Science.gov

Sample records for diverse kunitz inhibitors

  1. A Family of Diverse Kunitz Inhibitors from Echinococcus granulosus Potentially Involved in Host-Parasite Cross-Talk

    PubMed Central

    Margenat, Mariana; Durán, Rosario; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Graña, Martín; Parkinson, John; Maizels, Rick M.; Salinas, Gustavo; Alvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    The cestode Echinococcus granulosus, the agent of hydatidosis/echinococcosis, is remarkably well adapted to its definitive host. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the successful establishment of larval worms (protoscoleces) in the dog duodenum are unknown. With the aim of identifying molecules participating in the E. granulosus-dog cross-talk, we surveyed the transcriptomes of protoscoleces and protoscoleces treated with pepsin at pH 2. This analysis identified a multigene family of secreted monodomain Kunitz proteins associated mostly with pepsin/H+-treated worms, suggesting that they play a role at the onset of infection. We present the relevant molecular features of eight members of the E. granulosus Kunitz family (EgKU-1 – EgKU-8). Although diverse, the family includes three pairs of close paralogs (EgKU-1/EgKU-4; EgKU-3/EgKU-8; EgKU-6/EgKU-7), which would be the products of recent gene duplications. In addition, we describe the purification of EgKU-1 and EgKU-8 from larval worms, and provide data indicating that some members of the family (notably, EgKU-3 and EgKU-8) are secreted by protoscoleces. Detailed kinetic studies with native EgKU-1 and EgKU-8 highlighted their functional diversity. Like most monodomain Kunitz proteins, EgKU-8 behaved as a slow, tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases, with global inhibition constants (KI*) versus trypsins in the picomolar range. In sharp contrast, EgKU-1 did not inhibit any of the assayed peptidases. Interestingly, molecular modeling revealed structural elements associated with activity in Kunitz cation-channel blockers. We propose that this family of inhibitors has the potential to act at the E. granulosus-dog interface and interfere with host physiological processes at the initial stages of infection. PMID:19759914

  2. A new Kunitz-type plasmin inhibitor from scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Hongyan; San, Mingkui; Xu, Yue; Li, Jian; Li, Shan; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang; Chen, Zongyun

    2015-11-01

    Kunitz-type peptides from venomous animals are an important source of lead drug candidates towards human plasmin, a target of protease-associated diseases. However, no Kunitz-type plasmin inhibitor from venomous scorpion has been characterized. Here, we first investigated plasmin inhibiting activities of eight known Kunitz-type scorpion toxins Hg1, BmKTT-1, BmKTT-2, BmKTT-3, LmKTT-1a, LmKTT-1b, LmKTT-1c and BmKPI, and found a new plasmin inhibitor BmKTT-2, a Kunitz-type toxin peptide from the scorpion Buthus martensi karch. Protease inhibitory activity assay showed that BmKTT-2 potently inhibited plasmin with a Ki value of 8.75 ± 2.05 nM. Structure-function relationship studies between BmKTT-2 and plasmin showed that BmKTT-2 is a classical Kunitz-type plasmin inhibitor: Lys13 in BmKTT-2 is the P1 site, and Ala14 in BmKTT-2 is the P1' site. Interestingly, BmKTT-2 has potent inhibiting activities towards three important digestive serine proteases trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase, suggesting a good stability for administering oral medications. To the best of our knowledge, BmKTT-2 is the first Kunitz-type human plasmin inhibitor from scorpion venom, providing novel insights into drug developments targeting human plasmin protease. PMID:26363290

  3. A new multigene superfamily of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors from sea anemone Heteractis crispa.

    PubMed

    Isaeva, Marina P; Chausova, Victoriya E; Zelepuga, Elena A; Guzev, Konstantin V; Tabakmakher, Valentin M; Monastyrnaya, Margarita M; Kozlovskaya, Emma P

    2012-03-01

    Despite a considerable number of publications devoted to isolation and physicochemical properties of protease inhibitors from sea anemones, virtually nothing is known about the structure of the genes, and the nature of their isoforms diversity. Using the PCR-based cloning approach we discovered the Kunitz-type multigene superfamily composed of distinct gene families (GS-, RG-, GG-, and GN-gene families). It has been identified only three full-length GS-transcripts indicating a much greater variety of Kunitz homologs in Heteractis crispa. We have examined an exon-intron structure of GS-genes; an open reading frame is interrupted by a single intron located at the middle of the signal peptide. 33 deduced mature GS-polypeptides have been categorized into three groups according to the nature of a P1 residue. Some of them corresponded to native Kunitz-type protease inhibitors earlier isolated from H. crispa. The deduced GS-polypeptide sequences demonstrated diverse charge distribution ranging from the local point charges forms to the overall positive ones. We have suggested that the GS-gene family has evolved through gene tandem duplication followed by adaptive divergence of the P1 residue in the reactive site selected for divergent functions in paralogs. The expansion of this Kunitz-type multigene superfamily during evolution is lineage-specific, providing the tropical sea anemone H. crispa with the ability to interact an increasing diversity of the preys and predators. Our results show that the Kunitz-type polypeptides are encoded by a multigene superfamily and realized via a combinatory Kunitz-type library in the H. crispa tentacles venom. PMID:22001835

  4. Knock-down of transcript abundance of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor genes in white clover (Trifolium repens) reveals a redundancy and diversity of gene function.

    PubMed

    Islam, Afsana; Leung, Susanna; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Laing, William A; Richardson, Kim A; Hofmann, Rainer W; Dijkwel, Paul P; McManus, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional regulation of four phylogenetically distinct members of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor (KPI) genes isolated from white clover (Trifolium repens; designated Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5) has been investigated to determine their wider functional role. The four genes displayed differential transcription during seed germination, and in different tissues of the mature plant, and transcription was also ontogenetically regulated. Heterologous over-expression of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5 in Nicotiana tabacum retarded larval growth of the herbivore Spodoptera litura, and an increase in the transcription of the pathogenesis-related genes PR1 and PR4 was observed in the Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI4 over-expressing lines. RNA interference (RNAi) knock-down lines in white clover displayed significantly altered vegetative growth phenotypes with inhibition of shoot growth and a stimulation of root growth, while knock-down of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2 and Tr-KPI5 transcript abundance also retarded larval growth of S. litura. Examination of these RNAi lines revealed constitutive stress-associated phenotypes as well as altered transcription of cellular signalling genes. These results reveal a functional redundancy across members of the KPI gene family. Further, the regulation of transcription of at least one member of the family, Tr-KPI2, may occupy a central role in the maintenance of a cellular homeostasis. PMID:26377591

  5. Precursor of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean seeds

    SciTech Connect

    McGrain, A.; Chen, J.; Tan-Wilson, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) appears to be synthesized in precursor form which is converted by proteolytic digestion to the mature form of KSTI. Two forms of anti-cross-reacting material are evident when Western blots of extracts of developing seeds are analyzed. The precursor form increases to maximum levels as seed lengths increase to 11 mm. As the seed matures to 13 mm and turns yellow, precursor levels decrease while mature KSTI levels increase. The conversion of precursor to mature form could be demonstrated in vitro in seed extracts. The conversion could also be demonstrated in excised seeds pulse-labeled with ({sup 14}C)-leucine as loss of radioactivity from the precursor and appearance in the mature KSTI form.

  6. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  7. SdPI, The First Functionally Characterized Kunitz-Type Trypsin Inhibitor from Scorpion Venom

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian; He, Yawen; Ma, Yibao; Chen, Zongyun; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2011-01-01

    Background Kunitz-type venom peptides have been isolated from a wide variety of venomous animals. They usually have protease inhibitory activity or potassium channel blocking activity, which by virtue of the effects on predator animals are essential for the survival of venomous animals. However, no Kunitz-type peptides from scorpion venom have been functionally characterized. Principal Findings A new Kunitz-type venom peptide gene precursor, SdPI, was cloned and characterized from a venom gland cDNA library of the scorpion Lychas mucronatus. It codes for a signal peptide of 21 residues and a mature peptide of 59 residues. The mature SdPI peptide possesses a unique cysteine framework reticulated by three disulfide bridges, different from all reported Kunitz-type proteins. The recombinant SdPI peptide was functionally expressed. It showed trypsin inhibitory activity with high potency (Ki = 1.6×10−7 M) and thermostability. Conclusions The results illustrated that SdPI is a potent and stable serine protease inhibitor. Further mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation revealed that SdPI possesses a serine protease inhibitory active site similar to other Kunitz-type venom peptides. To our knowledge, SdPI is the first functionally characterized Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor derived from scorpion venom, and it represents a new class of Kunitz-type venom peptides. PMID:22087336

  8. A four-domain Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from Solen grandis is implicated in immune response.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jialong; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Liu, Meijun; Yang, Dinglong; Xu, Jie; Hu, Xiaoke

    2012-12-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitor (SPI) serves as a negative regulator in immune signal pathway by restraining the activities of serine proteinase (SP) and plays an essential role in the innate immunity. In the present study, a Kunitz-type SPI was identified from the mollusk razor clam Solen grandis (designated as SgKunitz). The full-length cDNA of SgKunitz was of 1284 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 768 bp. The ORF encoded four Kunitz domains, and their amino acids were well conserved when compared with those in other Kunitz-type SPIs, especially the six cysteines involved in forming of three disulfide bridges in each domain. In addition, the tertiary structure of all the four domains adopted a typical model of Kunitz-type SPI family, indicating SgKunitz was a new member of Kunitz-type SPI superfamily. The mRNA transcripts of SgKunitz were detected in all tested tissues of razor clam, including muscle, mantle, gonad, gill, hepatopancreas and hemocytes, and with the highest expression level in gill. When the razor clams were stimulated by LPS, PGN or β-1, 3-glucan, the expression level of SgKunitz mRNA in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01), suggesting SgKunitz might involved in the processes of inhibiting the activity of SPs during the immune responses triggered by various pathogens. Furthermore, the recombinant protein of SgKunitz could effectively inhibit the activities of SP trypsin and chymotrypsin in vitro. The present results suggested SgKunitz could serve as an inhibitor of SP involving in the immune response of S. grandis, and provided helpful evidences to understand the regulation mechanism of immune signal pathway in mollusk. PMID:23022284

  9. Crystal structure of a novel cysteinless plant Kunitz-type protease inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Daiane; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Verissimo, Paula; Yoo Im, Sonia; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela . E-mail: olivaml.bioq@epm.br

    2007-09-07

    Bauhinia bauhinioides Cruzipain Inhibitor (BbCI) is a cysteine protease inhibitor highly homologous to plant Kunitz-type inhibitors. However, in contrast to classical Kunitz family inhibitors it lacks cysteine residues and therefore disulfide bridges. BbCI is also distinct in the ability to inactivate enzymes belonging to two different classes, cysteine and serine proteases. Besides inhibiting the cysteine protease cruzipain, BbCI also inhibits cathepsin L and the serine proteases HNE (human neutrophil elastase) and PPE (porcine pancreatic elastase). Monoclinic crystals of the recombinant inhibitor that diffract to 1.7 A resolution were obtained using hanging drop method by vapor diffusion at 18 {sup o}C. The refined structure shows the conservative {beta}-trefoil fold features of the Kunitz inhibitors. In BbCI, one of the two characteristic S-S bonds is replaced by the water-mediated interaction between Tyr125 and Gly132. In this work we explore the structural differences between Kunitz-type inhibitors and analyze the essential interactions that maintain the protein structural stability preserving its biological function.

  10. Structural insights into serine protease inhibition by a marine invertebrate BPTI Kunitz-type inhibitor.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Pons, Tirso; Perbandt, Markus; Valiente, Pedro A; Talavera, Ariel; González-González, Yamile; Rehders, Dirk; Chávez, María A; Betzel, Christian; Redecke, Lars

    2012-11-01

    Proteins isolated from marine invertebrates are frequently characterized by exceptional structural and functional properties. ShPI-1, a BPTI Kunitz-type inhibitor from the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, displays activity not only against serine-, but also against cysteine-, and aspartate proteases. As an initial step to evaluate the molecular basis of its activities, we describe the crystallographic structure of ShPI-1 in complex with the serine protease bovine pancreatic trypsin at 1.7Å resolution. The overall structure and the important enzyme-inhibitor interactions of this first invertebrate BPTI-like Kunitz-type inhibitor:trypsin complex remained largely conserved compared to mammalian BPTI-Kunitz inhibitor complexes. However, a prominent stabilizing role within the interface was attributed to arginine at position P3. Binding free-energy calculations indicated a 10-fold decrease for the inhibitor affinity against trypsin, if the P3 residue of ShPI-1 is mutated to alanine. Together with the increased role of Arg(11) at P3 position, slightly reduced interactions at the prime side (Pn') of the primary binding loop and at the secondary binding loop of ShPI-1 were detected. In addition, the structure provides important information for site directed mutagenesis to further optimize the activity of rShPI-1A for biotechnological applications. PMID:22975140

  11. Characterization of a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor from Solanum tuberosum having lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kunal R; Patel, Dhaval K; Pappachan, Anju; Prabha, C Ratna; Singh, Desh Deepak

    2016-02-01

    Plant lectins and protease inhibitors constitute a class of proteins which plays a crucial role in plant defense. In our continuing investigations on lectins from plants, we have isolated, purified and characterized a protein of about 20 kDa, named PotHg, showing hemagglutination activity from tubers of Indian potato, Solanum tuberosum. De novo sequencing and MS/MS analysis confirmed that the purified protein was a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor having two chains (15 kDa and 5 kDa). SDS and native PAGE analysis showed that the protein was glycosylated and was a heterodimer of about 15 and 5 kDa subunits. PotHg agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes with specific activity of 640 H.U./mg which was inhibited by complex sugars like fetuin. PotHg retained hemagglutination activity over a pH range 4-9 and up to 80°C. Mannose and galactose interacted with the PotHg with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.5×10(-3) M and 2.8×10(-3) M, respectively as determined through fluorescence studies. Fluorescence studies suggested the involvement of a tryptophan in sugar binding which was further confirmed through modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide. Circular dichroism (CD) studies showed that PotHg contains mostly β sheets (∼45%) and loops which is in line with previously characterized protease inhibitors and modeling studies. There are previous reports of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors showing lectin like activity from Peltophorum dubium and Labramia bojeri. This is the first report of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor showing lectin like activity from a major crop plant and this makes PotHg an interesting candidate for further investigation. PMID:26645142

  12. Atypical reactive center Kunitz-type inhibitor from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa.

    PubMed

    Gladkikh, Irina; Monastyrnaya, Margarita; Leychenko, Elena; Zelepuga, Elena; Chausova, Victoria; Isaeva, Marina; Anastyuk, Stanislav; Andreev, Yaroslav; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Kozlovkaya, Emma

    2012-07-01

    The primary structure of a new Kunitz-type protease inhibitor InhVJ from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa (Radianthus macrodactylus) was determined by protein sequencing and cDNA cloning. InhVJ amino acid sequence was shown to share high sequence identity (up to 98%) with the other known Kunitz-type sea anemones sequences. It was determined that the P1 Thr at the reactive site resulted in a decrease of the K(i) of InhVJ to trypsin and α-chymotrypsin (7.38 × 10(-8) M and 9.93 × 10(-7) M, respectively). By structure modeling the functional importance of amino acids at the reactive site as well as at the weak contact site were determined. The significant role of Glu45 for the orientation and stabilization of the InhVJ-trypsin complex was elucidated. We can suggest that there has been an adaptive evolution of the P1 residue at the inhibitor reactive site providing specialization or functional diversification of the paralogs. The appearance of a key so-called P1 Thr residue instead of Lys might lead to refinement of inhibitor specificity in the direction of subfamilies of serine proteases. The absence of Kv channel and TRPV1-receptor modulation activity was confirmed by electrophysiological screening tests. PMID:22851925

  13. Practical and theoretical characterization of Inga laurina Kunitz inhibitor on the control of Homalinotus coriaceus.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues; Freire, Maria das Graças Machado; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Migliolo, Ludovico; de Oliveira, Caio Fernando Ramalho

    2011-02-01

    Digestive endoprotease activities of the coconut palm weevil, Homalinotus coriaceus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were characterized based on the ability of gut extracts to hydrolyze specific synthetic substrates, optimal pH, and hydrolysis sensitivity to protease inhibitors. Trypsin-like proteinases were major enzymes for H. coriaceus, with minor activity by chymotrypsin proteinases. More importantly, gut proteinases of H. coriaceus were inhibited by trypsin inhibitor from Inga laurina seeds. In addition, a serine proteinase inhibitor from I. laurina seeds demonstrated significant reduction of growth of H. coriaceus larvae after feeding on inhibitor incorporated artificial diets. Dietary utilization experiments show that 0.05% I. laurina trypsin inhibitor, incorporated into an artificial diet, decreases the consumption rate and fecal production of H. coriaceus larvae. Dietary utilization experiments show that 0.05% I. laurina trypsin inhibitor, incorporated into an artificial diet, decreases the consumption rate and fecal production of H. coriaceus larvae. We have constructed a three-dimensional model of the trypsin inhibitor complexed with trypsin. The model was built based on its comparative homology with soybean trypsin inhibitor. Trypsin inhibitor of I. laurina shows structural features characteristic of the Kunitz type trypsin inhibitor. In summary, these findings contribute to the development of biotechnological tools such as transgenic plants with enhanced resistance to insect pests. PMID:21094272

  14. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    M Salameh; A Soares; D Navaneetham; D Sinha; P Walsh; E Radisky

    2011-12-31

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P{sub 1} and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin-APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  15. Determinants of Affinity and Proteolytic Stability in Interactions of Kunitz Family Protease Inhibitors with Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, M.A.; Soares, A.; Navaneetham, D.; Sinha, D.; Walsh, P. N.; Radisky, E. S.

    2010-11-19

    An important functional property of protein protease inhibitors is their stability to proteolysis. Mesotrypsin is a human trypsin that has been implicated in the proteolytic inactivation of several protein protease inhibitors. We have found that bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a Kunitz protease inhibitor, inhibits mesotrypsin very weakly and is slowly proteolyzed, whereas, despite close sequence and structural homology, the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APPI) binds to mesotrypsin 100 times more tightly and is cleaved 300 times more rapidly. To define features responsible for these differences, we have assessed the binding and cleavage by mesotrypsin of APPI and BPTI reciprocally mutated at two nonidentical residues that make direct contact with the enzyme. We find that Arg at P{sub 1} (versus Lys) favors both tighter binding and more rapid cleavage, whereas Met (versus Arg) at P'{sub 2} favors tighter binding but has minimal effect on cleavage. Surprisingly, we find that the APPI scaffold greatly enhances proteolytic cleavage rates, independently of the binding loop. We draw thermodynamic additivity cycles analyzing the interdependence of P1 and P'{sub 2} substitutions and scaffold differences, finding multiple instances in which the contributions of these features are nonadditive. We also report the crystal structure of the mesotrypsin {center_dot} APPI complex, in which we find that the binding loop of APPI displays evidence of increased mobility compared with BPTI. Our data suggest that the enhanced vulnerability of APPI to mesotrypsin cleavage may derive from sequence differences in the scaffold that propagate increased flexibility and mobility to the binding loop.

  16. Secretion of miraculin through the function of a signal peptide conserved in the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor family.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ayako; Satoh, Makiko; Matsuyama, Tomomi; Ito, Akane; Nakata, Rieko; Aoyama, Takashi; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2013-06-19

    Miraculin, a glycoprotein that modifies sour tastes into sweet ones, belongs to the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family. To clarify the functional relation of miraculin with Kunitz-type STIs, we investigated its subcellular localization and trypsin inhibitory activity. In transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, miraculin, fused to yellow fluorescent protein, localized to and outside the plasma membrane depending on the putative secretion signal peptide. When transgenic seedlings were cultured in liquid medium, miraculin was present in the supernatant only after cellulase treatment. No trypsin inhibitory activity was detected in native or recombinant miraculin. In conclusion, miraculin is secreted outside the plasma membrane through the function of a signal peptide, conserved in Kunitz-type STIs, whereas its trypsin inhibitory activity may be lost during its evolution. PMID:23660404

  17. Identification of a new soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor mutation and its effect on Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor content in soybean seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean seeds possess anti-nutritional compounds which inactivate digestive proteases, principally corresponding to two families: Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitors (KTi) and Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBI). High levels of raw soybeans/soybean meal in feed mixtures can cause poor weight gain and pancreatic abno...

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Patil, Dipak N; Chaudhry, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-07-01

    A Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor has been purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. SDS-PAGE analysis of a purified sample showed a homogeneous band corresponding to a molecular weight of 21 kDa. The protein was identified as a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor based on N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6000. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 77.1, c = 129.1 A. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 A. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of one proteinase inhibitor molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 44%. PMID:19574654

  19. Isolation, Cloning and Structural Characterisation of Boophilin, a Multifunctional Kunitz-Type Proteinase Inhibitor from the Cattle Tick

    PubMed Central

    Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Almeida, Carla; Calisto, Bárbara M.; Friedrich, Thomas; Mentele, Reinhard; Stürzebecher, Jörg; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitors of coagulation factors from blood-feeding animals display a wide variety of structural motifs and inhibition mechanisms. We have isolated a novel inhibitor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus, one of the most widespread parasites of farm animals. The inhibitor, which we have termed boophilin, has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Mature boophilin is composed of two canonical Kunitz-type domains, and inhibits not only the major procoagulant enzyme, thrombin, but in addition, and by contrast to all other previously characterised natural thrombin inhibitors, significantly interferes with the proteolytic activity of other serine proteinases such as trypsin and plasmin. The crystal structure of the bovine α-thrombin·boophilin complex, refined at 2.35 Å resolution reveals a non-canonical binding mode to the proteinase. The N-terminal region of the mature inhibitor, Q16-R17-N18, binds in a parallel manner across the active site of the proteinase, with the guanidinium group of R17 anchored in the S1 pocket, while the C-terminal Kunitz domain is negatively charged and docks into the basic exosite I of thrombin. This binding mode resembles the previously characterised thrombin inhibitor, ornithodorin which, unlike boophilin, is composed of two distorted Kunitz modules. Unexpectedly, both boophilin domains adopt markedly different orientations when compared to those of ornithodorin, in its complex with thrombin. The N-terminal boophilin domain rotates 9° and is displaced by 6 Å, while the C-terminal domain rotates almost 6° accompanied by a 3 Å displacement. The reactive-site loop of the N-terminal Kunitz domain of boophilin with its P1 residue, K31, is fully solvent exposed and could thus bind a second trypsin-like proteinase without sterical restraints. This finding explains the formation of a ternary thrombin·boophilin·trypsin complex, and suggests a mechanism for prothrombinase inhibition in vivo. PMID:18286181

  20. Cloning and Characterization of Two Potent Kunitz Type Protease Inhibitors from Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Shiwanthi L; Fischer, Katja; Zhang, Wenbao; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus is responsible for cystic echinococcosis (CE), a cosmopolitan disease which imposes a significant burden on the health and economy of affected communities. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms whereby E. granulosus is able to survive in the hostile mammalian host environment, avoiding attack by host enzymes and evading immune responses, but protease inhibitors released by the parasite are likely implicated. We identified two nucleotide sequences corresponding to secreted single domain Kunitz type protease inhibitors (EgKIs) in the E. granulosus genome, and their cDNAs were cloned, bacterially expressed and purified. EgKI-1 is highly expressed in the oncosphere (egg) stage and is a potent chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase inhibitor that binds calcium and reduced neutrophil infiltration in a local inflammation model. EgKI-2 is highly expressed in adult worms and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin. As powerful inhibitors of mammalian intestinal proteases, the EgKIs may play a pivotal protective role in preventing proteolytic enzyme attack thereby ensuring survival of E. granulosus within its mammalian hosts. EgKI-1 may also be involved in the oncosphere in host immune evasion by inhibiting neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G once this stage is exposed to the mammalian blood system. In light of their key roles in protecting E. granulosus from host enzymatic attack, the EgKI proteins represent potential intervention targets to control CE. This is important as new public health measures against CE are required, given the inefficiencies of available drugs and the current difficulties in its treatment and control. In addition, being a small sized highly potent serine protease inhibitor, and an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, EgKI-1 may have clinical potential as a novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic. PMID:26645974

  1. Cloning and Characterization of Two Potent Kunitz Type Protease Inhibitors from Echinococcus granulosus

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, Shiwanthi L.; Fischer, Katja; Zhang, Wenbao; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; McManus, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    The tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus is responsible for cystic echinococcosis (CE), a cosmopolitan disease which imposes a significant burden on the health and economy of affected communities. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms whereby E. granulosus is able to survive in the hostile mammalian host environment, avoiding attack by host enzymes and evading immune responses, but protease inhibitors released by the parasite are likely implicated. We identified two nucleotide sequences corresponding to secreted single domain Kunitz type protease inhibitors (EgKIs) in the E. granulosus genome, and their cDNAs were cloned, bacterially expressed and purified. EgKI-1 is highly expressed in the oncosphere (egg) stage and is a potent chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase inhibitor that binds calcium and reduced neutrophil infiltration in a local inflammation model. EgKI-2 is highly expressed in adult worms and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin. As powerful inhibitors of mammalian intestinal proteases, the EgKIs may play a pivotal protective role in preventing proteolytic enzyme attack thereby ensuring survival of E. granulosus within its mammalian hosts. EgKI-1 may also be involved in the oncosphere in host immune evasion by inhibiting neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G once this stage is exposed to the mammalian blood system. In light of their key roles in protecting E. granulosus from host enzymatic attack, the EgKI proteins represent potential intervention targets to control CE. This is important as new public health measures against CE are required, given the inefficiencies of available drugs and the current difficulties in its treatment and control. In addition, being a small sized highly potent serine protease inhibitor, and an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis, EgKI-1 may have clinical potential as a novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic. PMID:26645974

  2. Marker assisted accelerated introgression of null allele of kunitz trypsin inhibitor in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vineet; Rani, Anita; Rawal, Reena; Mourya, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Development of kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI)-free soybean is crucial for soy-food industry as the heat inactivation employed to inactivate the anti-nutritional factor in regular soybean incurs extra cost and affects protein solubility. In the presented work, a null allele of KTI from PI542044 was introgressed into cultivar ‘JS97-52’ (recurrent parent) through marker assisted backcrossing. Foreground selection in BC1F2, BC2F2 and BC3F2 was carried out using the null allele-specific marker in tandem with SSR marker Satt228, tightly linked with a trypsin inhibitor Ti locus. Background selection in null allele-carrying plants through 106 polymorphic SSR markers across the genome led to the identification of 9 KTI-free lines exhibiting 98.6% average recurrent parent genome content (RPGC) after three backcrosses, which otherwise had required 5–6 backcrosses through conventional method. Introgressed lines (ILs) were free from KTI and yielded at par with recurrent parent. Reduction of 68.8–83.5% in trypsin inhibitor content (TIC) in ILs compared to the recurrent parent (‘JS97-52’) was attributed to the elimination of KTI. PMID:26719748

  3. Characterization of a Kunitz trypsin inhibitor with a single disulfide bridge from seeds of Inga laurina (SW.) Willd.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues; Garcia, Viviane Alves; Freire, Maria das Graças M; Richardson, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Inga laurina is a tree that belongs to the Mimosoideae sub-family of the Leguminosae. A protein inhibitor of trypsin (ILTI) was isolated from its seeds by ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography and rechromatography on an HiTrap Q ion-exchange column. By SDS-PAGE, ILTI yielded a single band with a Mr of 20 kDa with or without reduction. ILTI was found to be a single polypeptide chain containing 180 amino acids, the sequence of which was clearly homologous to the Kunitz family of serine protease plant protein inhibitors, and it also showed significant similarity to the seed storage proteins, sporamin and miraculin. However, ILTI displayed major differences to most other Kunitz inhibitors in that it contained only one disulfide bridge, and did not have two polypeptide chains as for the majority of other Kunitz inhibitors purified from Mimosoideae species. ILTI inhibited bovine trypsin with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K(i)) of 6 x 10(-9)M, but did not inhibit chymotrypsin, papain and alpha-amylase. Its amino acid sequence contained a Lys residue at the putative reactive site (position 64). ILTI was stable over a wide range of temperature and pH and in the presence of DTT. PMID:17363015

  4. A genetically engineered human Kunitz protease inhibitor with increased kallikrein inhibition in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ohri, S K; Parratt, R; White, T; Becket, J; Brannan, J J; Hunt, B J; Taylor, K M

    2001-05-01

    A recombinant human serine protease inhibitor known as Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) wild type has functional similarities to the bovine Kunitz inhibitor, aprotinin, and had shown a potential to reduce bleeding in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The aim of this study was to assess KPI-185, a modification of KPI-wild type that differs from KPI-wild type in two amino acid residues and which enhances anti-kallikrein activity in a further double-blind, randomized study in an ovine model of CPB, and to compare with our previous study of KPI-wild type and aprotinin in the same ovine model. Post-operative drain losses and subjective assessment of wound 'dryness' showed no significant differences between KPI-185 and KPI-wild type, despite the significant enhancement of kallikrein inhibition using KPI-185 seen in serial kallikrein inhibition assays. These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that kallikrein inhibition is not the major mechanism by which Kunitz inhibitors such as aprotinin reduce perioperative bleeding. PMID:11419655

  5. Two cell wall Kunitz trypsin inhibitors in chickpea during seed germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Nistal, Josefina; Martín, Ignacio; Jiménez, Teresa; Dopico, Berta; Labrador, Emilia

    2009-03-01

    Two Kunitz trypsin inhibitors TPI-1 and TPI-2, encoded by CaTPI-1 and CaTPI-2, previously identified and characterized, have been detected in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) embryonic axes from seeds imbibed up to 48 h. Their gene transcription commenced before germination sensu stricto was completed. The transcript amount of CaTPI-1 remained high until 24 h after imbibition, when the epicotyls started to grow, while CaTPI-2 mRNA, which appeared later, reached a maximum at 48 h. Both the temporal and the spatial distribution of TPI-1 and TPI-2 proteins in the embryonic axes suggest that they perform different functions. The early appearance of TPI-1 in imbibed seeds suggests that it plays a protective role, preventing the premature degradation of the proteins stored in the embryonic axes. Its pattern of distribution suggests that the protein is involved in the regulation of vascular tissue differentiation, protecting the cells from some proteinases involved in programmed cell death. With regard to TPI-2, its later synthesis after imbibition, together with its tissue distribution, indicates that it is mainly active following germination, during elongation of the embryonic axes. PMID:19091584

  6. Three-dimensional Structure of a Kunitz-type Inhibitor in Complex with an Elastase-like Enzyme.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Perbandt, Markus; Rehders, Dirk; Ziegelmüller, Patrick; Piganeau, Nicolas; Hahn, Ulrich; Betzel, Christian; Chávez, María de Los Ángeles; Redecke, Lars

    2015-05-29

    Elastase-like enzymes are involved in important diseases such as acute pancreatitis, chronic inflammatory lung diseases, and cancer. Structural insights into their interaction with specific inhibitors will contribute to the development of novel anti-elastase compounds that resist rapid oxidation and proteolysis. Proteinaceous Kunitz-type inhibitors homologous to the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) provide a suitable scaffold, but the structural aspects of their interaction with elastase-like enzymes have not been elucidated. Here, we increased the selectivity of ShPI-1, a versatile serine protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus with high biomedical and biotechnological potential, toward elastase-like enzymes by substitution of the P1 residue (Lys(13)) with leucine. The variant (rShPI-1/K13L) exhibits a novel anti-porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) activity together with a significantly improved inhibition of human neuthrophil elastase and chymotrypsin. The crystal structure of the PPE·rShPI-1/K13L complex determined at 2.0 Å resolution provided the first details of the canonical interaction between a BPTI-Kunitz-type domain and elastase-like enzymes. In addition to the essential impact of the variant P1 residue for complex stability, the interface is improved by increased contributions of the primary and secondary binding loop as compared with similar trypsin and chymotrypsin complexes. A comparison of the interaction network with elastase complexes of canonical inhibitors from the chelonian in family supports a key role of the P3 site in ShPI-1 in directing its selectivity against pancreatic and neutrophil elastases. Our results provide the structural basis for site-specific mutagenesis to further improve the binding affinity and/or direct the selectivity of BPTI-Kunitz-type inhibitors toward elastase-like enzymes. PMID:25878249

  7. Three-dimensional Structure of a Kunitz-type Inhibitor in Complex with an Elastase-like Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Perbandt, Markus; Rehders, Dirk; Ziegelmüller, Patrick; Piganeau, Nicolas; Hahn, Ulrich; Betzel, Christian; Chávez, María de los Ángeles; Redecke, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Elastase-like enzymes are involved in important diseases such as acute pancreatitis, chronic inflammatory lung diseases, and cancer. Structural insights into their interaction with specific inhibitors will contribute to the development of novel anti-elastase compounds that resist rapid oxidation and proteolysis. Proteinaceous Kunitz-type inhibitors homologous to the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) provide a suitable scaffold, but the structural aspects of their interaction with elastase-like enzymes have not been elucidated. Here, we increased the selectivity of ShPI-1, a versatile serine protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus with high biomedical and biotechnological potential, toward elastase-like enzymes by substitution of the P1 residue (Lys13) with leucine. The variant (rShPI-1/K13L) exhibits a novel anti-porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) activity together with a significantly improved inhibition of human neuthrophil elastase and chymotrypsin. The crystal structure of the PPE·rShPI-1/K13L complex determined at 2.0 Å resolution provided the first details of the canonical interaction between a BPTI-Kunitz-type domain and elastase-like enzymes. In addition to the essential impact of the variant P1 residue for complex stability, the interface is improved by increased contributions of the primary and secondary binding loop as compared with similar trypsin and chymotrypsin complexes. A comparison of the interaction network with elastase complexes of canonical inhibitors from the chelonian in family supports a key role of the P3 site in ShPI-1 in directing its selectivity against pancreatic and neutrophil elastases. Our results provide the structural basis for site-specific mutagenesis to further improve the binding affinity and/or direct the selectivity of BPTI-Kunitz-type inhibitors toward elastase-like enzymes. PMID:25878249

  8. Tryptogalinin Is a Tick Kunitz Serine Protease Inhibitor with a Unique Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, James J.; Schwarz, Alexandra; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Calvo, Eric; Pedra, Joao H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background A salivary proteome-transcriptome project on the hard tick Ixodes scapularis revealed that Kunitz peptides are the most abundant salivary proteins. Ticks use Kunitz peptides (among other salivary proteins) to combat host defense mechanisms and to obtain a blood meal. Most of these Kunitz peptides, however, remain functionally uncharacterized, thus limiting our knowledge about their biochemical interactions. Results We discovered an unusual cysteine motif in a Kunitz peptide. This peptide inhibits several serine proteases with high affinity and was named tryptogalinin due to its high affinity for β-tryptase. Compared with other functionally described peptides from the Acari subclass, we showed that tryptogalinin is phylogenetically related to a Kunitz peptide from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, also reported to have a high affinity for β-tryptase. Using homology-based modeling (and other protein prediction programs) we were able to model and explain the multifaceted function of tryptogalinin. The N-terminus of the modeled tryptogalinin is detached from the rest of the peptide and exhibits intrinsic disorder allowing an increased flexibility for its high affinity with its inhibiting partners (i.e., serine proteases). Conclusions By incorporating experimental and computational methods our data not only describes the function of a Kunitz peptide from Ixodes scapularis, but also allows us to hypothesize about the molecular basis of this function at the atomic level. PMID:23658744

  9. Serine protease inhibitor kunitz-type 2 is downregulated in myelodysplastic syndromes and modulates cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Roversi, Fernanda Marconi; Lopes, Matheus Rodrigues; Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Longhini, Ana Leda F; Duarte, Adriana da Silva Santos; Baratti, Mariana Ozello; Palodetto, Bruna; Corrocher, Flávia Adolfo; Pericole, Fernando Vieira; Campos, Paula de Melo; Favaro, Patricia; Traina, Fabiola; Saad, Sara Teresinha Olalla

    2014-05-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders involving hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis. In addition to HSC defects, a defective hematopoiesis supporting capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the microenvironment niche has been implicated in MDS pathophysiology. The interaction between the dysfunctional MSCs MDS and HSC regulates diverse adhesion-related processes, such as progenitor cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal. As previously reported, a microarray analysis identified serine protease inhibitor kunitz-type 2 (SPINT2), an inhibitor of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activation, to be downregulated in MSCs from MDS patients. To define the role of SPINT2 in MDS hematopoietic microenvironment, an analysis of the effect of SPINT2 silencing in MSCs was carried out. We herein reported significantly lower levels of SPINT2 whereas HGF was expressed at higher levels in MSCs from MDS patients compared with healthy controls. SPINT2 underexpression results in an increased expression, production, and secretion of HGF and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) by MSCs. An increased adhesion of normal HSC or malignant cells onto MSCs silenced for SPINT2 was also observed. The altered MSCs adhesion in SPINT2-knockdown cells was correlated with increased CD49b and CD49d expression and with a decrease in CD49e expression. Our results suggest that the SPINT2 underexpression in the MSC from MDS patients is probably involved in the adhesion of progenitors to the bone marrow niche, through an increased HGF and SDF-1 signaling pathway. PMID:24410667

  10. Effect of the enzymatic inhibitor of Kunitz on the gastric lesions from reserpine, from phenylbutazone, from pyloric ligation and by restraint in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrin, F.; Demaille, A.; Merveille, P.; Bel, C.

    1980-01-01

    The protective effects of certain polypeptides on gastric ulcerations caused from reserpine and phenylbutazone in the rate were studied. It was found that the Kunitz enzymatic inhibitor exerts a protective action in regard to gastric lesions. However, the inhibitor did not change the development of Shay ulcers and stress ulcers from restraint.

  11. A chickpea Kunitz trypsin inhibitor is located in cell wall of elongating seedling organs and vascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Teresa; Martín, Ignacio; Labrador, Emilia; Dopico, Berta

    2007-06-01

    Kunitz proteinase inhibitors in legumes have mainly been described as defence and storage proteins. Here, we report a Kunitz trypsin inhibitor, encoded by the CaTPI-1 gene from Cicer arietinum. The transcription of this gene mainly occurs in seedling vegetative organs, and is affected by the light and growth stages. The recombinant TPI-1 protein expressed in E. coli was seen to be an efficient inhibitor of trypsin. After the generation of polyclonal antibodies against recombinant TPI-1 protein, the protein was located in the cell wall of elongating epicotyls and radicles by Western-blot experiments, in agreement with the transcription pattern. These results, together with the fact that both CaTPI-1 mRNA and protein levels decreased with epicotyl growth, suggest a possible role in the elongation of seedling epicotyls and radicles. Immunolocalization analyses of the TPI-1 protein indicated that it is abundant in the cell walls of both immature primary xylem cells and surrounding parenchyma cells. This location has led us to explore potential functions for TPI-1 protein in vascular tissue during seedling elongation. PMID:17226027

  12. A homolog of Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus: Molecular insights and transcriptional modulation in response to microbial and PAMP stimulation, and tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Godahewa, G I; Jayasinghe, J D H E; Whang, Ilson; Noh, Jae Koo; Lee, Jehee

    2015-10-01

    Serine proteases and their inhibitors play vital roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we identified and characterized cDNA coding for a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (SPI), which we designated as RbKSPI, in a commercially important species, rock bream. The full-length cDNA sequence of RbKSPI consisted of 2452 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1521 bp encoding a polypeptide of 507 amino acid (aa) residues. In the RbKSPI protein, MANEC, PKD, LDLa, and two Kunitz domains responsible for various functions were identified as characteristic features. Homology analysis revealed that RbKSPI shared the highest identity with the Kunitz homolog in Takifugu rubripes (77.6%). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that RbKSPI clusters with other teleostean KSPIs. In tissue-specific expression analysis, RbKSPI transcripts were detected in all the tested tissues, with the highest expression in gill tissue, followed by kidney and intestine. The mRNA expression of RbKSPI significantly increased in blood cells upon stimulation with two strains of bacteria (Edwardsiella tarda and Streptococcus iniae) and two pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs; LPS and poly I:C). Meanwhile, down-regulated expression of RbKSPI was observed in response to tissue injury. Collectively, these results suggest that the RbKSPI may be involved in essential immune defense against microbial pathogens and in the wound-healing process. PMID:26162478

  13. Crystal Structure of a Two-domain Fragment of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator Inhibitor-1: FUNCTIONAL INTERACTIONS BETWEEN THE KUNITZ-TYPE INHIBITOR DOMAIN-1 AND THE NEIGHBORING POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE-LIKE DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zebin; De Meulemeester, Laura; Jacobi, Annemarie; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Morth, J Preben; Andreasen, Peter A; Jensen, Jan K

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 (HAI-1) is a type I transmembrane protein and inhibitor of several serine proteases, including hepatocyte growth factor activator and matriptase. The protein is essential for development as knock-out mice die in utero due to placental defects caused by misregulated extracellular proteolysis. HAI-1 contains two Kunitz-type inhibitor domains (Kunitz), which are generally thought of as a functionally self-contained protease inhibitor unit. This is not the case for HAI-1, where our results reveal how interdomain interactions have evolved to stimulate the inhibitory activity of an integrated Kunitz. Here we present an x-ray crystal structure of an HAI-1 fragment covering the internal domain and Kunitz-1. The structure reveals not only that the previously uncharacterized internal domain is a member of the polycystic kidney disease domain family but also how the two domains engage in interdomain interactions. Supported by solution small angle x-ray scattering and a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and functional assays, we show that interdomain interactions not only stabilize the fold of the internal domain but also stimulate the inhibitory activity of Kunitz-1. By completing our structural characterization of the previously unknown N-terminal region of HAI-1, we provide new insight into the interplay between tertiary structure and the inhibitory activity of a multidomain protease inhibitor. We propose a previously unseen mechanism by which the association of an auxiliary domain stimulates the inhibitory activity of a Kunitz-type inhibitor (i.e. the first structure of an intramolecular interaction between a Kunitz and another domain). PMID:27189939

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a novel Kunitz-type kallikrein inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Marcos Vicente de A. S.; Vierira, Débora F.; Nagem, Ronaldo A. P.; Araújo, Ana Paula U. de; Oliva, Maria Luiza V.; Garratt, Richard C.

    2005-10-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies are reported for a novel Kunitz-type protease inhibitor from B. bauhinioides which contains no disulfide bridges. A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (BbKI) found in Bauhinia bauhinioides seeds has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at 293 K using PEG 4000 as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.87 Å resolution using an in-house X-ray generator. The crystals of the recombinant protein (rBbKI) belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.70, b = 64.14, c = 59.24 Å. Calculation of the Matthews coefficient suggests the presence of one monomer of rBbKI in the asymmetric unit, with a corresponding solvent content of 51% (V{sub M} = 2.5 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}). Iodinated crystals were prepared and a derivative data set was also collected at 2.1 Å resolution. Crystals soaked for a few seconds in a cryogenic solution containing 0.5 M NaI were found to be reasonably isomorphous to the native crystals. Furthermore, the presence of iodide anions could be confirmed in the NaI-derivatized crystal. Data sets from native and derivative crystals are being evaluated for use in crystal structure determination by means of the SIRAS (single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering) method.

  15. The complete amino acid sequence of the major Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Prosopsis juliflora.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, A N; Carvalho, M M; Xavier Filho, J; Blanco-Labra, A; Shewry, P R; Richardson, M

    1991-01-01

    The major inhibitor of trypsin in seeds of Prosopsis juliflora was purified by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE- and CM-Sepharose and preparative reverse phase HPLC on a Vydac C-18 column. The protein inhibited trypsin in the stoichiometric ratio of 1:1, but had only weak activity against chymotrypsin and did not inhibit human salivary or porcine pancreatic alpha-amylases. SDS-PAGE indicated that the inhibitor has a Mr of ca 20,000, and IEF-PAGE showed that the pI is 8.8. The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automatic degradation, and by DABITC/PITC microsequence analysis of peptides obtained from enzyme digestions of the reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein with trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, the Glu-specific protease from S. aureus and the Lys-specific protease from Lysobacter enzymogenes. The inhibitor consisted of two polypeptide chains, of 137 residues (alpha chain) and 38 residues (beta chain) linked together by a single disulphide bond. The amino acid sequence of the protein exhibited homology with a number of Kunitz proteinase inhibitors from other legume seeds, the bifunctional subtilisin/alpha-amylase inhibitors from cereals and the taste-modifying protein miraculin. PMID:1367792

  16. Engineering Kunitz Domain 1 (KD1) of Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-2 to Selectively Inhibit Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Madhu S.; Ogueli, Godwin I.; Kumar, Yogesh; Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Lawson, Gregory; Shanker, Sreejesh; Schmidt, Amy E.; Bajaj, S. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) inhibits factor XIa, plasma kallikrein, and factor VIIa/tissue factor; accordingly, it has been proposed for use as an anticoagulant. Full-length TFPI-2 or its isolated first Kunitz domain (KD1) also inhibits plasmin; therefore, it has been proposed for use as an antifibrinolytic agent. However, the anticoagulant properties of TFPI-2 or KD1 would diminish its antifibrinolytic function. In this study, structure-based investigations and analysis of the serine protease profiles revealed that coagulation enzymes prefer a hydrophobic residue at the P2′ position in their substrates/inhibitors, whereas plasmin prefers a positively charged arginine residue at the corresponding position in its substrates/inhibitors. Based upon this observation, we changed the P2′ residue Leu-17 in KD1 to Arg (KD1-L17R) and compared its inhibitory properties with wild-type KD1 (KD1-WT). Both WT and KD1-L17R were expressed in Escherichia coli, folded, and purified to homogeneity. N-terminal sequences and mass spectra confirmed proper expression of KD1-WT and KD1-L17R. Compared with KD1-WT, the KD1-L17R did not inhibit factor XIa, plasma kallikrein, or factor VIIa/tissue factor. Furthermore, KD1-L17R inhibited plasmin with ∼6-fold increased affinity and effectively prevented plasma clot fibrinolysis induced by tissue plasminogen activator. Similarly, in a mouse liver laceration bleeding model, KD1-L17R was ∼8-fold more effective than KD1-WT in preventing blood loss. Importantly, in this bleeding model, KD1-L17R was equally or more effective than aprotinin or tranexamic acid, which have been used as antifibrinolytic agents to prevent blood loss during major surgery/trauma. Furthermore, as compared with aprotinin, renal toxicity was not observed with KD1-L17R. PMID:21115497

  17. Potent cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion injury by a 2-domain fusion protein comprising Annexin V and Kunitz protease inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chi-Hsiao; Chen, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Yao-Chang; Fang, Shu-Wen; Wun, Tze-Chein

    2013-01-01

    Background Considerable evidence suggests that coagulation proteases (TF/FVIIa/FXa/thrombin) and their target protease activated receptors (PAR-1/PAR-2) play important roles in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury. We hypothesized that localized inhibition of TF/FVIIa on the membrane surfaces of ischemic cells could effectively block coagulation cascade and subsequent PAR-1/PAR-2 cell signaling, thereby protecting the myocardium from I-R injury. Objectives We recently developed an annexin V-Kunitz inhibitor fusion protein (ANV-6L15) that could specifically bind to anionic phospholipids on the membrane surfaces of apoptotic cells and efficiently inhibit the membrane-anchored TF/FVIIa. In this study, we investigated the cardioprotective effect of ANV-6L15 in a rat cardiac I-R model in comparison to that of hirudin. Methods Left coronary artery occlusion was maintained for 45 minutes followed by 4 hours of reperfusion in anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats. One minute before or 2 minutes after coronary ligation, rats received an i.v. bolus injection of ANV-6L15 (2.5 to 250 μg/kg), vehicle, or hirudin by bolus injection and continuous infusion. Results and Conclusions ANV-6L15 dose-dependently reduced infarct size by up to 87 %, and decreased plasma levels of cardiac troponin I, TNF-α, and sICAM-1, by up to 97 %, 96 %, and 66 %, respectively, with little impact on the coagulation parameters. ANV-6L15 also ameliorated hemodynamic derangements, attenuated neutrophil infiltration and reduced TUNEL-(+) apoptotic cardiomyocytes. Hirudin was less efficacious even at supra-clinical dose. ANV-6L15 confers exceptionally potent cardioprotection and is a promising drug candidate for prevention of myocardial I-R injury. PMID:23746209

  18. [Development of new soybean germplasm with null lipoxygenase and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor genes].

    PubMed

    Han, Fen-Xia; Ding, An-Lin; Sun, Jun-Ming; Li, Gui-Ying

    2005-04-01

    Soybean is one of the most important sources of plant protein for human. Soybean protein is a kind of high-quality protein composed of balanced amino acids, which contains all kinds of amino acids, especially 8 amino acids necessary for human. But it also contains some components that are not good for human and affect food quality, such as lipoxygenase (Lox) and trypsin inhibitor (Ti). Those are important anti-nutritious factors. Nutritional value and processing quality of soybean can be improved by means of development of new variety with null Lox and Ti. In this paper, new soybean germplasms that pyramided multiple genes of high quality, null lipoxygenase and trypsin inhibitor genes (Ix1, Ix2, Ix3 and ti) were developed by means of cross and biochemical marker-assisted selection of progenies for null lipoxygenase and trypsin inhibitor genes using known Lox and Ti markers (protein markers). Female parents were soybean varieties Ludou 4, Zhongpin 661, Yudou 8,91D15, wei8640 popularized in Huanghuaihai Plain. Male parents were varieties introduced from US, trypsin-inhibitor (Ti)-deficient varieties P. I. L83-4387 and near isogenic lines of varieties Century for lipoxygenase (Lox)-deficient genes, Century-2 (Ix2), Century-2.3 (Ix2Ix3) and Century-1.3 (Ix1 Ix3). These new germplasms will promote soybean breeding for improved quality production,and utilization. PMID:16011034

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of ILTI, a Kunitz-Type Trypsin Inhibitor from Inga laurina (SW.) Willd.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Taveira, Gabriel B; Gomes, Valdirene M; de Barros, Karina M C A; Maria-Neto, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Over the last few years, a growing number of proteinase inhibitors have been isolated from plants and particularly from seeds and have shown antimicrobial activity. A 20,000 Da serine peptidase inhibitor, named ILTI, was isolated from Inga laurina seeds and showed potent inhibitory enzymatic activity against trypsin. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ILTI on the growth of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. We observed that ILTI strongly inhibited in particular the growth of Candida tropicalis and Candida buinensis, inducing cellular agglomeration. However, it was ineffective against human pathogenic bacteria. We also investigated the potential of ILTI to permeabilize the plasma membrane of yeast cells. C. tropicalis and C. buinensis were incubated for 24 h with the ILTI at different concentrations, which showed that this inhibitor induced changes in the membranes of yeast cells, leading to their permeabilization. Interestingly, ILTI induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. tropicalis and C. buinensis cells. Finally, ILTI was coupled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and subsequent treatment of C. tropicalis and C. buinensis with DAPI revealed the presence of the labeled protein in the intracellular spaces. In conclusion, our results indicated the ability of peptidase inhibitors to induce microbial inhibition; therefore, they might offer templates for the design of new antifungal agents. PMID:26769111

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex of Kunitz-type tamarind trypsin inhibitor and porcine pancreatic trypsin.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Sakshi; Patil, Dipak N; Datta, Manali; Tapas, Satya; Preeti; Chaudhary, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-11-01

    The complex of Tamarindus indica Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and porcine trypsin has been crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium acetate as precipitant and sodium acetate as buffer. The homogeneity of complex formation was checked by size-exclusion chromatography and further confirmed by reducing SDS-PAGE. The crystals diffracted to 2.0 angstrom resolution and belonged to the tetragonal space group P4(1), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.1, c = 120.1 angstrom. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the presence of one unit of inhibitor-trypsin complex per asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 45%. PMID:19923745

  1. Pharmacological properties and pathophysiological significance of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (Rusvikunin-II) and its protein complex (Rusvikunin complex) purified from Daboia russelii russelii venom.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2014-10-01

    A 7.1 kDa basic peptide (Rusvikunin-II) was purified from a previously described protein complex (Rusvikunin complex, consists of Rusvikunin and Rusvikunin-II) of Daboia russelii russelii venom. The N-terminal sequence of Rusvikunin-II was found to be blocked, but peptide mass fingerprinting analysis indicated its identity as Kunitz-type basic protease inhibitor 2, previously reported from Russell's Viper venom. A tryptic peptide sequence of Rusvikunin-II containing the N-terminal sequence HDRPTFCNLFPESGR demonstrated significant sequence homology to venom basic protease inhibitors, Kunitz-type protease inhibitors and trypsin inhibitors. The secondary structure of Rusvikunin-II was dominated by β-sheets (60.4%), followed by random coil (38.2%), whereas α-helix (1.4%) contributes the least to its secondary structure. Both Rusvikunin-II and the Rusvikunin complex demonstrated dose-dependent anticoagulant activity; however, the anticoagulant potency of latter was found to be higher. Both inhibited the amidolytic activity of trypsin > plasmin > FXa, fibrinogen clotting activity of thrombin, and, to a lesser extent, the prothrombin activation property of FXa; however, the inhibitory effect of the Rusvikunin complex was more pronounced. Neither Rusvikunin-II nor Rusvikunin complex inhibited the amidolytic activity of chymotrypsin and thrombin. Rusvikunin-II at 10 μg/ml was not cytotoxic to Colo-205, MCF-7 or 3T3 cancer cells; conversely, Rusvikunin complex showed ∼30% reduction of MCF-7 cells under identical experimental conditions. Rusvikunin-II (5.0 mg/kg body weight, i.p. injection) was not lethal to mice or House Geckos; nevertheless, it showed in vivo anticoagulant action in mice. However, the Rusvikunin complex (at 5.0 mg/kg) was toxic to NSA mice, but not to House Geckos, suggesting it has prey-specific toxicity. Rusvikunin complex-treated mice exhibited dyspnea and hind-limb paresis prior to death. The present study indicates that the Kunitz

  2. Structures of a bi-functional Kunitz-type STI family inhibitor of serine and aspartic proteases: Could the aspartic protease inhibition have evolved from a canonical serine protease-binding loop?

    PubMed

    Guerra, Yasel; Valiente, Pedro A; Pons, Tirso; Berry, Colin; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Bi-functional inhibitors from the Kunitz-type soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) family are glycosylated proteins able to inhibit serine and aspartic proteases. Here we report six crystal structures of the wild-type and a non-glycosylated mutant of the bifunctional inhibitor E3Ad obtained at different pH values and space groups. The crystal structures show that E3Ad adopts the typical β-trefoil fold of the STI family exhibiting some conformational changes due to pH variations and crystal packing. Despite the high sequence identity with a recently reported potato cathepsin D inhibitor (PDI), three-dimensional structures obtained in this work show a significant conformational change in the protease-binding loop proposed for aspartic protease inhibition. The E3Ad binding loop for serine protease inhibition is also proposed, based on structural similarity with a novel non-canonical conformation described for the double-headed inhibitor API-A from the Kunitz-type STI family. In addition, structural and sequence analyses suggest that bifunctional inhibitors of serine and aspartic proteases from the Kunitz-type STI family are more similar to double-headed inhibitor API-A than other inhibitors with a canonical protease-binding loop. PMID:27329566

  3. Bowman-Birk and Kunitz protease inhibitors among antinutrients and bioactives modified by germination and hydrolysis in Brazilian soybean cultivar BRS 133.

    PubMed

    Dia, Vermont P; Gomez, Tegan; Vernaza, Gabriela; Berhow, Mark; Chang, Yoon Kil; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2012-08-15

    Soybean contains constituents that have antinutritional and bioactive properties. Enzymatic hydrolysis and germination can enhance the biological activity of these compounds in soybean. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of germination, Alcalase (protease) hydrolysis, and their combination on the concentrations of antinutritional and bioactive compounds in Brazilian soybean cultivar BRS 133. A combination of germination and Alcalase hydrolysis resulted in the degradation of Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI), and lunasin by 96.9, 97.8, and 38.4%. Lectin was not affected by any of the processing treatments when compared to nongerminated and nonhydrolyzed soy protein extract. Total isoflavones (ISF) and total saponins (SAP) increased by 16.2 and 28.7%, respectively, after 18 h of germination, while Alcalase hydrolysis led to the reduction of these compounds. A significant correlation was found between concentrations of BBI and KTI, BBI and lunasin, BBI and ISF, KTI and lunasin, KTI and ISF, KTI and SAP, lunasin and ISF, and ISF and SAP. Germination and Alcalase hydrolysis interacted in reducing BBI, ISF, and SAP. This study presents a process of preparing soy flour ingredients with lower concentrations of antinutritional factors and with biologically active constituents, important for the promotion of health associated with soybean consumption. In conclusion, 18 h of germination and 3 h of Alcalase hydrolysis is recommended for elimination of protease inhibitors, while bioactives are maintained by at least 50% of their original concentrations. PMID:22800092

  4. In Vitro Mode of Action and Anti-thrombotic Activity of Boophilin, a Multifunctional Kunitz Protease Inhibitor from the Midgut of a Tick Vector of Babesiosis, Rhipicephalus microplus

    PubMed Central

    Assumpção, Teresa C.; Ma, Dongying; Mizurini, Daniella M.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Kotsyfakis, Michail; Monteiro, Robson Q.; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hematophagous mosquitos and ticks avoid host hemostatic system through expression of enzyme inhibitors targeting proteolytic reactions of the coagulation and complement cascades. While most inhibitors characterized to date were found in the salivary glands, relatively few others have been identified in the midgut. Among those, Boophilin is a 2-Kunitz multifunctional inhibitor targeting thrombin, elastase, and kallikrein. However, the kinetics of Boophilin interaction with these enzymes, how it modulates platelet function, and whether it inhibits thrombosis in vivo have not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings Boophilin was expressed in HEK293 cells and purified to homogeneity. Using amidolytic assays and surface plasmon resonance experiments, we have demonstrated that Boophilin behaves as a classical, non-competitive inhibitor of thrombin with respect to small chromogenic substrates by a mechanism dependent on both exosite-1 and catalytic site. Inhibition is accompanied by blockade of platelet aggregation, fibrin formation, and clot-bound thrombin in vitro. Notably, we also identified Boophilin as a non-competitive inhibitor of FXIa, preventing FIX activation. In addition, Boophilin inhibits kallikrein activity and the reciprocal activation, indicating that it targets the contact pathway. Furthermore, Boophilin abrogates cathepsin G- and plasmin-induced platelet aggregation and partially affects elastase-mediated cleavage of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI). Finally, Boophilin inhibits carotid artery occlusion in vivo triggered by FeCl3, and promotes bleeding according to the mice tail transection method. Conclusion/Significance Through inhibition of several enzymes involved in proteolytic cascades and cell activation, Boophilin plays a major role in keeping the midgut microenvironment at low hemostatic and inflammatory tonus. This response allows ticks to successfully digest a blood meal which is critical for metabolism and egg

  5. Bio-potency of a 21 kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica seeds on the developmental physiology of H. armigera.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prabhash K; Jamal, Farrukh

    2014-11-01

    A trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of Tamarindus indica by Sephadex G-75, DEAE-Sepharose and Trypsin-Sepharose CL-4B columns was studied for its antifeedant, larvicidal, pupicidal and growth inhibitory activities against Helicoverpa armigera larvae. Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor (TTI) exhibited inhibitory activity towards total gut proteolytic enzymes of H. armigera (~87%) and bovine trypsin (~84%). Lethal doses which caused mortality and weight reduction by 50% were 1% w/w and 0.50% w/w, respectively. IC50 of TTI against Helicoverpa midgut proteases and bovine trypsin were ~2.10 µg/ml and 1.68 µg/ml respectively. In larval feeding studies the 21 kDa Kunitz-type protein was found to retard growth and development, prolonged the larval-pupal development durations along with adversely affecting the fertility and fecundity of H. armigera. In artificial diet at 0.5% w/w TTI, the efficiency of conversion of ingested food as well as of digested food, relative growth rate, growth index declined whereas approximate digestibility, metabolic cost, relative consumption rate, consumption index and total developmental period enhanced for H. armigera larvae. These results suggest that TTI has toxic and adverse effect on the developmental physiology of H. armigera and could be useful in controlling the pest H. armigera. PMID:25454525

  6. The Kunitz-protease inhibitor domain in amyloid precursor protein reduces cellular mitochondrial enzymes expression and function.

    PubMed

    Chua, Li-Min; Lim, Mei-Li; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this can be contributed by aberrant metabolic enzyme function. But, the mechanism causing this enzymatic impairment is unclear. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is known to be alternatively spliced to produce three major isoforms in the brain (APP695, APP751, APP770). Both APP770 and APP751 contain the Kunitz Protease Inhibitory (KPI) domain, but the former also contain an extra OX-2 domain. APP695 on the other hand, lacks both domains. In AD, up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms has been reported. But the functional contribution of this elevation is unclear. In the present study, we have expressed and compared the effect of the non-KPI containing APP695 and the KPI-containing APP751 on mitochondrial function. We found that the KPI-containing APP751 significantly decreased the expression of three major mitochondrial metabolic enzymes; citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase (COX IV). This reduction lowers the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, COX IV activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overall, this study demonstrated that up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms is likely to contribute to the impairment of metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial function in AD. PMID:23872114

  7. Characterization of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (MjKuPI) reveals the involvement of MjKuPI positive hemocytes in the immune responses of kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hung Nam; Nguyen, Ha Thi Nhu; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2016-10-01

    Serine proteases and their inhibitors play vital roles in biological processes. Serine protease inhibitors, including Kunitz-type protease inhibitors play important roles not only in physiological process (i.e. blood clotting and fibrinolysis) but also in immune responses. In this study, we characterized a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, designated MjKuPI, from kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus. An expression profile showed that MjKuPI was mainly expressed in hemocytes. Immunostaining revealed that some hemocytes expressed MjKuPI (MjKuPI(+) hemocytes) and others did not (MjKuPI(-) hemocytes). Injection of shrimp with Vibrio penaeicida and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) upregulated the mRNA level of MjKuPI, and a flow cytometry analysis revealed that the proportion of MjKuPI(+) hemocytes increased significantly 24 h after injection. Together, these results suggest that MjKuPI and MjKuPI(+) hemocytes have a role in the innate immune system of kuruma shrimp. PMID:27255219

  8. Interaction of thrombin des-ETW with antithrombin III, the Kunitz inhibitors, thrombomodulin and protein C. Structural link between the autolysis loop and the Tyr-Pro-Pro-Trp insertion of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Le Bonniec, B F; Guinto, E R; Esmon, C T

    1992-09-25

    X-ray diffraction studies of human thrombin revealed that compared with trypsin, two insertions (B and C) potentially limit access to the active site groove. When amino acids Glu146, Thr147, and Trp148, adjacent to the C-insertion (autolysis loop), are deleted the resulting thrombin (des-ETW) has dramatically altered interaction with serine protease inhibitors. Whereas des-ETW resists antithrombin III inactivation with a rate constant (Kon) approximately 350-fold slower than for thrombin, des-ETW is remarkably sensitive to the Kunitz inhibitors, with inhibition constants (Ki) decreased from 2.6 microM to 34 nM for the soybean trypsin inhibitor and from 52 microM to 1.8 microM for the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The affinity for hirudin (Ki = 5.6 pM) is weakened at least 30-fold compared with recombinant thrombin. The mutation affects the charge stabilizing system and the primary binding pocket of thrombin as depicted by a decrease in Kon for diisopropylfluorophosphate (9.5-fold) and for N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl ketone (51-fold) and a 39-fold increase in the Ki for benzamidine. With peptidyl p-nitroanilide substrates, the des-ETW deletion results in changes in the Michaelis (Km) and/or catalytic (kcat) constants, worsened as much as 85-fold (Km) or 100-fold (kcat). The specific clotting activity of des-ETW is less than 5% that of thrombin and the kcat/Km for protein C activation in the absence of cofactor less than 2%. Thrombomodulin binds to des-ETW with a dissociation constant of approximately 2.5 nM and partially restores its ability to activate protein C since, in the presence of the cofactor, kcat/Km rises to 6.5% that of thrombin. This study suggests that the ETW motif of thrombin prevents (directly or indirectly) its interaction with the two Kunitz inhibitors and is not essential for the thrombomodulin-mediated enhancement of protein C activation. PMID:1326550

  9. Polar Desolvation and Position 226 of Pancreatic and Neutrophil Elastases Are Crucial to their Affinity for the Kunitz-Type Inhibitors ShPI-1 and ShPI-1/K13L.

    PubMed

    Hernández González, Jorge Enrique; García-Fernández, Rossana; Valiente, Pedro Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The Kunitz-type protease inhibitor ShPI-1 inhibits human neutrophil elastase (HNE, Ki = 2.35·10-8 M) but does not interact with the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE); whereas its P1 site variant, ShPI-1/K13L, inhibits both HNE and PPE (Ki = 1.3·10-9 M, and Ki = 1.2·10-8 M, respectively). By employing a combination of molecular modeling tools, e.g., structural alignment, molecular dynamics simulations and Molecular Mechanics Generalized-Born/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area free energy calculations, we showed that D226 of HNE plays a critical role in the interaction of this enzyme with ShPI-1 through the formation of a strong salt bridge and hydrogen bonds with K13 at the inhibitor's P1 site, which compensate the unfavorable polar-desolvation penalty of the latter residue. Conversely, T226 of PPE is unable to establish strong interactions with K13, thereby precluding the insertion of K13 side-chain into the S1 subsite of this enzyme. An alternative conformation of K13 site-chain placed at the entrance of the S1 subsite of PPE, similar to that observed in the crystal structure of ShPI-1 in complex with chymotrypsin (PDB: 3T62), is also unfavorable due to the lack of stabilizing pair-wise interactions. In addition, our results suggest that the higher affinity of ShPI-1/K13L for both elastases mainly arises from the lower polar-desolvation penalty of L13 compared to that of K13, and not from stronger pair-wise interactions of the former residue with those of each enzyme. These results provide insights into the PPE and HNE inhibition and may contribute to the design of more potent and/or specific inhibitors toward one of these proteases. PMID:26372354

  10. Secretion and assembly of calicivirus-like particles in high-cell-density yeast fermentations: strategies based on a recombinant non-specific BPTI-Kunitz-type protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Erlinda; Toledo, Jorge R; Mansur, Manuel; Sánchez, Oliberto; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Lamazares, Emilio; Fernández, Yaiza; Parra, Francisco; Farnós, Omar

    2015-05-01

    The yeast Pichia pastoris is one of the most robust cell factories in use for the large-scale production of biopharmaceuticals with applications in the fields of human and animal health. Recently, intracellular high-level expression of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) capsid protein (VP1) as a self-assembled multipurpose antigen/carrier was established as a production process from P. pastoris. Since recovery of VP1 from the culture media implies technological and economic advantages, the secretion of VP1 variants was undertaken in this work. Conversely, extensive degradation of VP1 was detected. Variations to culture parameters and supplementation with different classes of additives were unable to diminish degradation. Strategies were then conducted during fermentations using a recombinant variant of a non-specific BPTI-Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (rShPI-1A) isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. The presence of the inhibitor in the culture medium at the recombinant protein induction phase, as well as co-culture of the yeast strains expressing VP1 and rShPI-1A, led to VP1 protection from proteolysis and to production of ordered virus-like particles. A yeast strain was also engineered to co-express the rShPI-1A inhibitor and intact VP1. Expression levels up to 116 mg L(-1) of VP1 were reached under these approaches. The antigen was characterized and purified in a single chromatography step, its immunogenic capacity was evaluated, and a detection test for specific antibodies was developed. This work provides feasible strategies for improvements in P. pastoris heterologous protein secretion and is the first report on co-expression of the ShPI-1A with a recombinant product otherwise subjected to proteolytic degradation. PMID:25403337

  11. Polar Desolvation and Position 226 of Pancreatic and Neutrophil Elastases Are Crucial to their Affinity for the Kunitz-Type Inhibitors ShPI-1 and ShPI-1/K13L

    PubMed Central

    Hernández González, Jorge Enrique; García-Fernández, Rossana; Valiente, Pedro Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The Kunitz-type protease inhibitor ShPI-1 inhibits human neutrophil elastase (HNE, Ki = 2.35·10−8 M) but does not interact with the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE); whereas its P1 site variant, ShPI-1/K13L, inhibits both HNE and PPE (Ki = 1.3·10−9 M, and Ki = 1.2·10−8 M, respectively). By employing a combination of molecular modeling tools, e.g., structural alignment, molecular dynamics simulations and Molecular Mechanics Generalized-Born/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area free energy calculations, we showed that D226 of HNE plays a critical role in the interaction of this enzyme with ShPI-1 through the formation of a strong salt bridge and hydrogen bonds with K13 at the inhibitor’s P1 site, which compensate the unfavorable polar-desolvation penalty of the latter residue. Conversely, T226 of PPE is unable to establish strong interactions with K13, thereby precluding the insertion of K13 side-chain into the S1 subsite of this enzyme. An alternative conformation of K13 site-chain placed at the entrance of the S1 subsite of PPE, similar to that observed in the crystal structure of ShPI-1 in complex with chymotrypsin (PDB: 3T62), is also unfavorable due to the lack of stabilizing pair-wise interactions. In addition, our results suggest that the higher affinity of ShPI-1/K13L for both elastases mainly arises from the lower polar-desolvation penalty of L13 compared to that of K13, and not from stronger pair-wise interactions of the former residue with those of each enzyme. These results provide insights into the PPE and HNE inhibition and may contribute to the design of more potent and/or specific inhibitors toward one of these proteases. PMID:26372354

  12. Calcicludine, a venom peptide of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family, is a potent blocker of high-threshold Ca2+ channels with a high affinity for L-type channels in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Schweitz, H; Heurteaux, C; Bois, P; Moinier, D; Romey, G; Lazdunski, M

    1994-01-01

    Calcicludine (CaC) is a 60-amino acid polypeptide from the venom of Dendroaspis angusticeps. It is structurally homologous to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, to dendrotoxins, which block K+ channels, and to the protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid beta protein that accumulates in Alzheimer disease. Voltage-clamp experiments on a variety of excitable cells have shown that CaC specifically blocks most of the high-threshold Ca2+ channels (L-, N-, or P-type) in the 10-100 nM range. Particularly high densities of specific 125I-labeled CaC binding sites were found in the olfactory bulb, in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the stratum oriens of CA3 field in the hippocampal formation, and in the granular layer of the cerebellum. 125I-labeled CaC binds with a high affinity (Kd = 15 pM) to a single class of noninteracting sites in rat olfactory bulb microsomes. The distribution of CaC binding sites in cerebella of three mutant mice (Weaver, Reeler, and Purkinje cell degeneration) clearly shows that the specific high-affinity labeling is associated with granule cells. Electrophysiological experiments on rat cerebellar granule neurons in primary culture have shown that CaC potently blocks the L-type component of the Ca2+ current (K0.5 = 0.2 nM). Then CaC, in the nanomolar range, appears to be a highly potent blocker of an L-subtype of neuronal Ca2+ channels. Images PMID:8302860

  13. Molecular evolution of miraculin-like proteins in soybean Kunitz super-family.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Purushotham; Gahloth, Deepankar; Tomar, Prabhat Pratap Singh; Sharma, Nidhi; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Miraculin-like proteins (MLPs) belong to soybean Kunitz super-family and have been characterized from many plant families like Rutaceae, Solanaceae, Rubiaceae, etc. Many of them possess trypsin inhibitory activity and are involved in plant defense. MLPs exhibit significant sequence identity (~30-95%) to native miraculin protein, also belonging to Kunitz super-family compared with a typical Kunitz family member (~30%). The sequence and structure-function comparison of MLPs with that of a classical Kunitz inhibitor have demonstrated that MLPs have evolved to form a distinct group within Kunitz super-family. Sequence analysis of new genes along with available MLP sequences in the literature revealed three major groups for these proteins. A significant feature of Rutaceae MLP type 2 sequences is the presence of phosphorylation motif. Subtle changes are seen in putative reactive loop residues among different MLPs suggesting altered specificities to specific proteases. In phylogenetic analysis, Rutaceae MLP type 1 and type 2 proteins clustered together on separate branches, whereas native miraculin along with other MLPs formed distinct clusters. Site-specific positive Darwinian selection was observed at many sites in both the groups of Rutaceae MLP sequences with most of the residues undergoing positive selection located in loop regions. The results demonstrate the sequence and thereby the structure-function divergence of MLPs as a distinct group within soybean Kunitz super-family due to biotic and abiotic stresses of local environment. PMID:22274614

  14. The influence of a 21 kDa Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from nonhost madras thorn, Pithecellobium dulce, seeds on H. armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prabhash K; Singh, Dushyant; Jamal, Farrukh

    2015-05-01

    A trypsin inhibitor purified from the seeds of the Manila tamarind, Pithecellobium dulce (PDTI), was studied for its effects on growth parameters and developmental stages of Helicoverpa armigera. PDTI exhibited inhibitory activity against bovine trypsin (∼86%; ∼1.33 ug/ml IC50). The inhibitory activity of PDTI was unaltered over a wide range of temperature, pH, and in the presence of dithiothreitol. Larval midgut proteases were unable to digest PDTI for up to 12 h of incubation. Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots analysis revealed a competitive inhibition mechanism and a Ki of ∼3.9 × 10(-8) M. Lethal dose (0.50% w/w) and dosage for weight reduction by 50% (0.25% w/w) were determined. PDTI showed a dose-dependent effect on mean larval weight and a series of nutritional disturbances. In artificial diet at 0.25% w/w PDTI, the efficiency of conversion of ingested food, of digested food, relative growth rate, and growth index declined, whereas approximate digestibility, relative consumption rate, metabolic cost, consumption index, and total developmental period were increased in larvae. This is the first report of antifeedant and antimetabolic activities of PDTI on midgut proteases of H. armigera. PMID:25580830

  15. Discovery of a Distinct Superfamily of Kunitz-Type Toxin (KTT) from Tarantulas

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Li-Ping; Tang, Xing; Liang, Song-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs) have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking) were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. Principal Findings Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of KTTs in spiders (Tarantulas: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana), which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI) as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (ω) for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins) derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications. Conclusions

  16. Protease inhibitors from marine venomous animals and their counterparts in terrestrial venomous animals.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Caroline B F; Schwartz, Elisabeth F

    2013-06-01

    The Kunitz-type protease inhibitors are the best-characterized family of serine protease inhibitors, probably due to their abundance in several organisms. These inhibitors consist of a chain of ~60 amino acid residues stabilized by three disulfide bridges, and was first observed in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-like protease inhibitors, which strongly inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin. In this review we present the protease inhibitors (PIs) described to date from marine venomous animals, such as from sea anemone extracts and Conus venom, as well as their counterparts in terrestrial venomous animals, such as snakes, scorpions, spiders, Anurans, and Hymenopterans. More emphasis was given to the Kunitz-type inhibitors, once they are found in all these organisms. Their biological sources, specificity against different proteases, and other molecular blanks (being also K+ channel blockers) are presented, followed by their molecular diversity. Whereas sea anemone, snakes and other venomous animals present mainly Kunitz-type inhibitors, PIs from Anurans present the major variety in structure length and number of Cys residues, with at least six distinguishable classes. A representative alignment of PIs from these venomous animals shows that, despite eventual differences in Cys assignment, the key-residues for the protease inhibitory activity in all of them occupy similar positions in primary sequence. The key-residues for the K+ channel blocking activity was also compared. PMID:23771044

  17. Protease Inhibitors from Marine Venomous Animals and Their Counterparts in Terrestrial Venomous Animals

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Caroline B.F.; Schwartz, Elisabeth F.

    2013-01-01

    The Kunitz-type protease inhibitors are the best-characterized family of serine protease inhibitors, probably due to their abundance in several organisms. These inhibitors consist of a chain of ~60 amino acid residues stabilized by three disulfide bridges, and was first observed in the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-like protease inhibitors, which strongly inhibit trypsin and chymotrypsin. In this review we present the protease inhibitors (PIs) described to date from marine venomous animals, such as from sea anemone extracts and Conus venom, as well as their counterparts in terrestrial venomous animals, such as snakes, scorpions, spiders, Anurans, and Hymenopterans. More emphasis was given to the Kunitz-type inhibitors, once they are found in all these organisms. Their biological sources, specificity against different proteases, and other molecular blanks (being also K+ channel blockers) are presented, followed by their molecular diversity. Whereas sea anemone, snakes and other venomous animals present mainly Kunitz-type inhibitors, PIs from Anurans present the major variety in structure length and number of Cys residues, with at least six distinguishable classes. A representative alignment of PIs from these venomous animals shows that, despite eventual differences in Cys assignment, the key-residues for the protease inhibitory activity in all of them occupy similar positions in primary sequence. The key-residues for the K+ channel blocking activity was also compared. PMID:23771044

  18. Structural basis for resistance to diverse classes of NAMPT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiru; Elkins, Kristi; Oh, Angela; Ho, Yen-Ching; Wu, Jiansheng; Li, Hong; Xiao, Yang; Kwong, Mandy; Coons, Mary; Brillantes, Bobby; Cheng, Eric; Crocker, Lisa; Dragovich, Peter S; Sampath, Deepak; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Bair, Kenneth W; O'Brien, Thomas; Belmont, Lisa D

    2014-01-01

    Inhibiting NAD biosynthesis by blocking the function of nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT) is an attractive therapeutic strategy for targeting tumor metabolism. However, the development of drug resistance commonly limits the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. This study identifies mutations in NAMPT that confer resistance to a novel NAMPT inhibitor, GNE-618, in cell culture and in vivo, thus demonstrating that the cytotoxicity of GNE-618 is on target. We determine the crystal structures of six NAMPT mutants in the apo form and in complex with various inhibitors and use cellular, biochemical and structural data to elucidate two resistance mechanisms. One is the surprising finding of allosteric modulation by mutation of residue Ser165, resulting in unwinding of an α-helix that binds the NAMPT substrate 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). The other mechanism is orthosteric blocking of inhibitor binding by mutations of Gly217. Furthermore, by evaluating a panel of diverse small molecule inhibitors, we unravel inhibitor structure activity relationships on the mutant enzymes. These results provide valuable insights into the design of next generation NAMPT inhibitors that offer improved therapeutic potential by evading certain mechanisms of resistance. PMID:25285661

  19. New Kunitz-Type HCRG Polypeptides from the Sea Anemone Heteractis crispa

    PubMed Central

    Gladkikh, Irina; Monastyrnaya, Margarita; Zelepuga, Elena; Sintsova, Oksana; Tabakmakher, Valentin; Gnedenko, Oksana; Ivanov, Alexis; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Kozlovskaya, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Sea anemones are a rich source of Kunitz-type polypeptides that possess not only protease inhibitor activity, but also Kv channels toxicity, analgesic, antihistamine, and anti-inflammatory activities. Two Kunitz-type inhibitors belonging to a new Heteractis crispa RG (HCRG) polypeptide subfamily have been isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa. The amino acid sequences of HCRG1 and HCRG2 identified using the Edman degradation method share up to 95% of their identity with the representatives of the HCGS polypeptide multigene subfamily derived from H. crispa cDNA. Polypeptides are characterized by positively charged Arg at the N-terminus as well as P1 Lys residue at their canonical binding loop, identical to those of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). These polypeptides are shown by our current evidence to be more potent inhibitors of trypsin than the known representatives of the HCGS subfamily with P1Thr. The kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the intermolecular interactions between inhibitors and serine proteases were determined by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) method. Residues functionally important for polypeptide binding to trypsin were revealed using molecular modeling methods. Furthermore, HCRG1 and HCRG2 possess anti-inflammatory activity, reducing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretions, as well as proIL-1β expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. However, there was no effect on nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:26404319

  20. New Kunitz-Type HCRG Polypeptides from the Sea Anemone Heteractis crispa.

    PubMed

    Gladkikh, Irina; Monastyrnaya, Margarita; Zelepuga, Elena; Sintsova, Oksana; Tabakmakher, Valentin; Gnedenko, Oksana; Ivanov, Alexis; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Kozlovskaya, Emma

    2015-10-01

    Sea anemones are a rich source of Kunitz-type polypeptides that possess not only protease inhibitor activity, but also Kv channels toxicity, analgesic, antihistamine, and anti-inflammatory activities. Two Kunitz-type inhibitors belonging to a new Heteractis crispa RG (HCRG) polypeptide subfamily have been isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa. The amino acid sequences of HCRG1 and HCRG2 identified using the Edman degradation method share up to 95% of their identity with the representatives of the HCGS polypeptide multigene subfamily derived from H. crispa cDNA. Polypeptides are characterized by positively charged Arg at the N-terminus as well as P1 Lys residue at their canonical binding loop, identical to those of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). These polypeptides are shown by our current evidence to be more potent inhibitors of trypsin than the known representatives of the HCGS subfamily with P1Thr. The kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics of the intermolecular interactions between inhibitors and serine proteases were determined by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) method. Residues functionally important for polypeptide binding to trypsin were revealed using molecular modeling methods. Furthermore, HCRG1 and HCRG2 possess anti-inflammatory activity, reducing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretions, as well as proIL-1β expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. However, there was no effect on nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:26404319

  1. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  2. The intact Kunitz domain protects the amyloid precursor protein from being processed by matriptase-2.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Anna-Madeleine; Glebov, Konstantin; Walter, Jochen; Merkel, Olaf; Mangold, Martin; Schmidt, Frederike; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Gütschow, Michael; Stirnberg, Marit

    2016-08-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) leads to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. So far, the mechanism of APP processing is insufficiently characterized at the molecular level. Whereas the knowledge of Aβ generation by several proteases has been expanded, the contribution of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain (KPI) present in two major APP isoforms to the complex proteolytic processing of APP is poorly understood. In this study, we have identified KPI-containing APP as a very potent, slow-binding inhibitor for the membrane-bound proteolytic regulator of iron homeostasis matriptase-2 by forming stable complexes with its target protease in HEK cells. Inhibition and complex formation depend on the intact KPI domain. By inhibiting matriptase-2, KPI-containing APP is protected from matriptase-2-mediated proteolysis within the Aβ region, thus preventing the generation of N-terminally truncated Aβ. PMID:27078672

  3. Structure of conkunitzin-S1, a neurotoxin and Kunitz-fold disulfide variant from cone snail

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Catherine Y.; Buczek, Pawel; Imperial, Julita S.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Horvath, Martin P.

    2006-01-01

    Cone snails (Conus) are predatory marine mollusks that immobilize prey with venom containing 50–200 neurotoxic polypeptides. Most of these polypeptides are small disulfide-rich conotoxins that can be classified into families according to their respective ion-channel targets and patterns of cysteine–cysteine disulfides. Conkunitzin-S1, a potassium-channel pore-blocking toxin isolated from C. striatus venom, is a member of a newly defined conotoxin family with sequence homology to Kunitz-fold proteins such as α-dendrotoxin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). While conkunitzin-S1 and α-dendrotoxin are 42% identical in amino-acid sequence, conkunitzin-S1 has only four of the six cysteines normally found in Kunitz proteins. Here, the crystal structure of conkunitzin-S1 is reported. Conkunitzin-S1 adopts the canonical 310–β–β–α Kunitz fold complete with additional distinguishing structural features including two completely buried water molecules. The crystal structure, although completely consistent with previously reported NMR distance restraints, provides a greater degree of precision for atomic coordinates, especially for S atoms and buried solvent molecules. The region normally cross-linked by cysteines II and IV in other Kunitz proteins retains a network of hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions comparable to those found in α-dendrotoxin and BPTI. In conkunitzin-S1, glycine occupies the sequence position normally reserved for cysteine II and the special steric properties of glycine allow additional van der Waals contacts with the glutamine residue substituting for cysteine IV. Evolution has thus defrayed the cost of losing a disulfide bond by augmenting and optimizing weaker yet nonetheless effective non-covalent interactions. PMID:16929098

  4. Structure of conkunitzin-S1, a neurotoxin and Kunitz-fold disulfide variant from cone snail

    SciTech Connect

    Dy, Catherine Y.; Buczek, Pawel; Imperial, Julita S.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Horvath, Martin P.

    2006-09-01

    Most Kunitz proteins like BPTI and α-dendrotoxin are stabilized by three disulfide bonds. The crystal structure shows how subtle repacking of non-covalent interactions may compensate for disulfide bond loss in a naturally occurring two-disulfide variant, conkunitzin-S1, the first discovered member of a new conotoxin family. Cone snails (Conus) are predatory marine mollusks that immobilize prey with venom containing 50–200 neurotoxic polypeptides. Most of these polypeptides are small disulfide-rich conotoxins that can be classified into families according to their respective ion-channel targets and patterns of cysteine–cysteine disulfides. Conkunitzin-S1, a potassium-channel pore-blocking toxin isolated from C. striatus venom, is a member of a newly defined conotoxin family with sequence homology to Kunitz-fold proteins such as α-dendrotoxin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). While conkunitzin-S1 and α-dendrotoxin are 42% identical in amino-acid sequence, conkunitzin-S1 has only four of the six cysteines normally found in Kunitz proteins. Here, the crystal structure of conkunitzin-S1 is reported. Conkunitzin-S1 adopts the canonical 3{sub 10}–β–β–α Kunitz fold complete with additional distinguishing structural features including two completely buried water molecules. The crystal structure, although completely consistent with previously reported NMR distance restraints, provides a greater degree of precision for atomic coordinates, especially for S atoms and buried solvent molecules. The region normally cross-linked by cysteines II and IV in other Kunitz proteins retains a network of hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions comparable to those found in α-dendrotoxin and BPTI. In conkunitzin-S1, glycine occupies the sequence position normally reserved for cysteine II and the special steric properties of glycine allow additional van der Waals contacts with the glutamine residue substituting for cysteine IV. Evolution has thus defrayed

  5. Diverse heterocyclic scaffolds as allosteric inhibitors of AKT.

    PubMed

    Kettle, Jason G; Brown, Simon; Crafter, Claire; Davies, Barry R; Dudley, Phillippa; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Fillery, Shaun; Greenwood, Hannah; Hawkins, Janet; James, Michael; Johnson, Keith; Lane, Clare D; Pass, Martin; Pink, Jennifer H; Plant, Helen; Cosulich, Sabina C

    2012-02-01

    Wide-ranging exploration of potential replacements for a quinoline-based inhibitor of activation of AKT kinase led to number of alternative, novel scaffolds with potentially improved potency and physicochemical properties. Examples showed predictable DMPK properties, and one such compound demonstrated pharmacodynamic knockdown of phosphorylation of AKT and downstream biomarkers in vivo and inhibition of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model. PMID:22248236

  6. Dynein Function and Protein Clearance Changes in Tumor Cells Induced by a Kunitz-Type Molecule, Amblyomin-X

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Mario T. F.; Berra, Carolina M.; Morais, Kátia L. P.; Sciani, Juliana M.; Branco, Vania G.; Bosch, Rosemary V.; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Amblyomin-X is a Kunitz-type recombinant protein identified from the transcriptome of the salivary glands of the tick Amblyomma cajennense and has anti-coagulant and antitumoral activity. The supposed primary target of this molecule is the proteasome system. Herein, we elucidated intracellular events that are triggered by Amblyomin-X treatment in an attempt to provide new insight into how this serine protease inhibitor, acting on the proteasome, could be comparable with known proteasome inhibitors. The collective results showed aggresome formation after proteasome inhibition that appeared to occur via the non-exclusive ubiquitin pathway. Additionally, Amblyomin-X increased the expression of various chains of the molecular motor dynein in tumor cells, modulated specific ubiquitin linkage signaling and inhibited autophagy activation by modulating mTOR, LC3 and AMBRA1 with probable dynein involvement. Interestingly, one possible role for dynein in the mechanism of action of Amblyomin-X was in the apoptotic response and its crosstalk with autophagy, which involved the factor Bim; however, we observed no changes in the apoptotic response related to dynein in the experiments performed. The characteristics shared among Amblyomin-X and known proteasome inhibitors included NF-κB blockage and nascent polypeptide-dependent aggresome formation. Therefore, our study describes a Kunitz-type protein that acts on the proteasome to trigger distinct intracellular events compared to classic known proteasome inhibitors that are small-cell-permeable molecules. In investigating the experiments and literature on Amblyomin-X and the known proteasome inhibitors, we also found differences in the structures of the molecules, intracellular events, dynein involvement and tumor cell type effects. These findings also reveal a possible new target for Amblyomin-X, i.e., dynein, and may serve as a tool for investigating tumor cell death associated with proteasome inhibition. PMID:25479096

  7. [Interaction of sea amemone Heteractis crispa Kunitz type polypeptides with pain vanilloid receptor TRPV1: in silico investigation].

    PubMed

    Zelepuga, E A; Tabakmakher, V M; Chausova, V E; monastyrnaia, M M; Isaeva, M P; Kozlovskaia, É P

    2012-01-01

    Using methods of molecular biology we defined the structures of the 31 sea anemone Heteractis crispa genes encoding polypeptides which are structurally homologous to the Kunitz proteinase inhibitor family. Identified amino acid sequences have point residue substitutions, high degree of homology with sequences of known H. crispa Kunitz family members, and represent a combinatorial library of polypeptides. We generated their three-dimensional structures by homologous modeling methods. Analysis of their molecular electrostatic potential enabled us to divide given polypeptides into three clusters. One of them includes polypeptides APHC1, APHC2 and APHC3, which were earlier shown to possess a unique property of inhibiting of the pain vanilloid receptor TRPV1 in vitro and providing the analgesic effects in vivo in addition to their trypsin inhibitory activity. Molecular docking made possible establishing the spatial structure of the complexes, the nature of the polypeptides binding with TRPV1, as well as functionally important structural elements involved in the complex formation. Structural models have enabled us to propose a hypothesis contributing to understanding the APHC1-3 impact mechanism for the pain signals transduction by TRPV1: apparently, there is an increase of the receptor relaxation time resulted in binding of its two chains with the polypeptide molecule, which disrupt the functioning of the TRPV1 and leads to partial inhibition of signal transduction in electrophysiological experiments. PMID:22792722

  8. Growing location has a pronounced effect on the accumulation of cancer chemopreventive agent Bowman-Birk inhibitor in soybean seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans contain several health promoting compounds including phytosterols, isoflavones, phytic acid, and protease inhibitors. The two abundant protease inhibitors of soybean seeds are the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI). BBI is a serine protease inhibitor that can inhi...

  9. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A.; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  10. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  11. Death by a thousand cuts: the challenges and diverse landscape of lignocellulosic hydrolysate inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Zhang, Yaoping; Bates, Donna M.; Keating, David H.; Sato, Trey K.; Ong, Irene M.; Landick, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysate (LCH) inhibitors are a large class of bioactive molecules that arise from pretreatment, hydrolysis, and fermentation of plant biomass. These diverse compounds reduce lignocellulosic biofuel yields by inhibiting cellular processes and diverting energy into cellular responses. LCH inhibitors present one of the most significant challenges to efficient biofuel production by microbes. Development of new strains that lessen the effects of LCH inhibitors is an economically favorable strategy relative to expensive detoxification methods that also can reduce sugar content in deconstructed biomass. Systems biology analyses and metabolic modeling combined with directed evolution and synthetic biology are successful strategies for biocatalyst development, and methods that leverage state-of-the-art tools are needed to overcome inhibitors more completely. This perspective considers the energetic costs of LCH inhibitors and technologies that can be used to overcome their drain on conversion efficiency. We suggest academic and commercial research groups could benefit by sharing data on LCH inhibitors and implementing “translational biofuel research.” PMID:24672514

  12. Trypsin-kallikrein isoinhibitor K (type Kunitz) from snails (Helix pomatia). Purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Dietl, T; Tschesche, H

    1975-10-15

    A basic proteinase inhibitor, isoinhibitor K, was purified by SE-Sephadex C-25 column chromatography from the mixture of acid-stable and heat-stable isoinhibitors of the snail (Helix pomatia). Isoinhibitor K is homogeneous in polyacrylamide gel, cellulose acetate and polyacrylamide-dodecylsulfate electrophoresis. From the electrophoretic mobility in dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel and apparent molecular weight of 6500 +/- 200 was estimated. From the amino acid composition the inhibitor consists of 58 amino acid residues. It contains three disulfide bridges, a C-terminal valine and a lysine residue at the reactive site. Isoinhibitor K inhibits the enzymes: bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin, porcine plasmin and pancreatic kallikrein, the trypsin-like component of Streptomyces griseus proteinase-pronase E, and fungi proteinase K from Tritirachium album Limber, which is only inhibited very slightly in contrast to the effect of the mixture of isoinhibitors. The inhibitory effect of isoinhibitor K against these enzymes is compared to that of the mixture or of other isoinhibitors. The following enzymes are not inhibited by isoinhibitor K: Aspergillus proteinase P and alkaline bacillus proteinase 2231 (Röhm), which both are inhibited by the mixture of isoinhibitors. Porcine elastase, bacterial proteinase N (M) (Röhm), and a trypsin-like proteinase from wheat are not inhibited, porcine acrosin and porcine serum kallikrein only to a very minor extent by the mixture of isoinhibitors. Reactive-site peptide-bond cleavage during inhibition could not be detected. Thus, the inhibitory behaviour is just as broad in specificity and as unusual as that of the trypsin-kallikrein inhibitor (Kunitz) from bovine organs. The N-terminus is blocked by pyroglutamic acid. Isoinhibitor K is the main component of the isoinhibitors secreted into the mucus and amounts to 35-40% of the mixture. PMID:1081050

  13. Structurally diverse c-Myc inhibitors share a common mechanism of action involving ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabo; Sharma, Lokendra; Lu, Jie; Finch, Paul; Fletcher, Steven; Prochownik, Edward V

    2015-06-30

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein is deregulated in a large proportion of diverse human cancers. Considerable effort has therefore been directed at identifying pharmacologic inhibitors as potential anti-neoplastic agents. Three such groups of small molecule inhibitors have been described. The first is comprised of so-called "direct" inhibitors, which perturb Myc's ability to form productive DNA-binding heterodimers in association with its partner, Max. The second group is comprised of indirect inhibitors, which largely function by targeting the BET-domain protein BRD4 to prevent the proper formation of transcriptional complexes that assemble in response to Myc-Max DNA binding. Thirdly, synthetic lethal inhibitors cause the selective apoptosis of Myc over-expressing either by promoting mitotic catastrophe or altering Myc protein stability. We report here a common mechanism by which all Myc inhibitors, irrespective of class, lead to eventual cellular demise. This involves the depletion of ATP stores due to mitochondrial dysfunction and the eventual down-regulation of Myc protein. The accompanying metabolic de-regulation causes neutral lipid accumulation, cell cycle arrest, and an attempt to rectify the ATP deficit by up-regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). These responses are ultimately futile due to the lack of functional Myc to support the requisite anabolic response. Finally, the effects of Myc depletion on ATP levels, cell cycle arrest, differentiation and AMPK activation can be mimicked by pharmacologic inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain without affecting Myc levels. Thus, all Myc inhibitors promote a global energy collapse that appears to underlie many of their phenotypic consequences. PMID:26036281

  14. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors.

  15. Sequence diversity of NanA manifests in distinct enzyme kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongli; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Walther, Elisabeth; Fuchs, Julian E.; Liedl, Klaus R.; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading pathogen causing bacterial pneumonia and meningitis. Its surface-associated virulence factor neuraminidase A (NanA) promotes the bacterial colonization by removing the terminal sialyl residues from glycoconjugates on eukaryotic cell surface. The predominant role of NanA in the pathogenesis of pneumococci renders it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Despite the highly conserved activity of NanA, our alignment of the 11 NanAs revealed the evolutionary diversity of this enzyme. The amino acid substitutions we identified, particularly those in the lectin domain and in the insertion domain next to the catalytic centre triggered our special interest. We synthesised the representative NanAs and the mutagenized derivatives from E. coli for enzyme kinetics study and neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility test. Via molecular docking we got a deeper insight into the differences between the two major variants of NanA and their influence on the ligand-target interactions. In addition, our molecular dynamics simulations revealed a prominent intrinsic flexibility of the linker between the active site and the insertion domain, which influences the inhibitor binding. Our findings for the first time associated the primary sequence diversity of NanA with the biochemical properties of the enzyme and with the inhibitory efficiency of neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:27125351

  16. Targeting multifunctional proteins by virtual screening: structurally diverse cytohesin inhibitors with differentiated biological functions.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bill, Anke; Novak, Nina; Loch, Gerrit; Blockus, Heike; Geppert, Hanna; Becker, Thomas; Schmitz, Anton; Hoch, Michael; Kolanus, Waldemar; Famulok, Michael; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-09-17

    Virtual screening (VS) of chemical libraries formatted in silico provides an alternative to experimental high-throughput screening (HTS) for the identification of small molecule modulators of protein function. We have tailored a VS approach combining fingerprint similarity searching and support vector machine modeling toward the identification of small molecular probes for the study of cytohesins, a family of cytoplasmic regulator proteins with multiple cellular functions. A total of 40 new structurally diverse inhibitors were identified, and 26 of these compounds were more active than the primary VS template, a single known inhibitory chemotype, in at least one of three different assays (guanine nucleotide exchange, Drosophila insulin signaling, and human leukocyte cell adhesion). Moreover, these inhibitors displayed differential inhibitory profiles. Our findings demonstrate that, at least for the cytohesins, computational extrapolation from known active compounds was capable of identifying small molecular probes with highly diversified functional profiles. PMID:20614894

  17. Inhibition of soybean seeds in warm water results in the release of copious amounts of Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor, a putative anticarcinogenic agent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protease inhibitors play a protective role against pathogenic microorganisms and herbivorous insects. The two predominant protease inhibitors of soybean seeds are the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) and Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (BBI). In this study we report that soybean seeds incubated in war...

  18. A bifunctional sea anemone peptide with Kunitz type protease and potassium channel inhibiting properties.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Billen, Bert; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Debaveye, Sarah; Béress, László; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Sea anemone venom is a known source of interesting bioactive compounds, including peptide toxins which are invaluable tools for studying structure and function of voltage-gated potassium channels. APEKTx1 is a novel peptide isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima, containing 63 amino acids cross-linked by 3 disulfide bridges. Sequence alignment reveals that APEKTx1 is a new member of the type 2 sea anemone peptides targeting voltage-gated potassium channels (K(V)s), which also include the kalicludines from Anemonia sulcata. Similar to the kalicludines, APEKTx1 shares structural homology with both the basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a very potent Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, and dendrotoxins which are powerful blockers of voltage-gated potassium channels. In this study, APEKTx1 has been subjected to a screening on a wide range of 23 ion channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes: 13 cloned voltage-gated potassium channels (K(V)1.1-K(V)1.6, K(V)1.1 triple mutant, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.1, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3, hERG, the insect channel Shaker IR), 2 cloned hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-sensitive cation non-selective channels (HCN1 and HCN2) and 8 cloned voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)1.2-Na(V)1.8 and the insect channel DmNa(V)1). Our data show that APEKTx1 selectively blocks K(V)1.1 channels in a very potent manner with an IC(50) value of 0.9nM. Furthermore, we compared the trypsin inhibitory activity of this toxin with BPTI. APEKTx1 inhibits trypsin with a dissociation constant of 124nM. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that APEKTx1 has the unique feature to combine the dual functionality of a potent and selective blocker of K(V)1.1 channels with that of a competitive inhibitor of trypsin. PMID:21477583

  19. Understanding the evolutionary structural variability and target specificity of tick salivary Kunitz peptides using next generation transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ticks are blood-sucking arthropods and a primary function of tick salivary proteins is to counteract the host’s immune response. Tick salivary Kunitz-domain proteins perform multiple functions within the feeding lesion and have been classified as venoms; thereby, constituting them as one of the important elements in the arms race with the host. The two main mechanisms advocated to explain the functional heterogeneity of tick salivary Kunitz-domain proteins are gene sharing and gene duplication. Both do not, however, elucidate the evolution of the Kunitz family in ticks from a structural dynamic point of view. The Red Queen hypothesis offers a fruitful theoretical framework to give a dynamic explanation for host-parasite interactions. Using the recent salivary gland Ixodes ricinus transcriptome we analyze, for the first time, single Kunitz-domain encoding transcripts by means of computational, structural bioinformatics and phylogenetic approaches to improve our understanding of the structural evolution of this important multigenic protein family. Results Organizing the I. ricinus single Kunitz-domain peptides based on their cysteine motif allowed us to specify a putative target and to relate this target specificity to Illumina transcript reads during tick feeding. We observe that several of these Kunitz peptide groups vary in their translated amino acid sequence, secondary structure, antigenicity, and intrinsic disorder, and that the majority of these groups are subject to a purifying (negative) selection. We finalize by describing the evolution and emergence of these Kunitz peptides. The overall interpretation of our analyses discloses a rapidly emerging Kunitz group with a distinct disulfide bond pattern from the I. ricinus salivary gland transcriptome. Conclusions We propose a model to explain the structural and functional evolution of tick salivary Kunitz peptides that we call target-oriented evolution. Our study reveals that combining analytical

  20. Using Trypsin & Soybean Trypsin Inhibitor to Teach Principles of Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, David R.; Herr, Julie; Hollister, Rhiannon

    2006-01-01

    Trypsin and soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz inhibitor) can be used in a relatively simple and inexpensive student exercise to demonstrate the usefulness of enzyme kinetics. The study of enzyme kinetics is essential to biology because enzymes play such a crucial role in the biochemical pathways of all living organisms. The data from enzyme…

  1. Subtype diversity associated with the development of HIV-1 resistance to integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Bluma G; Lowe, Matthew; Moisi, Daniela; Hardy, Isabelle; Gagnon, Simon; Charest, Hugues; Baril, Jean Guy; Wainberg, Mark A; Roger, Michel

    2011-05-01

    We used genotypic and phylogenetic analysis to determine integrase diversity among subtypes, and studied natural polymorphisms and mutations implicated in resistance to integrase inhibitors (INI) in treatment-naïve persons (n = 220) and -experienced individuals (n = 24). Phylogenetics revealed 7 and 10% inter-subtype diversity in the integrase and reverse transcriptase (RT)/protease regions, respectively. Integrase sequencing identified a novel A/B recombinant in which all viruses in a male-sex-male (MSM) transmission cluster (n = 12) appeared to possess subtype B in integrase and subtype A in the remainder of the pol region. Natural variations and signature polymorphisms were observed at codon positions 140, 148, 151, 157, and 160 among HIV subtypes. These variations predicted higher genetic barriers to G140S and G140C in subtypes C, CRF02_AG, and A/CRF01_AE, as well as higher genetic barriers toward acquisition of V151I in subtypes CRF02_AG and A/CRF01_AE. The E157Q and E160Q mutational motif was observed in 35% of INI-naïve patients harboring subtype C infections, indicating intra-subtype variations. Thirteen patients failed raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens within 8 ± 1 months, in association with the major Q148K/R/H and G140A/S (n = 8/24) or N155H (n = 5/24) mutational pathways. Of note, the remaining patients on RAL regimens for 14 ± 3 months harbored no or only minor integrase mutations/polymorphisms (T66I, T97A, H114P, S119P, A124S, G163R, I203M, R263K). These results demonstrate the importance of understanding subtype variability in the development of resistance to INIs. PMID:21360548

  2. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  3. Barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor: structure, biophysics and protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C; Fukuda, Kenji; Svensson, Birte

    2004-02-12

    Bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitors have been implicated in plant defence and regulation of endogenous alpha-amylase action. The barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) inhibits the barley alpha-amylase 2 (AMY2) and subtilisin-type serine proteases. BASI belongs to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor family of the beta-trefoil fold proteins. Diverse approaches including site-directed mutagenesis, hybrid constructions, and crystallography have been used to characterise the structures and contact residues in the AMY2/BASI complex. The three-dimensional structure of the AMY2/BASI complex is characterised by a completely hydrated Ca2+ situated at the protein interface that connects the three catalytic carboxyl groups in AMY2 with side chains in BASI via water molecules. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we have recently demonstrated Ca2+-modulated kinetics of the AMY2/BASI interaction and found that the complex formation involves minimal structural changes. The modulation of the interaction by calcium ions makes it unique among the currently known binding mechanisms of proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors. PMID:14871656

  4. Differential effects on cell motility, embryonic stem cell self-renewal and senescence by diverse Src kinase family inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Christoffer Galito, Sara Pijuan Anneren, Cecilia

    2012-02-15

    The Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFKs) has been shown to play an intricate role in embryonic stem (ES) cell maintenance. In the present study we have focused on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the vastly different effects induced by various commonly used SFK inhibitors. We show that several diverse cell types, including fibroblasts completely lacking SFKs, cannot undergo mitosis in response to SU6656 and that this is caused by an unselective inhibition of Aurora kinases. In contrast, PP2 and PD173952 block motility immediately upon exposure and forces cells to grow in dense colonies. The subsequent halt in proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial cells in the center of the colonies approximately 24 h post-treatment appears to be caused by cell-to-cell contact inhibition rather than a direct effect of SFK kinase inhibition. Interestingly, in addition to generating more homogenous and dense ES cell cultures, without any diverse effect on proliferation, PP2 and PD173652 also promote ES cell self-renewal by reducing the small amount of spontaneous differentiation typically observed under standard ES cell culture conditions. These effects could not be mirrored by the use of Gleevec, a potent inhibitor of c-Abl and PDGFR kinases that are also inhibited by PP2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor SU6656 induces senescence in mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SU6656 inhibits mitosis in a SFK-independent manner via cross-selectivity for Aurora kinases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor PP2 impairs cell motility in various cell lines, including mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ensuing impeded motility, PP2 inhibits proliferation of various cells lines except for mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitors PP2 and PD173952 impede spontaneous differentiation in standard mouse ES culture maintenance.

  5. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis Probe Targets Plasmodium falciparum Cytochrome b Ubiquinone Reduction Site and Synergizes With Oxidation Site Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, Amanda K.; Heidebrecht, Richard W.; Mulrooney, Carol; Beaudoin, Jennifer A.; Comer, Eamon; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Fitzgerald, Mark E.; Masi, Daniela; Galinsky, Kevin; Scherer, Christina A.; Palmer, Michelle; Munoz, Benito; Foley, Michael; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wiegand, Roger C.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The emergence and spread of drug resistance to current antimalarial therapies remains a pressing concern, escalating the need for compounds that demonstrate novel modes of action. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis (DOS) libraries bridge the gap between conventional small molecule and natural product libraries, allowing the interrogation of more diverse chemical space in efforts to identify probes of novel parasite pathways. Methods. We screened and optimized a probe from a DOS library using whole-cell phenotypic assays. Resistance selection and whole-genome sequencing approaches were employed to identify the cellular target of the compounds. Results. We identified a novel macrocyclic inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum with nanomolar potency and identified the reduction site of cytochrome b as its cellular target. Combination experiments with reduction and oxidation site inhibitors showed synergistic inhibition of the parasite. Conclusions. The cytochrome b oxidation center is a validated antimalarial target. We show that the reduction site of cytochrome b is also a druggable target. Our results demonstrating a synergistic relationship between oxidation and reduction site inhibitors suggests a future strategy for new combination therapies in the treatment of malaria. PMID:25336726

  6. Novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors identified via a high throughput replicon-based screen.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Jeremy R; VerPlank, Lynn; Ludeke, Barbara; McLeod, Sarah M; Lee, Maurice D; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Mulrooney, Carol A; Le Quement, Sebastian; Yu, Qin; Palmer, Michelle A; Fleming, Paul; Fearns, Rachel; Foley, Michael A; Scherer, Christina A

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections affect millions of children and adults every year. Despite the significant disease burden, there are currently no safe and effective vaccines or therapeutics. We employed a replicon-based high throughput screen combined with live-virus triaging assays to identify three novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived scaffolds with activity against RSV. One of these small molecules is shown to target the RSV polymerase (L protein) to inhibit viral replication and transcription; the mechanisms of action of the other small molecules are currently unknown. The compounds described herein may provide attractive inhibitors for lead optimization campaigns. PMID:27059228

  7. Crystal Structure of Barley Limit Dextrinase-Limit Dextrinase Inhibitor (LD-LDI) Complex Reveals Insights into Mechanism and Diversity of Cereal Type Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Marie S.; Vester-Christensen, Malene B.; Jensen, Johanne M.; Hachem, Maher Abou; Henriksen, Anette; Svensson, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Molecular details underlying regulation of starch mobilization in cereal seed endosperm remain unknown despite the paramount role of this process in plant growth. The structure of the complex between the starch debranching enzyme barley limit dextrinase (LD), hydrolyzing α-1,6-glucosidic linkages, and its endogenous inhibitor (LDI) was solved at 2.7 Å. The structure reveals an entirely new and unexpected binding mode of LDI as compared with previously solved complex structures of related cereal type family inhibitors (CTIs) bound to glycoside hydrolases but is structurally analogous to binding of dual specificity CTIs to proteases. Site-directed mutagenesis establishes that a hydrophobic cluster flanked by ionic interactions in the protein-protein interface is vital for the picomolar affinity of LDI to LD as assessed by analysis of binding by using surface plasmon resonance and also supported by LDI inhibition of the enzyme activity. A phylogenetic analysis identified four LDI-like proteins in cereals among the 45 sequences from monocot databases that could be classified as unique CTI sequences. The unprecedented binding mechanism shown here for LDI has likely evolved in cereals from a need for effective inhibition of debranching enzymes having characteristic open active site architecture. The findings give a mechanistic rationale for the potency of LD activity regulation and provide a molecular understanding of the debranching events associated with optimal starch mobilization and utilization during germination. This study unveils a hitherto not recognized structural basis for the features endowing diversity to CTIs. PMID:25792743

  8. Crystal structure of barley limit dextrinase-limit dextrinase inhibitor (LD-LDI) complex reveals insights into mechanism and diversity of cereal type inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Møller, Marie S; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Jensen, Johanne M; Hachem, Maher Abou; Henriksen, Anette; Svensson, Birte

    2015-05-15

    Molecular details underlying regulation of starch mobilization in cereal seed endosperm remain unknown despite the paramount role of this process in plant growth. The structure of the complex between the starch debranching enzyme barley limit dextrinase (LD), hydrolyzing α-1,6-glucosidic linkages, and its endogenous inhibitor (LDI) was solved at 2.7 Å. The structure reveals an entirely new and unexpected binding mode of LDI as compared with previously solved complex structures of related cereal type family inhibitors (CTIs) bound to glycoside hydrolases but is structurally analogous to binding of dual specificity CTIs to proteases. Site-directed mutagenesis establishes that a hydrophobic cluster flanked by ionic interactions in the protein-protein interface is vital for the picomolar affinity of LDI to LD as assessed by analysis of binding by using surface plasmon resonance and also supported by LDI inhibition of the enzyme activity. A phylogenetic analysis identified four LDI-like proteins in cereals among the 45 sequences from monocot databases that could be classified as unique CTI sequences. The unprecedented binding mechanism shown here for LDI has likely evolved in cereals from a need for effective inhibition of debranching enzymes having characteristic open active site architecture. The findings give a mechanistic rationale for the potency of LD activity regulation and provide a molecular understanding of the debranching events associated with optimal starch mobilization and utilization during germination. This study unveils a hitherto not recognized structural basis for the features endowing diversity to CTIs. PMID:25792743

  9. Discovery of Diverse Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Mammalian Sterile20-like Kinase 3 (MST3).

    PubMed

    Olesen, Sanne H; Zhu, Jin-Yi; Martin, Mathew P; Schönbrunn, Ernst

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests key roles for members of the mammalian Sterile20-like (MST) family of kinases in many aspects of biology. MST3 is a member of the STRIPAK complex, the deregulation of which has recently been associated with cancer cell migration and metastasis. Targeting MST3 with small-molecule inhibitors may be beneficial for the treatment of certain cancers, but little information exists on the potential of kinase inhibitor scaffolds to engage with MST3. In this study we screened MST3 against a library of 277 kinase inhibitors using differential scanning fluorimetry and confirmed 14 previously unknown MST3 inhibitors by X-ray crystallography. These compounds, of which eight are in clinical trials or FDA approved, comprise nine distinct chemical scaffolds that inhibit MST3 enzymatic activity with IC50 values between 0.003 and 23 μm. The structure-activity relationships explain the differential inhibitory activity of these compounds against MST3 and the structural basis for high binding potential, the information of which may serve as a framework for the rational design of MST3-selective inhibitors as potential therapeutics and to interrogate the function of this enzyme in diseased cells. PMID:27135311

  10. Identification of diverse natural products as falcipain-2 inhibitors through structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyan; Zhang, Shoude; Zhu, Junsheng; Zhu, Lili; Liu, Xiaofeng; Shan, Lei; Huang, Jin; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Honglin

    2014-03-01

    Ten natural compounds are successfully identified as falcipain-2 (FP-2) inhibitors from our in-house natural products database using structure-based virtual screening, which show moderate inhibitory activities against FP-2 with IC50 values ranging from 3.18 to 68.19 μM. While one of the inhibitors (compound 5) also exhibits in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine sensitive strain (3D7) and chloroquine resistant strain (Dd2) of Plasmodium falciparum in the micromolar range (IC50s=5.54 μM and 4.05 μM against 3D7 cells and Dd2 cells, respectively). Furthermore, the predicted binding poses are analyzed to explain the structure-activity relationships, which will be helpful for further structural modifications. PMID:24530004

  11. Diverse effects of two allosteric inhibitors on the phosphorylation state of glycogen phosphorylase in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Latsis, Theodore; Andersen, Birgitte; Agius, Loranne

    2002-01-01

    Two distinct allosteric inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase, 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) and CP-91149 (an indole-2-carboxamide), were investigated for their effects on the phosphorylation state of the enzyme in hepatocytes in vitro. CP-91149 induced inactivation (dephosphorylation) of phosphorylase in the absence of hormones and partially counteracted the phosphorylation caused by glucagon. Inhibition of glycogenolysis by CP-91149 can be explained by dephosphorylation of phosphorylase a. This was associated with activation of glycogen synthase and stimulation of glycogen synthesis. DAB, in contrast, induced a small degree of phosphorylation of phosphorylase. This was associated with inactivation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen synthesis. Despite causing phosphorylation (activation) of phosphorylase, DAB is a very potent inhibitor of glycogenolysis in both the absence and presence of glucagon. This is explained by allosteric inhibition of phosphorylase a, which overrides the increase in activation state. In conclusion, two potent phosphorylase inhibitors exert different effects on glycogen metabolism in intact hepatocytes as a result of opposite effects on the phosphorylation state of both phosphorylase and glycogen synthase. PMID:12186629

  12. Assessment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pantothenate Kinase Vulnerability through Target Knockdown and Mechanistically Diverse Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B. K. Kishore; Landge, Sudhir; Ravishankar, Sudha; Patil, Vikas; Shinde, Vikas; Tantry, Subramanyam; Kale, Manoj; Raichurkar, Anandkumar; Menasinakai, Sreenivasaiah; Mudugal, Naina Vinay; Ambady, Anisha; Ghosh, Anirban; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Kaur, Parvinder; Singh, Ragini; Kumar, Naveen; Bharath, Sowmya; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Bhat, Jyothi; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.; Björkelid, Christofer; Jones, T. Alwyn; Das, Kaveri; Bandodkar, Balachandra; Malolanarasimhan, Krishnan; Mukherjee, Kakoli

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of pantothenate, the first committed and rate-limiting step toward coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. In our earlier reports, we had established that the type I isoform encoded by the coaA gene is an essential pantothenate kinase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this vital information was then exploited to screen large libraries for identification of mechanistically different classes of PanK inhibitors. The present report summarizes the synthesis and expansion efforts to understand the structure-activity relationships leading to the optimization of enzyme inhibition along with antimycobacterial activity. Additionally, we report the progression of two distinct classes of inhibitors, the triazoles, which are ATP competitors, and the biaryl acetic acids, with a mixed mode of inhibition. Cocrystallization studies provided evidence of these inhibitors binding to the enzyme. This was further substantiated with the biaryl acids having MIC against the wild-type M. tuberculosis strain and the subsequent establishment of a target link with an upshift in MIC in a strain overexpressing PanK. On the other hand, the ATP competitors had cellular activity only in a M. tuberculosis knockdown strain with reduced PanK expression levels. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo survival kinetic studies performed with a M. tuberculosis PanK (MtPanK) knockdown strain indicated that the target levels have to be significantly reduced to bring in growth inhibition. The dual approaches employed here thus established the poor vulnerability of PanK in M. tuberculosis. PMID:24687493

  13. The tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs): An ancient family with structural and functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Brew, Keith; Nagase, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are widely distributed in the animal kingdom and the human genome contains four paralogous genes encoding TIMPs 1 to 4. TIMPs were originally characterized as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), but their range of activities has now been found to be broader as it includes the inhibition of several of the disintegrin-metalloproteinases, ADAMs and ADAMTSs. TIMPs are therefore key regulators of the metalloproteinases that degrade the extracellular matrix and shed cell surface molecules. Structural studies of TIMP–MMP complexes have elucidated the inhibition mechanism of TIMPs and the multiple sites through which they interact with target enzymes, allowing the generation of TIMP variants that selectively inhibit different groups of metalloproteinases. Engineering such variants is complicated by the fact that TIMPs can undergo changes in molecular dynamics induced by their interactions with proteases. TIMPs also have biological activities that are independent of metalloproteinases; these include effects on cell growth and differentiation, cell migration, anti-angiogenesis, anti- and pro-apoptosis, and synaptic plasticity. Receptors responsible for some of these activities have been identified and their signaling pathways have been investigated. A series of studies using mice with specific TIMP gene deletions has illuminated the importance of these molecules in biology and pathology. PMID:20080133

  14. Combinatorial protein engineering of proteolytically resistant mesotrypsin inhibitors as candidates for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Itay; Kayode, Olumide; Hockla, Alexandra; Sankaran, Banumathi; Radisky, Derek C; Radisky, Evette S; Papo, Niv

    2016-05-15

    Engineered protein therapeutics offer advantages, including strong target affinity, selectivity and low toxicity, but like natural proteins can be susceptible to proteolytic degradation, thereby limiting their effectiveness. A compelling therapeutic target is mesotrypsin, a protease up-regulated with tumour progression, associated with poor prognosis, and implicated in tumour growth and progression of many cancers. However, with its unique capability for cleavage and inactivation of proteinaceous inhibitors, mesotrypsin presents a formidable challenge to the development of biological inhibitors. We used a powerful yeast display platform for directed evolution, employing a novel multi-modal library screening strategy, to engineer the human amyloid precursor protein Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (APPI) simultaneously for increased proteolytic stability, stronger binding affinity and improved selectivity for mesotrypsin inhibition. We identified a triple mutant APPIM17G/I18F/F34V, with a mesotrypsin inhibition constant (Ki) of 89 pM, as the strongest mesotrypsin inhibitor yet reported; this variant displays 1459-fold improved affinity, up to 350 000-fold greater specificity and 83-fold improved proteolytic stability compared with wild-type APPI. We demonstrated that APPIM17G/I18F/F34V acts as a functional inhibitor in cell-based models of mesotrypsin-dependent prostate cancer cellular invasiveness. Additionally, by solving the crystal structure of the APPIM17G/I18F/F34V-mesotrypsin complex, we obtained new insights into the structural and mechanistic basis for improved binding and proteolytic resistance. Our study identifies a promising mesotrypsin inhibitor as a starting point for development of anticancer protein therapeutics and establishes proof-of-principle for a novel library screening approach that will be widely applicable for simultaneously evolving proteolytic stability in tandem with desired functionality for diverse protein scaffolds. PMID:26957636

  15. Transferable scoring function based on semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6-DH2 method: CDK2 with 15 structurally diverse inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dobeš, Petr; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Rezáč, Jan; Otyepka, Michal; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-03-01

    A semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6-DH2 method accurately covering the dispersion interaction and H-bonding was used to score fifteen structurally diverse CDK2 inhibitors. The geometries of all the complexes were taken from the X-ray structures and were reoptimised by the PM6-DH2 method in continuum water. The total scoring function was constructed as an estimate of the binding free energy, i.e., as a sum of the interaction enthalpy, interaction entropy and the corrections for the inhibitor desolvation and deformation energies. The applied scoring function contains a clear thermodynamical terms and does not involve any adjustable empirical parameter. The best correlations with the experimental inhibition constants (ln K (i)) were found for bare interaction enthalpy (r (2) = 0.87) and interaction enthalpy corrected for ligand desolvation and deformation energies (r (2) = 0.77); when the entropic term was considered, however, the correlation becomes worse but still acceptable (r (2) = 0.52). The resulting correlation based on the PM6-DH2 scoring function is better than previously published function based on various docking/scoring, SAR studies or advanced QM/MM approach, however, the robustness is limited by number of available experimental data used in the correlation. Since a very similar correlation between the experimental and theoretical results was found also for a different system of the HIV-1 protease, the suggested scoring function based on the PM6-DH2 method seems to be applicable in drug design, even if diverse protein-ligand complexes have to be ranked. PMID:21286784

  16. Identification of the human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase residues that contribute to the activity of diverse nonnucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Condra, J H; Emini, E A; Gotlib, L; Graham, D J; Schlabach, A J; Wolfgang, J A; Colonno, R J; Sardana, V V

    1992-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is potently inhibited by a structurally diverse group of nonnucleoside compounds. These include pyridinone derivatives, tetrahydroimadazo[4,5,1-j,k][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione, and BI-RG-587 (nevirapine). The compounds act noncompetitively, by an unknown mechanism, with respect to template-primer and nucleotide substrates. Despite a high degree of similarity between the HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs, the HIV-2 enzyme is totally insensitive to these inhibitors. Using a novel method for joining DNA sequences, we have exploited this difference between the two enzymes to identify the regions of the RT that contribute to the compounds' inhibitory activities. The relative in vitro sensitivities of HIV-1/HIV-2 chimeric and site-specific mutant enzymes were determined. Sensitivity to inhibition was largely, though not exclusively, dependent upon the RT region defined by amino acid residues 176 to 190, with specific contributions by residues 181 and 188. The region defined by residues 101 to 106 was found to functionally interact with the domain from 155 to 217. In addition, the functional equivalence of the three inhibitor groups was shown. PMID:1380789

  17. X-ray crystal structure of the protease inhibitor domain of Alzheimer's amyloid. beta. -protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, T.R.; Randal, M.; Kennedy, L.A.; Eigenbrot, C.; Kossiakoff, A.A. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1990-10-01

    Alzheimer's amyloid {beta}-protein precursor contains a Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (APPI) potentially involved in proteolytic events leading to cerebral amyloid deposition. To facilitate the identification of the physiological target of the inhibitor, the crystal structure of APPI has been determined and refined to 1.5-{Angstrom} resolution. Sequences in the inhibitor-protease interface of the correct protease target will reflect the molecular details of the APPI structure. While the overall tertiary fold of APPI is very similar to that of the Kunitz inhibitor BPTI, a significant rearrangement occurs in the backbone conformation of one of the two protease binding loops. A number of Kunitz inhibitors have similar loop sequences, indicating the structural alteration is conserved and potentially an important determinant of inhibitor specificity. In a separate region of the protease binding loops, APPI side chains Met-17 and Phe-34 create an exposed hydrophobic surface in place of Arg-17 and Val-34 in BPTI. The restriction this change places on protease target sequences is seen when the structure of APPI is superimposed on BPTI complexed to serine proteases, where the hydrophobic surface of APPI faces a complementary group of nonpolar side chains on kallikrein A versus polar side chains on trypsin.

  18. SjAPI, the First Functionally Characterized Ascaris-Type Protease Inhibitor from Animal Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weishan; Cao, Zhijian; Zhuo, Renxi; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2013-01-01

    Background Serine protease inhibitors act as modulators of serine proteases, playing important roles in protecting animal toxin peptides from degradation. However, all known serine protease inhibitors discovered thus far from animal venom belong to the Kunitz-type subfamily, and whether there are other novel types of protease inhibitors in animal venom remains unclear. Principal Findings Here, by screening scorpion venom gland cDNA libraries, we identified the first Ascaris-type animal toxin family, which contains four members: Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (SjAPI), Scorpiops jendeki Ascaris-type protease inhibitor 2 (SjAPI-2), Chaerilus tricostatus Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (CtAPI), and Buthus martensii Ascaris-type protease inhibitor (BmAPI). The detailed characterization of Ascaris-type peptide SjAPI from the venom gland of scorpion Scorpiops jendeki was carried out. The mature peptide of SjAPI contains 64 residues and possesses a classical Ascaris-type cysteine framework reticulated by five disulfide bridges, different from all known protease inhibitors from venomous animals. Enzyme and inhibitor reaction kinetics experiments showed that recombinant SjAPI was a dual function peptide with α-chymotrypsin- and elastase-inhibiting properties. Recombinant SjAPI inhibited α-chymotrypsin with a Ki of 97.1 nM and elastase with a Ki of 3.7 μM, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses and chimera experiments indicated that SjAPI contained the unique short side chain functional residues “AAV” and might be a useful template to produce new serine protease inhibitors. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, SjAPI is the first functionally characterized animal toxin peptide with an Ascaris-type fold. The structural and functional diversity of animal toxins with protease-inhibiting properties suggested that bioactive peptides from animal venom glands might be a new source of protease inhibitors, which will accelerate the development of

  19. Impact of Inhibitors and L2 Antibodies upon the Infectivity of Diverse Alpha and Beta Human Papillomavirus Types

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kihyuck; Jiang, Rosie; Wang, Joshua W.; Jagu, Subhashini; Kirnbauer, Reinhard; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2014-01-01

    The licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines elicit type-restricted immunity but do not target cutaneous HPV types of the beta genus that are associated with non-melanoma skin cancer in immune-compromised patients, and it is unclear if these diverse types share a common mechanism of infection. Residues 11-88 of minor capsid protein L2 contain cross-protective epitopes, and vaccination with concatamers of this region derived from as many as eight alpha HPV (L2 α11-88x8) is being developed as an alternative prophylactic vaccine with potentially broader efficacy. There is also interest in developing broadly protective topical microbicides, such as carrageenan or heparin that block HPV receptor interactions, or small molecule inhibitors of infection. Here we have examined several inhibitors of HPV infection and antisera to L2 α11-88x8 for their breadth of activity against infection by 34 HPV types from within both the alpha and beta families using pseudovirions (PsV) carrying a luciferase reporter as surrogates for native virus. We observed that both heparin and carrageenan prevented infection by mucosatropic HPV types, but surprisingly PsV of several epidermotropic alpha4 and beta HPV types exhibited increased infectivity especially at low inhibitor concentrations. Furin and γ-secretase inhibitors and L2 α11-88x8 antiserum blocked infection by all HPV PsV types tested. These findings suggest that the distinct tropism of mucosal and cutaneous HPV may reflect distinct cell surface receptor interactions, but a common uptake mechanism dependent upon furin and γ-secretase proteolytic activities. Carrageenan, which is being tested as a vaginal microbicide, broadly inhibited infection by the high-risk mucosatropic HPV PsV, but not most skin tropic alpha and beta HPV. Vaccination with an L2 multimer derived exclusively from alpha papillomavirus sequences induced antibodies that broadly neutralized PsV of all 34 HPVs from within both the alpha and beta families

  20. Auxin transport inhibitors impair vesicle motility and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in diverse eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Grigoriev, Ilya; Fischer, Rainer; Tominaga, Motoki; Robinson, David G.; Hašek, Jiří; Paciorek, Tomasz; Petrášek, Jan; Seifertová, Daniela; Tejos, Ricardo; Meisel, Lee A.; Zažímalová, Eva; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Ueda, Takashi; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Akhmanova, Anna; Brock, Roland; Spang, Anne; Friml, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Many aspects of plant development, including patterning and tropisms, are largely dependent on the asymmetric distribution of the plant signaling molecule auxin. Auxin transport inhibitors (ATIs), which interfere with directional auxin transport, have been essential tools in formulating this concept. However, despite the use of ATIs in plant research for many decades, the mechanism of ATI action has remained largely elusive. Using real-time live-cell microscopy, we show here that prominent ATIs such as 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and 2-(1-pyrenoyl) benzoic acid (PBA) inhibit vesicle trafficking in plant, yeast, and mammalian cells. Effects on micropinocytosis, rab5-labeled endosomal motility at the periphery of HeLa cells and on fibroblast mobility indicate that ATIs influence actin cytoskeleton. Visualization of actin cytoskeleton dynamics in plants, yeast, and mammalian cells show that ATIs stabilize actin. Conversely, stabilizing actin by chemical or genetic means interferes with endocytosis, vesicle motility, auxin transport, and plant development, including auxin transport-dependent processes. Our results show that a class of ATIs act as actin stabilizers and advocate that actin-dependent trafficking of auxin transport components participates in the mechanism of auxin transport. These studies also provide an example of how the common eukaryotic process of actin-based vesicle motility can fulfill a plant-specific physiological role. PMID:18337510

  1. Selection of diverse and clinically relevant integrase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakahara, Koichiro; Seki, Takahiro; Miki, Shigeru; Kawauchi, Shinobu; Suyama, Akemi; Wakasa-Morimoto, Chiaki; Kodama, Makoto; Endoh, Takeshi; Oosugi, Eiichi; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Murai, Hitoshi; Fujishita, Toshio; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Garvey, Edward; Foster, Scott; Underwood, Mark; Johns, Brian; Sato, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Tamio

    2008-11-01

    Resistance passage studies were conducted with five INIs (integrase inhibitors) that have been tested in clinical trials to date: a new naphthyridinone-type INI S/GSK-364735, raltegravir, elvitegravir, L-870,810 and S-1360. In establishing the passage system and starting from concentrations several fold above the EC(50) value, resistance mutations against S-1360 and related diketoacid-type compounds could be isolated from infected MT-2 cell cultures from day 14 to 28. Q148R and F121Y were the two main pathways of resistance to S/GSK-364735. Q148R/K and N155H, which were found in patients failing raltegravir treatment in Phase IIb studies, were observed during passage with raltegravir with this method. The fold resistance of 40 mutant molecular clones versus wild type virus was compared with these five INIs. The overall resistance pattern of S/GSK-364735 was similar to that of raltegravir and other INIs. However, different fold resistances of particular mutations were noted among different INIs, reflecting a potential to develop INIs with distinctly different resistant profiles. PMID:18625269

  2. Identification of diverse microbial metabolites as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 Tat transactivation.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Zink, Deborah L; Polishook, Jon D; Bills, Gerald F; Dombrowski, Anne W; Genilloud, Olga; Pelaez, Fernando F; Herranz, Lucia; Quamina, Donette; Lingham, Russell B; Danzeizen, Renee; Graham, Pia L; Tomassini, Joanne E; Singh, Sheo B

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is one of six regulatory proteins that are required for viral replication and is an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV agents. Screening of microbial extracts using a whole cell Tat-dependent transactivation assay, which guided the separation of the active broths, led to the identification of five structurally diverse classes (M(R) range 232-1126) of natural products. These include i) three sesquiterpenoids, namely, sporogen-AO1, petasol, and 6-dehydropetasol, ii) two resorcylic 14-membered lactones, namely monorden and monocillin IV, iii) a ten-membered lactone, iv) a quinoline and quinoxiline bicyclic octadepsipeptides, namely echinomycin and UK-63598, and v) a cyclic heptapeptide, ternatin. These compounds displayed varying degrees of potencies with IC50 values ranging from 0.0002 to 100 microM. The most active compound was the quinoxiline bicyclic octadepsipeptides, UK-63598, which inhibited Tat-dependent transactivation with an IC50 value of 0.2 nM and exhibited a 100-fold therapeutic window with respect to toxicity. In a single-cycle antiviral assay, UK-6358 inhibited viral replication with an IC50 value of 0.5 nM; however, it appeared to be equally toxic at that concentration. Monocillin IV was significantly less active (Tat transactivation inhibitory IC50 of 5 microM) but was not toxic at 100 microM in an equivalent cytotoxicity assay. The compound exhibited antiviral activity with an IC50 value of 6.2 microM in the single-cycle antiviral assay and a sixfold therapeutic window. Details of the isolation, fermentation, and biological activities of these structurally diverse natural products are described. PMID:17191924

  3. Prolonged use of a proton pump inhibitor reduces microbial diversity: implications for Clostridium difficile susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of the gut microbiome in arresting pathogen colonization and growth is important for protection against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Observational studies associate proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and CDI incidence. We hypothesized that PPI use affected the distal gut microbiome over time, an effect that would be best explored by time-longitudinal study of healthy subjects on PPI in comparison to treatment-naïve CDI subjects. This study enrolled nine healthy human subjects and five subjects with treatment-naïve CDI. After random assignment to a low (20 mg/day) or high (2× 20 mg/day) dose group, fecal samples were collected from the nine healthy subjects before, during, and after 28 days of PPI use. This was done in conjunction with pre-treatment fecal collection from CDI subjects. High-throughput sequencing (16S rRNA) was performed on time-longitudinal samples to assess changes to the healthy gut microbiome associated with prolonged PPI usage. The healthy samples were then compared to the CDI subjects to explore changes over time to the gut microbiome associated with PPI use and potentially related to CDI. Results We report that PPI usage at low and high dosages, administered for 28 days, resulted in decreases to observed operational taxonomic unit (OTU) counts after both 1 week and 1 month. This decrease resulted in observed OTU levels that were similar to those found in treatment-naïve CDI patients, which was partly reversible after a 1 month recovery period. We did not detect a dose-dependent difference in OTU levels nor did we detect significant changes in taxa previously reported to be affected by PPI treatment. Conclusion While our observation of diminishing observed OTU counts during PPI therapy is a preliminary finding in a small cohort, our hypothesis that PPIs disrupt the healthy human gut microbiome is supported in this group. We conclude that decreases in observed species counts were reversible after cessation of

  4. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  5. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  6. Fasciola hepatica Kunitz Type Molecule Decreases Dendritic Cell Activation and Their Ability to Induce Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Falcón, Cristian R.; Masih, Diana; Gatti, Gerardo; Sanchez, María Cecilia; Motrán, Claudia C.; Cervi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The complete repertoire of proteins with immunomodulatory activity in Fasciola hepatica (Fh) has not yet been fully described. Here, we demonstrated that Fh total extract (TE) reduced LPS-induced DC maturation, and the DC ability to induce allogeneic responses. After TE fractionating, a fraction lower than 10 kDa (F<10 kDa) was able to maintain the TE properties to modulate the DC pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production induced by LPS. In addition, TE or F<10 kDa treatment decreased the ability of immature DC to stimulate the allogeneic responses and induced a novo allogeneic CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. In contrast, treatment of DC with T/L or F<10 kDa plus LPS (F<10/L) induced a regulatory IL-27 dependent mechanism that diminished the proliferative and Th1 and Th17 allogeneic responses. Finally, we showed that a Kunitz type molecule (Fh-KTM), present in F<10 kDa, was responsible for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production in LPS-activated DC, by printing tolerogenic features on DC that impaired their ability to induce inflammatory responses. These results suggest a modulatory role for this protein, which may be involved in the immune evasion mechanisms of the parasite. PMID:25486609

  7. Isolation, expression and characterization of a novel dual serine protease inhibitor, OH-TCI, from king cobra venom.

    PubMed

    He, Ying-Ying; Liu, Shu-Bai; Lee, Wen-Hui; Qian, Jin-Qiao; Zhang, Yun

    2008-10-01

    Snake venom Kunitz/BPTI members are good tools for understanding of structure-functional relationship between serine proteases and their inhibitors. A novel dual Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor named OH-TCI (trypsin- and chymotrypsin-dual inhibitor from Ophiophagus hannah) was isolated from king cobra venom by three chromatographic steps of gel filtration, trypsin affinity and reverse phase HPLC. OH-TCI is composed of 58 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 6339Da. Successful expression of OH-TCI was performed as the maltose-binding fusion protein in E. coli DH5alpha. Much different from Oh11-1, the purified native and recombinant OH-TCI both had strong inhibitory activities against trypsin and chymotrypsin although the sequence identity (74.1%) between them is very high. The inhibitor constants (K(i)) of recombinant OH-TCI were 3.91 x 10(-7) and 8.46 x10(-8)M for trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively. To our knowledge, it was the first report of Kunitz/BPTI serine proteinase inhibitor from snake venom that had equivalent trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activities. PMID:18582511

  8. The amino acid sequence of a weak trypsin inhibitor B from Dendroaspis Polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Strydom, D J; Joubert, F J

    1981-10-01

    The sequence of protein B, a weak trypsin inhibitor from black mamba venom was determined. The sequence differs much from other proteinase inhibitors of snake venom, bovine pancreas, snail and turtle egg. The phylogenetic relationship of B and its homologues, the basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz-type group, was investigated. The elapid snake proteins are grouped on a separate branch from the turtle egg - bovine - snail group, the viper inhibitor and the B-chain of beta-bungarotoxin each being a unique position. PMID:7309000

  9. Isolation and primary structure of proteinase inhibitors from Erythrina variegata (Linn.) var. Orientalis seeds.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Y; Suetake, M; Kimura, M; Yamasaki, N

    1992-11-01

    The Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitors, ETIa and ETIb, and chymotrypsin inhibitor ECI were isolated from the seeds of Erythrina variegata. The proteins were extracted from a defatted meal of seeds with 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.2, containing 0.15 M NaCl, and purified by DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose column chromatographies. The stoichiometry of trypsin inhibitors with trypsin was estimated to be 1:1, while that of chymotrypsin inhibitor with chymotrypsin was 1:2, judging from the titration patterns of their inhibitory activities. The complete amino acids of the two trypsin inhibitors were sequenced by protein chemical methods. The proteins ETIa and ETIb consist of 172 and 176 amino acid residues and have M(r) 19,242 and M(r) 19,783, respectively, and share 112 identical amino acid residues, which is 65% identity. They show structural features characteristic of the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor (i.e., identical residues at about 45% with soybean trypsin inhibitor STI). Furthermore, the trypsin inhibitors show a significant homology to the storage proteins, sporamin, in sweet potato and the taste-modifying protein, miraculin, in miracle fruit, having about 30% identical residues. PMID:1369077

  10. In vivo sequence diversity of the protease of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: presence of protease inhibitor-resistant variants in untreated subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lech, W J; Wang, G; Yang, Y L; Chee, Y; Dorman, K; McCrae, D; Lazzeroni, L C; Erickson, J W; Sinsheimer, J S; Kaplan, A H

    1996-01-01

    We have evaluated the sequence diversity of the protease human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in vivo. Our analysis of 246 protease coding domain sequences obtained from 12 subjects indicates that amino acid substitutions predicted to give rise to protease inhibitor resistance may be present in patients who have not received protease inhibitors. In addition, we demonstrated that amino acid residues directly involved in enzyme-substrate interactions may be varied in infected individuals. Several of these substitutions occurred in combination either more or less frequently than would be expected if their appearance was independent, suggesting that one substitution may compensate for the effects of another. Taken together, our analysis indicates that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease has flexibility sufficient to vary critical subsites in vivo, thereby retaining enzyme function and viral pathogenicity. PMID:8627733

  11. Computer based screening for novel inhibitors against Vibrio cholerae using NCI diversity set-II: an alternative approach by targeting transcriptional activator ToxT.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shakhinur Islam; Khadka, Bijendra; Akter, Arzuba; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Sultana, Razia

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae and remains as a major health risk in developing countries. The emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant V. cholerae strains during the past two decades is now a major problem in the treatment of cholera and have created the urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Targeting transcriptional factor is now a novel approach to tackle the development of multi-drug resistant strain. In the recent year virtual high throughput screening has emerged as a widely accepted powerful technology in the identification of novel and diverse lead. This study provides new insight to the search for new potent and selective inhibitors that still remains necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. The publications of high resolution X-ray structure of V. cholerae ToxT has open the way to the structure based virtual screening to identify new small molecular inhibitors which still remain necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. In this study we have performed structure based virtual screening approach using NCI diversity set-II to look for novel inhibitor of ToxT and proposed eight candidate compounds with high scoring function. Thus from complex scoring and binding ability it is elucidated that these compounds could be the promising inhibitors or could be developed as novel lead compounds for drug design against cholera. PMID:25172449

  12. A novel coagulation inhibitor from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Shiwanthi L; Fischer, Katja; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms whereby the human blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is able to survive in the host venous blood system. Protease inhibitors are likely released by the parasite enabling it to avoid attack by host proteolytic enzymes and coagulation factors. Interrogation of the S. japonicum genomic sequence identified a gene, SjKI-1, homologous to that encoding a single domain Kunitz protein (Sjp_0020270) which we expressed in recombinant form in Escherichia coli and purified. SjKI-1 is highly transcribed in adult worms and eggs but its expression was very low in cercariae and schistosomula. In situ immunolocalization with anti-SjKI-1 rabbit antibodies showed the protein was present in eggs trapped in the infected mouse intestinal wall. In functional assays, SjKI-1 inhibited trypsin in the picomolar range and chymotrypsin, neutrophil elastase, FXa and plasma kallikrein in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, SjKI-1, at a concentration of 7·5 µ m, prolonged 2-fold activated partial thromboplastin time of human blood coagulation. We also demonstrate that SjKI-1 has the ability to bind Ca(++). We present, therefore, characterization of the first Kunitz protein from S. japonicum which we show has an anti-coagulant properties. In addition, its inhibition of neutrophil elastase indicates SjKI-1 have an anti-inflammatory role. Having anti-thrombotic properties, SjKI-1 may point the way towards novel treatment for hemostatic disorders. PMID:26463744

  13. High-throughput screening against ~6.1 million structurally diverse, lead-like compounds to discover novel ROCK inhibitors for cerebral injury recovery.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haoling; Yuan, Zhicheng; Zhan, Liping

    2016-05-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) has been recognized as an attractive therapeutic target to promote neurogenesis, neuroregeneration, and neurorecovery after cerebral injury. Here, a high-throughput screening protocol was described to discover novel ROCK inhibitors from a large chemical library containing ~6.1 million structurally diverse, lead-like compounds. The protocol employed empirical rules such as ADMET evaluation and chemical similarity analysis to exclude those of drug-unlike candidates, and then molecular docking and binding affinity predictions were performed to suggest few promising candidates with high scores. Consequently, five compounds were successfully identified to have satisfactory activity profile with IC50 values at nanomolar level. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of inhibitor binding to target, the complex structures of ROCK kinase domain with the five identified compounds were modeled and examined in detail. A number of polar chemical forces such as hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions as well as nonpolar contacts such as π-π stacking and hydrophobic forces were revealed at the complex interface, conferring high affinity and strong specificity to inhibitor binding. In addition, several key residues around the kinase active site, including Val90, Lys105, Asn203, and Phe368, were found to play an important role in binding. PMID:26700101

  14. Minimal Pharmacophoric Elements and Fragment Hopping, an Approach Directed at Molecular Diversity and Isozyme Selectivity. Design of Selective Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haitao; Stanton, Benjamin Z.; Igarashi, Jotaro; Li, Huiying; Martásek, Pavel; Roman, Linda J.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Fragment hopping, a new fragment-based approach for de novo inhibitor design focusing on ligand diversity and isozyme selectivity, is described. The core of this approach is the derivation of the minimal pharmacophoric element for each pharmacophore. Sites for both ligand binding and isozyme selectivity are considered in deriving the minimal pharmacophoric elements. Five general-purpose libraries are established: the basic fragment library, the bioisostere library, the rules for metabolic stability, the toxicophore library, and the side chain library. These libraries are employed to generate focused fragment libraries to match the minimal pharmacophoric elements for each pharmacophore and then to link the fragment to the desired molecule. This method was successfully applied to neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which is implicated in stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. Starting with the nitroarginine-containing dipeptide inhibitors we developed previously, a small organic molecule with a totally different chemical structure was designed, which showed nanomolar nNOS inhibitory potency and more than 1000-fold nNOS selectivity. The crystallographic analysis confirms that the small organic molecule with a constrained conformation can exactly mimic the mode of action of the dipeptide nNOS inhibitors. Therefore, a new peptidomimetic strategy, referred to as fragment hopping, which creates small organic molecules that mimic the biological function of peptides by a pharmacophore-driven strategy for fragment-based de novo design, has been established as a new type of fragment-based inhibitor design. As an open system, the newly established approach efficiently incorporates the concept of early “ADME/Tox” considerations and provides a basic platform for medicinal chemistry-driven efforts. PMID:18321097

  15. Efficacy of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors with diverse isoform selectivity profiles for inhibiting the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Göckeritz, Elisa; Kerwien, Susan; Baumann, Michael; Wigger, Marion; Vondey, Verena; Neumann, Lars; Landwehr, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens M; Klein, Christian; Liu, Ningshu; Hallek, Michael; Frenzel, Lukas P; Krause, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatiylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated signaling holds great promise for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Therefore we assessed three structurally related PI3K inhibitors targeting the PI3K-δ isoform for their ability to inhibit the survival of freshly isolated CLL cells. The purely PI3K-δ-selective inhibitor idelalisib was compared to copanlisib (BAY 80-6946) and duvelisib (IPI-145), with isoform target profiles that additionally include PI3K-α or PI3K-γ, respectively. The concentrations leading to half-maximal reduction of the survival of CLL cells were more than ten-fold lower for copanlisib than for idelalisib and duvelisib. At concentrations reflecting the biological availability of the different inhibitors, high levels of apoptotic response among CLL samples were attained more consistently with copanlisib than with idelalisib. Copanlisib selectively reduced the survival of CLL cells compared to T cells and to B cells from healthy donors. In addition copanlisib and duvelisib impaired the migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 to a greater extent than equimolar idelalisib. Similarly copanlisib and duvelisib reduced the survival of CLL cells in co-cultures with the bone marrow stroma cell line HS-5 more strongly than idelalisib. Survival inhibition by copanlisib and idelalisib was enhanced by the monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and obinutuzumab (GA101), while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by alemtuzumab and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not substantially impaired by both PI3K inhibitors for the CLL-derived JVM-3 cell line as target cells. Taken together, targeting the α- and δ- p110 isoforms with copanlisib may be a useful strategy for the treatment of CLL and warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25912635

  16. Chemically Diverse Group I p21-Activated Kinase (PAK) Inhibitors Impart Acute Cardiovascular Toxicity with a Narrow Therapeutic Window.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Joachim; Murray, Lesley J; Ndubaku, Chudi O; O'Brien, Thomas; Blackwood, Elizabeth; Wang, Weiru; Aliagas, Ignacio; Gazzard, Lewis; Crawford, James J; Drobnick, Joy; Lee, Wendy; Zhao, Xianrui; Hoeflich, Klaus P; Favor, David A; Dong, Ping; Zhang, Haiming; Heise, Christopher E; Oh, Angela; Ong, Christy C; La, Hank; Chakravarty, Paroma; Chan, Connie; Jakubiak, Diana; Epler, Jennifer; Ramaswamy, Sreemathy; Vega, Roxanne; Cain, Gary; Diaz, Dolores; Zhong, Yu

    2016-06-01

    p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) has an important role in transducing signals in several oncogenic pathways. The concept of inhibiting this kinase has garnered significant interest over the past decade, particularly for targeting cancers associated with PAK1 amplification. Animal studies with the selective group I PAK (pan-PAK1, 2, 3) inhibitor G-5555 from the pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one class uncovered acute toxicity with a narrow therapeutic window. To attempt mitigating the toxicity, we introduced significant structural changes, culminating in the discovery of the potent pyridone side chain analogue G-9791. Mouse tolerability studies with this compound, other members of this series, and compounds from two structurally distinct classes revealed persistent toxicity and a correlation of minimum toxic concentrations and PAK1/2 mediated cellular potencies. Broad screening of selected PAK inhibitors revealed PAK1, 2, and 3 as the only overlapping targets. Our data suggest acute cardiovascular toxicity resulting from the inhibition of PAK2, which may be enhanced by PAK1 inhibition, and cautions against continued pursuit of pan-group I PAK inhibitors in drug discovery. PMID:27167326

  17. Purification, characterization and cloning of a chymotrypsin inhibitor (CI-9) from the hemolymph of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou; Li, Juan; Fujii, Hiroshi; Banno, Yutaka; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2007-08-01

    Hemolymph chymotrypsin inhibitor 9 (CI-9) from the hemolymph of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, Butyl Toyopearl hydrophobic chromatography, gel filtration through Sephadex C-50 and chymotrypsin-sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Checked by Native PAGE and SDS-PAGE in combination with silver staining, the final preparation appeared homogeneous. In tricine SDS-PAGE, CI-9 displayed a molecular weight of 7.5 kD, which was determined to be 7167 Da with the Voyager TOFMass analyser. The pI value for CI-9, revealed by 2D-PAGE (two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis), was 4.3. CI-9 exhibited inhibitory activity at a temperature as high as 100 degrees C and a stability against a wide range of pH (1-12). In N-terminal amino-acid analysis of CI-9, 40 amino acid residues were obtained. The C-terminal 22 amino acid residues were deduced by subsequently cloned cDNA and genomic fragments. MW and pI of CI-9 were predicted to be 7170.98 Da and 4.61, respectively, on the website. Its low molecular weight, high stability, conserved active site and Kunitz domain showed that CI-9 is a Kunitz-type CI. The difference of sequence and pI between CI-9 and other Kunitz type CIs indicated that it is a novel chymotrypsin inhibitor. PMID:17503165

  18. PIVL, a new serine protease inhibitor from Macrovipera lebetina transmediterranea venom, impairs motility of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Morjen, Maram; Kallech-Ziri, Olfa; Bazaa, Amine; Othman, Houcemeddine; Mabrouk, Kamel; Zouari-Kessentini, Raoudha; Sanz, Libia; Calvete, Juan José; Srairi-Abid, Najet; El Ayeb, Mohamed; Luis, José; Marrakchi, Naziha

    2013-01-01

    A novel Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor, termed PIVL, was purified to homogeneity from the venom of the Tunisian snake Macrovipera lebetina transmediterranea. It is a monomeric polypeptide chain cross-linked by three disulfide linkages with an isotope-averaged molecular mass of 7691.7 Da. The 67-residue full-length PIVL sequence was deduced from a venom gland cDNA clone. Structurally, PIVL is built by a single Kunitz/BPTI-like domain. Functionally, it is able to specifically inhibit trypsin activity. Interestingly, PIVL exhibits an anti-tumor effect and displays integrin inhibitory activity without being cytotoxic. Here we show that PIVL is able to dose-dependently inhibit the adhesion, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma U87 cells. Our results also show that PIVL impairs the function of αvβ3 and to a lesser extent, the activity of αvβ6, αvβ5, α1β1 and α5β1 integrins. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the (41)RGN(43) motif of PIVL is likely responsible for its anti-cancer effect. By using time lapse videomicroscopy, we found that PIVL significantly reduced U87 cells motility and affected cell directionality persistence by 68%. These findings reveal novel pharmacological effects for a Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor. PMID:23262217

  19. High resolution genetic mapping uncovers chitin synthase-1 as the target-site of the structurally diverse mite growth inhibitors clofentezine, hexythiazox and etoxazole in Tetranychus urticae

    PubMed Central

    Demaeght, Peter; Osborne, Edward J.; Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Grbić, Miodrag; Nauen, Ralf; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The acaricides clofentezine, hexythiazox and etoxazole are commonly referred to as ‘mite growth inhibitors’, and clofentezine and hexythiazox have been used successfully for the integrated control of plant mite pests for decades. Although they are still important today, their mode of action has remained elusive. Recently, a mutation in chitin synthase 1 (CHS1) was linked to etoxazole resistance. In this study, we identified and investigated a T. urticae strain (HexR) harboring recessive, monogenic resistance to each of hexythiazox, clofentezine, and etoxazole. To elucidate if there is a common genetic basis for the observed cross-resistance, we adapted a previously developed bulk segregant analysis method to map with high resolution a single, shared resistance locus for all three compounds. This finding indicates that the underlying molecular basis for resistance to all three compounds is identical. This locus is centered on the CHS1 gene, and as supported by additional genetic and biochemical studies, a non-synonymous variant (I1017F) in CHS1 associates with resistance to each of the tested acaricides in HexR. Our findings thus demonstrate a shared molecular mode of action for the chemically diverse mite growth inhibitors clofentezine, hexythiazox and etoxazole as inhibitors of an essential, non-catalytic activity of CHS1. Given the previously documented cross-resistance between clofentezine, hexythiazox and the benzyolphenylurea compounds flufenoxuron and cycloxuron, CHS1 should be also considered as a potential target-site of insecticidal BPUs. PMID:24859419

  20. The cAMP response element binding protein, CREB, is a potent inhibitor of diverse transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaigre, F P; Ace, C I; Green, M R

    1993-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) activates transcription of cAMP response element (CRE)-containing promoters following an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Here we show that CREB and the highly related protein ATF-1 are also potent transcription inhibitors. Strikingly, CREB inhibits transcription of multiple activators, whose DNA-binding domains and activation regions are unrelated to one another. Inhibition requires that the CREB dimerization and DNA-binding domains are intact. However, inhibition is not dependent upon the presence of a CRE in the promoter, and does not involve heterodimer formation between CREB and the activator. The ability of an activator protein to inhibit transcription in such a promiscuous fashion has not been previously reported. Images PMID:8332500

  1. Interrogating and predicting tolerated sequence diversity in protein folds: application to E. elaterium trypsin inhibitor-II cystine-knot miniprotein.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Jennifer L; Silverman, Adam P; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2009-09-01

    Cystine-knot miniproteins (knottins) are promising molecular scaffolds for protein engineering applications. Members of the knottin family have multiple loops capable of displaying conformationally constrained polypeptides for molecular recognition. While previous studies have illustrated the potential of engineering knottins with modified loop sequences, a thorough exploration into the tolerated loop lengths and sequence space of a knottin scaffold has not been performed. In this work, we used the Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor II (EETI) as a model member of the knottin family and constructed libraries of EETI loop-substituted variants with diversity in both amino acid sequence and loop length. Using yeast surface display, we isolated properly folded EETI loop-substituted clones and applied sequence analysis tools to assess the tolerated diversity of both amino acid sequence and loop length. In addition, we used covariance analysis to study the relationships between individual positions in the substituted loops, based on the expectation that correlated amino acid substitutions will occur between interacting residue pairs. We then used the results of our sequence and covariance analyses to successfully predict loop sequences that facilitated proper folding of the knottin when substituted into EETI loop 3. The sequence trends we observed in properly folded EETI loop-substituted clones will be useful for guiding future protein engineering efforts with this knottin scaffold. Furthermore, our findings demonstrate that the combination of directed evolution with sequence and covariance analyses can be a powerful tool for rational protein engineering. PMID:19730675

  2. Crystal Structures of a Plant Trypsin Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum (EcTI) and of Its Complex with Bovine Trypsin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dongwen; Lobo, Yara A.; Batista, Isabel F. C.; Marques-Porto, Rafael; Gustchina, Alla; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A serine protease inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum (EcTI) belongs to the Kunitz family of plant inhibitors, common in plant seeds. It was shown that EcTI inhibits the invasion of gastric cancer cells through alterations in integrin-dependent cell signaling pathway. We determined high-resolution crystal structures of free EcTI (at 1.75 Å) and complexed with bovine trypsin (at 2 Å). High quality of the resulting electron density maps and the redundancy of structural information indicated that the sequence of the crystallized isoform contained 176 residues and differed from the one published previously. The structure of the complex confirmed the standard inhibitory mechanism in which the reactive loop of the inhibitor is docked into trypsin active site with the side chains of Arg64 and Ile65 occupying the S1 and S1′ pockets, respectively. The overall conformation of the reactive loop undergoes only minor adjustments upon binding to trypsin. Larger deviations are seen in the vicinity of Arg64, driven by the needs to satisfy specificity requirements. A comparison of the EcTI-trypsin complex with the complexes of related Kunitz inhibitors has shown that rigid body rotation of the inhibitors by as much as 15° is required for accurate juxtaposition of the reactive loop with the active site while preserving its conformation. Modeling of the putative complexes of EcTI with several serine proteases and a comparison with equivalent models for other Kunitz inhibitors elucidated the structural basis for the fine differences in their specificity, providing tools that might allow modification of their potency towards the individual enzymes. PMID:23626794

  3. Intercompartmental recombination of HIV-1 contributes to env intrahost diversity and modulates viral tropism and sensitivity to entry inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J P; Peters, Paul J; Caron, Catherine; Gonzalez-Perez, Maria Paz; Stones, Leanne; Ankghuambom, Chiambah; Pondei, Kemebradikumo; McClure, C Patrick; Alemnji, George; Taylor, Stephen; Sharp, Paul M; Clapham, Paul R; Ball, Jonathan K

    2011-06-01

    HIV-1 circulates within an infected host as a genetically heterogeneous viral population. Viral intrahost diversity is shaped by substitutional evolution and recombination. Although many studies have speculated that recombination could have a significant impact on viral phenotype, this has never been definitively demonstrated. We report here phylogenetic and subsequent phenotypic analyses of envelope genes obtained from HIV-1 populations present in different anatomical compartments. Assessment of env compartmentalization from immunologically discrete tissues was assessed utilizing a single genome amplification approach, minimizing in vitro-generated artifacts. Genetic compartmentalization of variants was frequently observed. In addition, multiple incidences of intercompartment recombination, presumably facilitated by low-level migration of virus or infected cells between different anatomic sites and coinfection of susceptible cells by genetically divergent strains, were identified. These analyses demonstrate that intercompartment recombination is a fundamental evolutionary mechanism that helps to shape HIV-1 env intrahost diversity in natural infection. Analysis of the phenotypic consequences of these recombination events showed that genetic compartmentalization often correlates with phenotypic compartmentalization and that intercompartment recombination results in phenotype modulation. This represents definitive proof that recombination can generate novel combinations of phenotypic traits which differ subtly from those of parental strains, an important phenomenon that may have an impact on antiviral therapy and contribute to HIV-1 persistence in vivo. PMID:21471230

  4. In silico and in vitro screening to identify structurally diverse non-azole CYP51 inhibitors as potent antifungal agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aarti; Paliwal, Sarvesh Kumar; Sharma, Mukta; Mittal, Anupama; Sharma, Swapnil; Sharma, Jai Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The problem of resistance to azole class of antifungals is a serious cause of concern to the medical fraternity and thus there is an urgent need to identify non-azole scaffolds with high affinity for lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51). In view of this we have attempted to identify novel non-azole CYP51 inhibitors through the application of pharmacophore based virtual screening and in vitro evaluation. A rigorously validated pharmacophore model comprising of 2 hydrogen bond acceptor and 2 hydrophobic features has been developed and used to mine NCI database. Out of 265 retrieved hits, NSC 1215 and 1520 have been chosen on the basis of Lipinski's rule of five, fit and estimated values. Both the hits were docked into the active site of CYP51. In view of high fit value and CDocker score, NSC 1215 and 1520 have been subjected to in vitro microbiological assay. The result reveals that NSC 1215 and 1520 are active against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, and Aspergillus niger. In addition to this the absorption characteristics of both the hits have also been determined using the rat sac technique and permeation in order of NSC 1520>NSC 1215 has been observed. PMID:26579619

  5. Integrase inhibitor (INI) genotypic resistance in treatment-naive and raltegravir-experienced patients infected with diverse HIV-1 clades

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tomas; Dunn, David T.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; De Mendoza, Carmen; Garcia, Frederico; Smit, Erasmus; Fearnhill, Esther; Marcelin, Anne-Genevieve; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Kaiser, Rolf; Geretti, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to characterize the prevalence and patterns of genotypic integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance in relation to HIV-1 clade. Methods The cohort comprised 533 INI-naive subjects and 255 raltegravir recipients with viraemia who underwent integrase sequencing in routine care across Europe, including 134/533 (25.1%) and 46/255 (18.0%), respectively, with non-B clades (A, C, D, F, G, CRF01, CRF02, other CRFs, complex). Results No major INI resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) occurred in INI-naive subjects. Among raltegravir recipients with viraemia (median 3523 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL), 113/255 (44.3%) had one or more major INI RAMs, most commonly N155H (45/255, 17.6%), Q148H/R/K + G140S/A (35/255, 13.7%) and Y143R/C/H (12/255, 4.7%). In addition, four (1.6%) raltegravir recipients showed novel mutations at recognized resistance sites (E92A, S147I, N155D, N155Q) and novel mutations at other integrase positions that were statistically associated with raltegravir exposure (K159Q/R, I161L/M/T/V, E170A/G). Comparing subtype B with non-B clades, Q148H/R/K occurred in 42/209 (20.1%) versus 2/46 (4.3%) subjects (P = 0.009) and G140S/A occurred in 36/209 (17.2%) versus 1/46 (2.2%) subjects (P = 0.005). Intermediate- to high-level cross-resistance to twice-daily dolutegravir was predicted in 40/255 (15.7%) subjects, more commonly in subtype B versus non-B clades (39/209, 18.7% versus 1/46, 2.2%; P = 0.003). A glycine (G) to serine (S) substitution at integrase position 140 required one nucleotide change in subtype B and two nucleotide changes in all non-B clades. Conclusions No major INI resistance mutations occurred in INI-naive subjects. Reduced occurrence of Q148H/R/K + G140S/A was seen in non-B clades versus subtype B, and was explained by the higher genetic barrier to the G140S mutation observed in all non-B clades analysed. PMID:26311843

  6. Development of pharmacophore similarity-based quantitative activity hypothesis and its applicability domain: applied on a diverse data-set of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Mehta, Vijay P; Pandya, Himanshu A

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative pharmacophore hypothesis combines the 3D spatial arrangement of pharmacophore features with biological activities of the ligand data-set and predicts the activities of geometrically and/or pharmacophoric similar ligands. Most pharmacophore discovery programs face difficulties in conformational flexibility, molecular alignment, pharmacophore features sampling, and feature selection to score models if the data-set constitutes diverse ligands. Towards this focus, we describe a ligand-based computational procedure to introduce flexibility in aligning the small molecules and generating a pharmacophore hypothesis without geometrical constraints to define pharmacophore space, enriched with chemical features necessary to elucidate common pharmacophore hypotheses (CPHs). Maximal common substructure (MCS)-based alignment method was adopted to guide the alignment of carbon molecules, deciphered the MCS atom connectivity to cluster molecules in bins and subsequently, calculated the pharmacophore similarity matrix with the bin-specific reference molecules. After alignment, the carbon molecules were enriched with original atoms in their respective positions and conventional pharmacophore features were perceived. Distance-based pharmacophoric descriptors were enumerated by computing the interdistance between perceived features and MCS-aligned 'centroid' position. The descriptor set and biological activities were used to develop support vector machine models to predict the activities of the external test set. Finally, fitness score was estimated based on pharmacophore similarity with its bin-specific reference molecules to recognize the best and poor alignments and, also with each reference molecule to predict outliers of the quantitative hypothesis model. We applied this procedure to a diverse data-set of 40 HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and discussed its effectiveness with the reported CPH model. PMID:24735019

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Schizolobium parahyba chymotrypsin inhibitor (SPCI) at 1.8 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Teles, Rozeni Chagas Lima; Esteves, Gisele Ferreira; Araújo, Marcus Aurélio Miranda; Bloch, Carlos Jr; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Freitas, Sonia Maria de

    2007-11-01

    Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Schizolobium parahyba chymotrypsin inhibitor (SPCI) at 1.8 Å resolution. SPCI, a Kunitz-type chymotrypsin inhibitor, is a 180-amino-acid polypeptide isolated from Schizolobium parahyba seeds. This inhibitor has been characterized as a highly stable protein over a broad pH and temperature range. SPCI was crystallized using a solution containing 0.1 M sodium acetate trihydrate buffer pH 4.6, 33%(v/v) PEG 2000 and 0.2 M ammonium sulfate. Data were collected to 1.80 Å resolution from a single crystal of SPCI under cryogenic conditions. The protein crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 40.01, b = 71.58, c = 108.68 Å and an R{sub merge} of 0.052. The structure of SPCI has been solved by molecular replacement using the known structure of the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor from Delonix regia (PDB code) as the search model.

  8. Tri-domain Bifunctional Inhibitor of Metallocarboxypeptidases A and Serine Proteases Isolated from Marine Annelid Sabellastarte magnifica*

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-del-Rivero, Maday; Trejo, Sebastian A.; Reytor, Mey L.; Rodriguez-de-la-Vega, Monica; Delfin, Julieta; Diaz, Joaquin; González-González, Yamile; Canals, Francesc; Chavez, Maria Angeles; Aviles, Francesc X.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a novel bifunctional metallocarboxypeptidase and serine protease inhibitor (SmCI) isolated from the tentacle crown of the annelid Sabellastarte magnifica. SmCI is a 165-residue glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 19.69 kDa (mass spectrometry) and 18 cysteine residues forming nine disulfide bonds. Its cDNA was cloned and sequenced by RT-PCR and nested PCR using degenerated oligonucleotides. Employing this information along with data derived from automatic Edman degradation of peptide fragments, the SmCI sequence was fully characterized, indicating the presence of three bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor/Kunitz domains and its high homology with other Kunitz serine protease inhibitors. Enzyme kinetics and structural analyses revealed SmCI to be an inhibitor of human and bovine pancreatic metallocarboxypeptidases of the A-type (but not B-type), with nanomolar Ki values. SmCI is also capable of inhibiting bovine pancreatic trypsin, chymotrypsin, and porcine pancreatic elastase in varying measures. When the inhibitor and its nonglycosylated form (SmCI N23A mutant) were overproduced recombinantly in a Pichia pastoris system, they displayed the dual inhibitory properties of the natural form. Similarly, two bi-domain forms of the inhibitor (recombinant rSmCI D1-D2 and rSmCI D2-D3) as well as its C-terminal domain (rSmCI-D3) were also overproduced. Of these fragments, only the rSmCI D1-D2 bi-domain retained inhibition of metallocarboxypeptidase A but only partially, indicating that the whole tri-domain structure is required for such capability in full. SmCI is the first proteinaceous inhibitor of metallocarboxypeptidases able to act as well on another mechanistic class of proteases (serine-type) and is the first of this kind identified in nature. PMID:22411994

  9. Bauhinia variegata var. variegata trypsin inhibitor: From isolation to potential medicinal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Wong, Jack Ho; Bah, Clara Shui Fern; Lin, Peng; Tsao, Sai Wah; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2010-06-11

    Here we report for the first time of a new Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor (termed BvvTI) from seeds of the Camel's foot tree, Bauhinia variegata var. variegata. BvvTI shares the same reactive site residues (Arg, Ser) and exhibits a homology of N-terminal amino acid sequence to other Bauhinia protease inhibitors. The trypsin inhibitory activity (K{sub i}, 0.1 x 10{sup -9} M) of BvvTI ranks the highest among them. Besides anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity, BvvTI could significantly inhibit the proliferation of nasopharyngeal cancer CNE-1 cells in a selective way. This may partially be contributed by its induction of cytokines and apoptotic bodies. These results unveil potential medicinal applications of BvvTI.

  10. [Heterologous expression, purification, and properties of a chymotrypsin inhibitor isolated from potatoes].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The PKPIJ-B gene encoding a chymotrypsin inhibitor from a subfamily of potato Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors (PKPI) in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Yubilei Zhukova) was cloned into a pET23a vector and then expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant PKPIJ-B protein obtained in the inclusion bodies was denatured, purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on Mono Q under denaturing conditions, and renaturated. The renaturated protein was additionally purified using HPLC on DEAE-ToyoPearl. The PKPIJ-B protein efficiently suppressed chymotrypsin activity, had a weaker effect on trypsin, and inhibited the growth and development of phytopathogenic microorganisms affecting potato plants. PMID:23662448

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a protease inhibitor from the latex of Carica papaya

    SciTech Connect

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Dibiani, Rachid; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2006-12-01

    The Kunitz-type trypsin/chymotrypsin inhibitor isolated from C. papaya latex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Two different crystal forms are observed, diffracting to 2.6 and 1.7 Å. A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor purified from the latex of green papaya (Carica papaya) fruits was crystallized in the presence and absence of divalent metal ions. Crystal form I, which is devoid of divalent cations, diffracts to a resolution of 2.6 Å and belongs to space group P3{sub 1} or P3{sub 2}. This crystal form is a merohedral twin with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 74.70, c = 78.97 Å. Crystal form II, which was grown in the presence of Co{sup 2+}, diffracts to a resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.26, b = 81.99, c = 140.89 Å.

  12. Seed transmission rates of Bean pod mottle virus and Soybean mosaic virus in soybean may be affected by mixed infection or expression of the Kunitz trypsin inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To facilitate their spread, plant viruses have developed several methods for dispersal including insect and seed transmission. While insect transmission requires virus stability against insect digestion, seed-transmitted viruses have to overcome barriers to entry into embryos. Bean pod mottle virus ...

  13. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival. PMID:27608950

  14. Pisum sativum wild-type and mutant stipules and those induced by an auxin transport inhibitor demonstrate the entire diversity of laminated stipules observed in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Sharma, Vishakha; Khan, Moinuddin; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-02-01

    About a quarter of angiosperm species are stipulate. They produce stipule pairs at stem nodes in association with leaves. Stipule morphology is treated as a species-specific characteristic. Many species bear stipules as laminated organs in a variety of configurations, including laterally free large foliaceous, small, or wholly leaf-like stipules, and as fused intrapetiolar, opposite, ochreate or interpetiolar stipules. In Pisum sativum, the wild-type and stipule-reduced and cochleata mutants are known to form free large, small, and leaf-like stipules, respectively. Auxin controls initiation and development of plant organs and perturbations in its availability and distribution in the meristems, caused by auxin transport inhibitor(s) (ATIs), lead to aberrations in leaf development. The effect(s) of ATI(s) on stipule development are unexplored. To study the effect of the ATI 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) on stipule morphogenesis, P. sativum explants were grown in vitro in presence of a sublethal concentration of NPA. The NPA-treated shoots produced fused stipules of all the different types described in angiosperms. The observations indicate that (a) the gene sets for stipule differentiation may be common in angiosperms and (b) the interspecies stipule architectural differences are due to mutations, affecting gene expression or activity that got selected in the course of evolution. PMID:22456952

  15. Diverse Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease APE1 Identified from a Screen of a Large Public Collection

    PubMed Central

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N.; Maloney, David J.; Jadhav, Ajit; Wilson, David M.; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS) of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment. PMID:23110144

  16. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies of some structurally diverse flavonoids and design of new aldose reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chandra De, Utpal; Debnath, Tanusree; Sen, Debanjan; Debnath, Sudhan

    2015-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) plays an important role in the development of several long-term diabetic complications. Inhibition of AR activities is a strategy for controlling complications arising from chronic diabetes. Several AR inhibitors have been reported in the literature. Flavonoid type compounds are shown to have significant AR inhibition. The objective of this study was to perform a computational work to get an idea about structural insight of flavonoid type compounds for developing as well as for searching new flavonoid based AR inhibitors. The data-set comprising 68 flavones along with their pIC50 values ranging from 0.44 to 4.59 have been collected from literature. Structure of all the flavonoids were drawn in Chembiodraw Ultra 11.0, converted into corresponding three-dimensional structure, saved as mole file and then imported to maestro project table. Imported ligands were prepared using LigPrep option of maestro 9.6 version. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships and docking studies were performed with appropriate options of maestro 9.6 version installed in HP Z820 workstation with CentOS 6.3 (Linux). A model with partial least squares factor 5, standard deviation 0.2482, R2 = 0.9502 and variance ratio of regression 122 has been found as the best statistical model. PMID:25709964

  17. A colostrum trypsin inhibitor gene expressed in the Cape fur seal mammary gland during lactation.

    PubMed

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Cane, Kylie N; McCoey, Julia; Buckle, Ashley M; Oosthuizen, W H; Guinet, Christophe; Arnould, John P Y

    2016-03-01

    The colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene and transcript were cloned from the Cape fur seal mammary gland and CTI identified by in silico analysis of the Pacific walrus and polar bear genomes (Order Carnivora), and in marine and terrestrial mammals of the Orders Cetartiodactyla (yak, whales, camel) and Perissodactyla (white rhinoceros). Unexpectedly, Weddell seal CTI was predicted to be a pseudogene. Cape fur seal CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of a pregnant multiparous seal, but not in a seal in its first pregnancy. While bovine CTI is expressed for 24-48 h postpartum (pp) and secreted in colostrum only, Cape fur seal CTI was detected for at least 2-3 months pp while the mother was suckling its young on-shore. Furthermore, CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of only one of the lactating seals that was foraging at-sea. The expression of β-casein (CSN2) and β-lactoglobulin II (LGB2), but not CTI in the second lactating seal foraging at-sea suggested that CTI may be intermittently expressed during lactation. Cape fur seal and walrus CTI encode putative small, secreted, N-glycosylated proteins with a single Kunitz/bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) domain indicative of serine protease inhibition. Mature Cape fur seal CTI shares 92% sequence identity with Pacific walrus CTI, but only 35% identity with BPTI. Structural homology modelling of Cape fur seal CTI and Pacific walrus trypsin based on the model of the second Kunitz domain of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and porcine trypsin (Protein Data Bank: 1TFX) confirmed that CTI inhibits trypsin in a canonical fashion. Therefore, pinniped CTI may be critical for preventing the proteolytic degradation of immunoglobulins that are passively transferred from mother to young via colostrum and milk. PMID:26639991

  18. Genetic diversity on the integrase region of the pol gene among HIV type 1-infected patients naive for integrase inhibitors in São Paulo City, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Liã Bárbara; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The presence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance among INI-naive patients may play an important clinical role in the use of those drugs Samples from 76 HIV-1-infected subjects naive to INIs were submitted to direct sequencing. No differences were found between naive (25%) subjects and subjects on HAART (75%). No primary mutation associated with raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance was found. However, 78% of sequences showed at least one accessory mutation associated with resistance. The analysis of the 76 IN sequences showed a high polymorphic level on this region among Brazilian HIV-1-infected subjects, including a high prevalence of aa substitutions related to INI resistance. The impact of these findings remains unclear and further studies are necessary to address these questions. PMID:20055590

  19. Bifunctional fusion proteins of the human engineered antibody domain m36 with human soluble CD4 are potent inhibitors of diverse HIV-1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weizao; Xiao, Xiaodong; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2010-01-01

    Currently used antiretroviral therapy is highly successful but there is still a need for new effective and safe prophylactics and therapeutics. We have previously identified and characterized a human engineered antibody domain (eAd), m36, which exhibits potent broadly neutralizing activity against HIV-1 by targeting a highly conserved CD4 binding-induced (CD4i) structure on the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. m36 has very small size (~15 kDa) but is highly specific and is likely to be safe in long-term use thus representing a novel class of potentially promising HIV-1 inhibitors. Major problems with the development of m36 as a candidate therapeutic are possible short serum half life and lack of effector functions that could be important for effective protection in vivo. Fusion of m36 to human IgG1 Fc resulted in dramatically diminished neutralization potency most likely due to the sterically restricted nature of the m36 epitope that limits access of large molecules. To confer effector functions and simultaneously increase the potency, we first matured m36 by panning and screening a mutant library for mutants with increased binding to gp120. We next fused m36 and its mutants with the first two domains (soluble CD4, sCD4) of the human CD4 by using a polypeptide linker. Our results showed that the selected m36 mutants and the sCD4-fusion proteins exhibited more potent antiviral activities than m36. The m36-sCD4 fusion proteins with human IgG1 Fc showed even higher potency likely due to their bivalency and increased avidity although with a greater increase in molecular size. Our data suggest that m36 derivatives are promising HIV-1 candidate therapeutics and tools to study highly conserved gp120 structures with implications for understanding mechanisms of entry and design of vaccine immunogens and small molecule inhibitors. PMID:20709110

  20. The amino acid sequence of a 20 kDa bifunctional subtilisin/alpha-amylase inhibitor from bran [correction of brain] of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, K; Richardson, M

    1992-08-31

    A 20 kDa bifunctional inhibitor of the microbial proteinase, subtilisin, and the alpha-amylase from the larvae of the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) was purified from bran of rice seeds by saline extraction, precipitation with ammonium sulphate, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Cellulose and Toyopearl CM-650, and preparative HPLC on Vydac C18. The complete primary structure was determined by automatic degradation of the intact, reduced and S-alkylated protein, and by manual DABITC/PITC micro-sequencing of peptides obtained from the protein following separate enzymic digestions with trypsin, pepsin, chymotrypsin, elastase and the protease from S. aureus V8. The protein sequence, which contained 176 residues, showed strong homology with similar bifunctional inhibitors previously isolated from wheat and barley which are related to the Kunitz family of proteinase inhibitors from legume seeds. PMID:1511747

  1. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  2. The P2’ residue is a key determinant of mesotrypsin specificity: Engineering a high-affinity inhibitor with anticancer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, M.A.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, D. C.; Radisky, E. S.

    2011-11-15

    PRSS3/mesotrypsin is an atypical isoform of trypsin, the up-regulation of which has been implicated in promoting tumor progression. Mesotrypsin inhibitors could potentially provide valuable research tools and novel therapeutics, but small-molecule trypsin inhibitors have low affinity and little selectivity, whereas protein trypsin inhibitors bind poorly and are rapidly degraded by mesotrypsin. In the present study, we use mutagenesis of a mesotrypsin substrate, APPI (amyloid precursor protein Kunitz protease inhibitor domain), and of a poor mesotrypsin inhibitor, BPTI (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor), to dissect mesotrypsin specificity at the key P'{sub 2} position. We find that bulky and charged residues strongly disfavor binding, whereas acidic residues facilitate catalysis. Crystal structures of mesotrypsin complexes with BPTI variants provide structural insights into mesotrypsin specificity and inhibition. Through optimization of the P{sub 1} and P'{sub 2} residues of BPTI, we generate a stable high-affinity mesotrypsin inhibitor with an equilibrium binding constant K{sub i} of 5.9 nM, a >2000-fold improvement in affinity over native BPTI. Using this engineered inhibitor, we demonstrate the efficacy of pharmacological inhibition of mesotrypsin in assays of breast cancer cell malignant growth and pancreatic cancer cell invasion. Although further improvements in inhibitor selectivity will be important before clinical potential can be realized, the results of the present study support the feasibility of engineering protein protease inhibitors of mesotrypsin and highlight their therapeutic potential.

  3. The P 2 ' residue is a key determinant of mesotrypsin specificity: Engineering a high-affinity inhibitor with anticancer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, Moh'd A.; Soares, Alexei S.; Hockla, Alexandra; Radisky, Derek C.; Radisky, Evette S.

    2011-11-15

    PRSS3/mesotrypsin is an atypical isoform of trypsin, the up-regulation of which has been implicated in promoting tumour progression. Mesotrypsin inhibitors could potentially provide valuable research tools and novel therapeutics, but small-molecule trypsin inhibitors have low affinity and little selectivity, whereas protein trypsin inhibitors bind poorly and are rapidly degraded by mesotrypsin. In the present study, we use mutagenesis of a mesotrypsin substrate, APPI (amyloid precursor protein Kunitz protease inhibitor domain), and of a poor mesotrypsin inhibitor, BPTI (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor), to dissect mesotrypsin specificity at the key P2' position. We find that bulky and charged residues strongly disfavour binding, whereas acidic residues facilitate catalysis. Crystal structures of mesotrypsin complexes with BPTI variants provide structural insights into mesotrypsin specificity and inhibition. Through optimization of the P1 and P2' residues of BPTI, we generate a stable high-affinity mesotrypsin inhibitor with an equilibrium binding constant Ki of 5.9 nM, a >2000-fold improvement in affinity over native BPTI. Using this engineered inhibitor, we demonstrate the efficacy of pharmacological inhibition of mesotrypsin in assays of breast cancer cell malignant growth and pancreatic cancer cell invasion. Although further improvements in inhibitor selectivity will be important before clinical potential can be realized, the results of the present study support the feasibility of engineering protein protease inhibitors of mesotrypsin and highlight their therapeutic potential.

  4. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, José A; Pompeu, Dávia G; Smolka, Marcus B; Gozzo, Fabio C; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N; Granjeiro, Paulo A; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  5. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Silva, José A.; Pompeu, Dávia G.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  6. Structure-based design of diverse inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase: combined molecular docking, dynamic simulation, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Soni, Vijay; Suryadevara, Priyanka; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Kumar, Santhosh; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2015-07-01

    Persistent nature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the major factors which make the drug development process monotonous against this organism. The highly lipophilic cell wall, which constituting outer mycolic acid and inner peptidoglycan layers, acts as a barrier for the drugs to enter the bacteria. The rigidity of the cell wall is imparted by the peptidoglycan layer, which is covalently linked to mycolic acid by arabinogalactan. Uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) serves as the starting material in the biosynthesis of this peptidoglycan layers. This UDP-GlcNAc is synthesized by N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU(Mtb)), a bi-functional enzyme with two functional sites, acetyltransferase site and uridyltransferase site. Here, we report design and screening of nine inhibitors against UTP and NAcGlc-1-P of uridyltransferase active site of glmU(Mtb). Compound 4 was showing good inhibition and was selected for further analysis. The isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments showed the binding energy pattern of compound 4 to the uridyltransferase active site is similar to that of substrate UTP. In silico molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies, for compound 4, carried out for 10 ns showed the protein-compound complex to be stable throughout the simulation with relative rmsd in acceptable range. Hence, these compounds can serve as a starting point in the drug discovery processes against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:26078037

  7. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder. PMID:22736441

  8. IrSPI, a tick serine protease inhibitor involved in tick feeding and Bartonella henselae infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang Ye; de la Fuente, Jose; Cote, Martine; Galindo, Ruth C; Moutailler, Sara; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Bonnet, Sarah I

    2014-07-01

    Ixodes ricinus is the most widespread and abundant tick in Europe, frequently bites humans, and is the vector of several pathogens including those responsible for Lyme disease, Tick-Borne Encephalitis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis and bartonellosis. These tick-borne pathogens are transmitted to vertebrate hosts via tick saliva during blood feeding, and tick salivary gland (SG) factors are likely implicated in transmission. In order to identify such tick factors, we characterized the transcriptome of female I. ricinus SGs using next generation sequencing techniques, and compared transcriptomes between Bartonella henselae-infected and non-infected ticks. High-throughput sequencing of I. ricinus SG transcriptomes led to the generation of 24,539 isotigs. Among them, 829 and 517 transcripts were either significantly up- or down-regulated respectively, in response to bacterial infection. Searches based on sequence identity showed that among the differentially expressed transcripts, 161 transcripts corresponded to nine groups of previously annotated tick SG gene families, while the others corresponded to genes of unknown function. Expression patterns of five selected genes belonging to the BPTI/Kunitz family of serine protease inhibitors, the tick salivary peptide group 1 protein, the salp15 super-family, and the arthropod defensin family, were validated by qRT-PCR. IrSPI, a member of the BPTI/Kunitz family of serine protease inhibitors, showed the highest up-regulation in SGs in response to Bartonella infection. IrSPI silencing impaired tick feeding, as well as resulted in reduced bacterial load in tick SGs. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of I. ricinus SG transcriptome and contributes significant genomic information about this important disease vector. This in-depth knowledge will enable a better understanding of the molecular interactions between ticks and tick-borne pathogens, and identifies IrSPI, a candidate to study now in detail to estimate its

  9. Conserved Patterns of Microbial Immune Escape: Pathogenic Microbes of Diverse Origin Target the Human Terminal Complement Inhibitor Vitronectin via a Single Common Motif

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of many microbes relies on their capacity to resist innate immunity, and to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host microbes have developed highly efficient and sophisticated complement evasion strategies. Here we show that different human pathogens including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, acquire the human terminal complement regulator vitronectin to their surface. By using truncated vitronectin fragments we found that all analyzed microbial pathogens (n = 13) bound human vitronectin via the same C-terminal heparin-binding domain (amino acids 352–374). This specific interaction leaves the terminal complement complex (TCC) regulatory region of vitronectin accessible, allowing inhibition of C5b-7 membrane insertion and C9 polymerization. Vitronectin complexed with the various microbes and corresponding proteins was thus functionally active and inhibited complement-mediated C5b-9 deposition. Taken together, diverse microbial pathogens expressing different structurally unrelated vitronectin-binding molecules interact with host vitronectin via the same conserved region to allow versatile control of the host innate immune response. PMID:26808444

  10. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  11. Diverse Thinking about Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the concept of diversity in educational decision making. It is noted that the differences that distinguish the needs, interests and abilities are identified by educators. It lists misconceptions resulting from not attending to within-group diversity, and states that a "loss of self" for individual members of…

  12. Structure of BbKI, a disulfide-free plasma kallikrein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongwen; Hansen, Daiane; Shabalin, Ivan G; Gustchina, Alla; Vieira, Debora F; de Brito, Marlon V; Araújo, Ana Paula U; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    A serine protease inhibitor from Bauhinia bauhinioides (BbKI) belongs to the Kunitz family of plant inhibitors, which are common in plant seeds. BbKI does not contain any disulfides, unlike most other members of this family. It is a potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, in addition to other serine proteases, and thus exhibits antithrombotic activity. A high-resolution crystal structure of recombinantly expressed BbKI was determined (at 1.4 Å resolution) and was compared with the structures of other members of the family. Modeling of a complex of BbKI with plasma kallikrein indicates that changes in the local structure of the reactive loop that includes the specificity-determining Arg64 are necessary in order to explain the tight binding. An R64A mutant of BbKI was found to be a weaker inhibitor of plasma kallikrein, but was much more potent against plasmin, suggesting that this mutant may be useful for preventing the breakup of fibrin and maintaining clot stability, thus preventing excessive bleeding. PMID:26249699

  13. Comparative effects of ohmic, induction cooker, and electric stove heating on soymilk trypsin inhibitor inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Luping; Zhang, Caimeng; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2015-03-01

    During thermal treatment of soymilk, a rapid incorporation of Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI) into protein aggregates by covalent (disulfide bond, SS) and/or noncovalent interactions with other proteins is responsible for its fast inactivation of trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). In contrast, the slow cleavage of a single Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) peptide bond is responsible for its slow inactivation of TIA and chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (CIA). In this study, the effects of Ohmic heating (220 V, 50 Hz) on soymilk TIA and CIA inactivation were examined and compared to induction cooker and electric stove heating with similar thermal histories. It was found that: (1) TIA and CIA inactivation was slower from 0 to 3 min, and faster after 3 min as compared to induction cooker and electric stove. (2) The thiol (SH) loss rate was slower from 0 to 3 min, and similar to induction cooker and electric stove after 3 min. (3) Ohmic heating slightly increased protein aggregate formation. (4) In addition to the cleavage of one BBI peptide bond, an additional reaction might occur to enhance BBI inactivation. (5) Ohmic heating was more energy-efficient for TIA and CIA inactivation. (6) TIA and CIA inactivation was accelerated with increasing electric voltage (110, 165, and 220 V) of Ohmic heating. It is likely that the enhanced inactivation of TIA by Ohmic heating is due to its combined electrochemical and thermal effects. PMID:25678063

  14. Soyacystatin N inhibits proteolysis of wheat alpha-amylase inhibitor and potentiates toxicity against cowpea weevil.

    PubMed

    Amirhusin, Bahagiawati; Shade, Richard E; Koiwa, Hisashi; Hasegawa, Paul M; Bressan, Ray A; Murdock, Larry L; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2004-12-01

    Genetic engineering may be used to introduce multiple insect resistance genes with different modes of action into crop plants. We explored the possible interactions of two differing gene products fed in the diet of cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculates (F.), a stored grain pest. The soybean cysteine protease inhibitor soyacystatin N (scN) and alpha-amylase inhibitor (alphaAI) from wheat have defensive function against this coleopteran. When artificial seeds containing both scN and alpha(AI) were infested with eggs of C. maculatus, the delays in larval development were longer than was predicted by summing the developmental delays seen when larvae were fed a diet containing the individual proteins, indicating that the effects of scN and alpha(AI) are synergistic. Alpha(AI) was readily hydrolyzed when incubated with insect gut extract. This proteolytic degradation was inhibited by scN, but not by Kunitz inhibitor (a serine protease inhibitor). Thus, degradation of alpha(AI) was due to proteolysis by insect digestive cysteine proteases. These data suggest that C. maculatus uses digestive enzymes not only to function in food protein digestion but also to defend the insects themselves by helping reduce the concentration of a toxic dietary protein. PMID:15666770

  15. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a protease inhibitor from the latex of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Dibiani, Rachid; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2006-12-01

    A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor purified from the latex of green papaya (Carica papaya) fruits was crystallized in the presence and absence of divalent metal ions. Crystal form I, which is devoid of divalent cations, diffracts to a resolution of 2.6 A and belongs to space group P3(1) or P3(2). This crystal form is a merohedral twin with two molecules in the asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = b = 74.70, c = 78.97 A. Crystal form II, which was grown in the presence of Co2+, diffracts to a resolution of 1.7 A and belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 44.26, b = 81.99, c = 140.89 A. PMID:17142906

  17. CFTR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Synder, David; Tradtrantip, Lukmanee; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2014-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel whose major function is to facilitate epithelial fluid secretion. Loss-of-function mutations in CFTR cause the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is required for transepithelial fluid transport in certain secretory diarrheas, such as cholera, and for cyst expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. High-throughput screening has yielded CFTR inhibitors of the thiazolidinone, glycine hydrazide and quinoxalinedione chemical classes. The glycine hydrazides target the extracellular CFTR pore, whereas the thiazolidinones and quinoxalinediones act at the cytoplasmic surface. These inhibitors have been widely used in cystic fibrosis research to study CFTR function at the cell and organ levels. The most potent CFTR inhibitor has IC50 of approximately 4 nM. Studies in animal models support the development of CFTR inhibitors for antisecretory therapy of enterotoxin-mediated diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23331030

  18. Small Peptides Blocking Inhibition of Factor Xa and Tissue Factor-Factor VIIa by Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI)*

    PubMed Central

    Dockal, Michael; Hartmann, Rudolf; Fries, Markus; Thomassen, M. Christella L. G. D.; Heinzmann, Alexandra; Ehrlich, Hartmut; Rosing, Jan; Osterkamp, Frank; Polakowski, Thomas; Reineke, Ulrich; Griessner, Andreas; Brandstetter, Hans; Scheiflinger, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor that inhibits activated factor X (FXa) via a slow-tight binding mechanism and tissue factor-activated FVII (TF-FVIIa) via formation of a quaternary FXa-TFPI-TF-FVIIa complex. Inhibition of TFPI enhances coagulation in hemophilia models. Using a library approach, we selected and subsequently optimized peptides that bind TFPI and block its anticoagulant activity. One peptide (termed compound 3), bound with high affinity to the Kunitz-1 (K1) domain of TFPI (Kd ∼1 nm). We solved the crystal structure of this peptide in complex with the K1 of TFPI at 2.55-Å resolution. The structure of compound 3 can be segmented into a N-terminal anchor; an Ω-shaped loop; an intermediate segment; a tight glycine-loop; and a C-terminal α-helix that is anchored to K1 at its reactive center loop and two-stranded β-sheet. The contact surface has an overall hydrophobic character with some charged hot spots. In a model system, compound 3 blocked FXa inhibition by TFPI (EC50 = 11 nm) and inhibition of TF-FVIIa-catalyzed FX activation by TFPI (EC50 = 2 nm). The peptide prevented transition from the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex, but did not affect formation of the loose FXa-TFPI complex. The K1 domain of TFPI binds and inhibits FVIIa and the K2 domain similarly inhibits FXa. Because compound 3 binds to K1, our data show that K1 is not only important for FVIIa inhibition but also for FXa inhibition, i.e. for the transition of the loose to the tight FXa-TFPI complex. This mode of action translates into normalization of coagulation of hemophilia plasmas. Compound 3 thus bears potential to prevent bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:24275667

  19. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  20. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  1. Purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Junchen; Liu, Yuan; An, Tianchen; Liu, Yujun; Wang, Manchuriga; Song, Yanting; Zheng, Feifei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yingxia; Deng, Shiming

    2015-05-01

    A proteinaceous inhibitor against trypsin was isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. by successive ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange, and gel-filtration chromatography. The trypsin inhibitor, named as AHLTI (A. heterophyllus Lam. trypsin inhibitor), consisted of a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 28.5 kDa, which was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of AHLTI was DEPPSELDAS, which showed no similarity to other known trypsin inhibitor sequence. AHLTI completely inhibited bovine trypsin at a molar ratio of 1:2 (AHLTI:trypsin) analyzed by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, inhibition activity assay, and gel-filtration chromatography. Moreover, kinetic enzymatic studies were carried out to understand the inhibition mechanism of AHLTI against trypsin. Results showed that AHLTI was a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) of 3.7 × 10(-8) M. However, AHLTI showed weak inhibitory activity toward chymotrypsin and elastase. AHLTI was stable over a broad range of pH 4-8 and temperature 20-80°C. The reduction agent, dithiothreitol, had no obvious effect on AHLTI. The trypsin inhibition assays of AHLTI toward digestive enzymes from insect pest guts in vitro demonstrated that AHLTI was effective against enzymes from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). These results suggested that AHLTI might be a novel trypsin inhibitor from A. heterophyllus Lam. belonging to Kunitz family, and play an important role in protecting from insect pest. PMID:25851516

  2. Intron-exon organization of the human gene coding for the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor: The factor Xa dependent inhibitor of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    van der Logt, C.P.E.; Reitsma, P.H.; Bertina, R.M. )

    1991-02-12

    Blood coagulation can be initiated when factor VII(a) binds to its cofactor tissue factor. This factor VIIa/tissue factor complex proteolytically activates factors IX and X, which eventually leads to the formation of a fibrin clot. Plasma contains a lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor (LACI) which inhibits factor Xa directly and, in a Xa-dependent manner, also inhibits the factor VIIa/tissue factor complex. Here the authors report the cloning of the human LACI gene and the elucidation of its intron-exon organization. The LACI gene, which spans about 70 kb, consists of nine exons separated by eight introns. As has been found for other Kunitz-type protease inhibitors, the domain structure of human LACI is reflected in the intron-exon organization of the gene. The 5{prime} terminus of the LACI mRNA has been determined by primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping. The putative promoter was examined and found to contain two consensus sequences for AP-1 binding and one for NF-1 binding, but no TATA consensus promoter element.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel bi-functional α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor from Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Bunyatang, Orawan; Chirapongsatonkul, Nion; Bangrak, Phuwadol; Henry, Robert; Churngchow, Nunta

    2016-04-01

    A novel cDNA encoding a bi-functional α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (HbASI) was isolated from rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) leaves cultivar RRIM600. The HbASI had strong homology with the soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz) family of protease inhibitors. Its putative amino acid sequence was similar to that of the α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor from Ricinus communis (72% identity). Genomic sequencing indicated that the HbASI gene contained no introns. The messenger RNA of HbASI was detected in leaf, hypocotyl and root. The recombinant HbASI expressed extracellularly in Pichia pastoris exhibited inhibitory activity against α-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae, trypsin and subtilisin A. The HbASI gene was induced in the rubber leaves infected with a rubber tree pathogen, Phytophthora palmivora. It was also enhanced by salicylic acid (SA) treatment and mechanical wounding. In addition, the biological activity of the HbASI protein involving in the plant defence responses was also investigated. The HbASI at a concentration of 0.16 mg mL(-1) could inhibit the mycelium growth of P. palmivora. These data suggested that the HbASI protein might play a crucial role in defence against pathogen of rubber trees. PMID:26854410

  4. Managing diversity.

    PubMed

    Epting, L A; Glover, S H; Boyd, S D

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. work force is becoming increasingly diverse as the 20th century approaches. Statistics prove that most organizations are experiencing gender, culture, and age diversity within their labor forces. All managers and leaders must accept this diversity and work to handle it effectively. This article examines the current literature concerning management of diversity and its implications for the health care profession. Gender, culture, and age diversity and the potential problems that may arise with each are also addressed. Reasons to manage diversity are offered, as well as methods of managing diversity for both the manager and the chief executive officer. PMID:10134144

  5. Enhancing CHK1 inhibitor lethality in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2012-04-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine whether inhibitors of MEK1/2 or SRC signaling, respectively, enhance CHK1 inhibitor lethality in primary human glioblastoma cells. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (CI-1040 (PD184352); AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01, AZD7762) to kill multiple primary human glioma cell isolates that have a diverse set of genetic alterations typically found in the disease. Inhibition of SRC family proteins also enhanced CHK1 inhibitor lethality. Combined treatment of glioma cells with (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitors enhanced radiosensitivity. Combined (MEK1/2 + CHK1) inhibitor treatment led to dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6 ribosomal protein, whereas the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 was increased. MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor-stimulated cell death was associated with the cleavage of pro-caspases 3 and 7 as well as the caspase substrate (PARP). We also observed activation of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 effector proteins BAK and BAX and reduced levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family protein BCL-XL. Overexpression of BCL-XL alleviated but did not completely abolish MEK1/2 + CHK1 inhibitor cytotoxicity in GBM cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-MEK pathway have the potential to interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill glioma cells. PMID:22313687

  6. [Proteasome inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in degradation of eukaryotic intracellular protein, including cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and survival. Cancer cells generally have higher level of proteasome activity compared with normal cells, suggesting proteasome inhibition could be therapeutic target in oncology. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor introduced into the clinic, is approved for the treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although it was approved as single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination with conventional and novel targeted agents because bortezomib has demonstrated additive and synergistic activity in preclinical studies. Recently, several second-generation proteasome inhibitors, such as carfilzomib and MLN9708, have been developed and entered into clinical trials. These agents were investigated in frontline MM in combination with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone. These studies demonstrated positive efficacy and safety, and it is expected that they will be approved in near future. PMID:25016815

  7. Isolation, structure modeling and function characterization of a trypsin inhibitor from Cassia obtusifolia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zubi; Zhu, Qiankun; Li, Juanjuan; Zhang, Gan; Jiamahate, Aerguli; Zhou, Jiayu; Liao, Hai

    2015-04-01

    A trypsin inhibitor gene (CoTI1) from Cassia obtusifolia was isolated and the deduced amino acid sequence was attributed to the Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. The recombined CoTI1, expressed in E. coli, exhibited strong inhibitory effect on bovine trypsin and trypsin-like proteases from Helicoverpa armigera, Spodoptera exigua, and Spodoptera litura. CoTI1 thus presents insecticidal properties that may be useful for the genetic engineering of plants. Leu84, Arg86 and Thr88 were predicted as three key residues by molecular modeling in which Arg86, inserted into the substrate pocket of trypsin, interacted directly with residue Asp189 of trypsin causing the specific inhibition against trypsin. The predicted results were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis with L84A, R86A and T88A, respectively. The substantial changing expression level of CoTI1 under salt, drought and abscisic acid treatment suggested that CoTI1 might play important role in the resistance against abiotic stress. PMID:25479703

  8. Instructional Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Explains how learning occurs in the brain, specifically in the limbic system. Compares traditional teaching methods and diverse learning modes. Describes the characteristics of diverse instructional approaches. First published in 1994. (YDS)

  9. Analgesic Compound from Sea Anemone Heteractis crispa Is the First Polypeptide Inhibitor of Vanilloid Receptor 1 (TRPV1)*

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Yaroslav A.; Kozlov, Sergey A.; Koshelev, Sergey G.; Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Monastyrnaya, Margarita M.; Kozlovskaya, Emma P.; Grishin, Eugene V.

    2008-01-01

    Venomous animals from distinct phyla such as spiders, scorpions, snakes, cone snails, or sea anemones produce small toxic proteins interacting with a variety of cell targets. Their bites often cause pain. One of the ways of pain generation is the activation of TRPV1 channels. Screening of 30 different venoms from spiders and sea anemones for modulation of TRPV1 activity revealed inhibitors in tropical sea anemone Heteractis crispa venom. Several separation steps resulted in isolation of an inhibiting compound. This is a 56-residue-long polypeptide named APHC1 that has a Bos taurus trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)/Kunitz-type fold, mostly represented by serine protease inhibitors and ion channel blockers. APHC1 acted as a partial antagonist of capsaicin-induced currents (32 ± 9% inhibition) with half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) 54 ± 4 nm. In vivo, a 0.1 mg/kg dose of APHC1 significantly prolonged tail-flick latency and reduced capsaicin-induced acute pain. Therefore, our results can make an important contribution to the research into molecular mechanisms of TRPV1 modulation and help to solve the problem of overactivity of this receptor during a number of pathological processes in the organism. PMID:18579526

  10. Rethinking Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Jack

    1992-01-01

    Managing diversity is about coping with unassimilated differences, about building systems and a culture that unite different people in a common pursuit without undermining their diversity. The goal of diversity training is a high performance organization rather than a climate in which no one's feathers are ruffled. (SK)

  11. Autophagy inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent mechanism of intracellular degradation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are highly complex and involve multiple proteins, including the kinases ULK1 and Vps34. The main function of autophagy is the maintenance of cell survival when modifications occur in the cellular environment. During the past decade, extensive studies have greatly improved our knowledge and autophagy has exploded as a research field. This process is now widely implicated in pathophysiological processes such as cancer, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders, making it an attractive target for drug discovery. In this review, we will summarize the different types of inhibitors that affect the autophagy machinery and provide some potential therapeutic perspectives. PMID:26658914

  12. Substituted quinolines as noncovalent proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Tanner J; Lansdell, Theresa A; Dissanayake, Amila A; Azevedo, Lauren M; Claes, Jacob; Odom, Aaron L; Tepe, Jetze J

    2016-06-01

    Screening of a library of diverse heterocyclic scaffolds identified substituted quinolines as inhibitors of the human proteasome. The heterocyclic library was prepared via a novel titanium-catalyzed multicomponent coupling reaction, which rendered a diverse set of isoxazoles, pyrimidines, pyrroles, pyrazoles and quinolines. SAR of the parent lead compound indicated that hydrophobic residues on the benzo-moiety significantly improved potency. Lead compound 25 inhibits the chymotryptic-like proteolytic activity of the proteasome (IC50 5.4μM), representing a new class of nonpeptidic, noncovalent proteasome inhibitors. PMID:27112450

  13. Embracing Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeck, Kathryn T.

    2009-01-01

    The high school art unit "Embracing Diversity" was the author's principal work towards the completion of a Masters thesis. The objective was to learn whether or not teaching an art unit that focused on sexual diversity could have a positive impact on the current culture one finds in high schools. The unit was found to have a positive impact on…

  14. HMG-CoA reductase regulation: use of structurally diverse first half-reaction squalene synthetase inhibitors to characterize the site of mevalonate-derived nonsterol regulator production in cultured IM-9 cells.

    PubMed

    Petras, S F; Lindsey, S; Harwood, H J

    1999-01-01

    The activity of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) is tightly regulated, in part through post-transcriptional mechanisms that are mediated by nonsterol products of mevalonate metabolism. Previous reports have suggested that these mediators are derived from farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Recent studies have implicated FPP hydrolysis products (e.g., farnesol), the squalene synthetase (SQS) reaction products presqualene pyrophosphate (PSQPP) and squalene, or their metabolites. To distinguish among these possible mediators, we evaluated the ability of HMGR and SQS inhibitors to induce compensatory increases in HMGR activity in cultured IM-9 cells. Mevinolin (HMGR inhibitor) produced predicted increases in HMGR activity that were related to the degree of cholesterolgenesis inhibition (e.g., 4-fold, 9-fold, and 17-fold increases relative to 50%, 76%, and 90% inhibition, respectively). By contrast, a variety of structurally distinct reversible, competitive, first half-reaction SQS inhibitors all reduced cholesterolgenesis by up to 90% with no appreciable increases in HMGR activity. These observations strongly suggest that nonsterol-mediated post-transcriptional mechanisms regulating HMGR activity remain intact after SQS first half-reaction inhibition, indicating that nonsterol regulator production is independent of SQS action and ruling out PSQPP, squalene and their metabolites as possible mediators. Unexpectedly, the SQS mechanism-based irreversible inactivator, zaragozic acid A (ZGA) exhibited the greatest degree of HMGR modulation, producing 5-fold, 11-fold, and 40-fold increases in HMGR activity at concentrations that produced 25%, 50%, and 75% cholesterolgenesis inhibition, respectively. The markedly greater magnitude of HMGR stimulation by ZGA versus mevinolin at similar levels of cholesterolgenesis inhibition suggests that ZGA may directly interfere with the production or action of the nonsterol regulator. PMID:9869647

  15. Kunitzins: Prototypes of a new class of protease inhibitor from the skin secretions of European and Asian frogs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaole; Wang, He; Shen, Yue; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2016-08-19

    Amphibian skin secretions contain biologically-active compounds, such as anti-microbial peptides and trypsin inhibitors, which are used by biomedical researchers as a source of potential novel drug leads or pharmacological agents. Here, we report the application of a recently developed technique within our laboratory to "shotgun" clone the cDNAs encoding two novel but structurally-related peptides from the lyophilised skin secretions of one species of European frog, Rana esculenta and one species of Chinese frog, Odorrana schmackeri. Bioanalysis of the peptides established the structure of a 17-mer with an N-terminal Ala (A) residue and a C-terminal Cys (C) residue with a single disulphide bridge between Cys 12 and 17, which is a canonical Kunitz-type protease inhibitor motif (-CKAAFC-). Due to the presence of this structural attribute, these peptides were named kunitzin-RE (AAKIILNPKFRCKAAFC) and kunitzin-OS (AVNIPFKVHLRCKAAFC). Synthetic replicates of these two novel peptides were found to display a potent inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli but were ineffective at inhibiting the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans at concentrations up to 160 μM, and both showed little haemolytic activity at concentrations up to 120 μM. Subsequently, kunitzin-RE and kunitzin-OS were found to be a potent inhibitor of trypsin with a Ki of 5.56 μM and 7.56 μM that represent prototypes of a novel class of highly-attenuated amphibian skin protease inhibitor. Substitution of Lys-13, the predicted residue occupying the P1 position within the inhibitory loop, with Phe (F) resulted in decrease in trypsin inhibitor effectiveness and antimicrobial activity against Esherichia coli, but exhibits a potential inhibition activity against chymotrypsin. PMID:27311856

  16. Activated factor XI increases the procoagulant activity of the extrinsic pathway by inactivating tissue factor pathway inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Erik I.; Matafonov, Anton; Cheng, Qiufang; Zientek, Keith D.; Gailani, Dave; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation factor XI (FXI) may play a role in hemostasis. The primary substrate of activated FXI (FXIa) is FIX, leading to FX activation (FXa) and thrombin generation. However, recent studies suggest the hemostatic role of FXI may not be restricted to the activation of FIX. We explored whether FXI could interact with and inhibit the activity of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). TFPI is an essential reversible inhibitor of activated factor X (FXa) and also inhibits the FVIIa-TF complex. We found that FXIa neutralized both endothelium- and platelet-derived TFPI by cleaving the protein between the Kunitz (K) 1 and K2 domains (Lys86/Thr87) and at the active sites of the K2 (Arg107/Gly108) and K3 (Arg199/Ala200) domains. Addition of FXIa to plasma was able to reverse the ability of TFPI to prolong TF-initiated clotting times in FXI- or FIX-deficient plasma, as well as FXa-initiated clotting times in FX-deficient plasma. Treatment of cultured endothelial cells with FXIa increased the generation of FXa and promoted TF-dependent fibrin formation in recalcified plasma. Together, these results suggest that the hemostatic role of FXIa may be attributed not only to activation of FIX but also to promoting the extrinsic pathway of thrombin generation through inactivation of TFPI. PMID:25587039

  17. Activated factor XI increases the procoagulant activity of the extrinsic pathway by inactivating tissue factor pathway inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I; Matafonov, Anton; Cheng, Qiufang; Zientek, Keith D; Gailani, Dave; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-02-26

    Activation of coagulation factor XI (FXI) may play a role in hemostasis. The primary substrate of activated FXI (FXIa) is FIX, leading to FX activation (FXa) and thrombin generation. However, recent studies suggest the hemostatic role of FXI may not be restricted to the activation of FIX. We explored whether FXI could interact with and inhibit the activity of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). TFPI is an essential reversible inhibitor of activated factor X (FXa) and also inhibits the FVIIa-TF complex. We found that FXIa neutralized both endothelium- and platelet-derived TFPI by cleaving the protein between the Kunitz (K) 1 and K2 domains (Lys86/Thr87) and at the active sites of the K2 (Arg107/Gly108) and K3 (Arg199/Ala200) domains. Addition of FXIa to plasma was able to reverse the ability of TFPI to prolong TF-initiated clotting times in FXI- or FIX-deficient plasma, as well as FXa-initiated clotting times in FX-deficient plasma. Treatment of cultured endothelial cells with FXIa increased the generation of FXa and promoted TF-dependent fibrin formation in recalcified plasma. Together, these results suggest that the hemostatic role of FXIa may be attributed not only to activation of FIX but also to promoting the extrinsic pathway of thrombin generation through inactivation of TFPI. PMID:25587039

  18. A novel proteasome inhibitor acting in mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and ROS production.

    PubMed

    Maria, Durvanei Augusto; de Souza, Jean Gabriel; Morais, Katia L P; Berra, Carolina Maria; Zampolli, Hamilton de Campos; Demasi, Marilene; Simons, Simone Michaela; de Freitas Saito, Renata; Chammas, Roger; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2013-06-01

    In cancer-treatment, potentially therapeutic drugs trigger their effects through apoptotic mechanisms. Generally, cell response is manifested by Bcl-2 family protein regulation, the impairment of mitochondrial functions, and ROS production. Notwithstanding, several drugs operate through proteasome inhibition, which, by inducing the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded or unfolded proteins, can lead to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Accordingly, it was shown that Amblyomin-X, a Kunitz-type inhibitor identified in the transcriptome of the Amblyomma cajennense tick by ESTs sequence analysis of a cDNA library, obtained in recombinant protein form, induces apoptosis in murine renal adenocarcinoma (RENCA) cells by: inducing imbalance between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, dysfunction/mitochondrial damage, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), caspase cascade activation, and proteasome inhibition, all ER-stress inductive. Moreover, there was no manifest action on normal mouse-fibroblast cells (NHI3T3), suggesting an Amblyomin-X tumor-cell selectivity. Taken together, these evidences indicate that Amblyomin-X could be a promising candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:22975862

  19. Structural and inhibitory properties of a plant proteinase inhibitor containing the RGD motif.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, Adriana M; Bueno, Norlene R; Rocha, Hugo A O; Franco, Célia R C; Chammas, Roger; Nakaie, Clovis R; Jasiulionis, Miriam G; Nader, Helena B; Santana, Lucimeire A; Sampaio, Misako U; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2006-12-15

    Purified from Bauhinia rufa seeds, BrTI is a Kunitz proteinase inhibitor that contains the RGD sequence. BrTI inhibits trypsin (K(iapp) 2.9 nM) and human plasma kallikrein (K(iapp) 14.0 nM) but not other related enzymes. The synthetic peptide YLEPVARGDGGLA-NH(2) (70 microM) inhibited the adhesion to fibronectin of B16F10 (high-metastatic B16 murine mouse melanoma cell line) and of Tm5 (murine melanoma cell lines derived from a non-tumorigenic lineage of pigmented murine melanocytes, melan-a). YLEPVARGEGGLA-NH(2) in which Asp(9) was changed into Glu does not affect the cell attachment. Moreover, this peptide was functional only when the sequence present in the native protein was preserved, since YLIPVARGDGGLA-NH(2) in which Glu(3) was changed into Ile does not interfere with B16F10 and was less effective on Tm5 cell line adhesion. Neither YLEPVARGDGGLA-NH(2), YLIPVARGDGGLA-NH(2) or YLEPVARGEGGLA-NH(2) inhibit the interaction of RAEC (endothelial cell line from rabbit aorta) with fibronectin. PMID:16846639

  20. Use of nitric oxide synthase inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disease and pain.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, D R

    2001-07-01

    This article reviews the recent literature on selective inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) between 1999 and the first quarter of 2001. The introduction highlights the major therapeutic objectives for NOS inhibitors, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and pain. The review attempts to cover the structural diversity of small molecule NOS inhibitors currently being explored in the pharmaceutical and academic communities. PMID:15995936

  1. Multi-kinase inhibitors, AURKs and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cicenas, Jonas; Cicenas, Erikas

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitors that impact function of kinases are valuable both for the biological research as well as therapy of kinase-associated diseases, such as different cancers. There are quite a number of inhibitors, which are quite specific for certain kinases and several of them are either already approved for the cancer therapy or are in clinical studies of various phases. However, that does not mean that each single kinase inhibitor is suitable for targeted therapy. Some of them are not effective others might be toxic or fail some other criteria for the use in vivo. On the other hand, even in case of successful therapy, many responders eventually develop resistance to the inhibitors. The limitations of various single kinase inhibitors can be fought using compounds which target multiple kinases. This tactics can increase effectiveness of the inhibitors by the synergistic effect or help to diminish the likelihood of drug resistance. To date, several families of kinases are quite popular targets of the inhibition in cancers, such as tyrosine kinases, cycle-dependent kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinases as well as their pathway "players" and aurora kinases. Aurora kinases play an important role in the control of the mitosis and are often altered in diverse human cancers. Here, we will describe the most interesting multi-kinase inhibitors which inhibit aurora kinases among other targets and their use in preclinical and clinical cancer studies. PMID:27038473

  2. Functional domains of the human epididymal protease inhibitor, eppin.

    PubMed

    McCrudden, Maelíosa T C; Dafforn, Tim R; Houston, David F; Turkington, Philip T; Timson, David J

    2008-04-01

    Eppin has two potential protease inhibitory domains: a whey acid protein or four disulfide core domain and a Kunitz domain. The protein is also reported to have antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Eppin and its whey acid protein and Kunitz domains were expressed in Escherichia coli and their ability to inhibit proteases and kill bacteria compared. The Kunitz domain inhibits elastase (EC 3.4.21.37) to a similar extent as intact eppin, whereas the whey acid protein domain has no such activity. None of these fragments inhibits trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) or chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1) at the concentrations tested. In a colony forming unit assay, both domains have some antibacterial activity against E. coli, but this was not to the same degree as intact eppin or the two domains together. When bacterial respiratory electron transport was measured using a 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide assay, eppin and its domains caused an increase in the rate of respiration. This suggests that the mechanism of cell killing may be partly through the permeablization of the bacterial inner membrane, resulting in uncoupling of respiratory electron transport and consequent collapse of the proton motive force. Thus, we conclude that although both of eppin's domains are involved in the protein's antibacterial activity, only the Kunitz domain is required for selective protease inhibition. PMID:18331357

  3. Drug diversion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Prescription drug diversion has significant health, legal and social implications. Deaths from misuse of prescription drugs account for a significant proportion of overdose deaths. The drugs most commonly involved are analgesics, particularly opioids, and psychoactive drugs, particularly benzodiazepines. Diverted drugs are most often sourced from a family member or friend, but are also sourced from overseas pharmacies or laboratories, or bought from drug dealers. Drug diversion can be mitigated by good prescribing practices. Systems for monitoring the prescribing and dispensing of medicines are being instituted across Australia. PMID:26648654

  4. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  5. Discovering Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manner, Barbara M.; Hattler, Jean Anne

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a preservice teacher field trip to the rain forests and coastal areas. This experience develops an awareness for different cultures among preservice teachers by experiencing biological and cultural diversity in Costa Rica. Presents students' own ideas on this experience. (YDS)

  6. PLANT DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat change statistics and species-area curves were used to estimate the effects of alternative future scenarios for agriculture on plant diversity in Iowa farmlands. Study areas were two watersheds in central Iowa of about 50 and 90 square kilometers, respectively. Future s...

  7. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions. PMID:20395729

  8. Diversity Trailblazer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    When Dr. Kumea Shorter-Gooden took on her newly created job this month at the University of Maryland's flagship College Park campus, she assumed a challenge at the school with a lot riding on her shoulders--helping the University of Maryland strengthen its diversity efforts and, thus, its relevance to the state in the future and standing among the…

  9. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allison B; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LFinhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and highthroughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  10. Vegetative Storage Protein in Litchi chinensis, a Subtropical Evergreen Fruit Tree, Possesses Trypsin Inhibitor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei-Min; Peng, Shi-Qing; Wang, Xu-Chu; Shi, Min-Jing; Chen, Yue-Yi; Hu, Zheng-Hai

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Vegetative storage proteins (VSPs) are commonly bioactive in herbaceous plants but few VSPs with bioactivity have been identified in trees. In addition, information on the characterization of VSPs in evergreen trees is limited. The objective of this study was to characterize the VSPs with bioactivity in evergreen trees. Methods The VSP in lychee (Litchi chinensis), an evergreen fruit tree, was characterized by a combination of cytological, biochemical and molecular biological techniques. Key Results The VSP in lychee was a 22-kDa protein. It accumulated in the large central vacuoles of protein-storing cells (PSCs) in two distinguishable forms, granular and floccular. The PSCs were of a novel type. The 22-kDa protein is distributed in mature leaves, bark tissues of branches, trunk and large roots, paralleling the distribution of PSCs. Its homologues were present in mature seed. During young shoot development and fruiting, the 22-kDa protein decreased apparently, suggesting a nitrogen-storage function. The 22-kDa protein had several isoforms encoded by a small multigene family. One gene member, LcVSP1, was cloned. The LcVSP1 had no intron and contained a 675 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 225 amino acids. LcVSP1 was homologous to Kunitz trypsin inhibitors. The 22-kDa protein inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin, but had no inhibitory effect on subtilisin. Conclusions Lychee is rich in a 22-kDa VSP with trypsin inhibitor activity. The VSP plays an important role in nitrogen storage while its possible defensive function remains to be elucidated. PMID:17913726

  11. Design and synthesis of human ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) inhibitors by peptide coupling of diverse chemical scaffolds on carboxyl and amino termini of (S)-valine-derived thiazole amino acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyakam; Prasad, Nagarajan Rajendra; Chufan, Eduardo E; Patel, Bhargav A; Wang, Yi-Jun; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Talele, Tanaji T

    2014-05-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) serves as a therapeutic target for the development of multidrug resistance reversal agents. In this study, we synthesized 21 novel compounds by peptide coupling at corresponding carboxyl and amino termini of (S)-valine-based bis-thiazole and monothiazole derivatives with diverse chemical scaffolds. Using calcein-AM efflux assay, we identified compound 28 (IC50 = 1.0 μM) carrying 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl and 2-aminobenzophenone groups, respectively, at the amino and carboxyl termini of the monothiazole zwitter-ion. Compound 28 inhibited the photolabeling of P-gp with [(125)I]-iodoarylazidoprazosin with IC50 = 0.75 μM and stimulated the basal ATP hydrolysis of P-gp in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 ATPase = 0.027 μM). Compound 28 at 3 μM reduced resistance in cytotoxicity assay to paclitaxel in P-gp-expressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cell lines. Biochemical and docking studies showed site-1 to be the preferable binding site for 28 within the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp. PMID:24773054

  12. Managing diversity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M

    1991-09-30

    One look at projections for the U.S. work force through the year 2000 shows why healthcare administrators will be facing some new challenges. With the majority of new workers belonging to minority groups, "managing diversity" has become the newest catch phrase as executives work to reduce tensions resulting from race, gender or culture-based differences among workers, while also learning to understand and value those differences. PMID:10114151

  13. Genome-wide identification and immune response analysis of serine protease inhibitor genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Dong, Zhaoming; Duan, Jun; Wang, Genhong; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Youshan; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Xia, Qingyou

    2012-01-01

    In most insect species, a variety of serine protease inhibitors (SPIs) have been found in multiple tissues, including integument, gonad, salivary gland, and hemolymph, and are required for preventing unwanted proteolysis. These SPIs belong to different families and have distinct inhibitory mechanisms. Herein, we predicted and characterized potential SPI genes based on the genome sequences of silkworm, Bombyx mori. As a result, a total of eighty SPI genes were identified in B. mori. These SPI genes contain 10 kinds of SPI domains, including serpin, Kunitz_BPTI, Kazal, TIL, amfpi, Bowman-Birk, Antistasin, WAP, Pacifastin, and alpha-macroglobulin. Sixty-three SPIs contain single SPI domain while the others have at least two inhibitor units. Some SPIs also contain non-inhibitor domains for protein-protein interactions, including EGF, ADAM_spacer, spondin_N, reeler, TSP_1 and other modules. Microarray analysis showed that fourteen SPI genes from lineage-specific TIL family and Group F of serpin family had enriched expression in the silk gland. The roles of SPIs in resisting pathogens were investigated in silkworms when they were infected by four pathogens. Microarray and qRT-PCR experiments revealed obvious up-regulation of 8, 4, 3 and 3 SPI genes after infection with Escherichia coli, Bacillus bombysepticus, Beauveria bassiana or B. mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV), respectively. On the contrary, 4, 11, 7 and 9 SPI genes were down-regulated after infection with E. coli, B. bombysepticus, B. bassiana or BmNPV, respectively. These results suggested that these SPI genes may be involved in resistance to pathogenic microorganisms. These findings may provide valuable information for further clarifying the roles of SPIs in the development, immune defence, and efficient synthesis of silk gland protein. PMID:22348050

  14. [Diverse sustainability--sustainable diversity].

    PubMed

    Schmeling-Kludas, Christoph; Koch-Gromus, Uwe

    2011-08-01

    In spite of its plenitude, the scientific works of the important German psychologist Ernst August Dölle (1898-1972) are little adapted till today, mostly they are being reduced to his studies about dichotomy and duplicity. But based on his diaries of the year 1968, the authors can verify without doubt, that Dölle far ahead of his time, carried on research about sustainability and diversity. He was the first scientist worldwide to connect these two concepts. PMID:21837611

  15. Valuing Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Roland G.; Loury, Glenn C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the economics of diversity-enhancing policies. A model is proposed in which heterogeneous agents, distinguished by skill level and social identity, purchase productive opportunities in a competitive market. We analyze policies designed to raise the status of a disadvantaged identity group. When agent identity is contractible, efficient policy grants preferred access to slots but offers no direct assistance for acquiring skills. When identity is not contractible, efficient policy provides universal subsidies to skill development when the fraction of the disadvantaged group at the skill development margin is larger than their share at the slot assignment margin. PMID:25525280

  16. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  17. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  18. Genotype-dependent expression of specific members of potato protease inhibitor gene families in different tissues and in response to wounding and nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Turrà, David; Bellin, Diana; Lorito, Matteo; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2009-05-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are small ubiquitous proteins with a variety of biological functions in plants, including protein stabilization, modulation of apoptosis and defense against pathogens. Kunitz-like inhibitors (PKPIs) and proteinase inhibitors 1 (PI-1) are abundant in storage organs of potato plants and are up-regulated in other tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress. However, little information is available on genotype-dependent regulation of individual PKPI group- and PI-1 genes. We isolated, sequenced and characterized four novel full-length PI-1 cDNAs (PPI3A2, PPI3A4, PPI2C4 and PPI2C1A) from Solanum tuberosum cv. Desirée. Specific primers were developed for PI-1 genes PPI3A2, PPI3B2 and PPI2C4 and the three PKPI homology groups A, B and C. Their expression profiles were studied by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in comparison with transcripts of the PI-1, Pin2 and PR1 gene families in various tissues, after wounding and Globodera rostochiensis infection of nematode-resistant genotypes P40 and LB7/4/c-I-7, and susceptible cv. Desirée. Individual PI-1 genes and PKPI homology groups were expressed in a tissue- and genotype-dependent manner after wounding and nematode infection. The differences in PI expression patterns were related to the intensity, type of inhibitors produced, and the kinetics of induction. Therefore, different genotype-environment combinations produce different sets of PI transcripts. Potato plants reacted to G. rostochiensis infection by modulating PKPI, PI-1 and Pin2, but not PR1 gene expression, suggesting that the jasmonic acid but not the salicylic acid defense signaling pathway is activated. PI expression profiles were not correlated with the resistance status of the potato genotype infected with G. rostochiensis. PMID:19095329

  19. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  20. Purification and characterization of tenerplasminin-1, a serine peptidase inhibitor with antiplasmin activity from the coral snake (Micrurus tener tener) venom

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Jeilyn; Ibarra, Carlos; Salazar, Ana M.; Neves-Ferreira, Ana G.C.; Sánchez, Elda E.; Perales, Jonás; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Guerrero, Belsy

    2015-01-01

    A plasmin inhibitor, named tenerplasminin-1 (TP1), was isolated from Micrurus tener tener (Mtt) venom. It showed a molecular mass of 6542 Da, similarly to Kunitz-type serine peptidase inhibitors. The amidolytic activity of plasmin (0.5 nM) on synthetic substrate S-2251 was inhibited by 91% following the incubation with TP1 (1 nM). Aprotinin (2 nM) used as the positive control of inhibition, reduced the plasmin amidolytic activity by 71%. Plasmin fibrinolytic activity (0.05 nM) was inhibited by 67% following incubation with TP1 (0.1 nM). The degradation of fibrinogen chains induced by plasmin, trypsin or elastase was inhibited by TP1 at a 1:2, 1:4 and 1:20 enzyme:inhibitor ratio, respectively. On the other hand, the proteolytic activity of crude Mtt venom on fibrinogen chains, previously attributed to metallopeptidases, was not abolished by TP1. The tPA-clot lysis assay showed that TP1 (0.2 nM) acts like aprotinin (0.4 nM) inducing a delay in lysis time and lysis rate which may be associated with the inhibition of plasmin generated from the endogenous plasminogen activation. TP1 is the first serine protease plasmin-like inhibitor isolated from Mtt snake venom which has been characterized in relation to its mechanism of action, formation of a plasmin:TP1 complex and therapeutic potential as anti-fibrinolytic agent, a biological characteristic of great interest in the field of biomedical research. They could be used to regulate the fibrinolytic system in pathologies such as metastatic cancer, parasitic infections, hemophilia and other hemorrhagic syndromes, in which an intense fibrinolytic activity is observed. PMID:26419785

  1. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  2. Platelets Contain Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-2 Derived from Megakaryocytes and Inhibits Fibrinolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Ponnuraj, Sathya-Moorthy; Kumar, Yogesh; Zaiss, Anne K.; Bunce, Matthew W.; Camire, Rodney M.; Wu, Ling; Evseenko, Denis; Herschman, Harvey R.; Bajaj, Madhu S.; Bajaj, S. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a homologue of TFPI-1 and contains three Kunitz-type domains and a basic C terminus region. The N-terminal domain of TFPI-2 is the only inhibitory domain, and it inhibits plasma kallikrein, factor XIa, and plasmin. However, plasma TFPI-2 levels are negligible (≤20 pm) in the context of influencing clotting or fibrinolysis. Here, we report that platelets contain significant amounts of TFPI-2 derived from megakaryocytes. We employed RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy to determine that platelets, MEG-01 megakaryoblastic cells, and bone marrow megakaryocytes contain TFPI-2. ELISA data reveal that TFPI-2 binds factor V (FV) and partially B-domain-deleted FV (FV-1033) with Kd ∼9 nm and binds FVa with Kd ∼100 nm. Steady state analysis of surface plasmon resonance data reveal that TFPI-2 and TFPI-1 bind FV-1033 with Kd ∼36–48 nm and bind FVa with Kd ∼252–456 nm. Further, TFPI-1 (but not TFPI-1161) competes with TFPI-2 in binding to FV. These data indicate that the C-terminal basic region of TFPI-2 is similar to that of TFPI-1 and plays a role in binding to the FV B-domain acidic region. Using pull-down assays and Western blots, we show that TFPI-2 is associated with platelet FV/FVa. TFPI-2 (∼7 nm) in plasma of women at the onset of labor is also, in part, associated with FV. Importantly, TFPI-2 in platelets and in plasma of pregnant women inhibits FXIa and tissue-type plasminogen activator-induced clot fibrinolysis. In conclusion, TFPI-2 in platelets from normal or pregnant subjects and in plasma from pregnant women binds FV/Va and regulates intrinsic coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:25262870

  3. Diverse Classrooms, Diverse Curriculum, Diverse Complications: Three Teacher Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungemah, Lori D.

    2015-01-01

    Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversity continues to increase in classrooms. Many call for a more diverse curriculum, but curricular diversity brings its own challenges to both teachers and students. These three vignettes are drawn from my ethnographic data at Atlantic High School in Brooklyn, New York, where I worked for ten years as…

  4. Screening of telomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kleideiter, Elke; Piotrowska, Kamilla; Klotz, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Shortening of telomeres prevents cells from uncontrolled proliferation. Progressive telomere shortening occurs at each cell division until a critical telomeric length is reached. Telomerase expression is switched off after embryonic differentiation in most normal cells, but it is expressed in a very high percentage of tumors of different origin. Thus, telomerase is regarded as the best tumor marker and a promising novel molecular target for cancer treatment. Therefore, different strategies to inhibit telomerase have been developed. However, systematic screening of telomerase inhibitors has not been performed to compare their therapeutic potential. We propose a suitable strategy for estimation of the therapeutic potential of telomerase inhibitors, which is based on a systematic screening of different inhibitors in the same cell system. From the long list of compounds discussed in the literature, we have selected four telomerase inhibitors of different structure and mode of action: BRACO19 (G-quadruplex-interactive compound), BIBR1532 (non-nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitor), 2'-O-methyl RNA, and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs; hTR antisense oligonucleotides). To determine minimal effective concentrations for telomerase inhibition, telomerase activity was measured using the cell-free telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. We also tested inhibitors in long-term cell-culture experiments by exposing A-549 cells to non-cytotoxic concentrations of inhibitors for a period of 99 days. Subsequently, telomerase activity of A-549 cells was investigated using the TRAP assay, and telomere length of samples was assessed by telomere restriction fragment (TRF) Southern blot analysis. PMID:18369824

  5. Differential subcellular localization renders HAI-2 a matriptase inhibitor in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Xu, Yuan; Lai, Hongyu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, Chun-Che; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Pan, Yu; Zhou, Emily; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase is under tight control primarily by the actions of the integral membrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. Growing evidence indicates that HAI-2 might also be involved in matriptase inhibition in some contexts. Here we showed that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 depends on the subcellular localizations of HAI-2, and is observed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. HAI-2 is co-expressed with matriptase in 21 out of 26 human epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. HAI-2 is also a potent matriptase inhibitor in solution, but in spite of this, HAI-2 inhibition of matriptase is not observed in all contexts where HAI-2 is expressed, unlike what is seen for HAI-1. Induction of matriptase zymogen activation in mammary epithelial cells results in the formation of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but matriptase-HAI-2 complexes are not observed. In breast cancer cells, however, in addition to the appearance of matriptase-HAI-1 complex, three different matriptase-HAI-2 complexes, are formed following the induction of matriptase activation. Immunofluorescent staining reveals that activated matriptase is focused at the cell-cell junctions upon the induction of matriptase zymogen activation in both mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. HAI-2, in contrast, remains localized in vesicle/granule-like structures during matriptase zymogen activation in human mammary epithelial cells. In breast cancer cells, however, a proportion of the HAI-2 reaches the cell surface where it can gain access to and inhibit active matriptase. Collectively, these data suggest that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 requires the translocation of HAI-2 to the cell surface, a process which is observed in some breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25786220

  6. The Chief Diversity Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Damon; Wade-Golden, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    Numerous institutions are moving toward the chief diversity officer model of leading and managing diversity in higher education. These officers carry formal administrative titles and ranks that range from vice president for institutional diversity to associate vice chancellor for diversity and climate and dean of diversity and academic engagement.…

  7. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  8. Therapeutic potential of monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Melinda M; Nomura, Daniel K

    2013-03-19

    Marijuana and aspirin have been used for millennia to treat a wide range of maladies including pain and inflammation. Both cannabinoids, like marijuana, that exert anti-inflammatory action through stimulating cannabinoid receptors, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, like aspirin, that suppress pro-inflammatory eicosanoid production have shown beneficial outcomes in mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Both cannabinoids and COX inhibitors, however, have untoward effects that discourage their chronic usage, including cognitive deficits and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered that the serine hydrolase monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) links the endocannabinoid and eicosanoid systems together through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) to provide the major arachidonic acid (AA) precursor pools for pro-inflammatory eicosanoid synthesis in specific tissues. Studies in recent years have shown that MAGL inhibitors elicit anti-nociceptive, anxiolytic, and anti-emetic responses and attenuate precipitated withdrawal symptoms in addiction paradigms through enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. MAGL inhibitors have also been shown to exert anti-inflammatory action in the brain and protect against neurodegeneration through lowering eicosanoid production. In cancer, MAGL inhibitors have been shown to have anti-cancer properties not only through modulating the endocannabinoid-eicosanoid network, but also by controlling fatty acid release for the synthesis of protumorigenic signaling lipids. Thus, MAGL serves as a critical node in simultaneously coordinating multiple lipid signaling pathways in both physiological and disease contexts. This review will discuss the diverse (patho)physiological roles of MAGL and the therapeutic potential of MAGL inhibitors in treating a vast array of complex human diseases. PMID:23142242

  9. [STAT3 inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Clinical efficacies of various molecular-targeted drugs have been recently demonstrated. Most of these drugs are kinase inhibitors. A most successful drug Glivec is an inhibitor of Bcr-Abl fusion kinase, derived from a well-known causative chromosome translocation of chronic myeloid leukemia(CML). Although other kinase inhibitors have also proved to be useful in the therapy of malignant diseases including an ALK inhibitor for lung carcinomas, a general problem of kinase inhibitors is their lowspecificities. Therefore, the complication of these drugs must be overcome. Recently, trials to develop moleculartargeted therapy whose targets are molecules other than kinases have also been promising. Among molecular targets, STAT3 has attracted a great deal of researchers' attention because it is constitutively activated in most malignant tumors and plays important roles in carcinogenesis. This article summarizes the current situation and problems to be solved with STAT3 inhibitors as well as our recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of STAT3 activation. PMID:21368456

  10. Novel inhibitors of Anthrax edema factor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Misra, Milind; Sower, Laurie; Peterson, Johnny W.; Kellogg, Glen E.; Schein, Catherine H.

    2008-01-01

    Several pathogenic bacteria produce adenylyl cyclase toxins, such as the edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis. These disturb cellular metabolism by catalyzing production of excessive amounts of the regulatory molecule cAMP. Here, a structure-based method, where a 3D- pharmacophore that fit the active site of EF was constructed from fragments, was used to identify non-nucleotide inhibitors of EF. A library of small molecule fragments was docked to the EF- active site in existing crystal structures and those with the highest HINT scores were assembled into a 3D-pharmacophore. About 10,000 compounds, from over 2.7 million compounds in the ZINC database, had a similar molecular framework. These were ranked according to their docking scores, using methodology that was shown to achieve maximum accuracy (i.e., how well the docked position matched the experimentally determined site for ATP analogues in crystal structures of the complex). Finally, 19 diverse compounds with the best AutoDock binding/docking scores were assayed in a cell based assay for their ability to reduce cAMP secretion induced by EF. Four of the test compounds, from different structural groups, inhibited in the low micromolar range. One of these has a core structure common to phosphatase inhibitors previously identified by high-throughput assays of a diversity library. Thus, the fragment based pharmacophore identified a small number of diverse compounds for assay, and greatly enhanced the selection process of advanced lead compounds for combinatorial design. PMID:18620864

  11. Aromatase and its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brodie, A; Lu, Q; Long, B

    1999-01-01

    Inhibitors of aromatase (estrogen synthetase) have been developed as treatment for postmenopausal breast cancer. Both steroidal substrate analogs, type I inhibitors, which inactivate the enzyme and non-steroidal competitive reversible, type II inhibitors, are now available. 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4-OHA), the first selective aromatase inhibitor, has been shown to reduce serum estrogen concentrations and cause complete and partial responses in approximately 25% of patients with hormone responsive disease who have relapsed from previous endocrine treatment. Letrozole (CGS 20, 269) and anastrozole (ZN 1033) have been recently approved for treatment. Both suppress serum estrogen levels to the limit of assay detection. Letrozole has been shown to be significantly superior to megace in overall response rates and time to treatment failure, whereas anastrozole was found to improve survival in comparison to megace. Both were better tolerated than the latter. The potential of aromatase within the breast as a significant source of estrogen mediating tumor proliferation and which might determine the outcome of inhibitor treatment was explored. Using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, aromatase and mRNAarom was detected mainly in the epithelial cells of the terminal ductal lobular units (TDLU) of the normal breast and also in breast tumor epithelial cells as well as some stromal cells. Increase in proliferation, measured by increased thymidine incorporation into DNA and by PCNA immunostaining in response to testosterone was observed in histocultures of breast cancer samples. This effect could be inhibited by 4-OHA and implies that intratumoral aromatase has functional significance. An intratumoral aromatase model in the ovariectomized nude mouse was developed which simulated the hormone responsive postmenopausal breast cancer patient. This model also allows evaluation of the efficacy of aromatase inhibitors and antiestrogens in tumors of estrogen receptor positive

  12. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  13. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  14. Proteasome Inhibitors: An Expanding Army Attacking a Unique Target

    PubMed Central

    Kisselev, Alexei F.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Overkleeft, Herman S.

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes are large, multisubunit proteolytic complexes presenting multiple targets for therapeutic intervention. The 26S proteasome consists of a 20S proteolytic core and one or two 19S regulatory particles. The 20S core contains three types of active sites. Many structurally diverse inhibitors of these active sites, both natural product and synthetic, have been discovered in the last two decades. One, bortezomib, is used clinically for treatment of multiple myeloma, mantle cell lymphoma, and acute allograft rejection. Five more recently developed proteasome inhibitors are in trials for treatment of myeloma and other cancers. Proteasome inhibitors also have activity in animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, reperfusion injury, promote bone and hair growth, and can potentially be used as anti-infectives. In addition, inhibitors of ATPases and deubiquitinases of 19S regulatory particles have been discovered in the last decade. PMID:22284358

  15. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  16. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  17. Teaching for Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ricardo L.

    This book focuses on how to teach students from diverse cultures and how to teach students to live in a diverse society. Chapter 1, "Democracy, Diversity, and Universal Education," discusses "The Nature of a Free Society,""The Role of Universal Education," and "Schools as Communities." Chapter 2, "Identifying and Understanding Diversity Issues,"…

  18. 10 Diversity Champions II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nealy, Michelle J.; Pluviose, David; Roach, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Introducing the "Champions of Diversity" in the Academic Kickoff issue proved a timely reminder of the mission of Diverse during the lead up to the 25th anniversary of Cox, Matthews and Associates, the founder of the former Black Issues in Higher Education and publisher of Diverse. In this edition, the editors at Diverse unveil its second slate of…

  19. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  20. RAF inhibitors that evade paradoxical MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Spevak, Wayne; Zhang, Ying; Burton, Elizabeth A; Ma, Yan; Habets, Gaston; Zhang, Jiazhong; Lin, Jack; Ewing, Todd; Matusow, Bernice; Tsang, Garson; Marimuthu, Adhirai; Cho, Hanna; Wu, Guoxian; Wang, Weiru; Fong, Daniel; Nguyen, Hoa; Shi, Songyuan; Womack, Patrick; Nespi, Marika; Shellooe, Rafe; Carias, Heidi; Powell, Ben; Light, Emily; Sanftner, Laura; Walters, Jason; Tsai, James; West, Brian L; Visor, Gary; Rezaei, Hamid; Lin, Paul S; Nolop, Keith; Ibrahim, Prabha N; Hirth, Peter; Bollag, Gideon

    2015-10-22

    Oncogenic activation of BRAF fuels cancer growth by constitutively promoting RAS-independent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signalling. Accordingly, RAF inhibitors have brought substantially improved personalized treatment of metastatic melanoma. However, these targeted agents have also revealed an unexpected consequence: stimulated growth of certain cancers. Structurally diverse ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors can either inhibit or paradoxically activate the MAPK pathway, depending whether activation is by BRAF mutation or by an upstream event, such as RAS mutation or receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Here we have identified next-generation RAF inhibitors (dubbed 'paradox breakers') that suppress mutant BRAF cells without activating the MAPK pathway in cells bearing upstream activation. In cells that express the same HRAS mutation prevalent in squamous tumours from patients treated with RAF inhibitors, the first-generation RAF inhibitor vemurafenib stimulated in vitro and in vivo growth and induced expression of MAPK pathway response genes; by contrast the paradox breakers PLX7904 and PLX8394 had no effect. Paradox breakers also overcame several known mechanisms of resistance to first-generation RAF inhibitors. Dissociating MAPK pathway inhibition from paradoxical activation might yield both improved safety and more durable efficacy than first-generation RAF inhibitors, a concept currently undergoing human clinical evaluation with PLX8394. PMID:26466569

  1. Protein protease inhibitors in insects and comparison with mammalian inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Studies on insect protein protease inhibitors are summarized. Biochemical, genetic and physiological investigations of the silkworm are performed. 2. In addition, the properties and characteristics of fungal protease inhibitors from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) are described and their importance as defensive functions is emphasized. 3. This review also concerns comparative and evolutionary studies of protease inhibitors from various sources. 4. The biological significance of inhibitors is discussed in view of the extensive experimental results. PMID:8365101

  2. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Korsinczky, Michael L J; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Craik, David J

    2004-10-01

    SFTI-1 is a bicyclic 14 amino acid peptide that was originally isolated from the seeds of the sunflower Helianthus annuus. It is a potent inhibitor of trypsin, with a sub-nanomolar K(i) value and is homologous to the active site region of the well-known family of serine protease inhibitors known as the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitors. It has a cyclic backbone that is cross-braced by a single disulfide bridge and a network of hydrogen bonds that result in a well-defined structure. SFTI-1 is amenable to chemical synthesis, allowing for the creation of synthetic variants. Alterations to the structure such as linearising the backbone or removing the disulfide bridge do not reduce the potency of SFTI-1 significantly, and minimising the peptide to as few as nine residues results in only a small decrease in reactivity. The creation of linear variants of SFTI-1 also provides a tool for investigating putative linear precursor peptides. The mechanism of biosynthesis of SFTI-1 is not yet known but it seems likely that it is a gene-coded product that has arisen from a precursor protein that may be evolutionarily related to classic Bowman-Birk inhibitors. PMID:15544530

  3. Inhibitors of rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eliane V; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2016-03-01

    Rhomboid proteases form one of the most widespread families of intramembrane proteases. They utilize a catalytic serine-histidine dyad located several Å below the surface of the membrane for substrate hydrolysis. Multiple studies have implicated rhomboid proteases in biologically and medically relevant processes. Several assays have been developed that are able to monitor rhomboid activity. With the aid of these assays, different types of inhibitors have been found, all based on electrophiles that covalently react with the active site machinery. Although the currently available inhibitors have limited selectivity and moderate potency, they can function as research tools and as starting point for the development of activity-based probes, which are reagents that can specifically detect active rhomboid species. Structural studies on complexes of inhibitors with the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG have provided insight into how substrate recognition may occur. Future synthetic efforts, aided by high-throughput screening or structure-based design, may lead to more potent and selective inhibitors for this interesting family of proteases. PMID:26166068

  4. Diversity Statements: How Faculty Applicants Address Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaling, Karen B.; Trevino, Amira Y.; Lind, Justin R.; Blume, Arthur W.; Baker, Dana L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine application materials for assistant professor positions in 3 academic disciplines. Applicants were asked to write a diversity statement describing how they would advance diversity through their research, teaching, and service. The sample included application materials submitted by 191 candidates for…

  5. Capturing the Diversity in Lexical Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The range, variety, or diversity of words found in learners' language use is believed to reflect the complexity of their vocabulary knowledge as well as the level of their language proficiency. Many indices of lexical diversity have been proposed, most of which involve statistical relationships between types and tokens, and which ultimately…

  6. Does Staff Diversity Imply Openness to Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international university departments in Denmark. The authors set out…

  7. A shrimp pacifastin light chain-like inhibitor: molecular identification and role in the control of the prophenoloxidase system.

    PubMed

    Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Chomwong, Sudarat; Senapin, Saengchan; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Amparyup, Piti

    2016-01-01

    Pacifastin is a recently classified family of serine proteinase inhibitors that play essential roles in various biological processes, including in the regulation of the melanization cascade. Here, a novel pacifastin-related gene, termed PmPacifastin-like, was identified from a reverse suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library created from hemocytes of the prophenoloxidase PmproPO1/2 co-silenced black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. The full-length sequences of PmPacifastin-like and its homologue LvPacifastin-like from the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were determined. Sequence analysis revealed that both sequences contained thirteen conserved pacifastin light chain domains (PLDs), followed by two putative kunitz domains. Expression analysis demonstrated that the PmPacifastin-like transcript was expressed in all tested shrimp tissues and larval developmental stages, and its expression responded to Vibrio harveyi challenge. To gain insight into the functional roles of PmPacifastin-like protein, the in vivo RNA interference experiment was employed; the results showed that PmPacifastin-like depletion strongly increased PO activity. Interestingly, suppression of PmPacifastin-like also down-regulated the expression of the proPO-activating enzyme PmPPAE2 transcript; the PmPacifastin-like transcript was down-regulated after the PmproPO1/2 transcripts were silenced. Taken together, these results suggest that PmPacifastin-like is important in the shrimp proPO system and may play an essential role in shrimp immune defense against bacterial infection. These results also expand the knowledge of how pacifastin-related protein participates in the negative regulation of the proPO system in shrimp. PMID:26271600

  8. Bile enhances glucose uptake, reduces permeability, and modulates effects of lectins, trypsin inhibitors and saponins on intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Bakke, Anne Marie; Chikwati, Elvis M; Venold, Fredrik F; Sahlmann, Christian; Holm, Halvor; Penn, Michael H; Oropeza-Moe, Marianne; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-02-01

    Antinutritional factors (ANFs) can disrupt digestive and other intestinal functions. ANFs in soybean meal (SBM) are implicated in proliferative and inflammatory responses in the intestine of various (functionally) monogastric animals, including Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of ex vivo exposure of mid and distal intestinal tissue of salmon to soybean saponins (SAP), lectin (LEC) and Kunitz' trypsin inhibitor (KTI), singly and in combination, on epithelial function, as assessed by measuring in vitro glucose uptake pathways along a glucose concentration gradient. As solubilization of SAP in the calcium-containing Ringer's solution was problematic but resolved with the addition of a physiological concentration of bile collected from the gall bladder of salmon, an evaluation of bile effects became an added element. Results indicated that bile increased baseline glucose absorption and possibly transport, and also had a protective effect on the epithelial barrier, at least partially due to taurocholate. Compared to controls, tissues exposed to LEC+bile, KTI+bile and LEC+KTI+bile exhibited increased glucose uptake at the higher glucose concentrations, apparently due to markedly increased tissue permeability. Addition of SAP, however, attenuated the response, possibly by binding bile components. SAP+bile, also in combination with LEC and/or KTI, as well as LEC, KTI and LEC+KTI without bile often reduced transcellular glucose uptake pathways, while maintaining low tissue permeability. SAP+LEC+KTI+bile, LEC and KTI caused the most marked reductions. The distal intestine was more affected, reflecting the restriction of in vivo SBM-induced inflammatory changes to this region. PMID:24291392

  9. Recent advances for FLAP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Daniel; Davidsson, Öjvind; Whatling, Carl

    2015-07-01

    A number of FLAP inhibitors have been progressed to clinical trials for respiratory and other inflammatory indications but so far no drug has reached the market. With this Digest we assess the opportunity to develop FLAP inhibitors for indications beyond respiratory disease, and in particular for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We also show how recently disclosed FLAP inhibitors have structurally evolved from the first generation FLAP inhibitors paving the way for new compound classes. PMID:26004579

  10. Teaching Culturally Diverse Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Vivian; Tulbert, Beth

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of culturally diverse students are discussed in terms of language, culture, and socioeconomic factors. Meeting the educational needs of culturally diverse students can involve interactive teaming of professionals; parent involvement; and providing appropriate services, assessment, curriculum, and instruction. (JDD)

  11. Alpha glucosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Alpha glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are a unique class of anti-diabetic drugs. Derived from bacteria, these oral drugs are enzyme inhibitors which do not have a pancreato -centred mechanism of action. Working to delay carbohydrate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, they control postprandial hyperglycaemia and provide unquestioned cardiovascular benefit. Specially suited for a traditional Pakistani carbohydrate-rich diet, AGIs have been termed the 'untapped diamonds' of diabetology. The use of these oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) that target pathophysiology in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, notably to reduce postprandial hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia will inevitably increase with time. This review describes the history of their development, mechanism of action, basic and clinical pharmacology, and suggests practical, evidence-based guidance for their optimal use. PMID:24864650

  12. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  13. PARP inhibitors and more.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chinmoy K; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  14. PARP inhibitors and more

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Basu, Nirban

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) lends a panoramic view to the inner mystery of protection of integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a cell genome. They are a balancing part of an even more dynamic equilibrium of normalcy against daily assaults. PARP finds its companion candidates in other tumor suppressors, with the most prominent and glaring one being breast cancer (BRCA) 1 and 2. The strength of both is split by PARP inhibitors, inculcating the synthetic lethality of tumor cell, which is now in the market for ovarian cancer treatment. There are many reasons for the resistance of such inhibitors, which are now becoming clinically important. These are seen along with other damage repair approaches. PMID:26097394

  15. Benzoylurea Chitin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ranfeng; Liu, Chunjuan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-08-12

    Benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors are widely used in integrated pest management (IPM) and insecticide resistance management (IRM) programs due to their low toxicity to mammals and predatory insects. In the past decades, a large number of benzoylurea derivatives have been synthesized, and 15 benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors have been commercialized. This review focuses on the history of commercial benzolyphenylureas (BPUs), synthetic methods, structure-activity relationships (SAR), action mechanism research, environmental behaviors, and ecotoxicology. Furthermore, their disadvantages of high risk to aquatic invertebrates and crustaceans are pointed out. Finally, we propose that the para-substituents at anilide of benzoylphenylureas should be the functional groups, and bipartite model BPU analogues are discussed in an attempt to provide new insight for future development of BPUs. PMID:26168369

  16. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Toroian, Damon; Lim, Joo Eun

    2009-01-01

    One of our goals is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recently determined the size exclusion characteristics of the fibril. This study revealed that apatite crystals up to 12 unit cells in size can access the water within the fibril, whereas molecules larger than a 40-kDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization: that macromolecular inhibitors of apatite growth favor fibril mineralization by selectively inhibiting crystal growth in the solution outside of the fibril. To test this mechanism, we developed a system in which crystal formation is driven by homogeneous nucleation at high calcium phosphate concentration and the only macromolecule in solution is fetuin, a 48-kDa inhibitor of apatite growth. Our experiments with this system demonstrated that fetuin determines the location of mineral growth; in the presence of fetuin mineral grows exclusively within the fibril, whereas in its absence mineral grows in solution outside the fibril. Additional experiments showed that fetuin is also able to localize calcification to the interior of synthetic matrices that have size exclusion characteristics similar to those of collagen and that it does so by selectively inhibiting mineral growth outside of these matrices. We termed this new calcification mechanism “mineralization by inhibitor exclusion,” the selective mineralization of a matrix using a macromolecular inhibitor of mineral growth that is excluded from that matrix. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the possible role of this mechanism in bone mineralization. PMID:19414589

  17. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  18. Development of scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1996-12-01

    During the last fifty years, scale inhibition has gone from an art to a science. Scale inhibition has changed from simple pH adjustment to the use of optimized dose of designer polymers from multiple monomers. The water-treatment industry faces many challenges due to the need to conserve water, availability of only low quality water, increasing environmental regulations of the water discharge, and concern for human safety when using acid. Natural materials such as starch, lignin, tannin, etc., have been replaced with hydrolytically stable organic phosphates and synthetic polymers. Most progress in scale inhibition has come from the use of synergistic mixtures and copolymerizing different functionalities to achieve specific goals. Development of scale inhibitors requires an understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and its inhibition. This paper discusses the historic perspective of scale inhibition and the development of new inhibitors based on the understanding of the mechanism of crystal growth and the use of powerful tools like molecular modeling to visualize crystal-inhibitor interactions.

  19. Insights on Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Carol, Ed.; And Others

    This state-of-the-art report presents a series of essays on the topic of diversity. Essays include: (1) "Committing to Diversity" (George L. Mehaffy); (2) "Serving the Community by Serving Our Members" (Michael P. Wolfe); (3) "How Diversity Matters" (Asa G. Hilliard, III); (4) "A Prerequisite to Teaching Multiculturally" (Mary Louise Gomez); (5)…

  20. BioDiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, E. O., Ed.; Peter, Frances M., Ed.

    The diversity of life forms is one of the greatest wonders of the planet earth. The biosphere is an intricate tapestry of interwoven life forms. This book offers an overall view of this biological diversity and carries an urgent warning about the rapid alteration and destruction of the environments that have fostered the diversity of life forms…

  1. The State of Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    Examines what is being done to implement cultural diversity in libraries. Topics addressed include affirmative action; defining cultural diversity, including the significance of ethnicity, race, and race relations in the workplace; problems in implementing cultural diversity; and examples of successful implementation programs. (Contains three…

  2. Leadership and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    As part of the special edition recognizing the 40th anniversary of "Educational Management Administration & Leadership" this article reviews the coverage of leadership and diversity issues in the journal. The majority of articles concerning diversity have focused on gender, with attention turning to the wider concept of diversity since the year…

  3. Thinking about Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Before companies attempt to increase the diversity in their management ranks, it is necessary for them to learn to manage diversity. Managers should have a plan; focus on individual learning, human-relations, motivational, and communication styles; examine organizational culture; and offer diversity training. (JOW)

  4. Managing Generational Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donovan, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    Many school leaders have explored the issue of diversity when it comes to students, teachers and staff. Their focus typically has been on gender and ethnicity. However, generational diversity, an area of diversity that warrants serious consideration, has received less attention. Generational intelligence is important today for two reasons. First…

  5. Take action: influence diversity.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Norma J

    2013-01-01

    Increased diversity brings strength to nursing and ANNA. Being a more diverse association will require all of us working together. There is an old proverb that says: "one hand cannot cover the sky; it takes many hands." ANNA needs every one of its members to be a part of the diversity initiative. PMID:24579394

  6. Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only multilevel…

  7. Unique diversity of the venom peptides from the scorpion Androctonus bicolor revealed by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Shi, Wanxia; Zeng, Xian-Chun; Ge, Feng; Yang, Mingkun; Nie, Yao; Bao, Aorigele; Wu, Shifen; E, Guoji

    2015-10-14

    Androctonus bicolor is one of the most poisonous scorpion species in the world. However, little has been known about the venom composition of the scorpion. To better understand the molecular diversity and medical significance of the venom from the scorpion, we systematically analyzed the venom components by combining transcriptomic and proteomic surveys. Random sequencing of 1000 clones from a cDNA library prepared from the venom glands of the scorpion revealed that 70% of the total transcripts code for venom peptide precursors. Our efforts led to a discovery of 103 novel putative venom peptides. These peptides include NaTx-like, KTx-like and CaTx-like peptides, putative antimicrobial peptides, defensin-like peptides, BPP-like peptides, BmKa2-like peptides, Kunitz-type toxins and some new-type venom peptides without disulfide bridges, as well as many new-type venom peptides that are cross-linked with one, two, three, five or six disulfide bridges, respectively. We also identified three peptides that are identical to known toxins from scorpions. The venom was also analyzed using a proteomic technique. The presence of a total of 16 different venom peptides was confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The discovery of a wide range of new and new-type venom peptides highlights the unique diversity of the venom peptides from A. bicolor. These data also provide a series of novel templates for the development of therapeutic drugs for treating ion channel-associated diseases and infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens, and offer molecular probes for the exploration of structures and functions of various ion channels. PMID:26254009

  8. Transcriptional Profiling of a Selective CREB Binding Protein Bromodomain Inhibitor Highlights Therapeutic Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chekler, Eugene L Piatnitski; Pellegrino, Jessica A; Lanz, Thomas A; Denny, R Aldrin; Flick, Andrew C; Coe, Jotham; Langille, Jonathan; Basak, Arindrajit; Liu, Shenping; Stock, Ingrid A; Sahasrabudhe, Parag; Bonin, Paul D; Lee, Kevin; Pletcher, Mathew T; Jones, Lyn H

    2015-12-17

    Bromodomains are involved in transcriptional regulation through the recognition of acetyl lysine modifications on diverse proteins. Selective pharmacological modulators of bromodomains are lacking, although the largely hydrophobic nature of the pocket makes these modules attractive targets for small-molecule inhibitors. This work describes the structure-based design of a highly selective inhibitor of the CREB binding protein (CBP) bromodomain and its use in cell-based transcriptional profiling experiments. The inhibitor downregulated a number of inflammatory genes in macrophages that were not affected by a selective BET bromodomain inhibitor. In addition, the CBP bromodomain inhibitor modulated the mRNA level of the regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) gene in neurons, suggesting a potential therapeutic opportunity for CBP inhibitors in the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26670081

  9. Specificity of Rel-inhibitor interactions in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Tatei, K; Levine, M

    1995-01-01

    The Rel family of transcription factors participate in a diverse array of processes, including acute responses to injury and infection, lymphocyte differentiation, and embryonic patterning. These proteins show homology in an extended region spanning about 300 amino acids (the Rel homology domain [RHD]). The RHD mediates both DNA binding and interactions with a family of inhibitor proteins, including I kappa B alpha and cactus. Previous studies have shown that an N-terminal region of the RHD (containing the sequence motif RXXRXRXXC) is important for DNA binding, while the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence is important for inhibitor interactions. Here we present a structure-function analysis of the Drosophila dorsal RHD. These studies identify another sequence within the RHD (region I) that is essential for inhibitor interactions. There is a tight correlation between the conservation of region I sequences and the specificity of Rel-inhibitor interactions in both flies and mammals. Point mutations in the region I sequence can uncouple DNA binding and inhibitor interactions in vitro. The phenotypes associated with the expression of a modified dorsal protein in transgenic Drosophila embryos suggest a similar uncoupling in vivo. Recent crystallographic studies suggest that the region I sequence and the nuclear localization sequence might form a composite surface which interacts with inhibitor proteins. PMID:7791770

  10. Composite synthetic lethal identification of membrane traffic inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Mara C.; Ho, David G.; Huang, Jing; Jung, Michael E.; Payne, Gregory S.

    2007-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors provide powerful tools to characterize highly dynamic and complex eukaryotic cell pathways such as those mediating membrane traffic. However, a lack of easy and generalizable assays has constrained identification of novel inhibitors despite availability of diverse chemical libraries. Here, we report a facile growth-based strategy in yeast to screen for pathway-specific inhibitors. The approach uses well characterized synthetic genetic growth defects to guide design of cells genetically sensitized for inhibition of chosen pathways. With this strategy, we identified a family of piperazinyl phenylethanone compounds as inhibitors of traffic between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes that depends on the clathrin adaptor complex AP-1. The compounds did not significantly alter other trafficking pathways involving the TGN or endosomes, indicating specificity. Compound treatment also altered localization of AP-1 in mammalian cells. These previously uncharacterized inhibitors will be useful for future studies of clathrin-mediated transport in yeast, and potentially in other organisms. Furthermore, the easily automated technology should be adaptable for identification of inhibitors of other cellular processes. PMID:17404221

  11. Discovery of potent wall teichoic acid early stage inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Labroli, Marc A; Caldwell, John P; Yang, Christine; Lee, Sang Ho; Wang, Hao; Koseoglu, Sandra; Mann, Paul; Yang, Shu-Wei; Xiao, Jing; Garlisi, Charles G; Tan, Christopher; Roemer, Terry; Su, Jing

    2016-08-15

    The widespread emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has dramatically eroded the efficacy of current β-lactam antibiotics and created an urgent need for novel treatment options. Using an S. aureus phenotypic screening strategy, we have identified small molecule early stage wall teichoic acid (WTA) pathway-specific inhibitors predicted to be chemically synergistic with β-lactams. These previously disclosed inhibitors, termed tarocins, demonstrate by genetic and biochemical means inhibition of TarO, the first step in WTA biosynthesis. Tarocins demonstrate potent bactericidal synergy in combination with broad spectrum β-lactam antibiotics across diverse clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci. The synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a tarocin series will be detailed. Tarocins and other WTA inhibitors may provide a rational strategy to develop Gram-positive bactericidal β-lactam combination agents active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococci. PMID:27436582

  12. Marine-Derived Angiogenesis Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs. PMID:23502698

  13. Marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Qing; Miao, Ze-Hong

    2013-03-01

    Angiogenesis inhibitors have been successfully used for cancer therapy in the clinic. Many marine-derived natural products and their analogues have been reported to show antiangiogenic activities. Compared with the drugs in the clinic, these agents display interesting characteristics, including diverse sources, unique chemical structures, special modes of action, and distinct activity and toxicity profiles. This review will first provide an overview of the current marine-derived angiogenesis inhibitors based on their primary targets and/or mechanisms of action. Then, the marine-derived antiangiogenic protein kinase inhibitors will be focused on. And finally, the clinical trials of the marine-derived antiangiogenic agents will be discussed, with special emphasis on their application potentials, problems and possible coping strategies in their future development as anticancer drugs. PMID:23502698

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A and proteasome inhibitor PS-341 synergistically induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Jirong . E-mail: jbai@bidmc.harvard.edu; Demirjian, Aram; Sui Jianhua; Marasco, Wayne; Callery, Mark P. . E-mail: mcallery@bidmc.harvard.ede

    2006-10-06

    Pancreatic cancer is a common and lethal malignancy. Pancreatic cancer cells overexpress multiple anti-apoptotic factors and death receptor decoys, and are strongly resistant to radiation and to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)- or gemcitabine (Gem)-based chemotherapy regimens. We have found that low-dose proteasome inhibitor PS-341 and histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) synergistically induce cytotoxicity in a panel of eight diverse pancreatic cancer cell lines. Combining TSA with PS-341 effectively inactivated NF{kappa}B signaling, downregulated the predominant endogenous anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-XL overexpression, and disrupted MAP kinase pathway. The combined drug regimen effectively inflicted an average of 71.5% apoptotic cell death (55.2-80%) in diverse pancreatic cancer cell lines by activating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion: the TSA/PS-341 regimen may represent a potential novel therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer.

  15. Thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, P V; Malli, H; Swenson, S

    1999-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a critical enzyme for DNA replication and cell growth because it is the only de novo source of thymine nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. TS is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has been used for cancer treatment for more than 40 years. However, dissatisfaction with the overall activity of 5-FU against the major cancers, and the recognition that TS still remains an attractive target for anticancer drugs because of its central position in the pathway of DNA synthesis, led to a search for new inhibitors of TS structurally analogous to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the second substrate of TS. TS inhibitory antifolates developed to date that are in various stages of clinical evaluation are ZD 1694 and ZD9331 (Astra-Zeneca, London, UK), (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), LY231514 (BW1843U89 (Glaxo-Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC), and AG337 and AG331 (Agouron, La Jolla, CA). Although each of these compounds has TS as its major intracellular site of action, they differ in propensity for polyglutamylation and for transport by the reduced folate carrier. LY231514 also has secondary target enzymes. As a result, each compound is likely to have a different spectrum of antitumor activity and toxicity. This review will summarize the development and properties of this new class of TS inhibitors. PMID:10606255

  16. [Kinase inhibitors and their resistance].

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-08-01

    Kinase cascades are involved in all stages of tumorigenesis through modulation of transformation and differentiation, cell-cycle progression, and motility. Advances in molecular targeted drug development allow the design and synthesis of inhibitors targeting cancer-associated signal transduction pathways. Potent selective inhibitors with low toxicity can benefit patients especially with several malignancies harboring an oncogenic driver addictive signal. This article evaluates information on solid tumor-related kinase signals and inhibitors, including receptor tyrosine kinase or serine/threonine kinase signals that lead to successful application in clinical settings. In addition, the resistant mechanisms to the inhibitors is summarized. PMID:26281685

  17. [Cultural diversity reflexive learning].

    PubMed

    Pomarede, Ma José Morera; Caparà, Núria Roca

    2007-10-01

    Recent international migration trends contribute to set up new social scenarios where an increasing cultural diversity becomes self-evident. From a global diversity on a planetary scale, we enter into a local diversity comprised by persons, groups and emerging cultures with whom we share our daily life experiences. In this context, social relationships are not always easy and we may note difficulties due to the ethnocentrism each group has and due to a lack of knowledge, or distrust or prejudices among persons or groups having diverse cultural origins. PMID:18274398

  18. Chemical Inhibitors of Epigenetic Methyllysine Reader Proteins.

    PubMed

    Milosevich, Natalia; Hof, Fraser

    2016-03-22

    Protein methylation is a common post-translational modification with diverse biological functions. Methyllysine reader proteins are increasingly a focus of epigenetics research and play important roles in regulating many cellular processes. These reader proteins are vital players in development, cell cycle regulation, stress responses, oncogenesis, and other disease pathways. The recent emergence of a small number of chemical inhibitors for methyllysine reader proteins supports the viability of these proteins as targets for drug development. This article introduces the biochemistry and biology of methyllysine reader proteins, provides an overview of functions for those families of readers that have been targeted to date (MBT, PHD, tudor, and chromodomains), and reviews the development of synthetic agents that directly block their methyllysine reading functions. PMID:26650180

  19. Proteinase inhibitor homologues as potassium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Lancelin, J M; Foray, M F; Poncin, M; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1994-04-01

    We report here the NMR structure of dendrotoxin I, a powerful potassium channel blocker from the venom of the African Elapidae snake Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba), calculated from an experimentally-derived set of 719 geometric restraints. The backbone of the toxin superimposes on bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) with a root-mean-square deviation of < 1.7 A. The surface electrostatic potential calculated for dendrotoxin I and BPTI, reveal an important difference which might account for the differences in function of the two proteins. These proteins may provide examples of adaptation for specific and diverse biological functions while at the same time maintaining the overall three-dimensional structure of a common ancestor. PMID:7544683

  20. Predictive QSAR modeling of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kovalishyn, Vasyl; Tanchuk, Vsevolod; Charochkina, Larisa; Semenuta, Ivan; Prokopenko, Volodymyr

    2012-02-01

    A series of diverse organic compounds, phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE-4) inhibitors, have been modeled using a QSAR-based approach. 48 QSAR models were compared by following the same procedure with different combinations of descriptors and machine learning methods. QSAR methodologies used random forests and associative neural networks. The predictive ability of the models was tested through leave-one-out cross-validation, giving a Q² = 0.66-0.78 for regression models and total accuracies Ac=0.85-0.91 for classification models. Predictions for the external evaluation sets obtained accuracies in the range of 0.82-0.88 (for active/inactive classifications) and Q² = 0.62-0.76 for regressions. The method showed itself to be a potential tool for estimation of IC₅₀ of new drug-like candidates at early stages of drug development. PMID:22023934

  1. Repositioning of DHFR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lele, Arundhati Chandrashekhar; Mishra, Deepak Amarnath; Kamil, Tengku Karmila; Bhakta, Sanjib; Degani, Mariam Sohel

    2016-01-01

    Development of new drugs is a time-consuming, hugely expensive and an uncertain endeavor. The pharmaceutical industry is looking for cost-effective alternatives with reduced risks of drug failure. Validated target machinery along with established inhibitors indicates usefulness in drug design, discovery and further development. Folate metabolism, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, represents an essential druggable target for chemotherapy. Numerous enzymes in the cell replication cycle use folate either as a cofactor or as a substrate. DHFR, an enzyme of the folate biosynthesis pathway is an established chemotherapeutic target, initially explored for anti-cancer drug discovery. Diaminopteridines e.g. methotrexate and aminopterin, primarily used as anti-cancer agents, are folic acid analogues, first reported in late 1940's, used to produce temporary remission of acute leukaemia in children. However, due to the toxicity of these drugs, they could not be used for other therapeutic implications such as in the treatment of infectious diseases. Development of newer diaminopteridine derivatives has helped in repositioning their therapeutic usefulness. These analogues have now been proven as anti-parasitic, immuno-suppressants, anti-bacterial agents, to enlist a few therapeutic applications. Likewise, diaminopyrimidine, diaminoquinazoline and diaminodihydrotriazines are being explored for structural modifications by which they can be repurposed from their originally developed medicinal applicability and exploited for various other infectious disease conditions. In this review, we encompass the study of DHFR inhibitors potentially to be repurposed for different infectious disease case scenario and also highlight the novel anti-infective drug discovery benefits therein. PMID:26881719

  2. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  3. Purification and characterization of the beta-trefoil fold protein barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor overexpressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bønsager, Birgit C; Praetorius-Ibba, Mette; Nielsen, Peter K; Svensson, Birte

    2003-08-01

    Barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) is a beta-trefoil fold protein related to soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz) and inhibits barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 (AMY2), which is de novo synthesized in the seed during germination. Recombinant BASI was produced in Escherichia coli in an untagged form (untagged rBASI), in two His(6)-tag forms (His(6)-rBASI and His(6)-Xa-rBASI), and in an intein-CBD-tagged form (rBASI (intein)). The yields per liter culture after purification were (i) 25 mgl(-1) His(6)-rBASI; (ii) 6 mgl(-1) rBASI purified after cleavage of His(6)-Xa-rBASI by Factor Xa; (iii) 3 mgl(-1) untagged rBASI; and (iv) 0.2 mgl(-1) rBASI after a chitin-column and autohydrolysis of the rBASI-intein-CBD. In Pichia pastoris, rBASI was secreted at 0.1 mgl(-1). The recombinant BASI forms and natural seed BASI (sBASI) all had an identical isoelectric point of 7.2 and a mass of 19,879 Da, as determined by mass spectrometry. The fold of rBASI from the different preparations was confirmed by circular dichroism spectroscopy and rBASI (intein), His(6)-rBASI, and sBASI inhibited AMY2 catalyzed starch hydrolysis with K(i) of 0.10, 0.06, and 0.09 nM, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the formation of AMY2/rBASI (intein) gave k(on)=1.3x10(5)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=1.4x10(-4)s(-1), and K(D)=1.1 nM, and of the savinase-His(6)-rBASI complex k(on)=21.0x10(4)M(-1)s(-1), k(off)=53.0x10(-4)s(-1), and K(D)=25.0 nM, in agreement with sBASI values. K(i) was 77 and 65 nM for inhibition of savinase activity by His(6)-rBASI and sBASI, respectively. PMID:12880767

  4. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  5. Diversity at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabo, Sandra R.

    2000-01-01

    Diversity in the workplace goes beyond racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds. It extends to those with disabilities of all types and older workers. Students must be able to acknowledge and appreciate peoples' differences and educators must integrate diversity into the classroom. (JOW)

  6. Voices for Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Future Teacher, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Prominent Americans were asked to reflect on the diversity challenge facing America's teacher workforce. The following leaders from several fields voiced their support of teachers and their beliefs America needs more diverse and culturally responsive teachers: (1) Mary Hatwood Futrell, President of Education International; (2) Carol Moseley-Braun,…

  7. Global Diversity and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Art

    2003-01-01

    Argues that global diversity has become a business imperative in today's business climate. Global diversity is of core importance even for companies that are considered domestic. Suggests community colleges need help in understanding their customer base and their shifting values in order to meet their needs and win customer loyalty. (NB)

  8. Evolution & Diversity in Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Lorentz C.

    1988-01-01

    Summarizes recent findings that help in understanding how evolution has brought about the diversity of plant life that presently exists. Discusses basic concepts of evolution, diversity and classification, the three-line hypothesis of plant evolution, the origin of fungi, and the geologic time table. Included are 31 references. (CW)

  9. Issue Brief on Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Division on Developmental Disabilities, Council for Exceptional Children (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    During the past year, the Diversity Committee of the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) Board worked with the Board and the Issues Committee Chair to develop an issue brief addressing diversity, its impact on the membership and the wider community that is served by the work of DDD, resulting in recommendations that will influence policy…

  10. Diversity and Social Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagani, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    The issue of diversity, in its broadest sense, is discussed here in its relation to social cohesion, cross-cultural relations, ingroup-outgroup relations and educational interventions. The main thesis of the paper is that real social cohesion in an ingroup rests on the acknowledgment of and the dialog with the diversities of the members of the…

  11. Pasture diversity and management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the economic importance of pastures in the northeastern United States, not much is known about their ecology, including taxonomic and functional diversity. This factsheet presents results from a 1998-2005 survey of pastures on 44 farms from Maine to Maryland. Pastures are quite diverse; the ...

  12. Assessing Diverse Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    This keynote address begins with examples that underscore how profoundly the issues of multiculturalism and diversity impact the consciousness of society at the end of the 20th century. Changes in assessment that can lead to assessment for change in a culturally diverse society are based on the ideas that "assessment as a process must be…

  13. Diversity in Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a lecture given at the 17th Annual Lecture of the Association of University Administrators (AUA). The subject of the lecture is equality and diversity in higher education (HE) leadership, or possibly the absence of equality and diversity. The author focuses on what can be done to ensure that capable women enter HE leadership…

  14. Diversity in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains three papers presented at a symposium on diversity in the workplace moderated by Sandra Johnson at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Diversity and Development: An Assessment of Equal Opportunities and the Role of HRD in the Police Service" (Rashmi Biswas, Penny Dick) examines aspects…

  15. Equality, Innovation and Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Offers some ideas concerning promotion of gender equality and diversity within European Union-funded programs and activities. Reviews efforts since the 1970s to foster equal access in European schools and universities, examines some principles of innovation and entrepreneurship, and considers stages in diversity policy development. (DB)

  16. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  17. Soybean Molecular Genetic Diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A history of the various DNA marker types used in the assessment of molecular genetic diversity in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is followed by a description of a number of studies on the assessment of genetic diversity. These studies include a review of reports on 1) the quantification and comp...

  18. A Diversity Visionary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Today's chief diversity officer could be tomorrow's university president, says Dr. Damon Williams. The author profiles Damon Williams who shines as sought-after expert on issues surrounding higher education inclusion. As head of a diversity division with an eight-figure budget at Wisconsin's flagship state university, Williams oversees four…

  19. Past Planktonic Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufino, M. M.; Salgueiro, E.; Voelker, A. H. L.; Abrantes, F. F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Planktonic organisms have been extensively used in paleoceanographic studies as proxies for most marine environmental variables (temperature, salinity, currents, frontal zones, upwelling, etc.), both directly by species occurrences and indirectly through particular chemical components produced (e.g. Mg/Ca, stable isotopes, alkanones). In 1965 Stehli pioneered by suggesting the use of planktonic organisms diversity to decipher ancient oceanic circulation, instead of the traditional approaches based on particular indicator species or assemblages composition (transfer functions). The use of species diversity has two main advantages. First, it is not restricted to a temporal epoch where the species existed and second, it does not assume that the species ecology is the same as in the present. In the current work, we compare planktonic organisms diversity on the Atlantic Ocean, obtained from surface samples, with the main satellite measured oceanographic variables, i.e. SST (Sea Surface Temperature), CHL (as an indicator of primary productivity) and the main currents in the area. Three indices were used to quantify diversity: Shannon-Weaver diversity (H), specific richness (S) and Hulbert's probability of interspecific encounter index of species evenness (PIE). Diversity was then modelled spatially using geostatistical tools at two scales: Atlantic Ocean oceanographic scale and the Iberian margin regional scale. The main conclusions will then be used to interpret measured down core diversity, on a paleo perspective. This work will understand how did diversity reacted to major climatic events, and how long it took to recover - system resilience.

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Prolong Cardiac Repolarization through Transcriptional Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spence, Stan; Deurinck, Mark; Ju, Haisong; Traebert, Martin; McLean, LeeAnne; Marlowe, Jennifer; Emotte, Corinne; Tritto, Elaine; Tseng, Min; Shultz, Michael; Friedrichs, Gregory S

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of anticancer agents that modify gene expression by altering the acetylation status of lysine residues of histone proteins, thereby inducing transcription, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and cell death or apoptosis of cancer cells. In the clinical setting, treatment with HDAC inhibitors has been associated with delayed cardiac repolarization and in rare instances a lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmia known as torsades de pointes. The mechanism(s) of HDAC inhibitor-induced effects on cardiac repolarization is unknown. We demonstrate that administration of structurally diverse HDAC inhibitors to dogs causes delayed but persistent increases in the heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc), an in vivo measure of cardiac repolarization, at timepoints far removed from the Tmax for parent drug and metabolites. Transcriptional profiling of ventricular myocardium from dogs treated with various HDAC inhibitors demonstrated effects on genes involved in protein trafficking, scaffolding and insertion of various ion channels into the cell membrane as well as genes for specific ion channel subunits involved in cardiac repolarization. Extensive in vitro ion channel profiling of various structural classes of HDAC inhibitors (and their major metabolites) by binding and acute patch clamp assays failed to show any consistent correlations with direct ion channel blockade. Drug-induced rescue of an intracellular trafficking-deficient mutant potassium ion channel, hERG (G601S), and decreased maturation (glycosylation) of wild-type hERG expressed by CHO cells in vitro correlated with prolongation of QTc intervals observed in vivo The results suggest that HDAC inhibitor-induced prolongation of cardiac repolarization may be mediated in part by transcriptional changes of genes required for ion channel trafficking and localization to the sarcolemma. These data have broad implications for the development of these drug classes and

  1. Determinants of genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Ellegren, Hans; Galtier, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Genetic polymorphism varies among species and within genomes, and has important implications for the evolution and conservation of species. The determinants of this variation have been poorly understood, but population genomic data from a wide range of organisms now make it possible to delineate the underlying evolutionary processes, notably how variation in the effective population size (Ne) governs genetic diversity. Comparative population genomics is on its way to providing a solution to 'Lewontin's paradox' - the discrepancy between the many orders of magnitude of variation in population size and the much narrower distribution of diversity levels. It seems that linked selection plays an important part both in the overall genetic diversity of a species and in the variation in diversity within the genome. Genetic diversity also seems to be predictable from the life history of a species. PMID:27265362

  2. Embracing cultural diversity.

    PubMed

    Casady, W M

    2001-01-01

    Healthcare providers from all backgrounds are taught the Western medicine approach with little consideration given to cultural-specific care. Yet, today it is difficult to ignore that approximately 33 percent of Americans originate from ethnically diverse groups. As our population continues to become more diversified, it is imperative that healthcare professionals become more sensitive to cultural differences. Effectively managing cultural diversity in the workplace requires a complex set of skills as well as an understanding of the concept. Communication skills will be challenged in a complex and diverse work environment. Managers must learn to listen. Embracing cultural diversity is a two-step process. The first step begins with personal self-interest and self-examination. The second step in the process is the "awakening." Tomorrow's successful managers will take an active role today in creating an environment that views diversity as an asset to the work force. PMID:11302066

  3. Cathepsin B Inhibitors: Combining Dipeptide Nitriles with an Occluding Loop Recognition Element by Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Janina; Li, Tianwei; Bartz, Ulrike; Gütschow, Michael

    2016-03-10

    An active site mapping of human cathepsin B with dipeptide nitrile inhibitors was performed for a combinatorial approach by introducing several points of diversity and stepwise optimizing the inhibitor structure. To address the occluding loop of cathepsin B by a carboxylate moiety, click chemistry to generate linker-connected molecules was applied. Inhibitor 17 exhibited K i values of 41.3 nM, 27.3 nM, or 19.2 nM, depending on the substrate and pH of the assay. Kinetic data were discussed with respect to the conformational selection and induced fit models. PMID:26985300

  4. Pharmacophore Model for Wnt/Porcupine Inhibitors and Its Use in Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Anders; Ho, Soo Yei; Wang, Weiling; Alam, Jenefer; Jeyaraj, Duraiswamy A; Ang, Shi Hua; Tan, Eldwin Sum Wai; Lin, Grace Ruiting; Cheong, Vivien Wei Wen; Ke, Zhiyuan; Lee, May Ann; Keller, Thomas H

    2015-07-27

    Porcupine is a component of the Wnt pathway which regulates cell proliferation, migration, stem cell self-renewal, and differentiation. The Wnt pathway has been shown to be dysregulated in a variety of cancers. Porcupine is a membrane bound O-acyltransferase that palmitoylates Wnt. Inhibiting porcupine blocks the secretion of Wnt and effectively inhibits the Wnt pathway. Using high throughput screening, we have identified a number of novel porcupine inhibitors with diverse scaffolds. The pharmacophore requirements for our porcupine inhibitors were elucidated, and a pharmacophore model is proposed. Our compounds as well as all currently published porcupine inhibitors may be fitted to this model in low energy conformations with good superimposition of the pharmacophore elements. The model also explains the stereochemical requirements of our chiral porcupine inhibitors. The pharmacophore model was successfully used for designing 3 new series of porcupine inhibitors having a tricyclic xantine, a phtalimide, or a piperidine-maleimide scaffold. PMID:26024410

  5. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  6. "No. 190. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. Diversion gates, water flowing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 190. Grand Valley Diversion Dam. Diversion gates, water flowing into high line. June, 1917. R.B.D." - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  7. 2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, overview, diversion weir center foreground, headworks overflow weir to center left, view to east - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  8. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  9. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  10. Protease inhibitors targeting coronavirus and filovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H; Renslo, Adam R; Simmons, Graham

    2015-04-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  11. Managing biological diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samson, Fred B.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1993-01-01

    Biological diversity is the variety of life and accompanying ecological processes (Off. Technol. Assess. 1987, Wilcove and Samson 1987, Keystone 1991). Conservation of biological diversity is a major environmental issue (Wilson 1988, Counc. Environ. Quality 1991). The health and future of the earth's ecological systems (Lubchenco et al. 1991), global climate change (Botkin 1990), and an ever-increasing rate in loss of species, communities, and ecological systems (Myers 1990) are among issues drawing biological diversity to the mainstream of conservation worldwide (Int. Union Conserv. Nat. and Nat. Resour. [IUCN] et al. 1991). The legal mandate for conserving biological diversity is now in place (Carlson 1988, Doremus 1991). More than 19 federal laws govern the use of biological resources in the United States (Rein 1991). The proposed National Biological Diversity Conservation and Environmental Research Act (H.R. 585 and S.58) notes the need for a national biological diversity policy, would create a national center for biological diversity research, and recommends a federal interagency strategy for ecosystem conservation. There are, however, hard choices ahead for the conservation of biological diversity, and biologists are grappling with how to set priorities in research and management (Roberts 1988). We sense disillusion among field biologists and managers relative to how to operationally approach the seemingly overwhelming charge of conserving biological diversity. Biologists also need to respond to critics like Hunt (1991) who suggest a tree farm has more biological diversity than an equal area of old-growth forest. At present, science has played only a minor role in the conservation of biological diversity (Weston 1992) with no unified approach available to evaluate strategies and programs that address the quality and quantity of biological diversity (Murphy 1990, Erwin 1992). Although actions to conserve biological diversity need to be clearly defined by

  12. The Cultivation of Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Anne

    1972-01-01

    Presidential address at the American Psychological Association meeting, Honolulu, Hawaii, September 1972. Examines some implications of diversity with regard to psychology in relation to other disciplines, as well as within psychology itself. (DM)

  13. Blood and Diversity

    MedlinePlus

    ... type O negative blood, in particular, is the universal type needed for emergency transfusions. Minority and diverse ... levels. “I was deferred from giving blood 10 times or more.” However, in October 2005 Rosalyn’s iron ...

  14. Diversity in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Kalata, Emily A; Hingorani, Anil P

    2012-12-01

    A growing body of literature in vascular surgery demonstrates disparities in the type of health care that racial/ethnic minorities receive in the United States. Numerous recommendations, including those of the Institute of Medicine, have been set forth, which identify increasing the number of minority health professionals as a key strategy to eliminating health disparities. The purpose of this study is to compare the racial/ethnic distribution of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) membership, the SVS leadership, vascular surgery trainees, and medical students. The results demonstrate that the racial/ethnic distribution of the SVS membership reflects a considerable lack of diversity with a paucity of diversity among the SVS leadership. An increasing rate of racial/ethnic diversity among vascular surgery trainees may indicate that the SVS will see an improvement in diversity in the future. PMID:23182481

  15. How to Make Diversity Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Faye

    1994-01-01

    Companies that manage diversity successfully have common characteristics: chief executives' commitment, diversity as a business objective, fair compensation and career tracking, careful diversity training, consistent focus during downsizing, and plans that address the concerns of white males. (SK)

  16. Leadership in diversity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P L

    1994-12-01

    As principal change agents, healthcare leaders are well positioned to integrate diversity into their institutions' organizational structure. Thus healthcare leaders must be competent in handling diversity issues. Diversity refers to any characteristic that helps shape a person's attitudes, behaviors, perspective, and interpretation of what is "normal." In the healthcare ministry, diversity encompasses the cultural differences that can be found across functions or among organizations when they merge or partner. Managers and supervisors will have to be familiar with the nuances of diversity if they are to be effective. Those managers who are not adept at incorporating diversity into human resource management may incorrectly evaluate subordinates' capabilities and provide inappropriate training or supervision. As a result, some employees may be underutilized. Others may resist needed direction, overlook instructions, or hide problems such as a language barrier. If executives, marketers, and strategic planners are to develop relevant healthcare services that take into account the needs of their constituencies, they will need to determine how different groups understand and access healthcare. Healthcare leaders who know how to uncover cultural dynamics and challenge cultural assumptions will go far in enabling their staff and managers to confront personal attitudes about community residents. Ultimately, quality of service delivery will be improved. PMID:10138586

  17. Targeting cancer with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Stefan; Rahal, Rami; Stransky, Nicolas; Lengauer, Christoph; Hoeflich, Klaus P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors have played an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Currently, more than 25 oncology drugs that target kinases have been approved, and numerous additional therapeutics are in various stages of clinical evaluation. In this Review, we provide an in-depth analysis of activation mechanisms for kinases in cancer, highlight recent successes in drug discovery, and demonstrate the clinical impact of selective kinase inhibitors. We also describe the substantial progress that has been made in designing next-generation inhibitors to circumvent on-target resistance mechanisms, as well as ongoing strategies for combining kinase inhibitors in the clinic. Last, there are numerous prospects for the discovery of novel kinase targets, and we explore cancer immunotherapy as a new and promising research area for studying kinase biology. PMID:25932675

  18. Aromatase inhibitors for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-12-01

    Some men with severely defective sperm production commonly have excess aromatase activity, reflected by low serum testosterone and relatively elevated estradiol levels. Aromatase inhibitors can increase endogenous testosterone production and serum testosterone levels. Treatment of infertile males with the aromatase inhibitors testolactone, anastrazole, and letrozole has been associated with increased sperm production and return of sperm to the ejaculate in men with non-obstructive azoospermia. Use of the aromatase inhibitors anastrazole (1 mg/day) and letrozole (2.5 mg/day) represent off-label use of these agents for impaired spermatogenesis in men with excess aromatase activity (abnormal testosterone/estradiol [T/E] ratios). Side effects have rarely been reported. Randomized controlled trials are needed to define the magnitude of benefit of aromatase inhibitor treatment for infertile men. PMID:23103016

  19. [Cancer therapy by PARP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases(PARP) synthesize the ADP-ribose polymers onto proteins and play a role in DNA repair. PARP inhibitors block the repair of single-strand breaks, which in turn gives rise to double-strand breaks during DNA replication. Thus, PARP inhibitors elicit synthetic lethality in cancer with BRCA1/2 loss-of-function mutations that hamper homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks. Olaparib, the first-in-class PARP inhibitor, was approved for treatment of BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer in Europe and the United States in 2014. Other PARP inhibitors under clinical trials include rucaparib, niraparib, veliparib, and the "PARP-trapping" BMN-673. BRCA1/2 sequencing is an FDA-approved companion diagnostics, which predicts the cancer vulnerability to PARP inhibition. Together, synthetic lethal PARP inhibition is a novel promising strategy for cancer intervention even in cases without prominent driver oncogenes. PMID:26281686

  20. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  1. Natural and synthetic inhibitors of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs).

    PubMed

    Goettig, Peter; Magdolen, Viktor; Brandstetter, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Including the true tissue kallikrein KLK1, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent a family of fifteen mammalian serine proteases. While the physiological roles of several KLKs have been at least partially elucidated, their activation and regulation remain largely unclear. This obscurity may be related to the fact that a given KLK fulfills many different tasks in diverse fetal and adult tissues, and consequently, the timescale of some of their physiological actions varies significantly. To date, a variety of endogenous inhibitors that target distinct KLKs have been identified. Among them are the attenuating Zn(2+) ions, active site-directed proteinaceous inhibitors, such as serpins and the Kazal-type inhibitors, or the huge, unspecific compartment forming α(2)-macroglobulin. Failure of these inhibitory systems can lead to certain pathophysiological conditions. One of the most prominent examples is the Netherton syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctional domains of the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 which fail to appropriately regulate KLKs in the skin. Small synthetic inhibitory compounds and natural polypeptidic exogenous inhibitors have been widely employed to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of KLKs and to further investigate their structures and biophysical properties. Overall, this knowledge leads not only to a better understanding of the physiological tasks of KLKs, but is also a strong fundament for the synthesis of small compound drugs and engineered biomolecules for pharmaceutical approaches. In several types of cancer, KLKs have been found to be overexpressed, which makes them clinically relevant biomarkers for prognosis and monitoring. Thus, down regulation of excessive KLK activity in cancer and in skin diseases by small inhibitor compounds may represent attractive therapeutical approaches. PMID:20615447

  2. Juggling jobs: roles and mechanisms of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants.

    PubMed

    Grosse-Holz, Friederike M; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional protease inhibitors juggle jobs by targeting different enzymes and thereby often controlling more than one biological process. Here, we discuss the biological functions, mechanisms and evolution of three types of multifunctional protease inhibitors in plants. The first type is double-headed inhibitors, which feature two inhibitory sites targeting proteases with different specificities (e.g. Bowman-Birk inhibitors) or even different hydrolases (e.g. α-amylase/protease inhibitors preventing both early germination and seed predation). The second type consists of multidomain inhibitors which evolved by intragenic duplication and are released by processing (e.g. multicystatins and potato inhibitor II, implicated in tuber dormancy and defence, respectively). The third type consists of promiscuous inhibitory folds which resemble mouse traps that can inhibit different proteases cleaving the bait they offer (e.g. serpins, regulating cell death, and α-macroglobulins). Understanding how multifunctional inhibitors juggle biological jobs increases our knowledge of the connections between the networks they regulate. These examples show that multifunctionality evolved independently from a remarkable diversity of molecular mechanisms that can be exploited for crop improvement and provide concepts for protein design. PMID:26800491

  3. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors. PMID:25286857

  4. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Rottapel, Robert; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.

  5. Insights into the binding of PARP inhibitors to the catalytic domain of human tankyrase-2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, Wei; Lam, Robert; Voytyuk, Oleksandr; Romanov, Vladimir; Gordon, Roni; Gebremeskel, Simon; Vodsedalek, Jakub; Thompson, Christine; Beletskaya, Irina; Battaile, Kevin P.; et al

    2014-07-31

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated β-catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, themore » high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.« less

  6. Capturing nature's diversity.

    PubMed

    Pascolutti, Mauro; Campitelli, Marc; Nguyen, Bao; Pham, Ngoc; Gorse, Alain-Dominique; Quinn, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are universally recognized to contribute valuable chemical diversity to the design of molecular screening libraries. The analysis undertaken in this work, provides a foundation for the generation of fragment screening libraries that capture the diverse range of molecular recognition building blocks embedded within natural products. Physicochemical properties were used to select fragment-sized natural products from a database of known natural products (Dictionary of Natural Products). PCA analysis was used to illustrate the positioning of the fragment subset within the property space of the non-fragment sized natural products in the dataset. Structural diversity was analysed by three distinct methods: atom function analysis, using pharmacophore fingerprints, atom type analysis, using radial fingerprints, and scaffold analysis. Small pharmacophore triplets, representing the range of chemical features present in natural products that are capable of engaging in molecular interactions with small, contiguous areas of protein binding surfaces, were analysed. We demonstrate that fragment-sized natural products capture more than half of the small pharmacophore triplet diversity observed in non fragment-sized natural product datasets. Atom type analysis using radial fingerprints was represented by a self-organizing map. We examined the structural diversity of non-flat fragment-sized natural product scaffolds, rich in sp3 configured centres. From these results we demonstrate that 2-ring fragment-sized natural products effectively balance the opposing characteristics of minimal complexity and broad structural diversity when compared to the larger, more complex fragment-like natural products. These naturally-derived fragments could be used as the starting point for the generation of a highly diverse library with the scope for further medicinal chemistry elaboration due to their minimal structural complexity. This study highlights the possibility to capture a

  7. The marine diversity spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reuman, Daniel C; Gislason, Henrik; Barnes, Carolyn; Mélin, Frédéric; Jennings, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Distributions of species body sizes within a taxonomic group, for example, mammals, are widely studied and important because they help illuminate the evolutionary processes that produced these distributions. Distributions of the sizes of species within an assemblage delineated by geography instead of taxonomy (all the species in a region regardless of clade) are much less studied but are equally important and will illuminate a different set of ecological and evolutionary processes. We develop and test a mechanistic model of how diversity varies with body mass in marine ecosystems. The model predicts the form of the 'diversity spectrum', which quantifies the distribution of species' asymptotic body masses, is a species analogue of the classic size spectrum of individuals, and which we have found to be a new and widely applicable description of diversity patterns. The marine diversity spectrum is predicted to be approximately linear across an asymptotic mass range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Slope -0.5 is predicted for the global marine diversity spectrum for all combined pelagic zones of continental shelf seas, and slopes for large regions are predicted to lie between -0.5 and -0.1. Slopes of -0.5 and -0.1 represent markedly different communities: a slope of -0.5 depicts a 10-fold reduction in diversity for every 100-fold increase in asymptotic mass; a slope of -0.1 depicts a 1.6-fold reduction. Steeper slopes are predicted for larger or colder regions, meaning fewer large species per small species for such regions. Predictions were largely validated by a global empirical analysis. Results explain for the first time a new and widespread phenomenon of biodiversity. Results have implications for estimating numbers of species of small asymptotic mass, where taxonomic inventories are far from complete. Results show that the relationship between diversity and body mass can be explained from the dependence of predation behaviour, dispersal, and life history on

  8. Nucleotide diversity in gorillas.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ning; Jensen-Seaman, Michael I; Chemnick, Leona; Ryder, Oliver; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of the levels of nucleotide diversity in humans and apes may provide valuable information for inferring the demographic history of these species, the effect of social structure on genetic diversity, patterns of past migration, and signatures of past selection events. Previous DNA sequence data from both the mitochondrial and the nuclear genomes suggested a much higher level of nucleotide diversity in the African apes than in humans. Noting that the nuclear DNA data from the apes were very limited, we previously conducted a DNA polymorphism study in humans and another in chimpanzees and bonobos, using 50 DNA segments randomly chosen from the noncoding, nonrepetitive parts of the human genome. The data revealed that the nucleotide diversity (pi) in bonobos (0.077%) is actually lower than that in humans (0.087%) and that pi in chimpanzees (0.134%) is only 50% higher than that in humans. In the present study we sequenced the same 50 segments in 15 western lowland gorillas and estimated pi to be 0.158%. This is the highest value among the African apes but is only about two times higher than that in humans. Interestingly, available mtDNA sequence data also suggest a twofold higher nucleotide diversity in gorillas than in humans, but suggest a threefold higher nucleotide diversity in chimpanzees than in humans. The higher mtDNA diversity in chimpanzees might be due to the unique pattern in the evolution of chimpanzee mtDNA. From the nuclear DNA pi values, we estimated that the long-term effective population sizes of humans, bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas are, respectively, 10,400, 12,300, 21,300, and 25,200. PMID:15082556

  9. Capturing Nature's Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Pascolutti, Mauro; Campitelli, Marc; Nguyen, Bao; Pham, Ngoc; Gorse, Alain-Dominique; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products are universally recognized to contribute valuable chemical diversity to the design of molecular screening libraries. The analysis undertaken in this work, provides a foundation for the generation of fragment screening libraries that capture the diverse range of molecular recognition building blocks embedded within natural products. Physicochemical properties were used to select fragment-sized natural products from a database of known natural products (Dictionary of Natural Products). PCA analysis was used to illustrate the positioning of the fragment subset within the property space of the non-fragment sized natural products in the dataset. Structural diversity was analysed by three distinct methods: atom function analysis, using pharmacophore fingerprints, atom type analysis, using radial fingerprints, and scaffold analysis. Small pharmacophore triplets, representing the range of chemical features present in natural products that are capable of engaging in molecular interactions with small, contiguous areas of protein binding surfaces, were analysed. We demonstrate that fragment-sized natural products capture more than half of the small pharmacophore triplet diversity observed in non fragment-sized natural product datasets. Atom type analysis using radial fingerprints was represented by a self-organizing map. We examined the structural diversity of non-flat fragment-sized natural product scaffolds, rich in sp3 configured centres. From these results we demonstrate that 2-ring fragment-sized natural products effectively balance the opposing characteristics of minimal complexity and broad structural diversity when compared to the larger, more complex fragment-like natural products. These naturally-derived fragments could be used as the starting point for the generation of a highly diverse library with the scope for further medicinal chemistry elaboration due to their minimal structural complexity. This study highlights the possibility to capture a

  10. Teaching for Diversity: Addressing Diversity Issues in Responsive ESL Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Student diversity has become a typical phenomenon in American public schools. The impact of increasing diversity on literacy instruction is unchallenged. Teachers reinforce this message by often citing ESL student diversity as a barrier for literacy teaching. In order to better understand the complexity of diversity issues, I explored two ESL…

  11. NASFAA Diversity and Inclusion: Recommendations of the Professional Diversity Caucus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 2015

    2015-01-01

    NASFAA's Diversity and Inclusion Report emphasizes the importance of diversity and inclusivity to NASFAA. Included in this report is a diversity statement developed by NASFAA's Professional Diversity Caucus, and approved by NASFAA's Board in March of 2015. The Caucus convened in the summer of 2014 to better understand issues related to diversity…

  12. Insights into the physiological role of CNS regeneration inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Katherine T.; Giger, Roman J.

    2015-01-01

    The growth inhibitory nature of injured adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) tissue constitutes a major barrier to robust axonal outgrowth and functional recovery following trauma or disease. Prototypic CNS regeneration inhibitors are broadly expressed in the healthy and injured brain and spinal cord and include myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), the reticulon family member NogoA, oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). These structurally diverse molecules strongly inhibit neurite outgrowth in vitro, and have been most extensively studied in the context of nervous system injury in vivo. The physiological role of CNS regeneration inhibitors in the naïve, or uninjured, CNS remains less well understood, but has received growing attention in recent years and is the focus of this review. CNS regeneration inhibitors regulate myelin development and axon stability, consolidate neuronal structure shaped by experience, and limit activity-dependent modification of synaptic strength. Altered function of CNS regeneration inhibitors is associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, suggesting crucial roles in brain development and health. PMID:26113809

  13. Application of Molecular Modeling to Urokinase Inhibitors Development

    PubMed Central

    Sulimov, V. B.; Katkova, E. V.; Oferkin, I. V.; Sulimov, A. V.; Romanov, A. N.; Roschin, A. I.; Beloglazova, I. B.; Plekhanova, O. S.; Tkachuk, V. A.; Sadovnichiy, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the regulation of diverse physiologic and pathologic processes. Experimental research has shown that elevated uPA expression is associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and shortened survival in patients, whereas suppression of proteolytic activity of uPA leads to evident decrease of metastasis. Therefore, uPA has been considered as a promising molecular target for development of anticancer drugs. The present study sets out to develop the new selective uPA inhibitors using computer-aided structural based drug design methods. Investigation involves the following stages: computer modeling of the protein active site, development and validation of computer molecular modeling methods: docking (SOL program), postprocessing (DISCORE program), direct generalized docking (FLM program), and the application of the quantum chemical calculations (MOPAC package), search of uPA inhibitors among molecules from databases of ready-made compounds to find new uPA inhibitors, and design of new chemical structures and their optimization and experimental examination. On the basis of known uPA inhibitors and modeling results, 18 new compounds have been designed, calculated using programs mentioned above, synthesized, and tested in vitro. Eight of them display inhibitory activity and two of them display activity about 10 μM. PMID:24967388

  14. Structure-based drug discovery of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2012-12-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of anti-glaucoma, anti-convulsant and anti-cancer agents. But recently, it has also emerged that these enzymes have the potential for designing anti-infective drugs (anti-fungal and anti-bacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. Sulphonamides and their isosteres (sulphamates/sulphamides) constitute the main class of CA inhibitors (CAIs), which bind to the metal ion from the enzyme active site. Recently, the dithiocarbamates (DTCs), possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. These types of CAIs will be discussed in detail in this review. Novel drug design strategies have been reported ultimately based on the tail approach for obtaining sulphonamides/DTCs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Most of the promising data have been obtained by combining x-ray crystallography of enzyme-inhibitor adducts with novel synthetic approaches for generating chemical diversity. Whereas sulphonamide - NO donating hybrid drugs were reported as effective anti-glaucoma agents, most of the interesting new inhibitors were designed for inhibiting specifically the tumour-associated isoforms CA IX and XII, validated targets for imaging and treatment of hypoxic tumours. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the DTC and carboxylate types, will be also reviewed. PMID:22468747

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors: Rescuers of cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    King, Margaret K.; Pardo, Marta; Cheng, Yuyan; Downey, Kimberlee; Jope, Richard S.; Beurel, Eléonore

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of cognitive processes is a devastating outcome of many diseases, injuries, and drugs affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Most often, very little can be done by available therapeutic interventions to improve cognitive functions. Here we review evidence that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) ameliorates cognitive deficits in a wide variety of animal models of CNS diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, Parkinson's disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, traumatic brain injury, and others. GSK3 inhibitors also improve cognition following impairments caused by therapeutic interventions, such as cranial irradiation for brain tumors. These findings demonstrate that GSK3 inhibitors are able to ameliorate cognitive impairments caused by a diverse array of diseases, injury, and treatments. The improvements in impaired cognition instilled by administration of GSK3 inhibitors appear to involve a variety of different mechanisms, such as supporting long-term potentiation and diminishing long-term depression, promotion of neurogenesis, reduction of inflammation, and increasing a number of neuroprotective mechanisms. The potential for GSK3 inhibitors to repair cognitive deficits associated with many conditions warrants further investigation of their potential for therapeutic interventions, particularly considering the current dearth of treatments available to reduce loss of cognitive functions. PMID:23916593

  16. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) and DUB inhibitors: a patent review

    PubMed Central

    Nwankwo, Joseph O.; Arkwright, Richard T.; Cvek, Boris; Liu, Jinbao; Dou, Q. Ping

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deubiquitinating-enzymes (DUBs) are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS). The fundamental role of DUBs is specific removal of ubiquitin from substrates. DUBs contribute to activation/deactivation, recycling and localization of numerous regulatory-proteins, thus playing major roles in diverse cellular-processes. Altered DUB activity is associated with multitudes of pathologies including cancer. Therefore, DUBs represent novel candidates for target-directed drug development. Areas covered The article is a thorough review/accounting of patented compounds targeting DUBs stratifying/classifying the patented compounds based on: chemical-structures, nucleic-acid compositions, modes-of-action and targeting-sites. The review provides a brief background on the UPS and DUBs involvement. Furthermore, methods for assessing efficacy and potential pharmacological utility of DUB inhibitor (DUBi) are discussed. Expert opinion The FDA’s approval of the 20S proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib and carfilzomib for treatment of hematological malignancies established the UPS as an anti-cancer target. Unfortunately, many patients are inherently resistant or develop resistance to proteasome inhibitors (PIs). One potential strategy to combat PI resistance is targeting upstream components of the UPS such as DUBs. DUBs represent a promising potential therapeutic target due to their critical roles in various cellular processes including protein-turnover, localization and cellular homeostasis. While considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop DUB modulators, significant advancement is necessary move DUB inhibitors into the clinic. PMID:26077642

  17. Corrosion inhibitor selection for wet pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.

    1995-12-31

    Selection of corrosion inhibitors for wet pipelines is based on laboratory testing and field confirmation. Both the use and selection of corrosion inhibitors are driven by economics. Economics of alternative corrosion protection methods is not treated in this paper, but the economics of proper inhibitor selection are. The key to successful inhibitor selection is careful analysis of pipeline flow conditions and experimental emulation of its corrosive environment. Transportation of inhibitor to the corroding interface must be explicitly considered in the emulation. Standard corrosion rate measurement methods are used to evaluate inhibitors. Inhibitor properties tabulated during evaluation form a core database for continuing quality control.

  18. [The synthesis of specific enzyme inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, G M

    1987-04-01

    The review deals with directed synthesis of specific enzyme inhibitors. They are classified within the framework of the mechanistic approach, namely, stable analogues of substrates, which form enzyme complexes mimicking the Michaelis complex or those which influence the chemical stages of enzyme catalysis; conformational inhibitors; substrate analogues participating in enzyme reactions and producing modified products; suicide inhibitors; stage inhibitors (inhibitors influencing certain stages of enzyme reaction); transition state analogues; multisubstrate analogues and collected substrates. Types of chemical modification used in synthesis of the specific inhibitors are discussed. Some possibilities of the quantity structure-activity relationship methods, computer modelling and molecular graphics in designing the optimal structure of inhibitors are mentioned. PMID:3300658

  19. Reshaping Antibody Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Ekiert, Damian C.; Ahmad, Insha; Yu, Wenli; Zhang, Yong; Bazirgan, Omar; Torkamani, Ali; Raudsepp, Terje; Mwangi, Waithaka; Criscitiello, Michael F.; Wilson, Ian A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Unlike humans or mice, some species have limited genome encoded combinatorial diversity potential, yet mount a robust antibody response. Cows are unusual in having exceptionally long CDR H3 loops and few V-regions, but the mechanism for creating diversity is not understood. Deep sequencing revealed that ultralong CDR H3s contain a remarkable complexity of cysteines, suggesting that disulfide-bonded mini-domains may arise during repertoire development. Indeed, crystal structures of two cow antibodies reveal that these CDR H3s form a very unusual architecture composed of a β-strand “stalk” that supports a structurally diverse, disulfide-bonded, “knob” domain. Sequence analysis suggests that diversity arises from somatic hypermutation of an ultralong DH with a severe codon bias towards mutation to cysteine. These unusual antibodies can be elicited to recognize defined antigens through the knob domain. Thus, the bovine immune system produces an antibody repertoire composed of CDR H3s of unprecedented length that fold into a diversity of mini-domains generated through combinations of somatically generated disulfides. PMID:23746848

  20. Identification and characterization of small-molecule inhibitors of hepsin

    PubMed Central

    Chevillet, John R.; Park, Gemma J.; Bedalov, Antonio; Simon, Julian A.; Vasioukhin, Valeri I.

    2009-01-01

    Hepsin is a type-II transmembrane serine protease overexpressed in the majority of human prostate cancers. We recently demonstrated that hepsin promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis and thus represents a potential therapeutic target. Here we report the identification of novel small-molecule inhibitors of hepsin catalytic activity. We utilized purified human hepsin for high-throughput screening of established drug and chemical diversity libraries and identified sixteen inhibitory compounds with IC50 values against hepsin ranging from 0.23–2.31μM and relative selectivity of up to 86-fold or greater. Two compounds are orally administered drugs established for human use. Four compounds attenuated hepsin-dependent pericellular serine protease activity in a dose dependent manner with limited or no cytotoxicity to a range of cell types. These compounds may be used as leads to develop even more potent and specific inhibitors of hepsin to prevent prostate cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:18852137

  1. Identification of Novel Proteasome Inhibitors from an Enaminone Library.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Megan L; Thomas, Kevin; Kennedy, Steven; Koduri, Naga D; Hussaini, R Syed; Sheaff, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    A library of structurally distinct enaminones was synthesized using sonication or Ru(II) catalysis to couple primary, secondary, and tertiary thioamides with α-halocarbonyls or α-diazocarbonyls. Screening the library for proteasome inhibition using a luciferase-based assay identified seven structurally diverse compounds. Two of these molecules targeted luciferase, while the remaining five exhibited varying potency and specificity for the trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, or caspase-like protease activities of the proteasome. Physiological relevance was confirmed by showing these molecules inhibited proteasomal degradation of the full-length protein substrate p21cip1 expressed in tissue culture cells. A cell viability analysis revealed that the proteasome inhibitors differentially affected cell survival. Results indicate a subset of enaminones and precursor molecules identified in this study are good candidates for further development into novel proteasome inhibitors with potential therapeutic value. PMID:25494709

  2. Transverse colon conduit diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.D.; Buchsbaum, H.J.

    1986-05-01

    The versatility and other advantages of the transverse colon conduit for urinary diversion have been described and implemented in 50 patients. Because most patients considered for this procedure will be at high risk because of a history of significant pelvic irradiation, underlying malignancy, poor renal function, fistula, and so forth, the technical details of surgery and patient selection cannot be minimized. The transverse colon segment is indicated for primary supravesical diversion as well as for salvage of problems related to ileal conduits. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is an unlikely long-term complication of this form of diversion because the fecal stream is absent. Now that the transverse colon conduit has been used for more than 10 years, meaningful comparisons with ileal segments should soon be available.

  3. Diversity of Poissonian populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo I.; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2010-01-01

    Populations represented by collections of points scattered randomly on the real line are ubiquitous in science and engineering. The statistical modeling of such populations leads naturally to Poissonian populations—Poisson processes on the real line with a distinguished maximal point. Poissonian populations are infinite objects underlying key issues in statistical physics, probability theory, and random fractals. Due to their infiniteness, measuring the diversity of Poissonian populations depends on the lower-bound cut-off applied. This research characterizes the classes of Poissonian populations whose diversities are invariant with respect to the cut-off level applied and establishes an elemental connection between these classes and extreme-value theory. The measures of diversity considered are variance and dispersion, Simpson’s index and inverse participation ratio, Shannon’s entropy and Rényi’s entropy, and Gini’s index.

  4. Diversity and leadership.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jean Lau; Sanchez-Hucles, Janis

    2007-09-01

    Comments on the six articles contained in the special issue of the American Psychologist (January 2007) devoted to leadership, written by W. Bennis; S. J. Zaccaro; V. H. Vroom and A. G. Yago; B. J. Avolio; R. J. Sternberg; and R. J. Hackman and R. Wageman. The current authors express concern that the special issue failed to include attention to issues of diversity and intersecting identities as they pertain to leadership. A Special Issue Part II on Diversity and Leadership is being proposed to (a) advance new models of leadership, (b) expand on existing leadership theories, and (c) incorporate diversity and multiple identities in the formulation of more inclusive leadership research and theory. The goal of this special issue will be to revise our theories of leadership and our understanding of effective leadership to include gender, racial/ethnic minority status, sexual orientation, and disability status. PMID:17874910

  5. Diversity as strategy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David A

    2004-09-01

    IBM's turnaround in the last decade is an impressive and well-documented business story. But behind that success is a less told people story, which explains how the corporation dramatically altered its already diverse composition and created millions of dollars in new business. By the time Lou Gerstner took the helm in 1993, IBM had a long history of progressive management when it came to civil rights and equal-opportunity employment. But Gerstner felt IBM wasn't taking full advantage of a diverse market for talent, nor was it maximizing the potential of its diverse customer and employee base. So in 1995, he launched a diversity task force initiative to uncover and understand differences among people within the organization and find ways to appeal to an even broader set of employees and customers. Gerstner established a task force for each of eight constituencies: Asians; blacks; the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered community; Hispanics; white men; Native Americans; people with disabilities; and women. He asked the task forces to research four questions: What does your constituency need to feel welcome and valued at IBM? What can the corporation do, in partnership with your group, to maximize your constituency's productivity? What can the corporation do to influence your constituency's buying decisions so that IBM is seen as a preferred solution provider? And with which external organizations should IBM form relationships to better understand the needs of your constituency? The answers to these questions became the basis for IBM's diversity strategy. Thomas stresses that four factors are key to implementing any major change initiative: strong support from company leaders, an employee base that is fully engaged with the initiative, management practices that are integrated and aligned with the effort, and a strong and well-articulated business case for action. All four elements have helped IBM make diversity a key corporate strategy tied to real growth. PMID

  6. The interplay of diversity training and diversity beliefs on team creativity in nationality diverse teams.

    PubMed

    Homan, Astrid C; Buengeler, Claudia; Eckhoff, Robert A; van Ginkel, Wendy P; Voelpel, Sven C

    2015-09-01

    Attaining value from nationality diversity requires active diversity management, which organizations often employ in the form of diversity training programs. Interestingly, however, the previously reported effects of diversity training are often weak and, sometimes, even negative. This situation calls for research on the conditions under which diversity training helps or harms teams. We propose that diversity training can increase team creativity, but only for teams with less positive pretraining diversity beliefs (i.e., teams with a greater need for such training) and that are sufficiently diverse in nationality. Comparing the creativity of teams that attended nationality diversity training versus control training, we found that for teams with less positive diversity beliefs, diversity training increased creative performance when the team's nationality diversity was high, but undermined creativity when the team's nationality diversity was low. Diversity training had less impact on teams with more positive diversity beliefs, and training effects were not contingent upon these teams' diversity. Speaking to the underlying process, we showed that these interactive effects were driven by the experienced team efficacy of the team members. We discuss theoretical and practical implications for nationality diversity management. PMID:25688641

  7. An Ethylene-Protected Achilles’ Heel of Etiolated Seedlings for Arthropod Deterrence

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    A small family of Kunitz protease inhibitors exists in Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of which (encoded by At1g72290) accomplishes highly specific roles during plant development. Arabidopsis Kunitz-protease inhibitor 1 (Kunitz-PI;1), as we dubbed this protein here, is operative as cysteine PI. Activity measurements revealed that despite the presence of the conserved Kunitz-motif the bacterially expressed Kunitz-PI;1 was unable to inhibit serine proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, but very efficiently inhibited the cysteine protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21. Western blotting and cytolocalization studies using mono-specific antibodies recalled Kunitz-PI;1 protein expression in flowers, young siliques and etiolated seedlings. In dark-grown seedlings, maximum Kunitz-PI;1 promoter activity was detected in the apical hook region and apical parts of the hypocotyls. Immunolocalization confirmed Kunitz-PI;1 expression in these organs and tissues. No transmitting tract (NTT) and HECATE 1 (HEC1), two transcription factors previously implicated in the formation of the female reproductive tract in flowers of Arabidopsis, were identified to regulate Kunitz-PI;1 expression in the dark and during greening, with NTT acting negatively and HEC1 acting positively. Laboratory feeding experiments with isopod crustaceans such as Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug) pinpointed the apical hook as ethylene-protected Achilles’ heel of etiolated seedlings. Because exogenous application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and mechanical stress (wounding) strongly up-regulated HEC1-dependent Kunitz-PI;1 gene expression, our results identify a new circuit controlling herbivore deterrence of etiolated plants in which Kunitz-PI;1 is involved. PMID:27625656

  8. An Ethylene-Protected Achilles' Heel of Etiolated Seedlings for Arthropod Deterrence.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    A small family of Kunitz protease inhibitors exists in Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of which (encoded by At1g72290) accomplishes highly specific roles during plant development. Arabidopsis Kunitz-protease inhibitor 1 (Kunitz-PI;1), as we dubbed this protein here, is operative as cysteine PI. Activity measurements revealed that despite the presence of the conserved Kunitz-motif the bacterially expressed Kunitz-PI;1 was unable to inhibit serine proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, but very efficiently inhibited the cysteine protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21. Western blotting and cytolocalization studies using mono-specific antibodies recalled Kunitz-PI;1 protein expression in flowers, young siliques and etiolated seedlings. In dark-grown seedlings, maximum Kunitz-PI;1 promoter activity was detected in the apical hook region and apical parts of the hypocotyls. Immunolocalization confirmed Kunitz-PI;1 expression in these organs and tissues. No transmitting tract (NTT) and HECATE 1 (HEC1), two transcription factors previously implicated in the formation of the female reproductive tract in flowers of Arabidopsis, were identified to regulate Kunitz-PI;1 expression in the dark and during greening, with NTT acting negatively and HEC1 acting positively. Laboratory feeding experiments with isopod crustaceans such as Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug) pinpointed the apical hook as ethylene-protected Achilles' heel of etiolated seedlings. Because exogenous application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and mechanical stress (wounding) strongly up-regulated HEC1-dependent Kunitz-PI;1 gene expression, our results identify a new circuit controlling herbivore deterrence of etiolated plants in which Kunitz-PI;1 is involved. PMID:27625656

  9. Diversity of parasite complex II.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shigeharu; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Ohmori, Junko; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Parasites have developed a variety of physiological functions necessary for completing at least part of their life cycles in the specialized environments of surrounding the parasites in the host. Regarding energy metabolism, which is essential for survival, parasites adapt to the low oxygen environment in mammalian hosts by using metabolic systems that are very different from those of the hosts. In many cases, the parasite employs aerobic metabolism during the free-living stage outside the host but undergoes major changes in developmental control and environmental adaptation to switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. Parasite mitochondria play diverse roles in their energy metabolism, and in recent studies of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, the mitochondrial complex II plays an important role in anaerobic energy metabolism of parasites inhabiting hosts by acting as a quinol-fumarate reductase. In Trypanosomes, parasite complex II has been found to have a novel function and structure. Complex II of Trypanosoma cruzi is an unusual supramolecular complex with a heterodimeric iron-sulfur subunit and seven additional non-catalytic subunits. The enzyme shows reduced binding affinities for both substrates and inhibitors. Interestingly, this structural organization is conserved in all trypanosomatids. Since the properties of complex II differ across a wide range of parasites, this complex is a potential target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In this regard, structural information on the target enzyme is essential for the molecular design of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23333273

  10. Pharmacology of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J D; Francis, S H

    2002-01-01

    The clinical properties (efficacy and safety profile) of a medicine are related not only to its mode of action, but also to its selectivity for its target (usually a receptor or enzyme) and are also influenced by its pharmacokinetic properties (absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination). The growing number of phosphodiesterase inhibitors that are selective for phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) represent a promising new class of compounds that are useful for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and perhaps other disorders. Some of the basic pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters that describe drug action are discussed with regard to the new PDE5 inhibitors. Central topics reviewed are the concentration that produces a given in vitro response, or potency (IC50), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (Tmax), half-life (t 1/2), area under the curve (AUC), bioavailability, onset and duration of action, and the balance to achieve optimum safety and efficacy. To illustrate these concepts, a group of inhibitors with varying selectivities and potencies for PDE5 (theophylline, IBMX, zaprinast, sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil) are discussed. Each drug has its own set of unique pharmacological characteristics based on its specific molecular structure, enzyme inhibition profile and pharmacokinetic properties. Each PDE5 inhibitor has a distinct selectivity that contributes to its safety profile. As with all new drugs, and especially those in a new class, careful evaluation will be necessary to ensure the optimal use of the PDE5 inhibitors. PMID:12166544

  11. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  12. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  13. Computational Approaches for the Discovery of Human Proteasome Inhibitors: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Romina A; Serra, Patrícia; Salvador, Jorge A R; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome emerged as an important target in recent pharmacological research due to its pivotal role in degrading proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of eukaryotic cells, regulating a wide variety of cellular pathways, including cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, transcription, immune response, and signaling processes. The last two decades witnessed intensive efforts to discover 20S proteasome inhibitors with significant chemical diversity and efficacy. To date, the US FDA approved to market three proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib, carfilzomib, and ixazomib. However new, safer and more efficient drugs are still required. Computer-aided drug discovery has long being used in drug discovery campaigns targeting the human proteasome. The aim of this review is to illustrate selected in silico methods like homology modeling, molecular docking, pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and combined methods that have been used in proteasome inhibitors discovery. Applications of these methods to proteasome inhibitors discovery will also be presented and discussed to raise improvements in this particular field. PMID:27438821

  14. Progress of computer-aided drug design (CADD) of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lei, Meng; Liu, Yunde; Zhu, Yongqiang; Liu, Zhenming

    2011-12-01

    The target proteasome has been the focus of drug discovery since the first drug bortezomib was launched in 2003. Many structurally diverse proteasome inhibitors were discovered and even some of them entered the clinical trials. Due to rapid technological progress in chemistry, bioinformatics, structural biology and computer technology, computer-aided drug design (CADD) plays a more and more important role in today's drug discovery. Many CADD technologies were employed in designing various inhibitors of proteasome in the past years. This review gives a global description of the development of computer-aided proteasome inhibitor design by using different commercial or academic software. The binding modes of some structurally novel inhibitors with proteasome were visualized with these new technologies. PMID:21824106

  15. Discovery of a Chemical Tool Inhibitor Targeting the Bromodomains of TRIM24 and BRPF

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    TRIM24 is a transcriptional regulator as well as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. It is overexpressed in diverse tumors, and high expression levels have been linked to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. TRIM24 contains a PHD/bromodomain offering the opportunity to develop protein interaction inhibitors that target this protein interaction module. Here we identified potent acetyl-lysine mimetic benzimidazolones TRIM24 bromodomain inhibitors. The best compound of this series is a selective BRPF1B/TRIM24 dual inhibitor that bound with a KD of 137 and 222 nM, respectively, but exerted good selectivity over other bromodomains. Cellular activity of the inhibitor was demonstrated using FRAP assays as well as cell viability data. PMID:25974391

  16. Discovery of a Chemical Tool Inhibitor Targeting the Bromodomains of TRIM24 and BRPF.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James; Fedorov, Oleg; Tallant, Cynthia; Monteiro, Octovia; Meier, Julia; Gamble, Vicky; Savitsky, Pavel; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela A; Haendler, Bernard; Rogers, Catherine; Brennan, Paul E; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-02-25

    TRIM24 is a transcriptional regulator as well as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. It is overexpressed in diverse tumors, and high expression levels have been linked to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. TRIM24 contains a PHD/bromodomain offering the opportunity to develop protein interaction inhibitors that target this protein interaction module. Here we identified potent acetyl-lysine mimetic benzimidazolones TRIM24 bromodomain inhibitors. The best compound of this series is a selective BRPF1B/TRIM24 dual inhibitor that bound with a KD of 137 and 222 nM, respectively, but exerted good selectivity over other bromodomains. Cellular activity of the inhibitor was demonstrated using FRAP assays as well as cell viability data. PMID:25974391

  17. Diversity Networking Reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    Join us at the APS Diversity Reception to relax, network with colleagues, and learn about programs and initiatives for women, underrepresented minorities, and LGBT physicists. You'll have a great time meeting friends in a supportive environment and making connections.

  18. Education and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.; Cookson, Peter; Gay, Geneva; Hawley, Willis D.; Irvine, Jacqueline Jordan; Nieto, Sonia; Schofield, Janet Ward; Stephan, Walter G.

    2005-01-01

    What do we know about education and diversity, and how do we know it? This two-part question guided the work of the Multicultural Education Consensus Panel, which included the eight scholars named above. The panel's work was sponsored by the Center for Multicultural Education at the University of Washington and the Common Destiny Alliance at the…

  19. This Trend Called Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balderrama, Sandra Rios

    2000-01-01

    The work of diversity in libraries begins at the crossroad where superiority, inaction, and denial become intolerable. The paradoxes involved present questions that serve as teachable moments or paralyzing hurdles. Once at the crossroads, however, there are systematic strategies and operating principles for bringing significance, meaning, and…

  20. Workplace Diversity Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on workplace diversity issues. "Expanding Theories of Career Development: Adding the Voices of African American Women in the White Academy" (Mary V. Alfred) questions the validity of existing career development models for women and minority groups and examines the professional development of five…

  1. Campus Diversity Climate Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindes, Victoria

    In order to be responsive to the changing demographics of the emerging community college student population, and in an attempt to answer the Chancellor's Office's call to discover how community colleges serve the diverse needs of students, Shasta College, California, collaborated with Feather River College, California, to conduct a study that…

  2. Supply and Demand Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuszka, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Public universities in Virginia, as in many states, have generally not paid much attention to diversity among their suppliers. For years, state expenditures for outside contracts went to the usual suspects--White contractors from well-established companies. Four years ago, former Governor Mark Warner, a progressive Democrat from the high…

  3. Separation, Separatism and Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasegawa, Maya

    1991-01-01

    In the United States, once legal integration was achieved and the White male culture was challenged for real power, minority groups began to question the wisdom of cultural and social integration and celebrate diversity. An acceptable line between healthy separation and unhealthy separatism must be found. (MSE)

  4. The Quest for Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susan J.

    1996-01-01

    The current promotion of diversity encourages people from assorted backgrounds and mutual goals to find compatible but not necessarily identical ways to work together. Each literacy program will have a different need to expand its circle. It must consider all the characteristics that might widen its constituency, analyze all participants, and be…

  5. Diversity and International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Madeline, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on diversity and international issues in technology and teacher education: (1) "'At-Risk' Learners and the 'Digital Divide': Exploring the Equity in Access Issue" (Jeanne M. Foster and Sharla L. Snider); (2) "Integrating Standards-Based Instructional Technology" (Nicole M. Snow); (3) "Technology and the…

  6. Affirming Diversity at Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Ann D.

    2003-01-01

    In its much-anticipated review of affirmative action, the Supreme Court upheld the educational importance of diversity. Amid great controversy, confusion, and debate, the U.S. Supreme Court this June issued its much-anticipated decisions in two University of Michigan cases addressing affirmative action in higher education admissions. The Court was…

  7. Managing a Diverse Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziolkowski, Darlene M.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of managing diversity in student academic library employment. Provides suggestions for orientation, policy review and enforcement, supervisory and management training, task training, interviewing techniques, correct placement, job descriptions, performance reviews, and scheduling. Notes importance of communication,…

  8. Banking on Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Few organizations have as racially and culturally diverse a work force as the organizations that make up the World Bank Group. Of its 13,000 employees, nearly 60 percent of whom are located in downtown Washington, D.C., and the rest scattered across 160 offices around the globe, nearly every nation in the world is represented in the World Bank…

  9. Academies and School Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the implications of Academies for the diversity of schooling in England. It seeks to establish the extent to which Academies are distinctive compared to other types of state secondary schools and whether this has been affected by a number of recent reforms. Different types of Academies are also be examined. Previous work in…

  10. How Symbiosis Creates Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in habitats on Earth is astounding--whether on land or in the sea--and this is in part due to symbiosis. The lesson described in this article helps students understand how symbiosis affects different organisms through a fun and engaging game where they match hosts and symbionts based on their respective needs. This 45-minute lesson is…

  11. Institutionalizing Diversity Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Samuel A.; Van Natta, Carol

    1999-01-01

    Metropolitan universities are in the forefront of developing new administrative approaches to support and expand minority opportunities in higher education. Three design principles are at the heart of successful efforts to institutionalize diversity: strategic planning; the learning model; and integration across goals and functions. The experience…

  12. Accepting Tolerance and Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoss, Madeleine; Wylie, Roslyn

    Exploring diversity instills in children an awareness and respect for themselves and others. Research projects that address stereotyping, race relations, and prejudice within ourselves can be developed through collaboration between the librarian and classroom teacher (who may themselves be of different cultures). These research projects help…

  13. Marine Protistan Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, David A.; Countway, Peter D.; Jones, Adriane C.; Kim, Diane Y.; Schnetzer, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Protists have fascinated microbiologists since their discovery nearly 350 years ago. These single-celled, eukaryotic species span an incredible range of sizes, forms, and functions and, despite their generally diminutive size, constitute much of the genetic diversity within the domain Eukarya. Protists in marine ecosystems play fundamental ecological roles as primary producers, consumers, decomposers, and trophic links in aquatic food webs. Much of our knowledge regarding the diversity and ecological activities of these species has been obtained during the past half century, and only within the past few decades have hypotheses depicting the evolutionary relationships among the major clades of protists attained some degree of consensus. This recent progress is attributable to the development of genetic approaches, which have revealed an unexpectedly large diversity of protists, including cryptic species and previously undescribed clades of protists. New genetic tools now exist for identifying protistan species of interest and for reexamining long-standing debates regarding the biogeography of protists. Studies of protistan diversity provide insight regarding how species richness and community composition contribute to ecosystem function. These activities support the development of predictive models that describe how microbial communities will respond to natural or anthropogenically mediated changes in environmental conditions.

  14. Diversity and Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Anne

    1990-01-01

    Responds to five major articles by Duckworth, Goldman, Healy, Sampson, and Goodyear on issues pertaining to testing and assessment in counseling psychology. Suggests that such a diversity of approaches leads to a more comprehensive and flexible model of counseling, adaptable to differences in clients, context, and counselor personalities. (TE)

  15. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  16. Diversity as Asset.

    PubMed

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard; Nersessian, Nancy J

    2015-10-01

    We begin our commentary by summarizing the commonalities and differences in cognitive phenomena across cultures, as found by the seven papers of this topic. We then assess the commonalities and differences in how our various authors have approached the study of cognitive diversity, and speculate on the need for, and potential of, cross-disciplinary collaboration. PMID:26350021

  17. Diversity: A Corporate Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, Diana D.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author calls for a "campaign" because she believes there is a need to build upon the successes of diversity initiatives with renewed commitment, in much the same way as capital campaigns build upon past successes and refocus campuses on their work. Just as a capital campaign invests in financial stability by stimulating…

  18. "An Engine of Diversity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuszka, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This article features North Carolina's Research Triangle Park (RTP), which provides research and career opportunities for the region and creates a diverse work force. The convergence of higher education and research at the famed RTP has been all but idyllic for years. What happened there is a strong example of how regions can start their own…

  19. Making Diversity More Manageable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Clifford

    1994-01-01

    A framework using value orientations can make diversity training more manageable. Orientations shared by all include the following: (1) relationship to nature; (2) relationship to the supernatural; (3) relationship to other human beings; (4) time orientation; and (5) activity orientation. (JOW)

  20. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  2. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  3. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%. PMID:22561212

  4. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  5. Monoglyceride lipase: Structure and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scalvini, Laura; Piomelli, Daniele; Mor, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL), the main enzyme responsible for the hydrolytic deactivation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), is an intracellular serine hydrolase that plays critical roles in many physiological and pathological processes, such as pain, inflammation, neuroprotection and cancer. The crystal structures of MGL that are currently available provide valuable information about how this enzyme might function and interact with site-directed small-molecule inhibitors. On the other hand, its conformational equilibria and the contribution of regulatory cysteine residues present within the substrate-binding pocket or on protein surface remain open issues. Several classes of MGL inhibitors have been developed, from early reversible ones, such as URB602 and pristimerin, to carbamoylating agents that react with the catalytic serine, such as JZL184 and more recent O-hexafluoroisopropyl carbamates. Other inhibitors that modulate MGL activity by interacting with conserved regulatory cysteines act through mechanisms that deserve to be more thoroughly investigated. PMID:26216043

  6. STAT inhibitors for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins are a family of cytoplasmic transcription factors consisting of 7 members, STAT1 to STAT6, including STAT5a and STAT5b. STAT proteins are thought to be ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy since cancer cells are more dependent on the STAT activity than their normal counterparts. Inhibitors targeting STAT3 and STAT5 have been developed. These included peptidomimetics, small molecule inhibitors and oligonucleotides. This review summarized advances in preclinical and clinical development of these compounds. PMID:24308725

  7. SGLT2 inhibitors: new reports.

    PubMed

    2015-10-12

    A significant decrease in cardiovascular mortality has been reported with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin (Jardiance) to treat patients with type 2 diabetes who have established cardiovascular disease. The mechanism of this reduction is unclear, and these results may not apply to patients with type 2 diabetes and less advanced cardiovascular disease. Whether the increase in fractures reported with canagliflozin (Invokana) could also occur with empagliflozin remains to be established. All SGLT2 inhibitors are only modestly effective for treatment of diabetes. PMID:26445203

  8. Diazepam binding inhibitor is a potent cholecystokinin-releasing peptide in the intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, K H; Schön, I; Tatemoto, K; Ohe, Y; Li, Y; Fölsch, U R; Owyang, C

    1996-01-01

    Pancreatic proteases in the duodenum inhibit the release of cholecystokinin (CCK) and thus exert feedback control of pancreatic exocrine secretion. Exclusion of proteases from the duodenum either by the diversion of bile-pancreatic juice or by the addition of protease inhibitors stimulates exocrine pancreatic secretion. The mechanism by which pancreatic proteases in the duodenum regulate CCK secretion is unknown. In this study, we isolated a trypsin-sensitive peptide that is secreted intraduodenally, releases CCK, and stimulates pancreatic enzyme secretion in rats. This peptide was found to be identical to the porcine diazepam binding inhibitor by peptide sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis. Intraduodenal infusion of 200 ng of synthetic porcine diazepam binding inhibitor1-86 in rats significantly stimulated pancreatic amylase output. Infusion of the CCK antagonist MK-329 completely blocked the diazepam binding inhibitor-stimulated amylase secretion. Similarly, diazepam binding inhibitor33-52 [corrected] also stimulated CCK release and pancreatic secretion in a dose-dependent manner although it was 100 times less potent than the whole peptide. Using a perfusion system containing isolated mucosal cells from the proximal intestine of rats, porcine diazepam binding inhibitor 10(-12) M) dose dependently stimulated CCK secretion. In separate studies, it was demonstrated that luminal secretion of the diazepam binding inhibitor immunoreactivity (7.5 X 10(11) M) could be detected in rat's intestinal washing following the diversion of bile-pancreatic juice. The secretion of this peptide was inhibited by atropine. In conclusion, we have isolated and characterized a CCK-releasing peptide that has a sequence identical to the porcine diazepam binding inhibitor from pig intestinal mucosa and that stimulates CCK release when administered intraduodenally in rat. This peptide may mediate feedback regulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8755579

  9. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:17615669

  10. A Novel Allosteric Inhibitor of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengwei; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Cirillo, Pier; Ciustea, Mihai; Ledizet, Michel; Aristoff, Paul A.; Leng, Lin; Koski, Raymond A.; Powell, Thomas J.; Bucala, Richard; Anthony, Karen G.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a catalytic cytokine and an upstream mediator of the inflammatory pathway. MIF has broad regulatory properties, dysregulation of which has been implicated in the pathology of multiple immunological diseases. Inhibition of MIF activity with small molecules has proven beneficial in a number of disease models. Known small molecule MIF inhibitors typically bind in the tautomerase site of the MIF trimer, often covalently modifying the catalytic proline. Allosteric MIF inhibitors, particularly those that associate with the protein by noncovalent interactions, could reveal novel ways to block MIF activity for therapeutic benefit and serve as chemical probes to elucidate the structural basis for the diverse regulatory properties of MIF. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel allosteric MIF inhibitor. Identified from a high throughput screening effort, this sulfonated azo compound termed p425 strongly inhibited the ability of MIF to tautomerize 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate. Furthermore, p425 blocked the interaction of MIF with its receptor, CD74, and interfered with the pro-inflammatory activities of the cytokine. Structural studies revealed a unique mode of binding for p425, with a single molecule of the inhibitor occupying the interface of two MIF trimers. The inhibitor binds MIF mainly on the protein surface through hydrophobic interactions that are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with four highly specific residues from three different monomers. The mode of p425 binding reveals a unique way to block the activity of the cytokine for potential therapeutic benefit in MIF-associated diseases. PMID:22782901

  11. Differential effect of p7 inhibitors on hepatitis C virus cell-to-cell transmission☆

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, L.W.; Zitzmann, N.; McKeating, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors targeting the hepatitis C virus (HCV) encoded viroporin, p7 prevent virus release in vitro. HCV can transmit by cell-free particle infection of new target cells and via cell-to-cell dependent contact with limited exposure to the extracellular environment. The role of assembly inhibitors in preventing HCV transmission via these pathways has not been studied. We compared the efficacy of three published p7 inhibitors to inhibit cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission of two chimeric HCV strains encoding genotype 2 (GT2) or 5 (GT5) p7 using a recently developed single cycle co-culture assay. The inhibitors reduced the infectivity of extracellular GT2 and GT5 virus by 80–90% and GT2 virus cell-to-cell transmission by 50%. However, all of the p7 inhibitors had minimal effect on GT5 cell contact dependent transmission. Screening a wider panel of diverse viral genotypes demonstrated that p7 viroporin inhibitors were significantly more effective at blocking cell-free virus than cell-to-cell transmission. These results suggest an altered assembly or trafficking of cell-to-cell transmitted compared to secreted virus. These observations have important implications for the validation, therapeutic design and testing of HCV assembly inhibitors. PMID:24157306

  12. Toward a general predictive QSAR model for gamma-secretase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ajmani, Subhash; Janardhan, Sridhara; Viswanadhan, Vellarkad N

    2013-08-01

    Gamma secretase (GS) is an appealing drug target for Alzheimer disease and cancer because of its central role in the processing of amyloid precursor protein and the notch family of proteins. In the absence of three-dimensional structure of GS, there is an urgent need for new methods for the prediction and screening of GS inhibitors, for facilitating discovery of novel GS inhibitors. The present study reports QSAR studies on diverse chemical classes comprising 233 compounds collected from the ChEMBL database. Herein, continuous [PLS regression and neural-network (NN)] and categorical QSAR models (NN and linear discriminant analysis) were developed to obtain pertinent descriptors responsible for variation of GS inhibitor potency. Also, SAR within various chemical classes of compounds is analyzed with respect to important QSAR descriptors, which revealed the significance of electronegative substitutions on aryl rings (PEOE3) in determining variation of GS inhibitor potency. Furthermore, substitution of acyclic amines with N-substituted cyclic amines appears to be favorable for enhancing GS inhibitor potency by increasing the values of sssN_Cnt and number of aliphatic rings. The models developed are statistically significant and improve our understanding of compounds contributing toward GS inhibitor potency and aid in the rational design of novel potent GS inhibitors. PMID:23612850

  13. Structural diversity of the epigenetics pocketome.

    PubMed

    Cabaye, Alexandre; Nguyen, Kong T; Liu, Lihua; Pande, Vineet; Schapira, Matthieu

    2015-07-01

    Protein families involved in chromatin-templated events are emerging as novel target classes in oncology and other disease areas. The ability to discover selective inhibitors against chromatin factors depends on the presence of structural features that are unique to the targeted sites. To evaluate challenges and opportunities toward the development of selective inhibitors, we calculated all pair wise structural distances between 575 structures from the protein databank representing 163 unique binding pockets found in protein domains that write, read or erase post-translational modifications on histones, DNA, and RNA. We find that the structural similarity of binding sites does not always follow the sequence similarity of protein domains. Our analysis reveals increased risks of activity across target-class for compounds competing with the cofactor of protein arginine methyltransferases, lysine acetyltransferases, and sirtuins, while exploiting the conformational plasticity of a protein target is a path toward selective inhibition. The structural diversity landscape of the epigenetics pocketome can be explored via an open-access graphic user interface at thesgc.org/epigenetics_pocketome. PMID:25974248

  14. Diversity within the Profession. Part Two: Initiatives Promoting Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Marlee M.; Sharma, Neepun; Nygaard, Vicki L.; Kahlou, Christina

    2002-01-01

    Examines the literature on minority experiences in optometry and other health professions, describing programs geared either toward increasing diversity or facilitating acceptance of diversity within the optometric profession, including affirmative action and other institutional support structures. (EV)

  15. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  16. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  17. Less-toxic corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Combinations of borates, nitrates, phosphates, silicates, and sodium MBT protect aluminum from corrosion in fresh water. Most effective combinations contained sodium phosphate and were alkaline. These inhibitors replace toxic chromates which are subject to governmental restrictions, but must be used in larger quantities. Experimental exposure times varied from 1 to 14 months depending upon nature of submersion solution.

  18. Evolutionary origin of inhibitor cystine knot peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Darbon, Herve; Dyason, Karin; Verdonck, Fons; Tytgat, Jan

    2003-09-01

    The inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) fold is an evolutionarily conserved structural motif shared by a large group of polypeptides with diverse sequences and bioactivities. Although found in different phyla (animal, plant, and fungus), ICK peptides appear to be most prominent in venoms of cone snail and spider. Recently, two scorpion toxins activating a calcium release channel have been found to adopt an ICK fold. We have isolated and identified both cDNA and genomic clones for this family of ICK peptides from the scorpion Opistophthalmus carinatus. The gene characterized by three well-delineated exons respectively coding for three structural and functional domains in the toxin precursors illustrates the correlation between exon and module as suggested by the "exon theory of genes." Based on the analysis of precursor organization and gene structure combined with the 3-D fold and functional data, our results highlight a common evolutionary origin for ICK peptides from animals. In contrast, ICK peptides from plant and fungus might be independently evolved from another ancestor. PMID:12958203

  19. Supernovae and Their Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter M.

    2013-06-01

    The number of supernovae discovered annually has exploded and this has led to a growing diversity in observed supernova luminosities and properties. Stripped core-collapse supernovae show a range of expansion velocities with the broad-line events associated to gamma-ray bursts. Several types of extremely luminous supernovae have been identified in the past five years. Some may result from a pair-production instability in very massive stars while others appear to come from less massive progenitors and have an uncertain power source. Thermonuclear (type Ia) events are often thought of as uniform in their properties and that is what makes them good distance indicators. But type Ia supernovae are diverse in subtle and not so subtle ways that may reveal the nature of their explosion mechanism and progenitors. Wider, deeper time-domain sky surveys such as DES and LSST are likely to find even more variety in stellar explosions.

  20. Imposing genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The idea that a world in which everyone was born "perfect" would be a world in which something valuable was missing often comes up in debates about the ethics of technologies of prenatal testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This thought plays an important role in the "disability critique" of prenatal testing. However, the idea that human genetic variation is an important good with significant benefits for society at large is also embraced by a wide range of figures writing in the bioethics literature, including some who are notoriously hostile to the idea that we should not select against disability. By developing a number of thought experiments wherein we are to contemplate increasing genetic diversity from a lower baseline in order to secure this value, I argue that this powerful intuition is more problematic than is generally recognized, especially where the price of diversity is the well-being of particular individuals. PMID:26030484

  1. DEVELOPMENTAL DIVERSITY OF AMPHIBIANS

    PubMed Central

    Elinson, Richard P.; del Pino, Eugenia M.

    2011-01-01

    The current model amphibian, Xenopus laevis, develops rapidly in water to a tadpole which metamorphoses into a frog. Many amphibians deviate from the X. laevis developmental pattern. Among other adaptations, their embryos develop in foam nests on land or in pouches on their mother’s back or on a leaf guarded by a parent. The diversity of developmental patterns includes multinucleated oogenesis, lack of RNA localization, huge non-pigmented eggs, and asynchronous, irregular early cleavages. Variations in patterns of gastrulation highlight the modularity of this critical developmental period. Many species have eliminated the larva or tadpole and directly develop to the adult. The wealth of developmental diversity among amphibians coupled with the wealth of mechanistic information from X. laevis permit comparisons that provide deeper insights into developmental processes. PMID:22662314

  2. NSF announces diversity programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruesi, Liz

    2016-04-01

    The US National Science Foundation (NSF) has initiated a new funding programme that will create schemes to increase diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The initiative – Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (INCLUDES) – aims to increase the participation of women, those with a low socioeconomic status, people with disabilities and those from minority racial backgrounds.

  3. Education & Diversity Reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-03-01

    Join us to relax, unwind, and recognize new fellows and award winners at the Education & Diversity Reception sponsored by the Forum on Education, the Committee on Minorities, and the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics. We will recognize new Forum on Education Fellows, recipients of the Committee on Education's Award for Improving Undergraduate Physics Education, as well as women and minority physicists who have received APS prizes, awards, and fellowships. Light refreshments will be served. All are welcome; no registration required.

  4. Strength through Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sacha B.; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable versatility of the mammalian brain is made possible by a huge diversity of cellular plasticity mechanisms. These include long-term potentiation and depression at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses, as well as a variety of intrinsic and homeostatic plasticity mechanisms. A fundamental challenge for the field is to assemble our detailed knowledge of these specific mechanisms into a coherent picture of how plasticity within cortical circuits works to tune network properties. PMID:18995822

  5. Sessions Focus on Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamec, Bethany Holm

    2013-01-01

    Education and outreach play a significant role in AGU's mission; one of our major strategic goals is developing and nurturing the next generation of Earth and space scientists. Particular emphasis is placed on exploring ways to strengthen the numbers and diversity of the Earth and space science workforce and helping to strengthen Earth and space science departments and undergraduate teaching at the college and university levels.

  6. Diversity: The Business Case?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding perceptions and managing expectations are learnable skills that do not necessarily come with project funding. Finding life balance as one moves through a STEM career path poses unique challenges that require a certain skill set that is not always intuitive. Some of those challenges include: selecting grad or post doc positions; balancing work and family commitments; and dealing with employer/advisor perceptions and expectations. As in nature, the STEM enterprise requires multiple perspectives to flourish (necessity of peer review), and in a changing environment (e.g., budget, generations, technology, etc.), embracing diversity in thought and application may help drive the evolution of STEM in the U.S. Many Agencies and organizations have ';workforce development' programs that focus on preparing the next generation of scientists and engineers at the graduate and undergraduate level that focus on preparing students in the diverse disciplines that are unique to those Agency and organizational missions. While financial support certainly is critical to assist students in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and other fields, professional development is just as important to equip students with a balanced arsenal of tactics to be successful professionals in the STEM workforce of today. Success in these efforts requires an honest look at the issue of inequality in the STEM ecosystem... meaning, what initiatives have been successful in addressing the imbalance in sources of thought and application, therefore promoting the importance of diversity.

  7. Activities for Exploring Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan K.

    1992-01-01

    Presents topics for parents to use when discussing cultural diversity with their children (basic needs, cultural attitudes, body language, the arts, and language). Activities for exploring cultural diversity are suggested, and a list of multicultural resources is included. (SM)

  8. Structure-based virtual screening of novel, high-affinity BRD4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Muvva, Charuvaka; Singam, E R Azhagiya; Raman, S Sundar; Subramanian, V

    2014-07-29

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are a diverse family of evolutionarily conserved protein-interaction modules. Among various members of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain family, BRD4 is found to be an important target for many diseases such as cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, multiple myeloma, Burkitt's lymphoma, etc. Therefore, in this study an attempt has been made to screen compounds from NCI Diversity, Drug Bank and Toslab Databases targeting the Kac binding site of BRD4 using molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, MM-PB/GBSA binding free energy calculations and steered molecular dynamics simulations. Using virtual screening and docking, we have identified 11 inhibitors. These new inhibitors exhibit binding energy values higher than that of the (+)JQ1 inhibitor which is effective against BRD4. However, due to the toxicity of (+)JQ1, the designing of new inhibitors becomes significantly important. Thus, these new 11 ligands were systematically analyzed using other computational investigations. Results reveal that the compounds ZINC01411240, ZINC19632618 and ZINC04818522 could be potential drug candidates for targeting BRD4. It can also be seen from the results that there is a linear relationship between the results obtained from the SMD simulation and free energy obtained from the MM-PBSA/GBSA approach. This study clearly illustrates that the steered molecular dynamics can be effectively used for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:24976024

  9. Religious Diversity in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, George J.; Smith, William Gause; Vickers, Dianne Koenig; Brown, Elsie

    This document contains four papers that address constitutional issues of religious diversity in the schools. The first paper, "Religious Diversity in the Schools--The Overview" (George J. Michel), provides an overview of religious diversity in American public schools, with a focus on the long history of cooperation with Christian churches. It…

  10. 2008-09 Diversity Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada System of Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Pursuant to Board of Regents' policy, the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) prepares a diversity report intended to provide an overview of the current status of enrollment and employment of members of diverse groups across the System. The information presented in this report follows the NSHE "2007-08 Diversity Report" that was presented to…

  11. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were those of…

  12. Genetic diversity in Gossypium genus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall objectives of this paper are to report on cotton germplasm resources, morphobiological and agronomic diversity of Gossypium genus and review efforts on molecular genetic diversity of cotton gene pools as well as on the challenges and perspectives of exploiting genetic diversity in cotton...

  13. Resisting HRD's Resistance to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierema, Laura L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically illustrate how human resource development (HRD) resists and omits issues of diversity in academic programs, textbooks, and research; analyze the research on HRD and diversity over a ten-year period; discuss HRD's resistance to diversity; and offer some recommendations for a more authentic…

  14. Resource availability controls fungal diversity across a plant diversity gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.; Blackwood, C.B.; Curtis, C.D.; Tilman, D.

    2006-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the ecological determinants of microbial diversity remain poorly understood. Here, we test two alternative hypotheses concerning the factors regulating fungal diversity in soil. The first states that higher levels of plant detritus production increase the supply of limiting resources (i.e. organic substrates) thereby increasing fungal diversity. Alternatively, greater plant diversity increases the range of organic substrates entering soil, thereby increasing the number of niches to be filled by a greater array of heterotrophic fungi. These two hypotheses were simultaneously examined in experimental plant communities consisting of one to 16 species that have been maintained for a decade. We used ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA), in combination with cloning and sequencing, to quantify fungal community composition and diversity within the experimental plant communities. We used soil microbial biomass as a temporally integrated measure of resource supply. Plant diversity was unrelated to fungal diversity, but fungal diversity was a unimodal function of resource supply. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that plant diversity showed a relationship to fungal community composition, although the occurrence of RISA bands and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) did not differ among the treatments. The relationship between fungal diversity and resource availability parallels similar relationships reported for grasslands, tropical forests, coral reefs, and other biotic communities, strongly suggesting that the same underlying mechanisms determine the diversity of organisms at multiple scales. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  15. Production diversity and dietary diversity in smallholder farm households

    PubMed Central

    Sibhatu, Kibrom T.; Krishna, Vijesh V.; Qaim, Matin

    2015-01-01

    Undernutrition and micronutrient malnutrition remain problems of significant magnitude in large parts of the developing world. Improved nutrition requires not only better access to food for poor population segments, but also higher dietary quality and diversity. Because many of the poor and undernourished people are smallholder farmers, diversifying production on these smallholder farms is widely perceived as a useful approach to improve dietary diversity. However, empirical evidence on the link between production and consumption diversity is scarce. Here, this issue is addressed with household-level data from Indonesia, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Malawi. Regression models show that on-farm production diversity is positively associated with dietary diversity in some situations, but not in all. When production diversity is already high, the association is not significant or even turns negative, because of foregone income benefits from specialization. Analysis of other factors reveals that market access has positive effects on dietary diversity, which are larger than those of increased production diversity. Market transactions also tend to reduce the role of farm diversity for household nutrition. These results suggest that increasing on-farm diversity is not always the most effective way to improve dietary diversity in smallholder households and should not be considered a goal in itself. Additional research is needed to better understand how agriculture and food systems can be made more nutrition-sensitive in particular situations. PMID:26261342

  16. Production diversity and dietary diversity in smallholder farm households.

    PubMed

    Sibhatu, Kibrom T; Krishna, Vijesh V; Qaim, Matin

    2015-08-25

    Undernutrition and micronutrient malnutrition remain problems of significant magnitude in large parts of the developing world. Improved nutrition requires not only better access to food for poor population segments, but also higher dietary quality and diversity. Because many of the poor and undernourished people are smallholder farmers, diversifying production on these smallholder farms is widely perceived as a useful approach to improve dietary diversity. However, empirical evidence on the link between production and consumption diversity is scarce. Here, this issue is addressed with household-level data from Indonesia, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Malawi. Regression models show that on-farm production diversity is positively associated with dietary diversity in some situations, but not in all. When production diversity is already high, the association is not significant or even turns negative, because of foregone income benefits from specialization. Analysis of other factors reveals that market access has positive effects on dietary diversity, which are larger than those of increased production diversity. Market transactions also tend to reduce the role of farm diversity for household nutrition. These results suggest that increasing on-farm diversity is not always the most effective way to improve dietary diversity in smallholder households and should not be considered a goal in itself. Additional research is needed to better understand how agriculture and food systems can be made more nutrition-sensitive in particular situations. PMID:26261342

  17. Discovery of Novel Inhibitors and Fluorescent Probe Targeting NAMPT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Xu, Tian-Ying; Liu, Xin-Zhu; Zhang, Sai-Long; Wang, Pei; Li, Zhi-Yong; Guan, Yun-Feng; Wang, Shu-Na; Dong, Guo-Qiang; Zhuo, Shu; Le, Ying-Ying; Sheng, Chun-Quan; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a promising antitumor target. Novel NAMPT inhibitors with diverse chemotypes are highly desirable for development of antitumor agents. Using high throughput screening system targeting NAMPT on a chemical library of 30000 small-molecules, we found a non-fluorescent compound F671-0003 and a fluorescent compound M049-0244 with excellent in vitro activity (IC50: 85 nM and 170 nM respectively) and anti-proliferative activity against HepG2 cells. These two compounds significantly depleted cellular NAD levels. Exogenous NMN rescued their anti-proliferative activity against HepG2 cells. Structure-activity relationship study proposed a binding mode for NAMPT inhibitor F671-0003 and highlighted the importance of hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and π-π interactions in inhibitor binding. Imaging study provided the evidence that fluorescent compound M049-0244 (3 μM) significantly stained living HepG2 cells. Cellular fluorescence was further verified to be NAMPT dependent by using RNA interference and NAMPT over expression transgenic mice. Our findings provide novel antitumor lead compounds and a “first-in-class” fluorescent probe for imaging NAMPT. PMID:26227784

  18. Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitors Promote Macrophage Anti-Infective Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Donato, Nicholas J.; Wobus, Christiane E.; O’Riordan, Mary X. D.

    2014-01-01

    The global spread of anti-microbial resistance requires urgent attention, and diverse alternative strategies have been suggested to address this public health concern. Host-directed immunomodulatory therapies represent one approach that could reduce selection for resistant bacterial strains. Recently, the small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor WP1130 was reported as a potential anti-infective drug against important human food-borne pathogens, notably Listeria monocytogenes and noroviruses. Utilization of WP1130 itself is limited due to poor solubility, but given the potential of this new compound, we initiated an iterative rational design approach to synthesize new derivatives with increased solubility that retained anti-infective activity. Here, we test a small library of novel synthetic molecules based on the structure of the parent compound, WP1130, for anti-infective activity in vitro. Our studies identify a promising candidate, compound 9, which reduced intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes at concentrations that caused minimal cellular toxicity. Compound 9 itself had no bactericidal activity and only modestly slowed Listeria growth rate in liquid broth culture, suggesting that this drug acts as an anti-infective compound by modulating host-cell function. Moreover, this new compound also showed anti-infective activity against murine norovirus (MNV-1) and human norovirus, using the Norwalk virus replicon system. This small molecule inhibitor may provide a chemical platform for further development of therapeutic deubiquitinase inhibitors with broad-spectrum anti-infective activity. PMID:25093325

  19. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of SETD8 with Cellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the sole protein lysine methyltransferase (PKMT) known to monomethylate lysine 20 of histone H4 in vivo. SETD8’s methyltransferase activity has been implicated in many essential cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. Developing SETD8 inhibitors with cellular activity is a key step toward elucidating the diverse roles of SETD8 via convenient pharmacological perturbation. From the hits of a prior high throughput screen (HTS), SPS8I1–3 (NSC663284, BVT948, and ryuvidine) were validated as potent SETD8 inhibitors. These compounds contain different structural motifs and inhibit SETD8 via distinct modes. More importantly, these compounds show cellular activity by suppressing the H4K20me1 mark of SETD8 and recapitulate characteristic S/G2/M-phase cell cycle defects as observed for RNAi-mediated SETD8 knockdown. The commonality of SPS8I1–3 against SETD8, together with their distinct structures and mechanisms for SETD8 inhibition, argues for the collective application of these compounds as SETD8 inhibitors. PMID:25137013

  20. Thermodynamics and kinetics of inhibitor binding to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Shahid; Ashok, Yashwanth; Nanekar, Rahul; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-12-15

    Many nucleoside transport inhibitors are in clinical use as anti-cancer, vasodilator and cardioprotective drugs. However, little is known about the binding energetics of these inhibitors to nucleoside transporters (NTs) due to their low endogenous expression levels and difficulties in the biophysical characterization of purified protein with ligands. Here, we present kinetics and thermodynamic analyses of inhibitor binding to the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1), also known as SLC29A1. Using a radioligand binding assay, we obtained equilibrium binding and kinetic rate constants of well-known NT inhibitors--[(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR), dilazep, and dipyridamole--and the native permeant, adenosine, to hENT1. We observed that the equilibrium binding affinities for all inhibitors decreased whereas, the kinetic rate constants increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, we found that binding is enthalpy driven and thus, an exothermic reaction, implying that the transporter does not discriminate between its inhibitors and substrates thermodynamically. This predominantly enthalpy-driven binding by four chemically distinct ligands suggests that the transporter may not tolerate diversity in the type of interactions that lead to high affinity binding. Consistent with this, the measured activation energy of [(3)H]NBMPR association was relatively large (20 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting a conformational change upon inhibitor binding. For all three inhibitors the enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) contributions to the reaction energetics were determined by van't Hoff analysis to be roughly similar (25-75% ΔG°). Gains in enthalpy with increasing polar surface area of inhibitors suggest that the binding is favored by electrostatic or polar interactions between the ligands and the transporter. PMID:26428002

  1. Structural Basis for Inhibition of Histamine N-Methyltransferase by Diverse Drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Horton,J.; Sawada, K.; Nishibori, M.; Cheng, X.

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, histamine action is terminated through metabolic inactivation by histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) and diamine oxidase. In addition to three well-studied pharmacological functions, smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, and stimulation of gastric acid secretion, histamine plays important roles in neurotransmission, immunomodulation, and regulation of cell proliferation. The histamine receptor H1 antagonist diphenhydramine, the antimalarial drug amodiaquine, the antifolate drug metoprine, and the anticholinesterase drug tacrine (an early drug for Alzheimer's disease) are surprisingly all potent HNMT inhibitors, having inhibition constants in the range of 10-100 nM. We have determined the structural mode of interaction of these four inhibitors with HNMT. Despite their structural diversity, they all occupy the histamine-binding site, thus blocking access to the enzyme's active site. Near the N terminus of HNMT, several aromatic residues (Phe9, Tyr15, and Phe19) adopt different rotamer conformations or become disordered in the enzyme-inhibitor complexes, accommodating the diverse, rigid hydrophobic groups of the inhibitors. The maximized shape complementarity between the protein aromatic side-chains and aromatic ring(s) of the inhibitors are responsible for the tight binding of these varied inhibitors.

  2. F8 gene mutation profile in Indian hemophilia A patients: Identification of 23 novel mutations and factor VIII inhibitor risk association.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2016-04-01

    'FVIII inhibitors', especially in severe hemophilia A (HA) patients, is a serious adverse effect that complicates their clinical management. Many genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been proposed for FVIII inhibitor development, diverse in different population groups. This is the first study in Indian hemophiliacs that analyzes inhibitor risk in relation to the complete F8 mutation profile, in a case-control study that included 145 Indian severe HA patients, i.e. 69 inhibitor positive (with 18 inhibitor concordant/discordant family members), and 58 inhibitor negative patients, after informed consent. While 53.54% (68/127) index cases were positive for intron 22 or intron 1 inversions, 55 causative F8 mutations were detected in the 59 inversion negative patients, of which 23 were novel mutations (in 24 patients) and 32 were reported earlier (in 35 patients). A higher incidence of mutations, in the C1 and C2 domains in inhibitor positive patients, and in the A1 domain in inhibitor negative patients was observed, though not significantly different. The study suggests that large F8 rearrangements (significantly higher in the inhibitor positive patients) pose the highest risk, while missense mutations (significantly higher in the inhibitor negative patients) pose the lowest risk of inhibitor development in Indian hemophilia A patients. PMID:26897466

  3. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  4. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  5. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  6. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  7. Quasicrystals: diversity and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Jean-Marie; Lifshitz, Ron

    2011-07-01

    Scientific presentations at ICQ11 - the 11th International Conference on Quasicrystals, which took place in Sapporo, Japan, in June 2010 - offered a variety of stimulating new experimental data and novel theoretical results. New aperiodic crystals were presented; new theoretical ideas were described; exciting experimental results were revealed; and potential applications of quasicrystals were reviewed, showing an unprecedented level of development. ICQ11 was a great success thanks to the high standard of its scientific content and to the efficiency of its organization. ICQ11 proved that quasicrystal research is sure to continue offering diverse challenges and profound insights into the complexity of matter.

  8. Cycles in fossil diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Robert A.; Muller, Richard A.

    2004-10-20

    It is well-known that the diversity of life appears to fluctuate during the course the Phanerozoic, the eon during which hard shells and skeletons left abundant fossils (0-542 Ma). Using Sepkoski's compendium of the first and last stratigraphic appearances of 36380 marine genera, we report a strong 62 {+-} 3 Myr cycle, which is particularly strong in the shorter-lived genera. The five great extinctions enumerated by Raup and Sepkoski may be an aspect of this cycle. Because of the high statistical significance, we also consider contributing environmental factors and possible causes.

  9. Diverse Rock Named Squash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image from the Sojourner rover's right front camera was taken on Sol 27. The Pathfinder lander is seen at middle left. The large rock at right, nicknamed 'Squash', exhibits a diversity of textures. It looks very similar to a conglomerate, a type of rock found on Earth that forms from sedimentary processes.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and managed the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  10. Institutionalising Campus Diversity in South African Higher Education: Review of Diversity Scholarship and Diversity Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly the social, educational, cultural, linguistic, religious and racial diversity of South African society is finding expression within South African institutions of higher education. Consequently, "diversity'', "diversity issues'' and "diversification'', have become part of the education debate and policy,and pose new challenges to South…

  11. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  12. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  13. Bromodomains and their pharmacological inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gallenkamp, Daniel; Gelato, Kathy A; Haendler, Bernard; Weinmann, Hilmar

    2014-03-01

    Over 60 bromodomains belonging to proteins with very different functions have been identified in humans. Several of them interact with acetylated lysine residues, leading to the recruitment and stabilization of protein complexes. The bromodomain and extra-terminal domain (BET) proteins contain tandem bromodomains which bind to acetylated histones and are thereby implicated in a number of DNA-centered processes, including the regulation of gene expression. The recent identification of inhibitors of BET and non-BET bromodomains is one of the few examples in which effective blockade of a protein-protein interaction can be achieved with a small molecule. This has led to major strides in the understanding of the function of bromodomain-containing proteins and their involvement in diseases such as cancer and inflammation. Indeed, BET bromodomain inhibitors are now being clinically evaluated for the treatment of hematological tumors and have also been tested in clinical trials for the relatively rare BRD-NUT midline carcinoma. This review gives an overview of the newest developments in the field, with a focus on the biology of selected bromodomain proteins on the one hand, and on reported pharmacological inhibitors on the other, including recent examples from the patent literature. PMID:24497428

  14. The burden of inhibitors in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Auerswald, Guenter; Grancha, Salvador

    2016-08-31

    The burden of disease in haemophilia patients has wide ranging implications for the family and to society. There is evidence that having a current inhibitor increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Morbidity is increased by the inability to treat adequately and its consequent disabilities, which then equates to a poor quality of life compared with non-inhibitor patients. The societal cost of care, or `burden of inhibitors', increases with the ongoing presence of an inhibitor. Therefore, it is clear that successful eradication of inhibitors by immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the single most important milestone one can achieve in an inhibitor patient. The type of factor VIII (FVIII) product used in ITI regimens varies worldwide. Despite ongoing debate, there is in vitro and retrospective clinical evidence to support the use of plasma-derived VWF-containing FVIII concentrates in ITI regimens in order to achieve early and high inhibitor eradication success rates. PMID:27528280

  15. Identification of novel EZH2 inhibitors through pharmacophore-based virtual screening and biological assays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunlong; Hu, Junchi; Ding, Hong; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Rongfeng; Xu, Pan; Du, Daohai; Lu, Wenchao; Liu, Jingqiu; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yu-Chih; Lu, Junyan; Zhang, Jin; Yao, Zhiyi; Luo, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) acts as a primary writer for di- and tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. This protein plays an essential role in silencing gene expression. Enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2), the catalytic subunit of PRC2, is considered as a promising therapeutic target for cancer. GSK126, a specific inhibitor of EZH2, is undergoing phase I trials for hypermethylation-related cancers. In addition, many derivatives of GSK126 are also commonly used in laboratory investigations. However, studies on the mechanism and drug development of EZH2 are limited by the absence of structural diversity of these inhibitors because they share similar SAM-like scaffolds. In this study, we generated a pharmacophore model based on reported EZH2 inhibitors and performed in silico screenings. Experimental validations led to the identification of two novel EZH2 inhibitors, DCE_42 and DCE_254, with IC50 values of 23 and 11μM, respectively. They also displayed significant anti-proliferation activity against lymphoma cell lines. Thus, we discovered potent EZH2 inhibitors with novel scaffold using combined in silico screening and experimental study. Results from this study can also guide further development of novel specific EZH2 inhibitors. PMID:27289323

  16. Discovery and Characterization of a Biologically Active Non-ATP-Competitive p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Brice A P; Alam, Muhammad S; Guszczynski, Tad; Jakob, Michal; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Mitchell, Carter A; Goncharova, Ekaterina I; Evans, Jason R; Wipf, Peter; Liu, Gang; Ashwell, Jonathan D; O'Keefe, Barry R

    2016-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 is part of a broad and ubiquitously expressed family of MAPKs whose activity is responsible for mediating an intracellular response to extracellular stimuli through a phosphorylation cascade. p38 is central to this signaling node and is activated by upstream kinases while being responsible for activating downstream kinases and transcription factors via phosphorylation. Dysregulated p38 activity is associated with numerous autoimmune disorders and has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancer. A number of p38 inhibitors have been tested in clinical trials, with none receiving regulatory approval. One characteristic shared by all of the compounds that failed clinical trials is that they are all adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive p38 inhibitors. Seeing this lack of mechanistic diversity as an opportunity, we screened ~32,000 substances in search of novel p38 inhibitors. Among the inhibitors discovered is a compound that is both non-ATP competitive and biologically active in cell-based models for p38 activity. This is the first reported discovery of a non-ATP-competitive p38 inhibitor that is active in cells and, as such, may enable new pharmacophore designs for both therapeutic and basic research to better understand and exploit non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of p38 activity. PMID:26538432

  17. Characterization of monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 inhibitors by a novel probe in binding assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhengping; Chao, Hannguang J; Turdi, Huji; Hangeland, Jon J; Friends, Todd; Kopcho, Lisa M; Lawrence, R Michael; Cheng, Dong

    2016-05-15

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (MGAT2) is a membrane-bound lipid acyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of diacylglycerol using monoacylglycerol and fatty acyl CoA as substrates. MGAT2 is important for intestinal lipid absorption and is an emerging target for the treatment of metabolic diseases. In the current study, we identified and characterized four classes of novel MGAT2 inhibitors. We established both steady state and kinetic binding assay protocols using a novel radioligand, [(3)H]compound A. Diverse chemotypes of MGAT2 inhibitors were found to compete binding of [(3)H]compound A to MGAT2, indicating the broad utility of [(3)H]compound A for testing various classes of MGAT2 inhibitors. In the dynamic binding assays, the kinetic values of MGAT2 inhibitors such as Kon, Koff, and T1/2 were systematically defined. Of particular value, the residence times of inhibitors on MGAT2 enzyme were derived. We believe that the identification of novel classes of MGAT2 inhibitors and the detailed kinetic characterization provide valuable information for the identification of superior candidates for in vivo animal and clinical studies. The current work using a chemical probe to define inhibitory kinetics can be broadly applied to other membrane-bound acyltransferases. PMID:26925857

  18. Differential Responses of Wheat Inhibitor-Like Genes to Hessian Fly (Mayetiola destructor) Attacks during Compatible and Incompatible Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four groups of inhibitor-like genes encoding proteins with diverse structures were identified from wheat. The majority of these genes were up-regulated by avirulent Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) larvae during incompatible interactions, and were down-regulated by virulent larvae during compatib...

  19. Human phylogeography and diversity.

    PubMed

    Harcourt, Alexander H

    2016-07-19

    Homo sapiens phylogeography begins with the species' origin nearly 200 kya in Africa. First signs of the species outside Africa (in Arabia) are from 125 kya. Earliest dates elsewhere are now 100 kya in China, 45 kya in Australia and southern Europe (maybe even 60 kya in Australia), 32 kya in northeast Siberia, and maybe 20 kya in the Americas. Humans reached arctic regions and oceanic islands last-arctic North America about 5 kya, mid- and eastern Pacific islands about 2-1 kya, and New Zealand about 700 y ago. Initial routes along coasts seem the most likely given abundant and easily harvested shellfish there as indicated by huge ancient oyster shell middens on all continents. Nevertheless, the effect of geographic barriers-mountains and oceans-is clear. The phylogeographic pattern of diasporas from several single origins-northeast Africa to Eurasia, southeast Eurasia to Australia, and northeast Siberia to the Americas-allows the equivalent of a repeat experiment on the relation between geography and phylogenetic and cultural diversity. On all continents, cultural diversity is high in productive low latitudes, presumably because such regions can support populations of sustainable size in a small area, therefore allowing a high density of cultures. Of course, other factors operate. South America has an unusually low density of cultures in its tropical latitudes. A likely factor is the phylogeographic movement of peoples from the Old World bringing novel and hence, lethal diseases to the New World, a foretaste, perhaps, of present day global transport of tropical diseases. PMID:27432967

  20. Human phylogeography and diversity

    PubMed Central

    Harcourt, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    Homo sapiens phylogeography begins with the species’ origin nearly 200 kya in Africa. First signs of the species outside Africa (in Arabia) are from 125 kya. Earliest dates elsewhere are now 100 kya in China, 45 kya in Australia and southern Europe (maybe even 60 kya in Australia), 32 kya in northeast Siberia, and maybe 20 kya in the Americas. Humans reached arctic regions and oceanic islands last—arctic North America about 5 kya, mid- and eastern Pacific islands about 2–1 kya, and New Zealand about 700 y ago. Initial routes along coasts seem the most likely given abundant and easily harvested shellfish there as indicated by huge ancient oyster shell middens on all continents. Nevertheless, the effect of geographic barriers—mountains and oceans—is clear. The phylogeographic pattern of diasporas from several single origins—northeast Africa to Eurasia, southeast Eurasia to Australia, and northeast Siberia to the Americas—allows the equivalent of a repeat experiment on the relation between geography and phylogenetic and cultural diversity. On all continents, cultural diversity is high in productive low latitudes, presumably because such regions can support populations of sustainable size in a small area, therefore allowing a high density of cultures. Of course, other factors operate. South America has an unusually low density of cultures in its tropical latitudes. A likely factor is the phylogeographic movement of peoples from the Old World bringing novel and hence, lethal diseases to the New World, a foretaste, perhaps, of present day global transport of tropical diseases. PMID:27432967

  1. Xylanase inhibitors bind to nonstarch polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Fierens, Ellen; Gebruers, Kurt; Courtin, Christophe M; Delcour, Jan A

    2008-01-23

    This study is an in-depth investigation of the interaction between polysaccharides and the proteinaceous xylanase inhibitors, Triticum aestivum xylanase inhibitor (TAXI), xylanase inhibitor protein (XIP), and thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TLXI). The binding affinities of all three known types of xylanase inhibitors from wheat are studied by measuring the residual xylanase inhibition activity after incubation of the inhibitors in the presence of different polysaccharides, such as beta-glucans and (arabino)xylans. The binding affinities of all three xylanase inhibitors for (arabino)xylans increased with a decreasing arabinose/xylose ratio (A/X ratio). This phenomenon was observed both with water-extractable and water-unextractable (arabino)xylans. The inhibitors also interacted with different soluble and insoluble beta-glucans. None of the inhibitors tested had the ability to hydrolyze the polysaccharides investigated. The present findings contribute to the unraveling of the function of xylanase inhibitors in nature and to the prediction of the effect of added xylanases in cereal-based biotechnological processes, such as bread making and gluten-starch separation. PMID:18092758

  2. Proton pump inhibitors affect the gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Imhann, Floris; Bonder, Marc Jan; Vich Vila, Arnau; Fu, Jingyuan; Mujagic, Zlatan; Vork, Lisa; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Cenit, Maria Carmen; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Dijkstra, Gerard; Franke, Lude; Xavier, Ramnik J; Jonkers, Daisy; Wijmenga, Cisca; Weersma, Rinse K; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the top 10 most widely used drugs in the world. PPI use has been associated with an increased risk of enteric infections, most notably Clostridium difficile. The gut microbiome plays an important role in enteric infections, by resisting or promoting colonisation by pathogens. In this study, we investigated the influence of PPI use on the gut microbiome. Methods The gut microbiome composition of 1815 individuals, spanning three cohorts, was assessed by tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The difference in microbiota composition in PPI users versus non-users was analysed separately in each cohort, followed by a meta-analysis. Results 211 of the participants were using PPIs at the moment of stool sampling. PPI use is associated with a significant decrease in Shannon's diversity and with changes in 20% of the bacterial taxa (false discovery rate <0.05). Multiple oral bacteria were over-represented in the faecal microbiome of PPI-users, including the genus Rothia (p=9.8×10−38). In PPI users we observed a significant increase in bacteria: genera Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus and the potentially pathogenic species Escherichia coli. Conclusions The differences between PPI users and non-users observed in this study are consistently associated with changes towards a less healthy gut microbiome. These differences are in line with known changes that predispose to C. difficile infections and can potentially explain the increased risk of enteric infections in PPI users. On a population level, the effects of PPI are more prominent than the effects of antibiotics or other commonly used drugs. PMID:26657899

  3. Pharmacological Modulation of Cytotoxicity and Cellular Uptake of Anti-cancer Drugs by PDE5 Inhibitors in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, QING; SHU, YAN

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research has led to the recognition of a cGMP signaling pathway governing drug transport. This study is to investigate whether inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), which increase intracellular cGMP levels, modulate the cytotoxicity and uptake of anti-cancer drugs in cancer cells. Methods The experiments were conducted with and without PDE5 inhibitors: dipyridamole, vardenafil, and/or sildenafil. The cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, cisplatin and oxaliplatin was determined in multiple cancer cell lines derived from different tissues. The cellular uptake of structurally diverse compounds was further examined in lung cancer cells with and without various endocytotic inhibitors. The tumor accumulation and the anti-tumor effect of trastuzumab were examined in a lung cancer xenograft mouse model. Results Dipyridamole could modulate the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin in cancer cells. Particularly, PDE5 inhibitors increased cellular uptake of structurally diverse compounds into lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of vardenafil on drug uptake could be blocked by endocytotic inhibitors. The growth of lung cancer xenograft in nude mice was significantly suppressed by addition of vardenafil to trastuzumab treatment. Conclusion PDE5 inhibitors may increase the efficacy of anti-cancer drugs by increasing endocytosis-mediated cellular drug uptake, and thus serve as adjuvant therapy for certain cancers such as lung cancer. PMID:23884568

  4. Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions for Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this research are to explore how currently assessed diversity knowledge, diversity skills, and diversity dispositions of pre-service teachers (PST) relate to each other and further to surmise if the presence of diversity knowledge, diversity skills, and diversity dispositions manifests in cultural efficacy and a general cultural…

  5. A Combination of Receptor-Based Pharmacophore Modeling & QM Techniques for Identification of Human Chymase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Arooj, Mahreen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Kim, Songmi; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Lee, Keun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of chymase is likely to divulge therapeutic ways for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, and fibrotic disorders. To find novel and potent chymase inhibitors and to provide a new idea for drug design, we used both ligand-based and structure-based methods to perform the virtual screening(VS) of commercially available databases. Different pharmacophore models generated from various crystal structures of enzyme may depict diverse inhibitor binding modes. Therefore, multiple pharmacophore-based approach is applied in this study. X-ray crystallographic data of chymase in complex with different inhibitors were used to generate four structure–based pharmacophore models. One ligand–based pharmacophore model was also developed from experimentally known inhibitors. After successful validation, all pharmacophore models were employed in database screening to retrieve hits with novel chemical scaffolds. Drug-like hit compounds were subjected to molecular docking using GOLD and AutoDock. Finally four structurally diverse compounds with high GOLD score and binding affinity for several crystal structures of chymase were selected as final hits. Identification of final hits by three different pharmacophore models necessitates the use of multiple pharmacophore-based approach in VS process. Quantum mechanical calculation is also conducted for analysis of electrostatic characteristics of compounds which illustrates their significant role in driving the inhibitor to adopt a suitable bioactive conformation oriented in the active site of enzyme. In general, this study is used as example to illustrate how multiple pharmacophore approach can be useful in identifying structurally diverse hits which may bind to all possible bioactive conformations available in the active site of enzyme. The strategy used in the current study could be appropriate to design drugs for other enzymes as well. PMID:23658661

  6. Biomarkers associated with checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Manson, G; Norwood, J; Marabelle, A; Kohrt, H; Houot, R

    2016-07-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors (CPI), namely anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1/PD-L1 antibodies, demonstrated efficacy across multiple types of cancer. However, only subgroups of patients respond to these therapies. Additionally, CPI can induce severe immune-related adverse events (irAE). Biomarkers that predict efficacy and toxicity may help define the patients who may benefit the most from these costly and potentially toxic therapies. In this study, we review the main biomarkers that have been associated with the efficacy (pharmacodynamics and clinical benefit) and the toxicity (irAE) of CPIs in patients. PMID:27122549

  7. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  8. Benzoxazolone Carboxamides as Potent Acid Ceramidase Inhibitors: Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Studies.

    PubMed

    Bach, Anders; Pizzirani, Daniela; Realini, Natalia; Vozella, Valentina; Russo, Debora; Penna, Ilaria; Melzig, Laurin; Scarpelli, Rita; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-12-10

    Ceramides are lipid-derived intracellular messengers involved in the control of senescence, inflammation, and apoptosis. The cysteine amidase, acid ceramidase (AC), hydrolyzes these substances into sphingosine and fatty acid and, by doing so, regulates their signaling activity. AC inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of pathological conditions, such as cancer, in which ceramide levels are abnormally reduced. Here, we present a systematic SAR investigation of the benzoxazolone carboxamides, a recently described class of AC inhibitors that display high potency and systemic activity in mice. We examined a diverse series of substitutions on both benzoxazolone ring and carboxamide side chain. Several modifications enhanced potency and stability, and one key compound with a balanced activity-stability profile (14) was found to inhibit AC activity in mouse lungs and cerebral cortex after systemic administration. The results expand our arsenal of AC inhibitors, thereby facilitating the use of these compounds as pharmacological tools and their potential development as drug leads. PMID:26560855

  9. Computer tools in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design (CADD) methodologies have made great advances and contributed significantly to the discovery and/or optimization of many clinically used drugs in recent years. CADD tools have likewise been applied to the discovery of inhibitors of HIV-I integrase, a difficult and worthwhile target for the development of efficient anti-HIV drugs. This article reviews the application of CADD tools, including pharmacophore search, quantitative structure–activity relationships, model building of integrase complexed with viral DNA and quantum-chemical studies in the discovery of HIV-I integrase inhibitors. Different structurally diverse integrase inhibitors have been identified by, or with significant help from, various CADD tools. PMID:21426160

  10. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Trypanosoma brucei Trypanothione Synthetase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Daniel; Torrie, Leah S; Thompson, Stephen; Harrison, Justin R; Frearson, Julie A; Read, Kevin D; Fairlamb, Alan H; Wyatt, Paul G; Gilbert, Ian H

    2012-01-01

    Trypanothione synthetase (TryS) is essential for the survival of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes human African trypanosomiasis. It is one of only a handful of chemically validated targets for T. brucei in vivo. To identify novel inhibitors of TbTryS we screened our in-house diverse compound library that contains 62 000 compounds. This resulted in the identification of six novel hit series of TbTryS inhibitors. Herein we describe the SAR exploration of these hit series, which gave rise to one common series with potency against the enzyme target. Cellular studies on these inhibitors confirmed on-target activity, and the compounds have proven to be very useful tools for further study of the trypanothione pathway in kinetoplastids. PMID:22162199

  11. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Identifies 8-Hydroxyquinolines as Cell-Active Histone Demethylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akane; Rose, Nathan R.; Ng, Stanley S.; Quinn, Amy M.; Rai, Ganesha; Mott, Bryan T.; Beswick, Paul; Klose, Robert J.; Oppermann, Udo; Jadhav, Ajit; Heightman, Tom D.; Maloney, David J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background Small molecule modulators of epigenetic processes are currently sought as basic probes for biochemical mechanisms, and as starting points for development of therapeutic agents. Nε-Methylation of lysine residues on histone tails is one of a number of post-translational modifications that together enable transcriptional regulation. Histone lysine demethylases antagonize the action of histone methyltransferases in a site- and methylation state-specific manner. Nε-Methyllysine demethylases that use 2-oxoglutarate as co-factor are associated with diverse human diseases, including cancer, inflammation and X-linked mental retardation; they are proposed as targets for the therapeutic modulation of transcription. There are few reports on the identification of templates that are amenable to development as potent inhibitors in vivo and large diverse collections have yet to be exploited for the discovery of demethylase inhibitors. Principal Findings High-throughput screening of a ∼236,000-member collection of diverse molecules arrayed as dilution series was used to identify inhibitors of the JMJD2 (KDM4) family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone demethylases. Initial screening hits were prioritized by a combination of cheminformatics, counterscreening using a coupled assay enzyme, and orthogonal confirmatory detection of inhibition by mass spectrometric assays. Follow-up studies were carried out on one of the series identified, 8-hydroxyquinolines, which were shown by crystallographic analyses to inhibit by binding to the active site Fe(II) and to modulate demethylation at the H3K9 locus in a cell-based assay. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that diverse compound screening can yield novel inhibitors of 2OG dependent histone demethylases and provide starting points for the development of potent and selective agents to interrogate epigenetic regulation. PMID:21124847

  12. Root exudate diversity regulates soil fungal community composition and diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant diversity is thought to influence diversity of the soil microbial community, though how this occurs is poorly understood. We report that under greenhouse conditions, two model plant species (Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula) show an inability to support the native soil fungal comm...

  13. Why Diversity for Diversity's Sake Won't Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delton, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Proponents of "diversity hiring" insist that faculty members of color have a different perspective on issues of race and ethnicity that will increase students' understanding of the multiracial, multicultural world they will inhabit in the 21st century. The mere presence of "diverse" faculty members will prepare students for workplace realities,…

  14. Diversity Management and Respect for Diversity at Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saylik, Ahmet; Polatcan, Mahmut; Saylik, Numan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine employees' individual attitudes towards diversity management and respect for diversity in secondary education in views of secondary school administrators and teachers, and to explore the relationship between these concepts. According to the results of the study, administrators and teachers in secondary…

  15. Diversity in High Schools and Diversity Management: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordu, Aydan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present the diversities in high schools and opinions of teachers about management of these diversities. The sample of the study is from nine teachers working at the official high schools in the center of Denizli in Turkey. In this qualitative study, the data are collected with a semi-structured interview form…

  16. Selective AKR1C3 inhibitors do not recapitulate the anti-leukaemic activities of the pan-AKR1C inhibitor medroxyprogesterone acetate

    PubMed Central

    Khanim, F; Davies, N; Veliça, P; Hayden, R; Ride, J; Pararasa, C; Chong, M G; Gunther, U; Veerapen, N; Winn, P; Farmer, R; Trivier, E; Rigoreau, L; Drayson, M; Bunce, C

    2014-01-01

    Background: We and others have identified the aldo-keto reductase AKR1C3 as a potential drug target in prostate cancer, breast cancer and leukaemia. As a consequence, significant effort is being invested in the development of AKR1C3-selective inhibitors. Methods: We report the screening of an in-house drug library to identify known drugs that selectively inhibit AKR1C3 over the closely related isoforms AKR1C1, 1C2 and 1C4. This screen initially identified tetracycline as a potential AKR1C3-selective inhibitor. However, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance studies identified that the active agent was a novel breakdown product (4-methyl(de-dimethylamine)-tetracycline (4-MDDT)). Results: We demonstrate that, although 4-MDDT enters AML cells and inhibits their AKR1C3 activity, it does not recapitulate the anti-leukaemic actions of the pan-AKR1C inhibitor medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Screens of the NCI diversity set and an independently curated small-molecule library identified several additional AKR1C3-selective inhibitors, none of which had the expected anti-leukaemic activity. However, a pan AKR1C, also identified in the NCI diversity set faithfully recapitulated the actions of MPA. Conclusions: In summary, we have identified a novel tetracycline-derived product that provides an excellent lead structure with proven drug-like qualities for the development of AKR1C3 inhibitors. However, our findings suggest that, at least in leukaemia, selective inhibition of AKR1C3 is insufficient to elicit an anticancer effect and that multiple AKR1C inhibition may be required. PMID:24569460

  17. Nonnucleoside Inhibitor of Measles Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex Activity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura K.; Yoon, Jeong-Joong; Lee, Jin K.; Sun, Aiming; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian; Snyder, James P.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses comprise several major human pathogens. Although a live-attenuated vaccine protects against measles virus (MV), a member of the paramyxovirus family, the virus remains a principal cause of worldwide mortality and accounts for approximately 21 million cases and 300,000 to 400,000 deaths annually. The development of novel antivirals that allow improved case management of severe measles and silence viral outbreaks is thus highly desirable. We have previously described the development of novel MV fusion inhibitors. The potential for preexisting or emerging resistance in the field constitutes the rationale for the identification of additional MV inhibitors with a diverse target spectrum. Here, we report the development and implementation of a cell-based assay for high-throughput screening of MV antivirals, which has yielded several hit candidates. Following confirmation by secondary assays and chemical synthesis, the most potent hit was found to act as a target-specific inhibitor of MV replication with desirable drug-like properties. The compound proved highly active against multiple primary isolates of diverse MV genotypes currently circulating worldwide, showing active concentrations of 35 to 145 nM. Significantly, it does not interfere with viral entry and lacks cross-resistance with the MV fusion inhibitor class. Mechanistic characterization on a subinfection level revealed that the compound represents a first-in-class nonnucleoside inhibitor of MV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex activity. Singly or in combination with the fusion inhibitors, this novel compound class has high developmental potential as a potent therapeutic against MV and will likely further the mechanistic characterization of the viral polymerase complex. PMID:17470652

  18. WATER DIVERSION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Case

    1999-12-21

    The distribution of seepage in the proposed repository will be highly variable due in part to variations in the spatial distribution of percolations. The performance of the drip shield and the backfill system may divert the water flux around the waste packages to the invert. Diversion will occur along the drift surface, within the backfill, at the drip shield, and at the Waste Package (WP) surface, even after the drip shield and WP have been breached by corrosion. The purpose and objective of this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) are to develop a conceptual model and constitutive properties for bounding the volume and rate of seepage water that flows around the drip shield (CRWMS M&O 1999c). This analysis model is to be compatible with the selected repository conceptual design (Wilkins and Heath, 1999) and will be used to evaluate the performance of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), and to provide input to the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Model. This model supports the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) postclosure performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (SR). This document characterizes the hydrological constitutive properties of the backfill and invert materials (Section 6.2) and a third material that represents a mixture of the two. These include the Overton Sand which is selected as a backfill (Section 5.2), crushed tuff which is selected as the invert (Section 5.1), and a combined material (Sections 5.9 and 5.10) which has retention and hydraulic conductivity properties intermediate to the selected materials for the backfill and the invert. The properties include the grain size distribution, the dry bulk density and porosity, the moisture retention, the intrinsic permeability, the relative permeability, and the material thermal properties. The van Genuchten relationships with curve fit parameters are used to define the basic retention relationship of moisture potential to volumetric moisture content, and the basic relationship of unsaturated

  19. Combinatorial Pharmacophore-Based 3D-QSAR Analysis and Virtual Screening of FGFR1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nannan; Xu, Yuan; Liu, Xian; Wang, Yulan; Peng, Jianlong; Luo, Xiaomin; Zheng, Mingyue; Chen, Kaixian; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGF/FGFR) signaling pathway plays crucial roles in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, and survival. Aberration in FGFRs correlates with several malignancies and disorders. FGFRs have proved to be attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer, and it is of high interest to find FGFR inhibitors with novel scaffolds. In this study, a combinatorial three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model was developed based on previously reported FGFR1 inhibitors with diverse structural skeletons. This model was evaluated for its prediction performance on a diverse test set containing 232 FGFR inhibitors, and it yielded a SD value of 0.75 pIC50 units from measured inhibition affinities and a Pearson’s correlation coefficient R2 of 0.53. This result suggests that the combinatorial 3D-QSAR model could be used to search for new FGFR1 hit structures and predict their potential activity. To further evaluate the performance of the model, a decoy set validation was used to measure the efficiency of the model by calculating EF (enrichment factor). Based on the combinatorial pharmacophore model, a virtual screening against SPECS database was performed. Nineteen novel active compounds were successfully identified, which provide new chemical starting points for further structural optimization of FGFR1 inhibitors. PMID:26110383

  20. Kinase Pathway Dependence in Primary Human Leukemias Determined by Rapid Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Yang, Wayne F.; Bankhead, Armand; Fan, Guang; Fletcher, Luke B.; Bryant, Jade; Glover, Jason M.; Chang, Bill H.; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Fleming, William H.; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Gotlib, Jason R.; Oh, Stephen T.; Deininger, Michael W.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Den Boer, Monique L.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; O’Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.; Loriaux, Marc M.

    2012-01-01

    Kinases are dysregulated in most cancer but the frequency of specific kinase mutations is low, indicating a complex etiology in kinase dysregulation. Here we report a strategy to rapidly identify functionally important kinase targets, irrespective of the etiology of kinase pathway dysregulation, ultimately enabling a correlation of patient genetic profiles to clinically effective kinase inhibitors. Our methodology assessed the sensitivity of primary leukemia patient samples to a panel of 66 small-molecule kinase inhibitors over 3 days. Screening of 151 leukemia patient samples revealed a wide diversity of drug sensitivities, with 70% of the clinical specimens exhibiting hypersensitivity to one or more drugs. From this data set, we developed an algorithm to predict kinase pathway dependence based on analysis of inhibitor sensitivity patterns. Applying this algorithm correctly identified pathway dependence in proof-of-principle specimens with known oncogenes, including a rare FLT3 mutation outside regions covered by standard molecular diagnostic tests. Interrogation of all 151 patient specimens with this algorithm identified a diversity of gene targets and signaling pathways that could aid prioritization of deep sequencing data sets, permitting a cumulative analysis to understand kinase pathway dependence within leukemia subsets. In a proof-of-principle case, we showed that in vitro drug sensitivity could predict both a clinical response and the development of drug resistance. Taken together, our results suggested that drug target scores derived from a comprehensive kinase inhibitor panel could predict pathway dependence in cancer cells while simultaneously identifying potential therapeutic options. PMID:23087056

  1. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition. PMID:21963115

  2. New proteasome inhibitors in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lawasut, Panisinee; Chauhan, Dharminder; Laubach, Jacob; Hayes, Catriona; Fabre, Claire; Maglio, Michelle; Mitsiades, Constantine; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul G

    2012-12-01

    Proteasome inhibition has a validated role in cancer therapy since the successful introduction of bortezomib for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, leading to the development of second-generation proteasome inhibitors (PI) for MM patients in whom currently approved therapies have failed. Five PIs have reached clinical evaluation, with the goals of improving efficacy and limiting toxicity, including peripheral neuropathy (PN). Carfilzomib, an epoxyketone with specific chymothrypsin-like activity, acts as an irreversible inhibitor and was recently FDA approved for the response benefit seen in relapsed and refractory MM patients previously treated with bortezomib, thalidomide and lenalidomide. ONX-0912 is now under evaluation as an oral form with similar activity. The boronate peptides MLN9708 and CEP-18770 are orally bioactive bortezomib analogs with prolonged activity and greater tissue penetration. NPI-0052 (marizomib) is a unique, beta-lactone non-selective PI that has been shown to potently overcome bortezomib resistance in vitro. All of these second-generation PIs demonstrate encouraging anti-MM activity and appear to reduce the incidence of PN, with clinical trials ongoing. PMID:23065395

  3. New sulfur-containing corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, P.

    2000-04-01

    No corrosion inhibitor available today is ideal in every way, but a new class of sulfur-containing compounds promises to address many field requirements. This article describes the performance characteristics of these compounds and discusses possible inhibition mechanisms. The emphasis in this work was on better understanding corrosion inhibition by sulfur-containing inhibitors under high shear-stress conditions, with special focus on localized (pitting) corrosion. The results indicate that the new sulfur-containing inhibitors (e.g., mercaptoalcohol [MA]) could be more effective in the field than currently available inhibitors.

  4. Proteases in renal cell death: calpains mediate cell death produced by diverse toxicants.

    PubMed

    Schnellmann, R G; Williams, S W

    1998-09-01

    The role of proteases in renal cell death has received limited investigation. Calpains are non-lysosomal cysteine proteases that are Ca+2 activated. Calpain inhibitors that block the active site of calpains (calpain inhibitor 1 and 2) or the Ca+2 binding domain of calpains (PD150606) decreased calpain activity in rabbit renal proximal tubule (RPT) suspensions. The inhibition of calpain activity decreased cell death produced by the diverse toxicants antimycin A (mitochondrial inhibitor), tetrafluroethyl-L-cysteine (nephrotoxic halocarbon), bromohydroquinone (nephro-toxic quinone), t-butylhydroperoxide (model oxidant) and ionomycin (Ca+2 ionophore). In summary, calpains appear to play a common and critical role in cell injury produced by diverse toxicants with different mechanisms of action. The general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino)-butane (E-64) decreased antimycin A- and tetrafluoroethyl-L-cysteine-induced cell death but had no effect on bromohydroquinone- or t-butylhydroperoxide-induced cell death. Serine/cysteine protease inhibitors (antipain, leupeptin) were not cytoprotective to RPT exposed to any of the toxicants. The cytoprotection associated with E-64 correlated with inhibition of lysosomal cathepsins and E-64 was only cytoprotective after some cell death had occurred. Since some cell death occurred prior to the E-64 cytoprotective effect, lysosomal cathepsins may be released from dying cells and subsequently target the remaining viable cells. PMID:9768434

  5. The Sahara's Diverse Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast stretches of uninterrupted sand are only one kind of Saharan landscape. This true-color MODIS image from November 9, 2001, reveals a diversity of land surface features, including ancient lava flows and volcanoes. Beginning at upper left and moving clockwise are the countries of Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Chad, and Niger. Evidence of previous volcanic activity in the Sahara can be found in northeastern Chad, in particular, in a region known as Tibesti. Reaching up out of the surrounding desert, the dark rock of the Tibesti Plateau stands out in dark brown against the sand. Scattered throughout the region are the circular cones and calderas of several volcanoes. The dark remains of a lava flow mark the location of the Tousside volcano. North of Tibesti, in Libya, more dark-colored lava beds leave their mark on the landscape. Variety exists in Algeria, where the Grand Erg Oriental desert (far upper left) is hemmed in to the south by the Tinrhert Plateau. South of the Plateau, desert resumes briefly, only to give way to a mountainous region traced with impermanent rivers. In northern Niger, a sinuous gray-green line marks the edge of an escarpment that separates the Mangueni Plateau to the north from the rock deserts to the south. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  6. Diversity of Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is defined as an immune system-mediated adverse reaction to food components. Food allergic reactions are mostly IgE mediated and also known as immediate type hypersensitivity (type I reaction). There are several characteristic clinical types of food allergy, such as Anaphylaxis, Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), and Oral allergy syndrome (OAS). In addition, food allergy is also classified into two types (class 1 and class 2) based on the pathophysiological mechanism. In the class 2 food allergy, pollen allergy causes plant food allergy; therefore this type of allergy is sometimes called Pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS). The risk of food allergy (allergenicity) may vary with the treatment of the food allergens. The formation or status of the causative food affects its allergenicity. Class 1 food allergens are generally heat-, enzyme-, and low pH-resistant glycoproteins ranging in size from 10 to 70 kD. Class 1 food allergens induce allergic sensitization via the gastrointestinal tract and are responsible for systemic reactions. Class 2 food allergens are generally heat-labile, susceptible to digestion, and highly homologous with pollen allergens. Taken together, it may be important to consider the diversity of food allergy in order to fight against food allergy. PMID:26598816

  7. Development of Antioxidant COX-2 Inhibitors as Radioprotective Agents for Radiation Therapy—A Hypothesis-Driven Review

    PubMed Central

    Laube, Markus; Kniess, Torsten; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) evolved to be a primary treatment modality for cancer patients. Unfortunately, the cure or relief of symptoms is still accompanied by radiation-induced side effects with severe acute and late pathophysiological consequences. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are potentially useful in this regard because radioprotection of normal tissue and/or radiosensitizing effects on tumor tissue have been described for several compounds of this structurally diverse class. This review aims to substantiate the hypothesis that antioxidant COX-2 inhibitors are promising radioprotectants because of intercepting radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in normal tissue, especially the vascular system. For this, literature reporting on COX inhibitors exerting radioprotective and/or radiosensitizing action as well as on antioxidant COX inhibitors will be reviewed comprehensively with the aim to find cross-points of both and, by that, stimulate further research in the field of radioprotective agents. PMID:27104573

  8. Development of Antioxidant COX-2 Inhibitors as Radioprotective Agents for Radiation Therapy-A Hypothesis-Driven Review.

    PubMed

    Laube, Markus; Kniess, Torsten; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) evolved to be a primary treatment modality for cancer patients. Unfortunately, the cure or relief of symptoms is still accompanied by radiation-induced side effects with severe acute and late pathophysiological consequences. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are potentially useful in this regard because radioprotection of normal tissue and/or radiosensitizing effects on tumor tissue have been described for several compounds of this structurally diverse class. This review aims to substantiate the hypothesis that antioxidant COX-2 inhibitors are promising radioprotectants because of intercepting radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in normal tissue, especially the vascular system. For this, literature reporting on COX inhibitors exerting radioprotective and/or radiosensitizing action as well as on antioxidant COX inhibitors will be reviewed comprehensively with the aim to find cross-points of both and, by that, stimulate further research in the field of radioprotective agents. PMID:27104573

  9. Diversity: Gender, Color, and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essed, Philomena

    This book serves as an introduction to issues of diversity. Each chapter addresses an issue relevant to life and work in gender-conscious and ethnically diverse environments. Taken together, the chapters challenge the reader to develop alternative views on gender, color, culture, and human relations. The first chapter introduces key notions, such…

  10. Leisure Today: Educating for Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Kathleen, Ed.; Ibrahim, Hilmi, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Three articles propose diversity strategies for teachers, recreation leaders, and program managers to include in their classrooms and programs. The articles are "Diversity Education for Professional Practice" (Sharon Washington); "Just Recreation for Girls and Women" (Karla Henderson); and "A Different Set of Footprints: A Portrayal of One Woman's…

  11. Feed your soil through diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our soil resource is fundamental to plant and animal life, therefore, proper management is essential. One of the key tools to maintain our soil resource is diversity both below and above ground. Diversity is an important concept in all areas of our lives, from the food we eat, to the weather we ex...

  12. Love Me; I Celebrate Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    According to this author, by now everyone in America has learned to celebrate diversity. People do so to signify that they are a good person, they are hip, trendy, and "down with the program." He claims, however, that in academe, the word "diversity" still functions as a rhetorical trump card, always uttered with the tonal implication that the…

  13. The Scoop on Board Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Robert, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    In an interview, a prominent college trustee discusses strategies for increasing ethnic and cultural diversity on governing boards, the relationship between board diversity and institutional policies, effects on the student body, the responsibility of the board, and the challenges and rewards of trusteeship. (MSE)

  14. Advancing Diversity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    This special section of the "Journal of Diversity in Higher Education" ("JDHE") on "Advancing Diversity in Higher Education" emerged from the 2012 Association for the Study of Higher Education Council on Ethnic Participation (ASHE-CEP) Pre-Conference Forum. CEP, a standing committee of ASHE, partnered with the…

  15. Citizenship, Diversity and National Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crick, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the issues of citizenship, diversity and national identity in the context of the introduction of citizenship education in the UK. It considers the historical context of national identity in the UK and notes that the "British national identity has historically implied diversity". It also analyses the views of British national…

  16. The Changing Face of Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Noni Mendoza; Mendez, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    As the nation's schools strive to provide quality education for students most at risk for failure, the notion of diversity continues to lead the discussion. Revisiting understandings about diversity as a response to creating equitable learning opportunities to foster achievement for all students has become increasingly urgent given that, while the…

  17. Genetic Diversity and Human Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobzhansky, Theodosius

    The idea of equality often, if not frequently, bogs down in confusion and apparent contradictions; equality is confused with identity, and diversity with inequality. It would seem that the easiest way to discredit the idea of equality is to show that people are innately, genetically, and, therefore, irremediably diverse and unlike. The snare is,…

  18. States' Diversity Requirements for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maurice (Maury); Strosnider, Roberta; Dooley, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Documents from all states were analyzed for requirements for teachers in preparation for teaching diverse students including the definition of diversity used, whether documents listed specific standards, and whether preparation for teaching students with exceptionalities was also listed. Although 41 states had some requirements, specifics,…

  19. Genetic Diversity of Toscana Virus

    PubMed Central

    Collao, Ximena; Palacios, Gustavo; Sanbonmatsu-Gámez, Sara; Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Negredo, Ana I.; Navarro-Marí, José-María; Grandadam, Marc; Aransay, Ana Maria; Lipkin, W. Ian; Tenorio, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Distribution of Toscana virus (TOSV) is evolving with climate change, and pathogenicity may be higher in nonexposed populations outside areas of current prevalence (Mediterranean Basin). To characterize genetic diversity of TOSV, we determined the coding sequences of isolates from Spain and France. TOSV is more diverse than other well-studied phleboviruses (e.g.,Rift Valley fever virus). PMID:19331735

  20. Pathways to Tolerance: Student Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Dorothy, Ed.; Stanhope, Victoria, Ed.

    Ideas for schools to support tolerance and celebrate student diversity are presented in this volume of reprinted articles. Titles include: (1) "One of Us, One of Them: Lessons in Diversity for a School Psychologist" (M. M. Chittooran); (2) "The Tolerance-in-Action Campaign" (H. M. Knoff); (3) "Immigrant Parents and the School" (R. Rhodes, D.…

  1. Plasmas: Diversity, pervasiveness and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1998-01-01

    When considered inclusively, plasma science and technology encompass immense diversity, pervasiveness and potential: diversity through numerous topical areas (see list of nearly 200 in Table II); pervasiveness with examples covering the full range of energy, time and spatial scale; and potential through innumerable current and future applications.

  2. Diversity Research as Service Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suyemoto, Karen L.; Kiang, Peter Nien-chu

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Diversity Research Initiative at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, which involves students in seminars and research related to diversity. Concludes that these efforts have positively impacted curriculum and pedagogy, and have given students the opportunity to experience collaborative learning communities, become engaged in…

  3. Classroom Management in Diverse Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, H. Richard, IV; Tenore, F. Blake

    2010-01-01

    Classroom management continues to be a serious concern for teachers and especially in urban and diverse learning environments. The authors present the culturally responsive classroom management practices of two teachers from an urban and diverse middle school to extend the construct, culturally responsive classroom management. The principles that…

  4. Facilitating Respectful Diversity Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, David L.; Thomas, Earl E.

    2007-01-01

    Changing demographics continue to challenge professional development programs to prepare school personnel to serve a rapidly expanding diverse student body. Popular diversity professional development models are on a continuum. They range from preparing teachers to design themes and activities that are culturally relevant all the way to enabling…

  5. Why School Psychology for Diversity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolo, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the dilemma faced by psychologists in responding to diversity. It is based on a qualitative review of relevant literature over the past decade. It first describes psychologists as frontrunners in recognizing the uniqueness and autonomy of each of their diverse clients but within the biomedical model that locates problems…

  6. Diversity Cascades and Malaria Vectors

    PubMed Central

    CARLSON, JOHN C.; DYER, LEE A.; OMLIN, FRANCOIS X.; BEIER, JOHN C.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions between predator diversity and primary consumer abundance can include direct effects and indirect, cascading effects. Understanding these effects on immature Anopheles mosquitoes is important in sub-Saharan Africa, where most cases of malaria occur. Aquatic predators and immature mosquitoes were collected from shallow pools of varying age previously excavated by brickmakers in the western highlands of Kenya. Path analysis showed an indirect negative effect of habitat age on An. gambiae (Giles, 1902) mediated by effects on predator diversity. Disturbance resets habitats to an earlier successional stage, diminishing predator diversity and increasing An. gambiae populations. The increase in vector abundance as a result of reduced predator diversity highlights the public health value in conserving native insect diversity. PMID:19496413

  7. Simultaneous exposure of transformed cells to SRC family inhibitors and CHK1 inhibitors causes cell death.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Clint; Hamed, Hossein A; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Tang, Yong; Bareford, M Danielle; Hubbard, Nissan; Tye, Gary; Yacoub, Adly; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2011-08-01

    The present studies were initiated to determine in greater molecular detail the regulation of CHK1 inhibitor lethality in transfected and infected breast cancer cells and using genetic models of transformed fibrobalsts. Multiple MEK1/2 inhibitors (PD184352, AZD6244 (ARRY-142886)) interacted with multiple CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine), AZD7762) to kill mammary carcinoma cells and transformed fibroblasts. In transformed cells, CHK1 inhibitor -induced activation of ERK1/2 was dependent upon activation of SRC family non-receptor tyrosine kinases as judged by use of multiple SRC kinase inhibitors (PP2, Dasatinib; AZD0530), use of SRC/FYN/YES deleted transformed fibroblasts or by expression of dominant negative SRC. Cell killing by SRC family kinase inhibitors and CHK1 inhibitors was abolished in BAX/BAK -/- transformed fibroblasts and suppressed by over expression of BCL-XL. Treatment of cells with BCL-2/BCL-XL antagonists promoted SRC inhibitor + CHK1 inhibitor -induced lethality in a BAX/BAK-dependent fashion. Treatment of cells with [SRC + CHK1] inhibitors radio-sensitized tumor cells. These findings argue that multiple inhibitors of the SRC-RAS-MEK pathway interact with multiple CHK1 inhibitors to kill transformed cells. PMID:21642769

  8. Identification and Characterization of Novel Classes of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Inhibitors with Distinct Mechanisms of Action*

    PubMed Central

    Ouertatani-Sakouhi, Hajer; El-Turk, Farah; Fauvet, Bruno; Cho, Min-Kyu; Pinar Karpinar, Damla; Le Roy, Didier; Dewor, Manfred; Roger, Thierry; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Calandra, Thierry; Zweckstetter, Markus; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory cytokine, is considered an attractive therapeutic target in multiple inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. In addition to its known biologic activities, MIF can also function as a tautomerase. Several small molecules have been reported to be effective inhibitors of MIF tautomerase activity in vitro. Herein we employed a robust activity-based assay to identify different classes of novel inhibitors of the catalytic and biological activities of MIF. Several novel chemical classes of inhibitors of the catalytic activity of MIF with IC50 values in the range of 0.2–15.5 μm were identified and validated. The interaction site and mechanism of action of these inhibitors were defined using structure-activity studies and a battery of biochemical and biophysical methods. MIF inhibitors emerging from these studies could be divided into three categories based on their mechanism of action: 1) molecules that covalently modify the catalytic site at the N-terminal proline residue, Pro1; 2) a novel class of catalytic site inhibitors; and finally 3) molecules that disrupt the trimeric structure of MIF. Importantly, all inhibitors demonstrated total inhibition of MIF-mediated glucocorticoid overriding and AKT phosphorylation, whereas ebselen, a trimer-disrupting inhibitor, additionally acted as a potent hyperagonist in MIF-mediated chemotactic migration. The identification of biologically active compounds with known toxicity, pharmacokinetic properties, and biological activities in vivo should accelerate the development of clinically relevant MIF inhibitors. Furthermore, the diversity of chemical structures and mechanisms of action of our inhibitors makes them ideal mechanistic probes for elucidating the structure-function relationships of MIF and to further determine the role of the oligomerization state and catalytic activity of MIF in regulating the function(s) of MIF in health and disease. PMID:20516071

  9. Controlling CO{sub 2} corrosion with inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Transport of corrosion inhibitor to the location where they are needed is one of the primary concerns in the use of corrosion inhibitors. Two different types of inhibitors for controlling CO{sub 2} corrosion in gas well wellheads and flowlines are used as examples. In one example, the inhibitor forms a micelle in water which assists in the transport of inhibitor to the metal surface . In the other example, the inhibitor is readily dispersible in the water phase but must be stirred to ensure transport of the inhibitor to the metal surface. Field monitored corrosion rates using continuous application of inhibitor are presented for both types of inhibitor.

  10. Transglutaminase 2 Inhibitors and their Therapeutic Role in Disease States

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Matthew; Khosla, Chaitan

    2007-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multi-domain, multi-functional enzyme that post-translationally modifies proteins by catalyzing the formation of intermolecular isopeptide bonds between glutamine and lysine side-chains. It plays a role in diverse biological functions, including extracellular matrix formation, integrin mediated signaling, and signal transduction involving 7-transmembrane receptors. While some of the roles of TG2 under normal physiological conditions remain obscure, the protein is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of several unrelated diseases including celiac sprue, neurodegenerative diseases, and certain types of cancer. A variety of small molecule and peptidomimetic inhibitors of the TG2 active site have been identified. Here we summarize the biochemistry, biology, pharmacology and medicinal chemistry of human TG2. PMID:17582505

  11. Discovery of novel 7-azaindoles as PDK1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wucherer-Plietker, Margarita; Merkul, Eugen; Müller, Thomas J J; Esdar, Christina; Knöchel, Thorsten; Heinrich, Timo; Buchstaller, Hans-Peter; Greiner, Hartmut; Dorsch, Dieter; Finsinger, Dirk; Calderini, Michel; Bruge, David; Grädler, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    A combined screening strategy using HTS together with focused kinase library and virtual screening led to the identification of diverse chemical series as PDK1 inhibitors. We focused our medicinal chemistry efforts on 7-azaindoles with low micromolar IC50s (e.g., 16: IC50=1.1μM) in the biochemical PDK1 assay. Our structure-guided optimization efforts considered also PDK1 X-ray structures with weaker binding fragments and resulted in 7-azaindoles with significantly improved biochemical PDK1 potency in the two-digit nanomolar range. However, the most potent analogues only showed moderate activities in a cellular mechanistic assay (42: IC50=2.3μM) together with either low microsomal stability or low permeability. The described structure-activity relationship together with PDK1 X-ray structures and early ADME data provided the basis for our subsequent hit-to-lead program. PMID:27217002

  12. Predictive Models for Fast and Effective Profiling of Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bora, Alina; Avram, Sorin; Ciucanu, Ionel; Raica, Marius; Avram, Stefana

    2016-05-23

    In this study we developed two-dimensional pharmacophore-based random forest models for the effective profiling of kinase inhibitors. One hundred seven prediction models were developed to address distinct kinases spanning over all kinase groups. Rigorous external validation demonstrates excellent virtual screening and classification potential of the predictors and, more importantly, the capacity to prioritize novel chemical scaffolds in large chemical libraries. The models built upon more diverse and more potent compounds tend to exert the highest predictive power. The analysis of ColBioS-FlavRC (Collection of Bioselective Flavonoids and Related Compounds) highlighted several potentially promiscuous derivatives with undesirable selectivity against kinases. The prediction models can be downloaded from www.chembioinf.ro . PMID:27064988

  13. Diverse Bacterial Microcompartment Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Sinha, Sharmistha; Chun, Sunny; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are sophisticated protein-based organelles used to optimize metabolic pathways. They consist of metabolic enzymes encapsulated within a protein shell, which creates an ideal environment for catalysis and facilitates the channeling of toxic/volatile intermediates to downstream enzymes. The metabolic processes that require MCPs are diverse and widely distributed and play important roles in global carbon fixation and bacterial pathogenesis. The protein shells of MCPs are thought to selectively control the movement of enzyme cofactors, substrates, and products (including toxic or volatile intermediates) between the MCP interior and the cytoplasm of the cell using both passive electrostatic/steric and dynamic gated mechanisms. Evidence suggests that specialized shell proteins conduct electrons between the cytoplasm and the lumen of the MCP and/or help rebuild damaged iron-sulfur centers in the encapsulated enzymes. The MCP shell is elaborated through a family of small proteins whose structural core is known as a bacterial microcompartment (BMC) domain. BMC domain proteins oligomerize into flat, hexagonally shaped tiles, which assemble into extended protein sheets that form the facets of the shell. Shape complementarity along the edges allows different types of BMC domain proteins to form mixed sheets, while sequence variation provides functional diversification. Recent studies have also revealed targeting sequences that mediate protein encapsulation within MCPs, scaffolding proteins that organize lumen enzymes and the use of private cofactor pools (NAD/H and coenzyme A [HS-CoA]) to facilitate cofactor homeostasis. Although much remains to be learned, our growing understanding of MCPs is providing a basis for bioengineering of protein-based containers for the production of chemicals/pharmaceuticals and for use as molecular delivery vehicles. PMID:25184561

  14. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  15. KH-30 Parafin Inhibitor Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30

    United Energy Corporation (UNRG) and the U.S. Department of Energy personnel tested KH-30 at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) outside Casper, Wyoming on two separate occasions. KH-30 is a non-toxic, non-hazardous product, which combines the functions of a solvent dispersant, crystal modifier and inhibitor into a single solution. The first test was held in March of 2001, wherein five wells were treated with a mixture of KH-30 and brine water, heated to 180 degrees F. No increase in production was attained in these tests. In June, 2001, three shallow, low pressure RMOTC wells with 30 years of production were treated with a mixture of 40% KH-30 and 60% diesel. Increases were seen in three wells. The wells then returned to their original rates.

  16. Loratadine analogues as MAGL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayendra Z; Ahenkorah, Stephen; Vaara, Miia; Staszewski, Marek; Adams, Yahaya; Laitinen, Tuomo; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Savinainen, Juha R; Walczyński, Krzysztof; Laitinen, Jarmo T; Nevalainen, Tapio J

    2015-04-01

    Compound 12a (JZP-361) acted as a potent and reversible inhibitor of human recombinant MAGL (hMAGL, IC50=46 nM), and was found to have almost 150-fold higher selectivity over human recombinant fatty acid amide hydrolase (hFAAH, IC50=7.24 μM) and 35-fold higher selectivity over human α/β-hydrolase-6 (hABHD6, IC50=1.79 μM). Additionally, compound 12a retained H1 antagonistic affinity (pA2=6.81) but did not show cannabinoid receptor activity, when tested at concentrations ⩽ 10 μM. Hence, compound 12a represents a novel dual-acting pharmacological tool possessing both MAGL-inhibitory and antihistaminergic activities. PMID:25752982

  17. Inhibitors of apoptosis catch ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Dikic, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) proteins are a class of anti-apoptotic regulators characterized by the presence of BIR (baculoviral IAP repeat) domains. Some of the IAPs also possess a RING (really interesting new gene) domain with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Blankenship et al. unveil the presence of an UBA (ubiquitin-associated domain) in several IAPs. UBAs in c-IAPs (cellular IAPs) bind to monoubiquitin and ubiquitin chains and are implicated in degradation of c-IAPs by promoting their interaction with proteasomes as well as in regulation of TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha)-induced apoptosis. These novel observations establish IAPs as ubiquitin-interacting proteins and opens up new lines of investigation. PMID:19061481

  18. Quinolone-based HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Gopalan; Kilambi, Narasimhan; Rathinasamy, Suresh; Rajendran, Praveen; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan

    2014-08-01

    HDAC inhibitors emerged as promising drug candidates in combating wide variety of cancers. At present, two of the compounds SAHA and Romidepsin were approved by FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and many are in various clinical phases. A new quinolone cap structure was explored with hydroxamic acid as zinc-binding group (ZBG). The pan HDAC inhibitory and antiproliferative activities against three human cancer cell lines HCT-116 (colon), NCI-H460 (lung) and U251 (glioblastoma) of the compounds (4a-4w) were evaluated. Introduction of heterocyclic amines in CAP region increased the enzyme inhibitory and antiproliferative activities and few of the compounds tested are metabolically stable in both MLM and HLM. PMID:25019596

  19. The direct thrombin inhibitor hirudin.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, Andreas; Warkentin, Theodore E

    2008-05-01

    This review discusses the pharmacology and clinical applications of hirudin, a bivalent direct thrombin inhibitor (DTI). Besides the current major indication for hirudin--anticoagulation of patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT)--the experience with hirudin in other indications, especially acute coronary syndromes, are briefly presented. Hirudins have been formally studied prior to their regulatory approval; however, important information on their side effects and relevant preventative measures only became available later. Therefore, current recommendations and dosing schedules for hirudin differ considerably from the information given in the package inserts. Drawbacks of hirudin and important precautions for avoiding potential adverse effects are discussed in detail in the third part of this review. PMID:18449411

  20. The bean. alpha. -amylase inhibitor is encoded by a lectin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    The common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, contains an inhibitor of insect and mammalian {alpha}-amylases that does not inhibit plant {alpha}-amylase. This inhibitor functions as an anti-feedant or seed-defense protein. We purified this inhibitor by affinity chromatography and found that it consists of a series of glycoforms of two polypeptides (Mr 14,000-19,000). Partial amino acid sequencing was carried out, and the sequences obtained are identical with portions of the derived amino acid sequence of a lectin-like gene. This lectin gene encodes a polypeptide of MW 28,000, and the primary in vitro translation product identified by antibodies to the {alpha}-amylase inhibitor has the same size. Co- and posttranslational processing of this polypeptide results in glycosylated polypeptides of 14-19 kDa. Our interpretation of these results is that the bean lectins constitute a gene family that encodes diverse plant defense proteins, including phytohemagglutinin, arcelin and {alpha}-amylase inhibitor.

  1. Repurposing Kinase Inhibitors as Antiviral Agents to Control Influenza A Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Yan, Xiuzhen; O'Donnell, Jason; Johnson, Scott; Tripp, Ralph A

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection causes seasonal epidemics of contagious respiratory illness that causes substantial morbidity and some mortality. Regular vaccination is the principal strategy for controlling influenza virus, although vaccine efficacy is variable. IAV antiviral drugs are available; however, substantial drug resistance has developed to two of the four currently FDA-approved antiviral drugs. Thus, new therapeutic approaches are being sought to reduce the burden of influenza-related disease. A high-throughput screen using a human kinase inhibitor library was performed targeting an emerging IAV strain (H7N9) in A549 cells. The inhibitor library contained 273 structurally diverse, active cell permeable kinase inhibitors with known bioactivity and safety profiles, many of which are at advanced stages of clinical development. The current study shows that treatment of human A549 cells with kinase inhibitors dinaciclib, flavopiridol, or PIK-75 exhibits potent antiviral activity against H7N9 IAV as well as other IAV strains. Thus, targeting host kinases can provide a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach against IAV. These findings provide a path forward for repurposing existing kinase inhibitors safely as potential antivirals, particularly those that can be tested in vivo and ultimately for clinical use. PMID:26192013

  2. Identification of Genes Conferring Tolerance to Lignocellulose-Derived Inhibitors by Functional Selections in Soil Metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Kevin J; Patel, Sanket; Witt, Evan; Wang, Bin; Ellison, Tyler D; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    The production of fuels or chemicals from lignocellulose currently requires thermochemical pretreatment to release fermentable sugars. These harsh conditions also generate numerous small-molecule inhibitors of microbial growth and fermentation, limiting production. We applied small-insert functional metagenomic selections to discover genes that confer microbial tolerance to these inhibitors, identifying both individual genes and general biological processes associated with tolerance to multiple inhibitory compounds. Having screened over 248 Gb of DNA cloned from 16 diverse soil metagenomes, we describe gain-of-function tolerance against acid, alcohol, and aldehyde inhibitors derived from hemicellulose and lignin, demonstrating that uncultured soil microbial communities hold tremendous genetic potential to address the toxicity of pretreated lignocellulose. We recovered genes previously known to confer tolerance to lignocellulosic inhibitors as well as novel genes that confer tolerance via unknown functions. For instance, we implicated galactose metabolism in overcoming the toxicity of lignin monomers and identified a decarboxylase that confers tolerance to ferulic acid; this enzyme has been shown to catalyze the production of 4-vinyl guaiacol, a valuable precursor to vanillin production. These metagenomic tolerance genes can enable the flexible design of hardy microbial catalysts, customized to withstand inhibitors abundant in specific bioprocessing applications. PMID:26546427

  3. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors. PMID:25553996

  4. Identification of Genes Conferring Tolerance to Lignocellulose-Derived Inhibitors by Functional Selections in Soil Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Kevin J.; Patel, Sanket; Witt, Evan; Wang, Bin; Ellison, Tyler D.

    2015-01-01

    The production of fuels or chemicals from lignocellulose currently requires thermochemical pretreatment to release fermentable sugars. These harsh conditions also generate numerous small-molecule inhibitors of microbial growth and fermentation, limiting production. We applied small-insert functional metagenomic selections to discover genes that confer microbial tolerance to these inhibitors, identifying both individual genes and general biological processes associated with tolerance to multiple inhibitory compounds. Having screened over 248 Gb of DNA cloned from 16 diverse soil metagenomes, we describe gain-of-function tolerance against acid, alcohol, and aldehyde inhibitors derived from hemicellulose and lignin, demonstrating that uncultured soil microbial communities hold tremendous genetic potential to address the toxicity of pretreated lignocellulose. We recovered genes previously known to confer tolerance to lignocellulosic inhibitors as well as novel genes that confer tolerance via unknown functions. For instance, we implicated galactose metabolism in overcoming the toxicity of lignin monomers and identified a decarboxylase that confers tolerance to ferulic acid; this enzyme has been shown to catalyze the production of 4-vinyl guaiacol, a valuable precursor to vanillin production. These metagenomic tolerance genes can enable the flexible design of hardy microbial catalysts, customized to withstand inhibitors abundant in specific bioprocessing applications. PMID:26546427

  5. Allotides: Proline-Rich Cystine Knot α-Amylase Inhibitors from Allamanda cathartica.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Q T; Luu, Thuy T; Bai, Yang; Nguyen, Giang K T; Pervushin, Konstantin; Tam, James P

    2015-04-24

    Cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors belong to a knottin family of peptidyl inhibitors of 30-32 residues and contain two to four prolines. Thus far, only four members of the group of cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors have been characterized. Herein, the discovery and characterization of five cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors, allotides C1-C5 (Ac1-Ac5) (1-5), from the medicinal plant Allamanda cathartica are reported using both proteomic and genomic methods. Proteomic analysis showed that 1-5 are 30 amino acids in length with three or four proline residues. NMR determination of 4 revealed that it has two cis- and one trans-proline residues and adopts two equally populated conformations in solution. Determination of disulfide connectivity of 2 by differential S-reduction and S-alkylation provided clues of its unfolding process. Genomic analysis showed that allotide precursors contain a three-domain arrangement commonly found in plant cystine knot peptides with conserved residues flanking the processing sites of the mature allotide domain. This work expands the number of known cystine knot α-amylase inhibitors and furthers the understanding of both the structural and biological diversity of this type of knottin family. PMID:25832441

  6. High-throughput screening to identify selective inhibitors of microbial sulfate reduction (and beyond)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.; Deutschbauer, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The selective perturbation of complex microbial ecosystems to predictably influence outcomes in engineered and industrial environments remains a grand challenge for geomicrobiology. In some industrial ecosystems, such as oil reservoirs, sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) produce hydrogen sulfide which is toxic, explosive and corrosive. Current strategies to selectively inhibit sulfidogenesis are based on non-specific biocide treatments, bio-competitive exclusion by alternative electron acceptors or sulfate-analogs which are competitive inhibitors or futile/alternative substrates of the sulfate reduction pathway. Despite the economic cost of sulfidogenesis, there has been minimal exploration of the chemical space of possible inhibitory compounds, and very little work has quantitatively assessed the selectivity of putative souring treatments. We have developed a high-throughput screening strategy to target SRM, quantitatively ranked the selectivity and potency of hundreds of compounds and identified previously unrecognized SRM selective inhibitors and synergistic interactions between inhibitors. Once inhibitor selectivity is defined, high-throughput characterization of microbial community structure across compound gradients and identification of fitness determinants using isolate bar-coded transposon mutant libraries can give insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby compounds structure microbial communities. The high-throughput (HT) approach we present can be readily applied to target SRM in diverse environments and more broadly, could be used to identify and quantify the potency and selectivity of inhibitors of a variety of microbial metabolisms. Our findings and approach are relevant for engineering environmental ecosystems and also to understand the role of natural gradients in shaping microbial niche space.

  7. Enzyme-Inhibitor Association Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Resat, Haluk; Marrone, Tami J.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Studying the thermodynamics of biochemical association reactions at the microscopic level requires efficient sampling of the configurations of the reactants and solvent as a function of the reaction pathways. In most cases, the associating ligand and receptor have complementary interlocking shapes. Upon association, loosely connected or disconnected solvent cavities at and around the binding site are formed. Disconnected solvent regions lead to severe statistical sampling problems when simulations are performed with explicit solvent. It was recently proposed that, when such limitations are encountered, they might be overcome by the use of the grand canonical ensemble. Here we investigate one such case and report the association free energy profile (potential of mean force) between trypsin and benzamidine along a chosen reaction coordinate as calculated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo method. The free energy profile is also calculated for a continuum solvent model using the Poisson equation, and the results are compared to the explicit water simulations. The comparison shows that the continuum solvent approach is surprisingly successful in reproducing the explicit solvent simulation results. The Monte Carlo results are analyzed in detail with respect to solvation structure. In the binding site channel there are waters bridging the carbonyl oxygen groups of Asp189 with the NH2 groups of benzamidine, which are displaced upon inhibitor binding. A similar solvent-bridging configuration has been seen in the crystal structure of trypsin complexed with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The predicted locations of other internal waters are in very good agreement with the positions found in the crystal structures, which supports the accuracy of the simulations. ImagesFIGURE 5 PMID:9017183

  8. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  9. Trypsin inhibitors for the treatment of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Trixi; Simic, Oliver; Skaanderup, Philip R; Namoto, Kenji; Berst, Frederic; Ehrhardt, Claus; Schiering, Nikolaus; Mueller, Irene; Woelcke, Julian

    2016-09-01

    Proline-based trypsin inhibitors occupying the S1-S2-S1' region were identified by an HTS screening campaign. It was discovered that truncation of the P1' moiety and appropriate extension into the S4 region led to highly potent trypsin inhibitors with excellent selectivity against related serine proteases and a favorable hERG profile. PMID:27476144

  10. Aminofurazans as potent inhibitors of AKT kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Meagan B.; Seefeld, Mark A.; Leber, Jack D.; McNulty, Kenneth C.; Sun, Lihui; Miller, William H.; Zhang, ShuYun; Minthorn, Elisabeth A.; Concha, Nestor O.; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Schaber, Michael D.; Heerding, Dirk A.

    2009-06-24

    AKT inhibitors containing an imidazopyridine aminofurazan scaffold have been optimized. We have previously disclosed identification of the AKT inhibitor GSK690693, which has been evaluated in clinical trials in cancer patients. Herein we describe recent efforts focusing on investigating a distinct region of this scaffold that have afforded compounds (30 and 32) with comparable activity profiles to that of GSK690693.

  11. Discovery and SAR of hydantoin TACE inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wensheng; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Madison, Vincent; Chen, Lei; Dai, Chaoyang; Feltz, Robert J.; Girijavallabhan, Vinay M.; Kim, Seong Heon; Kozlowski, Joseph A.; Lavey, Brian J.; Li, Dansu; Lundell, Daniel; Niu, Xiaoda; Piwinski, John J.; Popovici-Muller, Janeta; Rizvi, Razia; Rosner, Kristin E.; Shankar, Bandarpalle B.; Shih, Neng-Yang; Siddiqui, M.A.; Sun, J.; Tong, L.; Umland, S.; Wong, M.K.; Yang, D.Y.; Zhou, G.

    2010-09-03

    We disclose inhibitors of TNF-{alpha} converting enzyme (TACE) designed around a hydantoin zinc binding moiety. Crystal structures of inhibitors bound to TACE revealed monodentate coordination of the hydantoin to the zinc. SAR, X-ray, and modeling designs are described. To our knowledge, these are the first reported X-ray structures of TACE with a hydantoin zinc ligand.

  12. Tyrosinase inhibitors from Bolivian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Kubo, I; Yokokawa, Y; Kinst-Hori, I

    1995-05-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation monitored by mushroom tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) activity, afforded six inhibitors from three Bolivian medicinal plants, Buddleia coriacea, Gnaphalium cheiranthifolium, and Scheelea princeps. These inhibitors, which are all known phenolic compounds, inhibited the oxidation of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) mediated by a mushroom tyrosinase. PMID:7623048

  13. The therapeutic potential of microbial proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Momose, Isao; Kawada, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome influences cellular homeostasis through the degradation of regulatory proteins, many of which are also involved in disease pathogenesis. In particular, numerous regulatory proteins associated with tumor growth, such as cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, tumor suppressors, and NF-κB inhibitors are degraded by the proteasome. Proteasome inhibitors can stabilize these regulatory proteins, resulting in the suppression of tumor development and the regulation of immune responses. Thus, proteasome inhibitors are promising candidate antitumor agents and immune-regulatory agents. Bortezomib is the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Despite its high efficiency, however, a large proportion of patients do not attain sufficient clinical response due to toxicity and drug resistance. Therefore, the development of new proteasome inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties is needed. Natural products produced by microorganisms are a promising source of such compounds. This review provides an overview of proteasome inhibitors produced by microorganisms, with special focus on inhibitors isolated from actinomycetes. PMID:26589840

  14. Discovery of Dual-Stage Malaria Inhibitors with New Targets.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria J; Gamo-Benito, Francisco Javier; Clardy, Jon; Derbyshire, Emily R

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a major global health problem, with more than half of the world population at risk of contracting the disease and nearly a million deaths each year. Here, we report the discovery of inhibitors that target multiple stages of malaria parasite growth. To identify these inhibitors, we took advantage of the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Compound Set (TCAMS) small-molecule library, which is comprised of diverse and potent chemical scaffolds with activities against the blood stage of the malaria parasite, and investigated their effects against the elusive liver stage of the malaria parasite using a forward chemical screen. From a screen of nearly 14,000 compounds, we identified and confirmed 103 compounds as dual-stage malaria inhibitors. Interestingly, these compounds show preferential inhibition of parasite growth in liver- versus blood-stage malaria parasite assays, highlighting the drug susceptibility of this parasite form. Mode-of-action studies were completed using genetically modified and drug-resistant Plasmodium parasite strains. While we identified some compound targets as classical antimalarial pathways, such as the mitochondrial electron transport chain through cytochrome bc1 complex inhibition or the folate biosynthesis pathway, most compounds induced parasite death through as yet unknown mechanisms of action. Importantly, the identification of new chemotypes with different modes of action in killing Plasmodium parasites represents a promising opportunity for probing essential and novel molecular processes that remain to be discovered. The chemical scaffolds identified with activity against drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites represent starting points for dual-stage antimalarial development to surmount the threat of malaria parasite drug resistance. PMID:26666931

  15. YCZ-18 Is a New Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Keimei; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Yamagami, Ayumi; Ogawa, Atushi; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Sawada, Takayuki; Fujioka, Shozo; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Nakano, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormone brassinosteroids (BRs) are a group of polyhydroxylated steroids that play critical roles in regulating broad aspects of plant growth and development. The structural diversity of BRs is generated by the action of several groups of P450s. Brassinazole is a specific inhibitor of C-22 hydroxylase (CYP90B1) in BR biosynthesis, and the application use of brassinazole has emerged as an effective way of complementing BR-deficient mutants to elucidate the functions of BRs. In this article, we report a new triazole-type BR biosynthesis inhibitor, YCZ-18. Quantitative analysis the endogenous levels of BRs in Arabidopsis indicated that YCZ-18 significantly decreased the BR contents in plant tissues. Assessment of the binding affinity of YCZ-18to purified recombinant CYP90D1 indicated that YCZ-18 induced a typical type II binding spectrum with a Kd value of approximately 0.79 μM. Analysis of the mechanisms underlying the dwarf phenotype associated with YCZ-18 treatment of Arabidopsis indicated that the chemically induced dwarf phenotype was caused by a failure of cell elongation. Moreover, dissecting the effect of YCZ-18 on the induction or down regulation of genes responsive to BRs indicated that YCZ-18 regulated the expression of genes responsible for BRs deficiency in Arabidopsis. These findings indicate that YCZ-18 is a potent BR biosynthesis inhibitor and has a new target site, C23-hydroxylation in BR biosynthesis. Application of YCZ-18 will be a good starting point for further elucidation of the detailed mechanism of BR biosynthesis and its regulation. PMID:25793645

  16. Restriction endonuclease inhibitor IPI* of bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Dalin; Wright, Nathan T.; Varney, Kristen M.; Weber, David J.; Black, Lindsay W.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Phage T4 protects its DNA from the two gene encoded gmrS/gmrD (glucose modified hydroxymethylcytosine (gHMC) restriction endonuclease) (CT), of pathogenic E. coli CT596, by injecting several hundred copies of the 76 amino acid residue nuclease inhibitor, IPI*, into the infected host. Here, the three-dimensional solution structure of mature IPI* is reported as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using 1290 experimental NOE and dipolar coupling constraints (∼17 constraints/residue). Close examination of this oblate-shaped protein structure reveals a novel fold consisting of two small β-sheets (β1: B1, B2; β2: B3-B5), flanked at the N- and C-termini by alpha helices (H1 & H2). Such a fold is very compact in shape, and allows ejection of IPI* through the narrow 30Å portal and tail tube apertures of the virion without unfolding. Structural and dynamic measurements identify an exposed hydrophobic knob that is a putative gmrS/gmrD binding site. A single gene from the uropathogenic E. coli UT189, which codes for a gmrS/gmrD-like fusion protein (∼90% identity to the heterodimeric CT enzyme) has evolved IPI* inhibitor immunity. Analysis of the gmrS/gmrD restriction endonuclease enzyme family and its IPI* family phage antagonists reveals an evolutionary pathway that has elaborated a surprisingly diverse and specifically fitted set of co-evolving attack and defense structures. PMID:18037438

  17. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins as intracellular signaling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Kocab, Andrew J; Duckett, Colin S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early reports that described their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving regarding the vital roles played by IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell-cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. As these receptors modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the involvement of the c-IAPs in these pathways provides an additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP-binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may affect c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multi-faceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate their importance as intracellular signaling intermediates. PMID:26462035

  18. Novel Inhibitor Cystine Knot Peptides from Momordica charantia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Richard J.; Tang, Jun; Zeng, Guang-Zhi; Franco, Octavio L.; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.; Tan, Ning-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Two new peptides, MCh-1 and MCh-2, along with three known trypsin inhibitors (MCTI-I, MCTI-II and MCTI-III), were isolated from the seeds of the tropical vine Momordica charantia. The sequences of the peptides were determined using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Using a strategy involving partial reduction and stepwise alkylation of the peptides, followed by enzymatic digestion and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing, the disulfide connectivity of MCh-1 was elucidated to be CysI-CysIV, CysII-CysV and CysIII-CysVI. The three-dimensional structures of MCh-1 and MCh-2 were determined using NMR spectroscopy and found to contain the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK) motif. The sequences of the novel peptides differ significantly from peptides previously isolated from this plant. Therefore, this study expands the known peptide diversity in M. charantia and the range of sequences that can be accommodated by the ICK motif. Furthermore, we show that a stable two-disulfide intermediate is involved in the oxidative folding of MCh-1. This disulfide intermediate is structurally homologous to the proposed ancestral fold of ICK peptides, and provides a possible pathway for the evolution of this structural motif, which is highly prevalent in nature. PMID:24116036

  19. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Pai, Ramdas; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    NSC 240898 was previously identified as a botulinum neurotoxin A light chain (BoNT/A LC) endopeptidase inhibitor by screening the National Cancer Institute Open Repository diversity set. Two types of analogs have been synthesized and shown to inhibit BoNT/A LC in a FRET-based enzyme assay, with confirmation in an HPLC-based assay. These two series of compounds have also been evaluated for inhibition of anthrax lethal factor (LF), an unrelated metalloprotease, to examine enzyme specificity of the BoNT/A LC inhibition. The most potent inhibitor against BoNT/A LC in these two series is compound 12 (IC50 = 2.5 µM, FRET assay), which is 4.4-fold more potent than the lead structure, and 11.2-fold more selective for BoNT/A LC versus the anthrax LF metalloproteinase. Structure-activity relationship studies have revealed structural features important to potency and enzyme specificity. PMID:20155918

  20. Estimating the diversity of dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Steve C.; Dodson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Despite current interest in estimating the diversity of fossil and extant groups, little effort has been devoted to estimating the diversity of dinosaurs. Here we estimate the diversity of nonavian dinosaurs at ≈1,850 genera, including those that remain to be discovered. With 527 genera currently described, at least 71% of dinosaur genera thus remain unknown. Although known diversity declined in the last stage of the Cretaceous, estimated diversity was steady, suggesting that dinosaurs as a whole were not in decline in the 10 million years before their ultimate extinction. We also show that known diversity is biased by the availability of fossiliferous rock outcrop. Finally, by using a logistic model, we predict that 75% of discoverable genera will be known within 60–100 years and 90% within 100–140 years. Because of nonrandom factors affecting the process of fossil discovery (which preclude the possibility of computing realistic confidence bounds), our estimate of diversity is likely to be a lower bound. PMID:16954187