyster landings were negatively associated with the same year's maximum annual river flows and the duration of low flows (<14 m 3 s -1) 2 years previous ( r2=0·63, P<0·001). The regression results indicate that post-diversion increases in freshwater inflows during low flow periods will likely benefit oyster harvests 2 years later Increases to oyster yields may take several more years to be realized and will be contingent upon the success of harvests from the newly created oyster reefs along the

  7. The Effect of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Activity in the Temporal Lobe while Speaking: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takaso, Hideki; Eisner, Frank; Wise, Richard J. S.; Scott, Sophie K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback is a technique that can improve fluency in stutterers, while disrupting fluency in many nonstuttering individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the neural basis for the detection of and compensation for such a delay, and the effects of increases in the delay duration. Method: Positron emission…

  8. 77 FR 60040 - Wage Methodology for the Temporary Non-Agricultural Employment H-2B Program; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ..., effective January 1, 2012, amended to September 30, 2011, at 76 FR 45667, August 1, 2011, delayed until November 30, 2011, at 76 FR 59896 (September 28, 2011), delayed until January 1, 2012, at 76 FR 73508 (November 29, 2011), and delayed until October 1, 2012 at 76 FR 82115 (December 30, 2011), is...

  9. Effects of large herbivores on grassland arthropod diversity

    PubMed Central

    van Klink, R; van der Plas, F; van Noordwijk, C G E (Toos); WallisDeVries, M F; Olff, H

    2015-01-01

    Both arthropods and large grazing herbivores are important components and drivers of biodiversity in grassland ecosystems, but a synthesis of how arthropod diversity is affected by large herbivores has been largely missing. To fill this gap, we conducted a literature search, which yielded 141 studies on this topic of which 24 simultaneously investigated plant and arthropod diversity. Using the data from these 24 studies, we compared the responses of plant and arthropod diversity to an increase in grazing intensity. This quantitative assessment showed no overall significant effect of increasing grazing intensity on plant diversity, while arthropod diversity was generally negatively affected. To understand these negative effects, we explored the mechanisms by which large herbivores affect arthropod communities: direct effects, changes in vegetation structure, changes in plant community composition, changes in soil conditions, and cascading effects within the arthropod interaction web. We identify three main factors determining the effects of large herbivores on arthropod diversity: (i) unintentional predation and increased disturbance, (ii) decreases in total resource abundance for arthropods (biomass) and (iii) changes in plant diversity, vegetation structure and abiotic conditions. In general, heterogeneity in vegetation structure and abiotic conditions increases at intermediate grazing intensity, but declines at both low and high grazing intensity. We conclude that large herbivores can only increase arthropod diversity if they cause an increase in (a)biotic heterogeneity, and then only if this increase is large enough to compensate for the loss of total resource abundance and the increased mortality rate. This is expected to occur only at low herbivore densities or with spatio-temporal variation in herbivore densities. As we demonstrate that arthropod diversity is often more negatively affected by grazing than plant diversity, we strongly recommend considering the

  10. Effects of large herbivores on grassland arthropod diversity.

    PubMed

    van Klink, R; van der Plas, F; van Noordwijk, C G E Toos; WallisDeVries, M F; Olff, H

    2015-05-01

    Both arthropods and large grazing herbivores are important components and drivers of biodiversity in grassland ecosystems, but a synthesis of how arthropod diversity is affected by large herbivores has been largely missing. To fill this gap, we conducted a literature search, which yielded 141 studies on this topic of which 24 simultaneously investigated plant and arthropod diversity. Using the data from these 24 studies, we compared the responses of plant and arthropod diversity to an increase in grazing intensity. This quantitative assessment showed no overall significant effect of increasing grazing intensity on plant diversity, while arthropod diversity was generally negatively affected. To understand these negative effects, we explored the mechanisms by which large herbivores affect arthropod communities: direct effects, changes in vegetation structure, changes in plant community composition, changes in soil conditions, and cascading effects within the arthropod interaction web. We identify three main factors determining the effects of large herbivores on arthropod diversity: (i) unintentional predation and increased disturbance, (ii) decreases in total resource abundance for arthropods (biomass) and (iii) changes in plant diversity, vegetation structure and abiotic conditions. In general, heterogeneity in vegetation structure and abiotic conditions increases at intermediate grazing intensity, but declines at both low and high grazing intensity. We conclude that large herbivores can only increase arthropod diversity if they cause an increase in (a)biotic heterogeneity, and then only if this increase is large enough to compensate for the loss of total resource abundance and the increased mortality rate. This is expected to occur only at low herbivore densities or with spatio-temporal variation in herbivore densities. As we demonstrate that arthropod diversity is often more negatively affected by grazing than plant diversity, we strongly recommend considering the

  11. The Effects of Discipline Responses in Delaying Toddler Misbehavior Recurrences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larzelere, Robert E.; Schneider, William N.; Larson, David B.; Pike, Patricia L.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the effectiveness of maternal punishment (time out, spanking), reasoning, and a combination of the two. Results based on mothers' (N=40) structured diaries of toddler fighting and disobedience indicate that mild punishment, combined with reasoning, is an effective discipline response to toddler misbehavior in terms of recurrence of…

  12. Learning from Feedback: Spacing and the Delay-Retention Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Troy A.; Kimball, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of…

  13. Evaluation of delayed effects of ionizing radiation: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A M

    1991-01-01

    It is widely assumed that after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki there were no lasting effects of the acute injuries (which included extensive damage to blood forming tissues by the radiation) or the massively high death rate (which was caused by environmental effects of the blast as well as personal injuries). However, close inspection of the dose response curves for non-cancer deaths has shown that this could be a false impression caused by one effect of marrow aplasia being confused with leukemia (defective erythropoiesis) and a second effect being confused with early selection in favor of general fitness (defective immune responses). Possible consequences of such confusion (for cancer risk coefficients) are discussed in relation to what is known about late effects of prenatal x-rays and occupational exposures to radiation. PMID:1805618

  14. Working-Memory Training: Effects on Delay Discounting in Male Long Evans Rats

    PubMed Central

    Renda, C. Renee; Stein, Jeffrey S.; Madden, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting describes the devaluation of a reward as the delay to the receipt of the reward increases. Because steep delay discounting is robustly correlated with a number of behavioral problems (e.g., substance dependence, gambling) and some evidence suggests steep discounting precedes and predicts drug-taking in humans and rats, this study sought to experimentally reduce rats' delay discounting. Human stimulant-dependent participants given working-memory training reportedly decreased their rates of discounting relative to a sham-training group (Bickel, Yi, Landes, Hill, & Baxter, 2011). To evaluate the cross-species generality of this effect, 38 male Long-Evans rats, matched on pretraining delay-discounting rates, were randomly assigned to receive 140 sessions of working-memory training or sham training (which required no memory of the sample stimulus). Large between-group differences in working memory were observed after training; however, posttraining delay-discounting rates were undifferentiated across groups. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:25418508

  15. Effects of delayed gastric emptying on postprandial glucose kinetics, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, Ling; Schiavon, Michele; Mallad, Ashwini; Man, Chiara Dalla; Basu, Rita; Bharucha, Adil. E.; Cobelli, Claudio; Carter, Rickey E.; Basu, Ananda

    2014-01-01

    Controlling meal-related glucose excursions continues to be a therapeutic challenge in diabetes mellitus. Mechanistic reasons for this need to be understood better to develop appropriate therapies. To investigate delayed gastric emptying effects on postprandial glucose turnover, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell responsivity and function, as a feasibility study prior to studying patients with type 1 diabetes, we used the triple tracer technique C-peptide and oral minimal model approach in healthy subjects. A single dose of 30 μg of pramlintide administered at the start of a mixed meal was used to delay gastric emptying rates. With delayed gastric emptying rates, peak rate of meal glucose appearance was delayed, and rate of endogenous glucose production (EGP) was lower. C-peptide and oral minimal models enabled the assessments of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell responsivity simultaneously. Delayed gastric emptying induced by pramlintide improved total insulin sensitivity and decreased total β-cell responsivity. However, β-cell function as measured by total disposition index did not change. The improved whole body insulin sensitivity coupled with lower rate of appearance of EGP with delayed gastric emptying provides experimental proof of the importance of evaluating pramlintide in artificial endocrine pancreas approaches to reduce postprandial blood glucose variability in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25074985

  16. Effects of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic resin modified glass ionomer adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Danielle Wiggins

    This study examined the effect of varying delayed polymerization times in combination with bracket manipulation on shear bond strength (SBS), degree of conversion (DC), and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score when using a resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) adhesive. Specimens were divided into three groups of clinically relevant delay times (0.5, 2, and 4-min) to simulate the delay that frequently occurs between bracket placement and manipulation and subsequent light curing. Based on an analysis of variance (alpha=.05), the SBS was not significantly different between the three groups. While one of the goals of this study was to be the first study to quantify DC of RMGI using Raman microspectroscopy, several challenges, including weak peak signal with and without fluorescence, were encountered and as a result, DC could not be determined. A significant difference (p<0.05) in ARI score was detected between the 0.5-min and 4.0-min delay groups with more adhesive remaining on the bracket with increasing delay time. A Spearman correlation between SBS and ARI indicated no positive association between SBS and ARI measures across delay times. The results of this study suggest that clinically relevant delay times of 0.5, 2, and 4-min do not negatively impact the SBS of a RMGI adhesive. However, with increasing delay time, the results suggest that more adhesive might remain on the bracket during debonding. With more adhesive remaining on the bracket, this could be beneficial in that less adhesive needs to be removed from enamel by grinding at the time of bracket removal when orthodontic treatment is completed.

  17. Time delay in photoionization in Ne: Effect of different types of correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Ankur; Saha, Soumyajit; Dutta, Narenda Nath; Ganesan, Aarthi; Deshmukh, P. C.; Dolmatov, V. K.; Kheifets, A. S.; Manson, S. T.

    2015-05-01

    Various effects on time delay in photoionization, such as many body correlations, relativity, Cooper minima, autoionizing resonances, etc.,. have been studied. Here we investigate the effects of correlation on time delay using relativistic randon phase approximation (RRPA), RRPA with relaxation (RRPA-R) muticonfiguration Tamm Dancoff (MCTD) (configuration interaction) and many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). Ne is chosen since it has been studied extensively. In an earlier study a truncated RRPA calculation on Ne showed an increase in time delay near the 2s threshold as compared to a nonrelativistic calculation. In the present work, a full RRPA calculation is studied to explore the interchannel coupling effects in the vicinity of the 1s threshold.

  18. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  19. Population diversity and the portfolio effect in an exploited species.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel E; Hilborn, Ray; Chasco, Brandon; Boatright, Christopher P; Quinn, Thomas P; Rogers, Lauren A; Webster, Michael S

    2010-06-01

    One of the most pervasive themes in ecology is that biological diversity stabilizes ecosystem processes and the services they provide to society, a concept that has become a common argument for biodiversity conservation. Species-rich communities are thought to produce more temporally stable ecosystem services because of the complementary or independent dynamics among species that perform similar ecosystem functions. Such variance dampening within communities is referred to as a portfolio effect and is analogous to the effects of asset diversity on the stability of financial portfolios. In ecology, these arguments have focused on the effects of species diversity on ecosystem stability but have not considered the importance of biologically relevant diversity within individual species. Current rates of population extirpation are probably at least three orders of magnitude higher than species extinction rates, so there is a pressing need to clarify how population and life history diversity affect the performance of individual species in providing important ecosystem services. Here we use five decades of data from Oncorhynchus nerka (sockeye salmon) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, to provide the first quantification of portfolio effects that derive from population and life history diversity in an important and heavily exploited species. Variability in annual Bristol Bay salmon returns is 2.2 times lower than it would be if the system consisted of a single homogenous population rather than the several hundred discrete populations it currently consists of. Furthermore, if it were a single homogeneous population, such increased variability would lead to ten times more frequent fisheries closures. Portfolio effects are also evident in watershed food webs, where they stabilize and extend predator access to salmon resources. Our results demonstrate the critical importance of maintaining population diversity for stabilizing ecosystem services and securing the economies and livelihoods

  20. Assessing the Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Language Delayed Children: A Clinical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkus, Gila; Tilley, Ciara; Thomas, Catherine; Hockey, Hannah; Kennedy, Anna; Arnold, Tina; Thorburn, Blair; Jones, Katie; Patel, Bhavika; Pimenta, Claire; Shah, Rena; Tweedie, Fiona; O'Brien, Felicity; Leahy, Ruth; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We investigated the effects of PCIT as…

  1. The Effects of Social Skills Groups for Young Children with Social Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted as a program evaluation of an existing social skills program. A review of literature identified a limited number of empirical studies on group-based social skills training for young children with social delays. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of social skills groups as well as the effects of homework…

  2. The effects of real versus hypothetical reward on delay and probability discounting.

    PubMed

    Hinvest, Neal S; Anderson, Ian M

    2010-06-01

    Delay discounting and probability discounting tasks providing hypothetical rewards have commonly been used to measure levels of impulsivity and risk taking. Results have been inconsistent as to whether real, compared with hypothetical, rewards influence choice behaviour in delay discounting tasks. This experiment examined choice behaviour in 38 healthy individuals using delay and probability discounting tasks involving both real and hypothetical rewards (pound sterling 0.10/pound sterling 0.20), real delays, and probabilistic outcomes. It was hypothesized that choice behaviour when receiving real rewards would be less impulsive and less risky than when receiving hypothetical rewards. The tasks were designed so that a mathematical model (the multiplicative hyperbolic model of choice) could be applied to assess effects on discounting parameters. The provision of real rewards was associated with significantly decreased impulsive, but not risky, choice although the size of effect was small and was influenced by the order of presentation. Repeated presentation of both tasks increased quantity discounting but not delay or probability discounting parameters. These results indicate that the nature of the reward provided, and repetition effects, need to be taken into account when designing discounting studies. PMID:19890767

  3. Eutrophication weakens stabilizing effects of diversity in natural grasslands.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Yann; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Adler, Peter B; Harpole, W Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; MacDougall, Andrew S; Stevens, Carly J; Bakker, Jonathan D; Buckley, Yvonne M; Chu, Chengjin; Collins, Scott L; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Jin, Virginia L; Klein, Julia A; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Li, Wei; McCulley, Rebecca L; Melbourne, Brett A; Moore, Joslin L; O'Halloran, Lydia R; Prober, Suzanne M; Risch, Anita C; Sankaran, Mahesh; Schuetz, Martin; Hector, Andy

    2014-04-24

    Studies of experimental grassland communities have demonstrated that plant diversity can stabilize productivity through species asynchrony, in which decreases in the biomass of some species are compensated for by increases in others. However, it remains unknown whether these findings are relevant to natural ecosystems, especially those for which species diversity is threatened by anthropogenic global change. Here we analyse diversity-stability relationships from 41 grasslands on five continents and examine how these relationships are affected by chronic fertilization, one of the strongest drivers of species loss globally. Unmanipulated communities with more species had greater species asynchrony, resulting in more stable biomass production, generalizing a result from biodiversity experiments to real-world grasslands. However, fertilization weakened the positive effect of diversity on stability. Contrary to expectations, this was not due to species loss after eutrophication but rather to an increase in the temporal variation of productivity in combination with a decrease in species asynchrony in diverse communities. Our results demonstrate separate and synergistic effects of diversity and eutrophication on stability, emphasizing the need to understand how drivers of global change interactively affect the reliable provisioning of ecosystem services in real-world systems. PMID:24531763

  4. The Instructional Effect of Color in Immediate and Delayed Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamberski, Richard J.

    The effect of verbal and visual (color or black/white) coding strategies in self-paced instruction and test materials in facilitating student retention on different cognitive tasks was studied. The 176 college student subjects received instruction and testing using varied combinations of color or black/white materials. Instructional materials were…

  5. Glucocorticoids Protect Against the Delayed Behavioral and Cellular Effects of Acute Stress on the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P.; Anilkumar, Shobha; McEwen, Bruce; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2013-01-01

    Background A single episode of acute immobilization stress has previously been shown to trigger a delayed onset of anxiety-like behavior and spinogenesis in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of rats. Spurred on by a seemingly paradoxical observation in which even a modest increase in corticosterone (CORT), caused by a single vehicle injection before stress, could dampen the delayed effects of stress, we hypothesized a protective role for glucocorticoids against stress. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analyzing how manipulations in CORT levels modulate delayed increase in anxiety-like behavior of rats on the elevated plus-maze 10 days after acute stress. We also investigated the cellular correlates of different levels of anxiety under different CORT conditions by quantifying spine density on Golgi-stained BLA principal neurons. Results CORT in drinking water for 12 hours preceding acute stress prevented delayed increase in anxiety rather than exacerbating it. Conversely, vehicle injection failed to prevent the anxiogenic effect of stress in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats. However, when CORT was restored in adrenalectomized rats by injection, the delayed anxiogenic effect of stress was once again blocked. Finally, high and low anxiety states were accompanied by high and low levels of BLA spine density. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the presence of elevated levels of CORT at the time of acute stress confers protection against the delayed enhancing effect of stress on BLA synaptic connectivity and anxiety-like behavior. These observations are consistent with clinical reports on the protective effects of glucocorticoids against the development of posttraumatic symptoms triggered by traumatic stress. PMID:22572034

  6. Automated problem scheduling and reduction of synchronization delay effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.

    1987-01-01

    It is anticipated that in order to make effective use of many future high performance architectures, programs will have to exhibit at least a medium grained parallelism. A framework is presented for partitioning very sparse triangular systems of linear equations that is designed to produce favorable preformance results in a wide variety of parallel architectures. Efficient methods for solving these systems are of interest because: (1) they provide a useful model problem for use in exploring heuristics for the aggregation, mapping and scheduling of relatively fine grained computations whose data dependencies are specified by directed acrylic graphs, and (2) because such efficient methods can find direct application in the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. Simple expressions are derived that describe how to schedule computational work with varying degrees of granularity. The Encore Multimax was used as a hardware simulator to investigate the performance effects of using the partitioning techniques presented in shared memory architectures with varying relative synchronization costs.

  7. The effects of physical activity on impulsive choice: Influence of sensitivity to reinforcement amount and delay.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Justin C; Feinstein, Max A; Lacy, Ryan T; Smith, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Impulsive choice is a diagnostic feature and/or complicating factor for several psychological disorders and may be examined in the laboratory using delay-discounting procedures. Recent investigators have proposed using quantitative measures of analysis to examine the behavioral processes contributing to impulsive choice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of physical activity (i.e., wheel running) on impulsive choice in a single-response, discrete-trial procedure using two quantitative methods of analysis. To this end, rats were assigned to physical activity or sedentary groups and trained to respond in a delay-discounting procedure. In this procedure, one lever always produced one food pellet immediately, whereas a second lever produced three food pellets after a 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80-s delay. Estimates of sensitivity to reinforcement amount and sensitivity to reinforcement delay were determined using (1) a simple linear analysis and (2) an analysis of logarithmically transformed response ratios. Both analyses revealed that physical activity decreased sensitivity to reinforcement amount and sensitivity to reinforcement delay. These findings indicate that (1) physical activity has significant but functionally opposing effects on the behavioral processes that contribute to impulsive choice and (2) both quantitative methods of analysis are appropriate for use in single-response, discrete-trial procedures. PMID:26964905

  8. Discounting of delayed food rewards in pigeons and rats: is there a magnitude effect?

    PubMed Central

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Holt, Daniel D; Slevin, John R; Estle, Sara J

    2004-01-01

    Temporal discounting refers to the decrease in the present, subjective value of a reward as the time to its receipt increases. Results from humans have shown that a hyperbola-like function describes the form of the discounting function when choices involve hypothetical monetary rewards. In addition, magnitude effects have been reported in which smaller reward amounts are discounted more steeply than larger amounts. The present research examines the cross-species generality of these findings using real rewards, namely food pellets, with both pigeons and rats. As with humans, an adjusting amount procedure was used to estimate the amount of immediate reward judged equal in value to a delayed reward. Different amounts of delayed food rewards (ranging from 5 to 32 pellets in pigeons and from 5 to 20 pellets in rats) were studied at delays varying from 1 s to 32 s. A simple hyperbola, similar to the hyperbola-like mathematical function that describes the discounting of hypothetical monetary rewards in humans, described the discounting of food rewards in both pigeons and rats. These results extend the generality of the mathematical model of discounting. Rates of discounting delayed food rewards were higher for pigeons than for rats. Unlike humans, however, neither pigeons nor rats showed a reliable magnitude effect: Rate of discounting did not vary systematically as a function of the amount of the delayed reward. PMID:15113132

  9. Effect of Landscape Structure on Species Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Paulo R. A.; Rosas, Alexandre; de Oliveira, Viviane M.; Gomes, Marcelo A. F.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of habitat fragmentation and their implications for biodiversity is a central issue in conservation biology which still lacks an overall comprehension. There is not yet a clear consensus on how to quantify fragmentation even though it is quite common to couple the effects of habitat loss with habitat fragmentation on biodiversity. Here we address the spatial patterns of species distribution in fragmented landscapes, assuming a neutral community model. To build up the fragmented landscapes, we employ the fractional Brownian motion approach, which in turn permits us to tune the amount of habitat loss and degree of clumping of the landscape independently. The coupling between the neutral community model, here simulated by means of the coalescent method, and fractal neutral landscape models enables us to address how the species–area relationship changes as the spatial patterns of a landscape is varied. The species–area relationship is one of the most fundamental laws in ecology, considered as a central tool in conservation biology, and is used to predict species loss following habitat disturbances. Our simulation results indicate that the level of clumping has a major role in shaping the species–area relationship. For instance, more compact landscapes are more sensitive to the effects of habitat loss and speciation rate. Besides, the level of clumping determines the existence and extension of the power-law regime which is expected to hold at intermediate scales. The distributions of species abundance are strongly influenced by the degree of fragmentation. We also show that the first and second commonest species have approximately self-similar spatial distributions across scales, with the fractal dimensions of the support of the first and second commonest species being very robust to changes in the spatial patterns of the landscape. PMID:23840490

  10. Binaural interaction in low-frequency neurons in inferior colliculus of the cat. I. Effects of long interaural delays, intensity, and repetition rate on interaural delay function.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, S; Yin, T C

    1983-10-01

    Detailed, quantitative studies were made of the interaural phase sensitivity of 197 neurons with low best frequency in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the barbiturate-anesthetized cat. We analyzed the responses of single cells to interaural delays in which tone bursts were delivered to the two ears via sealed earphones and the onset of the tone to one ear with respect to the other was varied. For most (80%) cells the discharge rate is a cyclic function of interaural delay at a period corresponding to that of the stimulating frequency. The cyclic nature of the interaural delay curve indicates that these cells are sensitive to the interaural phase difference. These cells are distributed throughout the low-frequency zone of the IC, but they are less numerous in the medial and caudal zones. Cells with a wide variety of response patterns will exhibit interaural phase sensitivities at stimulating frequencies up to 3,100 Hz, although above 2,500 Hz the number of such cells decrease markedly. Using dichotic stimuli we could study the cell's sensitivity to the onset delay and interaural phase independently. The large majority of IC cells respond only to changes in interaural phase, with no sensitivity to the onset delay. However, a small number (7%) of cells exhibit a sensitivity to the onset delay as well as to the interaural phase disparity, and most of these cells show an onset response. The effects of changing the stimulus intensity equally to both ears or of changing the interaural intensity difference on the mean interaural phase were studied. While some neurons are not affected by level changes, others exhibit systematic phase shifts for both average and interaural intensity variations, and there is a continuous distribution of sensitivities between these extremes. A few cells also showed systematic changes in the shape of the interaural delay curves as a function of interaural intensity difference, especially at very long delays. These shifts can be interpreted as a

  11. Process-dependent risk of delayed health effects for welders.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R M

    1981-01-01

    In most industrialized countries large numbers of workers are exposed to welding fumes. Although the general pattern of welders' health may not significantly differ from that of workers in other dusty industrial occupations which demonstrate elevated incidence of respiratory tract diseases with long latency periods, the extremely wide range of substances at potentially high concentrations produced by various welding technologies may give rise to undetected process-specific high-risk working conditions: ("hot spots"). The origin, prevalence and range of magnitude of such hot spots, especially for cancer of the respiratory tract, is discussed, with emphasis placed on the assessment of risk resulting from exposure to Cr(VI) and Ni accompanying the use of various technologies for the welding of stainless and high alloy steels. The wide variation of health effects found within the industry, however, indicates the need for a standard protocol for future epidemiological studies, as well as for the development of suitable methodologies for experimental risk assessment. PMID:7333241

  12. Effects of stomatal delays on the economics of leaf gas exchange under intermittent light regimes.

    PubMed

    Vico, Giulia; Manzoni, Stefano; Palmroth, Sari; Katul, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    • Understory plants are subjected to highly intermittent light availability and their leaf gas exchanges are mediated by delayed responses of stomata and leaf biochemistry to light fluctuations. In this article, the patterns in stomatal delays across biomes and plant functional types were studied and their effects on leaf carbon gains and water losses were quantified. • A database of more than 60 published datasets on stomatal responses to light fluctuations was assembled. To interpret these experimental observations, a leaf gas exchange model was developed and coupled to a novel formulation of stomatal movement energetics. The model was used to test whether stomatal delays optimize light capture for photosynthesis, whilst limiting transpiration and carbon costs for stomatal movement. • The data analysis showed that stomatal opening and closing delays occurred over a limited range of values and were strongly correlated. Plant functional type and climate were the most important drivers of stomatal delays, with faster responses in graminoids and species from dry climates. • Although perfectly tracking stomata would maximize photosynthesis and minimize transpiration at the expense of large opening costs, the observed combinations of opening and closure times appeared to be consistent with a near-optimal balance of carbon gain, water loss and movement costs. PMID:21851359

  13. A Time-Delayed Mathematical Model for Tumor Growth with the Effect of a Periodic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihe; Wei, Xiangqing; Zhang, Fangwei

    2016-01-01

    A time-delayed mathematical model for tumor growth with the effect of periodic therapy is studied. The establishment of the model is based on the reaction-diffusion dynamics and mass conservation law and is considered with a time delay in cell proliferation process. Sufficient conditions for the global stability of tumor free equilibrium are given. We also prove that if external concentration of nutrients is large the tumor will not disappear and the conditions under which there exist periodic solutions to the model are also determined. Results are illustrated by computer simulations. PMID:27274763

  14. A Time-Delayed Mathematical Model for Tumor Growth with the Effect of a Periodic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shihe; Wei, Xiangqing; Zhang, Fangwei

    2016-01-01

    A time-delayed mathematical model for tumor growth with the effect of periodic therapy is studied. The establishment of the model is based on the reaction-diffusion dynamics and mass conservation law and is considered with a time delay in cell proliferation process. Sufficient conditions for the global stability of tumor free equilibrium are given. We also prove that if external concentration of nutrients is large the tumor will not disappear and the conditions under which there exist periodic solutions to the model are also determined. Results are illustrated by computer simulations. PMID:27274763

  15. Simultaneous and Delayed Video Modeling: An Examination of System Effectiveness and Student Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber-Doughyt, Teresa; Patton, Scott E.; Brennan, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of simultaneous and delayed video modeling when used by three middle-school students with moderate intellectual disabilities was examined. Alternating between modeling systems, students were taught to use the public library computer to locate specific book call numbers and use the Dewey Decimal Classification System to locate…

  16. Effects of delayed winter harvest on biomass yield and quality of napiergrass and energycane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Napiergrass (Cenchrus purpureus Schumach) and energycane (Saccharum hyb.) are high-yielding perennial grasses that are well-suited for biomass production in the southeast USA. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of delayed winter harvest on biomass yield and quality of these two ...

  17. Initial Experiments on the Effects of System Delay on On-Line Problem-Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morfield, M. A.; And Others

    The main purpose of the research reported in this document was to discover whether controlled experiments can be conducted on the relations between people and the complex computing systems which they use. Three increasingly complex experiments were designed to test the effect of varying delays of computer response on the number of commands issues…

  18. Microarray as a First Genetic Test in Global Developmental Delay: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakadis, Yannis; Shevell, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Microarray technology has a significantly higher clinical yield than karyotyping in individuals with global developmental delay (GDD). Despite this, it has not yet been routinely implemented as a screening test owing to the perception that this approach is more expensive. We aimed to evaluate the effect that replacing karyotype with…

  19. Teaching Effectiveness, Course Evaluation, and Academic Performance: The Role of Academic Delay of Gratification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2009-01-01

    Academic delay of gratification is a significant and positive predictor of students' final course grades, even after controlling for the effect of their rating of the course, expected grade, and degree of interest, importance, and utility of the academic task. Students' expected course grades are by far the strongest predictor of their final…

  20. Age of Word Acquisition Effects in Treatment of Children with Phonological Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the age of acquisition (AoA) of words were examined in the clinical treatment of 10 preschool children with phonological delays. Using a single-subject multiple-baseline experimental design, children were enrolled in one of four conditions that varied the AoA of the treated words (early vs. late acquired) relative to their…

  1. Effect of delayed wrapping and wrapping source on digestibility and intake of alfalfa silage in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delays often occur between baling and wrapping during production of baled silage that increases exposure time of the forage to oxygen. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of two different wrapping sources and time intervals between baling and wrapping on intake and digestibility of al...

  2. Effects of wrapping time delays on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silages are an attractive forage conservation option, especially for small and mid-sized beef and dairy producers. Our objectives were to test the effects of delayed wrapping on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages on a pre- and post-storage basis. A secondary objective was to evaluate...

  3. Effects of wrapping time delays on fermentation characteristics of baled alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silage is an attractive forage conservation approach for small and mid-sized dairy or beef producers, partly because it limits the risks associated with baling dry hay during wet or unstable weather conditions. Our objectives were to test the effects of delayed wrapping on silage fermentation,...

  4. 78 FR 6025 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) Temporary Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ...: The effective date of the Final Rules published February 7, 2012 (77 FR 6194) and August 20, 2012 (77 FR 50244) and technical correction published July 10, 2012 (77 FR 40459) is delayed. The Bureau will...-Frank Act. 77 FR 6194 (February Final Rule).\\3\\ On August 20, 2012, the Bureau published a...

  5. The Effects of Behavioral History on Response Acquisition with Immediate and Delayed Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snycerski, Susan; Laraway, Sean; Huitema, Bradley E.; Poling, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Effects of prior exposure to the experimental chamber with levers present or absent and variable-time (VT) 60-s water deliveries arranged during one, five, or no 1-hr sessions were examined in rats during a 6-hr response-acquisition session in which presses on one lever produced water delivery immediately or after a 15-s resetting delay, and…

  6. Electron correlation effects on photoionization time delay in atomic Ar and Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A.; Saha, S.; Decshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Time delay studies in photoionization processes have stimulated much interest as they provide valuable dynamical information about electron correlation and relativistic effects. In a recent work on Wigner time delay in the photoionization of noble gas atoms, it was found that correlations resulting from interchannel coupling involving shells with different principal quantum numbers have significant effects on 2s and 2p photoionization of Ne, 3s photoionization of Ar, and 3d photoionization of Kr. In the present work, photoionization time delay in inner and outer subshells of the noble gases Ar and Xe are examined by including electron correlations using different many body techniques: (i) the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA), (ii) RRPA with relaxation, to include relaxation effects of the residual ion and (iii) the relativistic multiconfiguration Tamm-Dancoff (RMCTD) approximation. The (sometimes substantial) effects of the inclusion of non-RPA correlations on the photoionization Wigner time delay are reported. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  7. Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L.; Di Julio, S.S.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1993-12-03

    Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR=23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

  8. UAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study-2: Effects of Communications Delays and Winds in Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Communications Delays and Winds on Air Traffic Controller ratings of acceptability of horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between UAS and manned aircraft in a simulation of the Dallas-Ft. Worth East-side airspace. Fourteen encounters per hour were staged in the presence of moderate background traffic. Seven recently retired controllers with experience at DFW served as subjects. Guidance provided to the UAS pilots for maintaining a given HMD was provided by information from self-separation algorithms displayed on the Multi-Aircraft Simulation System. Winds tested did not affect the acceptability ratings. Communications delays tested included 0, 400, 1200, and 1800 msec. For longer communications delays, there were changes in strategy and communications flow that were observed and reported by the controllers. The aim of this work is to provide useful information for guiding future rules and regulations applicable to flying UAS in the NAS.

  9. Cutaneous tube ureterostomy: a fast and effective method of urinary diversion in emergency situations

    PubMed Central

    Abdin, Tamer; Zamir, Gideon; Pikarsky, Alon; Katz, Ran; Landau, Ezekiel H; Gofrit, Ofer N

    2015-01-01

    Aim To report on a simple and rapid method of urinary diversion. This method was applied successfully in different clinical scenarios when primary reconstruction of the ureters was not possible. Materials and methods The disconnected ureter is catheterized by a feeding tube. The tube is secured with sutures and brought out to the lateral abdominal wall as cutaneous tube ureterostomy (CTU). Results This method was applied in three different clinical scenarios: a 40-year-old man who sustained multiple high-velocity gunshots to the pelvis with combined rectal and bladder trigone injuries and massive bleeding from a comminuted pubic fracture. Damage control included colostomy and bilateral CTUs. A 26-year-old woman had transection of the right lower ureter during abdominal hysterectomy. Diagnosis was delayed for 3 weeks when the patient developed sepsis. The right kidney was diverted with a CTU. A 37-year-old male suffered from bladder perforation and hemorrhagic shock. Emergency cystectomy was done and urinary diversion was accomplished with bilateral CTUs. In all cases, effective drainage of the urinary system was achieved with normalization of kidney function. Conclusion When local or systemic conditions preclude definitive repair and damage control surgery is needed, CTU provides fast and effective urinary diversion. PMID:26090343

  10. Effect of Cover Crops on Soil Fungal Diversity and Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of various cover crops (sordan, mustard, canola, honeysweet, and fallow) to influence soil fungal biomass and diversity were tested in a potato field in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Soil samples (0-5 cm depth) were randomly selected from each cover crop plot and soil fungal communitie...

  11. Effective Schools for Culturally Diverse Students: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denbo, Sheryl, Comp.

    This 354-item annotated bibliography is intended to help teachers improve the educational experiences of diverse student bodies. Research reports, journal articles, books, and audiovisual materials are briefly described that focus on effective teaching methods for use with minority group students, special needs students, and females. The following…

  12. Effect of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic bracket bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, Michael J.

    This study examined the effect of bracket manipulation in combination with delayed polymerization times on orthodontic bracket shear bond strength and degree of resin composite conversion. Orthodontics brackets were bonded to extracted third molars in a simulated oral environment after a set period of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation. After curing the bracket adhesive, each bracket underwent shear bond strength testing followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis to measure the degree of conversion of the resin composite. Results demonstrated the shear bond strength and the degree of conversion of ceramic brackets did not vary over time. However, with stainless steel brackets there was a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05) of delay time on shear bond strength between the 0.5 min and 10 min bracket groups. In addition, stainless steel brackets showed significant differences related to degree of conversion over time between the 0.5 min and 5 min groups, in addition to the 0.5 min and 10 min groups. This investigation suggests that delaying bracket adhesive polymerization up to a period of 10 min then adjusting the orthodontic bracket may increase both shear bond strength and degree of conversion of stainless steel brackets while having no effect on ceramic brackets.

  13. Effects of selective dopaminergic compounds on a delay-discounting task.

    PubMed

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Newman, Amy H; Grundt, Peter; Rice, Kenner C; Woods, James H

    2011-08-01

    Impulsivity is widely regarded as a multidimensional trait that encompasses two or more distinct patterns of behavior, and dopaminergic systems are implicated in the expression of impulsive behavior in both humans and animal subjects. Impulsive choice, or the tendency to choose rewards associated with relatively little or no delay, has been extensively studied in humans and animal subjects using delay-discounting tasks. Here, delay-discounting procedures were used to assess the effects of receptor-selective dopaminergic agonists, antagonists, and dopamine transporter ligands on choices of immediate versus delayed sucrose pellets. The effects of d-amphetamine, GBR 12909, apomorphine, SKF 81297, sumanirole, pramipexole, ABT-724, SCH 23390, L-741,626, PG01037, and L-745,870 were assessed in 24 Sprague-Dawley rats. The only drugs to affect impulsive choice selectively without altering undelayed choice were the D1-like antagonist, SCH 23390 (0.01 mg/kg), and the D4 partial agonist, ABT-724 (3.2 mg/kg), which both increased impulsive choice. The shared effects of these compounds may be explained by their localization within the prefrontal cortex on different groups of neurons. None of the selective agonists and antagonists tested reduced impulsive choice, so further research is needed to determine if direct dopaminergic agonists or antagonists may be therapeutically useful in the treatment of impulse-control disorders. PMID:21694584

  14. A dynamic multilevel model of demographic diversity and misfit effects.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Joshua M; Schmitt, Neal

    2005-03-01

    In this study, the authors proposed and evaluated the linkages of a dynamic multilevel model of demographic diversity and misfit effects in a large sample of quick-service restaurants. Using a cross-level approach, the authors studied an employee's demographic misfit in relation to coworkers' demographics as a predictor of turnover risk over time. At the business-unit level, they studied changes in restaurant demographic diversity in relation to changes in profitability over time and unit turnover rates in relation to profitability. The authors also studied the impact of the match between the racial compositions of the restaurants and their communities on profitability. The results supported linkages between demographic misfit and turnover and partially supported a negative association between racial diversity and changes in profitability. PMID:15769233

  15. Delayed conifer mortality after fuel reduction treatments: Interactive effects of fuel, fire intensity, and bark beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youngblood, A.; Grace, J.B.; Mciver, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Many low-elevation dry forests of the western United States contain more small trees and fewer large trees, more down woody debris, and less diverse and vigorous understory plant communities compared to conditions under historical fire regimes. These altered structural conditions may contribute to increased probability of unnaturally severe wildfires, susceptibility to uncharacteristic insect outbreaks, and drought-related mortality. Broad-scale fuel reduction and restoration treatments are proposed to promote stand development on trajectories toward more sustainable structures. Little research to date, however, has quantified the effects of these treatments on the ecosystem, especially delayed and latent tree mortality resulting directly or indirectly from treatments. In this paper, we explore complex hypotheses relating to the cascade of effects that influence ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mortality using structural equation modeling (SEM). We used annual census and plot data through six growing seasons after thinning and four growing seasons after burning from a replicated, operational-scale, completely randomized experiment conducted in northeastern Oregon, USA, as part of the national Fire and Fire Surrogate study. Treatments included thin, burn, thin followed by burn (thin+burn), and control. Burn and thin+burn treatments increased the proportion of dead trees while the proportion of dead trees declined or remained constant in thin and control units, although the density of dead trees was essentially unchanged with treatment. Most of the new mortality (96%) occurred within two years of treatment and was attributed to bark beetles. Bark beetle-caused tree mortality, while low overall, was greatest in thin + burn treatments. SEM results indicate that the probability of mortality of large-diameter ponderosa pine from bark beetles and wood borers was directly related to surface fire severity and bole charring, which in

  16. Depth in anticorrelated stereograms: effects of spatial density and interocular delay.

    PubMed

    Cogan, A I; Lomakin, A J; Rossi, A F

    1993-09-01

    Disparity-based depth is not perceived in densely textured, anticorrelated random-dot stereograms (RDSs) whose elements carry opposite signs of brightness contrast on corresponding loci, as extant data show. We observed global depth in anticorrelated RDSs flashed repetitively with an interocular delay. During the delay time, a dot array in one eye was paired with a gray frame in the other eye and thus could interact with the negative afterimage of the contralateral dot array. A correlated RDS (e.g. 8 min arc dots, 50% density, 15-msec flash duration) lost depth with delays > 45 msec. An anticorrelated RDS, that was otherwise identical, showed robust depth when flashed with an interocular delay of some 60 msec. A delay was not always necessary to produce depth. At low dot density (1-2%), anticorrelated RDSs showed disparity-dependent local depth even when displayed continuously, or flashed simultaneously; as dot density alone was increased, depth was progressively lost. To make global depth visible in a dense RDS flashed with an interocular delay, the internal response had to be strongly biphasic. Our results support the generally held notion that cyclopean depth signals emerge exclusively from same-sign binocular cortical filters. However, the exclusionary rule may be invalid with respect to the processing of coarse local depth with figural stimuli. Relative depth between a pair of small dots was easily perceived when one of the dots was in opposite contrast, but the depth threshold was then about 0.5 log unit higher than with the same-contrast pair of dots indicating that the internal effects of contrast have not all lost their sign prior to binocular disparity processing. It remains to be determined whether depth can be perceived from edges of opposite contrast. PMID:8249313

  17. Predator diversity effects in an exotic freshwater food web.

    PubMed

    Naddafi, Rahmat; Rudstam, Lars G

    2013-01-01

    Cascading trophic interactions are often defined as the indirect effects of a predator on primary producers through the effect of the predator on herbivores. These effects can be both direct through removal of herbivores [density-mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs)] or indirect through changes in the behavior of the herbivores [trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs)]. How the relative importance of these two indirect interactions varies with predator diversity remains poorly understood. We tested the effect of predator diversity on both TMIIs and DMIIs on phytoplankton using two competitive invasive dreissenid mussel species (zebra mussel and quagga mussel) as the herbivores and combinations of one, two or all three species of the predators pumpkinseed sunfish, round goby, and rusty crayfish. Predators had either direct access to mussels and induced both TMII and DMII, or no direct access and induced only TMII through the presence of risk cues. In both sets of treatments, the predators induced a trophic cascade which resulted in more phytoplankton remaining with predators present than with only mussels present. The trophic cascade was weaker in three-predator and two-predator treatments than in one-predator treatments when predators had direct access to dreissenids (DMIIs and TMIIs). Crayfish had higher cascading effects on phytoplankton than both pumpkinseed and round goby. Increased predator diversity decreased the strength of DMIIs but had no effect on the strength of TMIIs. The strength of TMIIs was higher with zebra than quagga mussels. Our study suggests that inter-specific interference among predators in multi-species treatments weakens the consumptive cascading effects of predation on lower trophic levels whereas the importance of predator diversity on trait mediated effects depends on predator identity. PMID:23991126

  18. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback induces the temporal recalibration effect in both speech perception and production.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawabata, Hideaki

    2014-12-01

    We ordinarily speak fluently, even though our perceptions of our own voices are disrupted by various environmental acoustic properties. The underlying mechanism of speech is supposed to monitor the temporal relationship between speech production and the perception of auditory feedback, as suggested by a reduction in speech fluency when the speaker is exposed to delayed auditory feedback (DAF). While many studies have reported that DAF influences speech motor processing, its relationship to the temporal tuning effect on multimodal integration, or temporal recalibration, remains unclear. We investigated whether the temporal aspects of both speech perception and production change due to adaptation to the delay between the motor sensation and the auditory feedback. This is a well-used method of inducing temporal recalibration. Participants continually read texts with specific DAF times in order to adapt to the delay. Then, they judged the simultaneity between the motor sensation and the vocal feedback. We measured the rates of speech with which participants read the texts in both the exposure and re-exposure phases. We found that exposure to DAF changed both the rate of speech and the simultaneity judgment, that is, participants' speech gained fluency. Although we also found that a delay of 200 ms appeared to be most effective in decreasing the rates of speech and shifting the distribution on the simultaneity judgment, there was no correlation between these measurements. These findings suggest that both speech motor production and multimodal perception are adaptive to temporal lag but are processed in distinct ways. PMID:25106757

  19. The effects of time delay in man-machine control systems: Implications for design of flight simulator Visual-Display-Delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    When human operators are performing precision tracking tasks, their dynamic response can often be modeled by quasilinear describing functions. That fact permits analysis of the effects of delay in certain man machine control systems using linear control system analysis techniques. The analysis indicates that a reduction in system stability is the immediate effect of additional control system delay, and that system characteristics moderate or exaggerate the importance of the delay. A selection of data (simulator and flight test) consistent with the analysis is reviewed. Flight simulator visual-display delay compensation, designed to restore pilot aircraft system stability, was evaluated in several studies which are reviewed here. The studies range from single-axis, tracking-task experiments (with sufficient subjects and trials to establish the statistical significance of the results) to a brief evaluation of compensation of a computer generated imagery (CGI) visual display system in a full six degree of freedom simulation. The compensation was effective, improvements in pilot performance and workload or aircraft handling qualities rating (HQR) were observed. Results from recent aircraft handling qualities research literature, which support the compensation design approach, are also reviewed.

  20. Temperature effects on phytoplankton diversity - The zooplankton link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M.; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lengfellner, Kathrin; Sommer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Recent climate warming is expected to affect phytoplankton biomass and diversity in marine ecosystems. Temperature can act directly on phytoplankton (e.g. rendering physiological processes) or indirectly due to changes in zooplankton grazing activity. We tested experimentally the impact of increased temperature on natural phytoplankton and zooplankton communities using indoor mesocosms and combined the results from different experimental years applying a meta-analytic approach. We divided our analysis into three bloom phases to define the strength of temperature and zooplankton impacts on phytoplankton in different stages of bloom development. Within the constraints of an experiment, our results suggest that increased temperature and zooplankton grazing have similar effects on phytoplankton diversity, which are most apparent in the post-bloom phase, when zooplankton abundances reach the highest values. Moreover, we observed changes in zooplankton composition in response to warming and initial conditions, which can additionally affect phytoplankton diversity, because changing feeding preferences of zooplankton can affect phytoplankton community structure. We conclude that phytoplankton diversity is indirectly affected by temperature in the post-bloom phase through changing zooplankton composition and grazing activities. Before and during the bloom, however, these effects seem to be overruled by temperature enhanced bottom-up processes such as phytoplankton nutrient uptake.

  1. Effect of surgical delay on bacterial colonization in proximal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Blonna, Davide; Barbasetti di Prun, Nicola; Bellato, Enrico; Manino, Laura; Rossi, Roberto; Banche, Giuliana; Allizond, Valeria; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Castoldi, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative infection is a severe complication after proximal humeral fracture surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to determine if the surgical delay could modify the number and type of bacteria on the surgical site. A two stages study was set up. In the first stage the effect of delay was simulated in 20 patients affected by proximal humeral fracture treated conservatively. In a second stage, the effect of delay was measured in 20 patients that underwent surgery. In stage 1, three skin culture swabs were taken in correspondence of the deltopectoral approach, the day of the fracture (day 0), the day after (day 1), and five days after fracture (day 5). In stage 2, skin swab cultures were taken the day of trauma and immediately before surgery and cultured on various media suitable for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The number of bacteria increased over the course of the study, from day 0 to day 5, both considering the total number of colony-forming units and individual species of pathogen bacteria. The second stage of the study confirmed these data. An increasing number of bacteria was observed in patients that underwent surgery later than 2 days from trauma. The delay of surgery increased bacterial colonization of the skin in the deltopectoral approach area including common pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and Propionibacterium acnes. This might justify the correlation between delay to surgery and risk of infection. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:942-948, 2016. PMID:26580139

  2. Does Socioeconomic Diversity Make a Difference? Examining the Effects of Racial and Socioeconomic Diversity on the Campus Climate for Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Denson, Nida; Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    This article considers whether the socioeconomic diversity of the undergraduate student body and experiences with cross-class interaction (CCI) are significantly related to cross-racial interaction (CRI) and engagement with curricular/co-curricular diversity (CCD) activities. Individual students who reported higher levels of CCI had significantly…

  3. Dual effectiveness of lithium salt in controlling both delayed ettringite formation and ASR in concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Ekolu, S.O. . E-mail: stephen.ekolu@wits.ac.za; Thomas, M.D.A.; Hooton, R.D.

    2007-06-15

    The influence of lithium nitrate on expansions due to delayed ettringite formation (DEF) and alkali-silica reaction (ASR) has been investigated. Effects of the lithium salt were examined in heat-cured mortars and concretes containing one or both damage mechanisms. The mortars and concretes made using reactive and/or non-reactive aggregates were subjected to heat treatment consisting of a hydration delay period of 4 h at 23 deg. C followed by steam-curing at 95 deg. C and then stored in limewater. Results showed that the lithium salt admixture was able to reduce the occurrence of deleterious expansion due to delayed ettringite formation in addition to controlling alkali-silica reaction in cementitious systems containing one or both mechanisms. In concretes made using non-reactive limestone aggregates, incorporation of lithium nitrate in a proportion of 0.74 M ratio of Li to (Na + K) was found to control delayed ettringite formation during the one-year period of this study. By analyzing the leaching properties of lithium and other alkalis from mortars during storage, it was found that a substantial amount of lithium was retained in the cementitious system in a slightly soluble form, and is expected to be responsible for reducing DEF.

  4. Allee effect promotes diversity in traveling waves of colonization

    PubMed Central

    Roques, Lionel; Garnier, Jimmy; Hamel, François; Klein, Etienne K.

    2012-01-01

    Most mathematical studies on expanding populations have focused on the rate of range expansion of a population. However, the genetic consequences of population expansion remain an understudied body of theory. Describing an expanding population as a traveling wave solution derived from a classical reaction-diffusion model, we analyze the spatio-temporal evolution of its genetic structure. We show that the presence of an Allee effect (i.e., a lower per capita growth rate at low densities) drastically modifies genetic diversity, both in the colonization front and behind it. With an Allee effect (i.e., pushed colonization waves), all of the genetic diversity of a population is conserved in the colonization front. In the absence of an Allee effect (i.e., pulled waves), only the furthest forward members of the initial population persist in the colonization front, indicating a strong erosion of the diversity in this population. These results counteract commonly held notions that the Allee effect generally has adverse consequences. Our study contributes new knowledge to the surfing phenomenon in continuous models without random genetic drift. It also provides insight into the dynamics of traveling wave solutions and leads to a new interpretation of the mathematical notions of pulled and pushed waves. PMID:22611189

  5. Effects of racial diversity on complex thinking in college students.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Anthony Lising; Chang, Mitchell J; Hakuta, Kenji; Kenny, David A; Levin, Shana; Milem, Jeffrey F

    2004-08-01

    An experiment varying the racial (Black, White) and opinion composition in small-group discussions was conducted with college students (N = 357) at three universities to test for effects on the perceived novelty of group members' contributions to discussion and on participants' integrative complexity. Results showed that racial and opinion minorities were both perceived as contributing to novelty. Generally positive effects on integrative complexity were found when the groups had racial- and opinion-minority members and when members reported having racially diverse friends and classmates. The findings are discussed in the context of social psychological theories of minority influence and social policy implications for affirmative action. The research supports claims about the educational significance of race in higher education, as well as the complexity of the interaction of racial diversity with contextual and individual factors. PMID:15270993

  6. Toilet Training Children With Autism and Developmental Delays: An Effective Program for School Settings

    PubMed Central

    Cocchiola, Michael A.; Martino, Gayle M.; Dwyer, Lisa J.; Demezzo, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Current research literature on toilet training for children with autism or developmental delays focuses on smaller case studies, typically with concentrated clinical support. Limited research exists to support an effective school-based program to teach toileting skills implemented by public school staff. We describe an intervention program to toilet train 5 children with autism or developmental delays who demonstrated no prior success in the home or school setting. Intervention focused on (a) removal of diapers during school hours, (b) scheduled time intervals for bathroom visits, (c) a maximum of 3 min sitting on the toilet, (d) reinforcers delivered immediately contingent on urination in the toilet, and (e) gradually increased time intervals between bathroom visits as each participant met mastery during the preceding, shorter time interval. The program was effective across all 5 cases in a community-based elementary school. Paraprofessional staff implemented the program with minimal clinical oversight. PMID:23730467

  7. The effect of post-identification feedback, delay, and suspicion on accurate eyewitnesses.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Deah S; Neuschatz, Jeffrey S; Douglass, Amy Bradfield; Wells, Gary L; Wetmore, Stacy A

    2012-06-01

    We examined whether post-identification feedback and suspicion affect accurate eyewitnesses. Participants viewed a video event and then made a lineup decision from a target-present photo lineup. Regardless of accuracy, the experimenter either, informed participants that they made a correct lineup decision or gave no information regarding their lineup decision. Immediately following the lineup decision or after a 1-week delay, a second experimenter gave some of the participants who received confirming feedback reason to be suspicious of the confirming feedback. Following immediately after the confirming feedback, accurate witnesses did not demonstrate certainty inflation. However, after a delay accurate witnesses did demonstrate certainty inflation typically associated with confirming feedback. The suspicion manipulation only affected participants' certainty when the confirming feedback created certainty inflation. The results lend support to the accessibility interpretation of the post-identification feedback effect and the erasure interpretation of the suspicion effect. PMID:22667810

  8. The effect of reinforcer magnitude on probability and delay discounting of experienced outcomes in a computer game task in humans.

    PubMed

    Greenhow, Anna K; Hunt, Maree J; Macaskill, Anne C; Harper, David N

    2015-09-01

    Delay and uncertainty of receipt both reduce the subjective value of reinforcers. Delay has a greater impact on the subjective value of smaller reinforcers than of larger ones while the reverse is true for uncertainty. We investigated the effect of reinforcer magnitude on discounting of delayed and uncertain reinforcers using a novel approach: embedding relevant choices within a computer game. Participants made repeated choices between smaller, certain, immediate outcomes and larger, but delayed or uncertain outcomes while experiencing the result of each choice. Participants' choices were generally well described by the hyperbolic discounting function. Smaller numbers of points were discounted more steeply than larger numbers as a function of delay but not probability. The novel experiential choice task described is a promising approach to investigating both delay and probability discounting in humans. PMID:26377438

  9. Time Delay Effect in a Living Coupled Oscillator System with the Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Fujii, Teruo; Endo, Isao

    2000-08-01

    A living coupled oscillator system was constructed by a cell patterning method with a plasmodial slime mold, in which parameters such as coupling strength and distance between the oscillators can be systematically controlled. Rich oscillation phenomena between the two-coupled oscillators, namely, desynchronizing and antiphase/in-phase synchronization were observed according to these parameters. Both experimental and theoretical approaches showed that these phenomena are closely related to the time delay effect in interactions between the oscillators.

  10. Effects of two antagonistic ecosystem engineers on infaunal diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Ortiz, V.; Alcazar, P.; Vergara, J. J.; Pérez-Lloréns, J. L.; Brun, F. G.

    2014-02-01

    The role of ecosystem engineers has been highlighted in recent decades because of their importance for ecosystem functioning, although the interaction between different antagonistic engineer species and their effects on ecosystems have been so far poorly investigated. Coastal areas are good natural laboratories to explore such interactions, since they are often inhabited by macrophyte beds (autogenic engineers) and bioturbator species (allogenic engineers) with antagonistic effects on ecosystem properties and processes (e.g. species diversity, nutrient fluxes, etc.). The main goal of this study was to determine how coexisting antagonistic ecosystem engineers could influence benthic diversity and available resources in soft-bottom areas. To achieve this goal, a two-month experiment was carried out in situ by introducing artificial seagrass patches in a soft-bottom area inhabited by the fiddler crab Uca tangeri. Both the experimental exclusion of burrows as well as the presence of artificial seagrass-like structures (mimics) resulted in higher macrobenthic density and species richness in the benthic community. Resource availability for organisms (sediment chlorophyll a and epiphytes) was also favoured by the presence of mimics. Therefore, the higher structural complexity (above- and below-ground) associated with seagrass mimics promoted positive effects for infauna such as creation of a new habitat ready to colonize, reduction of the crab burrowing activity and the enhancement of resource availability, which resulted in increased diversity in the benthic community.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of silymarin on ischemia-induced delayed neuronal cell death in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Koki; Oshima, Hideki; Yamashita, Akiko; Sakatani, Kaoru; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    We examined the effects of silymarin, which was extracted from Silybum marianum, on delayed neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus. Rats were divided into four groups: sham-operated rats (sham group), rats which underwent ischemic surgery (control group), rats which were treated with silymarin before and after ischemic surgery (pre group), and rats which were treated with silymarin after ischemic surgery only (post group). We performed the ischemic surgery by occluding the bilateral carotid arteries for 20min and sacrificed the rats one week after the surgery. Silymarin was administered orally at 200mg/kg body weight. Smaller numbers of delayed cell deaths were noted in the rat CA1 region of the pre- and post-groups, and no significant difference was observed between these groups. There were few apoptotic cell deaths in all groups. Compared to the control group, significantly fewer cell deaths by autophagy were found in the pre- and post-group. We concluded that silymarin exerts a preservation effect on delayed neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus and this effect has nothing to do with the timing of administering of silymarin. PMID:27312091

  12. Measurements of effective delayed neutron fraction in a fast neutron reactor using the perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Jun; Yin, Yan-Peng; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Zheng-Hong; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2016-06-01

    A perturbation method is proposed to obtain the effective delayed neutron fraction β eff of a cylindrical highly enriched uranium reactor. Based on reactivity measurements with and without a sample at a specified position using the positive period technique, the reactor reactivity perturbation Δρ of the sample in β eff units is measured. Simulations of the perturbation experiments are performed using the MCNP program. The PERT card is used to provide the difference dk of effective neutron multiplication factors with and without the sample inside the reactor. Based on the relationship between the effective multiplication factor and the reactivity, the equation β eff = dk/Δρ is derived. In this paper, the reactivity perturbations of 13 metal samples at the designable position of the reactor are measured and calculated. The average β eff value of the reactor is given as 0.00645, and the standard uncertainty is 3.0%. Additionally, the perturbation experiments for β eff can be used to evaluate the reliabilities of the delayed neutron parameters. This work shows that the delayed neutron data of 235U and 238U from G.R. Keepin’s publication are more reliable than those from ENDF-B6.0, ENDF-B7.0, JENDL3.3 and CENDL2.2. Supported by Foundation of Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012AA01, 2014AA01), National Natural Science Foundation (11375158, 91326104)

  13. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  14. Delayed mortality effects cut the malaria transmission potential of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Viana, Mafalda; Hughes, Angela; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Ranson, Hilary; Ferguson, Heather M

    2016-08-01

    Malaria transmission has been substantially reduced across Africa through the distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). However, the emergence of insecticide resistance within mosquito vectors risks jeopardizing the future efficacy of this control strategy. The severity of this threat is uncertain because the consequences of resistance for mosquito fitness are poorly understood: while resistant mosquitoes are no longer immediately killed upon contact with LLINs, their transmission potential may be curtailed because of longer-term fitness costs that persist beyond the first 24 h after exposure. Here, we used a Bayesian state-space model to quantify the immediate (within 24 h of exposure) and delayed (>24 h after exposure) impact of insecticides on daily survival and malaria transmission potential of moderately and highly resistant laboratory populations of the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae Contact with LLINs reduced the immediate survival of moderately and highly resistant An. gambiae strains by 60-100% and 3-61%, respectively, and delayed mortality impacts occurring beyond the first 24 h after exposure further reduced their overall life spans by nearly one-half. In total, insecticide exposure was predicted to reduce the lifetime malaria transmission potential of insecticide-resistant vectors by two-thirds, with delayed effects accounting for at least one-half of this reduction. The existence of substantial, previously unreported, delayed mortality effects within highly resistant malaria vectors following exposure to insecticides does not diminish the threat of growing resistance, but posits an explanation for the apparent paradox of continued LLIN effectiveness in the presence of high insecticide resistance. PMID:27402740

  15. 76 FR 82115 - Wage Methodology for the Temporary Non-Agricultural Employment H-2B Program; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ...-agricultural Employment H-2B Program; Final Rule (the Wage Rule) on January 19, 2011, 76 FR 3452. The Wage Rule... effective date of the rule amending 20 CFR part 655, published January 19, 2011, at 76 FR 3452, delayed at 76 FR 45667, August 1, 2011, and further delayed at 76 FR 59896, September 28, 2011, and 76 FR...

  16. The Effect of Delay in the Presentation of Visual Information on Pilot Performance. Final Report, April 1974-July 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Fred R.; And Others

    Naval researchers studied the effects of delay in the presentatio of visual information on pilot performance. Simulated carrier landing tasks were performed by subjects using a visual display generated by a computer. In one part of the experiment pilots were asked to "fly" carrier approaches with and without a 0.1 second delay in the visual scene…

  17. Effects of Stimulus Context, Study Time, and Delay on Visual Recognition Memory in Six-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Melissa M.

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether context facilitated memory and whether this facilitation was still evident after a delay. Infants were expected to recognize pictures significantly longer when they were tested with the same context cues. This context effect was expected to be even after a 5-minute delay. The subjects were 64…

  18. The Effects of Embedded Skill Instruction on the Acquisition of Target and Nontarget Skills in Preschoolers with Developmental Delays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Stefanie; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

    2001-01-01

    In the current study, a constant time delay (CTD) procedure was embedded in classroom activities and routines to teach counting to three preschool children with speech and language delays. CTD was effective in teaching numbers to all three children. One child out of two also was able to acquire non-target information. (Contains references.) (CR)

  19. Mechanisms Controlling the Plant Diversity Effect on Soil Microbial Community Composition and Soil Microbial Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado Vázquez, P. G.; Lange, M.; Griffiths, R.; Malik, A.; Ravenek, J.; Strecker, T.; Eisenhauer, N.; Gleixner, G.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microorganisms are the main drivers of soil organic matter cycling. Organic matter input by living plants is the major energy and matter source for soil microorganisms, higher organic matter inputs are found in highly diverse plant communities. It is therefore relevant to understand how plant diversity alters the soil microbial community and soil organic matter. In a general sense, microbial biomass and microbial diversity increase with increasing plant diversity, however the mechanisms driving these interactions are not fully explored. Working with soils from a long-term biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment), we investigated how changes in the soil microbial dynamics related to plant diversity were explained by biotic and abiotic factors. Microbial biomass quantification and differentiation of bacterial and fungal groups was done by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis; terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to determine the bacterial diversity. Gram negative (G-) bacteria predominated in high plant diversity; Gram positive (G+) bacteria were more abundant in low plant diversity and saprotrophic fungi were independent from plant diversity. The separation between G- and G+ bacteria in relation to plant diversity was governed by a difference in carbon-input related factors (e.g. root biomass and soil moisture) between plant diversity levels. Moreover, the bacterial diversity increased with plant diversity and the evenness of the PLFA markers decreased. Our results showed that higher plant diversity favors carbon-input related factors and this in turn favors the development of microbial communities specialized in utilizing new carbon inputs (i.e. G- bacteria), which are contributing to the export of new C from plants to soils.

  20. Competitive coexistence and competitive exclusion for a nonlinear community with delay effect and impulsive birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Zhang, Feng; Wei, Jianzhou

    2016-12-01

    By constructing a population model of multi-species competition, a community with nonlinear interaction relationship is investigated, in which the species' response delay and environmental fluctuation effects (i.e., seasonal fluctuation of resource supplies and species' reproductive activities) on population are considered. Firstly, the conditions about competitive coexistence (i.e., persistence of all species) and competitive exclusion (i.e., only partial of species, but not all, keep persistence) of the community are established, and the underlying ecological mechanism of these results are analyzed. Secondly, by some illustrative examples, the interactive effects of nonlinear competition, species' response delay and environmental fluctuation on the structure of community are explored. It is demonstrated that small response delay and slight deviation of nonlinear competition indexes from 1 have little impact on the coexistence of community, but acute changes have distinct negative influence on community coexistence. This reveals to us that parameter perturbations of natural communities should keep in an appropriate range, which is of great significance in conservation and restoration biology.

  1. Design and In Vivo Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Ketoprofen Delayed Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cerciello, Andrea; Auriemma, Giulia; Morello, Silvana; Pinto, Aldo; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Russo, Paola; Aquino, Rita P

    2015-10-01

    For the treatment of inflammatory-based diseases affected by circadian rhythms, the development of once-daily dosage forms is required to target early morning symptoms. In this study, Zn-alginate beads containing ketoprofen (K) were developed by a tandem technique prilling/ionotropic gelation. The effect of main critical variables on particles micromeritics, inner structure as well as on drug loading and in vitro drug release was studied. The in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was evaluated using a modified protocol of carrageenan-induced edema in rat paw administering beads to rats by oral gavage at 0, 3, or 5 h before edema induction. Good drug loading and desired particle size and morphology were obtained for the optimized formulation F20. In vitro dissolution studies showed that F20 had a gastroresistant behavior and delayed release of the drug in simulated intestinal fluid. The in vitro delayed release pattern was clearly reflected in the prolonged anti-inflammatory effect in vivo of F20, compared to pure ketoprofen; F20, administered 3 h before edema induction, showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity, reducing maximum paw volume in response to carrageenan injection, whereas no response was observed for ketoprofen. The designed beads appear a promising platform suitable for a delayed release of anti-inflammatory drugs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:3451-3458, 2015. PMID:26088065

  2. Sensitivity and uncertainty in the effective delayed neutron fraction ({beta}{sub eff})

    SciTech Connect

    Kodeli, I. I.

    2012-07-01

    Precise knowledge of effective delayed neutron fraction ({beta}{sub eff}) and of the corresponding uncertainty is important for reactor safety analysis. The interest in developing the methodology for estimating the uncertainty in {beta}{sub eff} was expressed in the scope of the UAM project of the OECD/NEA. A novel approach for the calculation of the nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty of the effective delayed neutron fraction is proposed, based on the linear perturbation theory. The method allows the detailed analysis of components of {beta}{sub eff} uncertainty. The procedure was implemented in the SUSD3D sensitivity and uncertainty code applied to several fast neutron benchmark experiments from the ICSBEP and IRPhE databases. According to the JENDL-4 covariance matrices and taking into account the uncertainty in the cross sections and in the prompt and delayed fission spectra the total uncertainty in {beta}eff was found to be of the order of {approx}2 to {approx}3.5 % for the studied fast experiments. (authors)

  3. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  4. Pessimum effect of externally applied chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation: Proposed mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ekolu, S.O. . E-mail: s.ekolu@utoronto.ca; Thomas, M.D.A.; Hooton, R.D.

    2006-04-15

    Mortars and concretes were subjected to a heat treatment cycle consisting of a pre-set period of 4 h at 23 deg. C followed by accelerated curing at 95 deg. C prior to storage at room temperature in water or limewater, 0.5 M, 2.8 M sodium chloride solutions. It was found that the specimens stored in 0.5 M sodium chloride solution gave a much greater expansion than those stored in limewater or 2.8 M sodium chloride solution. This pessimum influence of chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation deviates from the commonly held view that chlorides mitigate sulphate attack in concretes. The mechanism of the pessimum effect of chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation, and the final products of the associated phase transformations have been proposed. X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis techniques were used to follow phase transformations.

  5. Prospective memory in dynamic environments: effects of load, delay, and phonological rehearsal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M.; Dismukes, K.; Remington, R.

    2001-01-01

    A new paradigm was developed to examine prospective memory performance in a visual-spatial task that resembles some aspects of the work of air traffic controllers. Two experiments examined the role of workload (number of aeroplanes that participants directed), delay (between receipt of prospective instructions and execution), and phonological rehearsal. High workload increased prospective memory errors but increasing delay from 1-3 or 5 minutes had no effect. Shadowing aurally presented text reduced prospective memory performance, presumably because it prevented verbal rehearsal of the prospective instructions. However, performance on the foreground task of directing aeroplanes to routine destinations was affected only by workload and not by opportunity for rehearsal. Our results suggest that ability to maintain performance on a routine foreground task while performing a secondary task--perhaps analogous to conversation--does not predict ability to retrieve a prospective intention to deviate from the routine.

  6. The Effects of a Working Memory Load on Delay Discounting in Those with Externalizing Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Peter R.; Gunn, Rachel L.; Gerst, Kyle R.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of executive working memory (EWM) capacity on impulsive decision-making in a sample of young adults (n=623) that varied in degree of externalizing psychopathology (EXT) by examining: (i) the effects of WM load on delay discounting rates, and, (ii) the association between EWM capacity and delay discounting rates. EXT was measured as a latent variable indicated by lifetime problems with alcohol, marijuana, other drugs, childhood conduct, and adult antisocial behavior. Results showed that (i) the WM load increased discounting rates throughout the spectrum of EXT, (ii) EXT was associated with higher discounting rates and lower EMW capacity, and (iii) WM capacity was significantly associated with higher discounting rates when controlling for IQ, but only after a WM load. The results are discussed in terms of the role of EWM capacity in impulsive decision making in EXT. PMID:25893146

  7. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  8. Hopf bifurcation in a diffusive Lotka-Volterra type system with nonlocal delay effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shangjiang; Yan, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a diffusive Lotka-Volterra type model for two species with nonlocal delay effect and Dirichlet boundary conditions is investigated in this paper. The existence and multiplicity of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solutions are obtained by means of Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction. The stability of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solutions and the existence of Hopf bifurcation with the changes of the time delay are obtained by analyzing the distribution of eigenvalues of the infinitesimal generator associated with the linearized system. By the normal form theory and the center manifold reduction, the stability and bifurcation direction of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits are derived. Finally, our theoretical results are illustrated by a model with homogeneous kernels and one-dimensional spatial domain.

  9. Effects of Acute and Chronic Flunitrazepam on Delay Discounting in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppolito, Amy K.; France, Charles P.; Gerak, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Delay to delivery of a reinforcer can decrease responding for that reinforcer and increase responding for smaller reinforcers that are available concurrently and delivered without delay; acute administration of drugs can alter responding for large, delayed reinforcers, although the impact of chronic treatment on delay discounting is not well…

  10. Best-fit estimate of relativistic effects in time-delay experiments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J.-P.

    1972-01-01

    Time-delay experiments are analyzed within the frame of a curved space-time. Residuals from Newtonian best fits of relativistic data are used as a measure of the 'relativistic effects.' Radial transponder trajectories are considered. If the motion is towards the sun, the relativistic residuals are of the order of 100 m. If the motion is away from the sun, they are at the 10-km level and the fraction due to the second-order curvature of the metric is at the 1-km level. Those effects are significantly smaller than those calculated from the divergence of the Newtonian and relativistic predictions after exact fit of the initial measurements.

  11. Small diversity effects on ocean primary production under environmental change in a diversity-resolving ocean ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowe, A. E. F.; Pahlow, M.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Oschlies, A.

    2013-07-01

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic diversity. Diversity, however, can affect functions such as primary production and their sensitivity to environmental changes. Using a global ocean ecosystem model that explicitly resolves phytoplankton diversity within four phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) we investigate the model's ability to capture diversity effects on primary production under environmental change. An idealized scenario with a sudden reduction in vertical mixing causes diversity and primary-production changes that turn out to be largely independent of the number of coexisting phytoplankton types. The model provides a small number of niches with respect to nutrient use in accordance with the PFTs defined in the model, and increasing the number of phytoplankton types increases the resolution within the niches. The variety of traits and trade-offs resolved in the model constrains diversity effects such as niche complementarity, which operate between, but not within PFTs. The number and nature of the niches formulated in the model, for example via trade-offs or different PFTs, thus determines the diversity effects on ecosystem functioning captured in ocean ecosystem models.

  12. Marble burying as a test of the delayed anxiogenic effects of acute immobilisation stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Sonal; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2014-08-15

    A majority of rodent studies characterizing the anxiogenic effects of stress have utilized exploration-based models, such as the elevated plus-maze. An alternative strategy has relied on ethologically natural behavior such as defensive burying. One such paradigm, marble burying, has proven to be an effective behavioral assay of the anxiolytic effects of pharmacological manipulations, and of genetically modified mouse models. Relatively little, however, is known about the sensitivity of this test in assessing the anxiogenic effects of stress. Most of the earlier reports have examined the immediate, but not more long-term, effects of pharmacological or environmental manipulations in mice. Hence, we used the marble burying test to examine if acute immobilization stress leads to enhanced anxiety-like behavior in C57Bl/6 mice if the test is employed with a significant time delay. We find this test to be sensitive enough to detect the anxiogenic effects even 10 days after a single episode of 2-h immobilization stress. Our results suggest that the marble burying test could serve as a useful behavioral paradigm for not only estimating the gradual progression of the anxiogenic impact of stress over time, but also raises the possibility of using the temporal delay after stress to test the potential efficacy of post-stress interventions with anxiolytic drugs. PMID:24932962

  13. P wave velocity structure below India and Tibet incorporating anisotropic delay time effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Debasis D.; Singh, Arun; O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Ravi Kumar, M.; Srinagesh, D.; Humphreys, Eugene D.

    2016-03-01

    We incorporate the effects of anisotropy to refine the continental-scale 3-D isotropic velocity model previously produced for India and Tibet by inverting 52,050 teleseismic P wave residuals. We have exploited a total of 1648 individual SKS splitting parameters to calculate the P wave travel time corrections due to azimuthal anisotropy. Our results suggest that anisotropy affects the P wave delays significantly (-0.3 to +0.5 s). Integration of these corrections into the 3-D modeling is achieved in two ways: (a) a priori adjustment to the delay time vector and (b) inverting only for anisotropic delays by introducing strong damping above 80 km and below 360 km depths and then subtracting the obtained anisotropic artifact image from the isotropic image, to get the corrected image. Under the assumption of azimuthal anisotropy resulting from lattice preferred orientation (LPO) alignment due to horizontal flow, the bias in isotropic P wave tomographic images is clear. The anisotropy corrected velocity perturbations are in the range of ±1.2% at depths of around 150 km and reduced further at deeper levels. Although the bias due to anisotropy does not affect the gross features, it does introduce certain artifacts at deeper levels.

  14. Effect of multiple and delayed jet impact and penetration on concrete target borehole diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J; Baum, D W; Kuklo, R M; Simonson, S C

    2001-01-26

    The effect of multiple and delayed jet impact and penetration on the borehole diameter in concrete targets is discussed in this paper. A first-order principle of shaped-charge jet penetration is that target hole volume is proportional to the energy deposited in the target by the jet. This principle is the basis for the relation that target borehole diameter at any depth along the penetration path is proportional to the jet energy deposited in the target at that location. Our current research shows that the 'jet energy per unit hole volume constant' for concrete can be substantially altered by the use of multiple and delayed jet impacts. It has been shown that enhanced entrance crater formation results from the simultaneous impact and penetration of three shaped-charge jets. We now demonstrate that enhanced borehole diameter is also observed by the simultaneous impact and penetration of multiple shaped-charge jets followed by the delayed impact and penetration of a single shaped-charge jet.

  15. Effect of Earth and Mars departure delays on human missions to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1993-08-01

    This study determines the impact on the initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO) for delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep space maneuver (DSM) is attempted to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time-frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 mt and 1977.3 mt, respectively. Conjunction class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties as compared to chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM is found not to have a significant impact on reducing the IMLEO penalties. Through this investigation, the effect of off-nominal departure conditions on the overall mission (i.e., IMLEO) can be gained, enabling mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design process of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  16. Effect of Earth and Mars departure delays on human missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1993-01-01

    This study determines the impact on the initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO) for delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep space maneuver (DSM) is attempted to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time-frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 mt and 1977.3 mt, respectively. Conjunction class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties as compared to chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM is found not to have a significant impact on reducing the IMLEO penalties. Through this investigation, the effect of off-nominal departure conditions on the overall mission (i.e., IMLEO) can be gained, enabling mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design process of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  17. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pausder, Heinz-Juergen; Blanken, Chris L.

    1993-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter flight control has recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effects on handling qualities due to time delays in combination with a high bandwidth vehicle. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was also used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and bandwidth values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities, ADS-33C.

  18. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, Chris L.; Pausder, Heinz-Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter aeromechanics have recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effect of time delays in a high bandwidth vehicle on handling qualities. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays of up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and band width values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities Aeronautical Design Standard (ADS)-33C.

  19. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pausder, Heinz-Juergen; Blanken, Chris L.

    1992-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter flight control has recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effects on handling qualities due to time delays in combination with a high bandwidth vehicle. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was also used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and bandwidth values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hr of flight time during 10 days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities, ADS-33C.

  20. Sensitivity and uncertainty in the effective delayed neutron fraction (βeff)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodeli, Ivan-Alexander

    2013-07-01

    Precise knowledge of the effective delayed neutron fraction (βeff) and the corresponding uncertainty is important for nuclear reactor safety analysis. The interest in developing the methodology for estimating the uncertainty in βeff was expressed in the scope of the UAM project of the OECD/NEA. The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of βeff performed using the standard first-order perturbation code SUSD3D is presented. The sensitivity coefficients of βeff with respect to the basic nuclear data were calculated by deriving Bretscher's k-ratio formula. The procedure was applied to several fast neutron benchmark experiments selected from the ICSBEP and IRPhE databases. According to the JENDL-4.0m covariance matrices and taking into account the uncertainties in the cross-sections and in the prompt and delayed fission spectra the total uncertainty in βeff was found to be in general around 3%, and up to ˜7% for the 233U benchmarks. An approximation was applied to investigate the uncertainty due to the delayed fission neutron spectra. The βeff sensitivity and uncertainty analyses are furthermore demonstrated to be useful for the better understanding and interpretation of the physical phenomena involved. Due to their specific sensitivity profiles the βeff measurements are shown to provide valuable complementary information which could be used in combination with the criticality (keff) measurements for the evaluation and validation of certain nuclear reaction data, such as for example the delayed (and prompt) fission neutron yields and interestingly also the 238U inelastic and elastic scattering cross-sections.

  1. Single-gene speciation with pleiotropy: effects of allele dominance, population size, and delayed inheritance.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Masato; Sasaki, Akira

    2013-07-01

    Single-gene speciation is considered to be unlikely, but an excellent example is found in land snails, in which a gene for left-right reversal has given rise to new species multiple times. This reversal might be facilitated by their small population sizes and maternal effect (i.e., "delayed inheritance," in which an individual's phenotype is determined by the genotype of its mother). Recent evidence suggests that a pleiotropic effect of the speciation gene on antipredator survival may also promote speciation. Here we theoretically demonstrate that, without a pleiotropic effect, in small populations the fixation probability of a recessive mutant is higher than a dominant mutant, but they are identical for large populations and sufficiently weak selection. With a pleiotropic effect that increases mutant viability, a dominant mutant has a higher fixation probability if the strength of viability selection is sufficiently greater than that of reproductive incompatibility, whereas a recessive mutant has a higher fixation probability otherwise. Delayed inheritance increases the fixation probability of a mutant if viability selection is sufficiently weaker than reproductive incompatibility. Our results clarify the conflicting effects of viability selection and positive frequency-dependent selection due to reproductive incompatibility and provide a new perspective to single-gene speciation theory. PMID:23815656

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Immediate Compared With Delayed Postpartum Etonogestrel Implant Insertion

    PubMed Central

    GARIEPY, Aileen M.; DUFFY, Jennifer Y.; XU, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of immediate versus delayed (6 weeks) postpartum etonogestrel implant insertion in preventing future unintended pregnancy. Methods We constructed a decision-analytic model to examine a hypothetical population of women who request a contraceptive implant after giving birth. The timeframe for analysis was from the time of childbirth to one year postpartum. Model inputs were derived from a comprehensive literature review. We compared immediate (before discharge from the childbirth hospital stay) versus delayed (at first postpartum office visit) postpartum placement of the contraceptive implant from a health care system’s perspective. Implant insertion and removal, loss to follow-up at postpartum visit, use of alternative contraceptive methods, and contraceptive failure were incorporated into the model. We calculated the incremental cost of immediate insertion for each pregnancy prevented during the first postpartum year and cost savings associated with pregnancies prevented. One-way sensitivity analyses were also performed. Cost estimates are reported in 2014 U.S. dollars. Results Immediate postpartum implant insertion is associated with higher expected cost than delayed insertion ($1,091 per patient versus $650 per patient), but is more effective in preventing pregnancies (expected pregnancy rate: 2.4% and 21.6%, respectively). This results in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $2,304 per pregnancy prevented. When taking into consideration medical costs of the resulting unintended pregnancies that could be avoided, immediate implant insertion is expected to save $1,263 per patient. Conclusions Immediate postpartum provision of the contraceptive implant is cost-effective in preventing unintended pregnancies, and should be provided to women requesting this form of contraception. PMID:26241255

  3. Strong density- and diversity-related effects help to maintain tree species diversity in a neotropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Christopher; Condit, Richard; Foster, Robin B.; Hubbell, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    Intraspecific density-dependent effects in the Barro Colorado Island (Panama) study area are far stronger, and involve far more species, than previously had been suspected. Significant effects on recruitment, many extremely strong, are seen for 67 out of the 84 most common species in the plot, including the 10 most common. Significant effects on the intrinsic rate of increase are seen in 54 of the 84 species. These effects are far more common than interspecific effects, and are predominantly of the type that should maintain tree diversity. As a result, the more diverse an area in the forest is, the higher is the overall rate of increase of the trees in that area, although sheer crowding has by itself a negative effect. These findings are consistent with, but do not prove, an important role for host–pathogen interactions (defined broadly) in the maintenance of diversity. Ways are suggested by which to test host–pathogen models and competing models. PMID:11038601

  4. Simulator study of the effect of visual-motion time delays on pilot tracking performance with an audio side task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. R.; Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of time delay was determined in the visual and motion cues in a flight simulator on pilot performance in tracking a target aircraft that was oscillating sinusoidally in altitude only. An audio side task was used to assure the subject was fully occupied at all times. The results indicate that, within the test grid employed, about the same acceptable time delay (250 msec) was obtained for a single aircraft (fighter type) by each of two subjects for both fixed-base and motion-base conditions. Acceptable time delay is defined as the largest amount of delay that can be inserted simultaneously into the visual and motion cues before performance degradation occurs. A statistical analysis of the data was made to establish this value of time delay. Audio side task provided quantitative data that documented the subject's work level.

  5. Telerobotic Surgery: An Intelligent Systems Approach to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Communication Delay. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardullo, Frank M.; Lewis, Harold W., III; Panfilov, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    An extremely innovative approach has been presented, which is to have the surgeon operate through a simulator running in real-time enhanced with an intelligent controller component to enhance the safety and efficiency of a remotely conducted operation. The use of a simulator enables the surgeon to operate in a virtual environment free from the impediments of telecommunication delay. The simulator functions as a predictor and periodically the simulator state is corrected with truth data. Three major research areas must be explored in order to ensure achieving the objectives. They are: simulator as predictor, image processing, and intelligent control. Each is equally necessary for success of the project and each of these involves a significant intelligent component in it. These are diverse, interdisciplinary areas of investigation, thereby requiring a highly coordinated effort by all the members of our team, to ensure an integrated system. The following is a brief discussion of those areas. Simulator as a predictor: The delays encountered in remote robotic surgery will be greater than any encountered in human-machine systems analysis, with the possible exception of remote operations in space. Therefore, novel compensation techniques will be developed. Included will be the development of the real-time simulator, which is at the heart of our approach. The simulator will present real-time, stereoscopic images and artificial haptic stimuli to the surgeon. Image processing: Because of the delay and the possibility of insufficient bandwidth a high level of novel image processing is necessary. This image processing will include several innovative aspects, including image interpretation, video to graphical conversion, texture extraction, geometric processing, image compression and image generation at the surgeon station. Intelligent control: Since the approach we propose is in a sense predictor based, albeit a very sophisticated predictor, a controller, which not only

  6. Special Effects: Antenna Wetting, Short Distance Diversity and Depolarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) communications system operates in the Ka frequency band. ACTS uses multiple, hopping, narrow beams and very small aperture terminal (VSAT) technology to establish a system availability of 99.5% for bit-error-rates of 5 x 10(exp -7) Or better over the continental United States. In order maintain this minimum system availability in all US rain zones, ACTS uses an adaptive rain fade compensation protocol to reduce the impact of signal attenuation resulting from propagation effects. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of system and sub-system characterizations considering the statistical effects of system variances due to antenna wetting and depolarization effects. In addition the availability enhancements using short distance diversity in a sub-tropical rain zone are investigated.

  7. Mathematical modeling of the nonlinear electrodynamics effect of signal delay in the magnetic field of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapochka, M. G.; Denisov, M. M.; Denisova, I. P.; Kalenova, N. V.; Korolev, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    The paper is devoted to mathematical modeling of the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics effect: the action of the strong magnetic field of a pulsar on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that, due to the birefringence of the vacuum, for one normal wave, it takes more time to travel from a pulsar to a detector installed on astrophysical satellites than for the other normal wave. The delay of the pulse carried by the second normal wave relative to pulse carried by the first normal wave from the common point of origin to the satellite is calculated.

  8. The Viking relativity experiment. [radio transmission delay due to solar gravitation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Macneil, P. E.; Goldstein, R. B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Komarek, T.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Cuddihy, W. F.; Michael, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the round-trip time of flight of radio signals transmitted from the earth to the Viking spacecraft are being analyzed to test the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity. According to this theory the signals will be delayed by up to approximately 250 microsec owing to the direct effect of solar gravity on the propagation. A very preliminary qualitative analysis of the Viking data obtained near the 1976 superior conjunction of Mars indicates agreement with the predictions to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.5%.

  9. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation; Infertility - delayed ejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  10. Delayed effects of sublethal ischemia on the acquisition of tolerance to ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kuzuya, T; Hoshida, S; Yamashita, N; Fuji, H; Oe, H; Hori, M; Kamada, T; Tada, M

    1993-06-01

    The infarct-limiting effect of ischemic preconditioning is believed to be a transient phenomenon. We examined the delayed effects of repetitive brief ischemia on limiting infarct size in an open-chest dog model by an occlusion (90 minutes) of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) followed by reperfusion (5 hours). The dogs were preconditioned with four brief repeated ischemic episodes induced by 5-minute LAD occlusions with subsequent reperfusion. The size of infarcts initiated by a sustained occlusion immediately or 24 hours after preconditioning was significantly smaller when compared with infarcts in sham-operated dogs (for the immediate occlusion, 14.4 +/- 2.0% versus 39.0 +/- 3.7%, respectively [p < 0.01]; and for the delayed occlusion, 18.8 +/- 3.4% versus 35.1 +/- 4.6%, respectively [p < 0.05]); however, when the infarction was induced 3 hours (31.2 +/- 3.7% versus 37.5 +/- 4.2%, respectively) or 12 hours (25.4 +/- 4.8% versus 35.0 +/- 5.3%, respectively) after repetitive ischemia, the infarct size did not differ. No differences were seen in regional myocardial blood flow or rate-pressure products between the two groups. These results indicate that an infarct-limiting effect of brief repeated ischemia can be observed 24 hours after sublethal preconditioning. PMID:8495557

  11. Modeling the Effects of Crustal Structure on Surface-Wave Phase Delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In tomographic studies, crustal structure has significant impact on the observed data but it is usually too thin to be resolved using traditional tomographic methods and "crustal corrections" - assuming known crustal structure - are often required in mantle tomographic inversions. Seismic surface waves propagate in the outer shell of the earth and are highly sensitive to crustal structure, therefore they can be potentially used to constrain crustal structure at a global scale. We investigate the limitations of linear perturbation theory in global seismic tomography of crustal structure. We calculate surface-wave phase velocity perturbations caused by Moho boundary variations in spherically symmetrical reference earth models using linear perturbation theory. Our calculations show that linear perturbation theory works well for Love waves over a range of periods from 40 to 200 seconds for perturbations up to 30 km; while for Rayleigh waves, linear perturbation theory breaks down for large perturbations in crustal thickness (~15km). To quantify finite-frequency effects in global crustal models, we simulate global wave propagation in crustal models using the spectral element method (SEM) and make phase delay measurements caused by lateral variations in crustal thickness. The measured delay times are compared with predictions made based upon three different methods associated with crustal tomography: path integrations of local phase delays, ray perturbation theory and finite-frequency theory. We show that finite-frequency effects are dependent upon the length scale of lateral variations in crustal thickness. In addition to forward simulations, we discuss limitations of each method in the inversion of global and regional crustal structure using the synthetic SEM measurements and tradesoffs between velocity and Moho boundary discontinuity perturbations.

  12. Embedded Lensing Time Delays, the Fermat Potential, and the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-01

    We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a Friedman-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) caused by individual large-scale clusters and voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the temperature fluctuation in the CMB across such a lens as a derivative of the lens’ Fermat potential. This formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. It is much simpler to use and makes the same predictions as conventional approaches. In this approach the total temperature fluctuation can be split into a time-delay part and an evolutionary part. Both parts must be included for cosmic structures that evolve and both can be equally important. We present very simple ISW models for cosmic voids and galaxy clusters to illustrate the ease of use of our formalism. We use the Fermat potentials of simple cosmic void models to compare predicted ISW effects with those recently extracted from WMAP and Planck data by stacking large cosmic voids using the aperture photometry method. If voids in the local universe with large density contrasts are no longer evolving we find that the time delay contribution alone predicts values consistent with the measurements. However, we find that for voids still evolving linearly, the evolutionary contribution cancels a significant part of the time delay contribution and results in predicted signals that are much smaller than recently observed.

  13. A novel approach to delayed-start analyses for demonstrating disease-modifying effects in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu-Seifert, Hong; Andersen, Scott W; Lipkovich, Ilya; Holdridge, Karen C; Siemers, Eric

    2015-01-01

    One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer's disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been successfully applied to actual

  14. A Novel Approach to Delayed-Start Analyses for Demonstrating Disease-Modifying Effects in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Seifert, Hong; Andersen, Scott W.; Lipkovich, Ilya; Holdridge, Karen C.; Siemers, Eric

    2015-01-01

    One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer’s disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been successfully applied to

  15. Delayed development induced by toxicity to the host can be inherited by a bacterial-dependent, transgenerational effect

    PubMed Central

    Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Stern, Shay; Elgart, Michael; Galili, Matana; Zeisel, Amit; Shental, Noam; Soen, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Commensal gut bacteria in many species including flies are integral part of their host, and are known to influence its development and homeostasis within generation. Here we report an unexpected impact of host–microbe interactions, which mediates multi-generational, non-Mendelian inheritance of a stress-induced phenotype. We have previously shown that exposure of fly larvae to G418 antibiotic induces transgenerationally heritable phenotypes, including a delay in larval development, gene induction in the gut and morphological changes. We now show that G418 selectively depletes commensal Acetobacter species and that this depletion explains the heritable delay, but not the inheritance of the other phenotypes. Notably, the inheritance of the delay was mediated by a surprising trans-generational effect. Specifically, bacterial removal from F1 embryos did not induce significant delay in F1 larvae, but nonetheless led to a considerable delay in F2. This effect maintains a delay induced by bacterial-independent G418 toxicity to the host. In line with these findings, reintroduction of isolated Acetobacter species prevented the inheritance of the delay. We further show that this prevention is partly mediated by vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) produced by these bacteria; exogenous Riboflavin led to partial prevention and inhibition of Riboflavin synthesis compromised the ability of the bacteria to prevent the inheritance. These results identify host–microbe interactions as a hitherto unrecognized factor capable of mediating non-Mendelian inheritance of a stress-induced phenotype. PMID:24611070

  16. Time-delay effect on the bursting of the synchronized state of coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. G.; Wang, Z. H.

    2012-12-01

    The time-delay effect on the bursting of the synchronized state of coupled Hindmarsh-Rose neurons is investigated in this paper. The time-delay influence on the structure of the slow manifold is first studied by using the method of stability switch. And then on the basis of the geometric singular perturbation theory, case studies are given to show that the time delay can suppress the bursting oscillation or lead to more complex dynamics. In particular, the mechanism of the transition from bursting oscillation to relaxation oscillation and to chaotic bursting is stated. Numerical results are given to demonstrate the validity of the analytical results.

  17. Effect of delayed feedback on the dynamics of a scalar map via a frequency-domain approach.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Franco S; Bel, Andrea L; Belén D'Amico, M; Moiola, Jorge L

    2011-06-01

    The effect of delayed feedback on the dynamics of a scalar map is studied by using a frequency-domain approach. Explicit conditions for the occurrence of period-doubling and Neimark-Sacker bifurcations in the controlled map are found analytically. The appearance of a 1:2 resonance for certain values of the delay is also formalized, revealing that this phenomenon is independent of the system parameters. A detailed study of the well-known logistic map under delayed feedback is included for illustration. PMID:21721759

  18. Group delay spread analysis of strongly coupled 3-core fibers: an effect of bending and twisting.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takeshi; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2016-05-01

    The effect of bending and twisting on the group delay spread (GDS) of strongly coupled 3-core fibers is investigated. For the random perturbation inducing modal coupling in the fiber, two physical mechanisms, microbending or macrobending with random twist, are considered. Calculated results show that both mechanisms lead to the same effect, namely, reduced GDS under strong coupling regime. Furthermore, a novel fiber structure having an air-hole at the center is proposed for reducing the GDS. By placing the air-hole, the effective index difference between fundamental and the higher order modes is reduced, leading to strong modal mixing in the fiber, and hence, small GDS. Calculated GDS of the fiber with air-hole is almost 1/5 compared with that of the fiber without air-hole. PMID:27137571

  19. Age of word acquisition effects in treatment of children with phonological delays

    PubMed Central

    GIERUT, JUDITH A.; MORRISETTE, MICHELE L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the age of acquisition (AoA) of words were examined in the clinical treatment of 10 preschool children with phonological delays. Using a single-subject multiple-baseline experimental design, children were enrolled in one of four conditions that varied the AoA of the treated words (early vs. late acquired) relative to their corresponding word frequency (high vs. low frequency). Phonological generalization to treated and untreated sounds in error served as the dependent variable. Results showed that late acquired words induced greater generalization, with an effect size four times greater than early acquired words, whereas the effects of word frequency were minimized. Results are discussed relative to hypotheses about the role of AoA in language acquisition and the relevance of this variable for phonological learning. PMID:22408279

  20. Alteration in delayed fluorescence characterize the effect of heat stress on plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lizhang; Xing, Da

    2005-02-01

    High temperature affects the photosynthetic functions of plants by its effects on the rate of chemical reactions and on structural organization. Delayed fluorescence originated from the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII) during the photosynthesis process shortly after stopped illumination. With lamina of soybean as a testing model, the effects of high temperature stress on plant photosynthesis capability were studied with various spectral analysis methods. Experimental results show that DF spectrum and Excitation spectrum can probably characterize the changes of soybean photosynthesis capability after different high temperature treatments. Meanwhile, the injury and harm degree of heat stress on soybean leaves were further studied by the variability of its chloroplast absorption spectrum. DF spectroscopy method may provide a new approach for fast detection of the effects of environment stresses on plant photosynthesis capability.

  1. Effects of a single reflection with varied horizontal angle and time delay on speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Ando, Y

    1991-12-01

    Previously, almost all physical measures for estimating speech intelligibility in a room have been derived from only temporal-monaural criteria. This paper shows that speech intelligibility for a sound field with a single reflection depends not only on the temporal-monaural factor but also on the spatial-binaural factor of the sound field. Articulation tests for sound fields simulated with a single reflection of delay time delta t1 after the direct sound were conducted changing the horizontal incident angle xi of the reflection. Remarkable findings are as followings: (1) speech intelligibility (SI) decreases with increasing delay time delta t1, (2) SI increases when xi approaches 90 degrees; the horizontal angle of the reflection causes a significant effect on SI, and (3) the analysis of variance for articulation test scores clearly demonstrated that the effects of both delta t1 and xi on SI are fully independent. Concerning result (2), if listeners get a spatial separation of signals at the two ears, then the listener's capability for speech perception is assumed to be improved due to "adding" further information to the temporal pattern recognition. PMID:1787252

  2. Effect of surface reactions on ignition delay of methanol/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, J. P.; Yang, H. L.; Jiang, L. Q.; Wang, X. H.; Zhao, D. Q.

    2014-11-01

    A surface reaction kinetic model for the combustion of methanol/air mixture was developed in order to investigate the ignition inhibitory mechanism of wall on the premixed gas in a micro closed volume. In this model, except for H, O, OH and CH3 radicals, the absorption of hydrogen peroxide and hydroperoxyl on the surface were also considered. By applying CHEMKIN-Pro software, the model was integrated into the calculation of homogeneous combustion process of gas mixture. Surface reactions were found resulting in the increase of ignition delay time. The sensitivity analysis showed that the loss of hydrogen peroxide on the wall was the main reason, due to the direct suppression effect on the generation and accumulation of OH in the radical pool. However, the loss of hydroperoxyl would take the place of hydrogen peroxide as the main inhibitory factor when the sticking coefficient became as large as the order of 10-3. In addition, the ignition delay time increased with sticking coefficient or surface-area-to-volume ratio. Enhancing the initial temperature of premixed gas was able to reduce the inhibitory effect of surface reactions.

  3. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  4. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  5. The delayed neurotoxic effect of some organophosphorus compounds. Identification of the phosphorylation site as an esterase

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. K.

    1969-01-01

    1. Organophosphorus compounds that produce a delayed neurotoxic effect in hens phosphorylate a specific site in the brain soon after administration. 2. Phosphorylation of the specific site by di-isopropyl [32P]phosphorofluoridate in vitro is blocked by the prior addition of phenyl phenylacetate. 3. A small proportion of the total activity of hen brain hydrolysing phenyl phenylacetate in vitro was shown to be due to an enzyme different from two others previously described. 4. This enzyme is only slightly inhibited in vitro by concentrations of tetraethyl pyrophosphate and paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate) up to 64μm and is completely inhibited by 6μm-di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate and 128μm-mipafox. 5. It is also inhibited in vivo by effective doses of neurotoxic organophosphorus compounds but not by high doses of non-neurotoxic analogues. 6. It is deduced that the active site of this enzyme is the phosphorylation site associated with the genesis of delayed neurotoxicity. PMID:4310054

  6. Reduction of the effects of the communication delays in scientific algorithms on message passing MIMD architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, J. H.; Naik, V. K.; Nicol, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The efficient implementation of algorithms on multiprocessor machines requires that the effects of communication delays be minimized. The effects of these delays on the performance of a model problem on a hypercube multiprocessor architecture is investigated and methods are developed for increasing algorithm efficiency. The model problem under investigation is the solution by red-black Successive Over Relaxation YOUN71 of the heat equation; most of the techniques described here also apply equally well to the solution of elliptic partial differential equations by red-black or multicolor SOR methods. Methods for reducing communication traffic and overhead on a multiprocessor are identified and results of testing these methods on the Intel iPSC Hypercube reported. Methods for partitioning a problem's domain across processors, for reducing communication traffic during a global convergence check, for reducing the number of global convergence checks employed during an iteration, and for concurrently iterating on multiple time-steps in a time-dependent problem. Empirical results show that use of these models can markedly reduce a numewrical problem's execution time.

  7. Effect of advanced and delayed rotation on the dominant flow pattern and its temporal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uksul, Esra; Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen

    2015-11-01

    During a flapping cycle of an insect, complex time dependent flows are produced as the wing reciprocates, producing a maximum lift at the stroke reversals. By flipping the wing rapidly at the end of each stroke, the insect modulates the flow around the wing and hence the aerodynamic forces necessary to hover. The duration and starting point of the flip play an important role in determining the amount of lift produced. To understand and tailor the effect of wing kinematics on the aerodynamic performance we focussed on the vortex dynamics of the flow field. Phase-averaged data from particle image velocimetry was used to evaluate the flow features inherent to changes in rotation during a stroke of a flat plate, which is modelled based on hoverfly characteristics. The period of rotation is one-third of the total time period. A +10% phase shift is used for delayed rotation, a -10% phase shift for advanced rotation. Vortex detection methods like the λ2 and Γ2 criteria are used to determine the effect of a delay or early rotation on the trajectories, size, shape and location of the prominent vortical structures. Proper orthogonal decomposition is used to study the influence of the phase-shifts on the dominant mode structure and the related time-scales.

  8. Reinforcement Delay Fading during Differential Reinforcement of Communication: The Effects of Signals on Response Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Michael E.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Roane, Henry S.; Zangrillo, Amanda N.

    2011-01-01

    Signals during delays to reinforcement may lessen reductions in responding that typically occur when there is a delay between a response and its reinforcer. Sparse applied research has been devoted to understanding the conditions under which responding may be maintained when delays to reinforcement are introduced. We evaluated the extent to which…

  9. [The effect of the external biliary diversion on cobalamin functions].

    PubMed

    Minato, H; Inada, A; Kozaka, S

    1995-10-01

    We studied the effect of the external biliary diversion on cobalamin functions clinically and experimentally. Serum cobalamin was rising to 10 ng/ml or more in each patient with obstructive jaundice and the diverted bile contained high concentrations of cobalamin (10-80 ng/ml). A total volume of diverted cobalamin reached to 2-12 micrograms/day after the relief of obstruction and was maintained 2-8 micrograms/day even after 30 days. In experimental dogs, serum cobalamin decreased to 360 +/- 40pg/ml (about 31% decreases) subsequent eight weeks after the relief. The cobalamin concentration of liver decreased to 184 +/- 123ng/g (19% decreases) after four weeks and to 164 +/- 108ng/g (30% decreases) after eight weeks. The concentration of the different cobalamins in the liver showed that the proportion of dimethyl benzimidazolyl cobamide coenzyme (DBCC) decreased and the proportion of methylcobalamin increased. It is concluded that cobalamin (10 micrograms/day at least) should be administered when the diversion continues for a long term. PMID:8538588

  10. Life in varying environments: experimental evidence for delayed effects of juvenile environment on adult life history.

    PubMed

    Helle, Heikki; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio

    2012-05-01

    1. The effects of environment experienced during early development on phenotype as an adult has started to gain vast amounts of interest in various taxa. Some evidence on long-term effects of juvenile environment is available, but replicated experimental studies in wild animals are still lacking. 2. Here we report the first replicated experiment in wild mammals which examines the long-term effects of juvenile and adult environments on individual fitness (reproduction, survival and health). The early development of bank vole (Myodes glareolus) individuals took place in either food-supplemented or un-supplemented outdoor enclosures. After the summer, adult individuals were reciprocally changed to either a similar or opposite resource environment to overwinter. 3. Adult environment had an overriding effect on reproductive success of females so that females overwintering in food-supplemented enclosures had a higher probability of breeding and advanced the initiation of breeding. However, the characteristics of their litters were determined by juvenile environment: females initially grown in food-supplemented conditions subsequently produced larger litters with bigger pups and a male-biased sex ratio. 4. In males, individuals growing in un-supplemented conditions had the highest survival irrespective of adult environment during winter, whereas in females, neither the juvenile nor adult environments affected their survival significantly. The physiological condition of voles in spring, as determined by haematological parameters, was also differentially affected by juvenile (plasma proteins and male testosterone) and adult (haematocrit) environments. 5. Our results suggest that (i) life-history trajectories of voles are not strictly specialized to a certain environment and (ii) the plastic life-history responses to present conditions can actually be caused by delayed effects of the juvenile environment. More generally, the results are important for understanding